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Sample records for absorption maximum wavelength

  1. Optimized wavelength selection for molecular absorption thermometry.

    PubMed

    An, Xinliang; Caswell, Andrew W; Lipor, John J; Sanders, Scott T

    2015-04-01

    A differential evolution (DE) algorithm is applied to a recently developed spectroscopic objective function to select wavelengths that optimize the temperature precision of water absorption thermometry. DE reliably finds optima even when many-wavelength sets are chosen from large populations of wavelengths (here 120 000 wavelengths from a spectrum with 0.002 cm(-1) resolution calculated by 16 856 transitions). Here, we study sets of fixed wavelengths in the 7280-7520 cm(-1) range. When optimizing the thermometer for performance within a narrow temperature range, the results confirm that the best temperature precision is obtained if all the available measurement time is split judiciously between the two most temperature-sensitive wavelengths. In the wide temperature range case (thermometer must perform throughout 280-2800 K), we find (1) the best four-wavelength set outperforms the best two-wavelength set by an average factor of 2, and (2) a complete spectrum (all 120 000 wavelengths from 16 856 transitions) is 4.3 times worse than the best two-wavelength set. Key implications for sensor designers include: (1) from the perspective of spectroscopic temperature sensitivity, it is usually sufficient to monitor two or three wavelengths, depending on the sensor's anticipated operating temperature range; and (2) although there is a temperature precision penalty to monitoring a complete spectrum, that penalty may be small enough, particularly at elevated pressure, to justify the complete-spectrum approach in many applications.

  2. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  3. Maximum profit performance of an absorption refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Sun, F.; Wu, C.

    1996-12-01

    The operation of an absorption refrigerator is viewed as a production process with exergy as its output. The relations between the optimal profit and COP (coefficient of performance), and the COP bound at the maximum profit of the refrigerator are derived based on a general heat transfer law. The results provide a theoretical basis for developing and utilizing a variety of absorption refrigerators. The focus of this paper is to search the compromise optimization between economics (profit) and the utilization factor (COP) for finite-time endoreversible thermodynamic cycles.

  4. Highly efficient plasmonic enhancement of graphene absorption at telecommunication wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Cumming, Benjamin P; Gu, Min

    2015-08-01

    A hybrid graphene system consisting of graphene and silica layers coated on a metal film with groove rings is proposed to strongly enhance light absorption in the graphene layer. Our results indicate that the excited localized plasmon resonance in groove rings can effectively improve the graphene absorption from 2.3% to 43.1%, even to a maximum value of 87.0% in five-layer graphene at telecommunication wavelengths. In addition, the absorption peak is strongly dependent on the groove depth and ring radius as well as the number of graphene layers, enabling the flexible selectivity of both the operating spectral position and bandwidth. This favorable enhancement and tunability of graphene absorption could provide a path toward high-performance graphene opto-electronic components, such as photodetectors.

  5. STED nanoscopy with wavelengths at the emission maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordenave, Martín D.; Balzarotti, Francisco; Stefani, Fernando D.; Hell, Stefan W.

    2016-09-01

    Commonly, in stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence nanoscopy, light of a wavelength located at the red tail of the emission spectrum of the dye is used to shrink the effective fluorophore excitation volume and thus to obtain images with sub diffraction resolution. Here, we demonstrate that continuous wave (CW) STED nanoscopy is feasible using STED wavelengths located at the emission maximum, where the cross section for stimulated emission is up to 10-fold larger than at the red tail. As a result, STED imaging becomes possible at equally lower STED beam power. Besides, fluorophores that have been considered inapplicable in certain wavelength constellations are thus becoming usable.

  6. Picosecond Surface Acoustic Waves Using A Suboptical Wavelength Absorption Grating

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, David Howard; Telschow, Kenneth Louis

    2002-10-01

    We have demonstrated laser generation and detection of Rayleigh surface acoustic waves (SAW’s) with acoustic wavelengths that are smaller than the optical wavelength of both the excitation and the detection beams. SAW generation was achieved using electron beam lithography to modulate the surface reflectivity and hence the lateral thermal gradients on a suboptical wavelength scale. The generation and detection characteristics of two material systems were investigated (aluminum absorption gratings on Si and GaAs substrates). The polarization sensitive absorption characteristics of the suboptical wavelength lithographic grating were exploited in order to explore various acoustic generation and detection schemes.

  7. Wavelength calibration of imaging spectrometer using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiankang; Chen, Yuheng; Chen, Xinhua; Ji, Yiqun; Shen, Weimin

    2012-11-01

    Imaging spectrometer is a promising remote sensing instrument widely used in many filed, such as hazard forecasting, environmental monitoring and so on. The reliability of the spectral data is the determination to the scientific communities. The wavelength position at the focal plane of the imaging spectrometer will change as the pressure and temperature vary, or the mechanical vibration. It is difficult for the onboard calibration instrument itself to keep the spectrum reference accuracy and it also occupies weight and the volume of the remote sensing platform. Because the spectral images suffer from the atmospheric effects, the carbon oxide, water vapor, oxygen and solar Fraunhofer line, the onboard wavelength calibration can be processed by the spectral images themselves. In this paper, wavelength calibration is based on the modeled and measured atmospheric absorption spectra. The modeled spectra constructed by the atmospheric radiative transfer code. The spectral angle is used to determine the best spectral similarity between the modeled spectra and measured spectra and estimates the wavelength position. The smile shape can be obtained when the matching process across all columns of the data. The present method is successful applied on the Hyperion data. The value of the wavelength shift is obtained by shape matching of oxygen absorption feature and the characteristics are comparable to that of the prelaunch measurements.

  8. Multi-wavelength differential absorption measurements of chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.

    The probability of accurate detection and quantification of airborne species is enhanced when several optical wavelengths are used to measure the differential absorption of molecular spectral features. Characterization of minor atmospheric constituents, biological hazards, and chemical plumes containing multiple species is difficult when using current approaches because of weak signatures and the use of a limited number of wavelengths used for identification. Current broadband systems such as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) have either limitations for long-range propagation, or require transmitter power levels that are unsafe for operation in urban environments. Passive hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize absorption of solar scatter at visible and infrared wavelengths, or use absorption of background thermal emission, have been employed routinely for detection of airborne chemical species. Passive approaches have operational limitations at various ranges, or under adverse atmospheric conditions because the source intensity and spectrum is often an unknown variable. The work presented here describes a measurement approach that uses a known source of a low transmitted power level for an active system, while retaining the benefits of broadband and extremely long-path absorption operations. An optimized passive imaging system also is described that operates in the 3 to 4 mum window of the mid-infrared. Such active and passive instruments can be configured to optimize the detection of several hydrocarbon gases, as well as many other species of interest. Measurements have provided the incentive to develop algorithms for the calculations of atmospheric species concentrations using multiple wavelengths. These algorithms are used to prepare simulations and make comparisons with experimental results from absorption data of a supercontinuum laser source. The MODTRAN model is used in preparing the simulations, and also in developing additional

  9. Strong Wavelength Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption from Peat Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gyawali, M. S.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Knue, J.; Samburova, V.; Watts, A.; Moosmüller, H.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Zielinska, B.; Chow, J. C.; Watson, J. G.; Tsibart, A.

    2014-12-01

    Globally, organic soils and peats may store as much as 600 Gt of terrestrial carbon, representing 20 - 30% of the planet's terrestrial organic carbon mass. This is approximately the same carbon mass as that contained in Earth's atmosphere, despite peatlands occupying only 3% of its surface. Effects of fires in these ecosystems are of global concern due to their potential for enormous carbon release into the atmosphere. The implications for contributions of peat fires to the global carbon cycle and radiative forcing scenarios are significant. Combustion of peat mostly takes place in the low temperature, smoldering phase of a fire. It consumes carbon that may have accumulated over a period of hundreds to thousands of years. In comparison, combustion of aboveground biomass fuels releases carbon that has accumulated much more recently, generally over a period of years or decades. Here, we report our findings on characterization of emissions from laboratory combustion of peat soils from three locations representing the biomes in which these soils occur. Peat samples from Alaska and Florida (USA) and Siberia (Russia) were burned at two different fuel moisture levels. Burns were conducted in an 8-m3 volume combustion chamber located at the Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV, USA. We report significant brown carbon production from combustion of all three peat soils. We used a multispectral (405, 532, 781 nm) photoacoustic instrument equipped with integrating nephelometer to measure the wavelength-dependent aerosol light absorption and scattering. Absorption Ångström exponents (between 405 and 532 nm) as high as ten were observed, revealing strongly enhanced aerosol light absorption in the violet and blue wavelengths. Single scattering albedos (SSA) of 0.94 and 0.99 were observed at 405 and 532 nm, respectively, for the same sample. Variability of these optical parameters will be discussed as a function of fuel and combustion conditions. Other real-time measurements

  10. Excited-state absorption in the lasing wavelength region of Alexandrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Walling, J.C.

    1982-07-01

    The excited-state absorption cross section sigma/sub 2/ /sub a/ (E) in the gain wavelength region of alexandrite has been determined and is shown to limit the vibronic laser range at both high and low energy. The maximum in vibronic laser emission is due to a minimum in sigma/sub 2/ /sub a/ (E) near 13 000 cm/sup -1/. sigma/sub 2/ /sub a/ (E) is less than 10/sup -20/ cm/sup 2/ between 12 000 and 14 000 cm/sup -1/.

  11. Wavelength-Dependent Optical Absorption Properties of Artificial and Atmospheric Aerosol Measured by a Multi-Wavelength Photoacoustic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-12-01

    Various aspects of the photoacoustic (PA) detection method are discussed from the point of view of developing it into a routine tool for measuring the wavelength-dependent optical absorption coefficient of artificial and atmospheric aerosol. The discussion includes the issues of calibration, cross-sensitivity to gaseous molecules, background PA signal subtraction, and size-dependent particle losses within the PA system. The results in this paper are based on a recently developed four-wavelength PA system, which has operational wavelengths in the near-infrared, in the visible, and in the ultraviolet. The measured spectra of artificial and atmospheric aerosol prove the outstanding applicability of the presented PA system.

  12. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  13. Wavelength selection in injection-driven Hele-Shaw flows: A maximum amplitude criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Eduardo; Miranda, Jose

    2013-11-01

    As in most interfacial flow problems, the standard theoretical procedure to establish wavelength selection in the viscous fingering instability is to maximize the linear growth rate. However, there are important discrepancies between previous theoretical predictions and existing experimental data. In this work we perform a linear stability analysis of the radial Hele-Shaw flow system that takes into account the combined action of viscous normal stresses and wetting effects. Most importantly, we introduce an alternative selection criterion for which the selected wavelength is determined by the maximum of the interfacial perturbation amplitude. The effectiveness of such a criterion is substantiated by the significantly improved agreement between theory and experiments. We thank CNPq (Brazilian Sponsor) for financial support.

  14. Effect of fiber and matrix maximum strain on the energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1985-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite composite tubes to examine the influence of fiber and matrix maximum strain at failure on the energy absorption capability of graphite reinforced composite material. Fiber and matrix maximum strain at failure were determined to significantly effect energy absorption. The higher strain at failure composite material system, AS-4/5245, exhibited superior energy absorption capability compared to AS-4/934, T300/5245 or T300/934 composite material. Results of this investigation suggest that to achieve maximum energy absorption from a composite material a matrix material that has a higher strain at failure than the fiber reinforcement should be used.

  15. Narrow Absorption NIR Wavelength Organic Nanoparticles Enable Multiplexed Photoacoustic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hoang D; Wilson, Brian K; Heinmiller, Andrew; Faenza, Bill; Hejazi, Shahram; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-06-15

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is an emerging hybrid optical-ultrasound based imaging technique that can be used to visualize optical absorbers in deep tissue. Free organic dyes can be used as PA contrast agents to concurrently provide additional physiological and molecular information during imaging, but their use in vivo is generally limited by rapid renal clearance for soluble dyes and by the difficulty of delivery for hydrophobic dyes. We here report the use of the block copolymer directed self-assembly process, Flash NanoPrecipitation (FNP), to form series of highly hydrophobic optical dyes into stable, biocompatible, and water-dispersible nanoparticles (NPs) with sizes from 38 to 88 nm and with polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface coatings suitable for in vivo use. The incorporation of dyes with absorption profiles within the infrared range, that is optimal for PA imaging, produces the PA activity of the particles. The hydrophobicity of the dyes allows their sequestration in the NP cores, so that they do not interfere with targeting, and high loadings of >75 wt % dye are achieved. The optical extinction coefficients (ε (mL mg(-1) cm(-1))) were essentially invariant to the loading of the dye in NP core. Co-encapsulation of dye with vitamin E or polystyrene demonstrates the ability to simultaneously image and deliver a second agent. The PEG chains on the NP surface were functionalized with folate to demonstrate folate-dependent targeting. The spectral separation of different dyes among different sets of particles enables multiplexed imaging, such as the simultaneous imaging of two sets of particles within the same animal. We provide the first demonstration of this capability with PA imaging, by simultaneously imaging nontargeted and folate-targeted nanoparticles within the same animal. These results highlight Flash NanoPrecipitation as a platform to develop photoacoustic tools with new diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27153806

  16. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  17. Mapping chemical concentration in binary thin organic films via multi-wavelength scanning absorption microscopy (MWSAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berriman, Garth; Routley, Ben; Holdsworth, John; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The composition and thickness of binary thin organic films is determined by measuring the optical absorption at multiple wavelengths across the film surface and performing a component analysis fit to absorption standards for the materials. The multiple laser wavelengths are focused onto the surface using microscope objectives and raster scanned across the film surface using a piezo-electric actuator X-Y stage. All of the wavelengths are scanned simultaneously with a frequency division multiplexing system used to separate the individual wavelength response. The composition values are in good quantitative agreement with measurements obtained by scanning transmission x-ray microscopy (STXM). This new characterization technique extends quantitative compositional mapping of thin films to thickness regimes beyond that accessible by STXM.

  18. Position and Confidence Limits of an Extremum: The Determination of the Absorption Maximum in Wide Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbronner, Edgar

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the determination of the position of the absorption maximum in wide bands as well as the confidence limits for such calculations. A simple method, suited for pocket calculators, for the numerical evaluation of these calculations is presented. (BB)

  19. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 350-nm wavelength range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of ozone have been measured in the wavelength range 185-350 nm and in the temperature range 225-298 K. The absolute ozone concentrations were established by measuring the pressure of pure gaseous samples in the 0.08to 300-torr range, and the UV spectra were recorded under conditions where less than 1 percent of the sample decomposed. The temperature dependence is significant for wavelengths longer than about 280 nm. The absorption cross-section values around 210 nm were found to be about 10 percent larger than the previously accepted values.

  20. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  1. Measured Wavelength-Dependent Absorption Enhancement of Internally Mixed Black Carbon with Absorbing and Nonabsorbing Materials.

    PubMed

    You, Rian; Radney, James G; Zachariah, Michael R; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Optical absorption spectra of laboratory generated aerosols consisting of black carbon (BC) internally mixed with nonabsorbing materials (ammonium sulfate, AS, and sodium chloride, NaCl) and BC with a weakly absorbing brown carbon surrogate derived from humic acid (HA) were measured across the visible to near-IR (550 to 840 nm). Spectra were measured in situ using a photoacoustic spectrometer and step-scanning a supercontinuum laser source with a tunable wavelength and bandwidth filter. BC had a mass-specific absorption cross section (MAC) of 7.89 ± 0.25 m(2) g(-1) at λ = 550 nm and an absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) of 1.03 ± 0.09 (2σ). For internally mixed BC, the ratio of BC mass to the total mass of the mixture was chosen as 0.13 to mimic particles observed in the terrestrial atmosphere. The manner in which BC mixed with each material was determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). AS/BC and HA/BC particles were fully internally mixed, and the BC was both internally and externally mixed for NaCl/BC particles. The AS/BC, NaCl/BC, and HA/BC particles had AAEs of 1.43 ± 0.05, 1.34 ± 0.06, and 1.91 ± 0.05, respectively. The observed absorption enhancement of mixed BC relative to the pure BC was wavelength dependent for AS/BC and decreased from 1.5 at λ = 550 nm with increasing wavelength while the NaCl/BC enhancement was essentially wavelength independent. For HA/BC, the enhancement ranged from 2 to 3 and was strongly wavelength dependent. Removal of the HA absorption contribution to enhancement revealed that the enhancement was ≈1.5 and independent of wavelength. PMID:27359341

  2. The concentration-estimation problem for multiple-wavelength differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.N.

    1994-07-01

    We are seeking to develop a reliable methodology for multi-chemicai detection and discrimination based upon multi-wavelength differential absorption lidar measurements. In this paper, we summarize some preliminary results of our efforts to devise suitable concentration-estimation algorithms for use in detection and discrimination schemes.

  3. Simulation-based comparison of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption TDLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, B.; Zinn, P.; Engelbrecht, R.; Schmauss, B.

    2010-08-01

    A simulative investigation of noise effects in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) and direct absorption diode laser absorption spectroscopy is presented. Special attention is paid to the impact of quantization noise of the analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) of the photodetector signal in the two detection schemes with the goal of estimating the necessary ADC resolution for each technique. With laser relative intensity noise (RIN), photodetector shot noise and thermal amplifier noise included, the strategies used for noise reduction in direct and wavelength modulation spectroscopy are compared by simulating two respective systems. Results show that because of the combined effects of dithering by RIN and signal averaging, the resolutions required for the direct absorption setup are only slightly higher than for the WMS setup. Only for small contributions of RIN an increase in resolution will significantly improve signal quality in the direct scheme.

  4. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-08

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  5. Multi-wavelength aerosol light absorption measurements in the Amazon rainforest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturno, Jorge; Chi, Xuguang; Pöhlker, Christopher; Morán, Daniel; Ditas, Florian; Massabò, Dario; Prati, Paolo; Rizzo, Luciana; Artaxo, Paulo; Andreae, Meinrat

    2015-04-01

    The most important light-absorbing aerosol is black carbon (BC), which is emitted by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass. BC is considered the second anthropogenic contributor to global warming. Beyond BC, other aerosols like some organics, dust, and primary biological aerosol particles are able to absorb radiation. In contrast to BC, the light absorption coefficient of these aerosols is wavelength dependent. Therefore, multi-wavelength measurements become important in environments where BC is not the predominant light-absorbing aerosol like in the Amazon. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO) site is located in the remote Amazon rainforest, one of the most pristine continental sites in the world during the wet season. In the dry season, winds coming from the southern hemisphere are loaded with biomass burning aerosol particles originated by farming-related deforestation. BC and aerosol number concentration data from the last two years indicate this is the most polluted period. Two different techniques have been implemented to measure the light absorption at different wavelengths; one of them is the 7-wavelengths Aethalometer, model AE30, an instrument that measures the light attenuation on a filter substrate and requires multiple scattering and filter-loading corrections to retrieve the light absorption coefficient. The other method is an offline technique, the Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analysis (MWAA), which is able to measure reflectance and absorbance by aerosols collected on a filter and, by means of a radiative model, can retrieve the light absorption coefficient. Filters collected during May-September 2014, comprehending wet-to-dry transition and most of the dry season, were analyzed. The results indicate that the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE), a parameter that is directly proportional to the wavelength dependence of the aerosol light absorption, is close to 1.0 during the transition period and slightly decreases in the beginning of

  6. Improved speckle statistics in coherent differential absorption lidar with in-fiber wavelength multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Ridley, K D; Pearson, G N; Harris, M

    2001-04-20

    Remote detection of gaseous pollutants and other atmospheric constituents can be achieved with differential absorption lidar (DIAL) methods. The technique relies on the transmission of two or more laser wavelengths and exploits absorption features in the target gas by measuring the ratio of their detected powers to determine gas concentration. A common mode of operation is when the transmitter and receiver are collocated, and the absorption is measured over a return trip by a randomly scattering topographic target. Hence, in coherent DIAL, speckle fluctuation leads to a large uncertainty in the detected powers unless the signal is averaged over multiple correlation times, i.e., over many independent speckles. We examine a continuous-wave coherent DIAL system in which the laser wavelengths are transmitted and received by the same single-mode optical fibers. This ensures that the two wavelengths share a common spatial mode, which, for certain transmitter and target parameters, enables highly correlated speckle fluctuations to be readily achieved in practice. For a DIAL system, this gives the potential for improved accuracy in a given observation time. A theoretical analysis quantifies this benefit as a function of the degree of correlation between the two time series (which depends on wavelength separation and target depth). The results are compared with both a numerical simulation and a laboratory-based experiment.

  7. Evaluation wavelength range mapping, a tool to optimize the evaluation window in differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-04-01

    Optical remote sensing via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to assess various trace gases in the atmosphere. Measurement instruments are usually classified into active instruments applying an artificial light source and passive instruments using natural light sources, e.g., scattered or direct sunlight. Platforms range from ground based to satellites and trace gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Naturally, the evaluation of gathered spectra needs to be tuned to each specific case and trace gas of interest due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should be as large as possible and include the largest differential absorption features of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize sensitivity. However, the differential optical densities of other absorbers should be minimized in order to prevent interferences between different absorption cross sections. Furthermore, instrumental specific features and wavelength dependent radiative transfer effects may have malicious effects and lead to erroneous values. Usually a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Evaluation wavelength range mapping is an easily applied tool to visualize wavelength depending evaluation features of DOAS and to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range. As an example, synthetic spectra are studied which simulate passive DOAS measurements of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) by Zenith-DOAS and Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) measurements of BrO in volcanic plumes. The influence of the I0-effect and the Ring-effect on the respective retrievals are demonstrated. However, due to the general nature of the tool it is applicable to any DOAS measurement and the technique also allows to study any other wavelength dependent influences on retrieved trace gas columns.

  8. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  9. Intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network based on dense wavelength division multiplexing filter.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiwei; Lu, Ying; Duan, Liangcheng; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Shi, Wei; Yao, Jianquan

    2014-10-01

    We report the system design and experimental verification of an intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network with hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) sensors and dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) filters. Compared with fiber Bragg grating (FBG), it is easier for the DWDM to accomplish a stable output. We realize the concentration detection of three gas cells filled with acetylene. The sensitivity is up to 100 ppmV at 1536.71 nm. Voltage gradient is firstly used to optimize the intracavity sensor network enhancing the detection efficiency up to 6.5 times. To the best of our knowledge, DWDM is firstly used as a wavelength division multiplexing device to realize intracavity absorption multiplexed sensor network. It make it possible to realize high capacity intracavity sensor network via multiplexed technique. PMID:25322029

  10. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  11. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  12. Investigation of black and brown carbon multiple-wavelength-dependent light absorption from biomass and fossil fuel combustion source emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Michael R.; Victoria Garcia, Mercedes; Robinson, Michael A.; Van Rooy, Paul; Dietenberger, Mark A.; Bergin, Michael; Schauer, James Jay

    2015-07-01

    Quantification of the black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC) components of source emissions is critical to understanding the impact combustion aerosols have on atmospheric light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption was measured from fuels including wood, agricultural biomass, coals, plant matter, and petroleum distillates in controlled combustion settings. Filter-based absorption measurements were corrected and compared to photoacoustic absorption results. BC absorption was segregated from the total light extinction to estimate the BrC absorption from individual sources. Results were compared to elemental carbon (EC)/organic carbon (OC) concentrations to determine composition's impact on light absorption. Multiple-wavelength absorption coefficients, Angstrom exponent (6.9 to <1.0), mass absorption cross section (MAC), and Delta C (97 µg m-3 to ~0 µg m-3) were highly variable. Sources such as incense and peat emissions showed ultraviolet wavelength (370 nm) BrC absorption over 175 and 80 times (respectively) the BC absorption but only 21 and 11 times (respectively) at 520 nm wavelength. The bulk EC MACEC, λ (average at 520 nm = 9.0 ± 3.7 m2 g-1; with OC fraction <0.85 = ~7.5 m2 g-1) and the BrC OC mass absorption cross sections (MACBrC,OC,λ) were calculated; at 370 nm ultraviolet wavelengths; the MACBrC,OC,λ ranged from 0.8 m2 g-1 to 2.29 m2 g-1 (lowest peat, highest kerosene), while at 520 nm wavelength MACBrC,OC,λ ranged from 0.07 m2 g-1 to 0.37 m2 g-1 (lowest peat, highest kerosene/incense mixture). These MAC results show that OC content can be an important contributor to light absorption when present in significant quantities (>0.9 OC/TC), source emissions have variable absorption spectra, and nonbiomass combustion sources can be significant contributors to BrC.

  13. Wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption in urban and biomass burning impacted conditions: An integrative perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Gyawali, M.; Lewis, K.; Moosmuller, H.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol light absorption depends on aerosol size, morphology, mixing state, and composition. The wavelength dependence is often characterized with use of the Angstrom coefficient for absorption (AAE) determined from measurements at two or more wavelengths. Low fractal dimension black carbon (BC) particles are often expected to have an AAE near unity. Values of AAE significantly larger than unity are often attributed to the presence of an organic coating that absorbs strongly at lower wavelengths, though we have found that even non absorbing coatings on small, biomass burning related BC cores can have large AAE. Values of AAE significantly less than unity are often ascribed to experimental errors or large particle sizes, however, we find that they are most commonly associated with modest absorbing or non absorbing organic coatings that collapse the fractal soot BC core in urban aerosol to a dimension near that of a sphere. Photoacoustic measurements at 405 nm, 532 nm, 870 nm, and 1047 nm in urban Reno and Las Vegas NV, and for biomass burning experiments are used presented to illustrate the range of AAE possible, and coated sphere modeling results are presented to interpret the measurements.

  14. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators

    PubMed Central

    Romero-García, V.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction. PMID:26781863

  15. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators.

    PubMed

    Romero-García, V; Theocharis, G; Richoux, O; Merkel, A; Tournat, V; Pagneux, V

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction. PMID:26781863

  16. Perfect and broadband acoustic absorption by critically coupled sub-wavelength resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-García, V.; Theocharis, G.; Richoux, O.; Merkel, A.; Tournat, V.; Pagneux, V.

    2016-01-01

    Perfect absorption is an interdisciplinary topic with a large number of applications, the challenge of which consists of broadening its inherently narrow frequency-band performance. We experimentally and analytically report perfect and broadband absorption for audible sound, by the mechanism of critical coupling, with a sub-wavelength multi-resonant scatterer (SMRS) made of a plate-resonator/closed waveguide structure. In order to introduce the role of the key parameters, we first present the case of a single resonant scatterer (SRS) made of a Helmholtz resonator/closed waveguide structure. In both cases the controlled balance between the energy leakage of the several resonances and the inherent losses of the system leads to perfect absorption peaks. In the case of the SMRS we show that systems with large inherent losses can be critically coupled using resonances with large leakage. In particular, we show that in the SMRS system, with a thickness of λ/12 and diameter of λ/7, several perfect absorption peaks overlap to produce absorption bigger than 93% for frequencies that extend over a factor of 2 in audible frequencies. The reported concepts and methodology provide guidelines for the design of broadband perfect absorbers which could contribute to solve the major issue of noise reduction.

  17. Scattering and Absorption Properties of Polydisperse Wavelength-sized Particles Covered with Much Smaller Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dlugach, Jana M.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2012-01-01

    Using the results of direct, numerically exact computer solutions of the Maxwell equations, we analyze scattering and absorption characteristics of polydisperse compound particles in the form of wavelength-sized spheres covered with a large number of much smaller spherical grains.The results pertain to the complex refractive indices1.55 + i0.0003,1.55 + i0.3, and 3 + i0.1. We show that the optical effects of dusting wavelength-sized hosts by microscopic grains can vary depending on the number and size of the grains as well as on the complex refractive index. Our computations also demonstrate the high efficiency of the new superposition T-matrix code developed for use on distributed memory computer clusters.

  18. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy--digital detection of gas absorption harmonics based on Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a detailed study of the theoretical aspects of the Fourier analysis method, which has been utilized for gas absorption harmonic detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lock-in detection of the harmonic signal is accomplished by studying the phase term of the inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier spectrum that corresponds to the harmonic signal. The mathematics and the corresponding simulation results are given for each procedure when applying the Fourier analysis method. The present work provides a detailed view of the WMS technique when applying the Fourier analysis method.

  19. Logarithmic conversion of absorption detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy with a current-modulated diode laser.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Cai, Haiwen; Geng, Jianxin; Fang, Zujie

    2009-07-20

    Logarithmic-conversion data processing used in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with a current-modulated diode laser as its source is analyzed and compared with second-to-first ratio detection. Analytic Fourier coefficients of logarithmic-converted residual amplitude modulation (RAM) of a light source are given. An experimental setup for methane absorption detection at 1650 nm is described. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that logarithmic-converted WMS cannot only eliminate the fluctuation of received light power, but also improve the signal-to-noise ratio significantly. PMID:19623220

  20. The photochemical determinants of color vision: revealing how opsins tune their chromophore's absorption wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a variety of important chromophore-dependent biological processes, including microbial light sensing and mammalian color vision, relies on protein modifications that alter the spectral characteristics of a bound chromophore. Three different color opsins share the same chromophore, but have three distinct absorptions that together cover the entire visible spectrum, giving rise to trichromatic vision. The influence of opsins on the absorbance of the chromophore has been studied through methods such as model compounds, opsin mutagenesis, and computational modeling. The recent development of rhodopsin mimic that uses small soluble proteins to recapitulate the binding and wavelength tuning of the native opsins provides a new platform for studying protein-regulated spectral tuning. The ability to achieve far-red shifted absorption in the rhodopsin mimic system was attributed to a combination of the lack of a counteranion proximal to the iminium, and a uniformly neutral electrostatic environment surrounding the chromophore. PMID:24323922

  1. The photochemical determinants of color vision: revealing how opsins tune their chromophore's absorption wavelength.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjing; Geiger, James H; Borhan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of a variety of important chromophore-dependent biological processes, including microbial light sensing and mammalian color vision, relies on protein modifications that alter the spectral characteristics of a bound chromophore. Three different color opsins share the same chromophore, but have three distinct absorptions that together cover the entire visible spectrum, giving rise to trichromatic vision. The influence of opsins on the absorbance of the chromophore has been studied through methods such as model compounds, opsin mutagenesis, and computational modeling. The recent development of rhodopsin mimic that uses small soluble proteins to recapitulate the binding and wavelength tuning of the native opsins provides a new platform for studying protein-regulated spectral tuning. The ability to achieve far-red shifted absorption in the rhodopsin mimic system was attributed to a combination of the lack of a counteranion proximal to the iminium, and a uniformly neutral electrostatic environment surrounding the chromophore.

  2. The optical absorption of triatomic carbon C3 for the wavelength range 260 to 560 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    The spectral absorption properties of C3 have been measured in a shock tube containing a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3240 to 4300 K and 37 to 229 kPa, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption by C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nm. The various reported measurements of the heat of formation of C3 which are available in the open literature were reviewed, and a value of 198 kcal/mol is recommended. This value, along with best available values for other species, was used to calculate the number density of C3 for the conditions of the present experiments in order to compute absorption cross section or electronic oscillator strength. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from a high of 0.062 at 3300 K to a low of 0.036 at 3900 K.

  3. Investigation of the stability of the emission wavelength of a laser with an external neon absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kapralov, V.P.; Privalov, V.E.; Chulyaeva, E.G.

    1980-08-01

    The optical heterodyne method was used to determine the absolute wavelength of a commercial LG-149-1 helium--neon laser. Measurements were carried out using apparatus containing a laser stabilized by the saturated absorption in /sup 127/I, which acted as the reference source. The iodine laser wavelength was determined interferrometrically by comparison with the wavelength of the orange line of /sup 86/Kr.

  4. Ritz wavelengths of Fe I, Si II and Ni II for quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The study of absorption lines in the spectra of galaxies along the line of sight to distant quasars can give important information about the abundances, ionization and kinematics of atoms within these galaxies. They have also been used to study the variability of the fine structure constant at high redshifts. However, the laboratory wavelengths need to be known to better than 6 parts in 108 (20 ms-1). A paper by M. Murphy and J. C. Berengut (2014, MNRAS 438,388) includes a table of spectral lines for which the laboratory wavelength uncertainties are greater than this, including 13 resonance lines of Fe I, 11 lines of Ni II, and 4 lines of Si II.Improved wavelengths for these lines were derived by re-analyzing archival spectra of iron hollow cathode lamps and a silicon carbide Penning discharge lamp. These spectra have previously been used in a comprehensive analysis of the spectrum of Fe I (Nave et al. 1994, ApJS 94, 221) and in a study of Si II, Si IV, and C IV for quasar spectroscopy (Griesmann & Kling, 2000, ApJ 536, L113). By re-optimizing the energy levels of Fe I, the absolute uncertainty of the resonance lines has been reduced by over a factor of 2 and the relative uncertainty by an order of magnitude. A similar analysis for Si II gives a improved values for the resonance lines with wavelength uncertainties of around 4 parts in 108. Analysis of new spectra of Ni II is in progress.

  5. Modeling of scattering and absorption by nonspherical cirrus ice particles at thermal infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Sun, W.B.; Yang, P.

    1999-08-15

    This paper examines a number of commonly used methods for the calculation of the scattering and absorption properties of nonspherical ice crystals at thermal infrared wavelengths. It is found that, for randomly oriented nonspherical particles, Mie theory using equivalent ice spheres tends to overestimate the absorption efficiency while the anomalous diffraction theory (ADT) and the geometric optics method (GOM) tend to underestimate it. The absorption efficiency is not sensitive to the particle shape when the size parameter is large. Herein a composite scheme is used that is valid for nonspherical particles with a wide range of size parameters. This scheme is a composite of Mie theory, GOM, and ADT to fit the single-scattering properties of hexagonal particles derived from the GOM for large size parameters and the finite-difference time domain technique for small size parameters. Applying this composite technique, errors in the broadband emissivity of cirrus clouds associated with conventional approaches are examined. It is shown that, when the projected area is preserved, Mie results overestimate the emissivity of cirrus clouds while, when the volume is preserved, Mie results underestimate the emissivity. Mie theory yields the best results when both projected area and volume are preserved (the relative errors are less than 10%). It is also shown that the ADT underestimates cirrus cloud emissivity. In some cases, the relative errors can be as large as 20%. The errors in the GOM are also significant and are largely a result of nonspherical particles with size parameters smaller than 40.

  6. WAVELENGTH MEASUREMENTS OF K TRANSITIONS OF OXYGEN, NEON, AND MAGNESIUM WITH X-RAY ABSORPTION LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Jinyuan; Zhang Shuangnan; Yao Yangsen

    2013-09-10

    Accurate atomic transition data are important in many astronomical research areas, especially for studies of line spectroscopy. Whereas transition data of He-like and H-like ions (i.e., ions in high-charge states) have been accurately calculated, the corresponding data of K transitions of neutral or low-ionized metal elements are still very uncertain. Spectroscopy of absorption lines produced in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been proven to be an effective way to measure the central wavelengths of these atomic transitions. In this work, we analyze 36 Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating observations to search for and measure the ISM absorption lines along sight lines to 11 low-mass X-ray binaries. We correct the Galactic rotation velocity to the rest frame for every observation and then use two different methods to merge all the corrected spectra to a co-added spectrum. However, the co-added spectra obtained by this method exhibit biases, toward to either observations with high counts or lines with high signal-to-noise ratios. We do a Bayesian analysis of several significantly detected lines to obtain the systematic uncertainty and the bias correction for other lines. Compared to previous studies, our results improve the wavelength accuracy by a factor of two to five and significantly reduce the systematic uncertainties and biases. Several weak transitions (e.g., 1s-2p of Mg IV and Mg V; 1s-3p of Mg III and Mg V) are also detected for the first time, albeit with low significance; future observations with improved accuracy are required to confirm these detections.

  7. Influence of the absorption behavior of sunscreens in the short-wavelength UV range (UVB) and the long-wavelength UV range (UVA) on the relation of the UVB absorption to sun protection factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Juergen; Schanzer, Sabine; Antoniou, Christina; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2010-09-01

    The absorption of filter substances in sunscreens, reducing the incident ultraviolet (UV) radiation, is the basis for the protecting ability of such formulations. The erythema-correlated sun protection factor (SPF), depending mainly on the intensity of the UVB radiation, is the common value to quantify the efficacy of the formulations avoiding sunburn. An ex vivo method combining tape stripping and optical spectroscopy is applied to measure the absorption of sunscreens in the entire UV spectral range. The obtained relations between the short-wavelength UV (UVB) absorption and the SPF confirm a clear influence of the long-wavelength UV (UVA) absorption on the SPF values. The data reflect the historical development of the relation of the concentration of UVB and UVA filters in sunscreens and points to the influence of additional ingredients, e.g., antioxidants and cell-protecting agents on the efficacy of the products.

  8. Measurements of absolute absorption cross sections of ozone in the 185- to 254-nm wavelength region and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory measurements of the relative absorption cross sections of ozone at temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K have been made throughout the 185 to 254 nm wavelength region. The absolute absorption cross sections at the same temperatures have been measured at several discrete wavelengths in the 185 to 250 nm region. The absolute cross sections of ozone have been used to put the relative cross sections on a firm absolute basis throughout the 185 to 255 nm region. These recalibrated cross sections are slightly lower than those of Molina and Molina (1986), but the differences are within a few percent and would not be significant in atmospheric applications.

  9. Sensitivity of depth of maximum and absorption depth of EAS to hadron production mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Galkin, V. I.; Hein, L. A.; Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Kuzmin, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison of experimental data on depth of extensive air showers (EAS) development maximum in the atmosphere, T sub M and path of absorption, lambda, in the lower atmosphere of EAS with fixed particle number in the energy region eV with the results of calculation show that these parameters are sensitive mainly to the inelastic interaction cross section and scaling violation in the fragmentation and pionization region. The data are explained in a unified manner within the framework of a model in which scaling is violated slightly in the fragmentation region and strongly in the pionization region at primary cosmic rays composition close to the normal one and a permanent increase of inelastic interaction cross section. It is shown that, while interpreting the experimental data, disregard of two methodical points causes a systematic shift in T sub M: (1) shower selection system; and (2) EAS electron lateral distribution when performing the calculations on basis of which the transfer is made from the Cerenkov pulse FWHM to the depth of shower maximum, T sub M.

  10. Linear absorption coefficient of beryllium in the 50-300-A wavelength range. [bandpass filter materials for ultraviolet astronomy instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barstow, M. A.; Lewis, M.; Petre, R.

    1983-01-01

    Transmittances of thin-film filters fabricated for an extreme-UV astronomy sounding-rocket experiment yield values for the linear absorption coefficient of beryllium in the 50-300-A wavelength range, in which previous measurements are sparse. The inferred values are consistent with the lowest data previously published and may have important consequences for extreme-UV astronomers.

  11. Determination of the scattering coefficient of biological tissue considering the wavelength and absorption dependence of the anisotropy factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukutomi, Daichi; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    The anisotropy factor g, one of the optical properties of biological tissues, has a strong influence on the calculation of the scattering coefficient μ s in inverse Monte Carlo (iMC) simulations. It has been reported that g has the wavelength and absorption dependence; however, few attempts have been made to calculate μ s using g values by taking the wavelength and absorption dependence into account. In this study, the angular distributions of scattered light for biological tissue phantoms containing hemoglobin as a light absorber were measured by a goniometric optical setup at strongly (405 nm) and weakly (664 nm) absorbing wavelengths to obtain g. Subsequently, the optical properties were calculated with the measured values of g by integrating sphere measurements and an iMC simulation, and compared with the results obtained with a conventional g value of 0.9. The μ s values with measured g were overestimated at the strongly absorbing wavelength, but underestimated at the weakly absorbing wavelength if 0.9 was used in the iMC simulation.

  12. Laboratory measurements of the ozone absorption coefficient in the wavelength region 339 to 362 nm at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacciani, Marco; Disarra, Alcide; Fiocco, Giorgio

    1987-06-01

    Instrumentation for the absolute measurement of the ozone absorption coefficient in the Huggins bands at different temperatures was set up. Ozone is produced with an electrical discharge and stored cryogenically; differential absorption measurements are carried out in a slowly evolving mixture of ozone and molecular oxygen. Results in the region 339 to 362 nm at temperatures between minus 30 and plus 40 C are reported. Results support Katayama's (1979) model of the transitions giving rise to the Huggins absorption bands of ozone. For measurements of atmospheric ozone profiles by DIAL techniques, the results on the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient at the wavelength corresponding to the third harmonic of an NdYAG laser are stressed.

  13. Absolute absorption cross-section measurements of ozone in the wavelength region 238-335 nm and the temperature dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    The absolute absorption cross-section of ozone has been experimentally determined at the temperatures 195, 228, and 295 K at several discrete wavelengths in the 238-335-nm region. The present results for ozone at 295 K are found to be in agreement with those of Hearn (1961). Absolute cross-section measurements of ozone at 195 K have confirmed previous (Freeman et al., 1984) relative cross-section measurements throughout the 240-335-nm region.

  14. High-accuracy reference standards for two-photon absorption in the 680-1050 nm wavelength range.

    PubMed

    de Reguardati, Sophie; Pahapill, Juri; Mikhailov, Alexander; Stepanenko, Yuriy; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-04-18

    Degenerate two-photon absorption (2PA) of a series of organic fluorophores is measured using femtosecond fluorescence excitation method in the wavelength range, λ2PA = 680-1050 nm, and ~100 MHz pulse repetition rate. The function of relative 2PA spectral shape is obtained with estimated accuracy 5%, and the absolute 2PA cross section is measured at selected wavelengths with the accuracy 8%. Significant improvement of the accuracy is achieved by means of rigorous evaluation of the quadratic dependence of the fluorescence signal on the incident photon flux in the whole wavelength range, by comparing results obtained from two independent experiments, as well as due to meticulous evaluation of critical experimental parameters, including the excitation spatial- and temporal pulse shape, laser power and sample geometry. Application of the reference standards in nonlinear transmittance measurements is discussed.

  15. Quantum cascade laser absorption sensor for carbon monoxide in high-pressure gases using wavelength modulation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Spearrin, R M; Goldenstein, C S; Jeffries, J B; Hanson, R K

    2014-03-20

    A tunable quantum cascade laser sensor, based on wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy near 4.8 μm, was developed to measure CO concentration in harsh, high-pressure combustion gases. The sensor employs a normalized second harmonic detection technique (WMS-2f/1f) at a modulation frequency of 50 kHz. Wavelength selection at 2059.91  cm⁻¹ targets the P(20) transition within the fundamental vibrational band of CO, chosen for absorption strength and relative isolation from infrared water and carbon dioxide absorption. The CO spectral model is defined by the Voigt line-shape function, and key line-strength and line-broadening spectroscopic parameters were taken from the literature or measured. Sensitivity analysis identified the CO-N₂ collisional broadening coefficient as most critical for uncertainty mitigation in hydrocarbon/air combustion exhaust measurements, and this parameter was experimentally derived over a range of combustion temperatures (1100-2600 K) produced in a shock tube. Accuracy of the wavelength-modulation-spectroscopy-based sensor, using the refined spectral model, was validated at pressures greater than 40 atm in nonreactive shock-heated gas mixtures. The laser was then free-space coupled to an indium-fluoride single-mode fiber for remote light delivery. The fiber-coupled sensor was demonstrated on an ethylene/air pulse detonation combustor, providing time-resolved (~20  kHz), in situ measurements of CO concentration in a harsh flow field.

  16. Satellite-Based Evidence of Wavelength-Dependent Aerosol Absorption in Biomass Burning Smoke Inferred from Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jethva, H.; Torres, O.

    2012-01-01

    We provide satellite-based evidence of the spectral dependence of absorption in biomass burning aerosols over South America using near-UV measurements made by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) during 2005-2007. In the current near-UV OMI aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV), it is implicitly assumed that the only absorbing component in carbonaceous aerosols is black carbon whose imaginary component of the refractive index is wavelength independent. With this assumption, OMI-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) is found to be significantly over-estimated compared to that of AERONET at several sites during intense biomass burning events (August-September). Other well-known sources of error affecting the near-UV method of aerosol retrieval do not explain the large observed AOD discrepancies between the satellite and the ground-based observations. A number of studies have revealed strong spectral dependence in carbonaceous aerosol absorption in the near-UV region suggesting the presence of organic carbon in biomass burning generated aerosols. A sensitivity analysis examining the importance of accounting for the presence of wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in carbonaceous particles in satellite-based remote sensing was carried out in this work. The results convincingly show that the inclusion of spectrally-dependent aerosol absorption in the radiative transfer calculations leads to a more accurate characterization of the atmospheric load of carbonaceous aerosols.

  17. ABSORPTION CROSS SECTION OF GASEOUS ACETYLENE AT 85 K IN THE WAVELENGTH RANGE 110-155 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Bing-Ming; Chen, Hui-Fen; Lu, Hsiao-Chi; Chen, Hong-Kai; Alam, M. S.; Chou, Sheng-Lung; Lin, Meng-Yeh

    2011-09-01

    Absorption spectra and absorption cross sections of gaseous acetylene, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, at 298 and 85 K were measured in the wavelength range 110-155 nm with a slit-jet system coupled to a synchrotron as a source of vacuum ultraviolet light. Using published spectral parameters of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, we simulated the absorption profile for the Rydberg transition to state 4R{sub 0} in the range 124.6-125.1 nm, according to which the temperature of the jet-expanded sample at stagnation pressure 200 Torr is 85 {+-} 5 K. Our cross sections of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} are applicable for determining properties sensitive to temperature for diagnostic work on Saturn and Titan.

  18. Absorption and wavelength modulation spectroscopy of NO2 using a tunable, external cavity continuous wave quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Andreas; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2009-01-10

    The absorption spectra and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) of NO(2) using a tunable, external cavity CW quantum cascade laser operating at room temperature in the region of 1625 to 1645 cm(-1) are reported. The external cavity quantum cascade laser enabled us to record continuous absorption spectra of low concentrations of NO(2) over a broad range (approximately 16 cm(-1)), demonstrating the potential for simultaneously recording the complex spectra of multiple species. This capability allows the identification of a particular species of interest with high sensitivity and selectivity. The measured spectra are in excellent agreement with the spectra from the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database [J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 96, 139-204 (2005)]. We also conduct WMS for the first time using an external cavity quantum cascade laser, a technique that enhances the sensitivity of detection. By employing WMS, we could detect low-intensity absorption lines, which are not visible in the simple absorption spectra, and demonstrate a minimum detection limit at the 100 ppb level with a short-path absorption cell. Details of the tunable, external cavity quantum cascade laser system and its performance are discussed.

  19. Absolute absorption cross sections of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Parkinson, W. H.; Freeman, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of progress of work on absorption cross section measurements of ozone at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K in the wavelength region 185-240 nm. In this wavelength region, the penetration of solar radiation into the Earth's atmosphere is controlled by O2 and O3. The transmitted radiation is available to dissociate trace species such as halocarbons and nitrous oxide. We have recently measured absolute absorption cross sections of O3 in the wavelength region 240-350 nm (Freeman et al., 1985; Yoshino et al., 1988). We apply these proven techniques to the determination of the absorption cross section of O3 at 300 K, 228 K and 195 K throughout the wavelength region 185-240 nm. A paper titled 'Absolute Absorption Cross Section Measurements of Ozone in the Wavelength Region 185-254 nm and the Temperature Dependence' has been submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  20. Black carbon and wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in the North China Plain based on two-year aethalometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z. Z.; Wang, P. C.; Xia, X. A.

    2016-10-01

    Light-absorbing components of atmospheric aerosols have gained particular attention in recent years due to their climatic and environmental effects. Based on two-year measurements of aerosol absorption at seven wavelengths, aerosol absorption properties and black carbon (BC) were investigated in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated and polluted regions in the world. Aerosol absorption was stronger in fall and the heating season (from November to March) than in spring and summer at all seven wavelengths. Similar spectral dependence of aerosol absorption was observed in non-heating seasons despite substantially strong absorption in fall. With an average absorption Angström exponent (α) of 1.36 in non-heating seasons, freshly emitted BC from local fossil fuel burning was thought to be the major component of light-absorbing aerosols. In the heating season, strong ultraviolet absorption led to an average α of 1.81, clearly indicating the importance of non-BC light-absorbing components, which were possibly from coal burning for domestic heating and aging processes on a regional scale. Diurnally, the variation of BC mass concentrations experienced a double-peak pattern with a higher level at night throughout the year. However, the diurnal cycle of α in the heating season was distinctly different from that in non-heating seasons. α peaked in the late afternoon in non-heating seasons with concomitantly observed low valley in BC mass concentrations. In contrast, α peaked around the midnight in the heating season and lowered down during the daytime. The relationship of aerosol absorption and winds in non-heating seasons also differed from that in the heating season. BC mass concentrations declined while α increased with increasing wind speed in non-heating seasons, which suggested elevated non-BC light absorbers in transported aged aerosols. No apparent dependence of α on wind speed was found in the heating season, probably due to well mixed

  1. Absorption and scattering properties of the Martian dust in the solar wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert-Bell, M. E.; Pollack, J. B.; McKay, C. P.; Forget, F.

    1997-01-01

    A new wavelength-dependent model of the single-scattering properties of the Martian dust is presented. The model encompasses the solar wavelengths (0.3 to 4.3 micrometers at 0.02 micrometer resolution) and does not assume a particular mineralogical composition of the particles. We use the particle size distribution, shape, and single-scattering properties at Viking Lander wavelengths presented by Pollack et al. [1995]. We expand the wavelength range of the aerosol model by assuming that the atmospheric dust complex index of refraction is the same as that of dust particles in the bright surface geologic units. The new wavelength-dependent model is compared to observations taken by the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper solar channel instrument during two dust storms. The model accurately matches afternoon observations and some morning observations. Some of the early morning observations are much brighter than the model results. The increased reflectance can be ascribed to the formation of a water ice shell around the dust particles, thus creating the water ice clouds which Colburn et al. [1989], among others, have predicted.

  2. Absorption and scattering properties of the Martian dust in the solar wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Ockert-Bell, M E; Bell JF 3rd; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Forget, F

    1997-04-25

    A new wavelength-dependent model of the single-scattering properties of the Martian dust is presented. The model encompasses the solar wavelengths (0.3 to 4.3 micrometers at 0.02 micrometer resolution) and does not assume a particular mineralogical composition of the particles. We use the particle size distribution, shape, and single-scattering properties at Viking Lander wavelengths presented by Pollack et al. [1995]. We expand the wavelength range of the aerosol model by assuming that the atmospheric dust complex index of refraction is the same as that of dust particles in the bright surface geologic units. The new wavelength-dependent model is compared to observations taken by the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper solar channel instrument during two dust storms. The model accurately matches afternoon observations and some morning observations. Some of the early morning observations are much brighter than the model results. The increased reflectance can be ascribed to the formation of a water ice shell around the dust particles, thus creating the water ice clouds which Colburn et al. [1989], among others, have predicted.

  3. Detection of harmonics and recovery of the absorption line profile using logarithmic-transformed wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Menglong; Sun, Dandan

    2016-07-01

    A versatile signal processing strategy for eliminating the residual amplitude modulation (RAM) and distortion in tunable diode laser wavelength modulation spectroscopy is theoretically demonstrated and experimentally validated. The strategy involves logarithmic transformation and differential detection, which are achieved using a homemade circuit. Through the logarithmic transformation, the optical intensity modulation of the laser, which performs as the source of RAM and distortion, is separated from the absorption-induced power attenuation and further balanced during the differential detection. The first harmonic, which is proportional to the first-order derivative of the absorption line profile in the case of a small modulation index, is extracted along with the second harmonic and is integrated for the recovery of the absorption line profile. The experiments are carried out for CH4 at its R(3) absorption line of the 2ν3 overtone for validation of the system, and the derived results are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical simulations. These promising results indicate the high potential of the strategy for absorption spectrum-based determination of gas properties.

  4. Wavelength Dependence of the Absorption of Black Carbon Particles: Predictions and Results from the TARFOX Experiment and Implications for the Aerosol Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, Robert W.; Russell, Philip B.; Hignett, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the wavelength dependence of the aerosol absorption coefficient taken during the Tropical Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX) over the northern Atlantic. The data show an approximate lamda(exp -1) variation between 0.40 and 1.0 micrometers. The theoretical basis of the wavelength variation of the absorption of solar radiation by elemental carbon [or black carbon (BC)] is explored. For a wavelength independent refractive index the small particle absorption limit simplifies to a lambda(exp -1) variation in relatively good agreement with the data. This result implies that the refractive indices of BC were relatively constant in this wavelength region, in agreement with much of the data on refractive indices of BC. However, the result does not indicate the magnitude of the refractive indices. The implications of the wavelength dependence of BC absorption for the spectral behavior of the aerosol single scattering albedo are discussed. It is shown that the single scattering albedo for a mixture of BC and nonabsorbing material decreases with wavelength in the solar spectrum (i.e., the percentage amount of absorption increases). This decease in the single scattering albedo with wavelength for black carbon mixtures is different from the increase in single scattering allied for most mineral aerosols (dusts). This indicates that, if generally true, the spectral variation of the single- scattering albedo can be used to distinguish aerosol types. It also highlights the importance of measurements of the spectral variation of the aerosol absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo.

  5. Wavelength-insensitive radiation coupling for multi-quantum well sensor based on intersubband absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Devices and techniques for coupling radiation to intraband quantum-well semiconductor sensors that are insensitive to the wavelength of the coupled radiation. At least one reflective surface is implemented in the quantum-well region to direct incident radiation towards the quantum-well layers.

  6. Wavelength-insensitive radiation coupling for multi-quantum well sensor based on intersubband absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunapala, Sarath D. (Inventor); Bandara, Sumith V. (Inventor); Liu, John K. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Devices and techniques for coupling radiation to intraband quantum-well semiconductor sensors that are insensitive to the wavelength of the coupled radiation. At least one reflective surface is implemented in the quantum-well region to direct incident radiation towards the quantum-well layers.

  7. Fractal morphology of black carbon aerosol enhances absorption in the thermal infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Heinson, William R; Chakrabarty, Rajan K

    2016-02-15

    In this Letter, we numerically calculate the mass absorption cross sections (MACs) of black carbon fractal aggregates in the thermal infrared solar spectrum. Compared to equivalent-size spheres, the MAC values of aggregates show a percent enhancement of ≈150 and 400 at small and large length scales, respectively. The absorption properties of aggregates with size parameters >1 surprisingly continued to remain in the Rayleigh optics regime. We explain this phenomenon using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium theory and the concept of phase shift parameter. PMID:26872194

  8. Fine wavelength id for tunable laser local oscillators. [sensing the absorption emission spectra of atmospheric gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M. G.; Augeri, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    A wavelength ID device which consists of an electronic show that the etalon has a finesse F 30 which is maintainable for several days. These tests also demonstrate that the etalon system is capable of resonance frequency stability during similar time periods. With currently available coatings, this level of performance is achievable over an optical bandwidth delta lambda = 3 micrometers centered at lambda = 10 micrometers.

  9. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  10. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2014-03-18

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  11. Evolution of wavelength-dependent mass absorption cross sections of carbonaceous aerosols during the 2010 DOE CARES campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flowers, B. A.; Dubey, M. K.; Subramanian, R.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Kelley, P.; Luke, W. T.; Jobson, B. T.; Zaveri, R. A.

    2011-12-01

    Predictions of aerosol radiative forcing require process level optical property models that are built on precise and accurate field observations. Evolution of aerosol optical properties for urban influenced carbonaceous aerosol undergoing transport and mixing with rural air masses was a focal point of the DOE Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects (CARES) campaign near Sacramento, CA in summer 2010. Urban aerosol was transported from Sacramento, CA (T0) to the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mountains to a rural site located near Cool, CA (T1). Aerosol absorption and scattering coefficients were measured at the T0 and T1 sites using integrated photoacoustic acoustic/nephelometer instruments (PASS-3 and PASS-UV) at 781, 532, 405, and 375 nm. Single particle soot photometry (SP2) instrumentation was used to monitor black carbon (BC) mass at both sites. Combining data from these sensors allows estimate of the wavelength-dependent mass absorption coefficient (MAC(λ)) and partitioning of MAC(λ) into contributions from the BC core and from enhancements from coating of BC cores. MAC(λ) measured in this way is free of artifacts associated with filter-based aerosol absorption measurements and takes advantage of the single particle sensitivity of the SP2 instrument, allowing observation of MAC(λ) on 10 minute and faster time scales. Coating was observed to enhance MAC(λ) by 20 - 30 % and different wavelength dependence for MAC(λ) was observed for urban and biomass burning aerosol. Further, T0 - T1 evolution of MAC(λ) was correlated with separately measured NO/NOy ratios and CO/CO2 ratios to understand the effects of aging & transport on MAC(λ) and the implications of aerosol processing that links air quality to radiative forcing on a regional scale. Aircraft observations made from the Gulfstream-1 during CARES are also analyzed to enhance process level understanding of the optical properties of fresh and aged carbonaceous aerosol in the urban-rural interface.

  12. Effects of particulate complex refractive index and particle size distribution variations on atmospheric extinction and absorption for visible through middle ir wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Jennings, S G; Pinnick, R G; Auvermann, H J

    1978-12-15

    A comprehensive sensitivity study has been made using Mie theory to determine the effect of realistic variations in values of real and imaginary parts of the complex index of refraction on volume extinction and absorption coefficients for a wide range of log normal particle size distributions (defined by geometric mean radius r(g) and geometric standard deviation sigma(g)). Wavelengths lambda from the visible (0.55 microm) through the middle ir (10.6 microm) were considered. Extinction is independent of the complex index to within 20% for the majority of realistic particle size distributions, providing lambda < 2 microm. However, changes in extinction by up to an order of magnitude are caused by realistic variations in refractive indexes for 2 microm maximum extinction coefficients are given. Absorption is generally less dependent on size distribution than is extinction and is not, in general, linear with the imaginary index, especially for broad particle distributions.

  13. Modulation of the Absorption Maximum of Rhodopsin by Amino Acids in the C-terminus†

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Shozo; Tada, Takashi; Yamato, Takahisa

    2008-01-01

    Vision begins when light is absorbed by visual pigments. It is commonly believed that the absorption spectra of visual pigments are modulated by interactions between the retinal and amino acids within or near 4.5 Å of the retinal in the transmembrane (TM) segments. However, this dogma has not been rigorously tested. In this study, we show that the retinal-opsin interactions extend well beyond the retinal binding pocket. We found that, although it is positioned outside of TM segments, the C-terminus of the rhodopsin in the rockfish longspine thornyhead (Sebastolobus altivelis) modulates its λmax by interacting mainly with the last TM segment. Our results illustrate how amino acids in the C-terminus are likely to interact with the retinal. We anticipate our analyses to be a starting point for viewing the spectral tuning of visual pigments as interactions between the retinal and key amino acids that are distributed throughout the entire pigment. PMID:16922606

  14. Ultraviolet-B Wavelengths Regulate Changes in UV Absorption of Cleaner Fish Labroides dimidiatus Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Zamzow, Jill P.; Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Eckes, Maxi J.; Grutter, Alexandra S.

    2013-01-01

    High-energy wavelengths in the ultraviolet-B (UVB, 280-315 nm) and the UVA (315-400-nm) portion of the spectrum are harmful to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Interestingly, UVA is also involved in the repair of UV induced damage. Organisms living in shallow coral reef environments possess UV absorbing compounds, such as mycosporine-like amino acids, to protect them from UV radiation. While it has been demonstrated that exposure to UV (280-400 nm) affects the UV absorbance of fish mucus, whether the effects of UV exposure vary between UVB and UVA wavelengths is not known. Therefore, we investigated whether the UVB, UVA, or photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) portions of the spectrum affected the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus and Fulton’s body condition index of the cleaner fish Labroides dimidiatus. We also compared field-measured UV absorbance with laboratory based high-performance liquid chromatography measurements of mycosporine-like amino acid concentrations. After 1 week, we found that the UV absorbance of epithelial mucus was higher in the UVB+UVA+PAR treatment compared with the UVA+PAR and PAR only treatments; after 2 and 3 weeks, however, differences between treatments were not detected. After 3 weeks, Fulton’s body condition index was lower for fish in the UVB+UVA+PAR compared with PAR and UVA+PAR treatments; furthermore, all experimentally treated fish had a lower Fulton’s body condition index than did freshly caught fish. Finally, we found a decrease with depth in the UV absorbance of mucus of wild-caught fish. This study suggests that the increase in UV absorbance of fish mucus in response to increased overall UV levels is a function of the UVB portion of the spectrum. This has important implications for the ability of cleaner fish and other fishes to adjust their mucus UV protection in response to variations in environmental UV exposure. PMID:24143264

  15. Sub-wavelength plasmon laser

    DOEpatents

    Bora, Mihail; Bond, Tiziana C.

    2016-04-19

    A plasmonic laser device has resonant nanocavities filled with a gain medium containing an organic dye. The resonant plasmon frequencies of the nanocavities are tuned to align with both the absorption and emission spectra of the dye. Variables in the system include the nature of the dye and the wavelength of its absorption and emission, the wavelength of the pumping radiation, and the resonance frequencies of the nanocavities. In addition the pumping frequency of the dye is selected to be close to the absorption maximum.

  16. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  17. New insights into two-photon absorption properties of functionalized aza-BODIPY dyes at telecommunication wavelengths: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoting; Zhang, Jilong; Li, Kai; Sun, Xiaobo; Wu, Zhijian; Ren, Aimin; Feng, Jikang

    2013-04-01

    Special attention has been paid to understanding the structural effect on electronic structure and absorption spectra for an extensive series of functionalized aza-BODIPY molecules. We have employed the quadratic response theory as well as a sum-over-states approach involving few intermediate states to calculate the two-photon cross section (δmax). The results suggest that chemical modifications on the aza-BODIPY core and peripheral moieties using various substituents can finely tune their linear and nonlinear optical properties. Therefore, some new fluorophores absorbing in the near infrared region and featuring considerably high δmax at telecommunication wavelengths are proposed, which are excellent candidates for nonlinear transmission and fluorescent labeling materials. The investigation contributes a useful starting point for further design of more effective aza-BODIPY dyes and can be valuable as a foundation for future experimental research and development.

  18. Sensitive absorption measurements of hydrogen sulfide at 1.578 μm using wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua; Dong, Feng-Zhong; Wu, Bian; Zhang, Zhi-Rong; Pang, Tao; Sun, Peng-Shuai; Cui, Xiao-Juan; Han, Luo; Wang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Sensitive detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been performed by means of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) near 1.578 μm. With the scan amplitude and the stability of the background baseline taken into account, the response time is 4 s for a 0.8 L multi-pass cell with a 56.7 m effective optical path length. Moreover, the linearity has been tested in the 0-50 ppmv range. The detection limit achievable by the Allan variance is 224 ppb within 24 s under room temperature and ambient pressure conditions. This tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system for H2S detection has the feasibility of real-time online monitoring in many applications. Project supported by the Special Fund for Basic Research on Scientific Instruments of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. YZ201315) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204320, 41405034, and 11204319).

  19. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  20. Short-wavelength, mid- and far-infrared intersubband absorption in nonpolar GaN/Al(Ga)N heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Caroline B.; Beeler, Mark; Ajay, Akhil; Lähnemann, Jonas; Bellet-Amalric, Edith; Bougerol, Catherine; Schörmann, Jörg; Eickhoff, Martin; Monroy, Eva

    2016-05-01

    This paper assesses nonpolar m-oriented GaN:Si/Al(Ga)N heterostructures grown on free-standing GaN for intersubband optoelectronics in the short-wavelength, mid- and far-infrared ranges. Characterization results are compared with reference c-plane samples and interpreted by correlation with self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson calculations. In the near- and mid-infrared regions, we demonstrate m-GaN/Al(Ga)N multi-quantum-wells exhibiting room-temperature intersubband absorption tunable in the range of 1.5-5.8 µm (827-214 meV), the long wavelength limit being set by the second order of the Reststrahlen band in the GaN substrates. Extending the study to the far-infrared region, low-temperature intersubband transitions in the 1.5-9 THz range (6.3-37.4 meV) are observed in larger m-plane GaN/AlGaN multi-quantum-wells, covering most of the 7-10 THz band forbidden to GaAs-based technologies.

  1. Active resonance wavelength stabilization for silicon microring resonators with an in-resonator defect-state-absorption-based photodetector.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu; Poon, Andrew W

    2015-01-12

    We propose and demonstrate active resonance wavelength stabilization for silicon microring resonators with an in-resonator defect-state-absorption (DSA)-based photodetector (PD) for optical interconnects. We integrate an electro-optic (EO) tuner and a thermo-optic (TO) tuner on the microring, which are both feedback-controlled following a photocurrent threshold-detection method. Our BF(2)-ion-implanted DSA-based PIN PD exhibits a cavity-enhanced sub-bandgap responsivity at 1550 nm of 3.3 mA/W upon -2 V, which is 550-fold higher than that exhibited by an unimplanted PIN diode integrated on the same microring. Our experiment reveals active stabilization of the resonance wavelength within a tolerance of 0.07 nm upon a step increment of the stage temperature by 7 °C. Upon temperature modulations between 23 °C and 32 °C and between 18 °C and 23 °C, the actively stabilized resonance exhibits a transmission power fluctuation within 2 dB. We observe open eye diagrams at a data transmission rate of up to 30 Gb/s under the temperature modulations. PMID:25835682

  2. COMPENSATIONAL THREE-WAVELENGTH DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR TECHNIQUE FOR REDUCING THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENTIAL SCATTERING ON OZONE-CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique for the UV spectral region is presented that reduces the influence of aerosol differential scattering on measured O3-concentration profiles. The principal advantage of this approach is that, to a good first approxi...

  3. Spectrally Consistent Scattering, Absorption, and Polarization Properties of Atmospheric Ice Crystals at Wavelengths from 0.2 to 100 um

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Ping; Bi, Lei; Baum, Bryan A.; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Kattawar, George W.; Mishchenko, Michael I.; Cole, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    A data library is developed containing the scattering, absorption, and polarization properties of ice particles in the spectral range from 0.2 to 100 microns. The properties are computed based on a combination of the Amsterdam discrete dipole approximation (ADDA), the T-matrix method, and the improved geometric optics method (IGOM). The electromagnetic edge effect is incorporated into the extinction and absorption efficiencies computed from the IGOM. A full set of single-scattering properties is provided by considering three-dimensional random orientations for 11 ice crystal habits: droxtals, prolate spheroids, oblate spheroids, solid and hollow columns, compact aggregates composed of eight solid columns, hexagonal plates, small spatial aggregates composed of 5 plates, large spatial aggregates composed of 10 plates, and solid and hollow bullet rosettes. The maximum dimension of each habit ranges from 2 to 10,000 microns in 189 discrete sizes. For each ice crystal habit, three surface roughness conditions (i.e., smooth, moderately roughened, and severely roughened) are considered to account for the surface texture of large particles in the IGOM applicable domain. The data library contains the extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, six independent nonzero elements of the phase matrix (P11, P12, P22, P33, P43, and P44), particle projected area, and particle volume to provide the basic single-scattering properties for remote sensing applications and radiative transfer simulations involving ice clouds. Furthermore, a comparison of satellite observations and theoretical simulations for the polarization characteristics of ice clouds demonstrates that ice cloud optical models assuming severely roughened ice crystals significantly outperform their counterparts assuming smooth ice crystals.

  4. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  5. LASER MEDICINE: Effect of laser radiation absorption in water and blood on the optimal wavelength for endovenous obliteration of varicose veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, K. M.; Minaev, V. P.; Sokolov, Aleksandr L.

    2009-08-01

    This work examines laser radiation absorption in water and blood at the wavelengths that are used in endovenous laser treatment (EVLT): 0.81-1.06, 1.32, 1.47, 1.5 and 1.56 μm. It is shown that the best EVLT conditions are ensured by 1.56-μm radiation. Analysis of published data suggests that even higher EVLT efficacy may be achieved at wavelengths of 1.68 and 1.7 μm.

  6. Evaluation of a direct-current argon plasma as a primary pseudocontinuum radiation source for wavelength-modulated atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, J.D.; O'Haver, T.C.; Epstein, M.S.

    1985-02-01

    A direct-current argon plasma (DCP) pseudocontinuum source is investigated as an alternative to a Cermax xenon arc continuum lamp (XAL) for wavelength-modulated continuum-source atomic absorption spectrometry (WM-AAC), particularly for the determination of elements in the lower ultraviolet wavelength region. The emission line from the DCP source is intentionally broadened by aspirating a large concentration of analyte solution into the plasma so that it appears as pseudocontinuum radiation over the narrow wavelength modulation interval. The DCP source significantly reduces both order overlap and far stray radiation compared to the XAL, but signal-to-noise ratios are degraded relative to the XAL source because of plasma-emission self-reversal flicker noise. 27 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  7. Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients and imaginary part of the complex refractive indices of mineral dust components measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-01-01

    Mass-specific optical absorption coefficients (MACs) and the imaginary part (κ) of the refractive indices of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at the wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. The MAC values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. Values of κ were calculated from the measured and particle-loss-corrected data by using a Mie-theory-based retrieval algorithm. The determined values could be used for comparisons with calculated wavelength-dependent κ values typically deduced from bulk-phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk-phase measurements.

  8. EXTENSION OF THE INVERSE ADDING-DOUBLING METHOD TO THE MEASUREMENT OF WAVELENGTH-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION AND SCATTERING COEFFICIENTS OF BIOLOGICAL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Allegood, M.S.; Baba, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Light interaction with biological tissue can be described using three parameters: the scattering and absorption coeffi cients (μs and μa), as well as the anisotropy (g) which describes the directional dependence of the scattered photons. Accurately determining these optical properties for different tissue types at specifi c wavelengths simultaneously would be benefi cial for a variety of different biomedical applications. The goal of this project was to take a user defi ned g-value and determine the remaining two parameters for a specifi ed wavelength range. A fully automated computer program and process was developed to collect data for all wavelengths in a timely and accurate manner. LabVIEW® was used to write programs to automate raw intensity data collection from a spectrometer equipped integrating sphere, conversion of the data into a format for analysis via Scott Prahl’s Inverse Adding-Doubling (IAD) C code execution, and fi nally computation of the optical properties based on the output from the IAD code. To allow data to be passed effi ciently between LabVIEW® and C code program modules, the two were combined into a single program (OPT 3.1). OPT 3.1 was tested using tissue mimicking phantoms. Determination of the absorption and scattering coeffi cients showed excellent agreement with theory for wavelengths where the user inputted single g-value was suffi ciently precise. Future improvements entail providing for multi-wavelength g-value entry to extend the accuracy of results to encompass the complete multispectral range. Ultimately, the data collection process and algorithms developed through this effort will be used to examine actual biological tissues for the purpose of building and refi ning models for light-tissue interactions.

  9. Robust and economical multi-sample, multi-wavelength UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detector for biological and chemical contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peter J.; Hoehl, Melanie M.; Macarthur, James B.; Sims, Peter A.; Ma, Hongshen; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2012-09-01

    We present a portable multi-channel, multi-sample UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detection device, which has no moving parts, can operate wirelessly and on batteries, interfaces with smart mobile phones or tablets, and has the sensitivity of commercial instruments costing an order of magnitude more. We use UV absorption to measure the concentration of ethylene glycol in water solutions at all levels above those deemed unsafe by the United States Food and Drug Administration; in addition we use fluorescence to measure the concentration of d-glucose. Both wavelengths can be used concurrently to increase measurement robustness and increase detection sensitivity. Our small robust economical device can be deployed in the absence of laboratory infrastructure, and therefore may find applications immediately following natural disasters, and in more general deployment for much broader-based testing of food, agricultural and household products to prevent outbreaks of poisoning and disease.

  10. Measurements of the absorption cross section of (13)CHO(13)CHO at visible wavelengths and application to DOAS retrievals.

    PubMed

    Goss, Natasha R; Waxman, Eleanor M; Coburn, Sean C; Koenig, Theodore K; Thalman, Ryan; Dommen, Josef; Hannigan, James W; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-05-14

    The trace gas glyoxal (CHOCHO) forms from the atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons and is a precursor to secondary organic aerosol. We have measured the absorption cross section of disubstituted (13)CHO(13)CHO ((13)C glyoxal) at moderately high (1 cm(-1)) optical resolution between 21 280 and 23 260 cm(-1) (430-470 nm). The isotopic shifts in the position of absorption features were found to be largest near 455 nm (Δν = 14 cm(-1); Δλ = 0.29 nm), whereas no significant shifts were observed near 440 nm (Δν < 0.5 cm(-1); Δλ < 0.01 nm). These shifts are used to investigate the selective detection of (12)C glyoxal (natural isotope abundance) and (13)C glyoxal by in situ cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CE-DOAS) in a series of sensitivity tests using synthetic spectra, and laboratory measurements of mixtures containing (12)C and (13)C glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide, and other interfering absorbers. We find the changes in apparent spectral band shapes remain significant at the moderately high optical resolution typical of CE-DOAS (0.55 nm fwhm). CE-DOAS allows for the selective online detection of both isotopes with detection limits of ∼200 pptv (1 pptv = 10(-12) volume mixing ratio), and sensitivity toward total glyoxal of few pptv. The (13)C absorption cross section is available for download from the Supporting Information. PMID:25551419

  11. [Decomposition of hemoglobin UV absorption spectrum into absorption spectra of prosthetic group and apoprotein by means of an additive model].

    PubMed

    Lavrinenko, I A; Vashanov, G A; Artyukhov, V G

    2015-01-01

    The decomposition pathways of hemoglobin UV absorption spectrum into the absorption spectra of the protein and non-protein components are proposed and substantiated by means of an additive model. We have established that the heme component has an absorption band with a maximum at λ(max) = 269.2 nm (ε = 97163) and the apoprotein component has an absorption band with a maximum at λ(max) = 278.4 nm (ε = 48669) for the wavelength range from 240.0 to 320.0 nm. An integral relative proportion of absorption for the heme fraction (78.8%) and apoprotein (21.2%) in the investigating wavelength range is defined.

  12. Optimizing spectral resolutions for the classification of C3 and C4 grass species, using wavelengths of known absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adjorlolo, Clement; Cho, Moses A.; Mutanga, Onisimo; Ismail, Riyad

    2012-01-01

    Hyperspectral remote-sensing approaches are suitable for detection of the differences in 3-carbon (C3) and four carbon (C4) grass species phenology and composition. However, the application of hyperspectral sensors to vegetation has been hampered by high-dimensionality, spectral redundancy, and multicollinearity problems. In this experiment, resampling of hyperspectral data to wider wavelength intervals, around a few band-centers, sensitive to the biophysical and biochemical properties of C3 or C4 grass species is proposed. The approach accounts for an inherent property of vegetation spectral response: the asymmetrical nature of the inter-band correlations between a waveband and its shorter- and longer-wavelength neighbors. It involves constructing a curve of weighting threshold of correlation (Pearson's r) between a chosen band-center and its neighbors, as a function of wavelength. In addition, data were resampled to some multispectral sensors-ASTER, GeoEye-1, IKONOS, QuickBird, RapidEye, SPOT 5, and WorldView-2 satellites-for comparative purposes, with the proposed method. The resulting datasets were analyzed, using the random forest algorithm. The proposed resampling method achieved improved classification accuracy (κ=0.82), compared to the resampled multispectral datasets (κ=0.78, 0.65, 0.62, 0.59, 0.65, 0.62, 0.76, respectively). Overall, results from this study demonstrated that spectral resolutions for C3 and C4 grasses can be optimized and controlled for high dimensionality and multicollinearity problems, yet yielding high classification accuracies. The findings also provide a sound basis for programming wavebands for future sensors.

  13. General Strategy for Broadband Coherent Perfect Absorption and Multi-wavelength All-optical Switching Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Multilayer Films

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Young; Badsha, Md. Alamgir; Yoon, Junho; Lee, Seon Young; Jun, Young Chul; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general, easy-to-implement scheme for broadband coherent perfect absorption (CPA) using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) multilayer films. Specifically, we employ indium tin oxide (ITO) as a tunable ENZ material, and theoretically investigate CPA in the near-infrared region. We first derive general CPA conditions using the scattering matrix and the admittance matching methods. Then, by combining these two methods, we extract analytic expressions for all relevant parameters for CPA. Based on this theoretical framework, we proceed to study ENZ CPA in a single layer ITO film and apply it to all-optical switching. Finally, using an ITO multilayer of different ENZ wavelengths, we implement broadband ENZ CPA structures and investigate multi-wavelength all-optical switching in the technologically important telecommunication window. In our design, the admittance matching diagram was employed to graphically extract not only the structural parameters (the film thicknesses and incident angles), but also the input beam parameters (the irradiance ratio and phase difference between two input beams). We find that the multi-wavelength all-optical switching in our broadband ENZ CPA system can be fully controlled by the phase difference between two input beams. The simple but general design principles and analyses in this work can be widely used in various thin-film devices. PMID:26965195

  14. General Strategy for Broadband Coherent Perfect Absorption and Multi-wavelength All-optical Switching Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Multilayer Films.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Young; Badsha, Md Alamgir; Yoon, Junho; Lee, Seon Young; Jun, Young Chul; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general, easy-to-implement scheme for broadband coherent perfect absorption (CPA) using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) multilayer films. Specifically, we employ indium tin oxide (ITO) as a tunable ENZ material, and theoretically investigate CPA in the near-infrared region. We first derive general CPA conditions using the scattering matrix and the admittance matching methods. Then, by combining these two methods, we extract analytic expressions for all relevant parameters for CPA. Based on this theoretical framework, we proceed to study ENZ CPA in a single layer ITO film and apply it to all-optical switching. Finally, using an ITO multilayer of different ENZ wavelengths, we implement broadband ENZ CPA structures and investigate multi-wavelength all-optical switching in the technologically important telecommunication window. In our design, the admittance matching diagram was employed to graphically extract not only the structural parameters (the film thicknesses and incident angles), but also the input beam parameters (the irradiance ratio and phase difference between two input beams). We find that the multi-wavelength all-optical switching in our broadband ENZ CPA system can be fully controlled by the phase difference between two input beams. The simple but general design principles and analyses in this work can be widely used in various thin-film devices. PMID:26965195

  15. General Strategy for Broadband Coherent Perfect Absorption and Multi-wavelength All-optical Switching Based on Epsilon-Near-Zero Multilayer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Young; Badsha, Md. Alamgir; Yoon, Junho; Lee, Seon Young; Jun, Young Chul; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2016-03-01

    We propose a general, easy-to-implement scheme for broadband coherent perfect absorption (CPA) using epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) multilayer films. Specifically, we employ indium tin oxide (ITO) as a tunable ENZ material, and theoretically investigate CPA in the near-infrared region. We first derive general CPA conditions using the scattering matrix and the admittance matching methods. Then, by combining these two methods, we extract analytic expressions for all relevant parameters for CPA. Based on this theoretical framework, we proceed to study ENZ CPA in a single layer ITO film and apply it to all-optical switching. Finally, using an ITO multilayer of different ENZ wavelengths, we implement broadband ENZ CPA structures and investigate multi-wavelength all-optical switching in the technologically important telecommunication window. In our design, the admittance matching diagram was employed to graphically extract not only the structural parameters (the film thicknesses and incident angles), but also the input beam parameters (the irradiance ratio and phase difference between two input beams). We find that the multi-wavelength all-optical switching in our broadband ENZ CPA system can be fully controlled by the phase difference between two input beams. The simple but general design principles and analyses in this work can be widely used in various thin-film devices.

  16. Lidar reflectance from snow at 2.05  μm wavelength as measured by the JPL Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph C

    2016-03-10

    We report airborne measurements of lidar directional reflectance (backscatter) from land surfaces at a wavelength in the 2.05 μm CO₂ absorption band, with emphasis on snow-covered surfaces in various natural environments. Lidar backscatter measurements using this instrument provide insight into the capabilities of lidar for both airborne and future global-scale CO₂ measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO₂ Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. Lidar measurement capability is particularly useful when the use of solar scattering spectroscopy is not feasible for high-accuracy atmospheric CO₂ measurements. Consequently, performance in high-latitude and winter season environments is an emphasis. Snow-covered surfaces are known to be dark in the CO₂ band spectral regions. The quantitative backscatter data from these field measurements help to elucidate the range of backscatter values that can be expected in natural environments.

  17. Optical effects of abaxial anthocyanin on absorption of red wavelengths by understorey species: revisiting the back-scatter hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Nicole M; Vogelmann, Thomas C; Smith, William K

    2008-01-01

    A red/purple coloration of lower (abaxial) leaf surfaces is commonly observed in deeply-shaded understorey plants, especially in the tropics. However, the functional significance of red abaxial coloration, including its role in photosynthetic adaptation, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to test the back-scatter hypothesis for abaxial leaf coloration, which posits that red pigments internally reflect/scatter red light transmitted by the upper leaf surface back into the mesophyll, thereby enhancing photon capture in light-limited environments. Abaxially red/non-red variegated leaves of Begonia heracleifolia (Cham. & Schltdl.) were used to compare reflectance spectra and chlorophyll fluorescence profiles of abaxially anthocyanic (red) and acyanic (non-red) tissues under red light. Photosynthetic gas exchange in response to red light was also compared for abaxially red/non-red leaf sections. The results did not support a back-scattering function, as anthocyanic leaf surfaces were not more reflective of red light than acyanic surfaces. Anthocyanic tissues also did not exhibit any increases in the mesophyll absorbance of red light, or increased photosynthetic gas exchange under red light at any intensity, relative to acyanic tissues. These results suggest that abaxial anthocyanins do not significantly enhance the absorption of red light in the species tested, and alternative functions are discussed.

  18. Optical effects of abaxial anthocyanin on absorption of red wavelengths by understorey species: revisiting the back-scatter hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Nicole M.; Vogelmann, Thomas C.; Smith, William K.

    2008-01-01

    A red/purple coloration of lower (abaxial) leaf surfaces is commonly observed in deeply-shaded understorey plants, especially in the tropics. However, the functional significance of red abaxial coloration, including its role in photosynthetic adaptation, remains unclear. The objective of this study was to test the back-scatter hypothesis for abaxial leaf coloration, which posits that red pigments internally reflect/scatter red light transmitted by the upper leaf surface back into the mesophyll, thereby enhancing photon capture in light-limited environments. Abaxially red/non-red variegated leaves of Begonia heracleifolia (Cham. & Schltdl.) were used to compare reflectance spectra and chlorophyll fluorescence profiles of abaxially anthocyanic (red) and acyanic (non-red) tissues under red light. Photosynthetic gas exchange in response to red light was also compared for abaxially red/non-red leaf sections. The results did not support a back-scattering function, as anthocyanic leaf surfaces were not more reflective of red light than acyanic surfaces. Anthocyanic tissues also did not exhibit any increases in the mesophyll absorbance of red light, or increased photosynthetic gas exchange under red light at any intensity, relative to acyanic tissues. These results suggest that abaxial anthocyanins do not significantly enhance the absorption of red light in the species tested, and alternative functions are discussed. PMID:18653695

  19. Backscattering measurements of atmospheric aerosols at CO2 laser wavelengths: implications of aerosol spectral structure on differential-absorption lidar retrievals of molecular species.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, A

    1999-04-20

    The volume backscattering coefficients of atmospheric aerosol were measured with a tunable CO2 lidar system at various wavelengths in Utah (a desert environment) along a horizontal path a few meters above the ground. In deducing the aerosol backscattering, a deconvolution (to remove the smearing effect of the long CO2 lidar pulse and the lidar limited bandwidth) and a constrained-slope method were employed. The spectral shape beta(lambda) was similar for all the 13 measurements during a 3-day period. A mean aerosol backscattering-wavelength dependence beta(lambda) was computed from the measurements and used to estimate the error Delta(CL) (concentration-path-length product) in differential-absorption lidar measurements for various gases caused by the systematic aerosol differential backscattering and the error that is due to fluctuations in the aerosol backscattering. The water-vapor concentration-path-length product CL and the average concentration C = /L for a path length L computed from the range-resolved lidar measurements is consistently in good agreement with the water-vapor concentration measured by a meteorological station. However, I was unable to deduce, reliably, the range-resolved water-vapor concentration C(r), which is the derivative of the range-dependent product CL, because of the effect of residual noise caused mainly by errors in the deconvolved lidar measurements.

  20. Simulation investigation of tensile strained GeSn fin photodetector with Si(3)N(4) liner stressor for extension of absorption wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingfang; Liu, Yan; Yan, Jing; Zhang, Chunfu; Hao, Yue; Han, Genquan

    2015-01-26

    In this paper, we design a biaxial tensile strained GeSn photodetector with fin structure wrapped in Si(3)N(4) liner stressor. A large biaxial tensile strain is induced in GeSn fins by the expansion of Si(3)N(4) liner stressor. The distribution of tensile strain in GeSn fins was calculated by a finite element simulation. It is observed that magnitude of the strain increases with the reduction of fin thickness T(fin). Under the biaxial tensile strain, the direct band gap E(G,Γ) of GeSn fin photodetector is significantly reduced by lowering Γ conduction valley in energy and lifting of degeneracy of valence bands. As the 30 nm Si(3)N(4) liner stressor expanses by 1%, a E(G,Γ) reduction of ~0.14 eV is achieved in Ge(0.92)Sn(0.08) fins with a T(fin) of 100 nm. The cut-off wavelengths of strained Ge(0.96)Sn(0.04), Ge(0.92)Sn(0.08) and Ge(0.90)Sn(0.10) fin photodetectors with a T(fin) of 100 nm are extended to 2.4, 3.3, and 4 μm, respectively. GeSn fin photodetector integrated with Si(3)N(4) liner stressor provides an effective technique for extending the absorption edge of GeSn with Sn composition less than 10% to mid-infrared wavelength.

  1. Characterization of thin poly(dimethylsiloxane)-based tissue-simulating phantoms with tunable reduced scattering and absorption coefficients at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    Greening, Gage J.; Istfan, Raeef; Higgins, Laura M.; Balachandran, Kartik; Roblyer, Darren; Pierce, Mark C.; Muldoon, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Optical phantoms are used in the development of various imaging systems. For certain applications, the development of thin phantoms that simulate the physical size and optical properties of tissue is important. Here, we demonstrate a method for producing thin phantom layers with tunable optical properties using poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a substrate material. The thickness of each layer (between 115 and 880  μm) was controlled using a spin coater. The reduced scattering and absorption coefficients were controlled using titanium dioxide and alcohol–soluble nigrosin, respectively. These optical coefficients were quantified at six discrete wavelengths (591, 631, 659, 691, 731, and 851 nm) at varying concentrations of titanium dioxide and nigrosin using spatial frequency domain imaging. From the presented data, we provide lookup tables to determine the appropriate concentrations of scattering and absorbing agents to be used in the design of PDMS-based phantoms with specific optical coefficients. In addition, heterogeneous phantoms mimicking the layered features of certain tissue types may be fabricated from multiple stacked layers, each with custom optical properties. These thin, tunable PDMS optical phantoms can simulate many tissue types and have broad imaging calibration applications in endoscopy, diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging, and optical coherence tomography, etc. PMID:25387084

  2. The influence of hyperfine structure and isotope shift on the detection of Rb by 2 f-wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectrometry—experimental verification of simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Jörgen; Axner, Ove

    1998-12-01

    This work presents an experimental verification of a previously developed methodology for simulation of the 2 f-wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectrometry technique (2 f-WM-DLAS) when the influence of hyperfine structure, isotope shift and collisional broadening and shift of an atomic transition is taken into account [J. Gustafsson, D. Rojas and O. Axner, Spectrochim. Acta, 52B, 1937-1953 (1997)]. The pilot element in the simulations was Rb, detected at the 780 nm 5s 2S 1/2-5p 2P 3/2 transition, in low-pressure cells and atmospheric-pressure reservoirs (e.g. graphite furnaces). This experimental investigation verifies that the simulations are able to predict, with good accuracy, experimental 2 f-WM signals from Rb atoms under both low-pressure, room-temperature conditions and atmospheric-pressure, high-temperature conditions. This implies that the previously published simulation methodology can be used for predicting and optimizing 2 f-WM signal strengths and shapes from Rb atoms (and thereby presumably also from other atoms) under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions.

  3. Infrared Attenuation Spectrum of Bulk High-Resistivity CdZnTe Single Crystal in Transparent Wavelength Region Between Electronic and Lattice Absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarugaku, Yuki; Kaji, Sayumi; Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Sukegawa, Takashi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kataza, Hirokazu; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-09-01

    We report measurement of the internal attenuation coefficient, α _{att} , of a bulk high-resistivity cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) single crystal at wavelength, λ = 0.84-26 μ m, to the unprecedentedly low level of α _{att} ˜ 0.001 cm^{-1} . This measurement reveals the spectral behavior for small attenuation in the infrared transparent region between the electronic and lattice absorptions. This result is essential for application of CdZnTe as an infrared transmitting material. Comparing the attenuation spectrum with model spectra obtained on the basis of Mie theory, we find that sub-micrometer-sized Te particles (inclusions) with a number density of approximately 10^{7.5-9} cm^{-3} are the principal source of the small attenuation observed at λ = 0.9-13 μ m. In addition, we determine α _{att} = (7.7 ± 1.9) × 10^{-4} cm^{-1} at λ = 10.6 μ m, which is valuable for CO_2 laser applications. Higher transparency can be achieved by reducing the number of inclusions rather than the number of precipitates. This study also demonstrates that high-accuracy measurement of CdZnTe infrared transmittance is a useful approach to investigating the number density of sub-micrometer-sized Te particles that cannot be identified via infrared microscopy.

  4. Simultaneous Maximum-Likelihood Reconstruction of Absorption Coefficient, Refractive Index and Dark-Field Scattering Coefficient in X-Ray Talbot-Lau Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela; Weber, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A maximum-likelihood reconstruction technique for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography is presented. This technique allows the iterative simultaneous reconstruction of discrete distributions of absorption coefficient, refractive index and a dark-field scattering coefficient. This technique avoids prior phase retrieval in the tomographic projection images and thus in principle allows reconstruction from tomographic data with less than three phase steps per projection. A numerical phantom is defined which is used to evaluate convergence of the technique with regard to photon statistics and with regard to the number of projection angles and phase steps used. It is shown that the use of a random phase sampling pattern allows the reconstruction even for the extreme case of only one single phase step per projection. The technique is successfully applied to measured tomographic data of a mouse. In future, this reconstruction technique might also be used to implement enhanced imaging models for X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. These enhancements might be suited to correct for example beam hardening and dispersion artifacts and improve overall image quality of X-ray Talbot-Lau tomography. PMID:27695126

  5. [The Establishment of the Method of the Fiber Optic Chemical Sensor Synchronous Absorption-Fluorescence].

    PubMed

    Zhang Li-hua; Iburaim, Arkin

    2016-03-01

    A new method of simultaneously measuring fiber-optic chemical sensor absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum is established. Make synchronous absorption-fluorescence cuvette, establish synchronous absorption-fluorescence spectrometry instrumentation combined by fiber optic chemical sensor technology, measure the synchronous absorption-fluorescence spectrums of solutions of rhodamine B, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6, compared by absorption spectroscopy measured by traditional UV-Visible photometric method and fluorescence spectroscopy measured by traditional fluorescence method. Synchronous absorption-fluorescence method measure absorption spectrums and fluorescence spectrums the same to traditional photometric and fluorescence spectroscopy of rhodamine B, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6. The maximum wavelength of fluorescence intensity method has high accuracy relatively compared with fluorescence, but the maximum wavelength of absorption has a slight deviation. Synchronous absorption-fluorescence method means simultaneously measure the absorption spectrums and fluorescence spectrums of the fluorescent substance, making two spectrums to one. The method measured the maximum emission wavelength with high accuracy, though in measuring maximum absorption wavelength there is a slight deviation, but it is worth further studying. PMID:27400519

  6. Two-photon absorption in SiO{sub 2}- and (SiO{sub 2} + GeO{sub 2})-based fibres at a wavelength of 349 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Chunaev, D S; Karasik, A Ya

    2014-06-30

    The nonlinear two-photon light absorption coefficients have been measured in an optical fibre with a quartz glass (SiO{sub 2}) core and in a fibre with a germanosilicate glass (SiO{sub 2} + GeO{sub 2}) core. The two-photon absorption coefficient β measured at a wavelength of 349 nm in the (SiO{sub 2} + GeO{sub 2})-based fibre (13.7 cm TW{sup -1}) multiply exceeds that for the pure quartz glass optical fibre (0.54 cm TW{sup -1}). (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  7. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  8. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Bincheng

    2015-02-15

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam.

  9. Sensitivity enhancement of surface thermal lens technique with a short-wavelength probe beam: experiment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Bincheng

    2015-02-01

    Surface thermal lens is a highly sensitive photothermal technique to measure low absorption losses of various solid materials. In such applications, the sensitivity of surface thermal lens is a key parameter for measuring extremely low absorption. In this paper, we experimentally investigated the influence of probe beam wavelength on the sensitivity of surface thermal lens for measuring the low absorptance of optical laser components. Three probe lasers with wavelength 375 nm, 633 nm, and 1570 nm were used, respectively, to detect the surface thermal lens amplitude of a highly reflective coating sample excited by a cw modulated Gaussian beam at 1064 nm. The experimental results showed that the maximum amplitude of surface thermal lens signal obtained at corresponding optimized detection distance was inversely proportional to the wavelength of the probe beam, as predicted by previous theoretical model. The sensitivity of surface thermal lens could, therefore, be improved by detecting surface thermal lens signal with a short-wavelength probe beam. PMID:25725872

  10. Effects of bias and temperature on the intersubband absorption in very long wavelength GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. H.; Zhou, X. H. Li, N.; Liao, K. S.; Huang, L.; Li, Q.; Li, Z. F.; Chen, P. P.; Lu, W.; Wang, L.; Sun, Q. L.

    2014-03-28

    The temperature- and bias-dependent photocurrent spectra of very long wavelength GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) are studied using spectroscopic measurements and corresponding theoretical calculations. It is found that the peak response wavelength will shift as the bias and temperature change. Aided by band structure calculations, we propose a model of the double excited states and explain the experimental observations very well. In addition, the working mechanisms of the quasi-bound state confined in the quantum well, including the processes of tunneling and thermionic emission, are also investigated in detail. We confirm that the first excited state, which belongs to the quasi-bound state, can be converted into a quasi-continuum state induced by bias and temperature. These obtained results provide a full understanding of the bound-to-quasi-bound state and the bound-to-quasi-continuum state transition, and thus allow for a better optimization of QWIPs performance.

  11. Non-Destructive and Discriminating Identification of Illegal Drugs by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy in the Visible and Near-IR Wavelength Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Chie; Furube, Akihiro; Katoh, Ryuzi; Nonaka, Hidehiko; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-01

    We have tested the possibility of identifying illegal drugs by means of nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with a 10-ns UV-laser pulse for the excitation light and visible-to-near-IR light for the probe light. We measured the transient absorption spectra of acetonitrile solutions of d-methamphetamine, dl-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine hydrochloride (MDMA), and dl-N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine hydrochloride (MBDB), which are illegal drugs widely consumed in Japan. Transient absorption signals of these drugs were observed between 400 and 950 nm, a range in which they are transparent in the ground state. By analyzing the spectra in terms of exponential and Gaussian functions, we could identify the drugs and discriminate them from chemical substances having similar structures. We propose that transient absorption spectroscopy will be a useful, non-destructive method of inspecting for illegal drugs, especially when they are dissolved in liquids. Such a method may even be used for drugs packed in opaque materials if it is further extended to utilize intense femtosecond laser pulses.

  12. The isolation of prophyra-334 from marine algae and its UV-absorption behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaohui, Zhang; Xin, Gao; Tashiro, Yuri; Matsukawa, Shingo; Ogawa, Hiroo

    2005-12-01

    Prophyra-334 was prepared by methanol extraction and HPLC methods from marine algae (dried laver). It is a sunscreen compound that has good absorption of ultraviolet radiations in the wavelength ranges of 200-400 nm. The absorption maximum wavelength of prophyra-334 is at 334 nm, so defined the name. The molar extinction coefficient (ɛ) of prophyra-334 in aqueous solution at 334 nm wavelength is 4.23×104. The absorption of prophyra-334 in organic solvents differs in aqueous solutions. In polar organic solvents, the absorption maximum wavelength of prophyra-334 has a slight shift toward longer wavelength compared with that in pure water. On the contrary, in inert non-polar organic solvents, the absorption maximum wavelength and the shape of absorption spectra of prophyra-334 are changed. The effects of organic solvents on prophyra-334 stability suggested that: (1) the absorbance of prophyra-334 in water is generally constant at temperature of 60°C in 24 h, meaning that prophyra-334 is quite stable in water; (2) the absorbance of prophyra-334 in ethanol and hexane decreases at the same condition. The stability of prophyra-334 in organic solvents is less than that in aqueous solution. In benzene, the prophyra-334 is very instable.

  13. Phase function, backscatter, extinction, and absorption for standard radiation atmosphere and El Chichon aerosol models at visible and near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Suttles, J. T.; Lecroy, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Tabular values of phase function, Legendre polynominal coefficients, 180 deg backscatter, and extinction cross section are given for eight wavelengths in the atmospheric windows between 0.4 and 2.2 microns. Also included are single scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, and refractive indices. These values are based on Mie theory calculations for the standard rediation atmospheres (continental, maritime, urban, unperturbed stratospheric, volcanic, upper atmospheric, soot, oceanic, dust, and water-soluble) assest measured volcanic aerosols at several time intervals following the El Chichon eruption. Comparisons of extinction to 180 deg backscatter for different aerosol models are presented and related to lidar data.

  14. Simultaneous imaging of temperature and concentration of ethanol-water mixtures in microchannel using near-infrared dual-wavelength absorption technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuta, Naoto; Yamashita, Hiroki; Kawashima, Daisuke; Kondo, Katsuya; Arimoto, Hidenobu; Yamada, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a simultaneous imaging method of temperature and ethanol concentration of ethanol-water mixtures in microfluidic channels. The principle is based on the facts that the absorbance at a wavelength of 1905 nm is dependent on the temperature of water and that the absorbance at 1935 nm is independent of the temperature but strongly dependent on the molar concentration of water, which is reciprocal to the molar concentration of ethanol in the mixture. The absorbance images at the two wavelengths were acquired alternately, each at 50 frames per second, by an alternate irradiation system and near-infrared (NIR) camera, and then converted to the temperature and concentration images by a linear regression model. The imaging method was applied to a dilute ethanol-water mixture with an ethanol concentration of 0.43 M and water flowing side by side in a temperature-controlled Y-channel. The concentration images clearly showed differences between the mixture and water streams, and that the transverse concentration gradient between the two streams decreased downstream by mutual diffusion. It was also confirmed that the mutual diffusion coefficient increased as the temperature increased. The temperature images showed that uniform distributions were immediately formed due to heat transfer between the fluid and channel materials.

  15. Absorption imaging of a single atom.

    PubMed

    Streed, Erik W; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-03

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  16. A Compact Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer to Monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm Wavelength in Hypersonic Flows

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship’s Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow. PMID:22219703

  17. A compact tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer to monitor CO2 at 2.7 μm wavelength in hypersonic flows.

    PubMed

    Vallon, Raphäel; Soutadé, Jacques; Vérant, Jean-Luc; Meyers, Jason; Paris, Sébastien; Mohamed, Ajmal

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the Mars planet exploration, the characterization of carbon dioxide hypersonic flows to simulate a spaceship's Mars atmosphere entry conditions has been an important issue. We have developed a Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer with a new room-temperature operating antimony-based distributed feedback laser (DFB) diode laser to characterize the velocity, the temperature and the density of such flows. This instrument has been tested during two measurement campaigns in a free piston tunnel cold hypersonic facility and in a high enthalpy arc jet wind tunnel. These tests also demonstrate the feasibility of mid-infrared fiber optics coupling of the spectrometer to a wind tunnel for integrated or local flow characterization with an optical probe placed in the flow.

  18. Opacity of iron, nickel, and copper plasmas in the x-ray wavelength range: Theoretical interpretation of 2p-3d absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Blenski, T.; Loisel, G.; Poirier, M.; Thais, F.; Arnault, P.; Caillaud, T.; Fariaut, J.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J.-C.; Porcherot, Q.; Reverdin, C.; Silvert, V.; Villette, B.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Foelsner, W.; Gaufridy de Dortan, F. de

    2011-09-15

    This paper deals with theoretical studies on the 2p-3d absorption in iron, nickel, and copper plasmas related to LULI2000 (Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses, 2000J facility) measurements in which target temperatures were of the order of 20 eV and plasma densities were in the range 0.004-0.01 g/cm{sup 3}. The radiatively heated targets were close to local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE). The structure of 2p-3d transitions has been studied with the help of the statistical superconfiguration opacity code sco and with the fine-structure atomic physics codes hullac and fac. A new mixed version of the sco code allowing one to treat part of the configurations by detailed calculation based on the Cowan's code rcg has been also used in these comparisons. Special attention was paid to comparisons between theory and experiment concerning the term features which cannot be reproduced by sco. The differences in the spin-orbit splitting and the statistical (thermal) broadening of the 2p-3d transitions have been investigated as a function of the atomic number Z. It appears that at the conditions of the experiment the role of the term and configuration broadening was different in the three analyzed elements, this broadening being sensitive to the atomic number. Some effects of the temperature gradients and possible non-LTE effects have been studied with the help of the radiative-collisional code scric. The sensitivity of the 2p-3d structures with respect to temperature and density in medium-Z plasmas may be helpful for diagnostics of LTE plasmas especially in future experiments on the {Delta}n=0 absorption in medium-Z plasmas for astrophysical applications.

  19. Optical absorption and intrinsic recombination in relaxed and strained InAs{sub 1–x}Sb{sub x} alloys for mid-wavelength infrared application

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Hanqing; Bellotti, Enrico

    2015-11-30

    The intrinsic carrier recombination lifetime in relaxed and strained InAs{sub 1−x}Sb{sub x} alloys is investigated using the full-band Green's function theory. By computing the phonon-perturbed electron self-energy of the system, both direct and phonon-assisted indirect Auger and radiative processes are studied as functions of antimony molar fractions, lattice temperatures and applied in-plane biaxial strains. To improve the overall accuracy of the calculation, an empirical pseudopotential band structure for the alloy is also fitted to the measured band extrema and effective masses under different biaxial strains. A set of effective screened potentials valid for all the needed antimony fractions x and biaxial strains ϵ, therefore, is obtained and applied to the calculation. The results showed reduced total Auger recombination rates and enhanced radiative recombination rates in InAsSb alloys at room temperature when a compressive strain is applied. Furthermore, the study on the widely employed mid-wavelength infrared detector material, InAs{sub 0.91}Sb{sub 0.09}, strained by an InAs substrate, demonstrated that much longer minority carrier lifetime can be achieved compared to that in the lattice-matched situation when the lattice temperature is above 200 K.

  20. Absorption Spectroscopy in the 4.4-4.6 μ m Infrared Wavelength Range for the 10 Khz High-Speed Measurement of CO and CO2 Concentrations in Combusting Environments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotia, Matthew L.; Sell, Brian C.; Hoke, John; Schauer, Fred

    2014-06-01

    An instrument has been developed to make 10 kHz in situ combustion gas measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO_2) concentrations. Operating in both the 4.40 and 4.58 μ m wavelength ranges allows for the fundamental molecular absorption bands of both molecules to be utilized. Such concentration measurements allow for the determination of total combustion efficiency of a particular process, which has engineering implications when considering the energy available from a combustion process to be utilized for propulsion purposes. A brief discussion of the initial calibration of the sensor with a calibrated diffusion flame, Hencken burner, and pressure-concentration cell is made with the main focus of the current work being the application of the instrument to examine the structure of propagating detonation waves.

  1. Comment on ‘Dual-wavelength Q-switched Er:YAG laser around 1.6 μm for methane differential absorption lidar’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, A.; Balembois, F.; Georges, P.

    2014-04-01

    A recent publication (Wang et al 2013 Laser Phys. Lett. 10 115804) described an actively Q-switched and diode-pumped Er:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser source. The novelty of that letter lies in the use of a very bright and spectrally narrowed fiber-coupled laser diode as a pump, thus leading to very good performance in continuous wave mode. In Q-switch operation, the output energy reported is surprisingly high (6.6 mJ) for this kind of setup with a low pump power (only 10 W) and with small beam diameter (250 μm). In this letter, we demonstrate that the output energy exceeds the maximum extractable energy of the gain medium.

  2. Maximum likelihood.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuying; De Angelis, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The maximum likelihood method is a popular statistical inferential procedure widely used in many areas to obtain the estimates of the unknown parameters of a population of interest. This chapter gives a brief description of the important concepts underlying the maximum likelihood method, the definition of the key components, the basic theory of the method, and the properties of the resulting estimates. Confidence interval and likelihood ratio test are also introduced. Finally, a few examples of applications are given to illustrate how to derive maximum likelihood estimates in practice. A list of references to relevant papers and software for a further understanding of the method and its implementation is provided.

  3. Engineering reverse saturable absorbers for desired wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Band, Yehuda B.; Scharf, Benjamin

    1986-06-01

    A variety of applications exist for reverse saturable absorbers (RSAs) in laser science (RSAs are substances whose excited-state absorption cross section is larger than their ground-state absorption cross section at a given wavelength and possess a number of other properties). We propose an approach to designing RSAs at a desired wavelength by construction of dimers of dye molecules which absorb near the wavelength of interest. The dimer ground-state absorption is to a state in which the excitation is spread over both monomeric units and the excited-state absorption commences from this state to the doubly excited electronic state in which both monomeric units are excited.

  4. Influence of absorption on stability of terahertz difference frequency generation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Nan; Liu, Hongjun; Sun, Qibing; Wang, Zhaolu; Li, Shaopeng; Han, Jing

    2016-01-20

    This work presents numerical studies of the stability feature of terahertz difference frequency generation (THz-DFG) with a ZnGeP(2) crystal using two pump wavelengths. We found that the maximum output of a THz wave is located in the unstable output region because of the competitive equilibrium between the absorption and the gain. Furthermore, the output stability is dependent on the pump stability. Different from the results at the pump wavelength of 9.588 μm, there is neither an appropriate stable output region nor gain saturation region at the pump wavelength of 1.064 μm for a larger absorption coefficient. This work demonstrates that the stable output region of the THz wave is difficult to obtain when the pump absorption is excessively large in DFG. PMID:26835915

  5. On the Ammonia Absorption on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejfel, Victor G.; Karimov, A. M.; Lyssenko, P. G.; Kharitonova, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The ammonia absorption bands centered at wavelengths of 645 and 787 nm in the visible spectrum of Saturn are very weak and overlapped with more strong absorption bands of methane. Therefore, the allocation of these bands is extremely difficult. In fact, the NH3 band 787 nm is completely masked by methane. The NH3 645 nm absorption band is superimposed on a relatively weak shortwave wing of CH4 band, in which the absorption maximum lies at the wavelength of 667 nm. In 2009, during the equinox on Saturn we have obtained the series of zonal spectrograms by scanning of the planet disk from the southern to the northern polar limb. Besides studies of latitudinal variation of the methane absorption bands we have done an attempt to trace the behavior of the absorption of ammonia in the band 645 nm. Simple selection of the pure NH3 profile of the band was not very reliable. Therefore, after normalizing to the ring spectrum and to the level of the continuous spectrum for entire band ranging from 630 to 680 nm in the equivalent widths were calculated for shortwave part of this band (630-652 nm), where the ammonia absorption is present, and a portion of the band CH4 652-680 nm. In any method of eliminating the weak part of the methane uptake in the short wing show an increased ammonia absorption in the northern hemisphere compared to the south. This same feature is observed also in the behavior of weak absorption bands of methane in contrast to the more powerful, such as CH4 725 and 787 nm. This is due to the conditions of absorption bands formation in the clouds at multiple scattering. Weak absorption bands of methane and ammonia are formed on the large effective optical depths and their behavior reflects the differences in the degree of uniformity of the aerosol component of the atmosphere of Saturn.

  6. A color sensor wavelength meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Dallin; Jackson, Jarom; Otterstrom, Nils; Jones, Tyler; Archibald, James

    2016-05-01

    We will discuss a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip consisting of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined with picometer-level precision and with picometer-scale calibration drift over a period longer than a month. This work was supported by NSF Grant Number PHY-1205736.

  7. Re-Assessing the Maximum Allowed Infrared (IR) Power for Enchanced Layering in a Conduction Dominated Cryogenic NIF-Scale Hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Kozioziemski, B J

    2003-08-11

    Recent measurements of the infrared (IR) absorption coefficient of CH and CD capsules differ significantly from earlier estimated values from thin flat samples. The optimum wavelength for IR enhanced layering of DT and D{sub 2} ice layers inside of a NIF scale hohlraum depends on the relative ice and capsule absorption coefficients. This update of a previous memo shows the maximum ice heating with IR as a function of ice and capsule absorption instead of at discrete wavelengths. Also discussed is the leverage of other parameters, such as the IR absorption of the hohlraum wall and thermal conductivities of the support rods and exchange gas. The most likely capsule and ice absorption values limit the IR heating to between 2-7 Q{sub DT}. We find most leverage of the IR heating comes from increasing the ice to capsule absorption ratio. As before, this is the conduction only limit to IR, with convection potentially playing a large role.

  8. Wavelength stabilized multi-kW diode laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Bernd; Unger, Andreas; Kindervater, Tobias; Drovs, Simon; Wolf, Paul; Hubrich, Ralf; Beczkowiak, Anna; Auch, Stefan; Müntz, Holger; Biesenbach, Jens

    2015-03-01

    We report on wavelength stabilized high-power diode laser systems with enhanced spectral brightness by means of Volume Holographic Gratings. High-power diode laser modules typically have a relatively broad spectral width of about 3 to 6 nm. In addition the center wavelength shifts by changing the temperature and the driving current, which is obstructive for pumping applications with small absorption bandwidths. Wavelength stabilization of high-power diode laser systems is an important method to increase the efficiency of diode pumped solid-state lasers. It also enables power scaling by dense wavelength multiplexing. To ensure a wide locking range and efficient wavelength stabilization the parameters of the Volume Holographic Grating and the parameters of the diode laser bar have to be adapted carefully. Important parameters are the reflectivity of the Volume Holographic Grating, the reflectivity of the diode laser bar as well as its angular and spectral emission characteristics. In this paper we present detailed data on wavelength stabilized diode laser systems with and without fiber coupling in the spectral range from 634 nm up to 1533 nm. The maximum output power of 2.7 kW was measured for a fiber coupled system (1000 μm, NA 0.22), which was stabilized at a wavelength of 969 nm with a spectral width of only 0.6 nm (90% value). Another example is a narrow line-width diode laser stack, which was stabilized at a wavelength of 1533 nm with a spectral bandwidth below 1 nm and an output power of 835 W.

  9. On the influence of wavelength-dependent light scattering on the UV-VIS absorption spectra of oxygen-based minerals: a study on silicate glass ceramics as model substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomenko, V. M.; Langer, K.; Wirth, R.

    transmission spectrometry in the range 35 000-20 000 cm-1. Different inclusions, from five to several hundred nm in size, were observed in the glass matrices depending on their compositions and heating history. These inclusions represent two groups: early very small crystals of Ti, Zr oxides and relatively large crystals of stuffed high-quartz type or keatite. The absorption spectra of the glass ceramics show largely varying long-wavelength slopes of the UV absorption. UV-edge intensity correlates mostly with the size of the inclusions and changes drastically when larger keatite-type microcrystals are growing. Small variations in the UV edges also follow the early process of Ti-phase separation and nucleation. This may be explained by Ti depletion from the glass matrix and, thus, by reducing the measured intensity of LMCT in the first co-ordination sphere of Ti4+ ions. The different yellowish colourations of unheated glasses studied here are caused by this effect, whereas developing several hundred-nm-large keatite crystals leads to a strong scattering effect and a milky colour in glass ceramics.

  10. Tripling the maximum imaging depth with third-harmonic generation microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Murat; Durr, Nicholas; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2015-09-01

    The growing interest in performing high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging has galvanized the use of longer excitation wavelengths and three-photon-based techniques in nonlinear imaging modalities. This study presents a threefold improvement in maximum imaging depth of ex vivo porcine vocal folds using third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy at 1552-nm excitation wavelength compared to two-photon microscopy (TPM) at 776-nm excitation wavelength. The experimental, analytical, and Monte Carlo simulation results reveal that THG improves the maximum imaging depth observed in TPM significantly from 140 to 420 μm in a highly scattered medium, reaching the expected theoretical imaging depth of seven extinction lengths. This value almost doubles the previously reported normalized imaging depths of 3.5 to 4.5 extinction lengths using three-photon-based imaging modalities. Since tissue absorption is substantial at the excitation wavelength of 1552 nm, this study assesses the tissue thermal damage during imaging by obtaining the depth-resolved temperature distribution through a numerical simulation incorporating an experimentally obtained thermal relaxation time (τ). By shuttering the laser for a period of 2τ, the numerical algorithm estimates a maximum temperature increase of ˜2°C at the maximum imaging depth of 420 μm. The paper demonstrates that THG imaging using 1552 nm as an illumination wavelength with effective thermal management proves to be a powerful deep imaging modality for highly scattering and absorbing tissues, such as scarred vocal folds.

  11. Maximum Jailbreak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.

    First formulated one hundred and fifty years ago by the heretical scholar Nikolai Federov, the doctrine of cosmism begins with an absolute refusal to treat the most basic factors conditioning life on Earth ­ gravity and death ­ as necessary constraints on action. As manifest through the intoxicated cheers of its early advocates that humans should storm the heavens and conquer death, cosmism's foundational gesture was to conceive of the earth as a trap. Its duty was therefore to understand the duty of philosophy, economics and design to be the creation of means to escape it. This could be regarded as a jailbreak at the maximum possible scale, a heist in which the human species could steal itself from the vault of the Earth. After several decades of relative disinterest new space ventures are inspiring scientific, technological and popular imaginations, this essay explores what kind of cosmism might be constructed today. In this paper cosmism's position as a means of escape is both reviewed and evaluated by reflecting on the potential of technology that actually can help us achieve its aims and also through the lens and state-ofthe-art philosophy of accelerationism, which seeks to outrun modern tropes by intensifying them.

  12. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-01

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×104 A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  13. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  14. Photo-fragmentation cross-section of gaseous 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene at different ultraviolet wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ramesh C; Miller, Tracy S; Usachev, Alexander D; Singh, Jagdish P; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Monts, David L

    2009-04-01

    The photo-fragmentation cross-section of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) vapor at room temperature was determined at different ultraviolet wavelengths (254, 300, 340, and 400 nm) by measuring the concentration of NO molecule with cavity ring down spectroscopy and correcting for the photo-fragmentation cross-section of NO(2). Nitric oxide (NO) molecules are produced by the TNT photo-fragmentation processes via an intermediate production of NO(2). Our results reveal that the photo-fragmentation cross-section of TNT changes appreciably with change in wavelength with xenon arc lamp illumination, increasing with decreasing excitation wavelength. The maximum value of cross-section was observed at the shortest photo-fragmentation wavelength studied (254 nm), which is closest to the wavelength of an absorption peak of TNT near 220 nm.

  15. Upper limits for absorption by water vapor in the near-UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eoin M.; Wenger, John C.; Venables, Dean S.

    2016-02-01

    There are few experimental measurements of absorption by water vapor in the near-UV. Here we report the results of spectral measurements of water vapor absorption at ambient temperature and pressure from 325 nm to 420 nm, covering most tropospherically relevant short wavelengths. Spectra were recorded using a broadband optical cavity in the chemically controlled environment of an atmospheric simulation chamber. No absorption attributable to the water monomer (or the dimer) was observed at the 0.5 nm resolution of our system. Our results are consistent with calculated spectra and recent DOAS field observations, but contradict a report of significant water absorption in the near-UV. Based on the detection limit of our instrument, we report upper limits for the water absorption cross section of less than 5×10-26 cm2 molecule-1 at our instrument resolution. For a typical, indicative slant column density of 4×1023 cm2, we calculate a maximum optical depth of 0.02 arising from absorption of water vapor in the atmosphere at wavelengths between 340 nm and 420 nm, with slightly higher maximum optical depths below 340 nm. The results of this work, together with recent atmospheric observations and computational results, suggest that water vapor absorption across most of the near-UV is small compared to visible and infrared wavelengths.

  16. Laser wavelength metrology with color sensor chips.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tyler B; Otterstrom, Nils; Jackson, Jarom; Archibald, James; Durfee, Dallin S

    2015-12-14

    We present a laser wavelength meter based on a commercial color sensor chip. The chip consists of an array of photodiodes with different absorptive color filters. By comparing the relative amplitudes of light on the photodiodes, the wavelength of light can be determined. In addition to absorption in the filters, etalon effects add additional spectral features which improve the precision of the device. Comparing the measurements from the device to a commercial wavelength meter and to an atomic reference, we found that the device has picometer-level precision and picometer-scale drift over a period longer than a month. PMID:26699036

  17. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of chlorine nitrite, ClONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Molina, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The near-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of chlorine nitrite (ClONO) has been quantitatively investigated over the wavelength range 230-400 nm at 231 K. An absorption maximum was observed at 290 nm with a cross section of 1.5 by 10 to the -18th power sq cm. The calculated lifetime against photodissociation for ClONO in the atmosphere is 2 to 3 minutes. The large photolysis rate indicates that ClONO does not play a significant role in the stratosphere as a temporary holding tank for chlorine.

  18. Ultra-low-power silicon photonics wavelength converter for phase-encoded telecommunication signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacava, C.; Ettabib, M. A.; Cristiani, I.; Fedeli, J.-M.; Richardson, D. J.; Petropoulos, P.

    2016-03-01

    The development of compact, low power, silicon photonics CMOS compatible components for all-optical signal processing represents a key step towards the development of fully functional platforms for next generation all-optical communication networks. The wavelength conversion functionality at key nodes is highly desirable to achieve transparent interoperability and wavelength routing allowing efficient management of network resources operated with high speed, phase encoded signals. All optical wavelength conversion has already been demonstrated in Si-based devices, mainly utilizing the strong Kerr effect that silicon exhibits at telecommunication wavelengths. Unfortunately, Two Photon Absorption (TPA) and Free Carrier (FC) effects strongly limit their performance, even at moderate power levels, making them unsuitable for practical nonlinear applications. Amorphous silicon has recently emerged as a viable alternative to crystalline silicon (c-Si), showing both an enhanced Kerr as well as a reduced TPA coefficient at telecom wavelengths, with respect to its c-Si counterpart. Here we present an ultra-low power wavelength converter based on a passive, CMOS compatible, 1-mm long amorphous silicon waveguide operated at a maximum pump power level of only 70 mW. We demonstrate TPA-free Four Wave Mixing (FWM)-based wavelength conversion of Binary Phase Shift Keyed (BPSK) and Quadrature Phase Shift Keyed (QPSK) signals at 20 Gbit/s with <1 dB power penalty at BER = 10-5.

  19. Accounting for self-absorption in calculation of light collection in plastic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchyshyn, V.; Lebedev, V.; Adadurov, A.; Budagov, J.; Chirikov-Zorin, I.

    2006-10-01

    This paper concerns Monte Carlo calculations of light collection in plastic scintillators with accounting for self-absorption. Two approaches are compared: a monochrome one, which takes into account light absorption at a wavelength of the emission spectra maximum, and a spectral one, which accounts for the absorption dependence on a wave length over the whole range of scintillating photon emission. Both approaches are used in light yield calculations for OPERA and Super-Nemo detectors. It is shown that the monochrome approach overestimates light collection values 1.5-2 times, while the spectral one leads to better agreement with experiment.

  20. Wavelength Anomalies in UV-Vis Spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellinghuisen, J.

    2012-06-01

    Commercial spectrophotometers are great tools for recording absorption spectra of low-to-moderate resolution and high photometic quality. However, in the case of at least one such instrument, the Shimadzu UV-2101PC (and by assumption, similar Shimadzu models), the wavelength accuracy may not match the photometric accuracy. In fact the wavelength varies with slit width, spectral sampling interval, and even the specified range, with a smoothing algorithm invoked any time the spectrum includes more than 65 sampled wavelengths. This behavior appears not to be documented anywhere, but it has been present for at least 20 years and persists even in the latest software available to run the instrument. The wavelength shifts can be as large as 1 nm, so for applications where wavelength accuracy better than this is important, wavelength calibration must be done with care to ensure that the results are valid for the parameters used to record the target spectra.

  1. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications. PMID:23435006

  2. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications.

  3. Double-pulse dual-wavelength alexandrite laser for atmospheric water vapor measurement.

    PubMed

    Bruneau, D; Cazeneuve, H; Loth, C; Pelon, J

    1991-09-20

    We describe a new alexandrite laser source arrangement designed to measure atmospheric water vapor using the differential absorption lidar technique. This laser is capable of emitting two pulses at two appropriately selected wavelengths within a single flash lamp discharge. A narrow spectral linewidth of Deltalambda < 1 pm is obtained for each pulse by intracavity filtering with a birefringent filter and two Fabry-Perot interferometers. Wavelength commutation between the two pulses is performed by electro-optically tuning the birefringent filter. The temporal separation between the two pulses can be chosen between 50 and 70 micros and each pulse duration is <250-ns (full width at half-maximum). Typical output energies of 50 mJ/pulse at each wavelength are obtained with this laser system at a 10-Hz repetition rate for a 1.3-kW input electrical power.

  4. LITT on canine prostates: an in-vivo study to compare the effects of different wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sroka, Ronald; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Martin, Thomas; Muschter, Rolf

    1996-05-01

    Laser induced interstitial thermotherapy is a new minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Since high power laser diode lasers became available for clinical use a comparison of tissue effects of different wavelengths under controlled conditions is needed. In this study three different laser wavelengths were compared at output powers of 4 W and 8 W with 10 min and 90 s irradiation time, respectively, resulting in applied energies of 2700 J and 720 J. The results in both groups showed that the use of a wavelength close to the relative water absorption peak at 980 nm gave tendentiously but not significantly larger coagulated areas. Furthermore it became obvious that the use of 8 W for 90 sec results in higher maximum temperatures and larger lesions compared to the application of 4 W over a period of 10 min, although the energy used in the latter group was 4 fold higher.

  5. Multi-wavelength fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwong, Tiffany C.; Lo, Pei-An; Cho, Jaedu; Nouizi, Farouk; Chiang, Huihua K.; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    The strong scattering and absorption of light in biological tissue makes it challenging to model the propagation of light, especially in deep tissue. This is especially true in fluorescent tomography, which aims to recover the internal fluorescence source distribution from the measured light intensities on the surface of the tissue. The inherently ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem along with strong tissue scattering makes Fluorescence Tomography (FT) extremely challenging. Previously, multispectral detection fluorescent tomography (FT) has been shown to improve the image quality of FT by incorporating the spectral filtering of biological tissue to provide depth information to overcome the inherent absorption and scattering limitations. We investigate whether multi-wavelength fluorescent tomography can be used to distinguish the signals from multiple fluorophores with overlapping fluorescence spectrums using a unique near-infrared (NIR) swept laser. In this work, a small feasibility study was performed to see whether multi-wavelength FT can be used to detect subtle shifts in the absorption spectrum due to differences in fluorophore microenvironment.

  6. Dual Wavelength Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    Dual wavelength lasers are discussed, covering fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics of these systems. Results on Tm:Ho:Er:YAG dual wavelength laser action (Ho at 2.1 m and Er at 2.9 m) as well as Nd:YAG (1.06 and 1.3 m) are presented as examples of such dual wavelength systems. Dual wavelength lasers are not common, but there are criteria that govern their behavior. Based on experimental studies demonstrating simultaneous dual wavelength lasing, some general conclusions regarding the successful operation of multi-wavelength lasers can be made.

  7. Radiation engineering of optical antennas for maximum field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Seok, Tae Joon; Jamshidi, Arash; Kim, Myungki; Dhuey, Scott; Lakhani, Amit; Choo, Hyuck; Schuck, Peter James; Cabrini, Stefano; Schwartzberg, Adam M; Bokor, Jeffrey; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2011-07-13

    Optical antennas have generated much interest in recent years due to their ability to focus optical energy beyond the diffraction limit, benefiting a broad range of applications such as sensitive photodetection, magnetic storage, and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. To achieve the maximum field enhancement for an optical antenna, parameters such as the antenna dimensions, loading conditions, and coupling efficiency have been previously studied. Here, we present a framework, based on coupled-mode theory, to achieve maximum field enhancement in optical antennas through optimization of optical antennas' radiation characteristics. We demonstrate that the optimum condition is achieved when the radiation quality factor (Q(rad)) of optical antennas is matched to their absorption quality factor (Q(abs)). We achieve this condition experimentally by fabricating the optical antennas on a dielectric (SiO(2)) coated ground plane (metal substrate) and controlling the antenna radiation through optimizing the dielectric thickness. The dielectric thickness at which the matching condition occurs is approximately half of the quarter-wavelength thickness, typically used to achieve constructive interference, and leads to ∼20% higher field enhancement relative to a quarter-wavelength thick dielectric layer.

  8. Multi-Wavelength Photoacoustic Visualization of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J. P.; Dana, N.; Dextraze, K. L.; Maier, F.; Emelianov, S.; Bouchard, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) thermal therapies are limited by deficiencies in existing image-guidance techniques. Previous studies using single-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) imaging have demonstrated that HIFU lesions generate contrast with respect to native tissues but have not sufficiently assessed lesion extent. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate feasibility of characterization of in vitro HIFU ablation lesion dimensions using 3D multi-wavelength PA imaging. Fresh porcine cardiac and liver tissue samples were embedded in agar phantoms and ablated using a 2.5 MHz small-animal HIFU system. Both 2D and 3D multi-wavelength photoacoustic-ultrasonic (PAUS) scans were performed in the near-infrared (NIR) range to characterize the change in the absorption spectrum of tissues following ablation and were compared to stained gross pathology to assess treatment margins and lesion extent. Comprehensive 2D multi-wavelength PA imaging yielded a spectrum in ablated tissue that did not display the characteristic local maximum in the optical absorption spectrum of deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) near 760 nm. Two-dimensional tissue characterization map (TCM) images reconstructed from 3D TCM volumes reliably characterized lesion area and showed >70% area agreement with stained gross pathology. In addition, tissue samples were heated via water bath and concurrently interrogated with 2D PAUS imaging. PA signal exhibited an initial amplitude increase across all wavelengths, corresponding to an initial temperature increase, before then exhibiting a spectral change. This study suggests that multi-wavelength PA imaging has potential to obtain accurate characterization of HIFU lesion extent and may be better suited to guide HIFU ablation therapies during clinical treatments than single-wavelength methods. PMID:26149314

  9. Influence of spectral properties of wavelength-locked and wavelength-unlocked diode laser on fiber laser performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihua; Tang, Xuan; Zhao, Pengfei; Li, Zebiao; Li, Chengyu; Li, Qi; Guo, Chao; Lin, Honghuan; Wang, Jianjun; Jing, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the spectral properties of laser diode (LD) pump source, i.e. central wavelength and linewidth, on the fiber laser performances are studied. The absorption degradation ratio (ADR) is introduced and evaluated as a guide for pump selection and fiber laser design. The spectra of wavelength-locked and wavelength-unlocked LDs are measured and they are used for fiber laser amplification. The results show that the efficiency of the wavelength-locked LDs is higher than that of the wavelength-unlocked LDs at full current but the residual pump power of wavelength-locked LDs can be much higher at lower current because of the side band.

  10. Determination of bromhexine in cough-cold syrups by absorption spectrophotometry and multivariate calibration using partial least-squares and hybrid linear analyses. Application of a novel method of wavelength selection.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, H C; Olivieri, A C

    1999-07-12

    The mucolitic bromhexine [N-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzyl)-N-methylcyclohexylamine] has been determined in cough suppressant syrups by multivariate spectrophotometric calibration, together with partial least-squares (PLS-1) and hybrid linear analysis (HLA). Notwithstanding the spectral overlapping between bromhexine and syrup excipients, as well as the intrinsic variability of the latter in unknown samples, the recoveries are excellent. A novel method of wavelength selection was also applied, based on the concept of net analyte signal regression, as adapted to the HLA methodology. This method allows one to improve the performance of both PLS-1 and HLA in samples containing nonmodeled interferences. PMID:18967655

  11. A non-critically phase matched KTA optical parametric oscillator intracavity pumped by an actively Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser with dual signal wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Kai; Guo, Shibei; Wang, Maorong; Mei, Jialin; Xu, Degang; Yao, Jianquan

    2015-06-01

    A non-critically phase matched eye-safe KTA optical parametric oscillator intracavity pumped by a dual-wavelength acousto-optically Q-switched Nd:GYSGG laser is demonstrated. Simultaneous dual signal wavelength at 1525.1 nm/1531.2 nm can be realized using only one laser crystal and one nonlinear crystal. When the absorbed diode pump power at 808 nm is 7.48 W, the maximum output power, single pulse energy and peak power are 296 mW, 2.96 μJ and 6.4 kW, respectively. As the signal wavelengths exactly locates at the absorption band of C2H2, such an Nd:GYSGG/KTA eye-safe laser has good application prospects in differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for C2H2 detection and difference frequency generation for terahertz waves at 0.77 THz.

  12. Light-induced growth of monodisperse silver nanoparticles with tunable SPR properties and wavelength self-limiting effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xianliang; Lombardi, John R.

    2008-08-01

    We present a technique for the tunable synthesis of a variety of monodisperse silver nanoparticles. Utilizing different optical wavelengths to irradiate initially grown seed crystals, the size and shape of the products can be controlled. Monitoring the absorption spectrum during growth, we observe that initially the absorption maximum shifts to longer wavelengths and broadens, indicating increasing particle size and dispersion. Remarkably, this effect gradually comes to a halt and reverses, displaying a shift to shorter wavelengths and simultaneously narrower bandwidths, until on completion, a final size and relatively narrow distribution is reached. The final morphology is found to depend on control of the laser wavelength and power. Discs, triangular prisms as well as pyramidal and pentagonal prisms may be produced. A process based on a wavelength dependent self-limiting mechanism governed by the surface plasmon resonance controlling the photochemical reduction of particles is suggested. By a similar mechanism, we show that by using a sodium lamp instead of a laser as an excitation source, a monodisperse sample of nanotetrahedra can be produced.

  13. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  14. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  15. Sub-wavelength antenna enhanced bilayer graphene tunable photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Howell, Stephen W.; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul; Ohta, Taisuke

    2016-03-22

    The integration of bilayer graphene with an absorption enhancing sub-wavelength antenna provides an infrared photodetector capable of real-time spectral tuning without filters at nanosecond timescales.

  16. Wavelength independent interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochberg, Eric B. (Inventor); Page, Norman A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A polychromatic interferometer utilizing a plurality of parabolic reflective surfaces to properly preserve the fidelity of light wavefronts irrespective of their wavelengths as they pass through the instrument is disclosed. A preferred embodiment of the invention utilizes an optical train which comprises three off-axis parabolas arranged in conjunction with a beam-splitter and a reference mirror to form a Twyman-Green interferometer. An illumination subsystem is provided and comprises a pair of lasers at different preselected wavelengths in the visible spectrum. The output light of the two lasers is coaxially combined by means of a plurality of reflectors and a grating beam combiner to form a single light source at the focal point of the first parabolic reflection surface which acts as a beam collimator for the rest of the optical train. By using visible light having two distinct wavelengths, the present invention provides a long equivalent wavelength interferogram which operates at visible light wherein the effective wavelength is equal to the product of the wavelengths of the two laser sources divided by their difference in wavelength. As a result, the invention provides the advantages of what amounts to long wavelength interferometry but without incurring the disadvantage of the negligible reflection coefficient of the human eye to long wavelength frequencies which would otherwise defeat any attempt to form an interferogram at that low frequency using only one light source.

  17. Selection of Wavelengths for Optimum Precision in Simultaneous Spectrophotometric Determinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiTusa, Michael R.; Schilt, Alfred A.

    1985-01-01

    Although many textbooks include a description of simultaneous determinations employing absorption spectrophotometry and treat the mathematics necessary for analytical quantitations, treatment of analytical wavelength selection has been mostly qualitative. Therefore, a general method for selecting wavelengths for optimum precision in simultaneous…

  18. Short-wavelength infrared photodetector with InGaAs/GaAsSb superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Chuan; Xu, Qingqing; Yu, Chengzhang; Chen, Jianxin

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, our recent study on InGaAs/GaAsSb Type II photodetector for extended short wavelength infrared detection is reported. The high quality InGaAs/GaAsSb superlattices (SLs) was grown successfully by molecular beam epitaxy. The full width of half maximum of the SLs peak is 39". Its optical properties were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) at different temperature. The dependences of peak energy on temperature were measured and analyzed. The photodetector with InGaAs/GaAsSb absorption regions has a Quantum Efficiency (QE) product of 12.51% at 2.1um and the 100% cutoff wavelength is at 2.5um, at 300K under zero bias. The dominant mechanism of the dark current is discussed.

  19. Perfect sub-wavelength metamaterial fishnet-like film absorbers for THz applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shchegolov, Dmitry; Azad, Abul K; O' Hara, John F; Smirnova, Evgenya I

    2009-01-01

    We present two designs of robust, easy to manufacture meta material-based films of sub-wavelength thickness capable of full absorption of the incident terahertz (THz) radiation at certain frequencies. Both designs can be either made polarization sensitive, or have 90{sup o} rotation symmetry, which works equally well for waves of any polarization provided the incident angle is zero. All our designs work for a wide range of angles of incidence, and even if the films are optimized for normal incidence the absorption remains greater than 99% for angles up to {approx}35{sup o} in the TE and {approx}65{sup o} in the TM case. In the first design the maximum absorption frequency shifts considerably with angle, and in the second design the maximum absorption frequency remains almost the same at any angle. Theory, simulation data, and recent experimental results are all in a good agreement, and will be reported in the presentation. Having a low heat capacity these absorbers combined with thermo detectors can be utilized for precise frequency-selective detection of THz radiation.

  20. All-fiber wavelength-tunable Tm/Ho-codoped laser between 1727 nm and 2030 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Guanghui; Zhang, Bin; Yin, Ke; Yang, Weiqiang; Hou, Jing

    2015-02-01

    Lasers in the eye-safe 2 μm spectral region are attracting significant interest due to a variety of applications such as atmospheric lidar sensing and medical treatment, which require laser sources matching the absorption lines of various molecules in the 2 μm wavelength region. We demonstrate an all-fiber Tm/Ho-codoped laser operating in the 2 μm wavelength region with a wide wavelength tuning range of more than 300 nm. The Tm/Ho-codoped fiber laser (THFL) was built in a ring cavity configuration with a fiberized grating-based tunable filter to select the operating wavelength. The tunable wavelength range of the THFL was from 1727 nm to 2030 nm. To the best of our knowledge, this is the widest tuning range that has been reported for an all-fiber rare-earth-doped laser to date. Efficient short wavelength operation was also achieved. The output power of the THFL was further scaled up from 1810 nm to 2010 nm by using a stage of Tm/Ho-codoped fiber amplifier (THFA), which exhibited the maximum slope efficiency of 42.6% with output power of 408 mW at 1910 nm.

  1. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application

    PubMed Central

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J.; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-01-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400–1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption. PMID:26935322

  2. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application.

    PubMed

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-01-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400-1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption. PMID:26935322

  3. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application.

    PubMed

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-03-03

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400-1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption.

  4. Millimeter wavelength propagation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    The investigations conducted for the Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Studies during the period December, 1966, to June 1974 are reported. These efforts included the preparation for the ATS-5 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment and the subsequent data acquisition and data analysis. The emphasis of the OSU participation in this experiment was placed on the determination of reliability improvement resulting from the use of space diversity on a millimeter wavelength earth-space communication link. Related measurements included the determination of the correlation between radiometric temperature and attenuation along the earth-space propagation path. Along with this experimental effort a theoretical model was developed for the prediction of attenuation statistics on single and spatially separated earth space propagation paths. A High Resolution Radar/Radiometer System and Low Resolution Radar System were developed and implemented for the study of intense rain cells in preparation for the ATS-6 Millimeter Wavelength Propagation Experiment.

  5. Integrating sphere effect in whole bladder wall photodynamic therapy at violet, green, and red wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Staveren, Hugo J.; Beek, Johan F.; Keijzer, Marleen; Star, Willem M.

    1995-01-01

    Fluence rates were measured in vivo at a piglet bladder wall during whole bladder wall (WBW) light irradiation at 458, 488, 514, 532, and 630 nm wavelengths. Bladder optical properties, the absorption-, scattering-, and anisotropy coefficient, were determined in vitro at these wavelengths using a double integrating sphere set-up. Monte Carlo (MC) computer simulations for WBW photodynamic therapy (PDT) were performed in a spherical geometry representing the bladder. The in vivo measured fluence multiplication factor ((beta) ) decreases from approximately equals 5 at 630 nm to approximately equals 1.5 at 458 nm. The simulated (beta) values, using the in vitro optical properties and non-absorbing (saline) bladder contents, are consistently larger with a minimum at 514/532 nm and a maximum at 458 and 630 nm. Simulations with slightly light absorbing bladder contents show that the inevitable urine in the cavity can at least partly be responsible for the lower in vivo values. Whereas the MC simulations use an in vitro absorption coefficient, the in vivo observed phenomenon might be attributed to additional light absorption by hemoglobin in the bladder tissue. Thus, WBW-PDT with red light is technically more advantageous than with green or blue light as this gives the strongest integrating sphere effect.

  6. Molecular level all-optical logic with chlorophyll absorption spectrum and polarization sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, B.; Bhattacharyya (Bhaumik), S.

    2008-06-01

    Chlorophyll is suggested as a suitable medium for realizing optical Boolean logic at the molecular level in view of its wavelength-selective property and polarization sensitivity in the visible region. Spectrophotometric studies are made with solutions of total chlorophyll and chromatographically isolated components, viz. chlorophyll a and b and carotenoids extracted from pumpkin leaves of different maturity stages. The absorption features of matured chlorophyll with two characteristic absorption peaks and one transmission band are molecular properties and independent of concentration. A qualitative explanation of such an absorption property is presented in terms of a ‘particle in a box’ model and the property is employed to simulate two-input optical logic operations. If both of the inputs are either red or blue, absorption is high. If either one is absent and replaced by a wavelength of the transmission band, e.g. green, absorption is low. Assigning these values as 0 s or 1 s, AND and OR operations can be performed. A NOT operation can be simulated with the transmittance instead of the absorbance. Also, the shift in absorbance values for two different polarizations of the same monochromatic light can simulate two logical states with a single wavelength. Cyclic change in absorbance is noted over a rotation of 360° for both red and blue peaks, although the difference is not very large. Red monochromatic light with polarizations apart by 90°, corresponding to maximum and minimum absorption, respectively, may be assigned as the two logical states. The fluorescence emissions for different pigment components are measured at different excitation wavelengths and the effect of fluorescence on the red absorbance is concluded to be negligible.

  7. High Accuracy In-Flight Wavelength Calibration of Imaging Spectrometry Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Heidebrecht, Kathleen B.; Chrien, Thomas G.

    1995-01-01

    Accurate wavelength calibration of imaging spectrometer data is essential if proper atmospheric transmission corrections are to be made to obtain apparent surface reflectance. Accuracies of 0.1 nm are necessary for a 10 nm-sampling instrument in order to match the slopes of the deep atmospheric water vapor features that dominate the 0.7-2.3 micrometer regions. The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) is calibrated in the laboratory to determine the wavelength position and full-width-half-maximum (FWHM) response for each of the 224 channels. The accuracies are limited by the quality of the monochromator used as a source. The accuracies vary from plus or minus to plus or minus 1.5 nm depending on the wavelength region, in general decreasing with increasing wavelength. Green et al. make corrections to the wavelength calibrations by using the known positions of 14 atmospheric absorption features throughout the 0.4-2.5 micrometer wavelength region. These features, having varying width and intensity, were matched to the MODTRAN model with a non-linear least squares fitting algorithm. A complete calibration was developed for all 224 channels by interpolation. Instrument calibration cannot be assumed to be stable to 0.1 nm over a flight season given the rigors of thermal cycling and launch and landing loads. The upcoming sensor HYDICE will require a means for in-flight spectral calibration of each scene because the calibration is both temperature and pressure sensitive. In addition, any sensor using a two-dimensional array has the potential for systematic wavelength shifts as a function of cross-track position, commonly called 'smile'. Therefore, a rapid means for calibrating complete images will be required. The following describes a method for determining instrument wavelength calibration using atmospheric absorption features that is efficient enough to be used for entire images on workstations. This study shows the effect of the surface reflectance on

  8. Observations of Venus at 1-meter wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, Bryan J.

    2014-11-01

    Radio wavelength observations of Venus (including from the Magellan spacecraft) have been a powerful method of probing its surface and atmosphere since the 1950's. The emission is generally understood to come from a combination of emission and absorption in the subsurface, surface, and atmosphere at cm and shorter wavelengths [1]. There is, however, a long-standing mystery regarding the long wavelength emission from Venus. First discovered at wavelengths of 50 cm and greater [2], the effect was later confirmed to extend to wavelengths as short as 13 cm [1,3]. The brightness temperatures are depressed significantly 50 K around 10-20 cm, increasing to as much as 200 K around 1 m) from what one would expect from a "normal" surface (e.g., similar to the Moon or Earth) [1-3].No simple surface and subsurface model of Venus can reproduce these large depressions in the long wavelength emission [1-3]. Simple atmospheric and ionospheric models fail similarly. In an attempt to constrain the brightness temperature spectrum more fully, new observations have been made at wavelengths that cover the range 60 cm to 1.3 m at the Very Large Array, using the newly available low-band receiving systems there [4]. The new observations were made over a very wide wavelength range and at several Venus phases, with that wide parameter space coverage potentially allowing us to pinpoint the cause of the phenomenon. The observations and potential interpretations will be presented and discussed.[1] Butler et al. 2001, Icarus, 154, 226. [2] Schloerb et al. 1976, Icarus, 29, 329; Muhleman et al. 1973, ApJ, 183, 1081; Condon et al. 1973, ApJ, 183, 1075; Kuzmin 1965, Radiophysics. [3] Butler & Sault 2003, IAUSS, 1E, 17B. [4] Intema et al. 2014, BASI, 1.

  9. Infrared absorption mechanisms of black silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhengxi; Chen, Yongping; Ma, Bin

    2014-09-01

    Black silicon has a wide spectrum of non-spectral characteristics high absorption from visible to long wave infrared band .Based on semi-empirical impurity band model, free carrier absorption, radiation transitions between the valence band and the impurity band, radiation transitions between the impurity band and the conduction band were calculated, and absorption coefficients for each process were got. The results showed that the transitions from valence band to the impurity band induced absorption in the near-infrared waveband, but it has a rapid decay with wavelength. In the shortwave mid-wave and long-wave IR bands, transitions from the impurity band to the conduction band caused a huge absorption, and the absorption coefficient was slowly decreased with increasing wavelength. The free carrier absorption dominates in long-wave band. The calculation results agreed well with the test results of plant black silicon in magnitude and trends.

  10. In-vitro investigations to compare various laser wavelengths for laser-induced interstitial thermotherapy (LITT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesecke von Rheinbaben, Ingolf; Roggan, Andre; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents in vitro investigations to compare three different wavelengths used to LITT on the basis of coagulation efficiency, maximum temperature and maximum coagulation volume. The results led us to the conclusion that wavelengths with a smaller penetration depth show a higher coagulation efficiency but a smaller maximum coagulation volume.

  11. Light absorption measurements: new techniques.

    PubMed

    Hänel, G; Busen, R; Hillenbrand, C; Schloss, R

    1982-02-01

    A new radiometer is described which simplifies measurement of the radiation supply of solar wavelengths. Two methods of measuring the radiant energy absorbed by aerosol particles are described: A photometric technique is used for particles collected on filters, and a calorimetric technique is used for in situ measurements. Data collected with the radiometer and the light absorption techniques yield the heating rate of the atmosphere due to light absorption by the particles. Sample measurements show substantial atmospheric temperature increases due to absorption, especially in industrial regions.

  12. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  13. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  14. Potential benefits of triethylamine as n-electron donor in the estimation of forskolin by electronic absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Gajula; Ram Reddy, A.

    2016-02-01

    Diterpenoid forskolin was isolated from Coleus forskolii. The electronic absorption and emission studies of forskolin were investigated in various solvents with an aim to improve its detection limits. The two chromophores present in the diterpenoid are not conjugated leading to the poor absorption and emission of UV light. The absorption and fluorescence spectra were solvent specific. In the presence of a monodentate ligand, triethylamine the detection of forskolin is improved by 3.63 times in ethanol with the fluorescence method and 3.36 times in DMSO by the absorption spectral method. The longer wavelength absorption maximum is blue shifted while the lower energy fluorescence maximum is red shifted in the presence of triethylamine. From the wavelength of fluorescence maxima of the exciplex formed between excited forskolin and triethylamine it is concluded that the order of reactivity of hydroxyl groups in the excited state forskolin is in the reverse order to that of the order of the reactivity of hydroxyl groups in its ground state.

  15. Wavelength-band-tuning photodiodes by using various metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J D; Chan, Y D; Chou, T C

    2015-11-20

    Wavelength-band tuning was easily achieved in this work by depositing various metallic nanoparticles (NPs) on silicon p-n junction photodiodes (PDs). The normalization spectrum of the PDs deposited with gold (Au) NPs reveals a high-wavelength pass characteristic; the PDs with silver (Ag) NPs coating behave as a low-wavelength pass, and the PDs with Au/Ag bimetallic NPs appear as a band-wavelength pass PD with a full width at half maximum of 450 ∼ 630 nm. The issue of wavelength-band tuning is due to the different plasmonic resonance wavelengths associated with various metallic NPs. The extinction plot shows the Au NPs have a longer resonant wavelength of about 545 nm, leading to the incident light with a wavelength near or longer than 545 nm scattered by the Au NPs, hence a high-wavelength pass PD. The PDs with Ag NPs, due to the Ag NPs, exhibit a short resonant wavelength of 430 nm, and the short-wavelength incident light is absorbed near the silicon (Si) surface, where the Ag NPs is atop it. The shorter-wavelength incident light is enhanced by the plasmonic resonance of Ag NPs, making a low-wavelength PD. The Au/Ag NPs presents a resonant wavelength of 500 nm between the Au and Ag NPs. For the incident light with a wavelength close to 500 nm, a constructive interference causes a substantial increase in the local electromagnetic field, hence leading to a band-wavelength pass PD. PMID:26508114

  16. Wavelength-band-tuning photodiodes by using various metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J D; Chan, Y D; Chou, T C

    2015-11-20

    Wavelength-band tuning was easily achieved in this work by depositing various metallic nanoparticles (NPs) on silicon p-n junction photodiodes (PDs). The normalization spectrum of the PDs deposited with gold (Au) NPs reveals a high-wavelength pass characteristic; the PDs with silver (Ag) NPs coating behave as a low-wavelength pass, and the PDs with Au/Ag bimetallic NPs appear as a band-wavelength pass PD with a full width at half maximum of 450 ∼ 630 nm. The issue of wavelength-band tuning is due to the different plasmonic resonance wavelengths associated with various metallic NPs. The extinction plot shows the Au NPs have a longer resonant wavelength of about 545 nm, leading to the incident light with a wavelength near or longer than 545 nm scattered by the Au NPs, hence a high-wavelength pass PD. The PDs with Ag NPs, due to the Ag NPs, exhibit a short resonant wavelength of 430 nm, and the short-wavelength incident light is absorbed near the silicon (Si) surface, where the Ag NPs is atop it. The shorter-wavelength incident light is enhanced by the plasmonic resonance of Ag NPs, making a low-wavelength PD. The Au/Ag NPs presents a resonant wavelength of 500 nm between the Au and Ag NPs. For the incident light with a wavelength close to 500 nm, a constructive interference causes a substantial increase in the local electromagnetic field, hence leading to a band-wavelength pass PD.

  17. Wavelength-band-tuning photodiodes by using various metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. D.; Chan, Y. D.; Chou, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    Wavelength-band tuning was easily achieved in this work by depositing various metallic nanoparticles (NPs) on silicon p-n junction photodiodes (PDs). The normalization spectrum of the PDs deposited with gold (Au) NPs reveals a high-wavelength pass characteristic; the PDs with silver (Ag) NPs coating behave as a low-wavelength pass, and the PDs with Au/Ag bimetallic NPs appear as a band-wavelength pass PD with a full width at half maximum of 450 ∼ 630 nm. The issue of wavelength-band tuning is due to the different plasmonic resonance wavelengths associated with various metallic NPs. The extinction plot shows the Au NPs have a longer resonant wavelength of about 545 nm, leading to the incident light with a wavelength near or longer than 545 nm scattered by the Au NPs, hence a high-wavelength pass PD. The PDs with Ag NPs, due to the Ag NPs, exhibit a short resonant wavelength of 430 nm, and the short-wavelength incident light is absorbed near the silicon (Si) surface, where the Ag NPs is atop it. The shorter-wavelength incident light is enhanced by the plasmonic resonance of Ag NPs, making a low-wavelength PD. The Au/Ag NPs presents a resonant wavelength of 500 nm between the Au and Ag NPs. For the incident light with a wavelength close to 500 nm, a constructive interference causes a substantial increase in the local electromagnetic field, hence leading to a band-wavelength pass PD.

  18. Light absorption properties and absorption budget of Southeast Pacific waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricaud, Annick; Babin, Marcel; Claustre, Hervé; Ras, JoséPhine; TièChe, Fanny

    2010-08-01

    Absorption coefficients of phytoplankton, nonalgal particles (NAPs), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and their relative contributions to total light absorption, are essential variables for bio-optical and biogeochemical models. However, their actual variations in the open ocean remain poorly documented, particularly for clear waters because of the difficulty in measuring very low absorption coefficients. The Biogeochemistry and Optics South Pacific Experiment (BIOSOPE) cruise investigated a large range of oceanic regimes, from mesotrophic waters around the Marquesas Islands to hyperoligotrophic waters in the subtropical gyre and eutrophic waters in the upwelling area off Chile. The spectral absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAPs were determined using the filter technique, while the CDOM absorption coefficients were measured using a 2 m capillary waveguide. Over the whole transect, the absorption coefficients of both dissolved and particulate components covered approximately two orders of magnitude; in the gyre, they were among the lowest ever reported for open ocean waters. In the oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAPs were notably lower than those measured in other oceanic areas with similar chlorophyll contents, indicating some deviation from the standard chlorophyll-absorption relationships. The contribution of absorption by NAPs to total particulate absorption showed large vertical and horizontal variations. CDOM absorption coefficients covaried with algal biomass, albeit with a high scatter. The spectral slopes of both NAP and CDOM absorption revealed structured spatial variability in relation with the trophic conditions. The relative contributions of each component to total nonwater absorption were (at a given wavelength) weakly variable over the transect, at least within the euphotic layer.

  19. Wavelength dependence of characteristics of 1. 2-1. 55. mu. m InGaAsP/InP P-substrate buried crescent laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Kakimoto, S.; Takemoto, A.; Sakakibara, Y.; Nakajima, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Namizaki, H.; Higuchi, H.; Yamamoto, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Various wavelength laser diodes with p-substrate buried crescent (PBC) structure have been fabricated at 1.2-1.55 ..mu..m. The dependences of laser characteristics on wavelength have been measured. Up to 70/sup 0/C, the increasing rates of the threshold current with temperature of these lasers are similar, while, above 70/sup 0/C, a shorter wavelength laser shows a larger increasing rate. At the same full width at half maximum of the far-field pattern perpendicular to the junction plane, the external differential quantum efficiency of 1.55 ..mu..m laser diode is found to be only 10 percent smaller than that of the 1.3 ..mu..m laser. The absorption loss coefficients in the active layer of 1.2, 1.3, and 1.55 ..mu..m laser are estimated to be 26, 34, and 73 cm/sup -1/, respectively.

  20. Absorption spectrum of the firefly luciferin anion isolated in vacuo.

    PubMed

    Støchkel, Kristian; Milne, Bruce F; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2011-03-24

    The excited-state physics of the firefly luciferin anion depends on its chemical environment, and it is therefore important to establish the intrinsic behavior of the bare ion. Here we report electronic absorption spectra of the anion isolated in vacuo obtained at an electrostatic ion storage ring and an accelerator mass spectrometer where ionic dissociation is monitored on a long time scale (from 33 μs and up to 3 ms) and on a short time scale (0-3 μs), respectively. In the ring experiment the yield of all neutrals (mainly CO(2)) as a function of wavelength was measured whereas in the single pass experiment, the abundance of daughter ions formed after loss of CO(2) was recorded to provide action spectra. We find maxima at 535 and 265 nm, and that the band shape is largely determined by the sampling time interval, which is due to the kinetics of the dissociation process. Calculations at the TD-B3LYP/TZVPP++ level predict maximum absorption at 533 and 275 nm for the carboxylate isomer in excellent agreement with the experimental findings. The phenolate isomer lies higher in energy by 0.22 eV, and also its absorption maximum is calculated to be at 463 nm, which is far away from the experimental value. Our data serve to benchmark future theoretical models for bioluminescence from fireflies.

  1. Effective absorption in cladding-pumped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, Michalis N.; Marshall, Andy; Kim, Jaesun

    2011-02-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the wavelength dependence of the pump absorption along Yb3+-doped fibers, for cladding-pumped single as well as coupled multimode (GTWaveTM) fibers. We show that significant spectral absorption distortions occur along the length with the 976nm absorption peak affected the most. We have developed a novel theoretical approach, based on coupled mode theory, to explain the observed effects. We have also investigated the mode mixing requirements in order to improve the absorption spectral distribution along the increase the overall absorption efficiency and discuss the implications on fiber laser performance.

  2. Characteristic wavelength of textile fiber in near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Hongnian; Jin, Shangzhong; Gan, Bin

    2006-01-01

    Near Infrared (NIR) spectroscopy in the region from 1300 to 1700nm, coupled with multivariate analytic statistical techniques, have been used to predict the chemical properties of textile fiber. Molecule absorbs electromagnetic wave with especial wavelength, which leads to bring characteristic absorption spectrum. Characteristic wavelength is the most important parameter in NIR detection. How to select characteristic wavelength is the key to NIR measure. Different mathematical methods are used to find relationship between the NIR absorption spectrum and the chemical properties of the textile fiber. We adopt stepwise multiple linear regression (SMLR) to select characteristic wavelength. As objective condition is limited, this article only refers to cotton and terylene. By computing correlation coefficient, we establish calibration equation with the smoothed absorbance data. Finally, the bias was controlled under 6%. Then, we find that NIR can be used to carry on qualitative analysis and quantitative analysis of the textile.

  3. High-efficiency Tm-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser pumped with a wavelength-locked laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. Z.; Huang, J. H.; Liu, H. G.; Dai, S. T.; Weng, W.; Zheng, H.; Ge, Y.; Li, J. H.; Deng, J.; Yang, X.; Lin, W. X.

    2016-09-01

    We first demonstrate a high-efficiency composite Tm-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser end-pumped with a narrow-linewidth laser diode, which was locked at a wavelength of 784.9 nm with volume Bragg gratings. The locked pump wavelength was experimentally determined by the excitation peak, which was also the absorption peak of a 3.5 at.% Tm:YAG crystal around 785 nm, for the improvement of laser efficiency under high-intensity pumping. Under an absorbed pump power of 24.64 W, a maximum output power of 11.12 W at 2018 nm was obtained, corresponding to an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 45.1% and a slope efficiency of 52.4%.

  4. Short wavelength laser

    DOEpatents

    Hagelstein, Peter L.

    1986-01-01

    A short wavelength laser (28) is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses (30, 31). A multiplicity of panels (32), mounted on substrates (34), are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path (42). When the panels (32) are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses (30, 31), single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses (44, 46) are produced.

  5. Large Absorption Enhancement in Ultrathin Solar Cells Patterned by Metallic Nanocavity Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jiasen; Che, Xiaozhou; Qin, Guogang

    2016-10-01

    A new type of light trapping structure utilizing ring-shaped metallic nanocavity arrays is proposed for the absorption enhancement in ultrathin solar cells with few photonic waveguide modes. Dozens of times of broadband absorption enhancement in the spectral range of 700 to 1100 nm is demonstrated in an ultrathin Si3N4/c-Si/Ag prototype solar cell by means of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and this dramatic absorption enhancement can be attributed to the excitation of plasmonic cavity modes in these nanocavity arrays. The cavity modes optimally compensate for the lack of resonances in the longer wavelength range for ultrathin solar cells, and eventually a maximum Jsc enhancement factor of 2.15 is achieved under AM 1.5G solar illumination. This study opens a new perspective for light management in thin film solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  6. Optical absorption and emission characterization of P3HT: graphene composite for its prospective photovoltaic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Joginder; Prasad, Neetu; Nirwal, Varun Singh; Gautam, Khyati; Peta, Koteswara Rao; Bhatnagar, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, regioregular P3HT (Poly (3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl) was blended with graphene nanopowder and the optical spectroscopic characterization of the composite has been performed. It was observed that at low concentration of graphene (up to 0.1 wt %) there is no significant variation in absorption intensity or wavelength range. But at higher concentration (> 0.1 wt %) the absorption intensity starts reducing. Whereas, the photoluminescence of the composite solution quenches as we increase the concentration of graphene. It reveals that charge recombination decreases with increase in concentration (0.05 to 0.5 wt %) of graphene. Therefore 0.1 wt % seems to be the optimized concentration of graphene in the composite for which appropriate quenching of PL was observed without any significant reduction in absorption of photons. Thus maximum efficiency in P3HT: graphene composite photovoltaic cell is expected for 0.1 wt % of graphene concentration in our typical case.

  7. Large Absorption Enhancement in Ultrathin Solar Cells Patterned by Metallic Nanocavity Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Jiasen; Che, Xiaozhou; Qin, Guogang

    2016-01-01

    A new type of light trapping structure utilizing ring-shaped metallic nanocavity arrays is proposed for the absorption enhancement in ultrathin solar cells with few photonic waveguide modes. Dozens of times of broadband absorption enhancement in the spectral range of 700 to 1100 nm is demonstrated in an ultrathin Si3N4/c-Si/Ag prototype solar cell by means of finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation, and this dramatic absorption enhancement can be attributed to the excitation of plasmonic cavity modes in these nanocavity arrays. The cavity modes optimally compensate for the lack of resonances in the longer wavelength range for ultrathin solar cells, and eventually a maximum Jsc enhancement factor of 2.15 is achieved under AM 1.5G solar illumination. This study opens a new perspective for light management in thin film solar cells and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:27703176

  8. Distance and plasmon wavelength dependent fluorescence of molecules bound to silica-coated gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Abadeer, Nardine S; Brennan, Marshall R; Wilson, William L; Murphy, Catherine J

    2014-08-26

    Plasmonic nanoparticles can strongly interact with adjacent fluorophores, resulting in plasmon-enhanced fluorescence or fluorescence quenching. This dipolar coupling is dependent upon nanoparticle composition, distance between the fluorophore and the plasmonic surface, the transition dipole orientation, and the degree of spectral overlap between the fluorophore's absorbance/emission and the surface plasmon band of the nanoparticles. In this work, we examine the distance and plasmon wavelength dependent fluorescence of an infrared dye ("IRDye") bound to silica-coated gold nanorods. Nanorods with plasmon band maxima ranging from 530 to 850 nm are synthesized and then coated with mesoporous silica shells 11-26 nm thick. IRDye is covalently attached to the nanoparticle surface via a click reaction. Steady-state fluorescence measurements demonstrate plasmon wavelength and silica shell thickness dependent fluorescence emission. Maximum fluorescence intensity, with approximately 10-fold enhancement, is observed with 17 nm shells when the nanorod plasmon maximum is resonant with IRDye absorption. Time-resolved photoluminescence reveals multiexponential decay and a sharp reduction in fluorescence lifetime with decreasing silica shell thickness and when the plasmon maximum is closer to IRDye absorption/emission. Control experiments are carried out to confirm that the observed changes in fluorescence are due to plasmonic interactions, is simply surface attachment. There is no change in fluorescence intensity or lifetime when IRDye is bound to mesoporous silica nanoparticles. In addition, IRDye loading is limited to maintain a distance between dye molecules on the surface to more than 9 nm, well above the Förster radius. This assures minimal dye-dye interactions on the surface of the nanoparticles.

  9. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  10. Carbon dioxide on the satellites of Saturn: Results from the Cassini VIMS investigation and revisions to the VIMS wavelength scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cruikshank, D.P.; Meyer, A.W.; Brown, R.H.; Clark, R.N.; Jaumann, R.; Stephan, K.; Hibbitts, C.A.; Sandford, S.A.; Mastrapa, R.M.E.; Filacchione, G.; Ore, C.M.D.; Nicholson, P.D.; Buratti, B.J.; McCord, T.B.; Nelson, R.M.; Dalton, J.B.; Baines, K.H.; Matson, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    response profiles with a deep atmospheric CO2 absorption profile, producing distorted detector profile shapes and shifted central positions. In a laboratory blackbody spectrum used for radiance calibration, close examination of the CO2 absorption profile shows a similar deviation from that expected from a model. These modeled effects appear to be sufficient to explain the distortion in the existing wavelength calibration now in use. A modification to the wavelength calibration for 13 adjacent bands is provided. The affected channels span about 0.2 ??m centered on 4.28 ??m. The maximum wavelength change is about 10 nm toward longer wavelength. This adjustment has implications for interpretation of some of the spectral features observed in the affected wavelength interval, such as from CO2, as discussed in this paper.

  11. Laser wavelength comparison by high resolution interferometry.

    PubMed

    Layer, H P; Deslattes, R D; Schweitzer, W G

    1976-03-01

    High resolution interferometry has been used to determine the wavelength ratio between two molecularly stabilized He-Ne lasers, one locked to a methane absorption at 3.39 microm and the other locked to the k peak of (129)I(2) at 633 nm. An optical beat frequency technique gave fractional orders while a microwave sideband method yielded the integer parts. Conventional (third derivative) peak seeking servoes stabilized both laser and cavity lengths. Reproducibility of the electronic control system and optics was a few parts in 10(12), while systematic errors associated with curvature of the cavity mirrors limited the accuracy of the wavelength ratio measurement to 2 parts in 10(10). The measured wavelength ratio of the methane stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 microm [P(7) line, nu(3) band] to the (129)I(2) (k peak) stabilized He-Ne laser at 633 nm was 5.359 049 260 6 (0.000 2 ppm). This ratio agrees with that calculated from the (lower accuracy) results of earlier wavelength measurements made relative to the (86)Kr standard. Its higher accuracy thus permits a provisional extension of the frequency scale based on the cesium oscillator into the visible spectrum.

  12. Color Matters—Material Ejection and Ion Yields in UV-MALDI Mass Spectrometry as a Function of Laser Wavelength and Laser Fluence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltwisch, Jens; Jaskolla, Thorsten W.; Dreisewerd, Klaus

    2013-10-01

    The success of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) as a widely employed analytical tool in the biomolecular sciences builds strongly on an effective laser-material interaction that is resulting in a soft co-desorption and ionization of matrix and imbedded biomolecules. To obtain a maximized ion yield for the analyte(s) of interest, in general both wavelength and fluence need to be tuned to match the specific optical absorption profile of the used matrix. However, commonly only lasers with fixed emission wavelengths of either 337 or 355 nm are used for MALDI-MS. Here, we employed a wavelength-tunable dye laser and recorded both the neutral material ejection and the MS ion data in a wide wavelength and fluence range between 280 and 377.5 nm. α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA), 4-chloro-α-cyanocinnamic acid (ClCCA), α-cyano-2,4-difluorocinnamic acid (DiFCCA), and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) were investigated as matrices, and several peptides as analytes. Recording of the material ejection was achieved by adopting a photoacoustic approach. Relative ion yields were derived by division of photoacoustic and ion signals. In this way, distinct wavelength/fluence regions can be identified for which maximum ion yields were obtained. For the tested matrices, optimal results were achieved for wavelengths corresponding to areas of high optical absorption of the respective matrix and at fluences about a factor of 2-3 above the matrix- and wavelength-dependent ion detection threshold fluences. The material ejection as probed by the photoacoustic method is excellently fitted by the quasithermal model, while a sigmoidal function allows for an empirical description of the ion signal-fluence relationship.

  13. Active Wavelength Control of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tracy; Wysocki, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    We present an active wavelength control system for grating-based external cavity lasers that increases the accuracy of predicting the lasing wavelength based on the grating equation and significantly improves scan-to-scan wavelength/frequency repeatability. The ultimate 3σ precision of a frequency scan is determined by the scan-to-scan repeatability of 0.042 cm−1. Since this control method can be applied to any external cavity laser with little to no modification, such a precision provides an excellent opportunity for spectroscopic applications that target molecular absorption lines at standard atmospheric conditions. PMID:23483850

  14. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  15. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  16. Effects of size-dependent emissivity on maximum temperatures during micrometeorite entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizk, B.; Hunten, D. M.; Engel, S.

    1991-02-01

    The effects of adopting the absorption efficiencies predicted by the Mie theory for spheres on the maximum temperature of pure olivine and pure iron micrometeorites entering the earth's atmosphere and pure water ice micrometeorites entering the Uranian atmosphere are examined numerically. It is found that particles of micron and submicron size with the optical properties that characterize these substances tend not to radiate away their frictional heat of entry as efficiently as classical micrometeorite theory predicts. Consequently, the degree to which these particles are heated and altered during entry is increased. It is concluded that micron and submicron-sized particles are more realistically treated as Mie spheres than as blackbodies, when accurate values exist for the imaginary index of refraction at wavelengths of a few microns.

  17. Solar cells based on particulate structure of active layer: Investigation of light absorption by an ordered system of spherical submicron silicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Enhancement of the performance of photovoltaic cells through increasing light absorption due to optimization of an active layer is considered. The optimization consists in creation of particulate structure of active layer. The ordered monolayers and multilayers of submicron crystalline silicon (c-Si) spherical particles are examined. The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used to calculate light absorption in the wavelength range from 0.28 μm to 1.12 μm. The integrated over the terrestial solar spectral irradiance "Global tilt" ASTM G173-03 absorption coefficient is calculated. In the wavelength range of small absorption index of c-Si (0.8-1.12 μm) the integral absorption coefficient of monolayer can be more than 20 times higher than the one of the plane-parallel plate of the equivalent volume of material. In the overall considered range (0.28-1.12 μm) the enhancement factor up to ~1.45 for individual monolayer is observed. Maximum value of the spectral absorption coefficient approaches unity for multilayers consisting of large amount of sparse monolayers of small particles. Multilayers with variable concentration and size of particles in the monolayer sequences are considered. Absorption increasing by such gradient multilayers as compared to the non-gradient ones is illustrated. The considered structures are promising for creation of high efficiency thin-film solar cells.

  18. Five-Channel Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Combustion Product Monitoring Aboard Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Borgentun, Carl E.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous combustion product monitoring aboard manned spacecraft can prevent chronic exposure to hazardous compounds and also provides early detection of combustion events. As future missions extend beyond low-Earth orbit, analysis of returned environmental samples becomes impractical and safety monitoring should be performed in situ. Here, we describe initial designs of a five-channel tunable laser absorption spectrometer to continuously monitor combustion products with the goal of minimal maintenance and calibration over long-duration missions. The instrument incorporates dedicated laser channels to simultaneously target strong mid-infrared absorption lines of CO, HCl, HCN, HF, and CO2. The availability of low-power-consumption semiconductor lasers operating in the 2 to 5 micron wavelength range affords the flexibility to select absorption lines for each gas with maximum interaction strength and minimal interference from other gases, which enables the design of a compact and mechanically robust spectrometer with low-level sensitivity. In this paper, we focus primarily on absorption line selection based on the availability of low-power single-mode semiconductor laser sources designed specifically for the target wavelength range.

  19. Quadrature wavelength scanning interferometry.

    PubMed

    Moschetti, Giuseppe; Forbes, Alistair; Leach, Richard K; Jiang, Xiang; O'Connor, Daniel

    2016-07-10

    A novel method to double the measurement range of wavelength scanning interferometery (WSI) is described. In WSI the measured optical path difference (OPD) is affected by a sign ambiguity, that is, from an interference signal it is not possible to distinguish whether the OPD is positive or negative. The sign ambiguity can be resolved by measuring an interference signal in quadrature. A method to obtain a quadrature interference signal for WSI is described, and a theoretical analysis of the advantages is reported. Simulations of the advantages of the technique and of signal errors due to nonideal quadrature are discussed. The analysis and simulation are supported by experimental measurements to show the improved performances. PMID:27409307

  20. Comets at radio wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovisier, Jacques; Bockelée-Morvan, Dominique; Colom, Pierre; Biver, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Comets are considered as the most primitive objects in the Solar System. Their composition provides information on the composition of the primitive solar nebula, 4.6 Gyr ago. The radio domain is a privileged tool to study the composition of cometary ices. Observations of the OH radical at 18 cm wavelength allow us to measure the water production rate. A wealth of molecules (and some of their isotopologues) coming from the sublimation of ices in the nucleus have been identified by observations in the millimetre and submillimetre domains. We present an historical review on radio observations of comets, focusing on the results from our group, and including recent observations with the Nançay radio telescope, the IRAM antennas, the Odin satellite, the Herschel space observatory, ALMA, and the MIRO instrument aboard the Rosetta space probe. xml:lang="fr"

  1. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  2. The last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  3. The Last Glacial Maximum.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter U; Dyke, Arthur S; Shakun, Jeremy D; Carlson, Anders E; Clark, Jorie; Wohlfarth, Barbara; Mitrovica, Jerry X; Hostetler, Steven W; McCabe, A Marshall

    2009-08-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level approximately 14.5 ka.

  4. Theoretical investigation of all-metal-based mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-12-01

    High-performance wavelength-selective infrared (IR) sensors require small pixel structures, a low-thermal mass, and operation in the middle-wavelength infrared (MWIR) and long-wavelength infrared (LWIR) regions for multicolor IR imaging. All-metal-based mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) were investigated theoretically and were designed to enhance the performance of wavelength-selective uncooled IR sensors. All components of the MPMAs are based on thin layers of metals such as Au without oxide insulators for increased absorption. The absorption properties of the MPMAs were investigated by rigorous coupled-wave analysis. Strong wavelength-selective absorption is realized over a wide range of MWIR and LWIR wavelengths by the plasmonic resonance of the micropatch and the narrow-gap resonance, without disturbance from the intrinsic absorption of oxide insulators. The absorption wavelength is defined mainly by the micropatch size and is longer than its period. The metal post width has less impact on the absorption properties and can maintain single-mode operation. Through-holes can be formed on the plate area to reduce the thermal mass. A small pixel size with reduced thermal mass and wideband single-mode operation can be realized using all-metal-based MPMAs.

  5. Correlations between absorption Angström exponent (AAE) of wintertime ambient urban aerosol and its physical and chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Filep, Á.; Pintér, M.; Török, Zs.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-07-01

    Based on a two-week measurement campaign in an environment heavily polluted both by transit traffic and household heating in the inner city of Szeged (Hungary), correlations between the absorption Angström exponent (AAE) fitted to the optical absorption coefficients measured with a four wavelength (1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm) photoacoustic aerosol measuring system (4λ-PAS) and various aerosol parameters were identified. AAE was found to depend linearly on OCwb/EC and on NGM100/NGMD20, i.e. on the ratio of mass concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) to the fraction of organic carbon associated with wood burning (OCwb), and on the ratio of aerosol number concentrations in the 20 nm (NGMD20) to 100 nm (NGMD100) modes, with a regression coefficient of R = 0.95 and R = 0.86, respectively. In the daily fluctuation of AAE two minima were identified, which coincide with the morning and afternoon rush hours, during which NGMD20 exhibits maximum values. During the campaign the shape of the aerosol volume size distribution (dV/dlogD) was found to be largely invariant, supporting the assumption that the primary driver for the AAE variation was aerosol chemical composition rather than particle size. Furthermore, when wavelength segregated AAE values were calculated, AAE for the shorter wavelengths (AAE355-266) was also found to depend linearly on the above mentioned ratios with similar regression coefficients but with a much steeper correlation line, while the AAE for the longer wavelengths (AAE1064-532) exhibits only a considerably weaker correlation. These results prove the unique advantages of real time multi-wavelength photoacoustic measurement of optical absorption in case the wavelength range includes the ultra-violet too.

  6. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harremoeës, P.; Topsøe, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural

  7. Internal to external wavelength calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash C.

    1999-01-01

    The spectra of Hen 1357 (the Stingray nebula) were used to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the STIS first order CCD modes. The radial velocity of the Stingray nebula is known to high accuracy (< 1 km/sec) and the line with of the nebular line is very narrow (< 8 km/sec for the integrated nebula). Thus the observations of the Stingray nebula are ideal to check the internal to external wavelength calibration of the first order modes. The observations were taken in G430L and G750M modes using a 52 x 0.05 arcsec slit covering the wavelength range 2900 to 5700 A and 6295 to 6867 A, respectively. The observed wavelength range includes many nebular emission lines. The wavelengths of the nebular lines derived using the pipeline internal wavelength calibration were compared with the wavelengths derived from other ground based observations. In all cases, the wavelength match between the two is of the same order as the accuracy to which the line center can be measured. These results imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibrations for these modes. The HDF-S QSO observations were also used for this test both for the first order and the Echelle modes. The results of the HDF-S QSO observations further confirm the above finding for the first order modes, and imply that there is no significant offset between the internal and external wavelength calibration for the Echelle modes.

  8. The Solar Maximum observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The successful retrieval and repair of the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite by Shuttle astronauts in April 1984 permitted continuance of solar flare observations that began in 1980. The SMM carries a soft X ray polychromator, gamma ray, UV and hard X ray imaging spectrometers, a coronagraph/polarimeter and particle counters. The data gathered thus far indicated that electrical potentials of 25 MeV develop in flares within 2 sec of onset. X ray data show that flares are composed of compressed magnetic loops that have come too close together. Other data have been taken on mass ejection, impacts of electron beams and conduction fronts with the chromosphere and changes in the solar radiant flux due to sunspots.

  9. Demonstration of differential backscatter absorption gas imaging.

    PubMed

    Powers, P E; Kulp, T J; Kennedy, R

    2000-03-20

    Backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) is a technique that uses infrared active imaging to generate real-time video imagery of gas plumes. We describe a method that employs imaging at two wavelengths (absorbed and not absorbed by the gas to be detected) to allow wavelength-differential BAGI. From the frames collected at each wavelength, an absorbance image is created that displays the differential absorbance of the atmosphere between the imager and the backscatter surface. This is analogous to a two-dimensional topographic differential absorption lidar or differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurement. Gas plumes are displayed, but the topographic scene image is removed. This allows a more effective display of the plume image, thus ensuring detection under a wide variety of conditions. The instrument used to generate differential BAGI is described. Data generated by the instrument are presented and analyzed to estimate sensitivity. PMID:18338030

  10. Wavelength-conserving grating router for intermediate wavelength density

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Patel, Rajesh R.; Bond, Steven W.; Bennett, Cory V.

    2007-03-20

    A wavelength router to be used for fiber optical networking router is based on a diffraction grating which utilizes only N wavelengths to interconnect N inputs to N outputs. The basic approach is to augment the grating with additional couplers or wavelength selective elements so than N-1 of the 2N-1 outputs are combined with other N outputs (leaving only N outputs). One embodiment uses directional couplers as combiners. Another embodiment uses wavelength-selective couplers. Another embodiment uses a pair of diffraction gratings to maintain parallel propagation of all optical beams. Also, beam combining can be implemented either by using retroflection back through the grating pair or by using couplers.

  11. THE ABSORPTION OF ADRENALIN

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, D. Murray

    1923-01-01

    1. Adrenalin solution given subcutaneously is usually rapidly absorbed, probably by lymphatic channels. 2. The speed of this process may be influenced by the circulation rate. 3. The relative amounts of adrenalin at any moment unabsorbed at the site of inoculation, carried in the circulating fluids, and taken up by the reacting tissues can be calculated from figures extracted from the curve of the blood pressure changes. The relative rates of transference of adrenalin into the blood and from the circulation into the tissues can also be estimated. 4. When absorption takes place rapidly a large quantity of the drug comes into action at once and the maximum occurs early, the curve of blood pressure reaches a considerable height, and subsides quickly. When absorption is slow the apex appears later and does not reach so high a level. 5. The response to adrenalin bears a logarithmic relationship to the dose employed and a method of allowing for this is indicated. PMID:19868816

  12. The Enhanced Light Absorptance and Device Application of Nanostructured Black Silicon Fabricated by Metal-assisted Chemical Etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hao; Guo, Anran; Guo, Guohui; Li, Wei; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-07-01

    We use metal-assisted chemical etching (MCE) method to fabricate nanostructured black silicon on the surface of C-Si. The Si-PIN photoelectronic detector based on this type of black silicon shows excellent device performance with a responsivity of 0.57 A/W at 1060 nm. Silicon nanocone arrays can be created using MCE treatment. These modified surfaces show higher light absorptance in the near-infrared range (800 to 2500 nm) compared to that of C-Si with polished surfaces, and the variations in the absorption spectra of the nanostructured black silicon with different etching processes are obtained. The maximum light absorptance increases significantly up to 95 % in the wavelength range of 400 to 2500 nm. Our recent novel results clearly indicate that nanostructured black silicon made by MCE has potential application in near-infrared photoelectronic detectors.

  13. Generalized Maximum Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John

    2005-01-01

    A long standing mystery in using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) is how to deal with constraints whose values are uncertain. This situation arises when constraint values are estimated from data, because of finite sample sizes. One approach to this problem, advocated by E.T. Jaynes [1], is to ignore this uncertainty, and treat the empirically observed values as exact. We refer to this as the classic MaxEnt approach. Classic MaxEnt gives point probabilities (subject to the given constraints), rather than probability densities. We develop an alternative approach that assumes that the uncertain constraint values are represented by a probability density {e.g: a Gaussian), and this uncertainty yields a MaxEnt posterior probability density. That is, the classic MaxEnt point probabilities are regarded as a multidimensional function of the given constraint values, and uncertainty on these values is transmitted through the MaxEnt function to give uncertainty over the MaXEnt probabilities. We illustrate this approach by explicitly calculating the generalized MaxEnt density for a simple but common case, then show how this can be extended numerically to the general case. This paper expands the generalized MaxEnt concept introduced in a previous paper [3].

  14. Maximum bow force revisited.

    PubMed

    Mores, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Schelleng [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 53, 26-41 (1973)], Askenfelt [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 503-516 (1989)], Schumacher [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 96, 1985-1998 (1994)], and Schoonderwaldt, Guettler, and Askenfelt [Acta Acust. Acust. 94, 604-622 (2008)] formulated-in different ways-how the maximum bow force relates to bow velocity, bow-bridge distance, string impedance, and friction coefficients. Issues of uncertainty are how to account for friction or for the rotational admittance of the strings. Related measurements at the respective transitions between regimes of Helmholtz motion and non-Helmholtz motion employ a variety of bowing machines and stringed instruments. The related findings include all necessary parameters except the friction coefficients, leaving the underlying models unconfirmed. Here, a bowing pendulum has been constructed which allows precise measurement of relevant bowing parameters, including the friction coefficients. Two cellos are measured across all strings for three different bow-bridge distances. The empirical data suggest that-taking the diverse elements of existing models as options-Schelleng's model combined with Schumacher's velocity term yields the best fit. Furthermore, the pendulum employs a bow driving mechanism with adaptive impedance which discloses that mentioned regimes are stable and transitions between them sometimes require a hysteresis on related parameters. PMID:27586745

  15. Dynamic wavelength conversion in copropagating slow-light pulses.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Baba, T

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic wavelength conversion (DWC) is obtained by controlling copropagating slow-light signal and control pulse trajectories. Our method is based on the understanding that conventional resonator-based DWC can be generalized, and is linked to cross-phase modulation. Dispersion-engineered Si photonic crystal waveguides produce such slow-light pulses. Free carriers generated by two-photon absorption of the control pulse dynamically shift the signal wavelength. Matching the group velocities of the two pulses enhances the shift, elongating the interaction length. We demonstrate an extremely large wavelength shift in DWC (4.9 nm blueshift) for the signal wavelength. Although DWC is similar to the Doppler effect, we highlight their essential differences. PMID:24949770

  16. Apparatus And Methods For Launching And Receiving A Broad Wavelength Range Source

    DOEpatents

    Von Drasek, William A.; Sonnenfroh, David; Allen, Mark G.; Stafford-Evans, Joy

    2006-02-28

    An apparatus and method for simultaneous detection of N gas species through laser radiation attenuation techniques is disclosed. Each of the N species has a spectral absorption band. N laser sources operate at a wavelength ?N in a spectral absorption band separated by the cutoff wavelength for single-mode transmission. Each laser source corresponds to a gas species and transmits radiation through an optical fiber constructed and arranged to provide single-mode transmission with minimal power loss.

  17. Light absorption enhancement in Ge nanomembrane and its optoelectronic application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Munho; Liu, Shih-Chia; Kim, Tong June; Lee, Jaeseong; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-07-25

    In this study, the light absorption property of Ge nanomembrane (Ge NM), which incorporates hydrogen (H), in near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range was analyzed. Due to the presence of a large amount of structural defects, the light absorption coefficient of the Ge layer becomes much higher (10 times) than that of bulk Ge in the wavelength range of 1000 ~1600 nm. Increased light absorption was further measured from released Ge NM that has H incorporation in comparison to that of bulk Ge, proving the enhanced light absorption coefficient of H incorporated Ge. Finally, metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors were demonstrated using the H incorporated Ge on GeOI.

  18. Composite multiple wavelength laser material and multiple wavelength laser for use therewith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jani, Mahendra G. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A composite multiple wavelength laser material is provided and is typically constructed with a common axis of construction in the form of a rod of uniform cross-section. The rod comprises a plurality of segments of laser material bonded, e.g., diffusion bonded, to one another along the common axis. Each segment lases at a unique wavelength when excited to produce a laser emission. The segments can be made from a birefringent material doped with laser active ions. If the same birefringent host material is used for all segments, ground-state absorption losses can be reduced by terminating either end of the rod with end segments made from undoped pieces of the birefringent material.

  19. Choice of the proper wavelength for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moan, Johan; Iani, Vladimir; Ma, LiWei

    1996-01-01

    All photosensitizers applied in experimental- and clinical-photochemotherapy (PCT) have broad absorption spectra stretching from the ultraviolet up to 6 - 700 nm. Light of wavelengths in the red part of the spectrum is chosen for PCT even though the extinction coefficients of the sensitizers are usually smaller in this wavelength region than at shorter wavelengths. Thus, if one wants to treat superficial tumors or skin disorders, this may be a wrong choice. Two pieces of information are needed in order to make a proper choice of wavelength to treat a lesion of a given depth: the wavelength dependence of the optical penetration depth into tissue, and the action spectrum for tumor destruction. Additionally, the skin photosensitivity induced by the drug should be considered. We have non-invasively measured the optical penetration spectra of human tissues in vivo and the fluorescence excitation spectra for several sensitizers, including protoporphyrin (PpIX), in cells. Assuming that the action spectrum for cell inactivation can be approximated by the fluorescence excitation spectrum of the sensitizer -- which is indeed the case for a number of sensitizers in cells in vitro -- we have considered the situation for 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced PpIX in human tissue. All the way down to about 2 mm below the surface light in the Soret band (-410 nm) would give the largest cell inactivation, while at depth exceeding 2 mm, the conventional 635 nm light would be optimal. Light at the argon laser wavelength 514.5 nm is more efficient than light at 635 nm down to 1 mm. From the surface and down to 6 mm, the 635 nm peak of the excitation spectrum of PpIX, as evaluated per photon incident on the skin surface, is redshifted by less than 2 nm. In some cases photosensitizing photoproducts are formed during PCT, such as photoprotoporphyrin during PCT with PpIX. In such cases it may be advantageous to apply a broad-band light source with a spectrum that covers also part of the action

  20. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  1. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  2. The Long Wavelength Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. B.

    2006-08-01

    The Long Wavelength Array (LWA) will be a new, open, user-oriented astronomical instrument operating in the poorly explored window from 20-80 MHz at arcsecond level resolution and mJy level sensitivity. Key science drivers include (1) acceleration, propagation, and turbulence in the ISM, including the space-distribution and spectrum of Galactic cosmic rays, supernova remnants, and pulsars; (2) the high redshift universe, including the most distant radio galaxies and clusters - tools for understanding the earliest black holes and the cosmological evolution of Dark Matter and Dark Energy; (3) planetary, solar, and space science, including space weather prediction and extra-solar planet searches; and (4) the radio transient universe: including the known (e.g., SNe, GRBs) and the unknown. Because the LWA will explore one of the last and least investigated regions of the spectrum, the potential for new discoveries, including new classes of physical phenomena, is high, and there is a strong synergy with exciting new X-ray and Gamma-ray measurements, e.g. for cosmic ray acceleration, transients, and galaxy clusters. Operated by the University of New Mexico on behalf of the South West Consortium (SWC) the LWA will also provide a unique training ground for the next generation of radio astronomers. Students may also put skills learned on the LWA to work in computer science, electrical engineering, and the communications industry, among others. The development of the LWA will follow a phased build, which benefits from lessons learned at each phase. Four university-based Scientific Testing and Evaluation (ST&E) teams with different areas of concentration (1. High resolution imaging and particle acceleration; 2. Wide field imaging and large scale structures; 3. Ionosphere, and 4. RFI suppression and transient detection) will provide the feedback needed to assure that science objectives are met as the build develops. Currently in its first year of construction funding, the LWA

  3. Micropulse differential absorption lidar for identification of carbon sequestration site leakage.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2013-05-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for identification of carbon dioxide leaks at carbon sequestration sites has been developed and initial data has been collected at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes operating in the continuous-wave mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto-optic modulator is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium-doped fiber amplifier to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 μJ, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 μm. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photomultiplier tube module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL has measured carbon dioxide profiles from 1 to 2.5 km with 60 min temporal averaging. Comparisons of DIAL measurements with a Licor LI-820 gas analyzer point sensor have been made.

  4. Micropulse differential absorption lidar for identification of carbon sequestration site leakage.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2013-05-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for identification of carbon dioxide leaks at carbon sequestration sites has been developed and initial data has been collected at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes operating in the continuous-wave mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto-optic modulator is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium-doped fiber amplifier to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 μJ, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 μm. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photomultiplier tube module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL has measured carbon dioxide profiles from 1 to 2.5 km with 60 min temporal averaging. Comparisons of DIAL measurements with a Licor LI-820 gas analyzer point sensor have been made. PMID:23669765

  5. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement.

    PubMed

    Dobosz, Marek; Kożuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ⋅ 10(-8). Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement. PMID:27131662

  6. Interference comparator for laser diode wavelength and wavelength instability measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobosz, Marek; KoŻuchowski, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Method and construction of a setup, which allows measuring the wavelength and wavelength instability of the light emitted by a laser diode (or a laser light source with a limited time coherence in general), is presented. The system is based on Twyman-Green interferometer configuration. Proportions of phases of the tested and reference laser's interference fringe obtained for a set optical path difference are a measure of the unknown wavelength. Optical path difference in interferometer is stabilized. The interferometric comparison is performed in vacuum chamber. The techniques of accurate fringe phase measurements are proposed. The obtained relative standard uncertainty of wavelength evaluation in the tested setup is about 2.5 ṡ 10-8. Uncertainty of wavelength instability measurement is an order of magnitude better. Measurement range of the current setup is from 500 nm to 650 nm. The proposed technique allows high accuracy wavelength measurement of middle or low coherence sources of light. In case of the enlarged and complex frequency distribution of the laser, the evaluated wavelength can act as the length master in interferometer for displacement measurement.

  7. Long Wavelength Ripples in the Nearshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcinov, T.; Hay, A. E.

    2008-12-01

    Sediment bedforms are ubiquitous in the nearshore environment, and their characteristics and evolution have a direct effect on the hydrodynamics and the rate of sediment transport. The focus of this study is long wavelength ripples (LWR) observed at two locations in the nearshore at roughly 3m water depth under combined current and wave conditions in Duck, North Carolina. LWR are straight-crested bedforms with wavelengths in the range of 20-200cm, and steepness of about 0.1. They occur in the build up and decay of storms, in a broader range of values of the flow parameters compared to other ripple types. The main goal of the study is to test the maximum gross bedform-normal transport (mGBNT) hypothesis, which states that the orientation of ripples in directionally varying flows is such that the gross sediment transport normal to the ripple crest is maximized. Ripple wavelengths and orientation are measured from rotary fanbeam images and current and wave conditions are obtained from electromagnetic (EM) flowmeters and an offshore pressure gauge array. Preliminary tests in which transport direction is estimated from the combined flow velocity vectors indicate that the mGBNT is not a good predictor of LWR orientation. Results from tests of the mGBNT hypothesis using a sediment transport model will be presented.

  8. Wavelength measurement of tunable TEA CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yanchen; Ren, Deming; Hu, Xiaoyong; Liu, Fengmei; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Chunyu

    2005-01-01

    Due to their interesting physical and chemical parameters, tunable transversely excited atmospheric-pressure(TEA) CO2 lasers are widely utilized in scientific and industrial applications. The CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL) is an effective tool for remote measurement of pollutant gaseous concentration of the atmosphere over large areas. Many pollutant gases have strong absorption lines within the spectral range of CO2 laser wavelength tuning. In addition, the radiation of CO2 laser is well distributed in the atmosphere, coinciding with the "transparency window" of the atmosphere. Therefore the wavelength tunable TEA CO2 laser is an ideal optical source for DIAL. Most existing instruments for measuring the laser wavelength are only suitable for the measurement of continuous wave and stable frequency output. With the attempt of measuring the wavelength of pulsed TEA CO2 laser, an experimental setup is established which consists of two main portions, namely auto-scanning grating monochromator as the color dispersion system and Boxcar integrator. In the experiment of tuning TEA CO2 laser, the wavelength of CO2 laser is observed and measured by means of integrating method. The accuracy of measurement in the mid-infrared region attains 1nm.

  9. Multi-wavelength characterization of carbonaceous aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massabò, Dario; Caponi, Lorenzo; Chiara Bove, Maria; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Prati, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol is a major component of the urban PM. It mainly consists of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) although a minor fraction of carbonate carbon could be also present. Elemental carbon is mainly found in the finer PM fractions (PM2.5 and PM1) and it is strongly light absorbing. When determined by optical methods, it is usually called black carbon (BC). The two quantities, EC and BC, even if both related to the refractory components of carbonaceous aerosols, do not exactly define the same PM component (Bond and Bergstrom, 2006; and references therein). Moreover, another fraction of light-absorbing carbon exists which is not black and it is generally called brown carbon (Andreae and Gelencsér, 2006). We introduce a simple, fully automatic, multi-wavelength and non-destructive optical system, actually a Multi-Wavelength Absorbance Analyzer, MWAA, to measure off-line the light absorption in Particulate Matter (PM) collected on filters and hence to derive the black and brown carbon content in the PM This gives the opportunity to measure in the same sample the concentration of total PM by gravimetric analysis, black and brown carbon, metals by, for instance, X Ray Fluorescence, and finally ions by Ion Chromatography. Up to 16 samples can be analyzed in sequence and in an automatic and controlled way within a few hours. The filter absorbance measured by MWAA was successfully validated both against a MAAP, Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (Petzold and Schönlinner, 2004), and the polar photometer of the University of Milan. The measurement of sample absorbance at three wavelengths gives the possibility to apportion different sources of carbonaceous PM, for instance fossil fuels and wood combustion. This can be done following the so called "aethalometer method" (Sandradewi et al., 2008;) but with some significant upgrades that will be discussed together the results of field campaigns in rural and urban sites. Andreae, M.O, and Gelencsér, A

  10. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of hydrogen peroxide vapor. [for atmospheric abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Schinke, S. D.; Molina, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor have been determined over the wavelength range 210 to 350 nm at 296 K. At the longer wavelengths, the gas phase absorptivities are significantly larger than the corresponding values in condensed phase. The atmospheric H2O2 photodissociation rate for overhead sun at the earth's surface is estimated to be about 1.3 x 10 to the -5th/sec.

  11. Reconstruction of N2O and CH4 Content by Dial Measurements at Wavelengths of Overtone CO Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Matvienko, G. G.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the results of laboratory experiments on measurement of absorption and extinction of radiation of the overtone Co laser at wavelengths used for sensing of methane and N2O in the mid-IR spectral range with the differential absorption (DIAL) method, as well as the concentrations of the studied gases reconstructed from the analysis of experimentally obtained absorption coefficients.

  12. Aluminum nitride nanophotonic circuits operating at ultraviolet wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Stegmaier, M.; Ebert, J.; Pernice, W. H. P.; Meckbach, J. M.; Ilin, K.; Siegel, M.

    2014-03-03

    Aluminum nitride (AlN) has recently emerged as a promising material for integrated photonics due to a large bandgap and attractive optical properties. Exploiting the wideband transparency, we demonstrate waveguiding in AlN-on-Insulator circuits from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths using nanophotonic components with dimensions down to 40 nm. By measuring the propagation loss over a wide spectral range, we conclude that both scattering and absorption of AlN-intrinsic defects contribute to strong attenuation at short wavelengths, thus providing guidelines for future improvements in thin-film deposition and circuit fabrication.

  13. Optical design of nanowire absorbers for wavelength selective photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Mokkapati, S.; Saxena, D.; Tan, H. H.; Jagadish, C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose the optical design for the absorptive element of photodetectors to achieve wavelength selective photo response based on resonant guided modes supported in semiconductor nanowires. We show that the waveguiding properties of nanowires result in very high absorption efficiency that can be exploited to reduce the volume of active semiconductor compared to planar photodetectors, without compromising the photocurrent. We present a design based on a group of nanowires with varying diameter for multi-color photodetectors with small footprint. We discuss the effect of a dielectric shell around the nanowires on the absorption efficiency and present a simple approach to optimize the nanowire diameter-dielectric shell thickness for maximizing the absorption efficiency. PMID:26469227

  14. Enhanced broadband absorption in gold by plasmonic tapered coaxial holes.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lei; Yang, Liu; Nadzeyka, Achim; Bauerdick, Sven; He, Sailing

    2014-12-29

    Gold absorbers based on plasmonic tapered coaxial holes (PTCHs) are demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. An average absorption of over 0.93 is obtained theoretically in a broad wavelength range from 300 nm to 900 nm without polarization sensitivity due to the structural symmetry. Strong scattering of the incident light by the tapered coaxial holes is the main reason for the high absorption in the short wavelength range below about 550 nm, while gap surface plasmon polaritons propagating along the taper dominate the resonance-induced high absorption in the long wavelength range. Combining two PTCHs with different structural parameters can further enhance the absorption and thus increase the spectral bandwidth, which is verified by a sample fabricated by focused ion beam milling. This design is promising to be extended to other metals to realize effective and efficient light harvesting and absorption.

  15. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  16. AWG Filter for Wavelength Interrogator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, Richard J. (Inventor); Costa, Joannes M. (Inventor); Faridian, Fereydoun (Inventor); Moslehi, Behzad (Inventor); Sotoudeh, Vahid (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A wavelength interrogator is coupled to a circulator which couples optical energy from a broadband source to an optical fiber having a plurality of sensors, each sensor reflecting optical energy at a unique wavelength and directing the reflected optical energy to an AWG. The AWG has a detector coupled to each output, and the reflected optical energy from each grating is coupled to the skirt edge response of the AWG such that the adjacent channel responses form a complementary pair response. The complementary pair response is used to convert an AWG skirt response to a wavelength.

  17. A novel tunable multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser with switchable frequency spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Lifen; Fen, Danqi; Xie, Heng; Sun, Junqiang

    2015-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a novel wavelength tunable and frequency spacing switchable multi-wavelength Brillouin fiber laser by employing optical gain and absorption during the Stimulated Brillouin scattering process. The frequency spacing can be switched by only varying the Brillouin pump power. Up to 16 Stokes lines with single Brillouin frequency spacing are observed under the lower Brillouin pump power, and 7 Stokes lines with double Brillouin frequency spacing are realized under the high Brillouin pump power by exploiting the Brillouin pump absorption. The proposed multi-wavelength laser can also be tuned from 1547 to 1569 nm and has the potential applications in the areas of optical communications and sensing.

  18. Dispersion of quadratic nonlinearity of polarized films of chromophore-containing polyimides in the range of resonance absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakimansky, A. V.; Nosova, G. I.; Solovskaya, N. A.; Smirnov, N. N.; Plekhanov, A. I.; Simanchuk, A. E.; Gorkovenko, A. I.

    2011-07-01

    Detailed investigations of the second harmonic generation of a series of new chromophore-containing polyimides in the range of their absorption bands are performed. Polymer films with thickness of 100-400 nm were spin-cast on glass substrates and corona poled. For the samples, the quadratic nonlinearity coefficients are determined from the intensity of the second harmonic generation signal. Fundamental wavelength was varied from 800 to 1400 nm. The quadratic nonlinear coefficient d33 of these materials with respect to the reference sample of quartz crystal are estimated. Maximum values of the second harmonic generation coefficient, d33, are 25-50 pm/V.

  19. AJ/LPI at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiffany, G. B.; Bleck, D. T.; Boatman, R. K.

    The AJ/LPI advantages of millimeter wavelength communication at or near the 60-GHz oxygen line have been apparent to researchers for many years. Realizing the full extent of these advantages in a system appropriate for field operation requires more than simply designing a conventional communications link for operation at 60 GHz. Very low sidelobe, narrow beamwidth antennas of rugged construction and the use of frequency agility and spread spectrum modulation are also necessary. Construction of short range, clear weather tactical communication systems exploiting tropospheric oxygen absorption in the 50- to 70-GHz region appears feasible with current state-of-the-art solid-state components. The critical design parameters for achieving all weather jamming resistance and covertness are frequency selection, power management, waveform design, and antenna side- and back-lobe performance.

  20. Field Deployments of DWEL, A Dual-Wavelength Echidna Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, G.; Hewawasam, K.; Strahler, A. H.; Douglas, E. S.; Martel, J.; Cook, T.; Chakrabarti, S.; Li, Z.; Schaaf, C.; Paynter, I.; Saenz, E.; Wang, Z.; Yang, X.; Erb, A.

    2013-12-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a terrestrial scanning lidar used for automated retrieval of forest structure. The Dual Wavelength Echidna Lidar (DWEL) distinguishes between leaf hits and those of trunks and branches by using simultaneous, co-axial laser pulses at 1548 nm, where leaf water content produces strong absorption, and at 1064 nm where leaves and trunks have similar reflectances. The DWEL instrument obtains three-dimensional locations and characteristics of scattering events by using an altitudinal scan mirror on an azimuthal rotating mount along with full waveform digitization. The instrument has seen two successful field deployments: to the Sierra National Forest, California in June of 2013 and to both the Karawatha Forest Park and Brisbane Forest Park near Brisbane, Australia in July/August 2013 as part of the Terrestrial Laser Scanner International Interest Group (TLSIIG) conference. Measurements of tree leaves, branches, and trunks were successfully made. Panels of known reflectance were used to calibrate and characterize the back scattered waveforms in the field. Preliminary maximum range measurements were shown to be over 75 meters for both wavelengths. To obtain accurate waveform data, the two lasers are triggered simultaneously and each has a full-width-half-max length of less than 10 meters. The light is then collimated and expanded to a diameter of 6 mm before diverging in user-selectable optics with divergences of either 1.25- or 2.5-mrad enabling scan resolutions of 1- and 2-mrad. The durations of complete scans are approximately 164 and 41 minutes, respectively. Mirrors and dichroic filters co-align the two NIR wavelength laser beams along with a continuous-wave green marker laser. The outgoing beams are directed by a rotating 10 cm scan mirror with effective field of view of ×110 degrees attitudinally while the instrument itself rotates for an effective azimuthal field of view of 360 degrees. Optical encoders in both planes

  1. Absorption properties of type-II InAs/InAsSb superlattices measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, P. T.; Riordan, N. A.; Liu, S.; Zhang, Y.-H.; Johnson, S. R.; Steenbergen, E. H.

    2015-02-09

    Strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattices offer access to the mid- to long-wavelength infrared region with what is essentially a ternary material system at the GaSb lattice constant. The absorption coefficients of InAs/InAsSb superlattices grown by molecular beam epitaxy on (100)-oriented GaSb substrates are measured at room temperature over the 30 to 800 meV photon energy range using spectroscopic ellipsometry, and the miniband structure of each superlattice is calculated using a Kronig-Penney model. The InAs/InAsSb conduction band offset is used as a fitting parameter to align the calculated superlattice ground state transition energy to the measured absorption onset at room temperature and to the photoluminescence peak energy at low temperature. It is observed that the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength are proportional to the square of the wavefunction overlap and the ground state absorption coefficient approaches a maximum value of around 5780 cm{sup −1} as the wavefunction overlap approaches 100%. The absorption analysis of these samples indicates that the optical joint density of states is weakly dependent on the period thickness and Sb content of the superlattice, and that wavefunction overlap is the principal design parameter in terms of obtaining strong absorption in these structures.

  2. SWOC: Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruchti, G. R.

    2016-06-01

    SWOC (Spectral Wavelength Optimization Code) determines the wavelength ranges that provide the optimal amount of information to achieve the required science goals for a spectroscopic study. It computes a figure-of-merit for different spectral configurations using a user-defined list of spectral features, and, utilizing a set of flux-calibrated spectra, determines the spectral regions showing the largest differences among the spectra.

  3. Measurement of wavelength-dependent extinction to distinguish between absorbing and nonabsorbing aerosol particulates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portscht, R.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of spectral transmission factors in smoky optical transmission paths reveal a difference between wavelength exponents of the extinction cross section of high absorption capacity and those of low absorption capacity. A theoretical explanation of this behavior is presented. In certain cases, it is possible to obtain data on the absorption index of aerosol particles in the optical path by measuring the spectral decadic extinction coefficient at, at least, two wavelengths. In this manner it is possible, for instance, to distinguish smoke containing soot from water vapor.

  4. Towards short wavelengths FELs workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Winick, H.

    1993-12-01

    This workshop was caged because of the growing perception in the FEL source community that recent advances have made it possible to extend FEL operation to wavelengths about two orders of magnitude shorter than the 240 nm that has been achieved to date. In addition short wavelength FELs offer the possibilities of extremely high peak power (several gigawatts) and very short pulses (of the order of 100 fs). Several groups in the USA are developing plans for such short wavelength FEL facilities. However, reviewers of these plans have pointed out that it would be highly desirable to first carry out proof-of-principle experiments at longer wavelengths to increase confidence that the shorter wavelength devices will indeed perform as calculated. The need for such experiments has now been broadly accepted by the FEL community. Such experiments were the main focus of this workshop as described in the following objectives distributed to attendees: (1) Define measurements needed to gain confidence that short wavelength FELs will perform as calculated. (2) List possible hardware that could be used to carry out these measurements in the near term. (3) Define a prioritized FEL physics experimental program and suggested timetable. (4) Form collaborative teams to carry out this program.

  5. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  6. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  7. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  8. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  9. Decomposition of Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Rémond, Guy; Myklebust, Robert; Fialin, Michel; Nockolds, Clive; Phillips, Matthew; Roques-Carmes, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Line shapes of atomic lines and soft x-ray emission bands measured with a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) with the Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) are reviewed. Least square fitting to pseudo-Voigt profiles of the digitally measured spectra are used to account for the presence of non-diagram features (high and low energy satellites) and instrumental induced distortions. The effect of line width and relative intensities on the quality of fits is illustrated. Spectral distortions resulting from the presence of absorption edges within the analyzed wavelength region are illustrated for the case of FeLα,β emission bands for pure Fe and iron oxides. For quantitative analysis, an analytical approach is presented where the measured soft x-ray emission bands are corrected for self absorption before extracting the intensities from the experimental data. PMID:27446750

  10. Asymmetries in SN 2014J near Maximum Light Revealed through Spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Amber L.; Leising, Mark D.; Williams, G. Grant; Milne, Peter; Smith, Paul; Smith, Nathan; Bilinski, Christopher; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Huk, Leah; Leonard, Douglas C.

    2016-09-01

    We present spectropolarimetric observations of the nearby Type Ia supernova SN 2014J in M82 over six epochs: +0, +7, +23, +51, +77, +109, and +111 days with respect to B-band maximum. The strong continuum polarization, which is constant with time, shows a wavelength dependence unlike that produced by linear dichroism in Milky Way dust. The observed polarization may be due entirely to interstellar dust or include a circumstellar scattering component. We find that the polarization angle aligns with the magnetic field of the host galaxy, arguing for an interstellar origin. Additionally, we confirm a peak in polarization at short wavelengths that would imply {R}V\\lt 2 along the light of sight, in agreement with earlier polarization measurements. For illustrative purposes, we include a two-component fit to the continuum polarization of our +51-day epoch that combines a circumstellar scattering component with interstellar dust where scattering can account for over half of the polarization at 4000 Å. Upon removal of the interstellar polarization signal, SN 2014J exhibits very low levels of continuum polarization. Asymmetries in the distribution of elements within the ejecta are visible through moderate levels of time-variable polarization in accordance with the Si ii λ6355 absorption line. At maximum light, the line polarization reaches ˜0.6% and decreases to ˜ 0.4 % 1 week later. This feature also forms a loop on the {q}{RSP}{--}{u}{RSP} plane, illustrating that the ion does not have an axisymmetric distribution. The observed polarization properties suggest that the explosion geometry of SN 2014J is generally spheroidal with a clumpy distribution of silicon.

  11. Fast wavelength calibration method for spectrometers based on waveguide comb optical filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Zhengang; Huang, Meizhen Zou, Ye; Wang, Yang; Sun, Zhenhua; Cao, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-15

    A novel fast wavelength calibration method for spectrometers based on a standard spectrometer and a double metal-cladding waveguide comb optical filter (WCOF) is proposed and demonstrated. By using the WCOF device, a wide-spectrum beam is comb-filtered, which is very suitable for spectrometer wavelength calibration. The influence of waveguide filter’s structural parameters and the beam incident angle on the comb absorption peaks’ wavelength and its bandwidth are also discussed. The verification experiments were carried out in the wavelength range of 200–1100 nm with satisfactory results. Comparing with the traditional wavelength calibration method based on discrete sparse atomic emission or absorption lines, the new method has some advantages: sufficient calibration data, high accuracy, short calibration time, fit for produce process, stability, etc.

  12. Subwavelength total acoustic absorption with degenerate resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental realization of perfect sound absorption by sub-wavelength monopole and dipole resonators that exhibit degenerate resonant frequencies. This is achieved through the destructive interference of two resonators' transmission responses, while the matching of their averaged impedances to that of air implies no backscattering, thereby leading to total absorption. Two examples, both using decorated membrane resonators (DMRs) as the basic units, are presented. The first is a flat panel comprising a DMR and a pair of coupled DMRs, while the second one is a ventilated short tube containing a DMR in conjunction with a sidewall DMR backed by a cavity. In both examples, near perfect absorption, up to 99.7%, has been observed with the airborne wavelength up to 1.2 m, which is at least an order of magnitude larger than the composite absorber. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  13. Nanoscale resonant-cavity-enhanced germanium photodetectors with lithographically defined spectral response for improved performance at telecommunications wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Balram, Krishna C; Audet, Ross M; Miller, David A B

    2013-04-22

    We demonstrate the use of a subwavelength planar metal-dielectric resonant cavity to enhance the absorption of germanium photodetectors at wavelengths beyond the material's direct absorption edge, enabling high responsivity across the entire telecommunications C and L bands. The resonant wavelength of the detectors can be tuned linearly by varying the width of the Ge fin, allowing multiple detectors, each resonant at a different wavelength, to be fabricated in a single-step process. This approach is promising for the development of CMOS-compatible devices suitable for integrated, high-speed, and energy-efficient photodetection at telecommunications wavelengths.

  14. Nanoantenna enhancement for telecom-wavelength superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Heath, Robert M; Tanner, Michael G; Drysdale, Timothy D; Miki, Shigehito; Giannini, Vincenzo; Maier, Stefan A; Hadfield, Robert H

    2015-02-11

    Superconducting nanowire single photon detectors are rapidly emerging as a key infrared photon-counting technology. Two front-side-coupled silver dipole nanoantennas, simulated to have resonances at 1480 and 1525 nm, were fabricated in a two-step process. An enhancement of 50 to 130% in the system detection efficiency was observed when illuminating the antennas. This offers a pathway to increasing absorption into superconducting nanowires, creating larger active areas, and achieving more efficient detection at longer wavelengths.

  15. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-08-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children.

  16. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed Central

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children. PMID:6476870

  17. Deriving in situ phytoplankton absorption for bio-optical productivity models in turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar; Bergmann, Trisha; Glenn, Scott; Orrico, Cristina; Moline, Mark

    2004-07-01

    As part of Hyperspectral Coupled Ocean Dynamics Experiment, a high-resolution hydrographic and bio-optical data set was collected from two cabled profilers at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO). Upwelling- and downwelling-favorable winds and a buoyant plume from the Hudson River induced large changes in hydrographic and optical structure of the water column. An absorption inversion model estimated the relative abundance of phytoplankton, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and detritus, as well as the spectral exponential slopes of CDOM and detritus from in situ WET Labs nine-wavelength absorption/attenuation meter (ac-9) absorption data. Derived optical weights were proportional to the parameter concentrations and allowed for their absorptions to be calculated. Spectrally weighted phytoplankton absorption was estimated using modeled spectral irradiances and the phytoplankton absorption spectra inverted from an ac-9. Derived mean spectral absorption of phytoplankton was used in a bio-optical model estimating photosynthetic rates. Measured radiocarbon uptake productivity rates extrapolated with water mass analysis and the bio-optical modeled results agreed within 20%. This approach is impacted by variability in the maximum quantum yield (ϕmax) and the irradiance light-saturation parameter (Ek(PAR)). An analysis of available data shows that ϕmax variability is relatively constrained in temperate waters. The variability of Ek(PAR) is greater in temperate waters, but based on a sensitivity analysis, has an overall smaller impact on water-column-integrated productivity rates because of the exponential decay of light. This inversion approach illustrates the utility of bio-optical models in turbid coastal waters given the measurements of the bulk inherent optical properties.

  18. Wavelength dependence of the apparent diameter of retinal blood vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Robert; Twietmeyer, Karen; Chipman, Russell; Beaudry, Neil; Salyer, David

    2005-04-01

    Imaging of retinal blood vessels may assist in the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and hypertension. However, close examination reveals that the contrast and apparent diameter of vessels are dependent on the wavelength of the illuminating light. In this study multispectral images of large arteries and veins within enucleated swine eyes are obtained with a modified fundus camera by use of intravitreal illumination. The diameters of selected vessels are measured as a function of wavelength by cross-sectional analysis. A fixed scale with spectrally independent dimension is placed above the retina to isolate the chromatic effects of the imaging system and eye. Significant apparent differences between arterial and venous diameters are found, with larger diameters observed at shorter wavelengths. These differences are due primarily to spectral absorption in the cylindrical blood column.

  19. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-03-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline.

  20. In-vacuum long-wavelength macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Armin; Duman, Ramona; Henderson, Keith; Mykhaylyk, Vitaliy

    2016-01-01

    Structure solution based on the weak anomalous signal from native (protein and DNA) crystals is increasingly being attempted as part of synchrotron experiments. Maximizing the measurable anomalous signal by collecting diffraction data at longer wavelengths presents a series of technical challenges caused by the increased absorption of X-rays and larger diffraction angles. A new beamline at Diamond Light Source has been built specifically for collecting data at wavelengths beyond the capability of other synchrotron macromolecular crystallography beamlines. Here, the theoretical considerations in support of the long-wavelength beamline are outlined and the in-vacuum design of the endstation is discussed, as well as other hardware features aimed at enhancing the accuracy of the diffraction data. The first commissioning results, representing the first in-vacuum protein structure solution, demonstrate the promising potential of the beamline. PMID:26960130

  1. The 1989 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    This document contains information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1989 pointed observations. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) Gamma Ray Spectrometer, (2) Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, (3) Flat Crystal Spectrometer, (4) Bent Crystal Spectrometer, (5) Ultraviolet Spectrometer Polarimeter, and (6) Coronagraph/Polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Satellite (GOES) X-ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  2. The 1980 solar maximum mission event listing

    SciTech Connect

    Speich, D.M.; Nelson, J.J.; Licata, J.P.; Tolbert, A.K.

    1991-06-01

    Information is contained on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1980 pointed observations. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) Gamma Ray Spectrometer, (2) Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer, (3) Hard X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer, (4) Flat Crystal Spectrometer, (5) Bent Crystal Spectrometer, (6) Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter, and (7) Coronagraph/Polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x-ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observations. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from Sun center are also included.

  3. The 1988 Solar Maximum Mission event list

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, B. R.; Licata, J. P.; Tolbert, A. K.

    1992-01-01

    Information on solar burst and transient activity observed by the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) during 1988 pointed observations is presented. Data from the following SMM experiments are included: (1) gamma ray spectrometer; (2) hard x ray burst spectrometer; (3) flat crystal spectrometers; (4) bent crystal spectrometer; (5) ultraviolet spectrometer polarimeter; and (6) coronagraph/polarimeter. Correlative optical, radio, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) x ray data are also presented. Where possible, bursts, or transients observed in the various wavelengths were grouped into discrete flare events identified by unique event numbers. Each event carries a qualifier denoting the quality or completeness of the observation. Spacecraft pointing coordinates and flare site angular displacement values from sun center are also included.

  4. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  5. Enhancement of ammonia gas detection by integrating wavelength-modulated spectra across the line 992.69 cm-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallah, Mohammad; Salloum, Akil

    2016-05-01

    A rapid tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption sensor was developed for real-time measurements of ammonia concentration by using wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) at 992.698 cm-1 of the ν2 vibrational band. This line has patterns free from interference with other species in the atmosphere, and can be used for open-path detection. The 1f signal was used to normalize the 2f signal thereby eliminating the need for calibration and explaining the laser transmission variations. Using WMS with a large modulation depth and integrating the absolute value of the resulting spectra increased the limit of detection (LOD) of the sensor by a factor of seven, compared with the LOD achieved by using the maximum value of the WMS 2f signal. Furthermore, an increase by a factor of 25 compared with the direct absorption spectroscopy was achieved, which allowed obtaining LOD ∼ 1 ppb with a resolution time of <2 s for the detection of NH3 in the atmosphere using a short-path cell (a 60-cm absorption cell with four passes).

  6. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  7. An excitation wavelength-scanning spectral imaging system for preclinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Jiang, Yanan; Patsekin, Valery; Rajwa, Bartek; Robinson, J. Paul

    2008-02-01

    Small-animal fluorescence imaging is a rapidly growing field, driven by applications in cancer detection and pharmaceutical therapies. However, the practical use of this imaging technology is limited by image-quality issues related to autofluorescence background from animal tissues, as well as attenuation of the fluorescence signal due to scatter and absorption. To combat these problems, spectral imaging and analysis techniques are being employed to separate the fluorescence signal from background autofluorescence. To date, these technologies have focused on detecting the fluorescence emission spectrum at a fixed excitation wavelength. We present an alternative to this technique, an imaging spectrometer that detects the fluorescence excitation spectrum at a fixed emission wavelength. The advantages of this approach include increased available information for discrimination of fluorescent dyes, decreased optical radiation dose to the animal, and ability to scan a continuous wavelength range instead of discrete wavelength sampling. This excitation-scanning imager utilizes an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF), with supporting optics, to scan the excitation spectrum. Advanced image acquisition and analysis software has also been developed for classification and unmixing of the spectral image sets. Filtering has been implemented in a single-pass configuration with a bandwidth (full width at half maximum) of 16nm at 550nm central diffracted wavelength. We have characterized AOTF filtering over a wide range of incident light angles, much wider than has been previously reported in the literature, and we show how changes in incident light angle can be used to attenuate AOTF side lobes and alter bandwidth. A new parameter, in-band to out-of-band ratio, was defined to assess the quality of the filtered excitation light. Additional parameters were measured to allow objective characterization of the AOTF and the imager as a whole. This is necessary for comparing the

  8. CO Ice Photodesorption: A Wavelength-dependent Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayolle, Edith C.; Bertin, Mathieu; Romanzin, Claire; Michaut, Xavier; Öberg, Karin I.; Linnartz, Harold; Fillion, Jean-Hugues

    2011-10-01

    UV-induced photodesorption of ice is a non-thermal evaporation process that can explain the presence of cold molecular gas in a range of interstellar regions. Information on the average UV photodesorption yield of astrophysically important ices exists for broadband UV lamp experiments. UV fields around low-mass pre-main-sequence stars, around shocks and in many other astrophysical environments are however often dominated by discrete atomic and molecular emission lines. It is therefore crucial to consider the wavelength dependence of photodesorption yields and mechanisms. In this work, for the first time, the wavelength-dependent photodesorption of pure CO ice is explored between 90 and 170 nm. The experiments are performed under ultra high vacuum conditions using tunable synchrotron radiation. Ice photodesorption is simultaneously probed by infrared absorption spectroscopy in reflection mode of the ice and by quadrupole mass spectrometry of the gas phase. The experimental results for CO reveal a strong wavelength dependence directly linked to the vibronic transition strengths of CO ice, implying that photodesorption is induced by electronic transition (DIET). The observed dependence on the ice absorption spectra implies relatively low photodesorption yields at 121.6 nm (Lyα), where CO barely absorbs, compared to the high yields found at wavelengths coinciding with transitions into the first electronic state of CO (A1Π at 150 nm); the CO photodesorption rates depend strongly on the UV profiles encountered in different star formation environments.

  9. Effect of idler absorption in pulsed optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Gunnar; Arisholm, Gunnar; Farsund, Øystein

    2011-01-31

    Absorption at the idler wavelength in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is often considered detrimental. We show through simulations that pulsed OPOs with significant idler absorption can perform better than OPOs with low idler absorption both in terms of conversion efficiency and beam quality. The main reason for this is reduced back conversion. We also show how the beam quality depends on the beam width and pump pulse length, and present scaling relations to use the example simulations for other pulsed nanosecond OPOs.

  10. Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, Anne

    2014-05-01

    The Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) measures the aerosol absorption of radiation at three visible wavelengths; 461, 522, and 653 nanometers (nm). Data from this measurement is used in radiative forcing calculations, atmospheric heating rates, and as a prediction of the amount of equivalent black carbon in atmospheric aerosol and in models of aerosol semi-direct forcing. Aerosol absorption measurements are essential to modeling the energy balance of the atmosphere.

  11. Systematic investigation of self-absorption and conversion efficiency of 6.7 nm extreme ultraviolet sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko; Kilbane, Deirdre; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Jiang, Weihua; Endo, Akira

    2010-12-06

    We have investigated the dependence of the spectral behavior and conversion efficiencies of rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources with peak emission at 6.7 nm on laser wavelength and the initial target density. The maximum conversion efficiency was 1.3% at a laser intensity of 1.6x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} at an operating wavelength of 1064 nm, when self-absorption was reduced by use of a low initial density target. Moreover, the lower-density results in a narrower spectrum and therefore improved spectral purity. It is shown to be important to use a low initial density target and/or to produce low electron density plasmas for efficient extreme ultraviolet sources when using high-Z targets.

  12. Theory of absorption rate of carriers in fused silica under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Wu, SY; Jiang, XD; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Kai

    2010-11-15

    A quantum non-perturbation theory for phonon-assisted photon absorption of conduction band electron in intense laser was developed. By carrying out the calculation in fused silica at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared in terawatt intensity laser, we show that the Non-perturbation approach can make a uniform description of energy absorption rate at both short wavelengths and long wavelengths on TW / cm2 intensity laser.

  13. Near infrared imaging of teeth at wavelengths between 1200 and 1600 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Soojeong; Fried, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Darling, Cynthia L.

    2011-03-01

    Near-IR (NIR) imaging is a new technology that is currently being investigated for the detection and assessment of dental caries without the use of ionizing radiation. Several papers have been published on the use of transillumination and reflectance NIR imaging to detect early caries in enamel. The purpose of this study was to investigate alternative near infrared wavelengths besides 1300-nm in the range from 1200- 1600-nm to determine the wavelengths that yield the highest contrast in both transmission and reflectance imaging modes. Artificial lesions were created on thirty tooth sections of varying thickness for transillumination imaging. NIR images at wavelengths from the visible to 1600-nm were also acquired for fifty-four whole teeth with occlusal lesions using a tungsten halogen lamp with several spectral filters and a Ge-enhanced CMOS image sensor. Cavity preparations were also cut into whole teeth and Z250 composite was used as a restorative material to determine the contrast between composite and enamel at NIR wavelengths. Slightly longer NIR wavelengths are likely to have better performance for the transillumination of occlusal caries lesions while 1300-nm appears best for the transillumination of proximal surfaces. Significantly higher performance was attained at wavelengths that have higher water absorption, namely 1460-nm and wavelengths greater than 1500-nm and these wavelength regions are likely to be more effective for reflectance imaging. Wavelengths with higher water absorption also provided higher contrast of composite restorations.

  14. A near infrared optimal wavelength imaging method for detection of foreign materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, De-Hao

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an optimal wavelength imaging system for detecting foreign materials in the NIR (near infrared) region from 750 nm to 2500 nm. This method is based on the principle that different fibers have different spectral absorptions and reflectance characteristic. When submitted to a source of illumination at different wavelength, foreign materials present different reflectance values in comparison to those from cotton fibers. For simultaneously discriminating several types of foreign materials from cotton, the optimal wavelength evaluation function for describing the cotton/foreign materials absorption discrimination was set up. Through the Fourier transform spectrometer experiment, the optimal wavelength for these detected foreign materials was determined and accordingly an optimal wavelength imaging system was developed. The wavelength selection experiment showed that the 940 nm wavelength was the most appropriate for detection of a wide range of foreign materials in cotton, and the 940 nm wavelength imaging system gave the clear image features of these foreign materials. The result suggests that use of NIR optimal wavelength imaging technique is a feasible and effective method to detect foreign materials in cotton, which are currently difficult for sorting.

  15. Efficient and aberration-free wavefront reconstruction from holograms illuminated at wavelengths differing from the forming wavelength.

    PubMed

    Lin, L H; Doherty, E T

    1971-06-01

    Recording materials producing higher efficiency, low absorption holograms are usually photosensitive only to blue and uv light. If a hologram is formed at a blue wavelength in such a material and is illuminated at a red wavelength, generally the reconstructed wavefront is aberrated, and the resolution of the image is reduced. A method of hologram formation is described that can alleviate this problem. In this method, a hologram H(1) is formed first at the red wavelength lambda(1) in a photographic emulsion. This hologram is then illuminated at the blue wavelength lambda(2) The diffracted wave from H(1) is used as the subject wave for forming the desired high efficiency hologram H(2). If certain requirements are met, illumination of H(2) at lambda(1) can produce an aberration-free reconstruction of the original subject wave. Experimental results of forming H(2) of a point source on dichromated gelatin film are presented. The hologram was formed at lambda(2) = 4800 A but could reconstruct an aberration-free wavefront at lambda(1) = 6328 A. The hologram had about 80% diffraction efficiency and essentially no absorption loss. PMID:20111111

  16. Optimal laser wavelength for photoacoustic imaging of breast microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jeeun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Young Kwak, Jin; Yoo, Yangmo; Song, Tai-Kyong; Ho Chang, Jin

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents photoacoustic imaging (PAI) for real-time detection of micro-scale calcifications (e.g., <1 mm) in the breast, which are an indicator of the cancer occurrence. Optimal wavelength of incident laser for the microcalcification imaging was ascertained through ex vivo experiments with seven breast specimens of volunteers. In the ex vivo experiments, the maximum amplitude of photoacoustic signals from the microcalcifications occurred when the laser wavelength ranged from 690 to 700 nm. This result demonstrated that PAI can serve as a real-time imaging and guidance tool for diagnosis and biopsy of the breast microcalcifications.

  17. Minimizing the probable maximum flood

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, M.S.; Pansic, N. ); Eberlein, D.T. )

    1994-06-01

    This article examines Wisconsin Electric Power Company's efforts to determine an economical way to comply with Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requirements at two hydroelectric developments on the Michigamme River. Their efforts included refinement of the area's probable maximum flood model based, in part, on a newly developed probable maximum precipitation estimate.

  18. Absorption characteristics of vapor transport equilibrated Er:LiNbO3 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, De-Long; Pun, E. Y. B.; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Yan; Jin, Yue-Han; Zhu, Deng-Song; Wu, Zhong-Kang

    2002-04-01

    The visible and infrared transmission spectra of vapor transport equilibration (VTE) treated Er:LiNbO3 crystals, which have different doping levels (0.2%, 0.4%, and 2.0% Er per cation site), different cut orientation (X and Z cut) and different VTE duration (80, 120, 150, and 180 h), were recorded at room temperature in the wavelength range of 250-3700 nm. All of 2.0 mol % doped VTE crystals have precipitated whether X cut or Z cut, while the others have not. Their absorption characteristics were summarized and discussed in contrast to those of corresponding as-grown crystals. The OH- absorption feature of VTE treated Er:LiNbO3 is found to be different from that of pure VTE LiNbO3 crystal. The significant reduction of OH- absorption band implies that the hydrogen content in the VTE crystals has been reduced substantially whether the crystal precipitates or not. The electron transition absorption characteristics of the lower-doped, not precipitated crystals mainly include the higher transmittance, slight shift of peak or band position, slight absorption intensity change, the appearance of some additional peaks or bands, the narrowing of the peak width (full width at half maximum), and the definite blueshift of the optical absorption edge. The spectral changes are associated with the redistribution of Er3+ spectroscopic sites induced by the VTE procedure. In comparison with those lower-doped VTE crystals, the highly doped VTE crystals display more significant absorption characteristics: the significant enhancement of 1480 nm pumping band and the obvious weakening of 1531 nm peak, the appearance of many additional peaks in the infrared region, and the interesting evolution of the transmittance with the wavelength. These substantial spectral changes are unambiguously conducted with the formation of a precipitate ErNbO4 induced by the VTE treatment in these crystals. The mechanism for the formation of the precipitate has been tentatively explained from the viewpoint of

  19. Modulation of ganciclovir intestinal absorption in presence of absorption enhancers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Pranav; Jogani, Viral; Mishra, Pushpa; Mishra, Anil Kumar; Bagchi, Tamishraha; Misra, Ambikanandan

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the influences of absorption enhancers in increasing oral bioavailability of Ganciclovir (GAN) by assessing the transepithelial permeation across cell monolayers in vitro and bioavailability in rats in vivo. The permeation of GAN across Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers in the absence/presence of dimethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (DMbetaCD), chitosan hydrochloride (CH), sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS), and their combinations was studied for a 2-h period. GAN was administered to rats in absence/presence of absorption enhancers and drug contents in plasma were estimated. We found that the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of GAN in absence of absorption enhancers (control) were 0.261 +/- 0.072 x 10(-6) and 0.486 +/- 0.063 x 10(-6) cm/s in Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers, respectively, whereas in the presence of DMbetaCD, CH, SLS, and their combinations, Papp of GAN increased by 5- to 25-fold and 7- to 33-fold as compared to control in Caco-2 and MDCK cell monolayers, respectively. However, in rats, the maximum enhancement in bioavailability of GAN during coadministration of these absorption enhancers was only fivefold compared to GAN control. To conclude, the absorption enhancers-DMbetaCD, CH, SLS, and their combinations demonstrated significant improvement in transepithelial permeation and bioavailability of GAN.

  20. Wavelength shifting of intra-cavity photons: Adiabatic wavelength tuning in rapidly wavelength-swept lasers

    PubMed Central

    Jirauschek, Christian; Huber, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the physics behind the newest generation of rapidly wavelength tunable sources for optical coherence tomography (OCT), retaining a single longitudinal cavity mode during operation without repeated build up of lasing. In this context, we theoretically investigate the currently existing concepts of rapidly wavelength-swept lasers based on tuning of the cavity length or refractive index, leading to an altered optical path length inside the resonator. Specifically, we consider vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with microelectromechanical system (MEMS) mirrors as well as Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) and Vernier-tuned distributed Bragg reflector (VT-DBR) lasers. Based on heuristic arguments and exact analytical solutions of Maxwell’s equations for a fundamental laser resonator model, we show that adiabatic wavelength tuning is achieved, i.e., hopping between cavity modes associated with a repeated build up of lasing is avoided, and the photon number is conserved. As a consequence, no fundamental limit exists for the wavelength tuning speed, in principle enabling wide-range wavelength sweeps at arbitrary tuning speeds with narrow instantaneous linewidth. PMID:26203373

  1. Absorption Characteristics of Vertebrate Non-Visual Opsin, Opn3.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Tomohiro; Nagata, Takashi; Mason, Benjamin; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    Most animals possess multiple opsins which sense light for visual and non-visual functions. Here, we show spectral characteristics of non-visual opsins, vertebrate Opn3s, which are widely distributed among vertebrates. We successfully expressed zebrafish Opn3 in mammalian cultured cells and measured its absorption spectrum spectroscopically. When incubated with 11-cis retinal, zebrafish Opn3 formed a blue-sensitive photopigment with an absorption maximum around 465 nm. The Opn3 converts to an all-trans retinal-bearing photoproduct with an absorption spectrum similar to the dark state following brief blue-light irradiation. The photoproduct experienced a remarkable blue-shift, with changes in position of the isosbestic point, during further irradiation. We then used a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay to investigate light-dependent cAMP responses in cultured cells expressing zebrafish, pufferfish, anole and chicken Opn3. The wild type opsins did not produce responses, but cells expressing chimera mutants (WT Opn3s in which the third intracellular loops were replaced with the third intracellular loop of a Gs-coupled jellyfish opsin) displayed light-dependent changes in cAMP. The results suggest that Opn3 is capable of activating G protein(s) in a light-dependent manner. Finally, we used this assay to measure the relative wavelength-dependent response of cells expressing Opn3 chimeras to multiple quantally-matched stimuli. The inferred spectral sensitivity curve of zebrafish Opn3 accurately matched the measured absorption spectrum. We were unable to estimate the spectral sensitivity curve of mouse or anole Opn3, but, like zebrafish Opn3, the chicken and pufferfish Opn3-JiL3 chimeras also formed blue-sensitive pigments. These findings suggest that vertebrate Opn3s may form blue-sensitive G protein-coupled pigments. Further, we suggest that the method described here, combining a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay with chimeric opsins possessing the third

  2. The First HeI* 10830 Broad Absorption Line Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen; Dietrich, M.; Barber, S.

    2010-03-01

    We report discovery of the first metastable HeI* broad absorption line quasar using SpeX on IRTF. The blue-shifted absorption profile extends in velocity space from about -1,000 to -11,000 km/s, and it shows considerable velocity structure of the order of 1,000 km/s. The maximum apparent optical depth is 0.6. Integration over the 10830 apparent optical depth profile yields a lower limit on the log HeI* column density of >14.3. Absorption is also seen in the HeI* λ3888Å line in optical spectra from SDSS and the MDM Hiltner telescope. These two transitions have the same lower level; thus, the covering fraction and optical depth can be determined. A pure partial covering model yields log HeI* column of 15.5-15.7, while a power law absorption distribution yields 16.1. These column densities are significantly larger than the lower limit because of the high ratio of the product of the wavelength and the oscillator strength (23.3). This property, plus the relatively low densities of HeI* in ionized gas, makes HeI* absorption a valuable probe of high column densities. Cloudy simulations were performed to investigate the nature of the absorber. The HeI* column density yielded a lower limit on the log ionization parameter of -0.2 and a corresponding lower limit on the log hydrogen column density of 23. The latter value is at least an order of magnitude larger than those generally obtained from BALQSOs with spectra amenable to partial covering analysis. The lack of Balmer absorption provided an upper limit on the log density of 7. The log kinetic luminosity was constrained to be between 46 and 48, corresponding to at least 0.3% to a large fraction of the bolometric luminosity. A proposed Suzaku observation may remove model degeneracy between the spectral energy distribution and ionization parameter. This work is funded by NSF AST-0707703.

  3. Absorption Characteristics of Vertebrate Non-Visual Opsin, Opn3

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, Tomohiro; Nagata, Takashi; Mason, Benjamin; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    Most animals possess multiple opsins which sense light for visual and non-visual functions. Here, we show spectral characteristics of non-visual opsins, vertebrate Opn3s, which are widely distributed among vertebrates. We successfully expressed zebrafish Opn3 in mammalian cultured cells and measured its absorption spectrum spectroscopically. When incubated with 11-cis retinal, zebrafish Opn3 formed a blue-sensitive photopigment with an absorption maximum around 465 nm. The Opn3 converts to an all-trans retinal-bearing photoproduct with an absorption spectrum similar to the dark state following brief blue-light irradiation. The photoproduct experienced a remarkable blue-shift, with changes in position of the isosbestic point, during further irradiation. We then used a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay to investigate light-dependent cAMP responses in cultured cells expressing zebrafish, pufferfish, anole and chicken Opn3. The wild type opsins did not produce responses, but cells expressing chimera mutants (WT Opn3s in which the third intracellular loops were replaced with the third intracellular loop of a Gs-coupled jellyfish opsin) displayed light-dependent changes in cAMP. The results suggest that Opn3 is capable of activating G protein(s) in a light-dependent manner. Finally, we used this assay to measure the relative wavelength-dependent response of cells expressing Opn3 chimeras to multiple quantally-matched stimuli. The inferred spectral sensitivity curve of zebrafish Opn3 accurately matched the measured absorption spectrum. We were unable to estimate the spectral sensitivity curve of mouse or anole Opn3, but, like zebrafish Opn3, the chicken and pufferfish Opn3-JiL3 chimeras also formed blue-sensitive pigments. These findings suggest that vertebrate Opn3s may form blue-sensitive G protein-coupled pigments. Further, we suggest that the method described here, combining a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay with chimeric opsins possessing the third

  4. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  5. Effect of wavelength on cutaneous pigment using pulsed irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwood, K.A.; Murray, S.; Kurban, A.K.; Tan, O.T.

    1989-05-01

    Several reports have been published over the last two decades describing the successful removal of benign cutaneous pigmented lesions such as lentigines, cafe au lait macules' nevi, nevus of Ota, and lentigo maligna by a variety of lasers such as the excimer (351 nm), argon (488,514 nm), ruby (694 nm), Nd:YAG (1060 nm), and CO/sub 2/ (10,600 nm). Laser treatment has been applied to lesions with a range of pigment depths from superficial lentigines in the epidermis to the nevus of Ota in the reticular dermis. Widely divergent laser parameters of wavelength, pulse duration, energy density, and spotsizes have been used, but the laser parameters used to treat this range of lesions have been arbitrary, with little effort focused on defining optimal laser parameters for removal of each type. In this study, miniature black pig skin was exposed to five wavelengths (504, 590, 694, 720, and 750 nm) covering the absorption spectrum of melanin. At each wavelength, a range of energy densities was examined. Skin biopsies taken from laser-exposed sites were examined histologically in an attempt to establish whether optimal laser parameters exist for destroying pigment cells in skin. Of the five wavelengths examined, 504 nm produced the most pigment specific injury; this specificity being maintained even at the highest energy density of 7.0 J/cm2. Thus, for the destruction of melanin-containing cells in the epidermal compartment, 504 nm wavelength appears optimal.

  6. Aerosol-induced laser breakdown thresholds: wavelength dependence.

    PubMed

    Pinnick, R G; Chylek, P; Jarzembski, M; Creegan, E; Srivastava, V; Fernandez, G; Pendleton, J D; Biswas, A

    1988-03-01

    Aerosol-induced loser breakdown thresholds have been measured for liquid droplets at wavelengths lambda= 1.064, 0.532, 0.355, 0.266 microm using a Nd:YAG laser with 5-10-ns pulse duration. Breakdown thresholds are 2-3 orders of magnitude below those for clean air and range from 4 x 10(7) to 3 x 10(9) W cm(-2) for nominal 50-microm diam droplets, depending on laser wavelength and droplet composition. Thresholds decrease with decreasing wavelength; they also decrease for droplets having a higher real refractive index. For water droplets the breakdown threshold intensity varies approximately as lambda(0.5). The wavelength dependence of breakdown thresholds can be qualitatively explained by considering (1) the effect of enhancement of internal fields and energy density within and near droplets and (2) the increasing importance of multiphoton absorption processes at shorter wavelengths. Laser transmission losses through the breakdown plasma and observations of the suppression of stimulated Raman scattering by the addition of small quantitites of absorbing material to water and carbon tetrachloride droplets are also reported.

  7. Wavelength-modulated photocapacitance spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamieniecki, E.; Lagowski, J.; Gatos, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Derivative deep-level spectroscopy was achieved with wavelength-modulated photocapacitance employing MOS structures and Schottky barriers. The energy position and photoionization characteristics of deep levels of melt-grown GaAs and the Cr level in high-resistivity GaAs were determined. The advantages of this method over existing methods for deep-level spectroscopy are discussed.

  8. Solid colloidal optical wavelength filter

    DOEpatents

    Alvarez, Joseph L.

    1992-01-01

    A solid colloidal optical wavelength filter includes a suspension of spheal particles dispersed in a coagulable medium such as a setting plastic. The filter is formed by suspending spherical particles in a coagulable medium; agitating the particles and coagulable medium to produce an emulsion of particles suspended in the coagulable medium; and allowing the coagulable medium and suspended emulsion of particles to cool.

  9. Wavelength-shifted Cherenkov radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Jacobson, V. L.; Pifer, A. E.; Polakos, P. A.; Kurz, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The scintillation and Cherenkov responses of plastic Cherenkov radiators containing different wavelength-shifting fluors in varying concentrations have been studied in beams of low energy protons and pions. For cosmic ray applications, where large Cherenkov to scintillation ratios are desired, the optimum fluor concentrations are 0.000025 by weight or less.

  10. Optical absorption enhancement in 40 nm ultrathin film silicon solar cells assisted by photonic and plasmonic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, S.; Dubey, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Presently, energy problems and environmental issues have attracted the scientific community for the development of cost-effective and high-performance solar cells. Thin film solar cells are cheaper but weak light absorption in longer wavelength has demanded an efficient light trapping scheme for the better harvesting of solar radiation to a maximum possibility. In this paper, we numerically explore the design efforts of an ultrathin film silicon solar cell, integrated with top dielectric and bottom metal gratings. The proposed design is influenced by the localized surface plasmon modes, surface plasmon polariton and optical resonances which leads to the optimal harvesting of sunlight within 40 nm thick absorbing layer. The optimized design of solar cell shows enhanced light absorption with cell efficiency ∼25% at normal transverse magnetic polarization condition. Our design approach assisted by photonic and plasmonic modes is promising for the realization of new generation, low-cost ultrathin film solar cells.

  11. Importance of dye host on absorption, propagation losses, and amplified spontaneous emission for dye-doped polymer thin films.

    PubMed

    Goudket, Hélène; Nhung, Tran Hong; Ea-Kim, Buntha; Roger, Gisèle; Canva, Michael

    2006-10-10

    The absorption spectra of dye-doped polymer thin films made from a variety of five dyes and six matrices, either organic or organomineral, are analyzed to evaluate the residual absorption in the red wavelength tail and in particular at amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) wavelengths. An absorption cutoff wavelength is defined as the extrapolated wavelength at which the absorption losses are expected to become negligible compared to the structure losses. Such absorption-spectrum-extrapolated wavelengths are compared to the ASE wavelengths and found to correlate for most of the dye-matrix couples. The propagation losses of PM597-doped organic polymers are also measured and accordingly found to increase with the glass transition temperature of the host matrix.

  12. Importance of dye host on absorption, propagation losses, and amplified spontaneous emission for dye-doped polymer thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudket, Hélène; Nhung, Tran Hong; Ea-Kim, Buntha; Roger, Gisèle; Canva, Michael

    2006-10-01

    The absorption spectra of dye-doped polymer thin films made from a variety of five dyes and six matrices, either organic or organomineral, are analyzed to evaluate the residual absorption in the red wavelength tail and in particular at amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) wavelengths. An absorption cutoff wavelength is defined as the extrapolated wavelength at which the absorption losses are expected to become negligible compared to the structure losses. Such absorption-spectrum-extrapolated wavelengths are compared to the ASE wavelengths and found to correlate for most of the dye-matrix couples. The propagation losses of PM597-doped organic polymers are also measured and accordingly found to increase with the glass transition temperature of the host matrix.

  13. Arctic Sea Ice Maximum 2011

    NASA Video Gallery

    AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice: September 2010 to March 2011: Scientists tracking the annual maximum extent of Arctic sea ice said that 2011 was among the lowest ice extents measured since satellites began ...

  14. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  15. Near-unity broadband absorption designs for semiconducting nanowire arrays via localized radial mode excitation.

    PubMed

    Fountaine, Katherine T; Kendall, Christian G; Atwater, Harry A

    2014-05-01

    We report design methods for achieving near-unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays, illustrated by results for visible absorption in GaAs nanowires on Si substrates. Sparse (<5% fill fraction) nanowire arrays achieve near unity absorption at wire resonant wavelengths due to coupling into 'leaky' radial waveguide modes of individual wires and wire-wire scattering processes. From a detailed conceptual development of radial mode resonant absorption, we demonstrate two specific geometric design approaches to achieve near unity broadband light absorption in sparse nanowire arrays: (i) introducing multiple wire radii within a small unit cell array to increase the number of resonant wavelengths, yielding a 15% absorption enhancement relative to a uniform nanowire array and (ii) tapering of nanowires to introduce a continuum of diameters and thus resonant wavelengths excited within a single wire, yielding an 18% absorption enhancement over a uniform nanowire array.

  16. Effect of graphene on plasmonic metasurfaces at infrared wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Ueno, Masashi

    2013-11-15

    Significant enhancement of infrared transmittance by the presence of a graphene layer on a plasmonic metasurface (PLM) has been demonstrated. PLMs with different configurations were fabricated, and their transmittance with and without graphene was compared. Selective enhancement by graphene occurred at the plasmon resonance wavelength. The degree of enhancement was found to depend on the width of the gap between the periodic metal regions in the PLM. A maximum enhancement of ∼210% was achieved at a wavelength of 10 μm. The ability to achieve such a drastic increase in transmittance at the plasmon resonant wavelength is expected to lead to improvements in the performance of energy collecting devices and optical sensors.

  17. Effect of graphene on plasmonic metasurfaces at infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Ueno, Masashi

    2013-11-01

    Significant enhancement of infrared transmittance by the presence of a graphene layer on a plasmonic metasurface (PLM) has been demonstrated. PLMs with different configurations were fabricated, and their transmittance with and without graphene was compared. Selective enhancement by graphene occurred at the plasmon resonance wavelength. The degree of enhancement was found to depend on the width of the gap between the periodic metal regions in the PLM. A maximum enhancement of ˜210% was achieved at a wavelength of 10 μm. The ability to achieve such a drastic increase in transmittance at the plasmon resonant wavelength is expected to lead to improvements in the performance of energy collecting devices and optical sensors.

  18. Wavelength limits for InGaN quantum wells on GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Pristovsek, Markus

    2013-06-17

    The emission wavelength of coherently strained InGaN quantum wells (QW) is limited by the maximum thickness before relaxation starts. For high indium contents x>40% the resulting wavelength decreases because quantum confinement dominates. For low indium content x<40% the electron hole wave function overlap (and hence radiative emission) is strongly reduced with increasing QW thickness due to the quantum confined Stark effect and imposes another limit. This results in a maximum usable emission wavelength at around 600 nm for QWs with 40%-50% indium content. Relaxed InGaN buffer layers could help to push this further, especially on non- and semi-polar orientations.

  19. Principles of maximum entropy and maximum caliber in statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Lee, Julian; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-07-01

    The variational principles called maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and maximum caliber (MaxCal) are reviewed. MaxEnt originated in the statistical physics of Boltzmann and Gibbs, as a theoretical tool for predicting the equilibrium states of thermal systems. Later, entropy maximization was also applied to matters of information, signal transmission, and image reconstruction. Recently, since the work of Shore and Johnson, MaxEnt has been regarded as a principle that is broader than either physics or information alone. MaxEnt is a procedure that ensures that inferences drawn from stochastic data satisfy basic self-consistency requirements. The different historical justifications for the entropy S=-∑ipilog⁡pi and its corresponding variational principles are reviewed. As an illustration of the broadening purview of maximum entropy principles, maximum caliber, which is path entropy maximization applied to the trajectories of dynamical systems, is also reviewed. Examples are given in which maximum caliber is used to interpret dynamical fluctuations in biology and on the nanoscale, in single-molecule and few-particle systems such as molecular motors, chemical reactions, biological feedback circuits, and diffusion in microfluidics devices.

  20. Detection of foreign fibers in cotton using near-infrared optimal wavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Dongyao; Ding, Tianhuai

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this research was to develop an optimal wavelength imaging system for detecting foreign fibers in the near infrared (NIR) region from 750 to 2500 nm. This method is based on the principle that different fibers have different spectral absorptions and reflectance characteristics. When subjected to a source of illumination at different wavelengths, foreign fibers present different reflectance values from those of cotton fibers. For simultaneously discriminating several types of foreign fibers from cotton, an optimal wavelength evaluation function for describing the cotton-foreign-fiber absorption discrimination was set up. Through a Fourier transform spectrometer experiment, the optimal wavelength for detecting these foreign fibers was determined and accordingly an optimal wavelength imaging system was developed. The wavelength selection experiment showed that 940 nm was the most appropriate wavelength for detection of a wide range of foreign fibers in cotton, and the 940-nm imaging system gave clear image features of these foreign fibers. The result suggests that NIR optimal wavelength imaging is a feasible and effective method to detect foreign fibers in cotton, which are currently difficult to detect.

  1. Multi-wavelength narrow linewidth fiber laser based on distributed feedback fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jingsheng; Qi, Haifeng; Song, Zhiqiang; Guo, Jian; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Chang; Peng, Gangding

    2016-09-01

    A narrow linewidth laser configuration based on distributed feedback fiber lasers (DFB-FL) with eight wavelengths in the international telecommunication union (ITU) grid is presented and realized. In this laser configuration, eight phase-shifted gratings in series are bidirectionally pumped by two 980-nm laser diodes (LDs). The final laser output with over 10-mW power for each wavelength can be obtained, and the maximum power difference within eight wavelengths is 1.2 dB. The laser configuration with multiple wavelengths and uniform power outputs can be very useful in large scaled optical fiber hydrophone fields.

  2. Optical modulation of quantum cascade laser with optimized excitation wavelength.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Chen, Gang; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer

    2013-04-15

    The excitation wavelength for all-optical modulation of a 10.6 μm mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade laser (QCL) was varied in order to obtain maximum modulation depth. Both amplitude and wavelength modulation experiments were conducted at 820 nm and 1550 nm excitation respectively, whereby the latter matches the interband transition in the QCL active region. Experimental results show that for continuous-wave mode-operated QCL, the efficiency of free carrier generation is doubled under 1550 nm excitation compared with 820 nm excitation, resulting in an increase of the amplitude modulation index from 19% to 36%. At the same time, the maximum wavelength shift is more than doubled from 1.05 nm to 2.80 nm. Furthermore, for the first time to our knowledge, we demonstrated the optical switching of a QCL operated in pulse mode by simple variation of the excitation wavelength.

  3. The Effects of Space Weathering at UV Wavelengths: S-Class Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendrix, Amanda R.; Vilas, Faith

    2006-01-01

    We present evidence that space weathering manifests itself at near-UV wavelengths as a bluing of the spectrum, in contrast with the spectral reddening that has been seen at visible-near-IR wavelengths. Furthermore, the effects of space weathering at UV wavelengths tend to appear with less weathering than do the longer wavelength effects, suggesting that the UV wavelength range is a more sensitive indicator of weathering, and thus age. We report results from analysis of existing near-UV (approx.220-350 nm) measurements of S-type asteroids from the International Ultraviolet Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope and comparisons with laboratory measurements of meteorites to support this hypothesis. Composite spectra of S asteroids are produced by combining UV spacecraft data with ground-based longer wavelength data. At visible-near-IR wavelengths, S-type asteroids are generally spectrally redder (and darker) than ordinary chondrite meteorites, whereas the opposite is generally true at near-UV wavelengths. Similarly, laboratory measurements of lunar samples show that lunar soils (presumably more weathered) are spectrally redder at longer wavelengths, and spectrally bluer at near-UV wavelengths, than less weathered crushed lunar rocks. The UV spectral bluing may be a result of the addition of nanophase iron to the regolith through the weathering process. The UV bluing is most prominent in the 300-400 nm range, where the strong UV absorption edge is degraded with weathering.

  4. Review of short wavelength lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1985-03-18

    There has recently been a substantial amount of research devoted to the development of short wavelength amplifiers and lasers. A number of experimental results have been published wherein the observation of significant gain has been claimed on transitions in the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. The present review is intended to discuss the main approaches to the creation of population inversions and laser media in the short wavelength regime, and hopefully aid workers in the field by helping to provide access to a growing literature. The approaches to pumping EUV and soft x-ray lasers are discussed according to inversion mechanism. The approaches may be divided into roughly seven categories, including collisional excitation pumping, recombination pumping, direct photoionization and photoexcitation pumping, metastable state storage plus optical pumping, charge exchange pumping, and finally, the extension of free electron laser techniques into the EUV and soft x-ray regimes. 250 references.

  5. Monitoring of MOCVD reactants by UV absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Baucom, K.C.; Killeen, K.P.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, we describe how UV absorption measurements can be used to measure the flow rates of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactants. This method utilizes the calculation of UV extinction coefficients by measuring the total pressure and absorbance in the neat reactant system. The development of this quantitative reactant flow rate monitor allows for the direct measurement of the efficiency of a reactant bubbler. We demonstrate bubbler efficiency results for TMGa, and then explain some discrepancies found in the TMAl system due to the monomer to dimer equilibrium. Also, the UV absorption spectra of metal organic and hydride MOCVD reactants over the wavelength range 185 to 400 nm are reported.

  6. Laser wavelengths and oral implantology.

    PubMed

    Romanos, George E; Gutknecht, Norbert; Dieter, Sandra; Schwarz, Frank; Crespi, Roberto; Sculean, Anton

    2009-11-01

    In modern implant dentistry there are several clinical indications for laser surgery. Different laser systems have a considerable spectrum of application in soft and hard peri-implant tissues. The literature was searched for clinical application of different laser wavelengths in peri-implant tissues: second-stage surgery of submerged implants, treatment of infrabony defects, removal of peri-implant hyperplastic overgrowths, and, possibly, the preparation of bone cavities for implant placement. This report describes the state-of-the-art application of different laser systems in modern implant dentistry for the treatment of peri-implant lesions and decontamination of implant surfaces. Our study evaluated in vitro examinations, clinical experience and long-term clinical studies. The exact selection of the appropriate laser system and wavelength was dependent on the scientific evaluation of recent literature and the level of changes in implant and tissue temperatures during laser application. The significant reduction in bacteria on the implant surface and the peri-implant tissues during irradiation and the cutting effects associated with the coagulation properties of the lasers are the main reasons for laser application in the treatment of peri-implant lesions and the successful long-term prognosis of failing oral implants. The various applications of lasers in implant dentistry are dependent on the wavelength and laser-tissue interactions.

  7. An intensity-modulated dual-wavelength He-Ne laser for remote sensing of methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uehara, K.; posed.

    1986-01-01

    A new type of dual wavelength He-Ne laser is described in which the output power at each of the two wavelengths is modulated with equal amplitude and opposite phase to each other. This laser source can greatly simplify the setup and improve the sensitivity of the differential absorption measurements for the methane detection, as verified by a preliminary experiment. A simple scheme to measure the concentration of methane is also proposed.

  8. Convex accelerated maximum entropy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) spectral reconstruction methods provide a powerful framework for spectral estimation of nonuniformly sampled datasets. Many methods exist within this framework, usually defined based on the magnitude of a Lagrange multiplier in the MaxEnt objective function. An algorithm is presented here that utilizes accelerated first-order convex optimization techniques to rapidly and reliably reconstruct nonuniformly sampled NMR datasets using the principle of maximum entropy. This algorithm - called CAMERA for Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction Algorithm - is a new approach to spectral reconstruction that exhibits fast, tunable convergence in both constant-aim and constant-lambda modes. A high-performance, open source NMR data processing tool is described that implements CAMERA, and brief comparisons to existing reconstruction methods are made on several example spectra.

  9. Extraordinary Absorption of Decorated Undoped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, T.; Gómez-Santos, G.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2014-02-01

    We theoretically study absorption by an undoped graphene layer decorated with arrays of small particles. We discuss periodic and random arrays within a common formalism, which predicts a maximum absorption of 50% for suspended graphene in both cases. The limits of weak and strong scatterers are investigated, and an unusual dependence on particle-graphene separation is found and explained in terms of the effective number of contributing evanescent diffraction orders of the array. Our results can be important to boost absorption by single-layer graphene due to its simple setup with potential applications to light harvesting and photodetection based on energy (Förster) rather than charge transfer.

  10. Dust in MG II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.

    The dust absorption feature at 2175 AA is detected in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest-frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers, and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 AA (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 microns^{-1} and the central wavelength is 2240 AA. The Galactic dust feature has a central wavelength of 2176 AA and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 microns^{-1}. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 AA feature in Mg II absorbers and Galactic ISM can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them (cf. Malhotra 1997).

  11. Improved performance of P3HT:PCBM solar cells by both anode modification and short-wavelength energy utilization using Tb(aca)3phen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Zu-Liang; Wang, Yong-Sheng; He, Da-Wei; Fu, Ming

    2014-09-01

    The performance of P3HT:PCBM solar cells was improved by anode modification using spin-coated Tb(aca)3phen ultrathin films. The modification of the Tb(aca)3phen ultrathin film between the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and the PE-DOT:PSS layer resulted in a maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 2.99% compared to 2.66% for the reference device, which was due to the increase in the short-circuit current density (Jsc). The PCE improvement could be attributed to the short-wavelength energy utilization and the optimized morphology of the active layers. Tb(aca)3phen with its strong down-conversion luminescence properties is suitable for the P3HT:PCBM blend active layer, and the absorption region of the ternary blend films is extended into the near ultraviolet region. Furthermore, the crystallization and the surface morphology of P3HT:PCBM films were improved with the Tb(aca)3phen ultrathin film. The ultraviolent—visible absorption spectra, atomic force microscope (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the films were investigated. Both anode modification and short-wavelength energy utilization using Tb(aca)3phen in P3HT:PCBM solar cells led to about a 12% PCE increase.

  12. Independent component analysis for unmixing multi-wavelength photoacoustic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Lu; Cox, Ben

    2016-03-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a blind source unmixing method that may be used under certain circumstances to decompose multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) images into separate components representing individual chromophores. It has the advantages of being fast, easy to implement and computationally inexpensive. This study uses simulated multi-wavelength PA images to investigate the conditions required for ICA to be an accurate unmixing method and compares its performance to linear inversion. An approximate fluence adjustment based on spatially homogeneous optical properties equal to that of the background region was applied to the PA images before unmixing with ICA or LI. ICA is shown to provide accurate separation of the chromophores in cases where the absorption coefficients are lower than certain thresholds, some of which are comparable to physiologically relevant values. However, the results also show that the performance of ICA abruptly deteriorates when the absorption is increased beyond these thresholds. In addition, the accuracy of ICA decreases in the presence of spatially inhomogeneous absorption in the background.

  13. Sub-half-wavelength localization of an atom via trichromatic phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Hu, Xiang-ming

    2007-04-01

    We show that the trichromatic manipulation of the absorption spectrum leads to sub-half-wavelength atom localization. In particular, a three-level atom in the Λ configuration is considered, in which one transition is coupled by a trichromatic field with one sideband component being a standing-wave field while the other transition is probed by a weak monochromatic field. By varying the sum of relative phases of the sideband components of the trichromatic field to the central component, the atom is localized in either of the two half-wavelength regions with 50% detecting probability when the absorption spectrum is measured.

  14. Single frequency and wavelength stabilized near infrared laser source for water vapor DIAL remote sensing application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ti; Walters, Brooke; Shuman, Tim; Losee, Andrew; Schum, Tom; Puffenberger, Kent; Burnham, Ralph

    2015-02-01

    Fibertek has demonstrated a single frequency, wavelength stabilized near infrared laser transmitter for NASA airborne water vapor DIAL application. The application required a single-frequency laser transmitter operating at 935 nm near infrared (NIR) region of the water vapor absorption spectrum, capable of being wavelength seeded and locked to a reference laser source and being tuned at least 100 pm across the water absorption spectrum for DIAL on/off measurements. Fibertek is building a laser transmitter system based on the demonstrated results. The laser system will be deployed in a high altitude aircraft (ER-2 or UAV) to autonomously perform remote, long duration and high altitude water vapor measurements.

  15. The role of laser wavelength on plasma generation and expansion of ablation plumes in air

    SciTech Connect

    Hussein, A. E.; Diwakar, P. K.; Harilal, S. S.; Hassanein, A.

    2013-04-14

    We investigated the role of excitation laser wavelength on plasma generation and the expansion and confinement of ablation plumes at early times (0-500 ns) in the presence of atmospheric pressure. Fundamental, second, and fourth harmonic radiation from Nd:YAG laser was focused on Al target to produce plasma. Shadowgraphy, fast photography, and optical emission spectroscopy were employed to analyze the plasma plumes, and white light interferometry was used to characterize the laser ablation craters. Our results indicated that excitation wavelength plays a crucial role in laser-target and laser-plasma coupling, which in turn affects plasma plume morphology and radiation emission. Fast photography and shadowgraphy images showed that plasmas generated by 1064 nm are more cylindrical compared to plasmas generated by shorter wavelengths, indicating the role of inverse bremsstrahlung absorption at longer laser wavelength excitation. Electron density estimates using Stark broadening showed higher densities for shorter wavelength laser generated plasmas, demonstrating the significance of absorption caused by photoionization. Crater depth analysis showed that ablated mass is significantly higher for UV wavelengths compared to IR laser radiation. In this experimental study, the use of multiple diagnostic tools provided a comprehensive picture of the differing roles of laser absorption mechanisms during ablation.

  16. Quantitative comparison of wavelength dependence on penetration depth and imaging contrast for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography using supercontinuum sources at five wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, S.; Nishizawa, N.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non invasive optical imaging technology for micron-scale cross-sectional imaging of biological tissue and materials. We have been investigating ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) using fiber based supercontinuum sources. Although ultrahigh longitudinal resolution was achieved in several center wavelength regions, its low penetration depth is a serious limitation for other applications. To realize ultrahigh resolution and deep penetration depth simultaneously, it is necessary to choose the proper wavelength to maximize the light penetration and enhance the image contrast at deeper depths. Recently, we have demonstrated the wavelength dependence of penetration depth and imaging contrast for ultrahigh resolution OCT at 0.8 μm, 1.3 μm, and 1.7 μm wavelength ranges. In this paper, additionally we used SC sources at 1.06 μm and 1.55 μm, and we have investigated the wavelength dependence of UHR-OCT at five wavelength regions. The image contrast and penetration depth have been discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient and water absorption of samples. Almost the same optical characteristics in longitudinal and lateral resolution, sensitivity, and incident optical power at all wavelength regions were demonstrated. We confirmed the enhancement of image contrast and decreased ambiguity of deeper epithelioid structure at longer wavelength region.

  17. The Fine-Structure Constant and Wavelength Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan

    The fine-structure constant is a fundamental constant of the universe--and widely thought to have an unchanging value. However, the past decade has witnessed a controversy unfold over the claimed detection that the fine-structure constant had a different value in the distant past. These astrophysical measurements were made with spectrographs at the world's largest optical telescopes. The spectrographs make precise measurements of the wavelength spacing of absorption lines in the metals in the gas between the quasar background source and our telescopes on Earth. The wavelength spacing gives a snapshot of the atomic physics at the time of the interaction. Whether the fine-structure constant has changed is determined by comparing the atomic physics in the distant past with the atomic physics of today. We present our contribution to the discussion by analyzing three nights data taken with the HIRES instrument (High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph) on the Keck telescope. We provide an independent measurement on the fine-structure constant from the Damped Lyman alpha system at a redshift of z =2.309 (10.8 billion years ago) quasar PHL957. We developed a new method for calibrating the wavelength scale of a quasar exposure to a much higher precision than previously achieved. In our subsequent analysis, we discovered unexpected wavelength calibration errors that has not been taken into account in the previously reported measurements. After characterizing the wavelength miscalibrations on the Keck-HIRES instrument, we obtained several nights of data from the main competing instrument, the VLT (Very Large Telescope) with UVES (Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph). We applied our new wavelength calibration method and uncovered similar in nature systematic errors as found on Keck-HIRES. Finally, we make a detailed Monte Carlo exploration of the effects that these miscalibrations have on making precision fine-structure constant measurements.

  18. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  19. Continuous 1052, 1064 nm dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Yuan, Haiyang; Wang, Mingshan; Huang, Wencai

    2016-10-01

    Dual-wavelength lasers are usually obtained through balancing the net gain of the two oscillating lines. Competition between transitions 1052 nm, 1061 nm and 1064 nm is utilized to realize a continuous wave 1052 and 1064 nm dual-wavelength Nd:YAG laser firstly in this paper. A specially designed Fabry-Perot band-pass filter is exploited as output coupler to control the thresholds of the oscillating wavelengths. The maximum power of the dual-wavelength laser is 1.6 W and the slope efficiency is about 10%. The power instability of the output dual-wavelength laser is smaller than ±4% in half an hour. The mechanism presented in this paper may provide a new way to obtain dual-wavelength lasers.

  20. Solar Maximum Mission Experiment - Ultraviolet Spectroscopy and Polarimetry on the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Cheng, C. C.; Woodgate, B. E.; Brandt, J. C.; Chapman, R. D.; Athay, R. G.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, E. C.; Gurman, J. B.; Hyder, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft is described. It is pointed out that the instrument, which operates in the wavelength range 1150-3600 A, has a spatial resolution of 2-3 arcsec and a spectral resolution of 0.02 A FWHM in second order. A Gregorian telescope, with a focal length of 1.8 m, feeds a 1 m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. A polarimeter comprising rotating Mg F2 waveplates can be inserted behind the spectrometer entrance slit; it permits all four Stokes parameters to be determined. Among the observing modes are rasters, spectral scans, velocity measurements, and polarimetry. Examples of initial observations made since launch are presented.

  1. The effects of wavelength and wavelength mixing ratios on microalgae growth and nitrogen, phosphorus removal using Scenedesmus sp. for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Su-Hyun; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-02-01

    In wastewater treatment using microalgae, the effects of wavelength and wavelength mixing ratio on microalgae growth and removal of nitrogen and phosphorus were evaluated using LEDs (white light, 670nm, 450nm, and 525nm). Microalgae production rates were enhanced by a maximum of 45% with 400-700nm white light compared to that of a single wavelength. The phosphorus removal rate was as high as 90% with blue light. When red light and blue light were mixed and supplied, the microalgae production rate was about 50% higher than the rate of the culture with white light. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal rates were as high as approximately 15mg/L/day at a wavelength mixing ratio of 7 (red light):3 (blue light) and 2.1mg/L/day at a wavelength mixing ratio of 5 (red light):5 (blue light). PMID:23306113

  2. The effects of wavelength and wavelength mixing ratios on microalgae growth and nitrogen, phosphorus removal using Scenedesmus sp. for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Su-Hyun; Hwang, Sun-Jin

    2013-02-01

    In wastewater treatment using microalgae, the effects of wavelength and wavelength mixing ratio on microalgae growth and removal of nitrogen and phosphorus were evaluated using LEDs (white light, 670nm, 450nm, and 525nm). Microalgae production rates were enhanced by a maximum of 45% with 400-700nm white light compared to that of a single wavelength. The phosphorus removal rate was as high as 90% with blue light. When red light and blue light were mixed and supplied, the microalgae production rate was about 50% higher than the rate of the culture with white light. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal rates were as high as approximately 15mg/L/day at a wavelength mixing ratio of 7 (red light):3 (blue light) and 2.1mg/L/day at a wavelength mixing ratio of 5 (red light):5 (blue light).

  3. The Maximum Density of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses a series of experiments performed by Thomas Hope in 1805 which show the temperature at which water has its maximum density. Early data cast into a modern form as well as guidelines and recent data collected from the author provide background for duplicating Hope's experiments in the classroom. (JN)

  4. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Gohar, H.

    2015-09-01

    We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax =c4 / 4 G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  5. Maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mottershead, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the formalism of maximum entropy beam diagnostic tomography as applied to the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) prototype accelerator. The same formalism has also been used with streak camera data to produce an ultrahigh speed movie of the beam profile of the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) at Livermore. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Maximum cooling and maximum efficiency of thermoacoustic refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartibu, L. K.

    2016-01-01

    This work provides valid experimental evidence on the difference between design for maximum cooling and maximum efficiency for thermoacoustic refrigerators. In addition, the influence of the geometry of the honeycomb ceramic stack on the performance of thermoacoustic refrigerators is presented as it affects the cooling power. Sixteen cordierite honeycomb ceramic stacks with square cross sections having four different lengths of 26, 48, 70 and 100 mm are considered. Measurements are taken at six different locations of the stack hot ends from the pressure antinode, namely 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 mm respectively. Measurement of temperature difference across the stack ends at steady state for different stack geometries are used to compute the cooling load and the coefficient of performance. The results obtained with atmospheric air showed that there is a distinct optimum depending on the design goal.

  7. Compact fixed wavelength femtosecond oscillators for multi-photon imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.; Zadoyan, R.; Baldacchini, T.; Franke, T.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years two-photon microscopy with fixed-wavelength has raised increasing interest in life-sciences: Two-photon (2P) absorption spectra of common dyes are broader than single-photon ones. Therefore, excitation of several dyes simultaneously with a single IR laser wavelength is feasible and could be seen as an advantage in 2P microscopy. We used pulsed fixed-wavelength infrared lasers with center wavelength at 1040 nm, for two-photon microscopy in a variety of biologically relevant samples, among these a mouse brain sample, a mouse artery (within the animal, acute preparation), and a preparation of mouse bladder. The 1040 nm laser proved to be efficient not only in exciting fluorescence from yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and red fluorescent dyes, but also for second harmonic generation (SHG) signals from muscle tissue and collagen. With this work we demonstrate that economical, small-footprint fixedwavelength lasers can present an interesting alternative to tunable lasers that are commonly used in multiphoton microscopy.

  8. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10-8.

  9. Note: Laser wavelength precision measurement based on a laser synthetic wavelength interferometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liping; Chen, Benyong; Zhang, Shihua; Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Enzheng

    2016-08-01

    A laser wavelength precision measurement method is presented based on the laser synthetic wavelength interferometer (LSWI). According to the linear relation between the displacements of measurement and reference arms in the interferometer, the synthetic wavelength produced by an unknown wavelength and a reference wavelength can be measured by detecting the phase coincidences of two interference signals. The advantage of the method is that a larger synthetic wavelength resulting from an unknown wavelength very close to the reference wavelength can be easily determined according to the linear relation in the interferometer. Then the unknown wavelength is derived according to the one-to-one corresponding relationship between single wavelength and synthetic wavelength. Wavelengths of an external cavity diode laser and two He-Ne lasers were determined experimentally. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to realize a relative uncertainty on the order of 10(-8). PMID:27587172

  10. A paradigm shift in the excitation wavelength of upconversion nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Idris, Niagara Muhammad; Huang, Kai; Zhang, Yong

    2014-07-01

    The past two decades witnessed the emergence of upconversion nanoparticles as promising luminophores finding multifarious uses from biological studies to solar cells. Progress in their practical use, however, has been hampered by requirements to be excited within a narrow absorption band at around 980 nm. Since the main constituent of biological tissue - water - absorbs strongly in this region, significant reduction in the penetration depth is anticipated as the 980 nm light gets attenuated travelling through tissues, besides also risking tissue damage from the overheating effect. Just recently, remarkable efforts to engineer the excitation of upconversion nanoparticles to a more suitable wavelength for biological applications were reported. This article gives an insightful view on the different ingenious designs that have been reported and their progression towards the development of upconversion nanoparticles with biologically friendlier excitation wavelength.

  11. A Fabry--Perot microinterferometer for visible wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Raley, N.F.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Koo, J.C.; Beiriger, W.J.; Trujillo, J.T.; Yu, C.M.; Loomis, G.M.; Chow, R.

    1992-04-01

    We report here on our efforts to develop a silicon-based microinterferometer for optical applications in the visible spectral region using micromachining fabrication techniques. The interferometer is formed by two parallel dielectric mirrors supported on membranes which are electrostatically deflected for wavelength control. A simplified two-wafer fabrication process has been designed and investigated. We have obtained 250 nm membrane deflection for an applied voltage of 100 V. Hafnium dioxide-silicon dioxide dielectric mirrors have been fabricated on membrane supports and also free-standing with high reflectivity and low stress. Optical transmission of fixed mirrors yield 1.6 nm spectral resolution at 450 nm wavelength with significant signal and selectivity. Anticipated applications include microinstrument spectroscopy systems for atomic absorption, ellipsometry, imaging, optical fiber communications, and general spectrophotometer uses as well as accelerometry.

  12. Propagation effects at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, R. K.

    The lower atmosphere can affect millimeter wave communication system performance by producing large variations in signal level. Several different propagation phenomena are responsible absorption by oxygen and water vapor, scattering by turbulent fluctuations in the index of refraction, and attenuation by clouds, fog, or rain. Models are available for the calculation of propagation effects on a path when the meteorological conditions are known. This paper reviews the available propagation models for the prediction of link reliability.

  13. Wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Harter, D.J.; Bado, P.

    1988-11-01

    We describe a wavelength tunable alexandrite regenerative amplifier which is used to amplify nanosecond slices from a single-frequency cw dye laser or 50-ps pulses emitted by a diode laser to energies in the 10-mJ range. The amplified 5-ns slices generated by the cw-pumped line narrowed dye laser are Fourier transform limited. The 50-ps pulses emitted by a gain-switched diode laser are amplified by more than 10 orders of magnitude in a single stage.

  14. Plasmonic lens for ultraviolet wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Minoru; Tanimoto, Takuya; Inoue, Tsutomu; Aizawa, Kento

    2016-09-01

    A plasmonic lens (PL) is one of the promising photonic devices utilizing the surface plasmon wave. In this study, we have newly developed a PL with a 3.5 µm diameter for a wavelength of 375 nm (ultraviolet region). It is composed of multiple circular slit apertures milled in aluminum (Al) thin film. We have simulated the electric field distribution of the PL, and confirmed that a tightly focused beam spot of subwavelength size in the far-field region was attained. We have also measured the focusing characteristics of the PL using a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and compared them with the calculated results.

  15. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin

  16. Mechanism of wavelength conversion in polystyrene doped with benzoxanthene: emergence of a complex

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Hisashi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent guest molecules doped in polymers have been used to convert ultraviolet light into visible light for applications ranging from optical fibres to filters for the cultivation of plants. The wavelength conversion process involves the absorption of light at short wavelengths followed by fluorescence emission at a longer wavelength. However, a precise understanding of the light conversion remains unclear. Here we show light responses for a purified polystyrene base substrates doped with fluorescent benzoxanthene in concentrations varied over four orders of magnitude. The shape of the excitation spectrum for fluorescence emission changes significantly with the concentration of the benzoxanthene, indicating formation of a base substrate/fluorescent molecule complex. Furthermore, the wavelength conversion light yield increases in three stages depending on the nature of the complex. These findings identify a mechanism that will have many applications in wavelength conversion materials. PMID:23974205

  17. Wavelength dependence of mycosporine-like amino acid synthesis in Gyrodinium dorsum.

    PubMed

    Klisch, M; Häder, D-P

    2002-02-01

    The synthesis or accumulation of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) is an important UV tolerance mechanism in aquatic organisms. To investigate the wavelength dependence of MAA synthesis in the marine dinoflagellate Gyrodinium dorsum, the organism was exposed to polychromatic radiation (PAR and UV) from a solar simulator for up to 72 h. Different irradiance spectra were produced by inserting various cut-off filters between lamp and samples. A polychromatic action spectrum for the synthesis of MAA synthesis was constructed. PAR and long wavelength UV-A radiation showed almost no effect while the most effective wavelength range was around 310 nm. Shorter wavelengths where less effective in the induction of MAA synthesis. Wavelengths below 300 nm damaged the organisms severely as indicated by a decrease in chlorophyll a absorption.

  18. WAVELENGTH CALIBRATION OF THE VLT-UVES SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Griest, Kim; Murphy, Michael T. E-mail: mmurphy@swin.edu.a

    2010-11-01

    We attempt to measure possible miscalibration of the wavelength scale of the VLT-UVES spectrograph. We take spectra of QSO HE0515-4414 through the UVES iodine cell which contains thousands of well-calibrated iodine lines and compare these lines to the wavelength scale from the standard thorium-argon pipeline calibration. Analyzing three exposures of this z = 1.71 QSO, we find two distinct types of calibration shifts needed to correct the Th/Ar wavelength scale. First, there is an overall average velocity shift of between 100 m s{sup -1} and 500 m s{sup -1} depending upon the exposure. Second, within a given exposure, we find intra-order velocity distortions of 100 m s{sup -1} up to more than 200 m s{sup -1}. These calibration errors are similar to, but smaller than, those found earlier in the Keck HIRES spectrometer. We discuss the possible origins of these two types of miscalibration. We also explore the implications of these calibration errors on the systematic error in measurements of {Delta}{alpha}/{alpha}, the change in the fine-structure constant derived from measurement of the relative redshifts of absorption lines in QSO absorption systems. The overall average, exposure-dependent shifts should be less relevant for fine-structure work, but the intra-order shifts have the potential to affect these results. Using either our measured calibration offsets or a Gaussian model with sigma of around 90 m s{sup -1}, Monte Carlo mock experiments find errors in {Delta}{alpha}/{alpha} of between 1 x 10{sup -6} N {sup -1/2}{sub sys} and 3 x 10{sup -6} N {sup -1/2}{sub sys}, where N{sub sys} is the number of systems used and the range is due to dependence on how many metallic absorption lines in each system are compared.

  19. Choosing optimal wavelength for photodynamic therapy of port wine stains by mathematic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Gu, Ying; Zuo, Zhaohui; Huang, Naiyan

    2011-09-01

    Many laser wavelengths have been used in photodynamic therapy (PDT) for port wine stains (PWS). However, how these wavelengths result in different PDT outcomes has not been clearly illuminated. This study is designed to analyze which wavelengths would be the most advantageous for use in PDT for PWS. The singlet oxygen yield in PDT-treated PWS skin under different wavelengths at the same photosensitizer dosage was simulated and the following three situations were simulated and compared: 1. PDT efficiency of 488, 532, 510, 578, and 630 nm laser irradiation at clinical dosage (100 mW/cm2, 40 min); 2. PDT efficiency of different wavelength for PWS with hyperpigmentation after previous PDT; 3. PDT efficiency of different wavelengths for PWS, in which only deeply located ectatic vessels remained. The results showed that singlet oxygen yield is the highest at 510 nm, it is similar at 532 nm and 488 nm, and very low at 578 nm and 630 nm. This result is identical to the state in clinic. According to this theoretical study, the optimal wavelength for PDT in the treatment of PWS should near the absorption peaks of photosensitizer and where absorption from native chromophores (haemoglobin and melanin) is diminished.

  20. Phosphate Yb3+ photonic crystal fiber single-mode laser with enormous high pump absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franczyk, M.; Stepien, R.; Pysz, D.; Kujawa, I.; Buczynski, R.

    2014-08-01

    We demonstrate a single-mode 6 cm long, phosphate fiber laser with maximum power of 9.0 W. Laser action output power per fiber length of 150 W m-1 was achieved and this is the highest value ever reported in a single-mode fiber laser using a phosphate glass fiber. The slope efficiency of the laser was 36.2% and lasing wavelength was 1028 nm. We used a 6% mol ytterbium-doped, air-clad photonic crystal fiber with the core of 30 µm in diameter. Estimated pump absorption in the fiber exceeded 400 dB m-1.

  1. [Characteristic wavelength variable optimization of near-infrared spectroscopy based on Kalman filtering].

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Qi; Ge, Hui-Fang; Li, Gui-Bin; Yu, Dian-Yu; Hu, Li-Zhi; Jiang, Lian-Zhou

    2014-04-01

    Combining classical Kalman filter with NIR analysis technology, a new method of characteristic wavelength variable selection, namely Kalman filtering method, is presented. The principle of Kalman filter for selecting optimal wavelength variable was analyzed. The wavelength selection algorithm was designed and applied to NIR detection of soybean oil acid value. First, the PLS (partial leastsquares) models were established by using different absorption bands of oil. The 4 472-5 000 cm(-1) characteristic band of oil acid value, including 132 wavelengths, was selected preliminarily. Then the Kalman filter was used to select characteristic wavelengths further. The PLS calibration model was established using selected 22 characteristic wavelength variables, the determination coefficient R2 of prediction set and RMSEP (root mean squared error of prediction) are 0.970 8 and 0.125 4 respectively, equivalent to that of 132 wavelengths, however, the number of wavelength variables was reduced to 16.67%. This algorithm is deterministic iteration, without complex parameters setting and randomicity of variable selection, and its physical significance was well defined. The modeling using a few selected characteristic wavelength variables which affected modeling effect heavily, instead of total spectrum, can make the complexity of model decreased, meanwhile the robustness of model improved. The research offered important reference for developing special oil near infrared spectroscopy analysis instruments on next step.

  2. Wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent and single scattering albedo observed by skyradiometer in Seoul, Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Ja-Ho; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Jaehwa; Eck, Thomas F.; Lee, Yun Gon; Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Mijin; Jung, Ukkyo; Yoon, Jongmin; Mok, Jungbin; Cho, Hi-Ku

    2016-11-01

    Absorption and scattering characteristics of various aerosol events are investigated using 2-years of measurements from a skyradiometer at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. Both transported dust and anthropogenic aerosols are observed at distinct geo-location of Seoul, a megacity located a few thousand kilometers away from dust source regions in China. We focus on the wavelength dependence of Ångström exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA), showing the characteristics of regional aerosols. The correlation between spectral SSAs and AEs calculated using different wavelength pairs generally indicates relatively weak absorption of fine-mode aerosols (urban pollution and/or biomass burning) and strong absorption of coarse-mode aerosols (desert dust) at this location. AE ratio (AER), a ratio of AEs calculated using wavelength pair between shorter (340-675 nm) and longer wavelength pair (675-1020 nm) correlates differently with SSA according to the dominant size of local aerosols. Correlations between SSA and AER show strong absorption of aerosols for AER < 1.0 and weak absorption for AER > 2.0. Based on the seasonal pattern of wavelength dependence of AER and SSA, this correlation difference looks to reveal the separated characteristics of transported dust and anthropogenic particles from urban pollution respectively. The seasonal characteristics of AER and SSAs also show that the skyradiometer measurement with multiple wavelengths may be able to detect the water soluble brown carbon, one of the important secondary organic aerosols in the summertime atmospheric composition.

  3. Absorption of very high energy gamma rays in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernetto, Silvia; Lipari, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    Galactic gamma ray astronomy at very high energy (Eγ≳30 TeV ) is a vital tool in the study of the nonthermal universe. The interpretation of the observations in this energy region requires the precise modeling of the attenuation of photons due to pair production interactions (γ γ →e+e- ) where the targets are the radiation fields present in interstellar space. For gamma rays with energy Eγ≳300 TeV the attenuation is mostly due to the photons of the cosmic microwave background radiation. At lower energy the most important targets are infrared photons with wavelengths in the range λ ≃50 - 500 μ m emitted by dust. The evaluation of the attenuation requires a good knowledge of the density, and energy and angular distributions of the target photons for all positions in the Galaxy. In this work we discuss a simple model for the infrared radiation that depends on only few parameters associated to the space and temperature distributions of the emitting dust. The model allows to compute with good accuracy the effects of absorption for any space and energy distribution of the diffuse Galactic gamma ray emission. The absorption probability due to the Galactic infrared radiation is maximum for Eγ≃150 TeV , and can be as large as Pabs≃0.45 for distant sources on lines of sight that pass close to the Galactic center. The systematic uncertainties on the absorption probability are estimated as Δ Pabs≲0.08 .

  4. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of hyperfine layers on surfaces of semiconductors and dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruzinov, S. N.; Tolstoy, V. P.

    1988-02-01

    Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy of film son surfaces of transparent or weakly absorbing semiconductor and dielectric substrates is analyzed theoretically, the purpose being to establish the conditions for maximum sensitivity of this method. The absorption factor, namely the relative change of the reflection coefficient upon formation of a film on the substrate surface, is selected as the sensitivity criterion. The analysis is based on exact relations, one for a homogeneous isotopic absorbing film between substrate and ambient medium with plane-parallel boundaries and one for a reflecting layer with the possibility of multiple reflections taken into account. Calculations have been programmed on a computer for up to 60 nm thick SiO2 films on various substrates and infrared radiation within the 8 to 11 gmm waveband. The results indicate that the dependence of the absorption factor on the radiation wavelength and on the film thickness is different with the radiation s-polarized than with the radiation p-polarized. Calculations have also yielded the dispersion of optical constants characterizing a SiO2 film. According to these results, infrared spectroscopy is most sensitive to films on substrates with a small refractive index and when done with p-polarized radiation incident at exactly or approximately the Brewster angle for a determination of their presence and their composition respectively, also when no multiple reflections occur.

  5. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Kita, Tomohiro Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-16

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  6. Compact silicon photonic wavelength-tunable laser diode with ultra-wide wavelength tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kita, Tomohiro; Tang, Rui; Yamada, Hirohito

    2015-03-01

    We present a wavelength-tunable laser diode with a 99-nm-wide wavelength tuning range. It has a compact wavelength-tunable filter with high wavelength selectivity fabricated using silicon photonics technology. The silicon photonic wavelength-tunable filter with wide wavelength tuning range was realized using two ring resonators and an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The wavelength-tunable laser diode fabricated by butt-joining a silicon photonic filter and semiconductor optical amplifier shows stable single-mode operation over a wide wavelength range.

  7. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moughames, J.; Jradi, S.; Chan, T. M.; Akil, S.; Battie, Y.; Naciri, A. En; Herro, Z.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Joly, L.; Cousin, J.; Bruyant, A.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ3, slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications.

  8. Wavelength-scale light concentrator made by direct 3D laser writing of polymer metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Moughames, J.; Jradi, S.; Chan, T. M.; Akil, S.; Battie, Y.; Naciri, A. En; Herro, Z.; Guenneau, S.; Enoch, S.; Joly, L.; Cousin, J.; Bruyant, A.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the realization of functional infrared light concentrators based on a thick layer of air-polymer metamaterial with controlled pore size gradients. The design features an optimum gradient index profile leading to light focusing in the Fresnel zone of the structures for two selected operating wavelength domains near 5.6 and 10.4 μm. The metamaterial which consists in a thick polymer containing air holes with diameters ranging from λ/20 to λ/8 is made using a 3D lithography technique based on the two-photon polymerization of a homemade photopolymer. Infrared imaging of the structures reveals a tight focusing for both structures with a maximum local intensity increase by a factor of 2.5 for a concentrator volume of 1.5 λ3, slightly limited by the residual absorption of the selected polymer. Such porous and flat metamaterial structures offer interesting perspectives to increase infrared detector performance at the pixel level for imaging or sensing applications. PMID:27698476

  9. Developability assessment of clinical drug products with maximum absorbable doses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuan; Rose, John P; Van Gelder, Jan

    2012-05-10

    Maximum absorbable dose refers to the maximum amount of an orally administered drug that can be absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Maximum absorbable dose, or D(abs), has proved to be an important parameter for quantifying the absorption potential of drug candidates. The purpose of this work is to validate the use of D(abs) in a developability assessment context, and to establish appropriate protocol and interpretation criteria for this application. Three methods for calculating D(abs) were compared by assessing how well the methods predicted the absorption limit for a set of real clinical candidates. D(abs) was calculated for these clinical candidates by means of a simple equation and two computer simulation programs, GastroPlus and an program developed at Eli Lilly and Company. Results from single dose escalation studies in Phase I clinical trials were analyzed to identify the maximum absorbable doses for these compounds. Compared to the clinical results, the equation and both simulation programs provide conservative estimates of D(abs), but in general D(abs) from the computer simulations are more accurate, which may find obvious advantage for the simulations in developability assessment. Computer simulations also revealed the complex behavior associated with absorption saturation and suggested in most cases that the D(abs) limit is not likely to be achieved in a typical clinical dose range. On the basis of the validation findings, an approach is proposed for assessing absorption potential, and best practices are discussed for the use of D(abs) estimates to inform clinical formulation development strategies.

  10. Contributions of particle absorption to mass extinction coefficients (0.55-14microm) of soil-derived atmospheric dusts: erratum.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R

    1980-04-01

    Mass extinction coefficients of soil-derived atmospheric dusts often are determined largely by the absorption (rather than scattering) by individual particles, especially at longer IR wavelengths. Under many conditions, reasonable estimates of mass extinction coefficients of dusts can be made from absorption coefficients without the need for detailed knowledge of particle optical constants to perform, e.g., Mie calculations. This paper discusses absorption coefficients of dusts in the visible and IR wavelengths and the physical mechanisms of dust aerosol generation determining that portion of extinction attributable to absorption in a given dust cloud. Some soils, especially clays, can produce dust clouds that are almost pure. absorbers at longer IR wavelengths.

  11. Contributions of particle absorption to mass extinction coefficients (0.55-14 microm) of soil-derived atmospheric dusts.

    PubMed

    Carlon, H R

    1980-03-01

    Mass extinction coefficients of soil-derived atmospheric dusts often are determined largely by the absorption (rather than scattering) by individual particles, especially at longer IR wavelengths. Under many conditions, reasonable estimates of mass extinction coefficients of dusts can be made from absorption coefficients without the need for detailed knowledge of particle optical constants to perform, e.g., Mie calculations. This paper discusses absorption coefficients of dusts in the visible and IR wavelengths and the physical mechanisms of dust aerosol generation determining that portion of extinction attributable to absorption in a given dust cloud. Some soils, especially clays, can produce dust clouds that are almost pure absorbers at longer IR wavelengths.

  12. Dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser for trace gas spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jágerská, J.; Tuzson, B.; Mangold, M.; Emmenegger, L.; Jouy, P.; Hugi, A.; Beck, M.; Faist, J.; Looser, H.

    2014-10-20

    We demonstrate a sequentially operating dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser with electrically separated laser sections, emitting single-mode at 5.25 and 6.25 μm. Based on a single waveguide ridge, this laser represents a considerable asset to optical sensing and trace gas spectroscopy, as it allows probing multiple gas species with spectrally distant absorption features using conventional optical setups without any beam combining optics. The laser capability was demonstrated in simultaneous NO and NO{sub 2} detection, reaching sub-ppb detection limits and selectivity comparable to conventional high-end spectroscopic systems.

  13. Broadband laser diode emitting at 1. 28. mu. m wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, K.; Noda, J.

    1985-10-15

    This letter presents a broadband laser diode (LD) emitting at the 1.28 ..mu..m wavelength fabricated by introducing an absorption region (300 ..mu..m long) into a conventional 600-..mu..m-long InGaAsP laser diode. The LD operates by the pulsed modulation of a high peak current whose repetition rate and duty cycle are respectively 200 kHz and 5%. The typical output power and the spectral width of the LD are 3.8 mW and 58 A, and the measured coherence length is 210 ..mu..m.

  14. Theoretical study of photophysical properties of 1,4-dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]pyrrole-cored branched molecules with thienylenevinylene arms toward broad absorption spectra for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shanshan; Tang, Binbin; Liang, Dadong; Chen, Guang; Jin, Ruifa

    2013-09-01

    A series of oligo(thienylenevinylene) derivatives with 1,4-dihydropyrrolo[3,2-b]pyrrole as core has been investigated at the PBE0/6-31G(d) and the TD-PBE0/6-31+G(d,p) levels to design materials with high performances such as broad absorption spectra and higher balance transfer property. The results show that position and amount of arm affect the electronic density contours of frontier molecular orbitals significantly. The molecule with four arms owns the narrowest energy gap and the largest maximum absorption wavelength, and the molecule with two arms in positions a and c has the broadest absorption region among the designed molecules. Calculated reorganization energies of the designed molecules indicate that the molecules with two arms can be good potential ambipolar transport materials under proper operating conditions.

  15. Making Displaced Holograms At Two Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witherow, William K.; Ecker, Andreas

    1989-01-01

    Two-wavelength holographic system augmented with pair of prisms to introduce small separation between holograms formed simultaneously at two wavelengths on holographic plate. Principal use in study of flows. Gradients in index of refraction of fluid caused by variations in temperature, concentration, or both. Holography at one wavelength cannot be used to distinguish between two types of variations. Difference between spacings of fringes in photographs reconstructed from holograms taken simultaneously at two different wavelengths manipulated mathematically to determine type of variation.

  16. Low control-power wavelength conversion on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Lombardo, David; Mathews, Jay; Agha, Imad

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate controlled wavelength conversion on a silicon chip based on four-wave mixing Bragg scattering (FWM-BS). A total conversion efficiency of 5% is achieved with strongly unbalanced pumps and a controlling peak power of 55 mW, while the efficiency is over 15% when using less asymmetric pumps. The numerical simulation agrees with the experimental results. Both time domain and spectral domain noise measurements show as low as 2 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) penalty because of the strong pump noise, two-photon absorption, and free-carrier absorption in silicon. We discuss how the scheme can be used to implement an all-optically controlled high-speed switch.

  17. The Testability of Maximum Magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clements, R.; Schorlemmer, D.; Gonzalez, A.; Zoeller, G.; Schneider, M.

    2012-12-01

    Recent disasters caused by earthquakes of unexpectedly large magnitude (such as Tohoku) illustrate the need for reliable assessments of the seismic hazard. Estimates of the maximum possible magnitude M at a given fault or in a particular zone are essential parameters in probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), but their accuracy remains untested. In this study, we discuss the testability of long-term and short-term M estimates and the limitations that arise from testing such rare events. Of considerable importance is whether or not those limitations imply a lack of testability of a useful maximum magnitude estimate, and whether this should have any influence on current PSHA methodology. We use a simple extreme value theory approach to derive a probability distribution for the expected maximum magnitude in a future time interval, and we perform a sensitivity analysis on this distribution to determine if there is a reasonable avenue available for testing M estimates as they are commonly reported today: devoid of an appropriate probability distribution of their own and estimated only for infinite time (or relatively large untestable periods). Our results imply that any attempt at testing such estimates is futile, and that the distribution is highly sensitive to M estimates only under certain optimal conditions that are rarely observed in practice. In the future we suggest that PSHA modelers be brutally honest about the uncertainty of M estimates, or must find a way to decrease its influence on the estimated hazard.

  18. Multiple wavelength light collimator and monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gore, Warren J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An optical system for receiving and collimating light and for transporting and processing light received in each of N wavelength ranges, including near-ultraviolet, visible, near-infrared and mid-infrared wavelengths, to determine a fraction of light received, and associated dark current, in each wavelength range in each of a sequence of time intervals.

  19. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  20. Long-term wavelength drift compensation of tunable pulsed dye laser for sodium detection lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yuan; Cheng, Xuewu; Li, Faquan; Wang, Jihong; Yang, Yong; Lin, Xin; Gong, Shunsheng

    2015-11-01

    Wavelength stabilization for a pulsed laser presents more challenges than that of continuous wave laser. We have developed a simple and efficient long-term wavelength drifts compensation technique for tunable pulsed dye lasers (PDL) applied in sodium detection lidar system. Wavelength calibration and locking are implemented by using optogalvanic (OG) spectroscopy in a Na hollow cathode lamp (HCL) in conjunction with a digital control software. Optimization of OG signals for better laser wavelength discrimination and feedback control is performed. Test results indicate that locking the multimode broadband PDL to the Na atomic transition corresponding to 589.158 nm is well achieved although the temperature in the laboratory is unstable. Through active compensation, the maximum wavelength drift is reduced from over 5 pm to 0.42 pm in 10 h and the maximum wavelength drift rate of the PDL is improved from 3.3 pm/h to 0.3 pm/h. It has been used to efficient sodium resonance fluorescence lidar detection. This technique is economical and easy to implement, and it provides flexible wavelength control and allows generalization for some other applications which require the wavelength of tunable pulsed lasers to be fixed at an atomic resonance transition references.

  1. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  2. Sub-microsecond wavelength stabilization of tunable lasers with the internal wavelength locker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Ryoga; Tatsumoto, Yudai; Sakuma, Kazuki; Onji, Hirokazu; Shimokozono, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazutoshi

    2016-08-01

    We proposed a method of accelerating the wavelength stabilization after wavelength switching of the tunable distributed amplification-distributed feedback (TDA-DFB) laser using the internal wavelength locker to reduce the size and the cost of the wavelength control system. The configuration of the wavelength stabilization system based on this locker was as follows. At the wavelength locker, the light intensity after an optical filter is detected as a current by the photodiodes (PDs). Then, for estimating the wavelength, the current is processed by the current/voltage-converting circuit (IVC), logarithm amplifier (Log Amp) and field programmable gate array (FPGA). Finally, the laser current is tuned to the desired wavelength with reference to the estimated wavelength. With this control system the wavelength is stabilized within 800 ns after wavelength switching, which is even faster than that with the conventional control system.

  3. Systems having optical absorption layer for mid and long wave infrared and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    An optical system according to one embodiment includes a substrate; and an optical absorption layer coupled to the substrate, wherein the optical absorption layer comprises a layer of diamond-like carbon, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). A method for applying an optical absorption layer to an optical system according to another embodiment includes depositing a layer of diamond-like carbon of an optical absorption layer above a substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  4. High pulse repetition frequency, multiple wavelength, pulsed CO2 lidar system for atmospheric transmission and target reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Emery, Silvio L.; Gotoff, Steven W.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1992-07-01

    A multiple wavelength, pulsed CO2 lidar system operating at a pulse repetition frequency of 200 Hz and permitting the random selection of CO2 laser wavelengths for each laser pulse is presented. This system was employed to measure target reflectance and atmospheric transmission by using laser pulse bursts consisting of groups with as many as 16 different wavelengths at a repetition rate of 12 Hz. The wavelength tuning mechanism of the transversely excited atmospheric laser consists of a stationary grating and a flat mirror controlled by a galvanometer. Multiple wavelength, differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements reduce the effects of differential target reflectance and molecular absorption interference. Examples of multiwavelength DIAL detection for ammonia and water vapor show the dynamic interaction between these two trace gases. Target reflectance measurements for maple trees in winter and autumn are presented.

  5. High pulse repetition frequency, multiple wavelength, pulsed CO(2) lidar system for atmospheric transmission and target reflectance measurements.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, A; Emery, S L; Gotoff, S W; D'Amico, F M

    1992-07-20

    A multiple wavelength, pulsed CO(2) lidar system operating at a pulse repetition frequency of 200 Hz and permitting the random selection of CO(2) laser wavelengths for each laser pulse is presented. This system was employed to measure target reflectance and atmospheric transmission by using laser pulse bursts consisting of groups with as many as 16 different wavelengths at a repetition rate of 12 Hz. The wavelength tuning mechanism of the transversely excited atmospheric laser consists of a stationary grating and a flat mirror controlled by a galvanometer. Multiple wavelength, differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements reduce the effects of differential target reflectance and molecular absorption interference. Examples of multiwavelength DIAL detection for ammonia and water vapor show the dynamic interaction between these two trace gases. Target reflectance measurements for maple trees in winter and autumn are presented. PMID:20725406

  6. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  7. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption.

    PubMed

    Malara, P; Campanella, C E; Giorgini, A; Avino, S; De Natale, P; Gagliardi, G

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator's quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  8. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  9. Absorption spectra of isomeric OH adducts of 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Vinchurkar, M.S.; Rao, B.S.M.; Mohan, H.; Mittal, J.P.; Schmidt, K.H.; Jonah, C.D.

    1997-04-17

    The reactions of OH{sup .}, O{sup .-}, and SO{sub 4}{sup .-} with 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine (caffeine) were studied by pulse radiolysis with optical and conductance detection techniques. The absorption spectra of transients formed in OH{sup .} reaction in neutral solutions exhibited peaks at 310 and 335 nm, as well as a broad absorption maximum at 500 nm, which decayed by first-order kinetics. The rate (k = (4.0 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of this decay is independent of pH in the range 4-9 and is in agreement with that determined from the conductance detection (k = 4 x 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}). The spectrum in acidic solutions has only a broad peak around 330 nm with no absorption in the higher wavelength region. The intermediates formed in reaction of O{sup .-} absorb around 310 and at 350 nm, and the first-order decay at the latter wavelength was not seen. The OH radical adds to C-4 (X-40H{sup .}) and C-8 (X-80H{sup .}) positions of caffeine in the ratio 1:2 as determined from the redox titration and conductivity measurements. H abstraction from the methyl group is an additional reaction channel in O{sup .-} reaction. Dehydroxylation of the X-40H{sup .} adduct occurs, whereas the X-80H{sup .} adduct does not undergo ring opening. The spectrum obtained for OH{sup .} reaction in oxygenated solutions is similar to that observed in SO{sub 4}{sup .-} reaction in basic solutions. 25 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  11. Direct and quantitative photothermal absorption spectroscopy of individual particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Eon Han, Sang; Burg, Brian R.; Chen, Gang; Zheng, Ruiting; Shen, Sheng

    2013-12-23

    Photonic structures can exhibit significant absorption enhancement when an object's length scale is comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light. This property has enabled photonic structures to be an integral component in many applications such as solar cells, light emitting diodes, and photothermal therapy. To characterize this enhancement at the single particulate level, conventional methods have consisted of indirect or qualitative approaches which are often limited to certain sample types. To overcome these limitations, we used a bilayer cantilever to directly and quantitatively measure the spectral absorption efficiency of a single silicon microwire in the visible wavelength range. We demonstrate an absorption enhancement on a per unit volume basis compared to a thin film, which shows good agreement with Mie theory calculations. This approach offers a quantitative approach for broadband absorption measurements on a wide range of photonic structures of different geometric and material compositions.

  12. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  13. Alternative wavelengths for laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel

    1993-01-01

    The following are considered to be necessary to accomplish multicolor laser ranging: the nature of the atmospheric dispersion and absorption, the satellite/lunar/ground retro-array characteristics, and ground/satellite ranging machine performance. The energy balance and jitter budget have to be considered as well. It is concluded that the existing satellite/laser retroreflectors seem inadequate for future experiments. The Raman Stokes/Anti-Stokes (0.68/0.43 micron) plus solid state detector appear to be promising instrumentation that satisfy the ground/satellite and satellite/ground ranging machine requirements on the precision, compactness, and data processing.

  14. Derivation of water vapour absorption cross-sections in the red region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, M.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption spectrum in 436 to 448 nm wavelength region gives NO2 and O3 column densities. This spectrum can also give H2O column density. The spectrum in the range of 655 to 667 nm contains absorption due to NO3 and H2O. Combining the absorption spectra in the wavelength ranges of 436 to 448 and 655 to 667 nm, water vapor absorption cross-sections in this range comes out to be of the order of 2.0 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp -2).

  15. Omnidirectional light absorption of disordered nano-hole structure inspired from Papilio ulysses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Bai, Mingwen; Zhang, Di

    2014-07-15

    Butterflies routinely produce nanostructured surfaces with useful properties. Here, we report a disordered nano-hole structure with ridges inspired by Papilio ulysses that produce omnidirectional light absorption compared with the common ordered structure. The result shows that the omnidirectional light absorption is affected by polarization, the incident angle, and the wavelength. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the stable omnidirectional light absorption is achieved in the structure inspired from the Papilio ulysses over a wide incident angle range and with various wavelengths. This explains some of the mysteries of the structure of the Papilio ulysses butterfly. These conclusions can guide the design of omnidirectional absorption materials. PMID:25121688

  16. Omnidirectional light absorption of disordered nano-hole structure inspired from Papilio ulysses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Bai, Mingwen; Zhang, Di

    2014-07-15

    Butterflies routinely produce nanostructured surfaces with useful properties. Here, we report a disordered nano-hole structure with ridges inspired by Papilio ulysses that produce omnidirectional light absorption compared with the common ordered structure. The result shows that the omnidirectional light absorption is affected by polarization, the incident angle, and the wavelength. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the stable omnidirectional light absorption is achieved in the structure inspired from the Papilio ulysses over a wide incident angle range and with various wavelengths. This explains some of the mysteries of the structure of the Papilio ulysses butterfly. These conclusions can guide the design of omnidirectional absorption materials.

  17. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  18. [Intercross cascaded dual-layer resonant sub-wavelength gratings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-li; Zhao, Da-zun

    2009-04-01

    A security grating structure, intercross cascaded dual-layer resonant sub-wavelength grating structure, is presented. It can broaden the resonant wavelength width of resonant sub-wavelength gratings and obtain the better optical variable effect. The full-width-at half-maximum (FWHM) broadening mechanism of security grating structures is analyzed. The FWHM is dependent on the energy coupled into the grating waveguide layer. The grating structure parameters are optimized and designed. The resonance performance and grating fabrication tolerances are also studied numerically using the vector diffraction theory (the rigorous coupled wave theory). Simulation results indicate that the value of the spectral resonant peak for the security grating structure is not decreased as the incident angle increases or decreases and the maximum FWHM of different depth of grating grooves is about seven times that of the basic resonant grating structure. The resonant dual grating waveguide structure is a kind of security grating configuration with the potential to achieve higher industry application value and its resonance performance is not sensitive to manufacture errors. PMID:19626922

  19. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  20. Bolometric Arrays for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, E.; Serrano, A.; Torres-Jácome, A.

    2009-11-01

    During last years, semiconductor bolometers using thin films have been developed at INAOE, specifically boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. The characteristics shown by these devices made them attractive to be used in astronomical instrumentation, mainly in two-dimentional arrays. These detector arrays used at the Large Millimeter Telescope will make possible to obtain astronomical images in millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths. With this in mind, we are developing a method to produce, with enough reliability, bolometer arrays at INAOE. Until now, silicon nitride diaphragm arrays, useful as radiation absorbers, have succesfully been obtained. Sizes going from one to four millimeter by element in a consistent way; however we have not tested thermometers and metallic contact deposition yet. At the same time, we are working on two possible configurations for the readout electronics; one of them using commercial components while the other will be an integrated circuit specifically designed for this application. Both versions will work below 77K.

  1. Absorption and emission in defective cholesteric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Harutyunyan, M. Z.; Matinyan, G. K.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Rostovtsev, Yu V.; Kurizki, G.; Scully, M. O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated peculiarities of absorption, emission and photonic density of states of a cholesteric liquid crystal with an isotropic defect layer inside. The influence of the defect layer position on absorption and emission in the system was studied. It was shown that for non-diffracting circularly polarized incident light absorption/emission is maximum if the defect is in the centre of the system; and for diffracting circularly polarized incident light absorption/emission is maximum if the defect is shifted from the centre of the system to its left border from where light is incident. We also investigated influence of the defect layer thickness and those parameters which characterize loss and gain on absorption and emission. The influence of anisotropic absorption in the cholesteric liquid crystal layer on photonic density states was investigated, too.

  2. Multi-wavelength Characterization of Brown and Black Carbon from Filter Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. M.; Yatavelli, R. L. N.; Chen, L. W. A. A.; Gyawali, M. S.; Arnott, W. P.; Wang, X.; Chakrabarty, R. K.; Moosmüller, H.; Watson, J. G.; Chow, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) scatters and absorbs solar radiation and thereby affects visibility, the Earth's radiation balance, and properties and lifetimes of clouds. Understanding the radiative forcing (RF) of PM is essential to reducing the uncertainty in total anthropogenic and natural RF. Many instruments that measure light absorption coefficients (βabs [λ], Mm-1) of PM have used light at near-infrared (NIR; e.g., 880 nm) or red (e.g., 633 nm) wavelengths. Measuring βabs over a wider wavelength range, especially including the ultraviolet (UV) and visible, allows for contributions from black carbon (BC), brown carbon (BrC), and mineral dust (MD) to be differentiated. This will help to determine PM RF and its emission sources. In this study, source and ambient samples collected on Teflon-membrane and quartz-fiber filters are used to characterize and develop a multi-wavelength (250 - 1000 nm) filter-based measurement method of PM light absorption. A commercially available UV-visible spectrometer coupled with an integrating sphere is used for quantifying diffuse reflectance and transmittance of filter samples, from which βabs and absorption Ǻngström exponents (AAE) of the PM deposits are determined. The filter-based light absorption measurements of laboratory generated soot and biomass burning aerosol are compared to 3-wavelength photoacoustic absorption measurements to evaluate filter media and loading effects. Calibration factors are developed to account for differences between filter types (Teflon-membrane vs. quartz-fiber), and between filters and in situ photoacoustic absorption values. Application of multi-spectral absorption measurements to existing archived filters, including specific source samples (e.g. diesel and gasoline engines, biomass burning, dust), will also be discussed.

  3. Maximum life spur gear design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M.; Mackulin, B. J.; Coe, H. H.; Coy, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    Optimization procedures allow one to design a spur gear reduction for maximum life and other end use criteria. A modified feasible directions search algorithm permits a wide variety of inequality constraints and exact design requirements to be met with low sensitivity to initial guess values. The optimization algorithm is described, and the models for gear life and performance are presented. The algorithm is compact and has been programmed for execution on a desk top computer. Two examples are presented to illustrate the method and its application.

  4. Fluid Properties Measurements Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with First Harmonic Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh (Inventor); Silver, Joel A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method for monitoring gas velocity, temperature, and pressure in combustion systems and flow devices, in particular at inlets and isolators of scramjet engines. The invention employs wavelength modulation spectroscopy with first harmonic detection and without the need to scan the full absorption spectra.

  5. Development of formulae for estimating amylose content, amylopectin chain length distribution, and resistant starch content based on the iodine absorption curve of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Satoh, Hikaru; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Not only amylose but also amylopectin greatly affects the gelatinization properties of rice starch and the quality of cooked rice grains. We here characterized the starches of 32 rice cultivars and evaluated the relationship between their iodine absorption curve, apparent amylose content (AAC), pasting property, resistant starch (RS) content, and chain length distribution of amylopectin. We found that the iodine absorption curve differed among the various sample rice cultivars. Using the wavelength at which absorbance becomes maximum on iodine staining of starch (λmax), we propose a novel index, "new λmax" (AAC/(λmax of sample rice starches-λmax of glutinous rice starch)). We developed the novel estimation formulae for AAC, RS contents, and amylopectin fractions with the use of λmax and "new λmax." These formulae would lead to the improved method for estimating starch properties using an easy and rapid iodine colorimetric method.

  6. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-09-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the NIR. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the absorption Ångström exponent, defined as the negative slope of absorption versus wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70 % of the absorption Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest absorption Ångström exponents (90 % of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with low Ångström exponents. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia have a weaker spectral dependence for absorption than biomass burning aerosols, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. In a first order assessment, results indicate a small (<1 %) effect of variations in absorption Ångström exponents on 24-h aerosol forcings, at least in the spectral

  7. Switchable wavelength-selective and diffuse metamaterial absorber/emitter with a phase transition spacer layer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2014-08-18

    We numerically demonstrate a switchable metamaterial absorber/emitter by thermally turning on or off the excitation of magnetic resonance upon the phase transition of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). Perfect absorption peak exists around the wavelength of 5 μm when the excitation of magnetic resonance is supported with the insulating VO{sub 2} spacer layer. The wavelength-selective absorption is switched off when the magnetic resonance is disabled with metallic VO{sub 2} that shorts the top and bottom metallic structures. The resonance wavelength can be tuned with different geometry, and the switchable metamaterial exhibits diffuse behaviors at oblique angles. The results would facilitate the design of switchable metamaterials for active control in energy and sensing applications.

  8. Wavelength optimization for rapid chromophore mapping using spatial frequency domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhar, Amaan; Dell, Steven; Cuccia, David J.; Gioux, Sylvain; Durkin, Anthony J.; Frangioni, John V.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-11-01

    Spatial frequency-domain imaging (SFDI) utilizes multiple-frequency structured illumination and model-based computation to generate two-dimensional maps of tissue absorption and scattering properties. SFDI absorption data are measured at multiple wavelengths and used to fit for the tissue concentration of intrinsic chromophores in each pixel. This is done with a priori knowledge of the basis spectra of common tissue chromophores, such as oxyhemoglobin (ctO2Hb), deoxyhemoglobin (ctHHb), water (ctH2O), and bulk lipid. The quality of in vivo SFDI fits for the hemoglobin parameters ctO2Hb and ctHHb is dependent on wavelength selection, fitting parameters, and acquisition rate. The latter is critical because SFDI acquisition time is up to six times longer than planar two-wavelength multispectral imaging due to projection of multiple-frequency spatial patterns. Thus, motion artifact during in vivo measurements compromises the quality of the reconstruction. Optimal wavelength selection is examined through matrix decomposition of basis spectra, simulation of data, and dynamic in vivo measurements of a human forearm during cuff occlusion. Fitting parameters that minimize cross-talk from additional tissue chromophores, such as water and lipid, are determined. On the basis of this work, a wavelength pair of 670 nm/850 nm is determined to be the optimal two-wavelength combination for in vivo hemodynamic tissue measurements provided that assumptions for water and lipid fractions are made in the fitting process. In our SFDI case study, wavelength optimization reduces acquisition time over 30-fold to 1.5s compared to 50s for a full 34-wavelength acquisition. The wavelength optimization enables dynamic imaging of arterial occlusions with improved spatial resolution due to reduction of motion artifacts.

  9. Scattering and absorption coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tairan; Tang, Jiaqi; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Fan

    2016-02-01

    Alumina-based aerogels are especially useful in many applications due to their excellent stability at high temperatures. This study experimentally analyzed the radiative properties of silica-doped alumina aerogels through spectral directional-hemispherical measurements for wavelengths of 0.38-25 μm. The silica-doped alumina aerogel samples were prepared with a 1.4∶1 molar ratio of silica to alumina. A two-flux model was used to describe the radiation propagation in a 1D scattering absorbing sample to derive expressions for the normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances based on the transport approximation. The normal-hemispherical transmittances and reflectances were measured at various spectral wavelengths and sample thicknesses using the integrating sphere method. The spectral absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels were then determined from the measured normal-hemispherical data. The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of silica-doped alumina aerogels are (0.1  cm-1, 36  cm-1) and (0.1  cm-1, 112  cm-1) for wavelengths of 0.38-8.0 μm. The spectral transport scattering coefficient varies in the opposite direction from the spectral absorption coefficient for various wavelengths. The radiative properties for silica and alumina aerogels were quite different for the absorption coefficient for wavelengths of 2.5-8.0 μm and for the transport scattering coefficient for wavelengths of 0.38-2.5 and 3.5-6.0 μm. The measured radiative properties were used to predict the spectral normal-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance of the silica-doped alumina aerogels for various sample thicknesses and wavelengths. The predicted values do not change for the sample thicknesses greater than a critical value. The analysis provides valuable reference data for alumina aerogels for high-temperature applications. PMID:26836071

  10. Terahertz ambipolar dual-wavelength quantum cascade laser.

    PubMed

    Lever, L; Hinchcliffe, N M; Khanna, S P; Dean, P; Ikonic, Z; Evans, C A; Davies, A G; Harrison, P; Linfield, E H; Kelsall, R W

    2009-10-26

    Terahertz frequency quantum cascade lasers (THz QCLs) are compact solid-state sources of terahertz radiation that were first demonstrated in 2002. They have a broad range of potential applications ranging from gas sensing and non-destructive testing, through to security and medical imaging, with many polycrystalline compounds having distinct fingerprint spectra in the terahertz frequency range. In this article, we demonstrate an electrically-switchable dual-wavelength THz QCL which will enable spectroscopic information to be obtained within a THz QCL-based imaging system. The device uses the same active region for both emission wavelengths: in forward bias, the laser emits at 2.3 THz; in reverse bias, it emits at 4 THz. The corresponding threshold current densities are 490 A/cm(2) and 330 A/cm(2), respectively, with maximum operating temperatures of 98K and 120 K.

  11. Percutaneous absorption of Octopirox.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Kamat, V B

    1988-01-01

    [14C]Octopirox administered to rats by intubation or injection was excreted mostly in the faeces (65-85% of the dose) with smaller amounts (6-19%) in the urine. Blood levels after intubation of Octopirox (4.8 mg/kg body weight) reached a maximum equivalent to 0.137 micrograms/ml at 2 hr and declined to 0.007 micrograms/ml at 48 hr after administration. Tissue levels were low, the greatest was the liver with the equivalent of 3 micrograms Octopirox at 6 hr after intubation. With female rats skin penetration of Octopirox at 1% (v/v) in shampoo without rinsing was 65.1 micrograms/cm2 under non-occlusive conditions for 48 hr. When the skin was rinsed after a 10-min contact, penetration was reduced to 3.4 micrograms/cm2 under occlusive, and 2.0 micrograms/cm2 under non-occlusive conditions. Skin penetration of Octopirox was dependent on duration of contact up to 10 min before rinsing. Penetration at 1% Octopirox increased significantly from 2.4 micrograms/cm2 after 2.5 min exposure to 4.5 micrograms/cm2 after 10 min contact, but there was no further increase in penetration with a 20-min application. Skin penetration and deposition of Octopirox were both proportional to Octopirox concentration between 0.1 and 1% (w/v); skin penetration increased from 0.31 to 3.6 micrograms/cm2 while deposition increased from 0.8 to 7.6 micrograms/cm2. There was no significant difference between the penetration through clipped skin and hairy skin from an application of 1% Octopirox for 5 min followed by rinsing. Under non-occlusive conditions, penetration was 1.5 micrograms/cm2 for both types of skin. Blood levels after topical application (15.4 mg/kg body weight) without rinsing and with occlusion reached the equivalent of 0.32 micrograms/ml at 6 hr. However, when the skin was rinsed and protected with a non-occlusive patch blood levels were reduced to a maximum equivalent to 0.02 micrograms/ml at 1 hr after application. The safety factor estimated for the consumer using a shampoo

  12. On the wavelength of self-organized shoreline sand waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falqués, A.; van den Berg, N.; Ribas, F.; Caballeria, M.; Calvete, D.

    2012-04-01

    Shoreline sand waves are undulations of the shoreline that extend into the bathymetry up to a certain depth. Here we will focus on self-organized sand waves that form due to shoreline instability in case of very oblique wave incidence (Ashton et al., 2001). The model of Ashton and co-authors did not predict any wavelength selection for the emerging sand waves whereas Falqués and Calvete (2005) predicted a wavelength selection in the range 4-15 km. This difference is attributable to that Falqués and Calvete (2005) computed wave refraction and shoaling over the actual curvilinear depth contours while Ashton et al. (2001) assumed locally rectilinear and parallel contours. Although there exist shoreline features at a larger scale (Ashton et al. 2001; Falqués et al. 2011) sand waves at a few km scale are more common (Ruessink and Jeuken, 2002; Davidson-Arnott and van Heyningen, 2003; Falqués et al., 2011; Medellin et al., 2008) . While their characteristic wavelength is a robust model output (Falqués and Calvete, 2005; Uguccioni et al., 2006; van den Berg et al., 2011) the physical reasons for the existence of a wavelength selection are still unknown. Furthermore, the parameter dependence of the dominant wavelength, Lm, is largely unexplored. In particular, the disparity between the large length scale of sand waves and the relevant length scales of the problem: width of the surf zone, water wave wavelength, etc. is intriguing. The aim of the present contribution is to gain insight into those physical reasons and the dependence of Lm on beach profile and water wave properties. The essence of sandwave behaviour can be captured with the simple one-line shoreline modelling concept by looking at the alongshore position of the maximum in total transport rate Q, which is here investigated with both the linearized model of Falqués and Calvete (2005) and the nonlinear model of van den Berg et al. (2011) . It is found that the position of that maximum is largely controlled

  13. [The spectral characteristic wavelength selection and parameter optimization based on Tikhonov regularization].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-Xin; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2014-07-01

    In the multicomponent mixture hydrocarbon gases Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) quantitative analysis, especially for light alkane gases, it is not easy to establish the quantitative analysis model because their IR spectra absorption peaks are seriously overlapped. Aiming at this problem, the Tikhonov regularization algorithm was used to select the characteristic wavelengths for seven kinds of light alkane mixture gases FTIR which are composed with methane, ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane and n-pentane. And then the wavelength selection was used to establish the quantitative analysis model. By comparing the analysis characteristics wavelength selection and TR parameters optimization of the mixed gases in the infrared all wave band, the first absorption peak band and the second peak band, the characteristic wavelength of 7 kinds of gases were selected by Tikhonov algorithm. The wavelength selection and Tikhonov regularization parameters were used to test the actual measured methane spectral data, and then we got that with other gas components the max cross sensitivity was 11.153 7%, the minimum cross sensitivity was 1.239 7%, and the root mean square prediction error was 0.004 8. The Tikhonov regularization algorithm effectively enhanced the accuracy in the light alkane mixed gas quantitative analysis. The feasibility of alkane gases mixture Fourier transform infrared spectrum wavelength selection was preliminarily verified by using the Tikhonov regularization algorithm. PMID:25269291

  14. A spectroscopic study of the wavelength-dependent photoisomerizations of bilirubins bound to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, Marina; Agati, Giovanni; Pratesi, Riccardo; Persico, Maurizio

    2005-12-01

    The wavelength-dependent photoisomerizations of the asymmetric bilirubin BR-IXα and of the symmetric bilirubin-IIIα (BR-III) and mesobilirubin-XIIIα (MBR-XIII) bound to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution were analysed with the help of an exciton coupling model. The modelling was based on the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra (bisignate Cotton effect). Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) of the free BR-IX molecule suggested the presence of two main bands of exciton coupling character in the blue region of the spectrum, and other weaker bands of charge transfer character at longer wavelengths. These peculiarities were taken into account to fit the photoisomerization quantum yields in the blue-green region as functions of the wavelength, obtaining the bandshape of the exciton coupling bands from the experimental CD spectra. The other excitons were extracted from the decomposition of the band resulting from the difference between the absorption spectrum and the sum (normalized-to-absorption) of the two CD excitons. We expressed photoisomerization quantum yields in terms of the sum of the contributions to photon absorption deriving from all the exciton states normalized to total absorption. For all the reversible photoprocesses of bilirubins and for the irreversible one of BR-IXα in HSA (i.e. lumirubin formation), we give reliable mean values of the individual state excitation probabilities and photoisomerization efficiencies in the pigment protein complex.

  15. Orthogonally polarized dual-wavelength Yb:KGW laser induced by thermal lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haitao; Major, Arkady

    2016-06-01

    Simultaneous dual-wavelength laser oscillation with orthogonal polarizations has been observed and analyzed in a continuous wave N g-cut Yb:KGW oscillator. Without inserting any optical elements for polarization control, the N m- and N p-polarized modes, each of which possessed a distinct wavelength, coexisted and switched twice in two power regimes as the pump power was varied. The two wavelengths and their separation slightly depended on output coupling level. The wavelength switching and coexistence was studied and explained by considering the thermal and spectral anisotropy of the Yb:KGW crystals, which led to polarization-dependent reabsorption loss in the unpumped regions of the crystal. The maximum average output power obtained in the dual-wavelength regime was 4.6 W.

  16. Discrimination networks for maximum selection.

    PubMed

    Jain, Brijnesh J; Wysotzki, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    We construct a novel discrimination network using differentiating units for maximum selection. In contrast to traditional competitive architectures like MAXNET the discrimination network does not only signal the winning unit, but also provides information about its evidence. In particular, we show that a discrimination network converges to a stable state within finite time and derive three characteristics: intensity normalization (P1), contrast enhancement (P2), and evidential response (P3). In order to improve the accuracy of the evidential response we incorporate distributed redundancy into the network. This leads to a system which is not only robust against failure of single units and noisy data, but also enables us to sharpen the focus on the problem given in terms of a more accurate evidential response. The proposed discrimination network can be regarded as a connectionist model for competitive learning by evidence.

  17. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  18. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  19. Sensor Technology at Submillimeter Wavelengths for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chattopadhyay, Goutam

    2007-01-01

    Our universe is most luminous at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths (100 GHz - 10 THz) after the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation. This region of the electromagnetic spectrum provides critical tracers for the study of a wide range of astrophysical and planetary phenomena. This spectral range contains information on the origin of the planets, stars, galaxies, and clusters; the geometry and matter/energy content of the Universe, atmospheric constituents and dynamics of the planets and comets and tracers for global monitoring and the ultimate health of the Earth. Sensors at far-infrared and submillimeter wavelengths provide unprecedented sensitivity for astrophysical, planetary, and earth observing instruments. Very often, for a spaced based platform where the instruments are not limited by atmospheric losses and absorption, the overall instrument sensitivity is dictated by the sensitivity of the sensors themselves. Moreover, some of the cryogenic sensors at submillimeter wavelengths provide almost quantum-limited sensitivity. This paper provides an overview of the submillimeter-wave sensors and their performance and capabilities for space applications.

  20. Ammonia sensing system based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viveiros, Duarte; Ferreira, João; Silva, Susana O.; Ribeiro, Joana; Flores, Deolinda; Santos, José L.; Frazão, Orlando; Baptista, José M.

    2015-06-01

    A sensing system in the near infrared region has been developed for ammonia sensing based on the wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) principle. The WMS is a rather sensitive technique for detecting atomic/molecular species, presenting the advantage that it can be used in the near-infrared region by using the optical telecommunications technology. In this technique, the laser wavelength and intensity were modulated by applying a sine wave signal through the injection current, which allowed the shift of the detection bandwidth to higher frequencies where laser intensity noise was typically lower. Two multi-pass cells based on free space light propagation with 160 cm and 16 cm of optical path length were used, allowing the redundancy operation and technology validation. This system used a diode laser with an emission wavelength at 1512.21 nm, where NH3 has a strong absorption line. The control of the NH3 gas sensing system, as well as acquisition, processing and data presentation was performed.

  1. Phase determination by wavelength-modulated diffraction. I. Centrosymmetric case.

    PubMed

    Koganezawa, T; Yoshimura, Y; Nakamura, N; Iwasaki, H

    2001-05-01

    Wavelength-modulated diffraction was developed by Iwasaki, Yurugi & Yoshimura [Acta Cryst. (1999), A55, 864-870] as a method for phase determination, in which the intensity of Bragg reflections is recorded using radiation whose wavelength is changing continually over a range in the vicinity of the absorption edge of an atom in the crystal. Using a ferrocene derivative crystal (chemical formula C36H32O7Fe, space group P2(1)/a) with the Fe atoms chosen as anomalous scatterers, measurements were made of the intensity gradient dI/d lambda of the reflections with an imaging plate as a detector on a synchrotron radiation source at Ritsumeikan University. In the case of a centrosymmetric crystal, the phase of the structure factor could be derived by measuring only the sign of dI/d lambda at one wavelength in the range. Of 104 reflections measured, the correct phase was assigned to 101 reflections. A discussion is given on the errors involved and on the limits of application of the method.

  2. Development and Testing of a Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar For Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, B.; Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is under development and testing at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the on-line absorption wavelength at 1571.4067 nm and the second operating at the off-line wavelength at 1571.2585 nm. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between on-line and off-line operation. After the fiber optic switches, an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 J and a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a fiber coupled photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The PMT has a 3% quantum efficiency, a dark count rate of 90 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz. Recently, a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD) operating in the geiger mode has been incorporated into the DIAL receiver. The APD has a quantum efficiency of 10%, a dark count rate of 10 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz and provides a much larger dynamic range than the PMT. Both the PMT and APD provide TTL logic pulses that are monitored using a multichannel scaler card used to count the return photons as a function of time of flight and are thus interchangeable. The DIAL instrument was developed at the 1.571 m wavelength to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf components. The instrument is operated using a custom Labview program that switches to the DMLD operating at the on-line wavelength, locks this laser to a user defined wavelength setting, and collects return signals for a user defined time. The control program switches to the DMLD operating at the off

  3. Dual-wavelength photoacoustic imaging of a photoswitchable reporter protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dortay, Hakan; Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Zhang, Edward; Grötzinger, Carsten; Hildebrandt, Peter; Friedrich, Thomas; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been shown to provide detailed 3-D images of genetically expressed reporters, such as fluorescent proteins and tyrosinase-induced melanin. Their unambiguous detection in vivo is a vital prerequisite for molecular imaging of biological processes at a cellular and molecular level. This typically requires multiwavelength imaging and spectral unmixing techniques, which can be computationally expensive. In addition, fluorescent proteins often exhibit fluence-dependent ground state depopulation and photobleaching which can adversely affect the specificity of unmixing methods. To overcome these problems, a phytochrome-based reporter protein and a dual-wavelength excitation method have been developed to obtain reporter-specific PA contrast. Phytochromes are non-fluorescent proteins that exhibit two isomeric states with different absorption spectra. Using dual-wavelength excitation pulses in the red and near-infrared wavelength region, these states can be switched, resulting in a modulation of the total absorption coefficient, and hence the PA signal amplitude. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, signals acquired using simultaneous pulses can be subtracted from the sum of signals obtained from separate pulses to provide a reporterspecific contrast mechanism and elimination of the tissue background. PA signals measured in protein solutions using separate and simultaneous excitation pulses at 670 nm and 755 nm (< 6 mJ cm-2) showed a difference in amplitude of a factor of five. Photobleaching was not observed. To demonstrate suitability for in vivo applications, mammalian cells were transduced virally to express phytochrome, and imaged in tissue phantoms and in mice in an initial preclinical study. The results show that this method has the potential to enable deep-tissue PA reporter gene imaging with high specificity.

  4. Inclusion Analysis and Absorption Measurement in Nonlinear Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L L

    2005-08-26

    Yttrium calcium oxyborate (YCOB) is a newly developed nonlinear optical crystal used for second harmonic generation in the Mercury laser. As with any new crystal, optical characterization of the material properties needs to be fully investigated. We are developing two new techniques to detect inclusions and measure optical absorption. With the side illuminating detection examination (SIDE) method, we hope to identify and map the size, density, and the morphology of inclusions. The multi-pass absorption technique (MPAT) will be used to help determine the absorption coefficient of various finished crystalline pieces at near-infrared wavelengths.

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of retinal light absorption by infants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2015-02-01

    Retinal damage can occur in normal ambient lighting conditions. Infants are particularly vulnerable to retinal damage, and thousands of preterm infants sustain vision damage each year. The size of the ocular fundus affects retinal light absorption, but there is a lack of understanding of this effect for infants. In this work, retinal light absorption is simulated for different ocular fundus sizes, wavelengths, and pigment concentrations by using the Monte Carlo method. The results indicate that the neural retina light absorption per volume for infants can be two or more times that for adults. PMID:26366599

  6. Monte Carlo simulation of retinal light absorption by infants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya; Tan, Jinglu

    2015-02-01

    Retinal damage can occur in normal ambient lighting conditions. Infants are particularly vulnerable to retinal damage, and thousands of preterm infants sustain vision damage each year. The size of the ocular fundus affects retinal light absorption, but there is a lack of understanding of this effect for infants. In this work, retinal light absorption is simulated for different ocular fundus sizes, wavelengths, and pigment concentrations by using the Monte Carlo method. The results indicate that the neural retina light absorption per volume for infants can be two or more times that for adults.

  7. Christiansen effect in disperse systems with resonant absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zimnyakov, D A; Isaeva, Elmira A; Isaeva, A A

    2012-01-31

    We discuss the results of experimental studies of competition of absorption and scattering of laser radiation propagating in dispersive media with resonant absorption. As media under study, use is made of a suspension of polystyrene particles in solutions of rhodamine 6G in ethylene glycol probed by laser light with a wavelength of 532 nm. It is found that an increase in the dye concentration leads to an increase in optical transmittance of suspensions and an increase in speckle modulation of the forward-scattered radiation. We interpret these features as a manifestation of Christiansen effect in disperse systems with resonance absorption.

  8. Quantitative broadband absorption and scattering spectroscopy in turbid media by combined frequency-domain and steady state methodologies

    DOEpatents

    Tromberg, Bruce J.; Berger, Andrew J.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Bevilacqua, Frederic; Jakubowski, Dorota

    2008-09-23

    A technique for measuring broadband near-infrared absorption spectra of turbid media that uses a combination of frequency-domain and steady-state reflectance methods. Most of the wavelength coverage is provided by a white-light steady-state measurement, whereas the frequency-domain data are acquired at a few selected wavelengths. Coefficients of absorption and reduced scattering derived from the frequency-domain data are used to calibrate the intensity of the steady-state measurements and to determine the reduced scattering coefficient at all wavelengths in the spectral window of interest. The absorption coefficient spectrum is determined by comparing the steady-state reflectance values with the predictions of diffusion theory, wavelength by wavelength. Absorption spectra of a turbid phantom and of human breast tissue in vivo, derived with the combined frequency-domain and steady-state technique, agree well with expected reference values.

  9. Laser wavelength meter: analysis of measurement uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrzeczanowski, Wojciech; Zyczkowski, Marek; Dlugaszek, Andrzej

    1999-08-01

    Principle of operation of laser radiation wavelength meter based on Fabry-Perot interferometer and linear CCD camera is presented in the paper. A dependence, on the base of which laser wavelength can be calculated, is found and a way of defining of all component uncertainties of a measurement is shown. An analysis of an influence and examples of definition of uncertainties of a measurement for four wavelength meter structural sets of different objective focal lengths are presented.

  10. Wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Armstrong, Darrell J.; Smith, Arlee V.

    2007-07-24

    A wavelength-doubling optical parametric oscillator (OPO) comprising a type II nonlinear optical medium for generating a pair of degenerate waves at twice a pump wavelength and a plurality of mirrors for rotating the polarization of one wave by 90 degrees to produce a wavelength-doubled beam with an increased output energy by coupling both of the degenerate waves out of the OPO cavity through the same output coupler following polarization rotation of one of the degenerate waves.

  11. Laboratory evaluation and application of microwave absorption properties under simulated conditions for planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, P. G.

    1985-01-01

    Radio absorptivity data for the Venus middle atmosphere (1 to 6 atm, temperatures from 500 to 575K) obtained from spacecraft radio occultation experiments (at 3.6 to 13.4 cm wavelengths) and earth-based radio astronomical observations (1 to 3 cm wavelength range) are compared to laboratory observations at the latter wavelength range under simulated Venus conditions to infer abundances of microwave-absorbing atmospheric constituents, i.e. H2SO4 in a CO2 atmosphere.

  12. Multiple Early Eocene Thermal Maximums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehl, U.; Zachos, J. C.; Thomas, E.; Kelly, D. C.; Donner, B.; Westerhold, T.

    2004-12-01

    Periodic dissolution horizons signifying abrupt shoaling of the lysocline and CCD are characteristic features of deep-sea sections and often attributed to Milankovitch forcing via their diagnostic frequencies. Prominent dissolution horizons also correspond to abrupt climate events, such as the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM), as a result of input of significant CH4 - CO2 into the ocean-atmosphere system. The question arises whether other significant dissolution horizons identified in sediments of late Paleocene and early Eocene age similar to the recently identified ELMO (Lourens et al., 2004) were formed as a result of greenhouse gas input, or whether they were related to cumulative effects of periodic changes in ocean chemistry and circulation. Here we report the discovery of a 3rd thermal maximum in early Eocene (about 52 Ma) sediments recovered from the South Atlantic during ODP Leg 208. The prominent clay layer was named the "X" event and was identified within planktonic foraminifer zone P7 and calcareous nannofossil zone CP10 at four Walvis Ridge Transect sites with a water depth range of 2000 m (Sites 1262 to 1267). Benthics assemblages are composed of small individuals, have low diversity and high dominance. Dominant taxa are Nuttallides truempyi and various abyssaminids, resembling the post PETM extinction assemblages. High-resolution bulk carbonate \\delta13C measurements of one of the more shallow Sites 1265 reveal a rapid about 0.6 per mill drop in \\delta13C and \\delta18O followed by an exponential recovery to pre-excursion \\delta13C values well known for the PETM and also observed for the ELMO. The planktonic foraminiferal \\delta13C records of Morozovella subbotina and Acaranina soldadoensis in the deepest Site 1262 show a 0.8 to 0.9 per mill drop, whereas the \\delta13C drop of benthic foraminifera Nuttallides truempyi is slightly larger (about 1 per mill). We are evaluating mechanisms for the widespread change in deep-water chemistry, its

  13. Optimizing constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cussen, Leo D.

    2016-06-01

    This article describes an analytic method to optimize constant wavelength neutron powder diffractometers. It recasts the accepted mathematical description of resolution and intensity in terms of new variables and includes terms for vertical divergence, wavelength and some sample scattering effects. An undetermined multiplier method is applied to the revised equations to minimize the RMS value of resolution width at constant intensity and fixed wavelength. A new understanding of primary spectrometer transmission (presented elsewhere) can then be applied to choose beam elements to deliver an optimum instrument. Numerical methods can then be applied to choose the best wavelength.

  14. Effective wavelength for multicolor/pyrometry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J L

    1980-09-15

    The concept of a temperature varying effective wavelength has recently been applied in multiwavelength pyrometry. The effective wavelength is shown to be discontinuous at a particular temperature, and the properties of the effective wavelength over a wide temperature range are explained. It is shown that a simple relationship is sufficient to calculate the effective wavelength and hence radiance at a given temperature without resorting to a convolution integration, in particular where broad filters are used to improve signal levels in a pyrometer. PMID:20234565

  15. Detection of foreign materials in cotton using a multi-wavelength imaging method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, D. Y.; Ding, T. H.

    2005-06-01

    Technologies currently in use cannot effectively detect foreign materials in cotton because they appear the same as the cotton fibres. The objective of this research was to develop a multiwavelength imaging system (MIS) for detecting foreign materials in the spectral region from 405 nm to 940 nm. This method is based on the principle that different materials have different spectral absorptions and reflectance characteristics. Through experiments, we determined an optimal wavelength for detecting each particular kind of foreign material. Then multi-wavelength images of foreign materials were captured using a CCD camera at different optimal wavelengths for each source of illumination. An image fusion algorithm based on wavelet analysis was created to acquire complete information on foreign materials. Imaging results showed that a combination of the wavelengths 405 nm and 850 nm was the most appropriate for detection of a wide range of foreign materials, and this provided an effective method for the detection of these foreign materials in cotton.

  16. The maximum drag reduction asymptote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, George H.; Hof, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Addition of long chain polymers is one of the most efficient ways to reduce the drag of turbulent flows. Already very low concentration of polymers can lead to a substantial drag and upon further increase of the concentration the drag reduces until it reaches an empirically found limit, the so called maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote, which is independent of the type of polymer used. We here carry out a detailed experimental study of the approach to this asymptote for pipe flow. Particular attention is paid to the recently observed state of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) which has been reported to occur in polymer solutions at sufficiently high shear. Our results show that upon the approach to MDR Newtonian turbulence becomes marginalized (hibernation) and eventually completely disappears and is replaced by EIT. In particular, spectra of high Reynolds number MDR flows are compared to flows at high shear rates in small diameter tubes where EIT is found at Re < 100. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement n° [291734].

  17. Objects of Maximum Electromagnetic Chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Fruhnert, Martin; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a definition of the electromagnetic chirality of an object and show that it has an upper bound. Reciprocal objects attain the upper bound if and only if they are transparent for all the fields of one polarization handedness (helicity). Additionally, electromagnetic duality symmetry, i.e., helicity preservation upon interaction, turns out to be a necessary condition for reciprocal objects to attain the upper bound. We use these results to provide requirements for the design of such extremal objects. The requirements can be formulated as constraints on the polarizability tensors for dipolar objects or on the material constitutive relations for continuous media. We also outline two applications for objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality: a twofold resonantly enhanced and background-free circular dichroism measurement setup, and angle-independent helicity filtering glasses. Finally, we use the theoretically obtained requirements to guide the design of a specific structure, which we then analyze numerically and discuss its performance with respect to maximal electromagnetic chirality.

  18. Maximum entropy production in daisyworld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunu, Haley A.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2012-05-01

    Daisyworld was first introduced in 1983 by Watson and Lovelock as a model that illustrates how life can influence a planet's climate. These models typically involve modeling a planetary surface on which black and white daisies can grow thus influencing the local surface albedo and therefore also the temperature distribution. Since then, variations of daisyworld have been applied to study problems ranging from ecological systems to global climate. Much of the interest in daisyworld models is due to the fact that they enable one to study self-regulating systems. These models are nonlinear, and as such they exhibit sensitive dependence on initial conditions, and depending on the specifics of the model they can also exhibit feedback loops, oscillations, and chaotic behavior. Many daisyworld models are thermodynamic in nature in that they rely on heat flux and temperature gradients. However, what is not well-known is whether, or even why, a daisyworld model might settle into a maximum entropy production (MEP) state. With the aim to better understand these systems, this paper will discuss what is known about the role of MEP in daisyworld models.

  19. Using maximum spectrum of continuous wavelet transform for demodulation of an overlapped spectrum in a fiber Bragg grating sensor network.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Mo, Wenqin; Dong, Kaifeng; Jin, Fang; Song, Junlei

    2016-06-10

    The maximum spectrum of the continuous wavelet transform (MSCWT) is proposed to demodulate the central wavelengths for the overlapped spectrum in a serial fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system. We describe the operation principle of the MSCWT method. Moreover, the influence of the interval gap between two FBG wavelengths, 3 dB bandwidths, and optical powers of the reflected spectra are discussed. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the MSCWT can resolve an overlapped spectrum and decode the central wavelength with high accuracy. More importantly, the proposed peak detection method can enhance the sensing capacity of a wavelength division multiplexing FBG sensor network. PMID:27409024

  20. Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits for visible and middle-near infrared repetitively pulsed lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-03-01

    The Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) is central to laser hazard analysis and is in general a function of the radiant wavelength. The selection of a laser for a particular application may allow for flexibility in the selection of the radiant wavelength. This flexibility would allow the selection of a particular laser based on the MPE and the hazards associated with that radiant wavelength. The Calculations of the MPEs for various laser wavelength ranges are presented. Techniques for determining eye safe viewing distances for both aided and unaided viewing and the determination of flight hazard distances are presented as well.

  1. 20 CFR 228.14 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Family maximum. 228.14 Section 228.14... SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.14 Family maximum. (a) Family maximum defined. Under... person's earnings record is limited. This limited amount is called the family maximum. The family...

  2. 20 CFR 228.14 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Family maximum. 228.14 Section 228.14... SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.14 Family maximum. (a) Family maximum defined. Under... person's earnings record is limited. This limited amount is called the family maximum. The family...

  3. 20 CFR 228.14 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2014-04-01 2012-04-01 true Family maximum. 228.14 Section 228.14... SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.14 Family maximum. (a) Family maximum defined. Under... person's earnings record is limited. This limited amount is called the family maximum. The family...

  4. 20 CFR 228.14 - Family maximum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Family maximum. 228.14 Section 228.14... SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.14 Family maximum. (a) Family maximum defined. Under... person's earnings record is limited. This limited amount is called the family maximum. The family...

  5. Stabilized master laser system for differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Hamilton, Murray W; Vincent, Robert A

    2010-06-10

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We present a control and timing design for the dual-stabilized cw master lasers in a pulsed master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration, which forms a robust low-cost water-vapor DIAL transmitter system. This design operates at 823 nm for water-vapor spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot-type laser diodes. However, the techniques described could be applied to other laser technologies at other wavelengths. The system can be extended with additional off-line or side-line wavelengths. The on-line master laser is locked to the center of a water absorption line, while the beat frequency between the on-line and the off-line is locked to 16 GHz using only a bandpass microwave filter and low-frequency electronics. Optical frequency stabilities of the order of 1 MHz are achieved.

  6. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  7. Absorption of ultraviolet radiation by antarctic phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Vernet, M.; Mitchell, B.G. )

    1990-01-09

    Antarctic phytoplankton contain UV-absorbing compounds that may block damaging radiation. Compounds that absorb from 320-340 nm were observed in spectral absorption of both particulates and in methanol extracts of the particulates. The decrease in the total concentration of these UV compounds with respect to chlorophyll a, as measured by the ratio of in vitro absorption at 335 nm to absorption at 665 nm is variable and decreases with depth. We observed up to 5-fold decrease in this ratio for samples within the physically mixes surface layer. The absorption of UV radiation in methanol extracts, which peaks from 320 to 340 nm, may be composed of several compounds. Shifts in peak absorption with depth (for example, from 331 nm at surface to 321 nm at 75 m), may be interpreted as a change in composition. Ratios of protective yellow xanthophylls (diadinoxanthin + diatoxanthin) to photosynthetic fucoxanthin-like pigments have highest values in surface waters. As these pigments also absorb in the near UV, their function might extend to protection as well as utilization of UV radiation for photosynthesis. We document strong absorption in the UV from 320-330 nm for Antarctic marine particulates. Below this region of the solar energy spectrum, absolute energy levels of incident radiation drop off dramatically. Only wavelengths shorter than about 320 nm will be significantly enhanced due to ozone depletion. If the absorption we observed serves a protective role for phytoplankton photosynthesis, it appears the peak band is in the region where solar energy increases rapidly, and not in the region where depletion would cause significant variations in absolute flux.

  8. 76 FR 1504 - Pipeline Safety: Establishing Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure or Maximum Operating Pressure...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-10

    ...: Establishing Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure or Maximum Operating Pressure Using Record Evidence, and... system, especially when calculating Maximum Allowable Operating Pressure (MAOP) or Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP), and to utilize these risk analyses in the identification of appropriate assessment...

  9. Light absorption of organic aerosol from pyrolysis of corn stalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinghua; Chen, Yanju; Bond, Tami C.

    2016-11-01

    Organic aerosol (OA) can absorb solar radiation in the low-visible and ultra-violet wavelengths thereby modifying radiative forcing. Agricultural waste burning emits a large quantity of organic carbon in many developing countries. In this work, we improved the extraction and analysis method developed by Chen and Bond, and extended the spectral range of OC absorption. We examined light absorbing properties of primary OA from pyrolysis of corn stalk, which is a major type of agricultural wastes. Light absorption of bulk liquid extracts of OA was measured using a UV-vis recording spectrophotometer. OA can be extracted by methanol at 95%, close to full extent, and shows polar character. Light absorption of organic aerosol has strong spectral dependence (Absorption Ångström exponent = 7.7) and is not negligible at ultra-violet and low-visible regions. Higher pyrolysis temperature produced OA with higher absorption. Imaginary refractive index of organic aerosol (kOA) is 0.041 at 400 nm wavelength and 0.005 at 550 nm wavelength, respectively.

  10. Absorption to reflection transition in selective solar coatings.

    PubMed

    Olson, Kyle D; Talghader, Joseph J

    2012-07-01

    The optimum transition wavelength between high absorption and low emissivity for selective solar absorbers has been calculated in several prior treatises for an ideal system, where the emissivity is exactly zero in the infrared. However, no real coating can achieve such a low emissivity across the entire infrared with simultaneously high absorption in the visible. An emissivity of even a few percent radically changes the optimum wavelength separating the high and low absorption spectral bands. This behavior is described and calculated for AM0 and AM1.5 solar spectra with an infrared emissivity varying between 0 and 5%. With an emissivity of 5%, solar concentration of 10 times the AM1.5 spectrum the optimum transition wavelength is found to be 1.28 µm and have a 957K equilibrium temperature. To demonstrate typical absorptions in optimized solar selective coatings, a four-layer sputtered Mo and SiO₂ coating with absorption of 5% across the infrared is described experimentally and theoretically.

  11. Maximum entropy principal for transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Bilich, F.; Da Silva, R.

    2008-11-06

    In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

  12. La/B(4)C multilayer mirrors with an additional wavelength suppression.

    PubMed

    Naujok, Philipp; Yulin, Sergiy; Bianco, Anna; Mahne, Nicola; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, the authors report on La/B(4)C multilayer mirrors designed for an incidence angle of 45° with both maximum reflectivity at a wavelength of 6.7 nm and reflectivity suppression at a wavelength of 20.1 nm. These mirrors were deposited for the EIS-TIMER at the FERMI@Elettra Free Electron Laser. The multilayer structure and optical properties were characterized using grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry with Cu-K(α) radiation and EUV reflectometry in the spectral region of 6.5 - 21.0 nm. An anti-reflective coating designed at the wavelength of 20.1 nm had to be deposited on top of the high reflective La/B(4)C multilayer mirror optimized at a wavelength of 6.7 nm. Measured reflectivities of 53.4% at the wavelength of 6.72 nm and 0.15% at the wavelength of 20.1 nm were simultaneously achieved. It is shown that the reflectivity loss at the wavelength of 6.7 nm due to the utilization of antireflective coating designed at the wavelength of 20.1 nm can be minimized up to 1.0%. PMID:25836465

  13. La/B(4)C multilayer mirrors with an additional wavelength suppression.

    PubMed

    Naujok, Philipp; Yulin, Sergiy; Bianco, Anna; Mahne, Nicola; Kaiser, Norbert; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, the authors report on La/B(4)C multilayer mirrors designed for an incidence angle of 45° with both maximum reflectivity at a wavelength of 6.7 nm and reflectivity suppression at a wavelength of 20.1 nm. These mirrors were deposited for the EIS-TIMER at the FERMI@Elettra Free Electron Laser. The multilayer structure and optical properties were characterized using grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry with Cu-K(α) radiation and EUV reflectometry in the spectral region of 6.5 - 21.0 nm. An anti-reflective coating designed at the wavelength of 20.1 nm had to be deposited on top of the high reflective La/B(4)C multilayer mirror optimized at a wavelength of 6.7 nm. Measured reflectivities of 53.4% at the wavelength of 6.72 nm and 0.15% at the wavelength of 20.1 nm were simultaneously achieved. It is shown that the reflectivity loss at the wavelength of 6.7 nm due to the utilization of antireflective coating designed at the wavelength of 20.1 nm can be minimized up to 1.0%.

  14. Spectral dependence of aerosol light absorption over the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, L. V.; Correia, A. L.; Artaxo, P.; Procópio, A. S.; Andreae, M. O.

    2011-04-01

    In this study, we examine the spectral dependence of aerosol absorption at different sites and seasons in the Amazon Basin. The analysis is based on measurements performed during three intensive field experiments at a pasture site (Fazenda Nossa Senhora, Rondônia) and at a primary forest site (Cuieiras Reserve, Amazonas), from 1999 to 2004. Aerosol absorption spectra were measured using two Aethalometers: a 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE30) that covers the visible (VIS) to near-infrared (NIR) spectral range, and a 2-wavelength Aethalometer (AE20) that measures absorption in the UV and in the visible. As a consequence of biomass burning emissions, about 10 times greater absorption values were observed in the dry season in comparison to the wet season. Power law expressions were fitted to the measurements in order to derive the Ångström exponent for absorption, defined as the negative slope of absorption vs. wavelength in a log-log plot. At the pasture site, about 70% of the Ångström exponents fell between 1.5 and 2.5 during the dry season, indicating that biomass burning aerosols have a stronger spectral dependence than soot carbon particles. Ångström exponents decreased from the dry to the wet season, in agreement with the shift from biomass burning aerosols, predominant in the fine mode, to biogenic and dust aerosols, predominant in the coarse mode. The lowest Ångström exponents (90% of data below 1.5) were observed at the forest site during the dry season. Also, results indicate that low absorption coefficients were associated with Ångström exponents below 1.0. This finding suggests that biogenic aerosols from Amazonia may have a weak spectral dependence for absorption, contradicting our expectations of biogenic particles behaving as brown carbon. Nevertheless, additional measurements should be taken in the future, to provide a complete picture of biogenic aerosol absorption spectral characteristics from different seasons and geographic locations. The

  15. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  16. Terahertz polarization spectroscopy in the near-field zone of a sub-wavelength-scale metal slit.

    PubMed

    Han, Daehoon; Lee, Kanghee; Jo, Hanlae; Song, Yunheung; Kim, Minhyuk; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-09-19

    Time-domain spectroscopy is used to probe the polarization dependence of the terahertz-frequency absorption of α-lactose molecules in the near-field vicinity of a sub-wavelength-scale metal slit. The experimental result finds that the 0.53-THz absorption of this material has an unexpected polarization dependence, strongly coupled to the slit orientation; in particular, the electric wave in parallel polarization exhibits even complete vanishing of the otherwise resonant strong absorption. The physics behind this phenomena may be explained based on the Bethe's sub-wavelength diffraction: the electric field that is measured in the far field, but diffracted from a sub-wavelength-scale metal aperture, originates from solely magnetic dipole radiation and not from the electric dipole radiation, thus showing no electrically-coupled material response. PMID:27661871

  17. Informative wavelengths for trace atmospheric gas sounding with an opo-lidar in the 3-4 μm spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovskii, O. A.; Kharchenko, O. V.; Sadovnikov, S. A.; Yakovlev, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a search for information-bearing mid-IR wavelengths for HCl and HBr sounding with a differential absorption lidar based on an optical parametric oscillator has been carried out. Lidar echo signals have been calculated at the wavelengths chosen during sounding of gas components along vertical paths 0-5 km long.

  18. A broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer for measuring the extinction of aerosols at blue and near-UV wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Dean; Fullam, Donovan; Hoa Le, Phuoc; Chen, Jun; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for sensitive extinction measurements of aerosols. The instrument is distinguished by its broad and continuous spectral coverage from the near-UV to blue wavelengths (ca. 320 to 450 nm). The short wavelength region has been little explored compared to visible wavelengths, but is important because (1) brown carbon (BrC) absorbs strongly in this wavelength region, and (2) absorption of near-UV radiation in the atmosphere alters the photolysis rate of the key atmospheric species O3, NO2, and HONO, with implications for air quality and atmospheric oxidation capacity. The instrument performance and the effect of a switchable in-line filter are characterised. Early results using the instrument in the TROPOS atmospheric simulation chamber are presented. These experiments include studies of secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA), and biomass burning experiments of rice and wheat straw, followed by experiments simulating particle aging under daytime and nighttime conditions.

  19. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  20. Optical wavelength modulation in free electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Mabe, R.M.; Wong, R.K.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    An attribute of the free electron laser (FEL) is the continuous tunability of the optical wavelength by modulation of the electron beam energy. The variation of the wavelength and power of the optical beam is studied as a function of FEL operating parameters. These results will be applied to the Stanford SCA FEL and Boeing FEL.

  1. GHRS Cycle 5 Echelle Wavelength Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David

    1995-07-01

    This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle A. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. This proposal defines the spectral lamp test for Echelle B. It is an internal test which makes measurements of the wavelength lamp SC2. It calibrates the carrousel function, Y deflections, resolving power, sensitivity, and scattered light. The wavelength calibration dispersion constants will be updated in the PODPS calibration data base. It will be run every 4 months. The wavelengths may be out of range according to PEPSI or TRANS. Please ignore the errors.

  2. o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption: syntheses and uncaging cross-sections for one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Aujard, Isabelle; Benbrahim, Chouaha; Gouget, Marine; Ruel, Odile; Baudin, Jean-Bernard; Neveu, Pierre; Jullien, Ludovic

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the o-nitrobenzyl platform for designing photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption that could be photolyzed upon one- and two-photon excitation. Several synthetic pathways to build different conjugated o-nitrobenzyl backbones, as well as to vary the benzylic position, are reported. Relative to the reference 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group, several o-nitrobenzyl derivatives exhibit a large and red-shifted one-photon absorption within the near-UV range. Uncaging after one-photon excitation was studied by measuring UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence emission on model caged ethers and esters. In the whole series investigated, the caged substrates were released cleanly upon photolysis. Quantum yields of uncaging after one-photon absorption lie within the 0.1-1 % range. We observed that these drop as the maximum wavelength absorption of the o-nitrobenzyl protecting group is increased. A new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) after two-photon excitation was used to measure the action uncaging cross section for two-photon excitation. The series of o-nitrobenzyl caged fluorescent coumarins investigated exhibit values within the 0.1-0.01 Goeppert-Mayer (GM) range. Such results are in line with the low quantum yields of uncaging associated with cross-sections of 1-50 GM for two-photon absorption. Although the cross-sections for one- and two-photon absorption of o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups can be readily improved, we emphasize the difficulty in enlarging the corresponding action uncaging cross-sections in view of the observed trend of their quantum yield of uncaging.

  3. o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption: syntheses and uncaging cross-sections for one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Aujard, Isabelle; Benbrahim, Chouaha; Gouget, Marine; Ruel, Odile; Baudin, Jean-Bernard; Neveu, Pierre; Jullien, Ludovic

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the o-nitrobenzyl platform for designing photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption that could be photolyzed upon one- and two-photon excitation. Several synthetic pathways to build different conjugated o-nitrobenzyl backbones, as well as to vary the benzylic position, are reported. Relative to the reference 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group, several o-nitrobenzyl derivatives exhibit a large and red-shifted one-photon absorption within the near-UV range. Uncaging after one-photon excitation was studied by measuring UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence emission on model caged ethers and esters. In the whole series investigated, the caged substrates were released cleanly upon photolysis. Quantum yields of uncaging after one-photon absorption lie within the 0.1-1 % range. We observed that these drop as the maximum wavelength absorption of the o-nitrobenzyl protecting group is increased. A new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) after two-photon excitation was used to measure the action uncaging cross section for two-photon excitation. The series of o-nitrobenzyl caged fluorescent coumarins investigated exhibit values within the 0.1-0.01 Goeppert-Mayer (GM) range. Such results are in line with the low quantum yields of uncaging associated with cross-sections of 1-50 GM for two-photon absorption. Although the cross-sections for one- and two-photon absorption of o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups can be readily improved, we emphasize the difficulty in enlarging the corresponding action uncaging cross-sections in view of the observed trend of their quantum yield of uncaging. PMID:16763952

  4. Maximum Parsimony on Phylogenetic networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic networks are generalizations of phylogenetic trees, that are used to model evolutionary events in various contexts. Several different methods and criteria have been introduced for reconstructing phylogenetic trees. Maximum Parsimony is a character-based approach that infers a phylogenetic tree by minimizing the total number of evolutionary steps required to explain a given set of data assigned on the leaves. Exact solutions for optimizing parsimony scores on phylogenetic trees have been introduced in the past. Results In this paper, we define the parsimony score on networks as the sum of the substitution costs along all the edges of the network; and show that certain well-known algorithms that calculate the optimum parsimony score on trees, such as Sankoff and Fitch algorithms extend naturally for networks, barring conflicting assignments at the reticulate vertices. We provide heuristics for finding the optimum parsimony scores on networks. Our algorithms can be applied for any cost matrix that may contain unequal substitution costs of transforming between different characters along different edges of the network. We analyzed this for experimental data on 10 leaves or fewer with at most 2 reticulations and found that for almost all networks, the bounds returned by the heuristics matched with the exhaustively determined optimum parsimony scores. Conclusion The parsimony score we define here does not directly reflect the cost of the best tree in the network that displays the evolution of the character. However, when searching for the most parsimonious network that describes a collection of characters, it becomes necessary to add additional cost considerations to prefer simpler structures, such as trees over networks. The parsimony score on a network that we describe here takes into account the substitution costs along the additional edges incident on each reticulate vertex, in addition to the substitution costs along the other edges which are

  5. Method development for the determination of fluorine in toothpaste via molecular absorption of aluminum mono fluoride using a high-resolution continuum source nitrous oxide/acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Akman, Suleyman

    2012-05-30

    Fluorine was determined via the rotational molecular absorption line of aluminum mono fluoride (AlF) generated in C(2)H(2)/N(2)O flame at 227.4613 nm using a high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (HR-CS-FAAS). The effects of AlF wavelength, burner height, fuel rate (C(2)H(2)/N(2)O) and amount of Al on the accuracy, precision and sensitivity were investigated and optimized. The Al-F absorption band at 227.4613 nm was found to be the most suitable analytical line with respect to sensitivity and spectral interferences. Maximum sensitivity and a good linearity were obtained in acetylene-nitrous oxide flame at a flow rate of 210 L h(-1) and a burner height of 8mm using 3000 mg L(-1) of Al for 10-1000 mg L(-1)of F. The accuracy and precision of the method were tested by analyzing spiked samples and waste water certified reference material. The results were in good agreement with the certified and spiked amounts as well as the precision of several days during this study was satisfactory (RSD<10%). The limit of detection and characteristic concentration of the method were 5.5 mg L(-1) and 72.8 mg L(-1), respectively. Finally, the fluorine concentrations in several toothpaste samples were determined. The results found and given by the producers were not significantly different. The method was simple, fast, accurate and sensitive.

  6. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively.

  7. Free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner demonstration.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Zahid; Riza, Nabeel A

    2002-09-10

    Experimental demonstration of a no-moving-parts free-space wavelength-multiplexed optical scanner (W-MOS) is presented. With fast tunable lasers or optical filters and planar wavelength dispersive elements such as diffraction gratings, this microsecond-speed scanner enables large several-centimeter apertures for subdegree angular scans. The proposed W-MOS design incorporates a unique optical amplifier and variable optical attenuator combination that enables the calibration and modulation of the scanner response, leading to any desired scanned laser beam power shaping. The experimental setup uses a tunable laser centered at 1560 nm and a 600-grooves/mm blazed reflection grating to accomplish an angular scan of 12.92 degrees as the source is tuned over an 80-nm bandwidth. The values for calculated maximum optical beam divergance, required wavelength resolution, beam-pointing accuracy, and measured scanner insertion loss are 1.076 mrad, 0.172 nm, 0.06 mrad, and 4.88 dB, respectively. PMID:12224780

  8. Broadband light absorption of silicon nanowires embedded in Ag nano-hole arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Lei; Ji, Chun-Lei; Li, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) embedded in Ag nano-hole arrays with broadband light absorption is proposed in this paper. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulations were utilized to obtain absorptivity and band diagrams for both SiNWs and SiNWs embedded in Ag nano-hole arrays. A direct relationship between waveguide modes and extraordinary absorptivity is established qualitatively, which helps to optimal design the structure parameters to achieve broadband absorptivity. After introducing Ag nano-hole arrays at the rear side of SiNWs, the band modes are extended into leaky regions and light energy can be fully absorbed, resulting in high absorptivity at long wavelength. Severe reflection is also suppressed by light trapping capability of SiNWs at short wavelength. Over 70% average absorptivity from 400 nm to 1100 nm is realized finally. This kinds of design give promising route for high efficiency solar cells and optical absorbers.

  9. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides.

  10. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  11. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  12. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  13. Refraction and absorption of microwaves in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziherl, Saša; Bajc, Jurij; Čepič, Mojca

    2013-03-01

    A demonstration experiment for physics students showing the dependence of the refractive index and absorption coefficient of wood on the direction of microwaves is presented. Wood and microwaves enable study of anisotropic properties, which are typically found in crystals. Wood is used as the persuasive representative of uniaxial anisotropic materials due to its visible structure and its consequent anisotropic properties. Wood can be cut in a general direction and wooden plates a few centimetres thick with well-defined fibre orientation are easily prepared. Microwaves are used because wood is transparent for microwaves and their centimetre-scale wavelength is comparable to the wood structure.

  14. Microwave absorption properties and infrared emissivities of ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with crystalline framework

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao; He, Jianping; Zhou, Jianhua; Tang, Jing; Guo, Yunxia; Ding, Xiaochun; Wu, Shichao; Zhao, Jianqing

    2010-12-15

    Ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites with crystalline framework were prepared by the evaporation-induced triconstituent co-assembly method. The products were characterized by XRD, TEM, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and TG. Their microwave absorption properties were investigated by mixing the product and epoxy resin. It is found that the peak with minimum reflection loss value moves to lower frequencies and the ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite possesses an excellent microwave absorbing property with the maximum reflection loss of -25.4 dB and the bandwidth lower than -10 dB is 6.6 GHz. The attenuation of microwave can be attributed to dielectric loss and their absorption mechanism is discussed in detail. The mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites also exhibit a lower infrared emissivity in the wavelength from 8 to 14 {mu}m than that of TiO{sub 2}-free powder. -- Graphical abstract: Ordered mesoporous C-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite with crystalline framework possess excellent microwave absorbing properties with the maximum reflection loss of -25.4 dB and the bandwidth lower than -10 dB is 6.6 GHz. Display Omitted

  15. A direct solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for the determination of silicon in biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. D.; Krivan, V.

    2007-03-01

    A solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry method for direct determination of trace silicon in biological materials was developed and applied to analysis of pork liver, bovine liver SRM 1577b and pure cellulose. The organic matrix was destroyed and expelled from the furnace in the pyrolysis stage involving a step-wise increasing the temperature from 160 °C to 1200 °C. The mixed Pd/Mg(NO 3) 2 modifier has proved to be the optimum one with respect to the achievement of maximum sensitivity, elimination of the effect of the remaining inorganic substances and the possibility of using calibration curves measured with aqueous standard solutions for quantification. For the maximum applicable sample amount of 6 mg, the limit of detection was found to be 30 ng g - 1 . The results were compared with those obtained by different spectrometric methods involving sample digestion, by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry using slurry sampling, by wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The method seems to be a promising one for analysis of biological materials containing no significant fraction of silicon in form of not naturally occurring volatile organosilicon compounds. The still incessant serious limitations and uncertainties in the determination of trace silicon in solid biological materials are discussed.

  16. Ultraviolet Absorption by Secondary Organic Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J. M.; Hodzic, A.; Aumont, B.

    2014-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are typically formed in the atmosphere by the condensation of a myriad of intermediates from the photo-oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many of these partly oxidized molecules have functional groups (chromophores) that absorb at the ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths available in the troposphere (λ ≳ 290 nm). We used the explicit chemical model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics for Organics in the Atmosphere) to estimate UV absorption cross sections for the gaseous and particulate components of SOA from different precursors (biogenic and anthropogenic) and formed in different environments (low and high NOx, day and night). Model predictions are evaluated with laboratory and field measurements of SOA UV optical properties (esp. mass absorption coefficients and single scattering albedo), and implications are presented for surface UV radiation trends, urban actinic flux modification, and SOA lifetimes.

  17. Determining CDOM Absorption Spectra in Diverse Coastal Environments Using a Multiple Pathlength, Liquid Core Waveguide System. Measuring the Absorption of CDOM in the Field Using a Multiple Pathlength Liquid Waveguide System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard L.; Belz, Mathias; DelCastillo, Carlos; Trzaska, Rick

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy, sensitivity and precision of a multiple pathlength, liquid core waveguide (MPLCW) system for measuring colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption in the UV-visible spectral range (370-700 nm). The MPLCW has four optical paths (2.0, 9.8, 49.3, and 204 cm) coupled to a single Teflon AF sample cell. Water samples were obtained from inland, coastal and ocean waters ranging in salinity from 0 to 36 PSU. Reference solutions for the MPLCW were made having a refractive index of the sample. CDOM absorption coefficients, a(sub CDOM), and the slope of the log-linearized absorption spectra, S, were compared with values obtained using a dual-beam spectrophotometer. Absorption of phenol red secondary standards measured by the MPLCW at 558 nm were highly correlated with spectrophotometer values (r > 0.99) and showed a linear response across all four pathlengths. Values of a(sub CDOM) measured using the MPLCW were virtually identical to spectrophotometer values over a wide range of concentrations. The dynamic range of a(sub CDOM) for MPLCW measurements was 0.002 - 231.5/m. At low CDOM concentrations (a(sub 370) < 0.1/m) spectrophotometric a(sub CDOM) were slightly greater than MPLCW values and showed larger fluctuations at longer wavelengths due to limitations in instrument precision. In contrast, MPLCW spectra followed an exponential to 600 nm for all samples. The maximum deviation in replicate MPLCW spectra was less than 0.001 absorbance units. The portability, sampling, and optical characteristics of a MPLCW system provide significant enhancements for routine CDOM absorption measurements in a broad range of natural waters.

  18. SALT spectroscopic classification of PS15bzz as a type-Ia supernova at maximum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, S. W.; Pan, Y.-C.; Foley, R. J.; Rest, A.; Scolnic, D.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Huber, M.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Willman, M.; Primak, N.; Schultz, A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E.; Waters, C.; Tonry, J.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Miszalski, B.

    2015-09-01

    We obtained SALT (+RSS) spectroscopy of PS15bzz on 2015 Aug 16.9 UT, covering the wavelength range 360-820 nm. Cross-correlation of the spectrum with a template library using SNID (Blondin & Tonry 2007, ApJ, 666, 1024) shows PS15bzz is a type-Ia supernova within a few days of maximum light.

  19. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  20. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  1. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression over the entire UV-visible spectral range. These results are compared to results obtained from the absorbance measurements obtained in the field. The differences in calculated Angstrom absorption exponents between the field and laboratory measurements are attributed partly to the differences in time resolution of the sample collection resulting in heavier particle pileup on the filter surface of the 12-hour samples. Some differences in calculated results can also be attributed to the presence of narrow band absorbers below 400 nm that do not fall in the wavelengths covered by the 7 wavelengths of the aethalometer. 1. Marley, N.A., J.S. Gaffney, J.C. Baird, C.A. Blazer, P.J. Drayton, and J.E. Frederick, "The determination of scattering and absorption coefficients of size-fractionated aerosols for radiative transfer calculations." Aerosol Sci. Technol., 34, 535-549, (2001). This work was conducted as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Science Program as part of the Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City during MILAGRO. This research was supported by the Office of Science (BER), U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64329. We also wish to thank Mexican Scientists and students for their assistance from the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo (IMP) and CENICA.

  2. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  3. Determination of absorption coefficients in AlInP lattice matched to GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, J. S.; Ng, J. S.; Krysa, A. B.; Ong, J. S. L.; David, J. P. R.

    2015-10-01

    The absorption properties of Al0.52In0.48P have been investigated near the fundamental absorption edge by measuring the photocurrent as a function of wavelength in a series of PIN and NIP diodes. Modelling of the photocurrent in these structures enables the absorption coefficients to be determined accurately over a wide dynamic range, which allows the direct and indirect band-gap to be determined.

  4. Absorption Changes in Bacterial Chromatophores

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Irwin D.; Loach, Paul A.; Calvin, Melvin

    1964-01-01

    The magnitude and kinetics of photo-induced absorption changes in bacterial chromatophores (R. rubrum, R. spheroides and Chromatium) have been studied as a function of potential, established by added redox couples. No photochanges can be observed above +0.55 v or below -0.15 v. The loss of signal at the higher potential is centered at +0.439 v and follows a one-electron change. The loss of signal at the lower potential is centered at -0.044 v and is also consistent with a one-electron change. Both losses are reversible. A quantitative relationship exists between light-minus-dark and oxidized-minus-reduced spectra in the near infrared from +0.30 to +0.55 v. Selective treatment of the chromatophores with strong oxidants irreversibly bleaches the bulk pigments but appears to leave intact those pigments responsible for the photo- and chemically-induced absorption changes. Kinetic studies of the photochanges in deaerated samples of R. rubrum chromatophores revealed the same rise time for bands at 433, 792, and 865 mμ (t½ = 50 msec.). However, these bands had different decay rates (t½ = 1.5, 0.5, 0.15 sec., respectively), indicating that they belong to different pigments. Analysis of the data indicates, as the simplest interpretation, a first-order (or pseudo first-order) forward reaction and two parallel first-order (or pseudo first-order) decay reactions at each wavelength. These results imply that all pigments whose kinetics are given are photooxidized and the decay processes are dark reductions. These experiments are viewed as supporting and extending the concept of a bacterial photosynthetic unit, with energy migration within it to specific sites of electron transfer. PMID:14185583

  5. Tunable diode laser absorption sensor for temperature and velocity measurements of O2 in air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philippe, L. C.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A fast and nonintrusive velocity and temperature diagnostic based on oxygen absorption is presented. The system uses a GaAlAs tunable diode laser, ramped and modulated in wavelength at high frequency. Detection is performed at twice the modulating frequency, leading to second harmonic absorption lineshapes. Velocity is inferred from the wavelength shift of the absorption line center due to the Doppler effect. Temperature is determined by comparing experimental and calculated lineshapes. Capabilities of the technique for studies of transient high-speed flows are demonstrated in shock tube experiments. Good agreement is obtained with predicted temperatures and velocities when pressure-induced shifts are accounted for.

  6. Gain Characteristics of Polymer Waveguide Amplifiers Based on NaYF4:Ybl+, Er3+ Nanocrystals at 0.54 µm Wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Yin, Jiao; Jia, Zhixu; Song, Weiye; Wang, Xibin; Qin, Guanshi; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Weiping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming

    2016-04-01

    Gain characteristics of polymer waveguide amplifiers based on NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals (NCs) at 0.54 µm wavelength were investigated through numerical simulations. NaYF4:18%Yb3+, 1 0%Er3+ NCs were doped into SU-8 2005 polymer matrix as the core of a polymer waveguide. The absorption spectrum and photoluminescence spectrum of the NCs were recorded and analyzed. The Judd-Ofelt parameters were achieved by means of Judd-Ofelt theory: Ω2 = 6.302 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω4 = 0.69 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω6 =7.572 x 10(-20) cm2. We simulated the gain characteristics of the waveguide amplifier at 0.54 µm wavelength by combining the atomic rate equations with power propaga- tion equations. The gain curves had the saturation effects. A maximum gain -4.3 dB for the 5 cm waveguide with the Er3+ concentration of ~7.5 x 1025 m-3 was obtained.

  7. Highly efficient tunable mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by a wavelength locked, Q-switched Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Tang, Pinghua; Chen, Yu; Zhao, Chujun; Shen, Deyuan; Wen, Shuangchun; Fan, Dianyuan

    2015-08-10

    A highly efficient and stable mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator is demonstrated, pumped by an electro-optic Q-switched Er:YAG laser with operating wavelength locked at 1645 nm by a volume Bragg grating. The oscillator, based on MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate (MgO:PPLN) crystal, yields a maximum overall average output power in excess of 1 W, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 35.5% and a slope efficiency of 43.6%. The signal and idler wavelengths of the OPO are around ~2.7 μm and ~4.3 μm, respectively, corresponding to the two peak absorption bands of CO(2). Lasing characteristics of the oscillator, including the time evolution of the pump, signal and idler pulses at different pump power levels, are also investigated. Temperature tuning of the MgO:PPLN crystal gives signal and idler ranges of 2.67 to 2.72 μm and 4.17 to 4.31 μm, respectively.

  8. Development of a high power supercontinuum source in the 1.7 μm wavelength region for highly penetrative ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kawagoe, H.; Ishida, S.; Aramaki, M.; Sakakibara, Y.; Omoda, E.; Kataura, H.; Nishizawa, N.

    2014-01-01

    We developed a high power supercontinuum source at a center wavelength of 1.7 μm to demonstrate highly penetrative ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT). A single-wall carbon nanotube dispersed in polyimide film was used as a transparent saturable absorber in the cavity configuration and a high-repetition-rate ultrashort-pulse fiber laser was realized. The developed SC source had an output power of 60 mW, a bandwidth of 242 nm full-width at half maximum, and a repetition rate of 110 MHz. The average power and repetition rate were approximately twice as large as those of our previous SC source [20]. Using the developed SC source, UHR-OCT imaging was demonstrated. A sensitivity of 105 dB and an axial resolution of 3.2 μm in biological tissue were achieved. We compared the UHR-OCT images of some biological tissue samples measured with the developed SC source, the previous one, and one operating in the 1.3 μm wavelength region. We confirmed that the developed SC source had improved sensitivity and penetration depth for low-water-absorption samples. PMID:24688825

  9. Gain Characteristics of Polymer Waveguide Amplifiers Based on NaYF4:Ybl+, Er3+ Nanocrystals at 0.54 µm Wavelength.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meiling; Yin, Jiao; Jia, Zhixu; Song, Weiye; Wang, Xibin; Qin, Guanshi; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Weiping; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Daming

    2016-04-01

    Gain characteristics of polymer waveguide amplifiers based on NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals (NCs) at 0.54 µm wavelength were investigated through numerical simulations. NaYF4:18%Yb3+, 1 0%Er3+ NCs were doped into SU-8 2005 polymer matrix as the core of a polymer waveguide. The absorption spectrum and photoluminescence spectrum of the NCs were recorded and analyzed. The Judd-Ofelt parameters were achieved by means of Judd-Ofelt theory: Ω2 = 6.302 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω4 = 0.69 x 10(-20) cm2, Ω6 =7.572 x 10(-20) cm2. We simulated the gain characteristics of the waveguide amplifier at 0.54 µm wavelength by combining the atomic rate equations with power propaga- tion equations. The gain curves had the saturation effects. A maximum gain -4.3 dB for the 5 cm waveguide with the Er3+ concentration of ~7.5 x 1025 m-3 was obtained. PMID:27451666

  10. Short-wavelength infrared (1.3-2.6 μm) observations of the nucleus of Comet 19P/Borrelly

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soderblom, L.A.; Britt, D.T.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Kirk, R.L.; Owen, T.C.; Yelle, R.V.

    2004-01-01

    During the last two minutes before closest approach of Deep Space 1 to Comet 19P/Borrelly, a long exposure was made with the short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) imaging spectrometer. The observation yielded 46 spectra covering 1.3–2.6 μm; the footprint of each spectrum was ∼160 m × width of the nucleus. Borrelly's highly variegated and extremely dark 8-km-long nucleus exhibits a strong red slope in its short-wavelength infrared reflection spectrum. This slope is equivalent to J–K and H–K colors of ∼0.82 and ∼0.43, respectively. Between 2.3–2.6 μm thermal emission is clearly detectable in most of the spectra. These data show the nucleus surface to be hot and dry; no trace of H2O ice was detected. The surface temperature ranged continuously across the nucleus from ⩽300 K near the terminator to a maximum of ∼340 K, the expected sub-solar equilibrium temperature for a slowly rotating body. A single absorption band at ∼2.39 μm is quite evident in all of the spectra and resembles features seen in nitrogen-bearing organic molecules that are reasonable candidates for compositional components of cometary nuclei. However as of yet the source of this band is unknown.

  11. Four-wavelength time-resolved optical mammography in the 680-980-nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Torricelli, Alessandro; Messina, Fabrizio; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Danesini, Gianmaria

    2003-07-01

    What is to our knowledge the first instrument for time-resolved optical mammography operating at wavelengths longer than 900 nm has been developed. It is a scanning system that relies on the acquisition of time-resolved transmittance curves at 683, 785, 912, and 975 nm, with a total measurement time of ~5 min for an entire image. Breast structures and lesions can be discriminated based on the different absorption and scattering properties at the four wavelengths, which reflect different contributions of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids, as well as distinct structures. The system is currently used in a European clinical trial.

  12. Enhancement of the short wavelength upconversion emission in inverse opal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hangjun; Zhu, Jialun; Yang, Zhengwen; Yan, Dong; Wang, Rongfei; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yu, Xue; Yang, Yong; Zhou, Dacheng; Yin, Zhaoyi

    2014-05-01

    Upconversion luminescence properties of Yb-Tb codoped Bi4Ti3O12 inverse opals have been investigated. The results show that the upconversion emission can be modulated by the photonic band gap. More significantly, in the upconversion inverse opals, the excited-state absorption of Tb3+ is greatly enhanced by the suppression of upconversion spontaneous emissions of the intermediate excited state, and thus the short wavelength upconversion emission from Tb3+ is considerably improved. We believe that the present work will be valuable for not only the foundational study of upconversion emission modifications but also new optical devices in upconversion displays and short wavelength upconversion lasers. PMID:24734648

  13. Dependence of laser-plasma interaction physics on laser wavelength and plasma scalelength

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.

    1984-04-09

    We discuss the dependence of many features of laser-plasma interaction physics on both the laser wavelength and plasma dimensions. Experimental results that are presented include absorption, stimulated Brillouin scattering, suprathermal electron production, and optical signatures of the two plasmon decay and stimulated Raman instabilities. While the experiments show beneficial effects of decreasing laser wavelength on the coupling physics, the mix and efficiency of the various interaction processes is shown to be strongly dependent on the size of the underdense plasma. 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Determination of Scattering and Absorption Coefficients for Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Spuckler, Charles M.; Markham, James R.

    2009-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the scattering and absorption coefficients for a set of freestanding plasma-sprayed 8 wt% yttria-stabilized zirconia (8YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) was determined at temperatures up to 1360 C in a wavelength range from 1.2 micrometers up to the 8YSZ absorption edge. The scattering and absorption coefficients were determined by fitting the directional-hemispherical reflectance and transmittance values calculated by a four-flux Kubelka Munk method to the experimentally measured hemispherical-directional reflectance and transmittance values obtained for five 8YSZ thicknesses. The scattering coefficient exhibited a continuous decrease with increasing wavelength and showed no significant temperature dependence. The scattering is primarily attributed to the relatively temperature-insensitive refractive index mismatch between the 8YSZ and its internal voids. The absorption coefficient was very low (less than 1 per centimeter) at wavelengths between 2 micrometers and the absorption edge and showed a definite temperature dependence that consisted of a shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths and an increase in the weak absorption below the absorption edge with increasing temperature. The shift in the absorption edge with temperature is attributed to strongly temperature-dependent multiphonon absorption. While TBC hemispherical transmittance beyond the absorption edge can be predicted by a simple exponential decrease with thickness, below the absorption edge, typical TBC thicknesses are well below the thickness range where a simple exponential decrease in hemispherical transmittance with TBC thickness is expected. [Correction added after online publication August 11, 2009: "edge to a shorter wavelengths" has been updated as edge to shorter wavelengths."

  15. Wavelengths effective in induction of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.; Grist, E.; Thompson, K.; Woodhead, A.D. )

    1993-07-15

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented back-cross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. The authors irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and score the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. They used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. They interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths >320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions. 25 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Short wavelength FELs using the SLAC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Winick, H.; Bane, K.; Boyce, R.

    1993-08-01

    Recent technological developments have opened the possibility to construct a device which we call a Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS); a fourth generation light source, with brightness, coherence, and peak power far exceeding other sources. Operating on the principle of the free electron laser (FEL), the LCLS would extend the range of FEL operation to much aborter wavelength than the 240 mn that has so far been reached. We report the results of studies of the use of the SLAC linac to drive an LCLS at wavelengths from about 3-100 nm initially and possibly even shorter wavelengths in the future. Lasing would be achieved in a single pass of a low emittance, high peak current, high energy electron beam through a long undulator. Most present FELs use an optical cavity to build up the intensity of the light to achieve lasing action in a low gain oscillator configuration. By eliminating the optical cavity, which is difficult to make at short wavelengths, laser action can be extended to shorter wavelengths by Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission (SASE), or by harmonic generation from a longer wavelength seed laser. Short wavelength, single pass lasers have been extensively studied at several laboratories and at recent workshops.

  17. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths. PMID:26723331

  18. Wavelengths Effective in Induction of Malignant Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setlow, Richard B.; Grist, Eleanor; Thompson, Keith; Woodhead, Avril D.

    1993-07-01

    It is generally agreed that sunlight exposure is one of the etiologic agents in malignant melanoma of fair-skinned individuals. However, the wavelengths responsible for tumorigenesis are not known, although DNA is assumed to be the target because individuals defective in the repair of UV damage to DNA are several thousandfold more prone to the disease than the average population. Heavily pigmented backcross hybrids of the genus Xiphophorus (platyfish and swordtails) are very sensitive to melanoma induction by single exposures to UV. We irradiated groups of five 6-day-old fish with narrow wavelength bands at 302, 313, 365, 405, and 436 nm and scored the irradiated animals for melanomas 4 months later. We used several exposures at each wavelength to obtain estimates of the sensitivity for melanoma induction as a function of exposure and wavelength. The action spectrum (sensitivity per incident photon as a function of wavelength) for melanoma induction shows appreciable sensitivity at 365, 405, and probably 436 nm, suggesting that wavelengths not absorbed directly in DNA are effective in induction. We interpret the results as indicating that light energy absorbed in melanin is effective in inducing melanomas in this animal model and that, in natural sunlight, 90-95% of melanoma induction may be attributed to wavelengths > 320 nm-the UV-A and visible spectral regions.

  19. Multiple Wavelength Observations of Flaring Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Kenneth R.

    The radio emission of quiescent active regions at 6 cm wavelength marks the legs of magnetic dipoles, and the emission at 20 cm wavelength delineates the radio wavelength counterpart of the coronal loops previously detected at X-ray wavelengths. At both wavelengths the temperatures have coronal values of a few million degrees. The polarization of the radio emission specifies the structure and strength of the coronal magnetic field (H ≈ 600 Gauss at heights h ≈ 4 x 109 cm above sunspot umbrae). At 6 cm and 20 cm wavelength the solar bursts have angular sizes between 5" and 30", brightness temperatures between 2 x 107 K and 2 x 108 K, and degrees of circular polarization between 10% and 90%. The location of the burst energy release is specified with second-of-arc accuracy. At radio wavelengths the bursts occur within the central regions of magnetic loops, while the flaring Ha kernels are located at the loop footpoints. Coronal loops exhibit enhanced radio emission (preburst heating) a few minutes before the release of burst energy. The radio polarization data indicate magnetic changes before and during solar bursts.

  20. Experimental verification of acoustic trace wavelength enhancement.

    PubMed

    Cray, Benjamin A

    2015-12-01

    Directivity is essentially a measure of a sonar array's beamwidth that can be obtained in a spherically isotropic ambient noise field; narrow array mainbeam widths are more directive than broader mainbeam widths. For common sonar systems, the directivity factor (or directivity index) is directly proportional to the ratio of an incident acoustic trace wavelength to the sonar array's physical length (which is always constrained). Increasing this ratio, by creating additional trace wavelengths for a fixed array length, will increase array directivity. Embedding periodic structures within an array generates Bragg scattering of the incident acoustic plane wave along the array's surface. The Bragg scattered propagating waves are shifted in a precise manner and create shorter wavelength replicas of the original acoustic trace wavelength. These replicated trace wavelengths (which contain identical signal arrival information) increase an array's wavelength to length ratio and thus directivity. Therefore, a smaller array, in theory, can have the equivalent directivity of a much larger array. Measurements completed in January 2015 at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center's Acoustic Test Facility, in Newport, RI, verified, near perfectly, these replicated, shorter, trace wavelengths.

  1. Tunable dual-wavelength ytterbium-doped fiber laser using a strain technique on microfiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, H; Salim, M A M; Azzuhri, Saaidal R; Jaddoa, M F; Harun, S W

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, stable dual-wavelength generation using a strain technique for a ytterbium-doped fiber laser is successfully demonstrated. A microfiber-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is inserted into the laser ring cavity and stretched using the xyz translation stage. Four sets of dual-wavelength output lasing are obtained when the strain is applied onto a microfiber. The dual-wavelength output possesses spacing between 7.12 and 11.59 nm, with displacement from 2 to 190 μm from the central wavelength. The obtained side-mode suppression ratio is ∼48  dBm, while the maximum power fluctuation and wavelength shift are less than 0.6 dB and 0.01 nm, respectively. The results demonstrate that this setup generates a stable dual-wavelength laser in the 1 μm region. PMID:26836079

  2. Wavelength initialization employing wavelength recognition scheme in WDM-PON based on tunable lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mun, Sil-Gu; Lee, Eun-Gu; Lee, Jong Hyun; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jyung Chan

    2015-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to initialize the wavelength of tunable lasers in WDM-PON employing wavelength recognition scheme with an optical filter as a function of wavelength and accomplished plug and play operation. We also implemented a transceiver based on our proposed wavelength initialization scheme and then experimentally demonstrated the feasibility in WDM-PON configuration guaranteeing 16 channels with 100 GHz channel spacing. Our proposal is a cost-effective and easy-to-install method to realize the wavelength initialization of ONU. In addition, this method will support compatibility with all kind of tunable laser regardless of their structures and operating principles.

  3. Potassium emission absorption system. Topical report 12

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, L.E.

    1995-04-01

    The Potassium Emission Absorption System is one of the advanced optical diagnostics developed at Mississippi State University to provide support for the demonstration of prototype-scale coal-fired combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generation. Intended for application in the upstream of an MHD flow, the system directly measures gas temperature and neutral potassium atom number density through spectroscopic emission absorption techniques. From these measurements the electron density can be inferred from a statistical equilibrium calculation and the electron conductivity in the MHD channel found by use of an electron mobility model. The instrument has been utilized for field test measurements on MHD facilities for almost a decade and has been proven to provide useful measurements as designed for MHD nozzle, channel, and diffuser test sections. The theory of the measurements, a system description, its capabilities, and field test measurement results are reported here. During the development and application of the instrument several technical issues arose which when addressed advanced the state of the art in emission absorption measurement. Studies of these issues are also reported here and include: two-wavelength measurements for particle-laden flows, potassium D-line far wing absorption coefficient, bias in emission absorption measurements arising from dirty windows and misalignments, non-coincident multiwavelength emission absorption sampling errors, and lineshape fitting for boundary layer flow profile information. Although developed for NLHD application, the instrument could be applied to any high temperature flow with a resonance line in the 300 to 800 nm range, for instance other types of flames, rocket plumes or low temperature plasmas.

  4. Fiber-coupled diode laser modules with wavelengths around 2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkamp, Mark; Wieching, Kristin; Traub, Martin; Boucke, Konstantin

    2007-02-01

    The common wavelength regime for high-power diode laser modules is the range between 800 nm and 1000 nm. However, there are also many applications that demand for a wavelength of around 2 μm. This wavelength range is extremely interesting for applications such as the processing of plastics, medical applications as well as environmental analytics. The interest in lasers with this wavelength is based on the special absorption characteristics of different types of material: Numerous plastics possess an intrinsic absorption around 2 μm, so that the use of additives is no longer necessary. This is of great value especially for medical-technical products, where additives require a separate approval. Furthermore the longer wavelength allows the processing of plastics which are clear and transparent at the visible. In addition, water, which is an essential element of biologic soft tissue, absorbs radiation at the wavelength about 2 μm very efficiently. As radiation of this wavelength can be guided by glass fibers, this wavelength may be very helpful for laser surgery. Currently available lasers at the spectral range about 2 μm are solid-state lasers based on Ho- and Tmdoped crystals. These systems suffer from high purchase costs as well as size and weight. In contrast to this, diode lasers can be built more compact, are much cheaper and more efficient. For this background, GaSb based high-power laser diodes for the wavelength regime of 1.9 - 2.3 μm are developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid State Physics (IAF). At the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT), fiber-coupled laser diode modules based on these laser bars are designed and realized. A first module prototype uses two laser bars with a wavelength of 1.9 μm to provide an output power of approx. 15 W from a 600 μm, NA 0.22 fiber. The module setup as well as the characteristics of the laser bars at 1.9 μm wavelength are described in this paper.

  5. Measurement of the complex refractive index and complex dielectric permittivity of T.P.S. Space Shuttle tile materials at millimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Afsar, Mohammed Nurul; Chi, Hua; Li, Xiaohui

    1990-01-01

    Complex refractive index and dielectric permittivity studies of presently used Space Shuttle tile materials at millimeter wavelengths reveal these tiles to exhibit similar absorption characteristics to those of fused silica materials. This absorption is mainly related to the water content in the specimen. A strong birefringence is observed at least in one of these fibrous refractory composite materials.

  6. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  7. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror.

  8. Photon Counting Detectors for the 1.0 - 2.0 Micron Wavelength Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    We describe results on the development of greater than 200 micron diameter, single-element photon-counting detectors for the 1-2 micron wavelength range. The technical goals include quantum efficiency in the range 10-70%; detector diameter greater than 200 microns; dark count rate below 100 kilo counts-per-second (cps), and maximum count rate above 10 Mcps.

  9. Investigation of SO3 absorption line for in situ gas detection inside combustion plants using a 4-μm-band laser source.

    PubMed

    Tokura, A; Tadanaga, O; Nishimiya, T; Muta, K; Kamiyama, N; Yonemura, M; Fujii, S; Tsumura, Y; Abe, M; Takenouchi, H; Kenmotsu, K; Sakai, Y

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated 4-μm-band SO3 absorption lines for in situSO3 detection using a mid-infrared laser source based on difference frequency generation in a quasi-phase-matched LiNbO3 waveguide. In the wavelength range of 4.09400-4.10600 μm, there were strong SO3 absorption lines. The maximum absorption coefficient at a concentration of 170 ppmv was estimated to be about 3.2×10-5  cm-1 at a gas temperature of 190°C. In coexistence with H2O, the reduction of the SO3 absorption peak height was observed, which was caused by sulfuric acid formation. We discuss a method of using an SO3 equilibrium curve to derive the total SO3 molecule concentration. PMID:27607263

  10. Magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Xiaoji; Xu Xia; Chen Xuzong; Chen Jingbiao

    2010-01-15

    Magic wavelengths for laser trapping of boson isotopes of alkaline-earth metal atoms Sr, Ca, and Mg are investigated while considering terahertz clock transitions between the {sup 3}P{sub 0}, {sup 3}P{sub 1}, and {sup 3}P{sub 2} metastable triplet states. Our calculation shows that magic wavelengths for laser trapping do exist. This result is important because those metastable states have already been used to make accurate clocks in the terahertz frequency domain. Detailed discussions for magic wavelengths for terahertz clock transitions are given in this article.

  11. Optical amplification at the 1. 31 wavelength

    DOEpatents

    Cockroft, N.J.

    1994-02-15

    An optical amplifier operating at the 1.31 [mu]m wavelength for use in such applications as telecommunications, cable television, and computer systems is described. An optical fiber or other waveguide device is doped with both Tm[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] ions. When pumped by a diode laser operating at a wavelength of 785 nm, energy is transferred from the Tm[sup 3+] ions to the Pr[sup 3+] ions, causing the Pr[sup 3+] ions to amplify at a wavelength of 1.31. 1 figure.

  12. Multimode fiber optic wavelength division multiplexing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) systems, with signals transmitted on different wavelengths through a single optical fiber, can have increased bandwidth and fault isolation properties over single wavelength optical systems. Two WDM system designs that might be used with multimode fibers are considered and a general description of the components which could be used to implement the system are given. The components described are sources, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and detectors. Emphasis is given to the demultiplexer technique which is the major developmental component in the WDM system.

  13. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  14. Measurement of the absorption coefficient of scattering liquid media by the calorimetric method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butenin, A. V.; Kogan, B. Ya.

    2012-02-01

    Using the example of a number of hydrosols (gold nanorods and nanoshells, silver nanoshells, zinc phthalocyanine nanoparticles), we show that the absorption coefficient of a scattering liquid medium can be measured from its heating by a short-time laser irradiation. The degree of heating was determined from expansion of the liquid in an ampoule with a capillary (the principle of liquid thermometer). Irradiation was performed at a wavelength of 671 or 1069 nm. From the transmission of samples of hydrosols at these wave-lengths, the sum of the absorption and scattering coefficients has been determined. To measure the absorption spectra of scattering liquids by this method, a laser with a tunable radiation wavelength is required. In the case of monodisperse colloidal solutions, the method ensures the measurement of the absorption and scattering cross-section ratio of particles.

  15. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  16. Solar radiometry at millimeter wavelengths. [Fast Fourier Transformation solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, W.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of resolution enhancement, the use of Fast Fourier Transform programs was investigated for possible application to millimeter wavelength maps of the sun. A difficulty arises with the La Posta maps in that they are limited to 35 arc-minutes square while the smeared out solar image is larger than that. A list of possible cometary emission lines near 13 millimeters is presented. Although preparation of the list was inspired by the appearance of Comet Kohoutek, the results are applicable to any future comet. The brightness temperature of the sun at 8.6 millimeters was measured using the moon as a calibration source. The result does not confirm a deep absorption feature as apparently observed by earlier workers.

  17. Multiple-wavelength resonant fluctuation x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurta, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    A multiple-wavelength resonant fluctuation x-ray scattering approach is proposed for element-specific imaging of nanoscale objects in random ensembles with short positional and rotational relaxation times. It is shown, that by applying x-ray cross-correlation analysis in combination with iterative phase retrieval to the scattering data measured at multiple x-ray energies near an absorption edge of a substance, it is possible to image the nanoscale structure of an individual object with chemical sensitivity. The elemental distribution in distinct two-component model nanostructures was reconstructed using the simulated scattering data from two-dimensional random ensembles of particles. The approach might be especially advantageous for structural studies at x-ray free electron lasers.

  18. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  20. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.