Science.gov

Sample records for absorption optical depths

  1. Studying Velocity Turbulence from Doppler-broadened Absorption Lines: Statistics of Optical Depth Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarian, A.; Pogosyan, D.

    2008-10-10

    We continue our work on developing techniques for studying turbulence with spectroscopic data. We show that Doppler-broadened absorption spectral lines, in particular, saturated absorption lines, can be used within the framework of the previously introduced technique termed the velocity coordinate spectrum (VCS). The VCS relates the statistics of fluctuations along the velocity coordinate to the statistics of turbulence; thus, it does not require spatial coverage by sampling directions in the plane of the sky. We consider lines with different degree of absorption and show that for lines of optical depth less than one, our earlier treatment of the VCS developed for spectral emission lines is applicable, if the optical depth is used instead of intensity. This amounts to correlating the logarithms of absorbed intensities. For larger optical depths and saturated absorption lines, we show that only wings of the line are available for the analysis. In terms of the VCS formalism, this results in introducing an additional window, whose size decreases with the increase of the optical depth. As a result, strongly saturated absorption lines only carry the information about the small-scale turbulence. Nevertheless, the contrast of the fluctuations corresponding to the small-scale turbulence increases with the increase of the optical depth, which provides advantages for studying turbulence by combining lines with different optical depths. By combining different absorption lines one can develop a tomography of the turbulence in the interstellar gas in all its complexity.

  2. Optical absorption depth profiling of photodegraded poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) films by quantitative photothermal deflection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.-W.; Power, J. F.; Nepotchatykh, O. V.

    2000-05-01

    An improved photothermal beam deflection technique is applied for optical absorption depth profiling of UV photodegraded PVC films, for nondestructive evaluation of their decomposition mechanism. A new model-based on diffraction theory is used to describe the photothermal response (with bicell recording), induced by impulse irradiation of a depth dependent array of thin planar optical absorbers approximating the sample's depth profile. Improved techniques of alignment, sample preparation and quantitative deconvolution of the bicell impulse response have increased the signal repeatability and reduced the principal bias errors affecting this ill posed problem. By this technique and a stable solution of the inverse problem, the absorption coefficient depth profile is accurately reconstructed in PVC films. Experimental depth profiles were confirmed against destructive techniques run on identical samples of the degraded material. An excellent agreement was found between depth profiles recovered using the mirage effect and these reference methods. Observed absorption profiles were fully consistent with known patterns of depth dependent PVC degradation under nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres.

  3. Total ozone and aerosol optical depths inferred from radiometric measurements in the Chappuis absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Flittner, D.E.; Herman, B.M.; Thome, K.J.; Simpson, J.M.; Reagan, J.A. )

    1993-04-15

    A second-derivative smoothing technique, commonly used in inversion work, is applied to the problem of inferring total columnar ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths. The application is unique in that the unknowns (i.e., total columnar ozone and aerosol optical depth) may be solved for directly without employing standard inversion methods. It is shown, however, that by employing inversion constraints, better solutions are normally obtained. The current method requires radiometric measurements of total optical depth through the Chappuis ozone band. It assumes no a priori shape for the aerosol optical depth versus wavelength profile and makes no assumptions about the ozone amount. Thus, the method is quite versatile and able to deal with varying total ozone and various aerosol size distributions. The technique is applied first in simulation, then to 119 days of measurements taken in Tucson, Arizona, that are compared to TOMS values for the same dates. The technique is also applied to two measurements taken at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, for which Dobson ozone values are available in addition to the TOMS values, and the results agree to within 15%. It is also shown through simulations that additional information can be obtained from measurements outside the Chappuis band. This approach reduces the bias and spread of the estimates total ozone and is unique in that it uses measurements from both the Chappuis and Huggins absorption bands. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The long-term global record on Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth from TOMS and OMI observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P.; Ahn, C.; Veefkind, P.

    2006-12-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols from biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and desert dust lofted by the winds from the world major arid and semi-arid areas are among the most long-lived aerosol types in the Earth's atmosphere, since they often reach the free troposphere and are sometimes transported thousands of kilometers from their original sources. A lot has been learned about the global distribution of aerosol sources, and the transport patterns of these aerosol types since the development of the near-UV methods of aerosol detection and characterization using data from the TOMS series of instruments. Because both smoke and desert dust aerosols absorb UV-radiation, the TOMS aerosol sensing technique is specially suited for tracking these aerosol types over variety of surfaces including clouds and snow. TOMS aerosol observations, for instance, have been fundamental in discovering that carbonaceous aerosols associated with wild fires at mid and high latitudes often reach the lower stratosphere, and travel as far as the remote polar regions. We have recently completed the development of an improved algorithm to derive quantitative information about aerosol absorption optical depth using near-UV data. We will discuss the multi- decadal global record on aerosol absorption optical depth produced using TOMS and OMI sensors, and review the multiple contributions of the TOMS-OMI record to the current understanding of the factors that govern the observed temporal and spatial distribution of smoke and desert dust aerosols.

  5. Case study of absorption aerosol optical depth closure of black carbon over the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, M.; Moteki, N.; Khatri, P.; Takamura, T.; Takegawa, N.; Kondo, Y.; Hashioka, H.; Matsui, H.; Shimizu, A.; Sugimoto, N.

    2014-01-01

    aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements made by sun-sky photometers are currently the only constraint available for estimates of the global radiative forcing of black carbon (BC), but their validation studies are limited. In this paper, we report the first attempt to compare AAODs derived from single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and ground-based sun-sky photometer (sky radiometer, SKYNET) measurements. During the Aerosol Radiative Forcing in East Asia (A-FORCE) experiments, BC size distribution and mixing state vertical profiles were measured using an SP2 on board a research aircraft near the Fukue Observatory (32.8°N, 128.7°E) over the East China Sea in spring 2009 and late winter 2013. The aerosol extinction coefficients (bext) and single scattering albedo (SSA) at 500 nm were calculated based on aerosol size distribution and detailed BC mixing state information. The calculated aerosol optical depth (AOD) agreed well with the sky radiometer measurements (2 ± 6%) when dust loadings were low (lidar-derived nonspherical particle contribution to AOD less than 20%). However, under these low-dust conditions, the AAODs obtained from sky radiometer measurements were only half of the in situ estimates. When dust loadings were high, the sky radiometer measurements showed systematically higher AAODs even when all coarse particles were assumed to be dust for in situ measurements. These results indicate that there are considerable uncertainties in AAOD measurements. Uncertainties in the BC refractive index, optical calculations from in situ data, and sky radiometer retrieval analyses are discussed.

  6. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  7. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to Evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). In this presentation we show comparisons of model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements during several months of 2007 characterized by a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. In parallel, model produced Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) were compared to OMI AAOD for the same period, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors, aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  8. Simulations of the Aerosol Index and the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth and Comparisons with OMI Retrievals During ARCTAS-2008 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the Aerosol Index (AI) at 354 nm, useful for observing the presence of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere, from aerosol simulations conducted with the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running online the GEOS-5 Atmospheric GCM. The model simulates five aerosol types: dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate aerosol and can be run in replay or data assimilation modes. In the assimilation mode, information's provided by the space-based MODIS and MISR sensors constrains the model aerosol state. Aerosol optical properties are then derived from the simulated mass concentration and the Al is determined at the OMI footprint using the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. In parallel, model derived Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) is compared with OMI retrievals. We have focused our study during ARCTAS (June - July 2008), a period with a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. Our ultimate goal is to use OMI measurements as independent validation for our MODIS/MISR assimilation. Towards this goal we document the limitation of OMI aerosol absorption measurements on a global scale, in particular sensitivity to aerosol vertical profile and cloud contamination effects, deriving the appropriate averaging kernels. More specifically, model simulated (full) column integrated AAOD is compared with model derived Al, this way identifying those regions and conditions under which OMI cannot detect absorbing aerosols. Making use of ATrain cloud measurements from MODIS, C1oudSat and CALIPSO we also investigate the global impact on clouds on OMI derived Al, and the extent to which GEOS-5 clouds can offer a first order representation of these effects.

  9. The Global Ozone and Aerosol Profiles and Aerosol Hygroscopic Effect and Absorption Optical Depth (GOA2HEAD) Network Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Frost, G. J.; McComiskey, A. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Inverse modeling using measurements of ozone (O3) and aerosol is a powerful tool for deriving pollutant emissions. Because they have relatively long lifetimes, O3 and aerosol are transported over large distances. Frequent and globally spaced vertical profiles rather than ground-based measurements alone are therefore highly desired. Three requirements necessary for a successful global monitoring program are: Low equipment cost, low operation cost, and reliable measurements of known uncertainty. Conventional profiling using aircraft provides excellent data, but is cost prohibitive on a large scale. Here we describe a new platform and instruments meeting all three global monitoring requirements. The platform consists of a small balloon and an auto-homing glider. The glider is released from the balloon at about 5 km altitude, returning the light instrument package to the launch location, and allowing for consistent recovery of the payload. Atmospheric profiling can be performed either during ascent or descent (or both) depending on measurement requirements. We will present the specifications for two instrument packages currently under development. The first measures O3, RH, p, T, dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol optical depth. The second measures dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol absorption coefficient. Other potential instrument packages and the desired spatial/temporal resolution for the GOA2HEAD monitoring initiative will also be discussed.

  10. Constraining Black Carbon Aerosol over Asia using OMI Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and the Adjoint of GEOS-Chem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Li; Henze, David K.; Grell, Georg A.; Carmichael. Gregory R.; Bousserez, Nicolas; Zhang, Qiang; Torres, Omar; Ahn, Changwoo; Lu, Zifeng; Cao, Junji; Mao, Yuhao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of the emissions and distribution of black carbon (BC) in the region referred to here as Southeastern Asia (70degE-l50degE, 11degS-55degN) are critical to studies of the atmospheric environment and climate change. Analysis of modeled BC concentrations compared to in situ observations indicates levels are underestimated over most of Southeast Asia when using any of four different emission inventories. We thus attempt to reduce uncertainties in BC emissions and improve BC model simulations by developing top-down, spatially resolved, estimates of BC emissions through assimilation of OMI observations of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) with the GEOS-Chem model and its adjoint for April and October of 2006. Overwhelming enhancements, up to 500%, in anthropogenic BC emissions are shown after optimization over broad areas of Southeast Asia in April. In October, the optimization of anthropogenic emissions yields a slight reduction (1-5%) over India and parts of southern China, while emissions increase by 10-50% over eastern China. Observational data from in situ measurements and AERONET observations are used to evaluate the BC inversions and assess the bias between OMI and AERONET AAOD. Low biases in BC concentrations are improved or corrected in most eastern and central sites over China after optimization, while the constrained model still underestimates concentrations in Indian sites in both April and October, possibly as a. consequence of low prior emissions. Model resolution errors may contribute up to a factor of 2.5 to the underestimate of surface BC concentrations over northern India. We also compare the optimized results using different anthropogenic emission inventories and discuss the sensitivity of top-down constraints on anthropogenic emissions with respect to biomass burning emissions. In addition, the impacts of brown carbon, the formulation of the observation operator, and different a priori constraints on the optimization are

  11. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  12. Characterization of penetration depth as a function of optical fiber separation at various absorption and scatter coefficients for a noninvasive metabolic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMilo, Charles; Brukilacchio, Thomas; Soller, Babs R.; Soyemi, Olusola

    2004-06-01

    A visible-near IR (500-1,000nm) fiber optic sensor is under development that is intended to non-invasively assess muscle metabolism through the measurement of tissue pH and oxygen partial pressure. These parameters are calculated from the spectra of hemoglobin and myoglobin in muscle. The sensor consists of transmit (illumination) fibers and receive (detection) fibers that are coupled to a spectrometer. Light from the probe must penetrate below the surface of the skin and into a 5-10mm thick layer of muscle. A study was conducted to quantify the relationship between transmit and receive fiber separation and sensor penetration depth below the surface of the skin. A liquid phantom was created to replicate the absorption (μa) and reduced scatter coefficient (μs') profiles typically found in human blood and tissue. The phantom consisted of a solution of Intralipid and India ink in the appropriate concentrations to achieve desired reduced scatter coefficient and absorption profiles. The reduced scatter coefficient of the liquid phantom was achieved to an accuracy of +/-10% compared to previously published data. A fixed illumination fiber and translatable detector fiber were placed in the liquid phantom, and the fiber separation was varied from 3-40mm. Values of μa and μs' varied from 0.03-0.40 cm-1 and 5.0-15.0 cm-1 respectively. Results from the experiment demonstrate a strong correlation between penetration depth and fiber separation. Additionally, it was found that penetration depth was not substantially influenced by absorption and scatter concentration. As signal-to-noise is an important parameter in many non-invasive biomedical applications, the relative signal as a function of fiber separation was determined to follow an exponential relationship.

  13. The Relationship between the Optical Depth of the 9.7 μm Silicate Absorption Feature and Infrared Differential Extinction in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, J. E.; Ennico, K.; Pendleton, Y. J.; Boogert, A. C. A.; Greene, T.; Knez, C.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D. C. B.

    2007-09-01

    We have examined the relationship between the optical depth of the 9.7 μm silicate absorption feature (τ9.7) and the near-infrared color excess, E(J-Ks), in the Serpens, Taurus, IC 5146, Chameleon I, Barnard 59, and Barnard 68 dense clouds/cores. Our data set, based largely on Spitzer IRS spectra, spans E(J-Ks)=0.3-10 mag (corresponding to visual extinction between about 2 and 60 mag). All lines of sight show the 9.7 μm silicate feature. Unlike in the diffuse ISM where a tight linear correlation between the 9.7 μm silicate feature optical depth and the extinction (AV) is observed, we find that the silicate feature in dense clouds does not show a monotonic increase with extinction. Thus, in dense clouds, τ9.7 is not a good measure of total dust column density. With few exceptions, the measured τ9.7 values fall well below the diffuse ISM correlation line for E(J-Ks)>2 mag (AV>12 mag). Grain growth via coagulation is a likely cause of this effect.

  14. Aerosols in GEOS-5: simulations of the UV Aerosol Index and the Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and comparisons with OMI retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard-Marchant, Virginie; da Silva, Arlindo; Colarco, Peter; Darmenov, Anton; Govindaraju, Ravi

    2013-04-01

    GEOS-5 is the latest version of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) earth system model. GEOS-5 contains components for atmospheric circulation and composition (including data assimilation), ocean circulation and biogeochemistry, and land surface processes. In addition to traditional meteorological parameters, GEOS-5 includes modules representing the atmospheric composition, most notably aerosols and tropospheric/stratospheric chemical constituents, taking explicit account of the impact of these constituents on the radiative processes of the atmosphere. The assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) in GEOS-5 involves very careful cloud screening and homogenization of the observing system by means of a Neural Net scheme that translates MODIS radiances into AERONET calibrated AOD. These measurements are further quality controlled using an adaptive buddy check scheme, and assimilated using the Local Displacement Ensemble (LDE) methodology. For this analysis, GEOS-5 runs at a nominal 50km horizontal resolution with 72 vertical layers (top at ~85km). GEOS-5 is driven by daily biomass burning emissions derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We present a summary of our efforts to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) at 354 nm from aerosol simulations by performing a radiative transfer calculation. We have compared model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Separately, model derived Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) is compared with OMI retrievals. Making use of CALIPSO measurements we have also investigated the impact of the altitude of the aerosol layer on OMI derived AI trying to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  15. Aerosol optical depth measuring network - project description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, A.; Koskela, K.; Lihavainen, L.

    2003-04-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI), in collaboration with Servicio Meteorológico Nacional (SMN), Argentina, is constructing a network for aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements. Measurements are to be started in the summer 2003 with three sunphotometers, model PFR, Davos. One of them will be sited in Marambio (64°S), Antarctica, and the rest two in the Observatory of Jokioinen (61°N) and Sodankylä GAW station (67°N), Finland. Each instrument consists of a precision filter radiometer and a suntracker. Due to the harsh climate conditions special solutions had to be introduced to keep the instrument warm and free from snow. Aerosol optical depth measured at Pallas-Sodankylä GAW station can be compared with estimated aerosol extinction, which is calculated from ground base aerosol scattering and absorption coefficient measurements.

  16. Assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verver, Gé; Henzing, Bas

    Climate predictions are hampered by the large uncertainties involved in the estima- tion of the effects of atmospheric aerosol (IPCC,2001). These uncertainties are caused partly because sources and sinks as well as atmospheric processing of the different types of aerosol are not accurately known. Moreover, the climate impact (especially the indirect effect) of a certain distribution of aerosol is hard to quantify. There have been different approaches to reduce these uncertainties. In recent years intensive ob- servational campaigns such as ACE and INDOEX have been carried out, aiming to in- crease our knowledge of atmospheric processes that determine the fate of atmospheric aerosols and to quantify the radiation effects. With the new satellite instruments such as SCIAMACHY and OMI it will be possible in the near future to derive the ge- ographical distribution of the aerosol optical depths (AOD) and perhaps additional information on the occurrence of different aerosol types. The goal of the ARIA project (started in 2001) is to assimilate global satellite de- rived aerosol optical depth (AOD) in an off-line chemistry/transport model TM3. The TM3 model (Jeuken et al. 2001) describes sources, sinks, transformation and transport processes of different types of aerosol (mineral dust, carbon, sulfate, nitrate) that are relevant to radiative forcing. All meteorological input is provided by ECMWF. The assimilation procedure constrains the aerosol distribution produced by the model on the basis of aerosol optical depths observed by satellite. The product, i.e. an optimal estimation of global aerosol distribution, is then available for the calculation of radia- tive forcing. Error analyses may provide valuable information on deficiencies of the model. In the ARIA project it is tried to extract additional information on the type of aerosol present in the atmosphere by assimilating AOD at multiple wavelengths. First results of the ARIA project will be presented. The values

  17. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  18. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  19. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  20. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  1. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  2. Optical absorption in trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Niu, Qian

    2013-03-01

    We use a low energy effective model to analyze the optical responses of trilayer graphene samples. We first show that optical absorption of the ABA-stacked trilayer has strong dependence on both the Fermi energy and optical frequency, which is in sharp contrast to that of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. Secondly, we are able to determine the possible existence of trigonal warping effects in the bandstructure of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene by a divergence in the absorption spectra at around 10 meV. In addition, we can partially distinguish the vairious broken symmetry states driven by electron-electron interactions in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. In particular, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is sensitive to the polarization of the incident light, giving a way to detect its possible existence.

  3. Electro-optical liquid depth sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Atwood, S. O.

    1976-01-01

    Transducer utilizes absorptive properties of water to determine variations in depth without disturbing liquid. Instrument is inexpensive, simple, and small and thus can be used in lieu of direct graduated scale readout or capacitive, ultrasonic, resistive or inducive sensors when these are impractical because of complexity or cost.

  4. Evaluation of Air Pollution Applications of AERONET and MODIS Aerosol Column Optical Depth by Comparison with In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria Salazar, S.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Colucci, D.

    2012-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is subject to typical urban aerosol, wind-blown dust, and occasional biomass burning smoke from anthropogenic and natural fires. Reno has complex air flow at levels relevant for aerosol transport. At times recirculating mountain and urban flow arrives from the Sierra Nevada, San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA. The urban plumes are further modified by biogenic forest emissions and secondary aerosol formation during transport over the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Reno. This complicates the use of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) for air quality measurements in Reno. Our laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno has collocated multispectral photoacoustic instruments and reciprocal nephelometers to measure light absorption and light scattering coefficients as well as an AERONET operated CIMEL CE-318 ground-based sunphotometer. Preliminary measurements from August 2011 indicate substantially larger Cimel AOD than could be accounted for by use of the in situ aerosol extinction measurements combined with mixing height estimate. This poster presents new results comparing AERONET AOD and single scattering albedo and MODIS AOD with in situ measurements for summer and fall 2012, along with extensive back trajectory analysis, to evaluate conditions when satellite measurement may be useful for air pollution applications in Reno.

  5. Depth selective acousto-optic flow measurement

    PubMed Central

    Tsalach, Adi; Schiffer, Zeev; Ratner, Eliahu; Breskin, Ilan; Zeitak, Reuven; Shechter, Revital; Balberg, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Optical based methods for non-invasive measurement of regional blood flow tend to incorrectly assess cerebral blood flow, due to contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signal. We demonstrate that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. Validation of the model is conducted by Monte Carlo simulation. In-vitro experiments demonstrate good agreement with the simulations' results and provide a solid validation to depth discrimination ability. These results suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light. PMID:26713201

  6. Aerosol Optical Depth Determinations for BOREAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Guzman, R. P.; Ried, D.; Lobitz, B.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Automated tracking sun photometers were deployed by NASA/Ames Research Center aboard the NASA C-130 aircraft and at a ground site for all three Intensive Field Campaigns (IFCs) of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) in central Saskatchewan, Canada during the summer of 1994. The sun photometer data were used to derive aerosol optical depths for the total atmospheric column above each instrument. The airborne tracking sun photometer obtained data in both the southern and northern study areas at the surface prior to takeoff, along low altitude runs near the ground tracking sun photometer, during ascents to 6-8 km msl, along remote sensing flightlines at altitude, during descents to the surface, and at the surface after landing. The ground sun photometer obtained data from the shore of Candle Lake in the southern area for all cloud-free times. During the first IFC in May-June ascents and descents of the airborne tracking sun photometer indicated the aerosol optical depths decreased steadily from the surface to 3.5 kni where they leveled out at approximately 0.05 (at 525 nm), well below levels caused by the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. On a very clear day, May 31st, surface optical depths measured by either the airborne or ground sun photometers approached those levels (0.06-0.08 at 525 nm), but surface optical depths were often several times higher. On June 4th they increased from 0.12 in the morning to 0.20 in the afternoon with some evidence of brief episodes of pollen bursts. During the second IFC surface aerosol optical depths were variable in the extreme due to smoke from western forest fires. On July 20th the aerosol optical depth at 525 nm decreased from 0.5 in the morning to 0.2 in the afternoon; they decreased still further the next day to 0.05 and remained consistently low throughout the day to provide excellent conditions for several remote sensing missions flown that day. Smoke was heavy for the early morning of July 24th but cleared partially by 10

  7. Optical design for large depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yang; Wang, Hu; Yue, Pan; Xue, Yaoke; Liu, Jie; Ye, Shuifu

    2016-01-01

    Optical system with large depth of field and large field of view has been designed. To enforce optical system with focal length of 6 mm to imaging the object with object length of 200mmm-1200mm, accord to the equation of depth of field, in case of the CCD sensor with pixel of 5.5umx 5.5um square area, the entrance pupil diameter to ideal imaging will be 0.423mm. To enlarge the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90 lp/mm, the entrance pupil diameter is enlarged to 1mm.After design and optimization, with field of view of 80°, within object length of 200mm - 1200mm, the optical system can imaging well, the modulation transfer function (MTF) at spatial frequency of 90lp/mm is larger than 0.1, the distortion of full field of viewed is less than 3%.The optical system can be widely used in machine vision, surveillance cameras, etc.

  8. Modeling optical absorption for thermoreflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia; Ziade, Elbara; Schmidt, Aaron J.

    2016-03-01

    Optical pump-probe techniques based on thermoreflectance, such as time domain thermoreflectance and frequency domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), have been widely used to characterize the thermal conductivity of thin films and the thermal conductance across interfaces. These techniques typically use a transducer layer to absorb the pump light and improve the thermoreflectance signal. The transducer, however, complicates the interpretation of the measured signal because the approximation that all the energy from the pump beam is deposited at the transducer surface is not always accurate. In this paper, we consider the effect of laser absorption in the top layer of a multilayer sample, and derive an analytical solution for the thermoreflectance signal in the diffusion regime based on volumetric heating. We analyze the measurement sensitivity to the pump absorption depth for transducers with different thermal conductivities, and investigate the additional effect of probe laser penetration depth on the measured signal. We validate our model using FDTR measurements on 490 nm thick amorphous silicon films deposited on fused silica and silicon substrates.

  9. Diurnal variations in optical depth at Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    Viking lander camera images of the Sun were used to compute atmospheric optical depth at two sites over a period of 1 to 1/3 martian years. The complete set of 1044 optical depth determinations is presented in graphical and tabular form. Error estimates are presented in detail. Otpical depths in the morning (AM) are generally larger than in the afternoon (PM). The AM-PM differences are ascribed to condensation of water vapor into atmospheric ice aerosols at night and their evaporation in midday. A smoothed time series of these differences shows several seasonal peaks. These are simulated using a one-dimensional radiative convective model which predicts martial atmospheric temperature profiles. A calculation combinig these profiles with water vapor measurements from the Mars Atmospheric Water Detector is used to predict when the diurnal variations of water condensation should occur. The model reproduces a majority of the observed peaks and shows the factors influencing the process. Diurnal variation of condensation is shown to peak when the latitude and season combine to warm the atmosphere to the optimum temperature, cool enough to condense vapor at night and warm enough to cause evaporation at midday.

  10. Absorption depth profile of water on thermoplastic starch films

    SciTech Connect

    Bonno, B.; Laporte, J.L.; Paris, D.; D'Leon, R.T.

    2000-01-01

    It is well known that petroleum derived polymers are primary environmental contaminants. The study of new packing biodegradable materials has been the object of numerous papers in past years. Some of these new materials are the thermoplastic films derived from wheat starch. In the present paper, the authors study some of properties of wheat starch thermoplastic films, with various amounts of absorbed water, using photoacoustic spectroscopy techniques. The absorption depth profile of water in the starch substrate is determined for samples having a variable water level.

  11. THEMIS Observations of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Christensen, Philip R.; Richardson, Mark I.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Odyssey spacecraft entered into Martian orbit in October 2001 and after successful aerobraking began mapping in February 2002 (approximately Ls=330 deg.). Images taken by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) on-board the Odyssey spacecraft allow the quantitative retrieval of atmospheric dust and water-ice aerosol optical depth. Atmospheric quantities retrieved from THEMIS build upon existing datasets returned by Mariner 9, Viking, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). Data from THEMIS complements the concurrent MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data by offering a later local time (approx. 2:00 for TES vs. approx. 4:00 - 5:30 for THEMIS) and much higher spatial resolution.

  12. Absorption Optics of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Gittings, Alex; Durian, D. J.

    2002-11-01

    Aqueous foams are composed of gas bubbles packed together in a small volume of soapy water. The large number of gas-liquid interfaces in foams results in very strong scattering of light, which explains the opaque nature of conventional aqueous foams such as shaving foams and mousse. For dry foams, the interfaces can take the following three forms: the soap films where two bubbles meet, the triangular plateau borders where three soap films meet and the vertices where four plateau borders meet. Previous experiments have shown that most of the scattering occurs from the plateau borders 2,3 and the transport mean free path of light (l*), the bubble radius (R) and the liquid fraction of foam (epsilon) is related through the relation l*=R/(epsilon0.5). To understand the reflection and scattering of light at the gas-bubble interfaces, we study the absorption of photons in the liquid network as a function of the foam absorptivity. We do this to confirm if the time spent by the photons in the liquid phase is proportional to the liquid fraction of the foam. Our results indicate that for a specific range of liquid fractions (0.05 is less than e is less than 0.1), the photons seem to get trapped in the liquid network. This result is independent of the absorptivity of the foam and leads us to conclude that under appropriate conditions, an aqueous foam behaves very much like an optical fiber network. Aqueous foam is generated in the lab by the method of turbulent mixing of N2 gas with a jet of alpha-olefin-sulfonate (AOS) solution. The foam has been made absorbing by dissolving small quantities of rhodamine dye (R = 0.005 g/l, R = 0.01 g/l and R = 0.0124 g/l) in the AOS solution. The transmission of photons through the foams of liquid fractions 0.0297 is less than e is less than 0.35 has been studied using Diffuse Transmission Spectroscopy (DTS). For each liquid fraction, the transport mean free path l* (the length over which the photon travels before it gets completely

  13. Aerosol optical depth retrievals over the Konza Prairie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruegge, Carol J.; Halthore, Rangasayi N.; Markham, Brian; Spanner, Michael; Wrigley, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The aerosol optical depth over the Konza Prairie, near Manhattan, Kansas, was recorded at various locations by five separate teams. These measurements were made in support of the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) and used to correct imagery from a variety of satellite and aircraft sensors for the effects of atmospheric scattering and absorption. The results from one instrument are reported here for 26 days in 1987 and for 7 in 1989. Daily averages span a range of 0.05 to 0.28 in the midvisible wavelengths. In addition, diurnal variations are noted in which the afternoon optical depths are greater than those of the morning by as much as 0.07. A comparison between instruments and processing techniques used to determine these aerosol optical depths is provided. The first comparisons are made using summer 1987 data. Differences of as much as 0.05 (midvisible) are observed. Although these data allow reasonable surface reflectance retrievals, they do not agree to within the performance limits typically associated with these types of instruments. With an accuracy goal of 0.02 a preseason calibration/comparison experiment was conducted at a mountain site prior to the final field campaign in 1989. Good calibration data were obtained, and good agreement (0.01, midvisible) was observed in the retrieved optical depth acquired over the Konza. By comparing data from the surface instruments at different locations, spatial inhomogeneities are determined. Then, data from the airborne tracking sunphotometer allow one to determine variations as a function of altitude. Finally, a technique is proposed for using the in situ data to establish an instrument calibration.

  14. RANDOM WALKS AND EFFECTIVE OPTICAL DEPTH IN RELATIVISTIC FLOW

    SciTech Connect

    Shibata, Sanshiro; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi

    2014-05-20

    We investigate the random walk process in relativistic flow. In the relativistic flow, photon propagation is concentrated in the direction of the flow velocity due to the relativistic beaming effect. We show that in the pure scattering case, the number of scatterings is proportional to the size parameter ξ ≡ L/l {sub 0} if the flow velocity β ≡ v/c satisfies β/Γ >> ξ{sup –1}, while it is proportional to ξ{sup 2} if β/Γ << ξ{sup –1}, where L and l {sub 0} are the size of the system in the observer frame and the mean free path in the comoving frame, respectively. We also examine the photon propagation in the scattering and absorptive medium. We find that if the optical depth for absorption τ{sub a} is considerably smaller than the optical depth for scattering τ{sub s} (τ{sub a}/τ{sub s} << 1) and the flow velocity satisfies β≫√(2τ{sub a}/τ{sub s}), then the effective optical depth is approximated by τ{sub *} ≅ τ{sub a}(1 + β)/β. Furthermore, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of radiative transfer and compare the results with the analytic expression for the number of scatterings. The analytic expression is consistent with the results of the numerical simulations. The expression derived in this study can be used to estimate the photon production site in relativistic phenomena, e.g., gamma-ray burst and active galactic nuclei.

  15. Sensitivity of depth of maximum and absorption depth of EAS to hadron production mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonov, R. A.; Ivanenko, I. P.; Kanevsky, B. L.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Galkin, V. I.; Hein, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Comparison of experimental data on depth of extensive air showers (EAS) development maximum in the atmosphere, T sub M and path of absorption, lambda, in the lower atmosphere of EAS with fixed particle number in the energy region eV with the results of calculation show that these parameters are sensitive mainly to the inelastic interaction cross section and scaling violation in the fragmentation and pionization region. The data are explained in a unified manner within the framework of a model in which scaling is violated slightly in the fragmentation region and strongly in the pionization region at primary cosmic rays composition close to the normal one and a permanent increase of inelastic interaction cross section. It is shown that, while interpreting the experimental data, disregard of two methodical points causes a systematic shift in T sub M: (1) shower selection system; and (2) EAS electron lateral distribution when performing the calculations on basis of which the transfer is made from the Cerenkov pulse FWHM to the depth of shower maximum, T sub M.

  16. Ocean optics estimation for absorption, backscattering, and phase function parameters.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Ammar H; McCormick, Norman J

    2003-02-20

    We propose and test an inverse ocean optics procedure with numerically simulated data for the determination of inherent optical properties using in-water radiance measurements. If data are available at only one depth within a deep homogeneous water layer, then the single-scattering albedo and the single parameter that characterizes the Henyey-Greenstein phase function can be estimated. If data are available at two depths, then these two parameters can be determined along with the optical thickness so that the absorption and scattering coefficients, and also the backscattering coefficient, can be estimated. With a knowledge of these parameters, the albedo and Lambertian fraction of reflected radiance of the bottom can be determined if measurements are made close to the bottom. A simplified method for determining the optical properties of the water also is developed for only three irradiance-type measurements if the radiance is approximately in the asymptotic regime. PMID:12617207

  17. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  18. Smoke optical depths - Magnitude, variability, and wavelength dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Russell, P. B.; Colburn, D. A.; Ackerman, T. P.; Allen, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    An airborne autotracking sun-photometer has been used to measure magnitudes, temporal/spatial variabilities, and the wavelength dependence of optical depths in the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared spectrum of smoke from two forest fires and one jet fuel fire and of background air. Jet fuel smoke optical depths were found to be generally less wavelength dependent than background aerosol optical depths. Forest fire smoke optical depths, however, showed a wide range of wavelength depedences, such as incidents of wavelength-independent extinction.

  19. Improved evaluation of optical depth components from Langley plot data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biggar, S. F.; Gellman, D. I.; Slater, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple, iterative procedure to determine the optical depth components of the extinction optical depth measured by a solar radiometer is presented. Simulated data show that the iterative procedure improves the determination of the exponent of a Junge law particle size distribution. The determination of the optical depth due to aerosol scattering is improved as compared to a method which uses only two points from the extinction data. The iterative method was used to determine spectral optical depth components for June 11-13, 1988 during the MAC III experiment.

  20. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  1. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  2. Optical and thermal depth profile reconstructions of inhomogeneous photopolymerization in dental resins using photothermal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Mandelis, A.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2010-09-01

    Photopolymerization is a process that depends, among other factors, on the optical properties of polymerized materials. In turn, this process affects longitudinal light transport in these materials, thereby altering their optical absorption coefficient which is thus expected to exhibit depth dependence. Furthermore, polymerization affects the thermal properties of these materials. A robust theoretical approach to the study of the depth-dependent optical absorption coefficient, β(x ), and thermal diffusivity, α(x ), in materials exhibiting depth profiles of these parameters has been developed through the photothermal inverse problem based on the concept of the thermal-harmonic oscillator. Using this concept in the frequency-domain nonhomogeneous photothermal-wave boundary-value problem, the simultaneous reconstruction of arbitrary simultaneous optical and thermal depth profiles was achieved using a multiparameter fitting method to the experimental amplitude and phase. As a first application of the theory to partially polymerized Alert Composite (shade A3) dental resin, with curing induced by a blue light-emitting diode, the β(x ) and α(x ) depth profiles were reconstructed from photothermal radiometric frequency-scanned data. A strong anticorrelation of these two depth profiles was observed and was interpreted in terms of photochemical processes occurring during the optical (photocuring) creation of long polymeric chains in the resin. The photothermally reconstructed depth profiles may have implications for the optimization of blue light curing methods using such resins in dental clinical practice.

  3. Coherent perfect absorption in nonlinear optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Wan, Wenjie; Chen, Xianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Recently, a concept of time reversed lasing or coherent perfect absorber (CPA) has been proposed by A. D. Stone and co-workers, and was shortly experimentally demonstrated by them. The CPA system is illuminated coherently and monochromatically by the time reverse of the output of a lasing mode and the incident radiation is perfectly absorbed. Shortly afterwards, Stefano Longhi extended the idea to realize a CPA for colored incident light, and have theoretically shown that the time reversal of optical parametric oscillation (OPO) in a nonlinear medium could also realize a colored CPA for incident signal and idler fields which can be seemed as a kind of nonlinear CPA. Here we present the realization of such time-reversed processes in nonlinear optics regime, including time-reversed second harmonic generation (SHG) for coherent absorption at harmonic frequency of the pump and time-reversed optical parametric amplification (OPA) for coherent attenuation of colored travelling optical fields. Time reversed SHG is carried out at both phase matching and mismatching conditions, which shows parametric near perfect absorption at the harmonic frequency of the pump. The time reversal of OPA is demonstrated experimentally in a nonlinear medium to form a coherent absorber for perpendicularly polarized signal and idler travelling waves, realizing in the condition of OPA by a type II phase matching scheme. The absorption of signal/idler pair occurs at some specific phase difference. This is the first experimental demonstration of coherent absorption processes in nonlinear optics regime.

  4. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-07-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  5. Microwave and optical saturable absorption in graphene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiwei; Zhao, Chujun; Lu, Shunbin; Chen, Yu; Li, Ying; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun

    2012-10-01

    We report on the first experiments on saturable absorption in graphene at microwave frequency band. Almost independent of the incident frequency, microwave absorbance of graphene always decreases with increasing the power and reaches at a constant level for power larger than 80 µW, evidencing the microwave saturable absorption property of graphene. Optical saturable absorption of the same graphene sample was also experimentally confirmed by an open-aperture Z-scan technique by one laser at telecommunication band and another pico-second laser at 1053 nm, respectively. Herein, we are able to conclude that graphene is indeed a broadband saturable absorber that can operate at both microwave and optical band. PMID:23188285

  6. Calculation of optical depths from an integral of the Voigt function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The optical depth along a vertical path in an atmosphere in hydrostatic equilibrium can be calculated from an integral of the Voigt function for the case where the absorption is due to spectral lines. Series expansions are presented that allow rapid evaluation of this integral over all values of the independent variables, frequency and pressure.

  7. LINKING Lyα AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Lyα emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Lyα emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Lyα emission, the Lyα line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Lyα profiles resemble the Hα line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Lyα emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Lyα emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Lyα profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Lyα, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Lyα emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Lyα to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Lyα profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  8. Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

    2005-03-18

    Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

  9. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  10. Depth

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan J; van Doorn, Andrea J; Wagemans, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Depth is the feeling of remoteness, or separateness, that accompanies awareness in human modalities like vision and audition. In specific cases depths can be graded on an ordinal scale, or even measured quantitatively on an interval scale. In the case of pictorial vision this is complicated by the fact that human observers often appear to apply mental transformations that involve depths in distinct visual directions. This implies that a comparison of empirically determined depths between observers involves pictorial space as an integral entity, whereas comparing pictorial depths as such is meaningless. We describe the formal structure of pictorial space purely in the phenomenological domain, without taking recourse to the theories of optics which properly apply to physical space—a distinct ontological domain. We introduce a number of general ways to design and implement methods of geodesy in pictorial space, and discuss some basic problems associated with such measurements. We deal mainly with conceptual issues. PMID:23145244

  11. Depth-resolved photothermal optical coherence tomography by local optical path length change measurement (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Li, En; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2016-03-01

    Photothermal OCT has been emerged to contrast absorbers in biological tissues. The tissues response to photothermal excitation as change of thermal strain and refractive index. To resolve the depth of absorption agents, the measurements of the local thermal strain change and local refractive index change due to photothermal effect is required. In this study, we developed photothermal OCT for depth-resolved absorption contrast imaging. The phase-resolved OCT can measure the axial strain change and local refractive index change as local optical path length change. A swept-source OCT system is used with a wavelength swept laser at 1310 nm with a scanning rate of 50 kHz. The sensitivity of 110 dB is achieved. At the sample arm, the excitation beam from a fiber-coupled laser diode of 406 nm wavelength is combined with the OCT probe beam co-linearly. The slowly modulated excitation beam around 300 Hz illuminate biological tissues. M-mode scan is applied during one-period modulation duration. The local optical path length change is measured by temporal and axial phase difference. The theoretical prediction of the photothermal response is derived and in good agreement with experimental results. In the case of slow modulation, the delay of photothermal response can be neglected. The local path length changes are averaged over the half period of the excitation modulation, and then demodulated. This method exhibits 3-dB gain in the sensitivity of the local optical path length change measurement over the direct Fourier transform method. In vivo human skin imaging of endogenous absorption agent will be demonstrated.

  12. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  13. Aerosol spectral optical depths - Jet fuel and forest fire smokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Livingston, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The Ames autotracking airborne sun photometer was used to investigate the spectral depth between 380 and 1020 nm of smokes from a jet fuel pool fire and a forest fire in May and August 1988, respectively. Results show that the forest fire smoke exhibited a stronger wavelength dependence of optical depths than did the jet fuel fire smoke at optical depths less than unity. At optical depths greater than or equal to 1, both smokes showed neutral wavelength dependence, similar to that of an optically thin stratus deck. These results verify findings of earlier investigations and have implications both on the climatic impact of large-scale smokes and on the wavelength-dependent transmission of electromagnetic signals.

  14. Towards Improved Cirrus Cloud Optical Depths from CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, Anne; Vaughan, Mark; Pelon, Jacques; Winker, David; Trepte, Chip; Young, Stuart

    2016-06-01

    This paper reviews recent advances regarding the retrieval of optical depths of semi-transparent cirrus clouds using synergetic analyses of perfectly collocated observations from the CALIOP lidar and the IIR infrared radiometer aboard the CALIPSO satellite.

  15. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Liu, Guanghui; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Xianyi

    2015-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells are theoretically investigated within analytical wave functions and numerical quantized energy levels. Our results show that the inner radius, the outer radius and the cut-off angle of spherical dome shells have great influences on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the total optical absorption coefficients. It is found that with the increase of the inner radius and the outer radius, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients exhibit a blueshift and a redshift, respectively. However, with the increase of the cut-off angle, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients do not shift. Besides, the resonant peaks of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients climb up and then decrease with increasing the cut-off angle. The influences of the incident optical intensity on the total optical absorption coefficients are studied. It is found that the bleaching effect occurs at higher incident optical intensity.

  16. Depth-encoded synthetic aperture optical coherence tomography of biological tissues with extended focal depth.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jianhua; de Groot, Mattijs; de Boer, Johannes F

    2015-02-23

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be able to provide three-dimensional (3D) volumetric images of scattering biological tissues for in vivo medical diagnostics. Unlike conventional optical microscopy, its depth-resolving ability (axial resolution) is exclusively determined by the laser source and therefore invariant over the full imaging depth. In contrast, its transverse resolution is determined by the objective's numerical aperture and the wavelength which is only approximately maintained over twice the Rayleigh range. However, the prevailing laser sources for OCT allow image depths of more than 5 mm which is considerably longer than the Rayleigh range. This limits high transverse resolution imaging with OCT. Previously, we reported a novel method to extend the depth-of-focus (DOF) of OCT imaging in Mo et al.Opt. Express 21, 10048 (2013)]. The approach is to create three different optical apertures via pupil segmentation with an annular phase plate. These three optical apertures produce three OCT images from the same sample, which are encoded to different depth positions in a single OCT B-scan. This allows for correcting the defocus-induced curvature of wave front in the pupil so as to improve the focus. As a consequence, the three images originating from those three optical apertures can be used to reconstruct a new image with an extended DOF. In this study, we successfully applied this method for the first time to both an artificial phantom and biological tissues over a four times larger depth range. The results demonstrate a significant DOF improvement, paving the way for 3D high resolution OCT imaging beyond the conventional Rayleigh range. PMID:25836528

  17. Depth profilometry via multiplexed optical high-coherence interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Behr, Bradford B; Hajian, Arsen R

    2015-01-01

    Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry. PMID:25803289

  18. Depth Profilometry via Multiplexed Optical High-Coherence Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander; Behr, Bradford B.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2015-01-01

    Depth Profilometry involves the measurement of the depth profile of objects, and has significant potential for various industrial applications that benefit from non-destructive sub-surface profiling such as defect detection, corrosion assessment, and dental assessment to name a few. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of depth profilometry using an Multiplexed Optical High-coherence Interferometry MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument utilizes the spatial coherence of a laser and the interferometric properties of light to probe the reflectivity as a function of depth of a sample. The axial and lateral resolutions, as well as imaging depth, are decoupled in the MOHI instrument. The MOHI instrument is capable of multiplexing interferometric measurements into 480 one-dimensional interferograms at a location on the sample and is built with axial and lateral resolutions of 40 μm at a maximum imaging depth of 700 μm. Preliminary results, where a piece of sand-blasted aluminum, an NBK7 glass piece, and an optical phantom were successfully probed using the MOHI instrument to produce depth profiles, demonstrate the feasibility of such an instrument for performing depth profilometry. PMID:25803289

  19. Optical absorption spectra of dications of carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Jeevarajan, J.A.; Wei, C.C.; Jeevarajan, A.S.; Kispert, L.D.

    1996-04-04

    Quantitative optical absorption spectra of the cation radicals and the dications of canthaxanthin (I), {beta}carotene (II), 7`-cyano-7`-ethoxycarbonyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (III), and 7`,7`-dimethyl-7`-apo-{beta}-carotene (IV) in dichloromethane solution are reported. Exclusive formation of dications occurs when the carotenoids are oxidized with ferric chloride. Addition of neutral carotenoid to the dications results in equilibrium formation of cation radicals. Oxidation with iodine in dichloromethane affords only cation radicals; electrochemical oxidation under suitable conditions yields both dications and cation radicals. Values of the optical parameters depend on the nature of the oxidative medium. The oscillator strengths calculated for gas phase cation radicals and dications of I-IV using the INDO/S method show the same trend as the experimental values. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Aerosol optical depth determination from ground based irradiance ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. R.; O'Neill, N. T.; Boyer, A.

    1989-08-01

    The atmospheric optical depth serves as an input parameter to atmospheric correction procedures in remote sensing and as an index of atmospheric opacity or constituent columnar abundance for meteorological applications. Its measurement, typically performed by means of a small field of view radiometer centered on the solar disk, is sensitive to the absolute calibration accuracy of the instrument. In this paper a simple technique is presented which permits the extraction of aerosol optical depth from the ratio of total to direct irradiance measurements. An error analysis performed on the results of radiative transfer simulations and field measurements indicates that the technique generates values of aerosol optical depth which are sufficiently accurate for many applications. This method thus represents a useful alternative to standard sunphotometer measurements.

  1. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Over Land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Ichoku, C.; Remer, L. A.; Tanre, D.; Holben, B. N.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths are derived operationally for the first time over land in the visible wavelengths by MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) onboard the EOSTerra spacecraft. More than 300 Sun photometer data points from more than 30 AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) sites globally were used in validating the aerosol optical depths obtained during July - September 2000. Excellent agreement is found with retrieval errors within (Delta)tau=+/- 0.05 +/- 0.20 tau, as predicted, over (partially) vegetated surfaces, consistent with pre-launch theoretical analysis and aircraft field experiments. In coastal and semi-arid regions larger errors are caused predominantly by the uncertainty in evaluating the surface reflectance. The excellent fit was achieved despite the ongoing improvements in instrument characterization and calibration. This results show that MODIS-derived aerosol optical depths can be used quantitatively in many applications with cautions for residual clouds, snow/ice, and water contamination.

  2. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  3. Comment: On the different approaches of Rayleigh optical depth determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, Wynn L.

    2010-07-01

    Srivastava et al. (2009) presented Rayleigh scattering cross-sections and optical depths for Earth's atmosphere that are approximately 3% smaller than previously accepted. Their analysis was based on quantum-mechanical theory for anisotropic scattering in the Cabannes line published in papers that seem to have introduced some confusion about determining the anisotropy and King factors. This comment clarifies these factors and shows that including the frequency-shifted rotational Raman lines gives the traditional King factor and the correct Rayleigh scattering for the optical depth.

  4. A quantitative assessment of the depth sensitivity of an optical topography system using a solid dynamic tissue-phantom.

    PubMed

    Correia, Teresa; Banga, Anil; Everdell, N L; Gibson, Adam P; Hebden, Jeremy C

    2009-10-21

    A solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains seven discrete targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment located at different depths from the surface. Changes in absorption are obtained in response to localized heating of the targets, simulating haemodynamic changes occurring in the brain and other tissues. The depth sensitivity of a continuous wave optical topography system was assessed successfully using the phantom. Images of the targets have been reconstructed using a spatially variant regularization, and the determined spatial localization in the depth direction is shown to be accurate within an uncertainty of about 3 mm down to a depth of about 30 mm. PMID:19794240

  5. A quantitative assessment of the depth sensitivity of an optical topography system using a solid dynamic tissue-phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Teresa; Banga, Anil; Everdell, N. L.; Gibson, Adam P.; Hebden, Jeremy C.

    2009-10-01

    A solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains seven discrete targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment located at different depths from the surface. Changes in absorption are obtained in response to localized heating of the targets, simulating haemodynamic changes occurring in the brain and other tissues. The depth sensitivity of a continuous wave optical topography system was assessed successfully using the phantom. Images of the targets have been reconstructed using a spatially variant regularization, and the determined spatial localization in the depth direction is shown to be accurate within an uncertainty of about 3 mm down to a depth of about 30 mm.

  6. Periodically Diameter-Modulated Semiconductor Nanowires for Enhanced Optical Absorption.

    PubMed

    Ko, Minjee; Baek, Seong-Ho; Song, Bokyung; Kang, Jang-Won; Kim, Shin-Ae; Cho, Chang-Hee

    2016-04-01

    A diameter-modulated silicon nanowire array to enhance the optical absorption across broad spectral range is presented. Periodic shape engineering is achieved using conventional semiconductor processes and the unique optical properties are analyzed. The periodicity in the diameter of the silicon nanowires enables stronger and more closely spaced optical resonances, leading to broadband absorption enhancement. PMID:26833855

  7. Linking Lyα and Low-ionization Transitions at Low Optical Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-01

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Lyα emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Lyα emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Lyα emission, the Lyα line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Lyα profiles resemble the Hα line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Lyα emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Lyα emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Lyα profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Lyα, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Lyα emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Lyα to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Lyα profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with programs GO-13293 and GO-12928.

  8. Mirage effect spectrometry and light profile microscopy: Two views of an optical depth profile (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. F.; Fu, S. W.; Nepotchatykh, O. V.

    2003-01-01

    Photothermal depth profiling techniques are well adapted for the inspection of optically absorbing features on the length scale of 1-100 μm in a variety of media. However, the depth profiling mechanism intrinsic to thermal wave imaging is inherently ill posed [J. F. Power, AIP Conf. Proc. 463, 3 (1999)], and suffers obvious disadvantages such as sensitivity to experimental errors (requiring regularization) and subsurface broadening of the regularized depth profiles. Recently, through the introduction of light profile microscopy (LPM) an alternate method of optical inspection was made available for depth profiling optically absorbing, scattering, and luminescent structures on this length scale [J. F. Power and S. W. Fu, Appl. Spectros. 53, 1507 (1999); J. F. Power and S. W. Fu, U.S. Patent Pending]. LPM inspects a thin film under test by directing a laser beam through the material along the depth axis, parallel to a polished cross-sectional viewing surface. Luminescence and elastic scatter excited in the beam volume is imaged by a microscope aligned orthogonal to the beam axis. The images obtained by this method showed striking depth contrast in a variety of materials with subsurface interfaces and depth variations of luminescence yield. When implemented in dual beam mode [J. F. Power and S. W. Fu, U.S. Patent Pending; J. F. Power and S. W. Fu, (unpublished)] with an associated mathematical method, LPM may be used to quantitatively resolve depth variable optical absorption from light scattering and luminescence efficiency. In contrast to photothermal methods, the LPM technique is well posed. LPM was evaluated in tandem with mirage effect spectrometry (in normal deflection mode with bicell detection) [J. F. Power, S. W. Fu, and M. A. Schweitzer, Appl. Spectros. 54, 110 (2000)], to determine the effective use of each technique in analysis problems on complex materials. This study used samples with known depth variations of optical properties including homogeneous

  9. A comparison of hydrographically and optically derived mixed layer depths

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zawada, D.G.; Zaneveld, J.R.V.; Boss, E.; Gardner, W.D.; Richardson, M.J.; Mishonov, A.V.

    2005-01-01

    Efforts to understand and model the dynamics of the upper ocean would be significantly advanced given the ability to rapidly determine mixed layer depths (MLDs) over large regions. Remote sensing technologies are an ideal choice for achieving this goal. This study addresses the feasibility of estimating MLDs from optical properties. These properties are strongly influenced by suspended particle concentrations, which generally reach a maximum at pycnoclines. The premise therefore is to use a gradient in beam attenuation at 660 nm (c660) as a proxy for the depth of a particle-scattering layer. Using a global data set collected during World Ocean Circulation Experiment cruises from 1988-1997, six algorithms were employed to compute MLDs from either density or temperature profiles. Given the absence of published optically based MLD algorithms, two new methods were developed that use c660 profiles to estimate the MLD. Intercomparison of the six hydrographically based algorithms revealed some significant disparities among the resulting MLD values. Comparisons between the hydrographical and optical approaches indicated a first-order agreement between the MLDs based on the depths of gradient maxima for density and c660. When comparing various hydrographically based algorithms, other investigators reported that inherent fluctuations of the mixed layer depth limit the accuracy of its determination to 20 m. Using this benchmark, we found a ???70% agreement between the best hydrographical-optical algorithm pairings. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  10. Eddington limit for a gaseous stratus with finite optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The Eddington luminosity of a spherical source is usually defined for a uniformly extending normal plasma. We usually suppose that the gas can accrete to the central object at the sub-Eddington luminosity, while it would be blown off from the central luminous source in the super-Eddington case. We reconsider this central dogma of the Eddington limit under the radiative transfer effect for the purely scattering case, using analytical and numerical methods. For the translucent isolated gas cloud (stratus) with finite optical depth, the concept of the Eddington luminosity is drastically changed. In an heuristic way, we find that the critical condition is approximately expressed as Γ = (1 + μ* + τc)/2, where Γ (=L/LE) is the central luminosity L normalized by the Eddington luminosity LE, τc is the optical depth of the stratus, and μ* (=√{1-R_*^2/R^2}) is the direction cosine of the central object, R* being the radius of the central object, and R the distance from the central object. When the optical depth of the stratus is around unity, the classical Eddington limit roughly holds for the stratus; Γ ˜ 1. However, when the optical depth is greater than unity, the critical condition becomes roughly Γ ˜ τc/2, and the stratus would infall on to the central source even at the highly super-Eddington luminosity. When the optical depth is less than unity, on the other hand, the critical condition reduces to Γ ≳ (1 + μ*)/2, and the stratus could be blown off in some limited ranges, depending on μ*. This new concept of the Eddington limit for the isolated stratus could drastically change the accretion and outflow physics of highly inhomegeneous plasmas, with relevance for astrophysical jets and winds and supermassive black hole formation.

  11. Structured illumination assisted microdeflectometry with optical depth scanning capability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng-Huei; Hua, Hong

    2016-09-01

    Microdeflectometry is a powerful noncontact tool for measuring nanometer defects on a freeform surface. However, it requires a time-consuming process to take measurements at different depths for an extended depth of field (EDOF) and lacks surface information for integrating the measured gradient data to height. We propose an optical depth scanning technique to speed up the measurement process and introduce the structured illumination technique to efficiently determine the focused data among 3D observation and provide surface orientations for reconstructing an unknown surface shape. We demonstrated 3D measurements with an equivalent surface height sensitivity of 7.21 nm and an EDOF of at least 250 μm, which is 15 times that of the diffraction limited depth range. PMID:27607986

  12. Absorption spectra and light penetration depth of normal and pathologically altered human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.; Volotovskaya, A. V.; Ulashchik, V. S.

    2007-05-01

    A three-layered skin model (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis) and engineering formulas for radiative transfer theory are used to study absorption spectra and light penetration depths of normal and pathologically altered skin. The formulas include small-angle and asymptotic approximations and a layer-addition method. These characteristics are calculated for wavelengths used for low-intensity laser therapy. We examined several pathologies such as vitiligo, edema, erythematosus lupus, and subcutaneous wound, for which the bulk concentrations of melanin and blood vessels or tissue structure (for subcutaneous wound) change compared with normal skin. The penetration depth spectrum is very similar to the inverted blood absorption spectrum. In other words, the depth is minimal at blood absorption maxima. The calculated absorption spectra enable the power and irradiation wavelength providing the required light effect to be selected. Relationships between the penetration depth and the diffuse reflectance coefficient of skin (unambiguously expressed through the absorption coefficient) are analyzed at different wavelengths. This makes it possible to find relationships between the light fields inside and outside the tissue.

  13. Contrails of Small and Very Large Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atlas, David; Wang, Zhien

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with two kinds of contrails. The first comprises a large number of optically thin contrails near the tropopause. They are mapped geographically using a lidar to obtain their height and a camera to obtain azimuth and elevation. These high-resolution maps provide the local contrail geometry and the amount of optically clear atmosphere. The second kind is a single trail of unprecedentedly large optical thickness that occurs at a lower height. The latter was observed fortuitously when an aircraft moving along the wind direction passed over the lidar, thus providing measurements for more than 3 h and an equivalent distance of 620 km. It was also observed by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) sensors. The lidar measured an optical depth of 2.3. The corresponding extinction coefficient of 0.023 per kilometer and ice water content of 0.063 grams per cubic meter are close to the maximum values found for midlatitude cirrus. The associated large radar reflectivity compares to that measured by ultrasensitive radar, thus providing support for the reality of the large optical depth.

  14. Optical absorption in semiconductor nanorings under electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tong-Yi; Cao, Jun-Cheng; Zhao, Wei

    2005-01-01

    The optical absorption in semiconductor nanorings under a lateral DC field and a perpendicular magnetic field is numerically simulated by coherent wave approach. The exciton dominated optical absorption is compared with the free-carrier interband absorption to demonstrate the key role of Coulomb interaction between electron and hole. The influence of the lateral DC field and the perpendicular magnetic field on the optical absorption are discussed in detail. It shows that the lateral DC field can significantly enhance the Aharonov-Bohm effect of the neutral excitons in semiconductor nanorings.

  15. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids. PMID:26576666

  16. High-resolution in-depth imaging of optically cleared thick samples using an adaptive SPIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Aurore; Escande, Paul; Frongia, Céline; Clouvel, Grégory; Ducommun, Bernard; Lorenzo, Corinne

    2015-11-01

    Today, Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) makes it possible to image fluorescent samples through depths of several hundreds of microns. However, LSFM also suffers from scattering, absorption and optical aberrations. Spatial variations in the refractive index inside the samples cause major changes to the light path resulting in loss of signal and contrast in the deepest regions, thus impairing in-depth imaging capability. These effects are particularly marked when inhomogeneous, complex biological samples are under study. Recently, chemical treatments have been developed to render a sample transparent by homogenizing its refractive index (RI), consequently enabling a reduction of scattering phenomena and a simplification of optical aberration patterns. One drawback of these methods is that the resulting RI of cleared samples does not match the working RI medium generally used for LSFM lenses. This RI mismatch leads to the presence of low-order aberrations and therefore to a significant degradation of image quality. In this paper, we introduce an original optical-chemical combined method based on an adaptive SPIM and a water-based clearing protocol enabling compensation for aberrations arising from RI mismatches induced by optical clearing methods and acquisition of high-resolution in-depth images of optically cleared complex thick samples such as Multi-Cellular Tumour Spheroids.

  17. Effect of depth order on linear vection with optical flows.

    PubMed

    Seya, Yasuhiro; Tsuji, Takayuki; Shinoda, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of depth order on forward and backward vection were examined using optical flows simulating motion in depth (i.e., approaching or receding). In an experiment, space extending 10 or 20 m in depth was simulated, and the space was divided into foreground and background spaces. In each space, a random-dot pattern was presented and the binocular disparity, size, and velocity of each dot were continuously manipulated in a way consistent with the depth being simulated. Participants reported whether they perceived vection. Latency, total duration (i.e., the amount of time that participants reported perceiving vection during a 60-s presentation), and strong-vection duration (i.e., the amount of time that participants reported perceiving strong vection) were measured. The results indicated that, even though the dots making up the optical flow were much smaller and slower moving in the background space than in the foreground space, vection was strongly dependent on flow motion in the background space. This supports the idea that the perceptual system uses background stimulus motion as a reliable cue for self-motion perception. PMID:25926971

  18. Diurnal variations in optical depth at Mars: Observations and interpretations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, D. S.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.

    1988-01-01

    Viking lander camera images of the Sun were used to compute atmospheric optical depth at two sites over a period of 1 to 1/3 martian years. The complete set of 1044 optical depth determinations is presented in graphical and tabular form. Error estimates are presented in detail. Optical depths in the morning (AM) are generally larger than in the afternoon (PM). The AM-PM differences are ascribed to condensation of water vapor into atmospheric ice aerosols at night and their evaporation in midday. A smoothed time series of these differences shows several seasonal peaks. These are simulated using a one-dimensional radiative convective model which predicts martial atmospheric temperature profiles. A calculation combining these profiles with water vapor measurements from the Mars Atmospheric Water Detector is used to predict when the diurnal variations of water condensation should occur. The model reproduces a majority of the observed peaks and shows the factors influencing the process. Diurnal variation of condensation is shown to peak when the latitude and season combine to warm the atmosphere to the optimum temperature, cool enough to condense vapor at night and warm enough to cause evaporation at midday.

  19. Elimination of depth degeneracy in optical frequency-domain imaging through polarization-based optical demodulation.

    PubMed

    Vakoc, B J; Yun, S H; Tearney, G J; Bouma, B E

    2006-02-01

    A novel optical frequency-domain imaging system is demonstrated that employs a passive optical demodulation circuit and a chirped digital acquisition clock derived from a voltage-controlled oscillator. The demodulation circuit allows the separation of signals from positive and negative depths to better than 50 dB, thereby eliminating depth degeneracy and doubling the imaging depth range. Our system design is compatible with dual-balanced and polarization-diverse detection, important techniques in the practical biomedical application of optical frequency-domain imaging. PMID:16480209

  20. Enhanced optical clearing of skin in vivo and optical coherence tomography in-depth imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiang; Jacques, Steven L.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zhu, Dan

    2012-06-01

    The strong optical scattering of skin tissue makes it very difficult for optical coherence tomography (OCT) to achieve deep imaging in skin. Significant optical clearing of in vivo rat skin sites was achieved within 15 min by topical application of an optical clearing agent PEG-400, a chemical enhancer (thiazone or propanediol), and physical massage. Only when all three components were applied together could a 15 min treatment achieve a three fold increase in the OCT reflectance from a 300 μm depth and 31% enhancement in image depth Zthreshold.

  1. The Non-Linear Relationship between Silicate Absorption Depth and IR Extinction in Dense Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, Jean E.; Pendleton, Y.; Ennico, K.; Boogert, A.; Greene, T.; Lada, C.; Roellig, T.; Tielens, A.; Werner, M.; Whittet, D.

    2006-12-01

    Interstellar silicates are likely to be a part of all grains responsible for extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) and dense clouds. A correlation between visual extinction (Av) and the depth of the 9.7 mu silicate feature (measured as optical depth, tau(9.7)) is expected if the dust species are well mixed. In the diffuse ISM, such a correlation is observed for lines of sight in the solar neighborhood. A previous study of the silicate absorption feature in the Taurus dark cloud showed a tendency for the correlation to break down at high Av (Whittet et al. 1988, MNRAS, 233, 321), but the scatter was large. We have acquired Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph data of several lines of sight in the IC 5146, Barnard 68, Chameleon I and Serpens dense clouds. To eliminate any uncertainties associated with adopting a specific extinction law, we investigated the relationship between tau(9.7) and E(J-K). Our data set spans E(J-K) between 0.3 and 8 mag (Av=between 2-35 mag.). All lines of sight show the 9.7 mu silicate feature. For E(J-K) greater than about 2 mag, tau(9.7) levels off, much like the trend observed in the Taurus data. There are two exceptions: one line of sight in Serpens, with E(J-K) 4 mag lies on the diffuse ISM line. Another line of sight with E(J-K) 8 mag, also in Serpens, lies well below the diffuse ISM line, but well above the “flat” trend of the other dense cloud sources. This particular line of sight also has a high ice column relative to the amount of visual/infrared extinction. The cause of the “flat” trend exhibited by most of the dense cloud points is undetermined. However, in general, it is unlikely that ice mantles would have any effect on the measured silicate feature since ices are transparent in the 10 mu region.

  2. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  3. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-09-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  4. Synthesis and nonlinear optical absorption of novel chalcone derivative compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahulan, K. Mani; Balamurugan, S.; Meena, K. S.; Yeap, G.-Y.; Kanakam, Charles C.

    2014-03-01

    3-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)-1-(4-(4-(hydroxymethyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)phenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was synthesized and its third order nonlinear optical properties have been investigated using a z-scan technique with nanosecond laser pulses at 532 nm. The nonlinear absorption behavior of the compound in chloroform presents a distinct difference at different laser intensity. Interestingly, the compound showed a switchover from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA) with the increase of excitation intensity. Our studies suggest that compound could be used as a potential candidate for optical device applications such as optical limiters.

  5. Depth resolved detection of lipid using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Eckert, Jocelyn; Halpern, Elkan F.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) can identify key components related to plaque vulnerability but can suffer from artifacts that could prevent accurate identification of lipid rich regions. In this paper, we present a model of depth resolved spectral analysis of OFDI data for improved detection of lipid. A quadratic Discriminant analysis model was developed based on phantom compositions known chemical mixtures and applied to a tissue phantom of a lipid-rich plaque. We demonstrate that a combined spectral and attenuation model can be used to predict the presence of lipid in OFDI images. PMID:24009991

  6. Strategies for Improved CALIPSO Aerosol Optical Depth Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Mark A.; Kuehn, Ralph E.; Tackett, Jason L.; Rogers, Raymond R.; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, A.; Getzewich, Brian J.; Powell, Kathleen A.; Hu, Yongxiang; Young, Stuart A.; Avery, Melody A.; Winker, David M.; Trepte, Charles R.

    2010-01-01

    In the spring of 2010, the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) project will be releasing version 3 of its level 2 data products. In this paper we describe several changes to the algorithms and code that yield substantial improvements in CALIPSO's retrieval of aerosol optical depths (AOD). Among these are a retooled cloud-clearing procedure and a new approach to determining the base altitudes of aerosol layers in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The results derived from these modifications are illustrated using case studies prepared using a late beta version of the level 2 version 3 processing code.

  7. Control of enhanced optical absorption in {mu}c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of grain size on the enhanced optical absorption of {micro}c-Si has been investigated using films of various grain sizes prepared by solid phase crystallization. The authors show that they can control this grain size and therefore the degree of absorption changes. For grain sizes below a threshold range significant absorption enhancement can be seen in the photon energy range of 1 to {approximately}3 eV and the absorption characteristics of these films show that the dominant mode of optical transitions is indirect. A correlation between first order Raman peak broadening and enhanced absorption was found suggesting both effects are related to confinement. A simple model was developed to see how confinement in the crystallites could influence indirect optical transitions.

  8. Seasonal variability of aerosol optical depth over Indian subcontinent

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prasad, A.K.; Singh, R.P.; Singh, A.; Kafatos, M.

    2005-01-01

    Ganga basin extends 2000 km E-W and about 400 km N-S and is bounded by Himalayas in the north. This basin is unequivocally found to be affected by high aerosols optical depth (AOD) (>0.6) throughout the year. Himalayas restricts movement of aerosols toward north and as a result dynamic nature of aerosol is seen over the Ganga basin. High AOD in this region has detrimental effects on health of more than 460 million people living in this part of India besides adversely affecting clouds formation, monsoonal rainfall pattern and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). Severe drought events (year 2002) in Ganga basin and unexpected failure of monsoon several times, occurred in different parts of Indian subcontinent. Significant rise in AOD (18.7%) over the central part of basin (Kanpur region) have been found to cause substantial decrease in NDVI (8.1%) since 2000. A negative relationship is observed between AOD and NDVI, magnitude of which differs from region to region. Efforts have been made to determine general distribution of AOD and its dominant departure in recent years spatially using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. The seasonal changes in aerosol optical depth over the Indo-Gangetic basin is found to very significant as a result of the increasing dust storm events in recent years. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  9. Depth-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detection of energy-loss Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Soejima, Narumasa; Iwasaki, Shiro; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Murai, Takaaki; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2015-11-01

    A unique X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) method is proposed for depth profiling of chemical states in material surfaces. Partial electron yield mode detecting energy-loss Auger electrons, called the inelastic electron yield (IEY) mode, enables a variation in the probe depth. As an example, Si K-edge XAS spectra for a well-defined multilayer sample (Si3N4/SiO2/Si) have been investigated using this method at various kinetic energies. We found that the peaks assigned to the layers from the top layer to the substrate appeared in the spectra in the order of increasing energy loss relative to the Auger electrons. Thus, the probe depth can be changed by the selection of the kinetic energy of the energy loss electrons in IEY-XAS.

  10. On optical depth profiling using confocal Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Freebody, N A; Vaughan, A S; Macdonald, A M

    2010-04-01

    Until 2006 the performance of confocal Raman spectroscopy depth profiling was typically described and modeled through the application of geometrical optics, including refraction at the surface, to explain the degree of resolution and the precise form of the depth profile obtained from transparent and semicrystalline materials. Consequently a range of techniques, physical and analytical, was suggested to avoid the errors thus encountered in order to improve the practice of Raman spectroscopy, if not the understanding of the underlying mechanisms. These approaches were completely unsuccessful in accounting for the precise form of the depth profile, the fact that spectra obtained from laminated samples always contain characteristic peaks from all materials present both well above and below the focal point and that spectra can be obtained when focused some 40 mum above the sample surface. This paper provides further evidence that the physical processes underlying Raman spectroscopy are better modeled and explained through the concept of an extended illuminated volume contributing to the final Raman spectrum and modeled through a photon scattering approach rather than a point focus ray optics approach. The power of this numerical model lies in its ability to incorporate, simultaneously, the effects of degree of refraction at the surface (whether using a dry or oil objective lens), the degree of attenuation due to scatter by the bulk of the material, the Raman scattering efficiency of the material, and surface roughness effects. Through this we are now able to explain why even removing surface aberration and refraction effects through the use of oil immersion objective lenses cannot reliably ensure that the material sampled is only that at or close to the point of focus of the laser. Furthermore we show that the precise form of the depth profile is affected by the degree of flatness of the surface of the sample. Perhaps surprisingly, we show that the degree of flatness

  11. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric optical depth using the Oxygen A-band at 765 nm.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Michael; Allan, Graham R; Hasselbrack, William; Mao, Jianping; Stephen, Mark; Abshire, James

    2013-09-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen optical depth measurements with an IPDA lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate knowledge of atmospheric temperature and pressure is required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, and climate modeling studies. The lidar uses a doubled erbium-doped fiber amplifier and single photon-counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at 765 nm. Our results show good agreement between the experimentally derived differential optical depth measurements with the theoretical predictions for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 13 km. PMID:24085100

  12. Measurements of aerosol optical depth and diffuse-to-direct irradiance ratios in the Northeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.; Larson, N.; Michalsky, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Simultaneous observations of total and diffuse irradiance on a horizontal surface in six narrowband filtered detectors and one broadband shortwave detector have been made since late 1991 at a nine-site network of multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometers. From these measurements, the direct normal irradiance values are calculated. These data are then used to calculate the outside-the-atmosphere direct irradiance (lo) and total optical depth using the Langley method of regressing the natural logarithm of the direct irradiance against air mass for cloud-free conditions. Frequent determinations of lo allow tracking of changes in lo caused by soiling and filter degradation. The daily average total optical depth is calculated in two ways: (1) from the slope of the Langley regression line and (2) from 30-minute averages calculated from the Beer-Lambert-Bougeur law using the median lo for that day. Finally, aerosol optical depths for five wavelengths (the other narrowband wavelength is used to estimate water vapor) are obtained by subtracting Rayleigh scattering and Chappuis ozone absorption optical depths from the total optical depths. The aerosol pattern at each site is consistent with an annual cycle superimposed on a decaying aerosol loading associated with the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. Moreover, the wavelength dependence of the aerosol pattern shows seasonal changes in the aerosol size distribution. The irradiance data are also used to calculate the diffuse-to-direct irradiance ratio, a quantity which in theory is related to the aerosol optical depth and surface albedo. A radiative transfer model based on the adjoint method, combined with a nonlinear least squares method. is used to estimate aerosol optical depth and surface albedo from the observed diffuse-to-direct ratios. The aerosol optical depths are in good agreement with those calculated from the direct beam data and the surface albedos are in accord with other observations.

  13. Optical-domain subsampling for data efficient depth ranging in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Meena; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in optical coherence tomography (OCT) have led to higher-speed sources that support imaging over longer depth ranges. Limitations in the bandwidth of state-of-the-art acquisition electronics, however, prevent adoption of these advances into the clinical applications. Here, we introduce optical-domain subsampling as a method for imaging at high-speeds and over extended depth ranges but with a lower acquisition bandwidth than that required using conventional approaches. Optically subsampled laser sources utilize a discrete set of wavelengths to alias fringe signals along an extended depth range into a bandwidth limited frequency window. By detecting the complex fringe signals and under the assumption of a depth-constrained signal, optical-domain subsampling enables recovery of the depth-resolved scattering signal without overlapping artifacts from this bandwidth-limited window. We highlight key principles behind optical-domain subsampled imaging, and demonstrate this principle experimentally using a polygon-filter based swept-source laser that includes an intra-cavity Fabry-Perot (FP) etalon. PMID:23038343

  14. Broadband optical limiting and nonlinear optical absorption properties of a novel hyperbranched conjugated polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao; Liu, Chunling; Li, Quanshui; Gong, Qihuang

    2004-12-01

    The nonlinear transmittance of a novel hyperbranched conjugated polymer named DMA-HPV has been measured in CHCl 3 solution using a nanosecond optical parametric oscillator. DMA-HPV shows excellent optical limiting performance in the visible region from 490 to 610 nm. An explanation based on the combination of two-photon absorption and reverse saturable absorption was proposed for its huge and broadband nonlinear optical absorption.

  15. Diffuse Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Human Breast for Quantitative Oximetry with Depth Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang

    Near-infrared spectral imaging for breast cancer diagnostics and monitoring has been a hot research topic for the past decade. Here we present instrumentation for diffuse optical imaging of breast tissue with tandem scan of a single source-detector pair with broadband light in transmission geometry for tissue oximetry. The efforts to develop the continuous-wave (CW) domain instrument have been described, and a frequency-domain (FD) system is also used to measure the bulk tissue optical properties and the breast thickness distribution. We also describe the efforts to improve the data processing codes in the 2D spatial domain for better noise suppression, contrast enhancement, and spectral analysis. We developed a paired-wavelength approach, which is based on finding pairs of wavelength that feature the same optical contrast, to quantify the tissue oxygenation for the absorption structures detected in the 2D structural image. A total of eighteen subjects, two of whom were bearing breast cancer on their right breasts, were measured with this hybrid CW/FD instrument and processed with the improved algorithms. We obtained an average tissue oxygenation value of 87% +/- 6% from the healthy breasts, significantly higher than that measured in the diseased breasts (69% +/- 14%) (p < 0.01). For the two diseased breasts, the tumor areas bear hypoxia signatures versus the remainder of the breast, with oxygenation values of 49 +/- 11% (diseased region) vs. 61 +/- 16% (healthy regions) for the breast with invasive ductal carcinoma, and 58 +/- 8% (diseased region) vs 77 +/- 11% (healthy regions) for ductal carcinoma in situ. Our subjects came from various ethnical/racial backgrounds, and two-thirds of our subjects were less than thirty years old, indicating a potential to apply the optical mammography to a broad population. The second part of this thesis covers the topic of depth discrimination, which is lacking with our single source-detector scan system. Based on an off

  16. Derivation of Aerosol Columnar Mass from MODIS Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify performance, aerosol transport models (ATM) compare aerosol columnar mass (ACM) with those derived from satellite measurements. The comparison is inherently indirect since satellites derive optical depths and they use a proportionality constant to derive the ACM. Analogously, ATMs output a four dimensional ACM distribution and the optical depth is linearly derived. In both cases, the proportionality constant requires a direct intervention of the user by prescribing the aerosol composition and size distribution. This study introduces a method that minimizes the direct user intervention by making use of the new aerosol products of MODIS. A parameterization is introduced for the derivation of columnar aerosol mass (AMC) and CCN concentration (CCNC) and comparisons between sunphotometer, MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and in-measurements are shown. The method still relies on the scaling between AMC and optical depth but the proportionality constant is dependent on the MODIS derived r$_{eff}$,\\eta (contribution of the accumulation mode radiance to the total radiance), ambient RH and an assumed constant aerosol composition. The CCNC is derived fkom a recent parameterization of CCNC as a function of the retrieved aerosol volume. By comparing with in-situ data (ACE-2 and TARFOX campaigns), it is shown that retrievals in dry ambient conditions (dust) are improved when using a proportionality constant dependent on r$ {eff}$ and \\eta derived in the same pixel. In high humidity environments, the improvement inthe new method is inconclusive because of the difficulty in accounting for the uneven vertical distribution of relative humidity. Additionally, two detailed comparisons of AMC and CCNC retrieved by the MAS algorithm and the new method are shown. The new method and MAS retrievals of AMC are within the same order of magnitude with respect to the in-situ measurements of aerosol mass. However, the proposed method is closer to the in-situ measurements than

  17. In-depth quantification by using multispectral time-resolved diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zouaoui, Judy; Hervé, Lionel; Di Sieno, Laura; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Berger, Michel; Dalla Mora, Alberto; Pifferi, Antonio; Derouard, Jacques; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-07-01

    Near-infrared diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a medical imaging which gives the distribution of the optical properties of biological tissues. To obtain endogenous chromophore features in the depth of a scattering medium, a multiwavelength/time-resolved (MW/TR) DOT setup was used. Reconstructions of the three-dimensional maps of chromophore concentrations of probed media were obtained by using a data processing technique which manages Mellin-Laplace Transforms of their MW/TR optical signals and those of a known reference medium. The point was to put a constraint on the medium absorption coefficient by using a material basis composed of a given set of chromophores of known absorption spectra. Experimental measurements were conducted by injecting the light of a picosecond near- infrared laser in the medium of interest and by collecting, for several wavelengths and multiple positions, the backscattered light via two fibers (with a source-detector separation of 15 mm) connected to fast-gated single-photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) and coupled to a time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) system. Validations of the method were performed in simulation in the same configuration as the experiments for different combination of chromophores. Evaluation of the technique in real conditions was investigated on liquid phantoms composed of an homogenous background and a 10 mm depth inclusion formed of combination of intralipid and inks scanned at 30 positions and at three wavelengths. Both numerical and preliminary phantom experiments confirm the potential of this method to determine chromophore concentrations in the depth of biological tissues.

  18. Exploring the origin of high optical absorption in conjugated polymers.

    PubMed

    Vezie, Michelle S; Few, Sheridan; Meager, Iain; Pieridou, Galatia; Dörling, Bernhard; Ashraf, Raja Shahid; Goñi, Alejandro R; Bronstein, Hugo; McCulloch, Iain; Hayes, Sophia C; Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Nelson, Jenny

    2016-07-01

    The specific optical absorption of an organic semiconductor is critical to the performance of organic optoelectronic devices. For example, higher light-harvesting efficiency can lead to higher photocurrent in solar cells that are limited by sub-optimal electrical transport. Here, we compare over 40 conjugated polymers, and find that many different chemical structures share an apparent maximum in their extinction coefficients. However, a diketopyrrolopyrrole-thienothiophene copolymer shows remarkably high optical absorption at relatively low photon energies. By investigating its backbone structure and conformation with measurements and quantum chemical calculations, we find that the high optical absorption can be explained by the high persistence length of the polymer. Accordingly, we demonstrate high absorption in other polymers with high theoretical persistence length. Visible light harvesting may be enhanced in other conjugated polymers through judicious design of the structure. PMID:27183327

  19. Parameterization of cirrus optical depth and cloud fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Soden, B.

    1995-09-01

    This research illustrates the utility of combining satellite observations and operational analysis for the evaluation of parameterizations. A parameterization based on ice water path (IWP) captures the observed spatial patterns of tropical cirrus optical depth. The strong temperature dependence of cirrus ice water path in both the observations and the parameterization is probably responsible for the good correlation where it exists. Poorer agreement is found in Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes where the temperature dependence breaks down. Uncertainties in effective radius limit quantitative validation of the parameterization (and its inclusion into GCMs). Also, it is found that monthly mean cloud cover can be predicted within an RMS error of 10% using ECMWF relative humidity corrected by TOVS Upper Troposphere Humidity. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  20. Underwater optical wireless communications: depth-dependent beam refraction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura J; Green, Roger J; Leeson, Mark S

    2014-11-01

    Global refractive gradients in seawater cause pointing problems for optical wireless communications. A refractive index depth profile of the Pacific Ocean was calculated from measured salinity, temperature, and pressure, determining the end points of a refracted and nonrefracted 200 m communication link. Numerical ray tracing was used with a point source for angles between 10° and 80° and transmission wavelengths of 500-650 nm; the maximum end-point difference found was 0.23 m. A 500 nm laser with a 0.57° full-angle FOV was traced; the nonrefracted receiver location was outside the FOV for all links angled >15° to the vertical. However, most pointing issues underwater are unlikely to be significant with suitable FOV choice and natural scattering of the source. PMID:25402887

  1. Aerosol Optical Depth: A study using Thailand based Brewer Spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumharn, Wilawan; Sudhibrabha, Sumridh; Hanprasert, Kesrin

    2015-12-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) was retrieved from the direct-sun Brewer observation by the application of the Beer's law for the years 1997-2011 at two monitoring sites in Thailand (Bangkok and Songkhla). AOD values measured in Bangkok exhibited higher values than Songkhla. In addition, AOD values were higher in the morning and evening in Bangkok. In contrast, the AOD values in Songkhla were slightly lower during the mornings and late afternoons. The variation of AOD was seasonal in Bangkok, with the higher values found in summer (from Mid-February to Mid-May) compared with rainy season (Mid-May to Mid-October), whilst there was no clear seasonal pattern of AOD in Songkhla.

  2. Fano resonance based optical modulator reaching 85% modulation depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Jiang, Huan; Liu, Bingyi; Jiang, Yongyuan; Tang, Chengchun; Li, Junjie

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the combination of nematic liquid crystal with a binary silicon nanohole array to realize a high performance Fano resonance based optical modulator. The simulations using a finite difference time domain method reveal that the sharp Fano profile in the binary array originates from the interaction of the in-phased and anti-phased lattice collective resonance hybridized through lattice coupling effects. Experimental results agree very well with the simulations and demonstrate the strong dependence of the Q factor and spectral contrast of the resonance on the radius difference of the two nanohole arrays. Infiltrated with nematic liquid crystal, E7, the Fano profile can be dynamically and continuously tuned by an applied voltage, and an unprecedented modulation depth up to 85% is achieved.

  3. Eight-year climatology of dust optical depth on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montabone, L.; Forget, F.; Millour, E.; Wilson, R. J.; Lewis, S. R.; Cantor, B.; Kass, D.; Kleinböhl, A.; Lemmon, M. T.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    We have produced a multiannual climatology of airborne dust from martian year 24-31 using multiple datasets of retrieved or estimated column optical depths. The datasets are based on observations of the martian atmosphere from April 1999 to July 2013 made by different orbiting instruments: the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The procedure we have adopted consists of gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. Our gridding method calculates averages and uncertainties on a regularly spaced spatio-temporal grid, using an iterative procedure that is weighted in space, time, and retrieval quality. The lack of observations at certain times and locations introduces missing grid points in the maps, which therefore may result in irregularly gridded (i.e. incomplete) fields. In order to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the resulting gridded maps, we compare with independent observations of CDOD by PanCam cameras and Mini-TES spectrometers aboard the Mars Exploration Rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity", by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard the Phoenix lander, and by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars aboard MRO. We have statistically analyzed the irregularly gridded maps to provide an overview of the dust climatology on Mars over eight years, specifically in relation to its interseasonal and interannual variability, in addition to provide a basis for instrument intercomparison. Finally, we have produced regularly gridded maps of CDOD by spatially interpolating the irregularly gridded maps using a kriging method. These complete maps are used as dust scenarios in the Mars Climate Database (MCD) version 5, and are useful in many modeling

  4. The Optical Depth Sensor (ODS) for Mars atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-10-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in both Martian and Earth environments. The principal goal of ODS is to carry out the opacity due to the Martian dust as well as to characterize the high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in understanding of Martian meteorology. The instrument was initially designed for the failed MARS96 Russian mission, and also was included in the payload of several other missions [1]. Until recently, it was selected (NASA/ESA AO) in the payload of the atmospheric package DREAMS onboard the MARS 2016 mission. But following a decision of the CNES, it is no more included in the payload. In order to study the performance of ODS under a wide range of conditions as well as its capable to provide daily measurements of both dust optical thickness and high altitude clouds properties, the instrument has participated in different terrestrial campaigns. A good performance of ODS prototype (Figure 1) on cirrus clouds detection and in dust opacity estimation was previously archived in Africa during 2004-2005 and in Brasil from 2012 to nowadays. Moreover, a campaign in the arctic is expected before 2016 where fifteen ODSs will be part of an integrated observing system over the Arctic Ocean, allowing test the ODS performance in extreme conditions. In this presentation we present main principle of the retrieval, the instrumental concept, the result of the tests performed and the principal objectives of ODS in Mars.

  5. [Study of retrieving formaldehyde with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Qu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Lin

    2009-01-01

    The present paper introduces the method of retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The authors measured ambient HCHO in Beijing region with the help of differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument made by ourself, and discussed numerous factors in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), especially, the choice of HCHO wave band, how to avoid absorption of ambient SO2, NO2 and O3, and the influence of the Xenon lamp spectrum structure on the absorption of ambient HCHO. The authors achieved the HCHO concentration by simultaneously retrieving the concentrations of HCHO, SO2, NO2 and O3 with non-linear least square fitting method, avoiding the effect of choosing narrow wave of HCHO and the residual of SO2, NO2, O3 and the Xenon lamp spectrum structure in retrieving process to attain the concentration of HCHO, Finally the authors analyzed the origin of error in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and the total error is within 13.7% in this method. PMID:19385238

  6. Absorption-edge calculations of inorganic nonlinear optical crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kechen; Chen, Chuangtian

    1992-03-01

    A theoretical model suitable for calculating absorption edges of inorganic nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals is introduced. This model is proved to be useful to elucidate the relationship between electronic structures of NLO-active groups and macroscopic properties of absorption edges on the UV side of most of the inorganic nonlinear optical crystals. A systematic calculation of absorption edges on the UV side for several important inorganic NLO crystals is carried out by means of DV-SCM-Xα method and all calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data. These inorganic NLO crystals include LiB3O5(LBO), β-BaB2O4(BBO), KB5, KDP, Na2SbF5, Ba2TiSi2O8, iodate and NaNO2. The calculated energy level structures of LiB3O5 and β-BaB2O4 crystals are compared with the measured XPS spectra. The unusual transparent spectra of KB5 and KDP crystals are partly explained from the microstructure point of view. The effect of lone electron pair in iodate and NaNO2 crystals on their absorption edges are discussed. All these results show that Anionic Group Theory of Nonlinear Optical Crystals is useful to evaluate the absorption edges of the inorganic nonlinear optical crystal and is a powerful tool in a Molecular Engineering approach to search for new nonlinear optical materials.

  7. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  8. Electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Houjian; Yang, Mou; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene (monolayer of black phosphorus) under strain. Strain was found to be a powerful tool for the band structure engineering. The in-plane strain in armchair or zigzag direction changes the effective mass components along both directions, while the vertical strain only has significant effect on the effective mass in the armchair direction. The band gap is narrowed by compressive in-plane strain and tensile vertical strain. Under certain strain configurations, the gap is closed and the energy band evolves to the semi-Dirac type: the dispersion is linear in the armchair direction and is gapless quadratic in the zigzag direction. The band-edge optic absorption is completely polarized along the armchair direction, and the polarization rate is reduced when the photon energy increases. Strain not only changes the absorption edge (the smallest photon energy for electron transition), but also the absorption polarization.

  9. Optical absorption spectra of palladium doped gold cluster cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kaydashev, Vladimir E.; Janssens, Ewald Lievens, Peter

    2015-01-21

    Photoabsorption spectra of gas phase Au{sub n}{sup +} and Au{sub n−1}Pd{sup +} (13 ≤ n ≤ 20) clusters were measured using mass spectrometric recording of wavelength dependent Xe messenger atom photodetachment in the 1.9–3.4 eV photon energy range. Pure cationic gold clusters consisting of 15, 17, and 20 atoms have a higher integrated optical absorption cross section than the neighboring sizes. It is shown that the total optical absorption cross section increases with size and that palladium doping strongly reduces this cross section for all investigated sizes and in particular for n = 14–17 and 20. The largest reduction of optical absorption upon Pd doping is observed for n = 15.

  10. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light. PMID:23387142

  11. Nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in a semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, D.; Chuang, S. L.

    1987-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear intersubband absorption in a semiconductor quantum well is studied theoretically using the density matrix formalism including intrasubband relaxation. It is shown that the peak absorption is reduced by half for an optical intensity 1 MW/sq cm for the well size L = 126.5 A with 3.0 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm electrons.

  12. Imaging heterogeneous absorption distribution of advanced breast cancer by optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Zhu, Quing

    2010-11-01

    Tumor vascular patterns of advanced breast cancers are complex and heterogeneous. Two typical light absorption patterns of periphery enhancement and posterior shadowing have been observed when imaging these advanced cancers using optical tomography guided by ultrasound. We perform a series simulation and phantom experiments to systemically evaluate the effects of target parameters, target locations, and target optical properties on imaging periphery enhancement absorption distribution using reflection geometry. Large tumors are modeled as concentric semiellipsoidal targets of different outer shell and inner core optical properties. We show that larger targets of more than 3 to 4 cm diameter with outer shell thicknesses less than 1 cm can be resolved at a depth less than 3 cm. A clinical example is given to show the complex vasculature distributions seen from an advanced cancer.

  13. Optical Absorption Spectra of Sodium Borate Cobalt Doped Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Elokr, M. M.; Hassan, M. A.; Yaseen, A. M.; Elokr, R.

    2007-02-14

    Glassy system: xNa2O-(100-x-y)B2O3-yCo3O4 has been prepared by conventional melt quenching technique. Optical absorption spectra have been obtained in the range 300 - 2500 nm at room temperature. An absorption edge was observed in the near UV range, the analysis of which reveals that indirect transition is the dominant absorption mechanism. All prepared samples exhibit blue color, indicating that the Co ions are acted upon by tetrahedral ligand field. Obtained spectra were used to estimate some ligand field parameters.

  14. Metal nanoparticles enhanced optical absorption in thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanlu; Liu, Fang; Qu, Di; Xu, Qi; Huang, Yidong

    2011-12-01

    The plasmonic enhanced absorption for thin film solar cells with silver nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on top of the amorphous silicon film (a-Si:H) solar cells and embedded inside the active layer of organic solar cells (OSCs) has been simulated and analyzed. Obvious optical absorption enhancement is obtained not only at vertical incidence but also at oblique incidence. By properly adjusting the period and size of NPs, an increased absorption enhancement of about 120% and 140% is obtained for a-Si:H solar cells and OSCs, respectively.

  15. Optical absorption of several nanostructures arrays for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaopeng; Qiao, Huiling; Huangfu, Huichao; Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    To improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of solar cells, it's important to enhance the light absorption. Within the visible solar spectrum based on optimization simulations by COMSOL Multiphysics, the optical absorption of silicon cylindrical nanowires, nanocones and inverted nanocones was calculated respectively. The results reveal that the average absorption for the nanocones between 400 and 800 nm is 70.2%, which is better than cylindrical nanowires (55.3%), inverted nanocones (42.3%) and bulk silicon (42.2%). In addition, more than 95% of light from 630 to 800 nm is reflected for inverted nanocones, which can be used to enhance infrared reflection in photovoltaic devices.

  16. Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of tropospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, F.; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.

    1995-05-01

    Our institute has recently developed a differential optical absorption spectrometry system called the gas analyzer spectrometer correlating optical absorption differences (GASCOAD), which features as a detector a linear image sensor that uses an artificial light source for long-path tropospheric-pollution monitoring. The GASCOAD, its method of eliminating interference from background sky light, and subsequent spectral analysis are reported and discussed. The spectrometer was used from 7 to 22 February 1993 in Milan, a heavily polluted metropolitan area, to measure the concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, and HNO2 averaged over a 1.7-km horizontal light path. The findings are reported and briefly discussed.

  17. Comparison of simulated and observed aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulainen, Nels; Ghan, Steven; Easter, Richard; Zaveri, Rahul

    2000-08-01

    A variety of measurements have been used to evaluate the treatment of aerosol radiative properties and radiative impacts of aerosols simulated by the Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges (MIRAGE). This paper focuses on comparisons of simulated and measured aerosol optical depth (AOD). When the analyzed relative humidity is used to calculate aerosol water uptake in MIRAGE, the simulated AOD agrees with most surface measurements after cloudy conditions are filtered out and differences between model and station elevations are accounted for. Simulated AODs are low over sites in Brazil during the biomass burning season and over sites in central Canada during the wildfire season, which can be attributed to limitations in the organic and black carbon emissions data used by MIRAGE. The simulated AODs are mostly within a factor of two of satellite estimates, but MIRAGE simulates excessively high AODs off the east coast of the US and China, and too little dust off the coast of West Africa and in the Arabian Sea.

  18. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingmueller, Klaus; Pozzer, Andrea; Metzger, Swen; Abdelkader, Mohamed; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite product of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. By relating the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface wind, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle, we identify regions where these attributes are significantly correlated to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. The Fertile Crescent turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD trend over these countries. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trend and interannual variability can be attributed to the above mentioned dust cycle parameters, confirming that the AOD increase is predominantly driven by dust. In particular, the positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. This suggests that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change. Based on simulations using the ECHAM/MESSy atmospheric chemistry-climate model (EMAC), we interpret the correlations identified in the observational data in terms of causal relationships.

  19. Aerosol optical depth retrieval using the MERIS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance determination and aerosol type selection are the two main challenges for space-borne aerosol remote sensing, especially for those instruments lacking of near-infrared channels, high-temporal observations, multi-angles abilities and/or polarization information. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm is presented. Global aerosol type and surface spectral dataset were used for the aerosol type selection and surface reflectance determination. A modified Ross-Li mode is used to describe the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect. The comparison with operational MODIS C6 product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results.

  20. Satellite derived aerosol optical depth climatology over Bangalore, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekanth, V.

    2013-06-01

    Climatological aerosol optical depths (AOD) over Bangalore, India have been examined to bring out the temporal heterogeneity in columnar aerosol characteristics. AOD values at 550 nm derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor onboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites, for the period of 2002-2011 have been analyzed (independently) for the purpose. Frequency distributions of the AOD values are examined to infer the monthly mean values. Monthly and seasonal variations of AOD are investigated in the light of regional synoptic meteorology. Climatological monthly and seasonal mean Terra and Aqua AOD values exhibited similar temporal variation patterns. Monthly mean AOD values increased from January, peaks during May and thereafter (except for a secondary peak during July) fall off to reach a minimum during December. Monsoon season recorded the highest climatological seasonal mean AOD, while winter season recorded the lowest. AOD values show an overall increasing trend on a yearly basis, which was found mainly due to sustained increase in the seasonal averaged AOD during summer. The results obtained in the present study are compared with that of the earlier studies over the same location and also with AOD over various other Indian locations. Finally, the radiative and climatic impacts are discussed.

  1. Spatiotemporal modeling of irregularly spaced Aerosol Optical Depth data

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Jacob J.; Kumar, Naresh; Smith, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Many advancements have been introduced to tackle spatial and temporal structures in data. When the spatial and/or temporal domains are relatively large, assumptions must be made to account for the sheer size of the data. The large data size, coupled with realities that come with observational data, make it difficult for all of these assumptions to be met. In particular, air quality data are very sparse across geographic space and time, due to a limited air pollution monitoring network. These “missing” values make it diffcult to incorporate most dimension reduction techniques developed for high-dimensional spatiotemporal data. This article examines aerosol optical depth (AOD), an indirect measure of radiative forcing, and air quality. The spatiotemporal distribution of AOD can be influenced by both natural (e.g., meteorological conditions) and anthropogenic factors (e.g., emission from industries and transport). After accounting for natural factors influencing AOD, we examine the spatiotemporal relationship in the remaining human influenced portion of AOD. The presented data cover a portion of India surrounding New Delhi from 2000 – 2006. The proposed method is demonstrated showing how it can handle the large spatiotemporal structure containing so much missing data for both meteorologic conditions and AOD over time and space. PMID:24470786

  2. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Above Clouds from OMI Observations: Sensitivity Analysis, Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2012-01-01

    A large fraction of the atmospheric aerosol load reaching the free troposphere is frequently located above low clouds. Most commonly observed aerosols above clouds are carbonaceous particles generally associated with biomass burning and boreal forest fires, and mineral aerosols originated in arid and semi-arid regions and transported across large distances, often above clouds. Because these aerosols absorb solar radiation, their role in the radiative transfer balance of the earth atmosphere system is especially important. The generally negative (cooling) top of the atmosphere direct effect of absorbing aerosols, may turn into warming when the light-absorbing particles are located above clouds. The actual effect depends on the aerosol load and the single scattering albedo, and on the geometric cloud fraction. In spite of its potential significance, the role of aerosols above clouds is not adequately accounted for in the assessment of aerosol radiative forcing effects due to the lack of measurements. In this paper we discuss the basis of a simple technique that uses near-UV observations to simultaneously derive the optical depth of both the aerosol layer and the underlying cloud for overcast conditions. The two-parameter retrieval method described here makes use of the UV aerosol index and reflectance measurements at 388 nm. A detailed sensitivity analysis indicates that the measured radiances depend mainly on the aerosol absorption exponent and aerosol-cloud separation. The technique was applied to above-cloud aerosol events over the Southern Atlantic Ocean yielding realistic results as indicated by indirect evaluation methods. An error analysis indicates that for typical overcast cloudy conditions and aerosol loads, the aerosol optical depth can be retrieved with an accuracy of approximately 54% whereas the cloud optical depth can be derived within 17% of the true value.

  3. Rattlesnake Mountain Observator (46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W) multispectral optical depth measurements, 1979--1994

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, R.C.

    1995-09-22

    Surface measurements of solar irradiance of the atmosphere were made by a multipurpose computer-controlled scanning photometer at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory. The observatory is located at 46.4{degrees}N, 119.6{degrees}W at an elevation of 1088 m above mean sea level. The photometer measures the attenuation of direct solar radiation for different wavelengths using 12 filters. Five of these filters (ie., at 428 nm, 486 nm, 535 nm, 785 nm, and 1010 nm, with respective half-power widths of 2, 2, 3, 18, and 28 nm) are suitable for monitoring variations in the total optical depth of the atmosphere. Total optical depths for the five wavelength bands were derived from solar irradiance measurements taken at the observatory from August 5, 1979, to September 2, 1994; these total optical depth data are distributed with this numeric data package (NDP). To determine the contribution of atmospheric aerosols to the total optical depths, the effects of Rayleigh scattering and ozone absorption were subtracted (other molecular scattering was minimal for the five filters) to obtain total column aerosol optical depths. The total aerosol optical depths were further decomposed into tropospheric and stratospheric components by calculating a robustly smoothed mean background optical depth (tropospheric component) for each wavelength using data obtained during periods of low stratospheric aerosol loading. By subtracting the smoothed background tropospheric aerosol optical depths from the total aerosol optical depths, residual aerosol optical depths were obtained. These residuals are good estimates of the stratospheric aerosol optical depth at each wavelength and may be used to monitor the long-term effects of volcanic eruptions on the atmosphere. These data are available as an NDP from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), and the NDP consists of this document and a set of computerized data files.

  4. Spectroradiometer with wedge interference filters (SWIF): measurements of the spectral optical depths at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, O B; Leyva, A; Muhila, A; Valdes, M; Peralta, R; Kovalenko, A P; Welch, R M; Berendes, T A; Isakov, V Y; Kulikovskiy, Y P; Sokolov, S S; Strepanov, N N; Gulidov, S S; von Hoyningen-Huene, W

    1995-07-20

    A spectroradiometer with wedge interference filters (SWIF) (the filters were produced by Carl Zeiss, Jena, Germany) and a CCD matrix (which was of Russian production) that functions as the sensor has been designed and built for use in ground-based optical sensing of the atmosphere and the Earth's surface in the spectral range of 0.35-1.15 µm. Absolute calibration of this instrument was performed through a series of observations of direct solar radiation at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) in Hawaii in May and June 1993. Spectral optical depth (SOD) measurements that were made during these field experiments provided detailed spectral information about both aerosol extinction (scattering plus absorption) and molecular absorption in the atmosphere above the site at MLO. The aerosol-SOD measurements were compared with narrow-band radiometer measurements at wavelengths of 380, 500, and 778 nm The SWIF and narrow-band radiometer measurements are in agreement to within the experimental error. At a wavelength of 500 nm, the aerosol SOD was found to be approximately 0.045. Adescription of the SWIF instrument, its absolute calibration, and the determination of atmospheric SOD's at MLO are presented. PMID:21052277

  5. Improved retrieval of aerosol optical depth by satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Easan Evans

    Atmospheric aerosols are of major concern for public health and climate change, but their sources and atmospheric distributions remain poorly constrained. Satellite-borne radiometers offer a new constraint on aerosol sources and processes by providing global aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals. However, quantitative evaluation of chemical transport models (CTMs) with AOD products retrieved from satellite backscattered reflectances can be compromised by inconsistent assumptions of aerosol optical properties and errors in surface reflectance estimates. We present an improved AOD retrieval algorithm for the MODIS satellite instrument using locally derived surface reflectances and CTM aerosol optical properties. Assuming negligible atmospheric reflectance at 2.13 in cloud-free conditions, we derive 0.47/2.13 and 0.65/2.13 surface reflectance ratios at 1°x1.25° horizontal resolution for the continental United States in summer 2004 from the subset of top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance data with minimal aerosol reflectance. We find higher ratios over arid regions than those assumed in the operational MODIS AOD retrieval algorithm, explaining the high AOD bias found in these regions. We simulate TOA reflectances for each MODIS scene using local aerosol optical properties from the GEOS-Chem CTM, and fit these reflectances to the observed MODIS TOA reflectances for a best estimate of AODs for each scene. Comparison with coincident ground-based (AERONET) AOD observations in the western and central United States during the summer of 2004 shows considerable improvement over the operational MODIS AOD products in this region. We find the AOD retrieval is more accurate at 0.47 than at 0.65 mum because of the higher signal to noise ratio, and that the correlation between MODIS and AERONET AODs improves as averaging time increases. We further improve the AOD retrieval method using an extensive ensemble of aircraft, ground-based, and satellite aerosol observations during the

  6. An Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Value-Added Product to Retrieve Optically Thin Cloud Visible Optical Depth using Micropulse Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, C; Comstock, JM; Flynn, C

    2006-10-01

    The purpose of the Micropulse Lidar (MPL) Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Value-Added Product (VAP) is to retrieve the visible (short-wave) cloud optical depth for optically thin clouds using MPL. The advantage of using the MPL to derive optical depth is that lidar is able to detect optically thin cloud layers that may not be detected by millimeter cloud radar or radiometric techniques. The disadvantage of using lidar to derive optical depth is that the lidar signal becomes attenuation limited when τ approaches 3 (this value can vary depending on instrument specifications). As a result, the lidar will not detect optically thin clouds if an optically thick cloud obstructs the lidar beam.

  7. AIR MONITORING BY DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY IN BAYTOWN, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the results of a field study carried out in Baytown, Texas in August 1993. ne goal of the field study was to evaluate calibration and audit procedures for a differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) system. he other major goal of the study was to c...

  8. Focused optical and acoustic beams in media with nonlinear absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Sukhorukov, A. A.

    1996-11-01

    Optical and acoustic beams are known to be useful for medical and biological applications, such as diagnostics, surgery, etc. At high intensities both nonlinear lens effects and nonlinear absorption can be significant for the beams. The nonlinear absorption arises due to two-photon optical processes or acoustic shock wave formation. The present work is devoted to the theoretical description of nonlinear beam propagation and focal spot formation taking into account the competition between focusing, diffraction and absorption. We derived a new nonlinear integro- differential equation describing the spatial evolution of the beam width. The general analytical solution of this equation is obtained for arbitrary boundary conditions. The simple formulas are derived for the angle divergence in the far field, as well as for beam width at nonlinear waist. The results of the analysis of these key parameters in different situations are presented.

  9. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-26

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  10. Aerosol optical depth trend over the Middle East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingmüller, Klaus; Pozzer, Andrea; Metzger, Swen; Stenchikov, Georgiy L.; Lelieveld, Jos

    2016-04-01

    We use the combined Dark Target/Deep Blue aerosol optical depth (AOD) satellite product of the moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 to study trends over the Middle East between 2000 and 2015. Our analysis corroborates a previously identified positive AOD trend over large parts of the Middle East during the period 2001 to 2012. We relate the annual AOD to precipitation, soil moisture and surface winds to identify regions where these attributes are directly related to the AOD over Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Iran. Regarding precipitation and soil moisture, a relatively small area in and surrounding Iraq turns out to be of prime importance for the AOD over these countries. Regarding surface wind speed, the African Red Sea coastal area is relevant for the Saudi Arabian AOD. Using multiple linear regression we show that AOD trends and interannual variability can be attributed to soil moisture, precipitation and surface winds, being the main factors controlling the dust cycle. Our results confirm the dust driven AOD trends and variability, supported by a decreasing MODIS-derived Ångström exponent and a decreasing AERONET-derived fine mode fraction that accompany the AOD increase over Saudi Arabia. The positive AOD trend relates to a negative soil moisture trend. As a lower soil moisture translates into enhanced dust emissions, it is not needed to assume growing anthropogenic aerosol and aerosol precursor emissions to explain the observations. Instead, our results suggest that increasing temperature and decreasing relative humidity in the last decade have promoted soil drying, leading to increased dust emissions and AOD; consequently an AOD increase is expected due to climate change.

  11. Deriving atmospheric visibility from satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, M.; Schneider, Ch.; Popp, Ch.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric visibility is a measure that reflects different physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere. In general, poor visibility conditions come along with risks for transportation (e.g. road traffic, aviation) and can negatively impact human health since visibility impairment often implies the presence of atmospheric pollution. Ambient pollutants, particulate matter, and few gaseous species decrease the perceptibility of distant objects. Common estimations of this parameter are usually based on human observations or devices that measure the transmittance of light from an artificial light source over a short distance. Such measurements are mainly performed at airports and some meteorological stations. A major disadvantage of these observations is the gap between the measurements, leaving large areas without any information. As aerosols are one of the most important factors influencing atmospheric visibility in the visible range, the knowledge of their spatial distribution can be used to infer visibility with the so called Koschmieder equation, which relates visibility and atmospheric extinction. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to infer atmospheric visibility on large spatial scale. First results applying AOD values scaled with the planetary boundary layer height are promising. For the comparison we use a full automated and objective procedure for the estimation of atmospheric visibility with the help of a digital panorama camera serving as ground truth. To further investigate the relation between the vertical measure of AOD and the horizontal visibility data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site Laegeren (Switzerland), where the digital camera is mounted, are included as well. Finally, the derived visibility maps are compared with synoptical observations in central

  12. Aerosol optical depth increase in partly cloudy conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chand, Duli; Wood, R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Rasch, Philip J.; Miller, Steven D.; Schichtel, Bret; Moore, Tom

    2012-09-14

    Remote sensing observations of aerosol from surface and satellite instruments are extensively used for atmospheric and climate research. From passive sensors, the apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds often appears to be brighter then further away from the clouds, leading to an enhancement in the retrieved aerosol optical depth. Mechanisms contributing to this enhancement, including contamination by undetected clouds, hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles, and meteorological conditions, have been debated in recent literature, but an extent to which each of these factors influence the observed enhancement is poorly known. Here we used 11 years of daily global observations at 10x10 km2 resolution from the MODIS on the NASA Terra satellite to quantify as a function of cloud fraction (CF). Our analysis reveals that, averaged over the globe, the clear sky is enhanced by ? = 0.05 which corresponds to relative enhancements of 25% in cloudy conditions (CF=0.8-0.9) compared with relatively clear conditions (CF=0.1-0.2). Unlike the absolute enhancement ?, the relative increase in ? is rather consistent in all seasons and is 25-35% in the subtropics and 15-25% at mid and higher latitudes. Using a simple Gaussian probability density function model to connect cloud cover and the distribution of relative humidity, we argue that much of the enhancement is consistent with aerosol hygroscopic growth in the humid environment surrounding clouds. Consideration of these cloud-dependent effects will facilitate understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and reduce the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol radiative forcing by global climate models.

  13. Large Magellanic Cloud Microlensing Optical Depth with Imperfect Event Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, David P.

    2005-11-01

    I present a new analysis of the MACHO Project 5.7 yr Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) microlensing data set that incorporates the effects of contamination of the microlensing event sample by variable stars. Photometric monitoring of MACHO LMC microlensing event candidates by the EROS and OGLE groups has revealed that one of these events is likely to be a variable star, while additional data have confirmed that many of the other events are very likely to be microlensing. These additional data on the nature of the MACHO microlensing candidates are incorporated into a simple likelihood analysis to derive a probability distribution for the number of MACHO microlens candidates that are true microlensing events. This analysis shows that 10-12 of the 13 events that passed the MACHO selection criteria are likely to be microlensing events, with the other 1-3 being variable stars. This likelihood analysis is also used to show that the main conclusions of the MACHO LMC analysis are unchanged by the variable star contamination. The microlensing optical depth toward the LMC is τ=(1.0+/-0.3)×10-7. If this is due to microlensing by known stellar populations plus an additional population of lens objects in the Galactic halo, then the new halo population would account for 16% of the mass of a standard Galactic halo. The MACHO detection exceeds the expected background of two events expected from ordinary stars in standard models of the Milky Way and LMC at the 99.98% confidence level. The background prediction is increased to three events if maximal disk models are assumed for both the Milky Way and LMC, but this model fails to account for the full signal seen by MACHO at the 99.8% confidence level.

  14. Intercomparison of Desert Dust Optical Depth from Satellite Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carboni, E.; Thomas, G. E.; Sayer, A. M.; Siddans, R.; Poulsen, C. A.; Grainger, R. G.; Ahn, C.; Antoine, D.; Bevan, S.; Braak, R.; Brindley, H.; DeSouza-Machado, S.; Deuze, J. L.; Diner, D.; Ducos, F.; Grey, W.; Hsu, C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Kahn, R.; North, P. R. J.; Salustro, C.; Smith, A.; Tanre, D.; Torres, O.; Veihelmann, B,

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a comparison of satellite retrievals of Saharan desert dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) during a strong dust event through March 2006. In this event, a large dust plume was transported over desert, vegetated, and ocean surfaces. The aim is to identify the differences between current datasets. The satellite instruments considered are AATSR, AIRS, MERIS, MISR, MODIS, OMI, POLDER, and SEVIRI. An interesting aspect is that the different algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. These include multi-angle approaches (MISR, AATSR), polarisation measurements (POLDER), single-view approaches using solar wavelengths (OMI, MODIS), and the thermal infrared spectral region (SEVIRI, AIRS). Differences between instruments, together with the comparison of different retrieval algorithms applied to measurements from the same instrument, provide a unique insight into the performance and characteristics of the various techniques employed. As well as the intercomparison between different satellite products, the AODs have also been compared to co-located AERONET data. Despite the fact that the agreement between satellite and AERONET AODs is reasonably good for all of the datasets, there are significant differences between them when compared to each other, especially over land. These differences are partially due to differences in the algorithms, such as assumptions about aerosol model and surface properties. However, in this comparison of spatially and temporally averaged data, it is important to note that differences in sampling, related to the actual footprint of each instrument on the heterogeneous aerosol field, cloud identification and the quality control flags of each dataset can be an important issue.

  15. Programmable diffractive optical elements for extending the depth of focus in ophthalmic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María. S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    The depth of focus (DOF) defines the axial range of high lateral resolution in the image space for object position. Optical devices with a traditional lens system typically have a limited DOF. However, there are applications such as in ophthalmology, which require a large DOF in comparison to a traditional optical system, this is commonly known as extended DOF (EDOF). In this paper we explore Programmable Diffractive Optical Elements (PDOEs), with EDOF, as an alternative solution to visual impairments, especially presbyopia. These DOEs were written onto a reflective liquid cystal on silicon (LCoS) spatial light modulator (SLM). Several designs of the elements are analyzed: the Forward Logarithmic Axicon (FLAX), the Axilens (AXL), the Light sword Optical Element (LSOE), the Peacock Eye Optical Element (PE) and Double Peacock Eye Optical Element (DPE). These elements focus an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis. The performances of the PDOEs are compared with those of multifocal lenses. In all cases, we obtained the point spread function and the image of an extended object. The results are presented and discussed.

  16. Optical absorption of thin film on a Lambertian reflector substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, P.

    1984-05-01

    A formula is derived for calculating the optical absorption of thin films deposited on a Lambertian reflector substrate. It is shown that compared with the case of flat reflecting substrate, the incoherent absorption is enhanced by a factor of m x epsilon (1) in the weak absorption limit, where epsilon (1) is the real part of the film dielectric constant and m near two is a slightly varying function of epsilon (1). For a 0.5-micron a-SiH(x) (bandgap 1.7 eV) solar cell with a Lambertian reflector substrate, the total absorption in terms of the short-circuit current is calculated to be 18.63 mA/sq cm.

  17. Marcasite revisited: Optical absorption gap at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, C.; Flores, E.; Barawi, M.; Clamagirand, J. M.; Ares, J. R.; Ferrer, I. J.

    2016-03-01

    Jagadeesh and Seehra published in 1980 that the marcasite band gap energy is 0.34 eV. However, recent calculations and experimental approximations accomplished by several research groups point out that the marcasite band gap energy should be quite similar to that of pyrite (of the order of 0.8-1.0 eV). By using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) we have determined that marcasite has no optical absorption gap at photon energies 0.06 ≤ hν ≤ 0.75 eV and that it has two well defined optical transitions at ~ 0.9 eV and ~ 2.2 eV quite similar to those of pyrite. Marcasite optical absorption gap appears to be Eg ≅ 0.83 ± 0.02 eV and it is due to an allowed indirect transition.

  18. Design of Optical Systems with Extended Depth of Field: An Educational Approach to Wavefront Coding Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferran, C.; Bosch, S.; Carnicer, A.

    2012-01-01

    A practical activity designed to introduce wavefront coding techniques as a method to extend the depth of field in optical systems is presented. The activity is suitable for advanced undergraduate students since it combines different topics in optical engineering such as optical system design, aberration theory, Fourier optics, and digital image…

  19. Study on optical weak absorption of borate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaomao; Hu, Zhanggui; Yue, Yinchao; Yu, Xuesong; Lin, Zheshuai; Zhang, Guochun

    2013-10-01

    Borate crystal is an important type of nonlinear optical crystals used in frequency conversion in all-solid-state lasers. Especially, LiB3O5 (LBO), CsB3O5 (CBO) and CsLiB6O10 (CLBO) are the most advanced. Although these borate crystals are all constructed by the same anionic group-(B3O7)5-, they show different nonlinear optical properties. In this study, bulk weak absorption values of three borate crystals have been studied at 1064 nm by a photothermal common-path interferometer. The bulk weak absorption values of them along [1 0 0], [0 1 0] and [0 0 1] directions were obtained, respectively, to be approximately 17.5 ppm cm-1, 15 ppm cm-1 and 20 ppm cm-1 (LBO); 80 ppm cm-1, 100 ppm cm-1 and 40 ppm cm-1 (CBO); 600 ppm cm-1, 600 ppm cm-1 and 150 ppm cm-1 (CLBO) at 1064 nm. The results showed an obvious discrepancy of the values of these crystals along three axis directions. A correlation between the bulk weak absorption property and crystal intrinsic structure was then discussed. It is found that the bulk weak absorption values strongly depend on the interstitial area surrounded by the B-O frames. The interstitial area is larger, the bulk weak absorption value is higher.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient using photothermal radiometry. II Multilayered solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, Agustín; Fuente, Raquel; Apiñaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza; Celorrio, R.

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the ability of modulated photothermal radiometry to retrieve the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of layered materials simultaneously. First, we extend the thermal quadrupole method to calculate the surface temperature of semitransparent multilayered materials. Then, this matrix method is used to evaluate the influence of heat losses by convection and radiation, the influence of the use of thin paint layers on the accuracy of thermal diffusivity measurements, and the effect of lateral heat diffusion due to the use of Gaussian laser beams. Finally, we apply the quadrupole method to retrieve (a) the thermal contact resistance in glass stacks and (b) the thermal diffusivity and optical absorption coefficient depth profiles in heterogeneous materials with continuously varying physical properties, as is the case of functionally graded materials and partially cured dental resins.

  1. Aerosol Optical Depth Trends in Switzerland from 1995 - 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyeki, S.; Halios, C.; Eleftheriadis, K.; Wehrli, C.; Groebner, J.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate and long-term measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) serve as an important contribution to studies assessing the effect of aerosols on climate change. In this study re-calibrated and updated AOD climatologies are reported for two sites in Switzerland for 1995 - 2010, (Davos, 1580 m and Jungfraujoch, 3580 m), as well as a new data-set for an urban site Bern (560 m asl). At Davos and Jungfraujoch AOD observations were conducted using an SPM2000 sun-photometer system until 2003 and with precision filter radiometers (PFR) from 1999 onwards, while continuous AOD measurements were conducted at Bern over the 1998 - 2006 period with SPM2000. In order to homogenize these diverse data-sets, procedures and algorithms of the GAW-PFR (Global Atmosphere Watch - Precision Filter Radiometer, WMO) program to derive AOD are used here. GAW-PFR procedures and algorithms use: 1) in-situ air pressure data, ii) in-situ or satellite ozone data, 3) commonly-used algorithms for cloud-screening, airmass calculation etc. The AOD average for the available 1-month data-set was 0.026 (± 0.013; ± 1 stdev) at Jungfraujoch, 0.069 (± 0.037) at Davos and 0.174 (± 0.054) at Bern illustrating the typical increase in average AOD with decreasing altitude due to surface aerosol sources, and to boundary layer/free troposphere dynamics. A trend analysis was performed using the seasonal Kendall test, and Sen's slope estimator on logarithmized AOD data. The seasonal Kendall test is an extension of the Mann-Kendall test, a non-parametric technique which determines if a monotonic increasing or de-creasing long-term trend exists. As AOD data are log-normally distributed, the logarithm of AOD was used for analysis. Statistically significant linear trends was found only at Jungfraujoch while for Davos and Bern even though no statistically significant trends were observed, significant trends during certain months were detected (e.g. during May, July, and December for Bern). Factors which could

  2. VIIRS Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) Products for Air Quality Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huff, A. K.; Zhang, H.; Kondragunta, S.; Laszlo, I.

    2014-12-01

    The air quality community uses satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) for a variety of applications, including daily air quality forecasting, retrospective event analysis, and justification for Exceptional Events. AOD is suitable for ambient air quality applications because is related to particulate matter (e.g., PM2.5) concentrations in the atmosphere; higher values of AOD correspond to higher concentrations of particulate matter. AOD is useful for identifying and tracking areas of high PM2.5 concentrations that correspond to air quality events, such as wildfires, dust storms, or haze episodes. Currently, the air quality community utilizes AOD from the MODIS instrument on NASA's polar-orbiting Terra and Aqua satellites and from NOAA's GOES geostationary satellites (e.g, GASP). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument on the Suomi-NPP satellite is making AOD measurements that are similar to MODIS AOD, but with higher spatial resolution. Two AOD products are available from VIIRS: the 750 m nadir resolution Intermediate Product (IP) and the 6 km resolution Environmental Data Record (EDR) product, which is aggregated from IP measurements. These VIIRS AOD products offer a substantial increase in spatial resolution compared to the MODIS AOD 3 km and 10 km AOD products, respectively. True color (RGB) imagery is also available from VIIRS as a decision aid for air quality applications. It serves as a complement to AOD measurements by providing visible information about areas of smoke, haze, and blowing dust in the atmosphere. Case studies of VIIRS AOD and RGB data for recent air quality events will be presented, with a focus on wildfires, and the relative pros and cons of the VIIRS AOD IP and EDR for air quality applications will be discussed in comparison to MODIS AOD products. Improvements to VIIRS aerosol products based on user feedback as part of the NOAA Satellite Air Quality Proving Ground (AQPG) will be outlined, and an overview of future

  3. Two-Photon-Absorption Scheme for Optical Beam Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Farr, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A new optical beam tracking approach for free-space optical communication links using two-photon absorption (TPA) in a high-bandgap detector material was demonstrated. This tracking scheme is part of the canonical architecture described in the preceding article. TPA is used to track a long-wavelength transmit laser while direct absorption on the same sensor simultaneously tracks a shorter-wavelength beacon. The TPA responsivity was measured for silicon using a PIN photodiode at a laser beacon wavelength of 1,550 nm. As expected, the responsivity shows a linear dependence with incident power level. The responsivity slope is 4.5 x 10(exp -7) A/W2. Also, optical beam spots from the 1,550-nm laser beacon were characterized on commercial charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imagers with as little as 13.7 microWatts of optical power (see figure). This new tracker technology offers an innovative solution to reduce system complexity, improve transmit/receive isolation, improve optical efficiency, improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reduce cost for free-space optical communications transceivers.

  4. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications. PMID:23435006

  5. Absorption characteristics of optically complex inland waters: Implications for water optical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Kun; Li, Yunmei; Li, Lin; Lu, Heng

    2013-06-01

    Multiple bio-optical measurements were conducted in inland waters of China, including Lake Taihu [spring and autumn], Lake Chaohu, Lake Dianchi, and Three Gorges Reservoirs. The variations in the absorption characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), phytoplankton, and non-algal particles (NAP) and their relative contributions to total absorption among these waters were analyzed. The obtained results indicated that these areas are representative of the optically complex inland waters characterized by strong regional variations of their absorption properties. By means of the relative contributions of NAP and phytoplankton to the total water absorption at 550 and 675 nm, these waters were classified into three optical water types, each one having specific biogeochemical and optical properties. Two of the types were distinct and corresponded to waters that are optically controlled by NAP (Type I) and dominated by phytoplankton (Type III). Type II was related to relatively optically mixed waters where the absorption properties are controlled by NAP and phytoplankton. Additionally, the differences in remote-sensing reflectance (Rrs) spectra among the three classified water types were clarified to establish optical criteria for identifying these water types. On this basis, the classification criteria for MERIS images were developed, which allowed one to cluster every Rrs spectrum into one of the three water types by comparing the values from band 6, band 8, and band 9 of MERIS images. The proposed criteria were subsequently conducted to map the water types of Lake Taihu using MERIS images.

  6. Hi Gas Cycles and Lyman Continuum Optical Depth in Low-Redshift Starbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, Anne Elizabeth

    Neutral gas both fuels star formation and determines the propagation of ionizing photons. In this work, we reveal the interactions between H I, star formation, and radiative feedback in two samples of low-redshift starbursts. Using the ALFALFA-Halpha sample, we present the first comparison of starbursts and non-starbursts within a statistically uniform, H I-selected sample. The moderate H I gas fractions of the starbursts relative to non-starbursts indicate efficient HI to H2 conversion and show that the H I supply is largely unaffected by ionizing radiation. Mergers may trigger the more massive starbursts, while the absence of obvious kinematical disturbances in dwarf starbursts may indicate periodic starburst activity, triggered by cycles of gas expulsion and re-accretion. While the ALFALFA-Halpha galaxies demonstrate that starbursts may maintain large H I reservoirs, the more powerful starbursts in the Green Pea (GP) galaxies illustrate the effects of extreme radiative feedback on neutral gas. To investigate whether the enormous [O III]/[O II] ratios in the most extreme GPs indicate LyC escape, we use photoionization modeling to constrain their ionizing sources and optical depths. Radiation from Wolf-Rayet stars or unusually hot O stars reproduces the observed [O III]/[O II] ratios, but no clear signatures of these stars are present. The GP spectra do suggest the presence of shocks, however, and accounting for shock emission necessitates a low optical depth. We therefore suggest that the GPs may be a new class of low-redshift LyC Emitters (LCEs), and we evaluate this scenario using Hubble Space Telescope COS spectra of four GPs. With these spectra, we develop a simple physical picture of the neutral gas optical depth and geometry that explains the previously enigmatic link between Lyalpha, Si II, and Si II* lines observed in high-redshift Lyalpha Emitters. Two GPs are likely optically thin along the line of sight, and their strong, narrow Lyalpha emission, weak

  7. Anomalous nonlinear absorption in epsilon-near-zero materials: optical limiting and all-optical control.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, M A; de Ceglia, D; Scalora, Michael

    2016-08-01

    We investigate nonlinear absorption in films of epsilon-near-zero materials. The combination of large local electric fields at the fundamental frequency and material losses at the harmonic frequencies induce unusual intensity-dependent phenomena. We predict that the second-order nonlinearity of a low-damping, epsilon-near-zero slab produces an optical limiting effect that mimics a two-photon absorption process. Anomalous absorption profiles that depend on low permittivity values at the pump frequency are also predicted for third-order nonlinearities. These findings suggest new opportunities for all-optical light control and novel ways to design reconfigurable and tunable nonlinear devices. PMID:27472631

  8. Contribution of a visual pigment absorption spectrum to a visual function: depth perception in a jumping spider

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Takashi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Terakita, Akihisa

    2013-01-01

    Absorption spectra of visual pigments are adaptively tuned to optimize informational capacity in most visual systems. Our recent investigation of the eyes of the jumping spider reveals an apparent exception: the absorption characteristics of a visual pigment cause defocusing of the image, reducing visual acuity generally in a part of the retina. However, the amount of defocus can theoretically provide a quantitative indication of the distance of an object. Therefore, we proposed a novel mechanism for depth perception in jumping spiders based on image defocus. Behavioral experiments revealed that the depth perception of the spider depended on the wavelength of the ambient light, which affects the amount of defocus because of chromatic aberration of the lens. This wavelength effect on depth perception was in close agreement with theoretical predictions based on our hypothesis. These data strongly support the hypothesis that the depth perception mechanism of jumping spiders is based on image defocus.

  9. Simultaneous multiple-depths en-face optical coherence tomography using multiple signal excitation of acousto-optic deflectors.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, Mantas; Rogers, John; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2013-01-28

    We present a novel low-coherence interferometer configuration, equipped with acousto-optic deflectors that can be used to simultaneously acquire up to eight time domain optical coherence tomography en-face images. The capabilities of the configuration are evaluated in terms of depth resolution, signal to noise ratio and crosstalk. Then the configuration is employed to demonstrate simultaneous en-face optical coherence tomography imaging at five different depths in a specimen of armadillidium vulgare. PMID:23389175

  10. Birefringence and anisotropic optical absorption in porous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Efimova, A. I. Krutkova, E. Yu.; Golovan', L. A.; Fomenko, M. A.; Kashkarov, P. K.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.

    2007-10-15

    The refractive indices and the coefficients of optical absorption by free charge carriers and local vibrations in porous silicon (por-Si) films, comprising nanometer-sized silicon residues (nanocrystals) separated by nanometer-sized pores (nanopores) formed in the course of electrochemical etching of the initial single crystal silicon, have been studied by polarization-resolved IR absorption spectroscopy techniques. It is shown that the birefringence observed in por-Si is related to the anisotropic shapes of nanocrystals and nanopores, while the anisotropy (dichroism) of absorption by the local vibrational modes is determined predominantly by the microrelief of the surface of nanocrystals. It is demonstrated that silicon-hydrogen surface bonds in nanocrystals can be restored by means of selective hydrogen thermodesorption with the formation of a considerable number of H-terminated surface Si-Si dimers.

  11. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  12. Optical absorption of ion-beam sputtered amorphous silicon coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Bassiri, Riccardo; Bell, Angus; Fejer, Martin M.; Hough, Jim; Markosyan, Ashot; Route, Roger K.; Rowan, Sheila; Tornasi, Zeno

    2016-03-01

    Low mechanical loss at low temperatures and a high index of refraction should make silicon optimally suited for thermal noise reduction in highly reflective mirror coatings for gravitational wave detectors. However, due to high optical absorption, amorphous silicon (aSi) is unsuitable for being used as a direct high-index coating material to replace tantala. A possible solution is a multimaterial design, which enables exploitation of the excellent mechanical properties of aSi in the lower coating layers. The possible number of aSi layers increases with absorption reduction. In this work, the optimum heat treatment temperature of aSi deposited via ion-beam sputtering was investigated and found to be 450 °C . For this temperature, the absorption after deposition of a single layer of aSi at 1064 nm and 1550 nm was reduced by more than 80%.

  13. Probing molecular chirality by coherent optical absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, W. Z.; Wei, L. F.

    2011-11-15

    We propose an approach to sensitively probe the chirality of molecules by measuring their coherent optical-absorption spectra. It is shown that quantum dynamics of the cyclic three-level chiral molecules driven by appropriately designed external fields is total-phase dependent. This will result in chirality-dependent absorption spectra for the probe field. As a consequence, the charality-dependent information in the spectra (such as the locations and relative heights of the characteristic absorption peaks) can be utilized to identify molecular chirality and determinate enantiomer excess (i.e., the percentages of different enantiomers). The feasibility of the proposal with chiral molecules confined in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is also discussed.

  14. Remark on: the neutron spherical optical-model absorption.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. B.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    The energy-dependent behavior of the absorption term of the spherical neutron optical potential for doubly magic {sup 208}Pb and the neighboring {sup 209}Bi is examined. These considerations suggest a phenomenological model that results in an intuitively attractive energy dependence of the imaginary potential that provides a good description of the observed neutron cross sections and that is qualitatively consistent with theoretical concepts. At the same time it provides an alternative to some of the arbitrary assumptions involved in many conventional optical-model interpretations reported in the literature and reduces the number of the parameters of the model.

  15. Ultraviolet optical absorptions of semiconducting copper phosphate glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Byeong-Soo; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a quantitative investigation of the change in UV optical absorption in semiconducting copper phosphate glasses with batch compositions of 40, 50, and 55 percent CuO, as a function of the Cu(2+)/Cu(total) ratio in the glasses for each glass composition. It was found that optical energy gap, E(opt), of copper phosphate glass is a function of both glass composition and Cu(2+)/Cu(total) ratio in the glass. E(opt) increases as the CuO content for fixed Cu(2+)/Cu(total) ratio and the Cu(2+)/Cu(total) ratio for fixed glass composition are reduced.

  16. Study on the elemental mercury absorption cross section based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haiming; Yao, Penghui

    2015-08-01

    With the method of ultraviolet absorption spectrum, the exact absorption cross-section with the light source of the low-pressure mercury lamp was determined, during which the optimum wavelength for mercury concentrations inversion was 253.69 nm, the highest detection limit was 0.177 μg/cm3, and the lowest detection limit was 0.034 μg/cm3. Furthermore, based on the differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS), the relationship between the integral parameters (IP) and the concentration as well as the signal-noise ration (SNR) under the conditions of gas flow was determined and the lowest detection limit was figured out to be 0.03524 μg/cm3, providing a method of DOAS to de-noise through the comparison between the mercury concentration values produced by DOAS and that produced by the wavelet de-noising method (db5). It turned out that the differential optical absorption spectroscopy had a strong anti-interference ability, while the wavelet de-noising method was not suitable for measuring the trace concentration change.

  17. Optical absorption spectrum of Cu 2+ in calcium tartrate tetrahydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, Y. K. R.; Reddy, P. P.; Reddy, Y. P.

    1980-02-01

    Copper doped single crystals of calcium tartrate tetrahydrate are grown from silica gel. The optical absorption spectrum is investigated with polarised and unpolarised beams of incident light. The spectrum is attributed to the Cu 2+ ion in C 4V symmetry associated with spin-orbit coupling. The following crystal field parameters are evaluated: Dq = 1000 cm -1; λ = -830 cm -1; Ds = 1540 cm -1; Dt = 470 cm -1.

  18. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals.

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectral studies on chalcocite.

    PubMed

    Reddy, S Lakshmi; Fayazuddin, Md; Frost, Ray L; Endo, Tamio

    2007-11-01

    A chalcocite mineral sample of Shaha, Congo is used in the present study. An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) study on powdered sample confirms the presence of Mn(II), Fe(III) and Cu(II). Optical absorption spectrum indicates that Fe(III) impurity is present in octahedral structure whereas Cu(II) is present in rhombically distorted octahedral environment. Mid-infrared results are due to water and sulphate fundamentals. PMID:17324611

  20. Estimation of aerosol optical properties considering hygroscopicity and light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influences of water solubility and light absorption on the optical properties of organic aerosols were investigated. A size-resolved model for calculating optical properties was developed by combining thermodynamic hygroscopic growth and aerosol dynamics models. The internal mixtures based on the homogeneous and core-shell mixing were compared. The results showed that the radiative forcing (RF) of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) aerosol can be estimated to range from -0.07 to -0.49 W/m2 for core-shell mixing and from -0.09 to -0.47 W/m2 for homogeneous mixing under the simulation conditions (RH = 60%). The light absorption properties of WSOC showed the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of WSOC can be estimated 0.43-0.5 m2/g, which accounts for 5-10% of the MAE of elemental carbon (EC). The effect on MAE of increasing the imaginary refractive index of WSOC was also calculated, and it was found that increasing the imaginary refractive index by 0.001i enhanced WSOC aerosol absorption by approximately 0.02 m2/g. Finally, the sensitivity test results revealed that changes in the fine mode fraction (FMF) and in the geometric mean diameter of the accumulation mode play important roles in estimating RF during hygroscopic growth.

  1. Underwater optical wireless communications: depth dependent variations in attenuation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Laura J; Green, Roger J; Leeson, Mark S

    2013-11-20

    Depth variations in the attenuation coefficient for light in the ocean were calculated using a one-parameter model based on the chlorophyll-a concentration C(c) and experimentally-determined Gaussian chlorophyll-depth profiles. The depth profiles were related to surface chlorophyll levels for the range 0-4  mg/m², representing clear, open ocean. The depth where C(c) became negligible was calculated to be shallower for places of high surface chlorophyll; 111.5 m for surface chlorophyll 0.8depth is the absolute minimum attenuation for underwater ocean communication links, calculated to be 0.0092  m⁻¹ at a wavelength of 430 nm. By combining this with satellite surface-chlorophyll data, it is possible to quantify the attenuation between any two locations in the ocean, with applications for low-noise or secure underwater communications and vertical links from the ocean surface. PMID:24513735

  2. Assessment of 10 Year Record of Aerosol Optical Depth from OMI UV Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, Changwoo; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren

    2014-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) onboard the EOS-Aura satellite provides information on aerosol optical properties by making use of the large sensitivity to aerosol absorption in the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectral region. Another important advantage of using near UV observations for aerosol characterization is the low surface albedo of all terrestrial surfaces in this spectral region that reduces retrieval errors associated with land surface reflectance characterization. In spite of the 13 × 24 square kilometers coarse sensor footprint, the OMI near UV aerosol algorithm (OMAERUV) retrieves aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single-scattering albedo under cloud-free conditions from radiance measurements at 354 and 388 nanometers. We present validation results of OMI AOD against space and time collocated Aerosol Robotic Network measured AOD values over multiple stations representing major aerosol episodes and regimes. OMAERUV's performance is also evaluated with respect to those of the Aqua-MODIS Deep Blue and Terra-MISR AOD algorithms over arid and semi-arid regions in Northern Africa. The outcome of the evaluation analysis indicates that in spite of the "row anomaly" problem, affecting the sensor since mid-2007, the long-term aerosol record shows remarkable sensor stability.

  3. Axial resolution improvement in spectral domain optical coherence tomography using a depth-adaptive maximum-a-posterior framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroomand, Ameneh; Tan, Bingyao; Wong, Alexander; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2015-03-01

    The axial resolution of Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) images degrades with scanning depth due to the limited number of pixels and the pixel size of the camera, any aberrations in the spectrometer optics and wavelength dependent scattering and absorption in the imaged object [1]. Here we propose a novel algorithm which compensates for the blurring effect of these factors of the depth-dependent axial Point Spread Function (PSF) in SDOCT images. The proposed method is based on a Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) reconstruction framework which takes advantage of a Stochastic Fully Connected Conditional Random Field (SFCRF) model. The aim is to compensate for the depth-dependent axial blur in SD-OCT images and simultaneously suppress the speckle noise which is inherent to all OCT images. Applying the proposed depth-dependent axial resolution enhancement technique to an OCT image of cucumber considerably improved the axial resolution of the image especially at higher imaging depths and allowed for better visualization of cellular membrane and nuclei. Comparing the result of our proposed method with the conventional Lucy-Richardson deconvolution algorithm clearly demonstrates the efficiency of our proposed technique in better visualization and preservation of fine details and structures in the imaged sample, as well as better speckle noise suppression. This illustrates the potential usefulness of our proposed technique as a suitable replacement for the hardware approaches which are often very costly and complicated.

  4. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth Under Thin Cirrus from MODIS: Application to an Ocean Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jaehwa; Hsu, Nai-Yung Christina; Sayer, Andrew Mark; Bettenhausen, Corey

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for retrieving aerosol optical depth (AOD) under conditions of thin cirrus coverage from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is presented. We adopt an empirical method that derives the cirrus contribution to measured reflectance in seven bands from the visible to shortwave infrared (0.47, 0.55, 0.65, 0.86, 1.24, 1.63, and 2.12 µm, commonly used for AOD retrievals) by using the correlations between the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) reflectance at 1.38 micron and these bands. The 1.38 micron band is used due to its strong absorption by water vapor and allows us to extract the contribution of cirrus clouds to TOA reflectance and create cirrus-corrected TOA reflectances in the seven bands of interest. These cirrus-corrected TOA reflectances are then used in the aerosol retrieval algorithm to determine cirrus-corrected AOD. The cirrus correction algorithm reduces the cirrus contamination in the AOD data as shown by a decrease in both magnitude and spatial variability of AOD over areas contaminated by thin cirrus. Comparisons of retrieved AOD against Aerosol Robotic Network observations at Nauru in the equatorial Pacific reveal that the cirrus correction procedure improves the data quality: the percentage of data within the expected error +/-(0.03 + 0.05 ×AOD) increases from 40% to 80% for cirrus-corrected points only and from 80% to 86% for all points (i.e., both corrected and uncorrected retrievals). Statistical comparisons with Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) retrievals are also carried out. A high correlation (R = 0.89) between the CALIOP cirrus optical depth and AOD correction magnitude suggests potential applicability of the cirrus correction procedure to other MODIS-like sensors.

  5. The matter power spectrum from the Lyα forest: an optical depth estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaroubi, S.; Viel, M.; Nusser, A.; Haehnelt, M.; Kim, T.-S.

    2006-06-01

    We measure the matter power spectrum from 31 Lyα spectra spanning the redshift range of 1.6-3.6. The optical depth, τ, for Lyα absorption of the intergalactic medium is obtained from the flux using the inversion method of Nusser & Haehnelt. The optical depth is converted to density by using a simple power-law relation, τ ~ (1 + δ)α. The non-linear 1D power spectrum of the gas density is then inferred with a method that makes simultaneous use of the one- and two-point statistics of the flux and compared against theoretical models with a likelihood analysis. A cold dark matter model with standard cosmological parameters fits the data well. The power-spectrum amplitude is measured to be (assuming a flat Universe), σ8 = (0.92 +/- 0.09) × (Ωm/0.3)-0.3, with α varying in the range of 1.56-1.8 with redshift. Enforcing the same cosmological parameters in all four redshift bins, the likelihood analysis suggests some evolution in the temperature-density relation and the thermal smoothing length of the gas. The inferred evolution is consistent with that expected if reionization of HeII occurred at z ~ 3.2. A joint analysis with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results together with a prior on the Hubble constant as suggested by the Hubble Space Telescope key project data, yields values of Ωm and σ8 that are consistent with the cosmological concordance model. We also perform a further inversion to obtain the linear 3D power spectrum of the matter density fluctuations.

  6. A Long-term Record of Saharan Dust Aerosol Properties from TOMS Observations: Optical Depth and Single Scattering Albedo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, P. K.; Herman, J. R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The interaction between the strong Rayleigh scattering in the near UV spectral region (330-380 nm) and the processes of aerosol absorption and scattering, produce a clear spectral signal in the upwelling radiance at the top of the atmosphere. This interaction is the basis of the TOMS (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) aerosol retrieval technique that can be used for their characterization and to differentiate non-absorbing sulfates from strongly UV-absorbing aerosols such as mineral dust. For absorbing aerosols, the characterization is in terms of the optical depth and single scattering albedo with assumptions about the aerosol plume height. The results for non-absorbing aerosols are not dependent on plume height. Although iron compounds represent only between 5% to 8% of desert dust aerosol mass, hematite (Fe2O3) accounts for most of the near UV absorption. Because of the large ultraviolet absorption characteristic of hematite, the near UV method of aerosol sensing is especially suited for the detection and characterization of desert dust aerosols. Using the combined record of near UV measurements by the Nimbus7 (1978-1992) and Earth Probe (1996-present) TOMS instruments, a global longterm climatology of near UV optical depth and single scattering albedo has been produced. The multi-year long record of mineral aerosol properties over the area of influence of the Saharan desert, will be discussed.

  7. Optical absorption of nanoporous silicon: quasiparticle band gaps and absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangsha; Kioupakis, Emmanouil

    2013-03-01

    Silicon is an earth-abundant material of great importance in semiconductors electronics, but its photovoltaic applications are limited by the low absorption coefficient in the visible due to its indirect band gap. One strategy to improve the absorbance is to perforate silicon with nanoscale pores, which introduce carrier scattering that enables optical transitions across the indirect gap. We used density functional and many-body perturbation theory in the GW approximation to investigate the electronic and optical properties of porous silicon for various pore sizes, spacings, and orientations. Our calculations include up to 400 atoms in the unit cell. We will discuss the connection of the band-gap value and absorption coefficient to the underlying nanopore geometry. The absorption coefficient in the visible range is found to be optimal for appropriately chosen nanopore size, spacing, and orientation. Our work allows us to predict porous-silicon structures that may have optimal performance in photovoltaic applications. This research was supported as part of CSTEC, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Computational resources were provided by the DOE NERSC facility.

  8. [Retrieval of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin-Hua; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Qin, Min; Li, Ang; Liu, Shi-Sheng; Wei, Qing-Nong

    2006-09-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, e. g. SO2, NO2, O3 etc. However, unlike the absorption spectra of SO2 and NO2, the analysis of aromatic compounds is difficult and strongly suffers from the cross interference of other absorbers (Herzberg bands of oxygen, ozone and sulfur dioxide), especially with relatively low concentrations of aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. In the present paper, the DOAS evaluation of aromatic compounds was performed by nonlinear least square fit with two interpolated oxygen optical density spectra at different path lengths and reference spectra of ozone at different temperature and SO2 cross section to correct the interference from absorbers of O2, O3 and SO2. The measurement of toluene, benzene, (m, p, o) xylene and phenol with a DOAS system showed that DOAS method is suitable for monocyclic aromatic compounds monitoring in the atmosphere. PMID:17112022

  9. Combining energy and Laplacian regularization to accurately retrieve the depth of brain activity of diffuse optical tomographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarelli, Antonio M.; Maclin, Edward L.; Low, Kathy A.; Mathewson, Kyle E.; Fabiani, Monica; Gratton, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides data about brain function using surface recordings. Despite recent advancements, an unbiased method for estimating the depth of absorption changes and for providing an accurate three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction remains elusive. DOT involves solving an ill-posed inverse problem, requiring additional criteria for finding unique solutions. The most commonly used criterion is energy minimization (energy constraint). However, as measurements are taken from only one side of the medium (the scalp) and sensitivity is greater at shallow depths, the energy constraint leads to solutions that tend to be small and superficial. To correct for this bias, we combine the energy constraint with another criterion, minimization of spatial derivatives (Laplacian constraint, also used in low resolution electromagnetic tomography, LORETA). Used in isolation, the Laplacian constraint leads to solutions that tend to be large and deep. Using simulated, phantom, and actual brain activation data, we show that combining these two criteria results in accurate (error <2 mm) absorption depth estimates, while maintaining a two-point spatial resolution of <24 mm up to a depth of 30 mm. This indicates that accurate 3-D reconstruction of brain activity up to 30 mm from the scalp can be obtained with DOT.

  10. Optical Absorption Spectra of Hydrous Wadsleyite to 32 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Jacobsen, S. D.; Bina, C. R.; Frost, D. J.

    2009-05-01

    Optical absorption spectra of high-pressure minerals can be used as indirect tools to calculate radiative conductivity of the Earth's interior [e.g., 1]. Recent high-pressure studies show that e.g. ringwoodite, γ-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4, does not become opaque in the near infrared and visible region, as previously assumed, but remains transparent to 21.5 GPa [2]. Therefore, it has been concluded that radiative heat transfer does not necessarily become blocked at high pressures of the mantle and ferromagnesian minerals actually could contribute to the heat flow in the Earth's interior [2]. In this study we use gem-quality single-crystals of hydrous Fe-bearing wadsleyite, β-(Mg,Fe)2SiO4, that were synthesized at 18 GPa and 1400 °C in a multianvil apparatus. Crystals were analyzed by Mössbauer and Raman spectroscopy, electron microprobe analysis and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. For absorption measurements a double-polished 50 μm sized single-crystal of wadsleyite was loaded in a diamond-anvil cell with neon as pressure medium. Optical absorption spectra were recorded at ambient conditions as well as up to 32 GPa from 400 to 50000 cm-1. At ambient pressure the absorption spectrum reveals two broad bands at - 10000 cm-1 and -15000 cm-1, and an absorption edge in the visible-ultraviolet range. With increasing pressure the absorption spectrum changes, both bands continuously shift to higher frequencies as has been observed for ringwoodite [2], but is contrary to earlier presumptions for wadsleyite [3]. Here, we will discuss band assignment along with the influence of iron, compare our results to previous absorption studies of mantle materials [2], and analyze possible implications for radiative conductivity of the transition zone. References: [1] Goncharov et al. (2008), McGraw Yearbook Sci. Tech., 242-245. [2] Keppler & Smyth (2005), Am. Mineral., 90 1209-1212. [3] Ross (1997), Phys. Chem. Earth, 22 113-118.

  11. Effect of Thin Cirrus Clouds on Dust Optical Depth Retrievals From MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Qian; Hsu, N. Christina; Yang, Ping; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    The effect of thin cirrus clouds in retrieving the dust optical depth from MODIS observations is investigated by using a simplified aerosol retrieval algorithm based on the principles of the Deep Blue aerosol property retrieval method. Specifically, the errors of the retrieved dust optical depth due to thin cirrus contamination are quantified through the comparison of two retrievals by assuming dust-only atmospheres and the counterparts with overlapping mineral dust and thin cirrus clouds. To account for the effect of the polarization state of radiation field on radiance simulation, a vector radiative transfer model is used to generate the lookup tables. In the forward radiative transfer simulations involved in generating the lookup tables, the Rayleigh scattering by atmospheric gaseous molecules and the reflection of the surface assumed to be Lambertian are fully taken into account. Additionally, the spheroid model is utilized to account for the nonsphericity of dust particles In computing their optical properties. For simplicity, the single-scattering albedo, scattering phase matrix, and optical depth are specified a priori for thin cirrus clouds assumed to consist of droxtal ice crystals. The present results indicate that the errors in the retrieved dust optical depths due to the contamination of thin cirrus clouds depend on the scattering angle, underlying surface reflectance, and dust optical depth. Under heavy dusty conditions, the absolute errors are comparable to the predescribed optical depths of thin cirrus clouds.

  12. Micro-optical system based 3D imaging for full HD depth image capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Hwa; Cho, Yong-Chul; You, Jang-Woo; Park, Chang-Young; Yoon, Heesun; Lee, Sang-Hun; Kwon, Jong-Oh; Lee, Seung-Wan

    2012-03-01

    20 Mega-Hertz-switching high speed image shutter device for 3D image capturing and its application to system prototype are presented. For 3D image capturing, the system utilizes Time-of-Flight (TOF) principle by means of 20MHz high-speed micro-optical image modulator, so called 'optical shutter'. The high speed image modulation is obtained using the electro-optic operation of the multi-layer stacked structure having diffractive mirrors and optical resonance cavity which maximizes the magnitude of optical modulation. The optical shutter device is specially designed and fabricated realizing low resistance-capacitance cell structures having small RC-time constant. The optical shutter is positioned in front of a standard high resolution CMOS image sensor and modulates the IR image reflected from the object to capture a depth image. Suggested novel optical shutter device enables capturing of a full HD depth image with depth accuracy of mm-scale, which is the largest depth image resolution among the-state-of-the-arts, which have been limited up to VGA. The 3D camera prototype realizes color/depth concurrent sensing optical architecture to capture 14Mp color and full HD depth images, simultaneously. The resulting high definition color/depth image and its capturing device have crucial impact on 3D business eco-system in IT industry especially as 3D image sensing means in the fields of 3D camera, gesture recognition, user interface, and 3D display. This paper presents MEMS-based optical shutter design, fabrication, characterization, 3D camera system prototype and image test results.

  13. Optical Hydrogen Absorption Consistent with a Bow Shock Leading the Hot Jupiter HD 189733b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauley, Paul Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam

    2015-08-01

    Bow shocks are ubiquitous astrophysical phenomena resulting from the supersonic passage of an object through a gas. Recently, pre-transit absorption in UV metal transitions of the hot Jupiter exoplanets HD 189733b and WASP12-b have been interpreted as being caused by material compressed in a planetary bow shock. Here we present a robust detection of a time-resolved pre-transit, as well as in-transit, absorption signature around the hot Jupiter exoplanet HD 189733b using high spectral resolution observations of several hydrogen Balmer lines. The line shape of the pre-transit feature and the shape of the time series absorption provide the strongest constraints on the morphology and physical characteristics of extended structures around an exoplanet. The in-transit measurements confirm the exospheric Hα detection of Jensen et al. (2012) although the absorption depth measured here is ~50% lower. The pre-transit absorption feature occurs 125 minutes before the predicted optical transit, a projected linear distance to the stellar disk of 7.2 Rp. The absorption strength observed in the Balmer lines indicates an optically thick, but physically small, geometry. We model this signal as the early ingress of a planetary bow shock. If the bow shock is mediated by a planetary magnetosphere, the large standoff distance derived from the model suggests a large planetary magnetic field strength. Better knowledge of exoplanet magnetic field strengths is crucial to understanding the role these fields play in star-planet interactions and protecting planets in the habitable zone from dangerous stellar flares.

  14. Retrieval of the optical depth using an all-sky CCD camera.

    PubMed

    Olmo, Francisco J; Cazorla, Alberto; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; López-Alvarez, Miguel A; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Romero, Javier

    2008-12-01

    A new method is presented for retrieval of the aerosol and cloud optical depth using a CCD camera equipped with a fish-eye lens (all-sky imager system). In a first step, the proposed method retrieves the spectral radiance from sky images acquired by the all-sky imager system using a linear pseudoinverse algorithm. Then, the aerosol or cloud optical depth at 500 nm is obtained as that which minimizes the residuals between the zenith spectral radiance retrieved from the sky images and that estimated by the radiative transfer code. The method is tested under extreme situations including the presence of nonspherical aerosol particles. The comparison of optical depths derived from the all-sky imager with those retrieved with a sunphotometer operated side by side shows differences similar to the nominal error claimed in the aerosol optical depth retrievals from sunphotometer networks. PMID:19037341

  15. A COMPARISON OF AEROSOL OPTICAL DEPTH SIMULATED USING CMAQ WITH SATELLITE ESTIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Satellite data provide new opportunities to study the regional distribution of particulate matter. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) - a derived estimate from the satellite measured irradiance, can be compared against model derived estimate to provide an evaluation of the columnar ...

  16. Temporal variations in atmospheric water vapor and aerosol optical depth determined by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, D. E.; Mcallum, W. E.; Heidt, M.; Jeske, K.; Lee, J. T.; Demonbrun, D.; Morgan, A.; Potter, J.

    1977-01-01

    By automatically tracking the sun, a four-channel solar radiometer was used to continuously measure optical depth and atmospheric water vapor. The design of this simple autotracking solar radiometer is presented. A technique for calculating the precipitable water from the ratio of a water band to a nearby nonabsorbing band is discussed. Studies of the temporal variability of precipitable water and atmospheric optical depth at 0.610, 0.8730 and 1.04 microns are presented. There was good correlation between the optical depth measured using the autotracker and visibility determined from National Weather Service Station data. However, much more temporal structure was evident in the autotracker data than in the visibility data. Cirrus clouds caused large changes in optical depth over short time periods. They appear to be the largest deleterious atmospheric effect over agricultural areas that are remote from urban pollution sources.

  17. Comparison of Cirrus height and optical depth derived from satellite and aircraft measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kastner, M.; Kriebel, K.T.; Meerkoetter, R.; Renger, W.; Ruppersberg, G.H.; Wendling, P. )

    1993-10-01

    During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA polar-orbiting meteorological satellite system have been used together with the algorithm package AVHRR processing scheme over clouds, land and ocean (APOLLO) to derive optical depth. NOAA High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) data have been used together with a bispectral technique to derive cloud-top height. Also, the optical depth of some contrails could be estimated. Airborne measurements have been performed simultaneously by using the Airborne Lidar Experiment (ALEX), a backscatter lidar. Comparison of satellite data with airborne data showed agreement of the top heights to about 500 m and of the optical depths to about 30%. These uncertainties are within the limits obtained from error estimates. 34 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Absorptance Measurements of Optical Coatings - A Round Robin

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Taylor, J R; Wu, Z L; Boccara, C A; Broulik, U; Commandre, M; DiJon, J; Fleig, C; Giesen, A; Fan, Z X; Kuo, P K; Lalezari, R; Moncur, K; Obramski, H-J; Reicher, D; Ristau, D; Roche, P; Steiger, B; Thomsen, M; von Gunten, M

    2000-10-26

    An international round robin study was conducted on the absorption measurement of laser-quality coatings. Sets of optically coated samples were made by a ''reactive DC magnetron'' sputtering and an ion beam sputtering deposition process. The sample set included a high reflector at 514 nm and a high reflector for the near infrared (1030 to 1318 nm), single layers of silicon dioxide, tantalum pentoxide, and hafnium dioxide. For calibration purposes, a sample metalized with hafnium and an uncoated, superpolished fused silica substrate were also included. The set was sent to laboratory groups for absorptance measurement of these coatings. Whenever possible, each group was to measure a common, central area and another area specifically assigned to the respective group. Specific test protocols were also suggested in regards to the laser exposure time, power density, and surface preparation.

  19. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  20. Tuning nonlinear optical absorption properties of WS2 nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hui; Tao, Lili; Tang, Chun Yin; Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Yuda; Zeng, Longhui; Yu, Siu Fung; Lau, Shu Ping; Chai, Yang; Tsang, Yuen Hong

    2015-10-01

    To control the optical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials is a long-standing goal, being of both fundamental and technological significance. Tuning nonlinear optical absorption (NOA) properties of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides in a cost effective way has emerged as an important research topic because of its possibility to custom design NOA properties, implying enormous applications including optical computers, communications, bioimaging, and so on. In this study, WS2 with different size and thickness distributions was fabricated. The results demonstrate that both NOA onset threshold, FON, and optical limiting threshold, FOL, of WS2 under the excitation of a nanosecond pulsed laser can be tuned over a wide range by controlling its size and thickness. The FON and FOL show a rapid decline with the decrease of size and thickness. Due to the edge and quantum confinement effect, WS2 quantum dots (2.35 nm) exhibit the lowest FON (0.01 J cm-2) and FOL (0.062 J cm-2) among all the samples, which are comparable to the lowest threshold achieved in graphene based materials, showing great potential as NOA materials with tunable properties.To control the optical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials is a long-standing goal, being of both fundamental and technological significance. Tuning nonlinear optical absorption (NOA) properties of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides in a cost effective way has emerged as an important research topic because of its possibility to custom design NOA properties, implying enormous applications including optical computers, communications, bioimaging, and so on. In this study, WS2 with different size and thickness distributions was fabricated. The results demonstrate that both NOA onset threshold, FON, and optical limiting threshold, FOL, of WS2 under the excitation of a nanosecond pulsed laser can be tuned over a wide range by controlling its size and thickness. The FON and FOL show a rapid decline with the decrease of size

  1. Photoacoustic determination of optical absorption to extinction ratio in aerosols.

    PubMed

    Roessler, D M; Faxvog, F R

    1980-02-15

    The photoacoustic technique has been used in conjunction with an optical transmission measurement to determine the fraction of light absorbed in cigarette and acetylene smoke aerosols. At 0.5145-microm wavelength,the absorption-to-extinction fraction is 0.01 +/- 0.003 for cigarette smoke and is in excellent agreement with predictions from Mie theory for smoke particles having a refractive index of 1.45-0.00133i and a median diameter in the 0.15-0.65-microm range. For acetylene smoke the absorbed fraction was 0.85 +/- 0.05. PMID:20216896

  2. Optical absorption and scattering spectra of pathological stomach tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraev, K. M.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Lakhina, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Diffuse reflection spectra of biotissues in vivo and transmission and reflection coefficients for biotissues in vitro are measured over 300-800 nm. These data are used to determine the spectral absorption and scattering indices and the scattering anisotropy factor for stomach mucous membranes under normal and various pathological conditions (chronic atrophic and ulcerous defects, malignant neoplasms). The most importan tphysiological (hemodynamic and oxygenation levels) and structural-morphological (scatterer size and density) parameters are also determined. The results of a morphofunctional study correlate well with the optical properties and are consistent with data from a histomorphological analysis of the corresponding tissues.

  3. Using a piezoelectric fiber stretcher to remove the depth ambiguity in optical Fourier domain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergnole, Sébastien; Lamouche, Guy; Dufour, Marc; Gauthier, Bruno

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports the study of an Optical Fourier Domain Imaging (OFDI) setup for optical coherence tomography. One of the main drawbacks of OFDI is its inability to differentiate positive and negative depths. Some setups have already been proposed to remove this depth ambiguity by introducing a modulation by means of electro-optic or acousto-optic modulators. In our setup, we implement a piezoelectric fiber stretcher to generate a periodic phase shift between successive A-scans, thus introducing a transverse modulation. The depth ambiguity is then resolved by performing a Fourier treatment in the transverse direction before processing the data in the axial direction. It is similar to the B-M mode scanning already proposed for Spectral-Domain OCT1 but with a more efficient experimental setup. We discuss the advantages and the drawbacks of our technique compared to the technique based on acousto-optics modulators by comparing images of an onion obtained with both techniques.

  4. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2009-11-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Therefore they are strictly valid for weak absorptions and narrow wavelength intervals (strictly only for monochromatic radiation). For medium and strong absorption (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is not linear anymore. As well, for large wavelength intervals the wavelength dependent differences in the travelled light-paths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, by taking into account these dependencies, the applicability of the DOAS method can be extended also to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals. Common approaches for this correction are the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a-priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function calculation by radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis. Thus the variability of the SCD in the fit window is determined by the retrieval itself. This new approach gives a description of the SCD that is as close to reality as desired (depending on the order of the Taylor expansion), and is independent from any assumptions or a-priori knowledge of the considered absorbers. In case studies for

  5. Fine Structure and Optical Depth in the Solar Transition Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plovanic, Jacob; Kankelborg, C. C.; Williamson, K.

    2011-05-01

    Unresolved fine structure in the solar transition region (TR) has long been inferred from measurements of density-sensitive line pairs showing low filling factor (< 0.01). Low filling factor models for the structure of the He II source region, however, have not been well studied. We propose a highly structured model of the lower atmosphere in which He II is formed at low filling factors, leading to high emission measure and an optically thin He II line. This transparent TR material is juxtaposed with absorbing chromospheric structures, leading to the nearly uniform center to limb behavior of the He II line as observed.

  6. All-optical reservoir computer based on saturation of absorption.

    PubMed

    Dejonckheere, Antoine; Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Fang, Li; Oudar, Jean-Louis; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2014-05-01

    Reservoir computing is a new bio-inspired computation paradigm. It exploits a dynamical system driven by a time-dependent input to carry out computation. For efficient information processing, only a few parameters of the reservoir needs to be tuned, which makes it a promising framework for hardware implementation. Recently, electronic, opto-electronic and all-optical experimental reservoir computers were reported. In those implementations, the nonlinear response of the reservoir is provided by active devices such as optoelectronic modulators or optical amplifiers. By contrast, we propose here the first reservoir computer based on a fully passive nonlinearity, namely the saturable absorption of a semiconductor mirror. Our experimental setup constitutes an important step towards the development of ultrafast low-consumption analog computers. PMID:24921786

  7. Graphical aerosol classification method using aerosol relative optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Xiang; Yuan, Yuan; Shuai, Yong; Tan, He-Ping

    2016-06-01

    A simple graphical method is presented to classify aerosol types based on a combination of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and aerosol relative optical thickness (AROT). Six aerosol types, including maritime (MA), desert dust (DD), continental (CO), sub-continental (SC), urban industry (UI) and biomass burning (BB), are discriminated in a two dimensional space of AOT440 and AROT1020/440. Numerical calculations are performed using MIE theory based on a multi log-normal particle size distribution, and the AROT ranges for each aerosol type are determined. More than 5 years of daily observations from 8 representative aerosol sites are applied to the method to confirm spatial applicability. Finally, 3 individual cases are analyzed according to their specific aerosol status. The outcomes indicate that the new graphical method coordinates well with regional characteristics and is also able to distinguish aerosol variations in individual situations. This technique demonstrates a novel way to estimate different aerosol types and provide information on radiative forcing calculations and satellite data corrections.

  8. Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter Radiometry: Phase Functions and the Optical Depth of Nocturnal Water Ice Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, G. A.; Barker, M. K.; Sun, X.

    2014-12-01

    Over the course of more than 3 Mars years the MOLA instrument on board Mars Global Surveyor (from 1999 to the loss of MGS in Nov. 2006) obtained passive reflectance measurements of Mars at 1064 nm wavelength from the solar background. As an altimeter, the quantity of light removed from a laser beam by scattering or absorption during the roundtrip to the surface may be calculated knowing the energy returned, the surface geometric albedo and the instrument parameters for each laser shot. These opacity measurements indicate the combined effects of dust and condensates, particularly those seen during during the night. The measure of opacity, to optical depths exceeding unity, correlates well with daytime measurements by the Hubble Space Telescope and with the broadband Thermal Emission Spectrometer. Applying a simple phase function to passive radiometric observations obtained at emission angles varying from 0 to 80 degrees, upper and lower limits are obtained for atmospheric opacity as a function of season and time of day. The implications for the effects of nocturnal water ice clouds on radiative transfer, and for future applications to the detection of icy plumes from moons of the outer solar system will be discussed.

  9. Improving Calculation Accuracies of Accumulation-Mode Fractions Based on Spectral of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Zhengqiang, Li; Yan, Wang

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are released into the atmosphere, which cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation, thus exerting a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. Anthropogenic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) calculations are important in the research of climate changes. Accumulation-Mode Fractions (AMFs) as an anthropogenic aerosol parameter, which are the fractions of AODs between the particulates with diameters smaller than 1μm and total particulates, could be calculated by AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm, and then the anthropogenic AODs are obtained using AMFs. In this study, we present a parameterization method coupled with an AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm to calculate AMFs in Beijing over 2011. All of data are derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) website. The parameterization method is used to improve the accuracies of AMFs compared with constant truncation radius method. We find a good correlation using parameterization method with the square relation coefficient of 0.96, and mean deviation of AMFs is 0.028. The parameterization method could also effectively solve AMF underestimate in winter. It is suggested that the variations of Angstrom indexes in coarse mode have significant impacts on AMF inversions.

  10. Importance of representing optical depth variability for estimates of global line-shaped contrail radiative forcing

    PubMed Central

    Kärcher, Bernd; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Ponater, Michael; Frömming, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Estimates of the global radiative forcing by line-shaped contrails differ mainly due to the large uncertainty in contrail optical depth. Most contrails are optically thin so that their radiative forcing is roughly proportional to their optical depth and increases with contrail coverage. In recent assessments, the best estimate of mean contrail radiative forcing was significantly reduced, because global climate model simulations pointed at lower optical depth values than earlier studies. We revise these estimates by comparing the probability distribution of contrail optical depth diagnosed with a climate model with the distribution derived from a microphysical, cloud-scale model constrained by satellite observations over the United States. By assuming that the optical depth distribution from the cloud model is more realistic than that from the climate model, and by taking the difference between the observed and simulated optical depth over the United States as globally representative, we quantify uncertainties in the climate model’s diagnostic contrail parameterization. Revising the climate model results accordingly increases the global mean radiative forcing estimate for line-shaped contrails by a factor of 3.3, from 3.5 mW/m2 to 11.6 mW/m2 for the year 1992. Furthermore, the satellite observations and the cloud model point at higher global mean optical depth of detectable contrails than often assumed in radiative transfer (off-line) studies. Therefore, we correct estimates of contrail radiative forcing from off-line studies as well. We suggest that the global net radiative forcing of line-shaped persistent contrails is in the range 8–20 mW/m2 for the air traffic in the year 2000. PMID:20974909

  11. Importance of representing optical depth variability for estimates of global line-shaped contrail radiative forcing.

    PubMed

    Kärcher, Bernd; Burkhardt, Ulrike; Ponater, Michael; Frömming, Christine

    2010-11-01

    Estimates of the global radiative forcing by line-shaped contrails differ mainly due to the large uncertainty in contrail optical depth. Most contrails are optically thin so that their radiative forcing is roughly proportional to their optical depth and increases with contrail coverage. In recent assessments, the best estimate of mean contrail radiative forcing was significantly reduced, because global climate model simulations pointed at lower optical depth values than earlier studies. We revise these estimates by comparing the probability distribution of contrail optical depth diagnosed with a climate model with the distribution derived from a microphysical, cloud-scale model constrained by satellite observations over the United States. By assuming that the optical depth distribution from the cloud model is more realistic than that from the climate model, and by taking the difference between the observed and simulated optical depth over the United States as globally representative, we quantify uncertainties in the climate model's diagnostic contrail parameterization. Revising the climate model results accordingly increases the global mean radiative forcing estimate for line-shaped contrails by a factor of 3.3, from 3.5 mW/m(2) to 11.6 mW/m(2) for the year 1992. Furthermore, the satellite observations and the cloud model point at higher global mean optical depth of detectable contrails than often assumed in radiative transfer (off-line) studies. Therefore, we correct estimates of contrail radiative forcing from off-line studies as well. We suggest that the global net radiative forcing of line-shaped persistent contrails is in the range 8-20 mW/m(2) for the air traffic in the year 2000. PMID:20974909

  12. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2010-05-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations. For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis

  13. Tuning nonlinear optical absorption properties of WS₂ nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Long, Hui; Tao, Lili; Tang, Chun Yin; Zhou, Bo; Zhao, Yuda; Zeng, Longhui; Yu, Siu Fung; Lau, Shu Ping; Chai, Yang; Tsang, Yuen Hong

    2015-11-14

    To control the optical properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials is a long-standing goal, being of both fundamental and technological significance. Tuning nonlinear optical absorption (NOA) properties of 2D transition metal dichalcogenides in a cost effective way has emerged as an important research topic because of its possibility to custom design NOA properties, implying enormous applications including optical computers, communications, bioimaging, and so on. In this study, WS2 with different size and thickness distributions was fabricated. The results demonstrate that both NOA onset threshold, F(ON), and optical limiting threshold, F(OL), of WS2 under the excitation of a nanosecond pulsed laser can be tuned over a wide range by controlling its size and thickness. The F(ON) and F(OL) show a rapid decline with the decrease of size and thickness. Due to the edge and quantum confinement effect, WS2 quantum dots (2.35 nm) exhibit the lowest F(ON) (0.01 J cm(-2)) and F(OL) (0.062 J cm(-2)) among all the samples, which are comparable to the lowest threshold achieved in graphene based materials, showing great potential as NOA materials with tunable properties. PMID:26456545

  14. Impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoqi; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-02-01

    We present a study through extensive simulation that considers the impact of inhomogeneous optical scattering coefficient distribution on recovery of optical absorption coefficient maps using tomographic photoacoustic data collected from media mimicking breast tissue. We found that while the impact of scattering heterogeneities/targets is modest on photoacoustic recovery of optical absorption coefficients, the impact of scattering contrast caused by adipose tissue, a layer of normal tissue along the boundary of the breast, is dramatic on reconstruction of optical absorption coefficients using photoacoustic data—up to 25.8% relative error in recovering the absorption coefficient is estimated in such cases. To overcome this problem, we propose a new method to enhance photoacoustic recovery of the optical absorption coefficient in heterogeneous media by considering inhomogeneous scattering coefficient distribution provided by diffuse optical tomography (DOT). Results from extensive simulations show that photoacoustic recovery of absorption coefficient maps can be improved considerably with a priori scattering information from DOT.

  15. Nonlinear dynamics of optical absorption of intense beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D.; van Oosten, C. L.; Warner, M.

    2008-07-01

    On traversing materials with absorbing dyes, weak optical beams decay exponentially (a Beer profile), while intense beams develop in time a profile that is spatially linear until at great depth it becomes spatially exponential. This anomalous, deep penetration, due to photobleaching of surface layers, is important for heavy dye loading and intense beams, for instance in photo-actuation. We address the problem of the evolution in time from initial Beer’s Law to a finally deeply-penetrating optical profile in dyes. Our largely analytic solution of the coupled, nonlinear, partial differential equations governing the spatiotemporal decay of the Poynting flux and the nonlinear population dynamics of the photo-active molecules under intense irradiation has application to optomechanical devices.

  16. Metal incorporated M-DNA: structure, magnetism, optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    DNA is an interesting material from the viewpoint of the materials science. This paper discusses the electronic states of the metal incorporated M-DNA complexes with several species of metal ions. M-DNA prepared by the ordinary methanol precipitation technique has been investigated with ESR, STM and optical absorption, and concluded that the metal ion hydrated with several water molecules locates in between the bases of a base pair and that the divalent metal ions are incorporated into DNA in place of two Na cations as the counter ion for PO-4in the DNA backbones. Only in Fe-DNA, it was confirmed that the Fe2+ in the FeCl2 aqueous solution reacts with DNA to form Fe-DNA complex with Fe3+, where the charge would transfer to DNA. Within 30 min, the hydrolysis of Fe2+ to form Fe3+O(OH) did not occur in the FeCl2 aqueous solution at room temperature. The optical absorption spectra of Fe-DNA is similar to that for FeCl3 with the ionic character, but definitely differs from that of Fe3+O(OH) with the covalent bonding nature, suggesting the ionic character of Fe3+ in Fe-DNA. Finally, the possible two kinds of electronic states for Zn-DNA with different bonding nature will be discussed in relation to the recent report on Zn-DNA.

  17. In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography for non-invasive imaging of endogenous absorption agents

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    In vivo photothermal optical coherence tomography (OCT) is demonstrated for cross-sectional imaging of endogenous absorption agents. In order to compromise the sensitivity, imaging speed, and sample motion immunity, a new photothermal detection scheme and phase processing method are developed. Phase-resolved swept-source OCT and fiber-pigtailed laser diode (providing excitation at 406 nm) are combined to construct a high-sensitivity photothermal OCT system. OCT probe and excitation beam coaxially illuminate and are focused on tissues. The photothermal excitation and detection procedure is designed to obtain high efficiency of photothermal effect measurement. The principle and method of depth-resolved cross-sectional imaging of absorption agents with photothermal OCT has been derived. The phase-resolved thermal expansion detection algorithm without motion artifact enables in vivo detection of photothermal effect. Phantom imaging with a blood phantom and in vivo human skin imaging are conducted. A phantom with guinea-pig blood as absorber has been scanned by the photothermal OCT system to prove the concept of cross-sectional absorption agent imaging. An in vivo human skin measurement is also performed with endogenous absorption agents. PMID:26137374

  18. Chemical state of Ag in Conducting Bridge Random Access Memory cells: a depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Souchier, E.; Noe, P.; Blaise, P.; Bernard, M.; Jousseaume, V.

    2016-05-01

    Conducting Bridge Random Access Memories (CBRAM) are a promising substitute for FLASH technology but problems with limited retention of the low resistance ON state still hamper their massive deployment. Depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy has been used to describe the chemical state of the atoms of the active electrode (in this case Ag) and to reveal the role of Sb as stabilizer of the metallic state.

  19. Cloud Optical Depth Retrievals from Solar Background "signal" of Micropulse Lidars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, J. Christine; Marshak, A.; Wiscombe, W.; Valencia, S.; Welton, E. J.

    2007-01-01

    Pulsed lidars are commonly used to retrieve vertical distributions of cloud and aerosol layers. It is widely believed that lidar cloud retrievals (other than cloud base altitude) are limited to optically thin clouds. Here we demonstrate that lidars can retrieve optical depths of thick clouds using solar background light as a signal, rather than (as now) merely a noise to be subtracted. Validations against other instruments show that retrieved cloud optical depths agree within 10-15% for overcast stratus and broken clouds. In fact, for broken cloud situations one can retrieve not only the aerosol properties in clear-sky periods using lidar signals, but also the optical depth of thick clouds in cloudy periods using solar background signals. This indicates that, in general, it may be possible to retrieve both aerosol and cloud properties using a single lidar. Thus, lidar observations have great untapped potential to study interactions between clouds and aerosols.

  20. Development and evaluation of optical needle depth sensor for percutaneous diagnosis and therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Keryn; Alelyunas, David; McCann, Connor; Yoshimitsu, Kitaro; Kato, Takahisa; Song, Sang-Eun; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2014-03-01

    Current methods of needle insertion during percutaneous CT and MRI guided procedures lack precision in needle depth sensing. The depth of the needle insertion is currently monitored through depth markers drawn on the needle and later confirmed by intra-procedural imaging; until this confirmation, the physicians' judgment that the target is reached is solely based on the depth markers, which are not always clearly visible. We have therefore designed an optical sensing device which provides continuous feedback of needle insertion depth and degree of rotation throughout insertion. An optical mouse sensor was used in conjunction with a microcontroller board, Arduino Due, to acquire needle position information. The device is designed to be attached to a needle guidance robot developed for MRI-guided prostate biopsy in order to aid the manual insertion. An LCD screen and three LEDs were employed with the Arduino Due to form a hand-held device displaying needle depth and rotation. Accuracy of the device was tested to evaluate the impact of insertion speed and rotation. Unlike single dimensional needle depth sensing developed by other researchers, this two dimensional sensing device can also detect the rotation around the needle axis. The combination of depth and rotation sensing would be greatly beneficial for the needle steering approaches that require both depth and rotation information. Our preliminary results indicate that this sensing device can be useful in detecting needle motion when using an appropriate speed and range of motion.

  1. Ocean color patterns help to predict depth of optical layers in stratified coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes-Hugo, Martín A.; Weidemann, Alan; Gould, Richard; Arnone, Robert; Churnside, James H.; Jaroz, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface optical layers distributed at two different depths were investigated in Monterrey Bay, East Sound, and the Black Sea based on spatial statistics of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the use of Rrs(443)/Rrs(490) (hereafter R1) skewness (ψ) as an indicator of vertical optical structure in different marine regions. Measurements of inherent optical properties were obtained using a remotely operated towed vehicle and R1 was theoretically derived from optical profiles. Although the broad range of trophic status and water stratification, a common statistical pattern consisting of lower ψR1--a deeper optical layer was found in all study cases. This variation was attributed to optical changes above the opticline and related to horizontal variability of particulates and spectral variations with depth. We recommend more comparisons in stratified coastal waters with different phytoplankton communities before the use of ψR1 can be generalized as a noninvasive optical proxy for screening depth changes on subsurface optical layers.

  2. Photothermal optical coherence tomography for depth-resolved imaging of mesenchymal stem cells via single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subhash, Hrebesh M.; Connolly, Emma; Murphy, Mary; Barron, Valerie; Leahy, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The progress in stem cell research over the past decade holds promise and potential to address many unmet clinical therapeutic needs. Tracking stem cell with modern imaging modalities are critically needed for optimizing stem cell therapy, which offers insight into various underlying biological processes such as cell migration, engraftment, homing, differentiation, and functions etc. In this study we report the feasibility of photothermal optical coherence tomography (PT-OCT) to image human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) labeled with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) for in vitro cell tracking in three dimensional scaffolds. PT-OCT is a functional extension of conventional OCT with extended capability of localized detection of absorbing targets from scattering background to provide depth-resolved molecular contrast imaging. A 91 kHz line rate, spectral domain PT-OCT system at 1310nm was developed to detect the photothermal signal generated by 800nm excitation laser. In general, MSCs do not have obvious optical absorption properties and cannot be directly visualized using PT-OCT imaging. However, the optical absorption properties of hMSCs can me modified by labeling with SWNTs. Using this approach, MSC were labeled with SWNT and the cell distribution imaged in a 3D polymer scaffold using PT-OCT.

  3. Comparison of Atmospheric Column Optical Depth Measurements for Urban Reno, NV with Three Different Sun Photometers and In Situ Measurements Combined with Boundary Layer Height Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria Salazar, S. M.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Sumlin, B.; Karr, D.

    2011-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is located in a mountain valley often characterized by very dry conditions, clear sky and red sunsets during the summer season, with rare incursions of monsoonal moisture. This city is subject to moderately strong nocturnal inversions nearly every day in summer. Urban aerosols, wind blown dust, as well as occasional biomass burning smoke from natural and non-natural fires all contribute to the optical depth. Because of its geographical position, drastic changes in weather conditions and variations in aerosol optical properties make Reno an excellent location for evaluating measurements of aerosol optical depth in order to determine particulate air pollution concentration as well as to provide input for models of atmospheric radiation transfer and evaluation of satellite-based aerosol optical sensing measurements. Aerosol optical depth can be calculated by in situ photoacoustic measurements of aerosol light absorption and reciprocal nephelometer scattering coefficients and estimation of aerosol mixing height. LED-based hand-held sun photometers are commonly used as inexpensive instruments for informal networks. However, the LED emission wavelength maximum and bandwidth are higher and narrower than the LED reception wavelength spectrum, necessitating empirical determination of an equivalent wavelength. The manually operated spectrometer and Cimel sun photometer measurements provide the most accurate and precise column aerosol optical depth. This paper makes a comparison between these four instruments for measurements obtained during the summer and fall seasons in order to study how the total and aerosol optical depth change during dry and moist conditions. Ångström exponents of extinction and absorption are also analyzed to provide insight on aerosol size distribution and composition, respectively.

  4. Study on the Relationship between the Depth of Spectral Absorption and the Content of the Mineral Composition of Biotite.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chang-bao; Zhang, Chen-xi; Liu, Fang; Jiang, Qi-gang

    2015-09-01

    The mineral composition of rock is one of the main factors affecting the spectral reflectance characteristics, and it's an important reason for generating various rock characteristic spectra. This study choose the rock samples provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) (including all kinds of mineral percentage of rocks, and spectral reflectances range from 0.35 to 2.50 μm wavelength measured by ASD spectrometer), and the various types of mineral spectral reflectances contained within the rocks are the essential data. Using the spectral linear mixture model of rocks and their minerals, firstly, a simulation study on the mixture of rock and mineral composition is achieved, the experimental results indicate that rock spectral curves using the model which based on the theory of the linear mixture are able to simulate better and preserve the absorption characteristics of various mineral components well. Then, 8 samples which contain biotite mineral are picked from the rock spectra of igneous, biotite contents and the absorption depth characteristics of spectral reflection at 2.332 μm, furthermore, a variety of linear and nonlinear normal statistical models are used to fit the relationship between the depth of absorption spectra and the content of the mineral composition of biotite, finally, a new simulation model is build up with the Growth and the Exponential curve model, and a statistical response relationship between the spectral absorption depth and the rock mineral contents is simulated by using the new model, the fitting results show that the correlation coefficient reaches 0.9984 and the standard deviation is 0.572, although the standard deviation using Growth and Exponential model is less than the two model combined with the new model fitting the standard deviation, the correlation coefficient of the new model had significantly increased, which suggesting that the, new model fitting effect is closer to the measured values of samples, it proves that the

  5. Optical performance and metallic absorption in nanoplasmonic systems.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Matthew D; Blaber, Martin G

    2009-03-01

    Optical metrics relating to metallic absorption in representative plasmonic systems are surveyed, with a view to developing heuristics for optimizing performance over a range of applications. We use the real part of the permittivity as the independent variable; consider strengths of particle resonances, resolving power of planar lenses, and guiding lengths of planar waveguides; and compare nearly-free-electron metals including Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Li, Na, and K. Whilst the imaginary part of metal permittivity has a strong damping effect, field distribution is equally important and thus factors including geometry, real permittivity and frequency must be considered when selecting a metal. Al performs well at low permittivities (e.g. sphere resonances, superlenses) whereas Au & Ag only perform well at very negative permittivities (shell and rod resonances, LRSPP). The alkali metals perform well overall but present engineering challenges. PMID:19259225

  6. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  7. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  8. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  9. Excitonic Effects and Optical Absorption Spectrum of Doped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jornada, Felipe; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven

    2012-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on the GW-Bethe-Salpeter Equation (GW-BSE) approach and subsequent experiments have shown large excitonic effects in the optical absorbance of graphene. Here we employ the GW-BSE formalism to probe the effects of charge carrier doping and of having an external electric field on the absorption spectrum of graphene. We show that the absorbance peak due to the resonant exciton exhibits systematic changes in both its position and profile when graphene is gate doped by carriers, in excellent agreement to very recent measurementsootnotetextTony F. Heinz, private communications.. We analyze the various contributions to these changes in the absorption spectrum, such as the effects of screening by carriers to the quasiparticle energies and electron-hole interactions. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and the U.S. DOD - Office of Naval Research under RTC Grant No. N00014-09-1-1066. Computer time was provided by NERSC.

  10. Absorption Filter Based Optical Diagnostics in High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samimy, Mo; Elliott, Gregory; Arnette, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Two major regimes where laser light scattered by molecules or particles in a flow contains significant information about the flow are Mie scattering and Rayleigh scattering. Mie scattering is used to obtain only velocity information, while Rayleigh scattering can be used to measure both the velocity and the thermodynamic properties of the flow. Now, recently introduced (1990, 1991) absorption filter based diagnostic techniques have started a new era in flow visualization, simultaneous velocity and thermodynamic measurements, and planar velocity measurements. Using a filtered planar velocimetry (FPV) technique, we have modified the optically thick iodine filter profile of Miles, et al., and used it in the pressure-broaden regime which accommodates measurements in a wide range of velocity applications. Measuring velocity and thermodynamic properties simultaneously, using absorption filtered based Rayleigh scattering, involves not only the measurement of the Doppler shift, but also the spectral profile of the Rayleigh scattering signal. Using multiple observation angles, simultaneous measurement of one component velocity and thermodynamic properties in a supersonic jet were measured. Presently, the technique is being extended for simultaneous measurements of all three components of velocity and thermodynamic properties.

  11. Measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Li, Buhong

    2003-01-01

    Experimental techniques for measurement of optical penetration depth and refractive index of human tissue are presented, respectively. Optical penetration depth can be obtained from the measurement of the relative fluence-depth distribution inside the target tissue. The depth of normal and carcinomatous human lung tissues irradiated with the wavelengths of 406.7, 632.8 and 674.4 nm in vitro are respectively determined. In addition, a novel simple method based on total internal reflection for measuring the refractive index of biotissue in vivo is developed, and the refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color are measured. Their refractive indices are almost same and the average is 1.533.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Perseus dust optical depth and column density maps (Zari+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zari, E.; Lombardi, M.; Alves, J.; Lada, C.; Bouy, H.

    2015-11-01

    We present optical depth and temperature maps of the Perseus Molecular Cloud, created combining Planck and Herschel data. The maps were obtained using Herschel SPIRE 250um, SPIRE 350um, SPIRE 500um, and, where available, PACS 160um data. The file planckherschelfit.fits reports the results of a full SED fit (with free parameters the optical depth and the temperature), at the SPIRE 500um resolution (36-arcsec). The file planckherschelfit2-a.fits uses the temperature from planckherschelfit.fits and the flux at SPIRE 250um to infer the optical depth with a resolution of 18 arcsec. Finally, the catalogue of Class I/0 protostars reports WISE magnitudes for the sources used to estimate the Schmidt law. (3 data files).

  13. Constraining the CMB optical depth through the dispersion measure of cosmological radio transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A.

    2016-05-01

    The dispersion measure of extragalactic radio transients can be used to measure the column density of free electrons in the intergalactic medium. The same electrons also scatter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons, affecting precision measurements of cosmological parameters. We explore the connection between the dispersion measure of radio transients existing during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the total optical depth for the CMB showing that the existence of such transients would provide a new sensitive probe of the CMB optical depth. As an example, we consider the population of FRBs. Assuming they exist during the EoR, we show that: (i) such sources can probe the reionization history by measuring the optical depth to sub-percent accuracy, and (ii) they can be detected with high significance by an instrument such as the Square Kilometer Array.

  14. 3D Radiative Aspects of the Increased Aerosol Optical Depth Near Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshak, Alexander; Wen, Guoyong; Remer, Lorraine; Cahalan, Robert; Coakley, Jim

    2007-01-01

    To characterize aerosol-cloud interactions it is important to correctly retrieve aerosol optical depth in the vicinity of clouds. It is well reported in the literature that aerosol optical depth increases with cloud cover. Part of the increase comes from real physics as humidification; another part, however, comes from 3D cloud effects in the remote sensing retrievals. In many cases it is hard to say whether the retrieved increased values of aerosol optical depth are remote sensing artifacts or real. In the presentation, we will discuss how the 3D cloud affects can be mitigated. We will demonstrate a simple model that can assess the enhanced illumination of cloud-free columns in the vicinity of clouds. This model is based on the assumption that the enhancement in the cloud-free column radiance comes from the enhanced Rayleigh scattering due to presence of surrounding clouds. A stochastic cloud model of broken cloudiness is used to simulate the upward flux.

  15. Transmission and division of total optical depth method: A universal calibration method for Sun photometric measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ming; Gong, Wei; Ma, Yingying; Wang, Lunche; Chen, Zhongyong

    2016-03-01

    Sun photometric measurements, which provide accurate and timely information on atmospheric components such as aerosols, clouds, and gases are important to climate research. For regions with heavy and variable aerosol loading, the traditional Langley plot method cannot be applied for Sun photometric instrument calibration, as almost no suitable prolonged periods with stable atmosphere and low-aerosol loading occurs. An improved calibration method, namely, the transmission and division of total optical depth method, is proposed in this study. Atmospheric total optical depth variation information obtained via other methods is transmitted, and period groups with similar atmospheric extinction effects are selected for Langley regression. This method is validated through calibration of a multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer under heavy aerosol-loading conditions. The obtained aerosol optical depth (AOD) compares well with the interpolated AOD from a Cimel Sun-sky radiometer.

  16. Depth enhancement in spectral domain optical coherence tomography using bidirectional imaging modality with a single spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, Naresh Kumar; Wijesinghe, Ruchire Eranga; Shirazi, Muhammad Faizan; Park, Kibeom; Jeon, Mansik; Jung, Woonggyu; Kim, Jeehyun

    2016-07-01

    A method for depth enhancement is presented using a bidirectional imaging modality for spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Two precisely aligned sample arms along with two reference arms were utilized in the optical configuration to scan the samples. Using exemplary images of the optical resolution target, Scotch tape, a silicon sheet with two needles, and a leaf, we demonstrated how the developed bidirectional SD-OCT imaging method increases the ability to characterize depth-enhanced images. The results of the developed system were validated by comparing the images with the standard OCT configuration (single-sample arm setup). Given the advantages of higher resolution and the ability to visualize deep morphological structures, this method can be utilized to increase the depth dependent fall-off in samples with limited thickness. Thus, the proposed bidirectional imaging modality is apt for cross-sectional imaging of entire samples, which has the potential capability to improve the diagnostic ability.

  17. Quantitative comparison of wavelength dependence on penetration depth and imaging contrast for ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography using supercontinuum sources at five wavelength regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, S.; Nishizawa, N.

    2012-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non invasive optical imaging technology for micron-scale cross-sectional imaging of biological tissue and materials. We have been investigating ultrahigh resolution optical coherence tomography (UHR-OCT) using fiber based supercontinuum sources. Although ultrahigh longitudinal resolution was achieved in several center wavelength regions, its low penetration depth is a serious limitation for other applications. To realize ultrahigh resolution and deep penetration depth simultaneously, it is necessary to choose the proper wavelength to maximize the light penetration and enhance the image contrast at deeper depths. Recently, we have demonstrated the wavelength dependence of penetration depth and imaging contrast for ultrahigh resolution OCT at 0.8 μm, 1.3 μm, and 1.7 μm wavelength ranges. In this paper, additionally we used SC sources at 1.06 μm and 1.55 μm, and we have investigated the wavelength dependence of UHR-OCT at five wavelength regions. The image contrast and penetration depth have been discussed in terms of the scattering coefficient and water absorption of samples. Almost the same optical characteristics in longitudinal and lateral resolution, sensitivity, and incident optical power at all wavelength regions were demonstrated. We confirmed the enhancement of image contrast and decreased ambiguity of deeper epithelioid structure at longer wavelength region.

  18. Increasing the penetration depth for ultrafast laser tissue ablation using glycerol based optical clearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabay, Ilan; Subramanian, Kaushik G.; Martin, Chris; Yildirim, Murat; Tuchin, Valery V.; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-03-01

    Background: Deep tissue ablation is the next challenge in ultrafast laser microsurgery. By focusing ultrafast pulses below the tissue surface one can create an ablation void confined to the focal volume. However, as the ablation depth increases in a scattering tissue, increase in the required power can trigger undesired nonlinear phenomena out of focus that restricts our ability to ablate beyond a maximum ablation depth of few scattering lengths. Optical clearing (OC) might reduce the intensity and increase the maximal ablation depth by lowering the refractive index mismatch, and therefore reducing scattering. Some efforts to ablate deeper showed out of focus damage, while others used brutal mechanical methods for clearing. Our clinical goal is to create voids in the scarred vocal folds and inject a biomaterial to bring back the tissue elasticity and restore phonation. Materials and methods: Fresh porcine vocal folds were excised and applied a biocompatible OC agent (75% glycerol). Collimated transmittance was monitored. The tissue was optically cleared and put under the microscope for ablation threshold measurements at different depths. Results: The time after which the tissue was optically cleared was roughly two hours. Fitting the threshold measurements to an exponential decay graph indicated that the scattering length of the tissue increased to 83+/-16 μm, which is more than doubling the known scattering length for normal tissue. Conclusion: Optical clearing with Glycerol increases the tissue scattering length and therefore reduces the energy for ablation and increases the maximal ablation depth. This technique can potentially improve clinical microsurgery.

  19. Measurements of total column ozone, precipitable water content and aerosol optical depth at Sofia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleyna, P.; Kolev, N.; Savov, P.; Evgenieva, Ts.; Danchovski, V.; Muhtarov, P.

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the results of a study related to variations in total ozone content, aerosol optical depth, water vapor content and Ångström coefficients from summer campaign carried out in June-July 2014, at two sites in the city of Sofia (Astronomical Observatory in the Borisova Gradina Park and National Institute of Geophysics, Geodesy and Geography (NIGGG)). The results of data analysis indicate the following: Spectral dependence of aerosol optical depth (AOD); Greater AOD values due to greater portion of aerosols; Inverse relationship between the time variations of AOD or water vapor and ozone.

  20. 24 mm depth range discretely swept optical frequency domain imaging in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuma, Hideo; Choi, DongHak; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Hiro-Oka, Hideaki; Ohbayashi, Kohji

    2009-02-01

    A large depth range is needed if optical coherence tomography (OCT) is to be used to observe multiple teeth simultaneously. A discretely swept optical frequency domain imaging system with a 24-mm depth range was made by using a superstructure-grating distributed Bragg reflector (SSG-DBR) laser as the light source and setting the frequencystep interval to be 3.13 GHz (λ ~ 0.026 nm). The swept wavelength range was 40 nm centered at 1580 nm, the resolution was 29 μm, and the A-scan rate was 1.3 kHz. Application of the OCT system to a dental phantom was demonstrated.

  1. A disposable flexible skin patch for clinical optical perfusion monitoring at multiple depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, Dana L.; Kolodziejski, Noah J.; Stapels, Christopher J.; McAdams, Daniel R.; Fernandez, Daniel E.; Podolsky, Matthew J.; Christian, James F.; Ward, Brent B.; Vartarian, Mark; Feinberg, Stephen E.; Lee, Seung Yup; Parikh, Urmi; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Joyner, Michael J.; Johnson, Christopher P.; Paradis, Norman A.

    2016-03-01

    Stable, relative localization of source and detection fibers is necessary for clinical implementation of quantitative optical perfusion monitoring methods such as diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). A flexible and compact device design is presented as a platform for simultaneous monitoring of perfusion at a range of depths, enabled by precise location of optical fibers in a robust and secure adhesive patch. We will discuss preliminary data collected on human subjects in a lower body negative pressure model for hypovolemic shock. These data indicate that this method facilitates simple and stable simultaneous monitoring of perfusion at multiple depths and within multiple physiological compartments.

  2. Trace gas emissions from biomass burning inferred from aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton-Walsh, Clare; Jones, Nicholas; Wilson, Stephen; Meier, Arndt; Deutscher, Nicholas; Griffith, David; Mitchell, Ross; Campbell, Susan

    2004-03-01

    We have observed strong correlations between simultaneous and co-located measurements of aerosol optical depth and column amounts of carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, formaldehyde and ammonia in bushfire smoke plumes over SE Australia during the Austral summers of 2001/2002 and 2002/2003. We show how satellite-derived aerosol optical depth maps may be used in conjunction with these correlations to determine the total amounts of these gases present in a fire-affected region. This provides the basis of a method for estimating total emissions of trace gases from biomass burning episodes using visible radiances measured by satellites.

  3. Analytical Derivation of the Vegetation Optical Depth from the Microwave Polarization Difference Index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meesters, Antoon G. C. A.; DeJeu, Richard A. M.; Owe, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    A numerical solution for the canopy optical depth in an existing microwave-based land surface parameter retrieval model is presented. The optical depth is derived from the microwave polarization difference index and the dielectric constant of the soil. The original procedure used an approximation in the form of a logarithmic decay function to define this relationship, and was derived through a series of lengthy polynomials. These polynomials had to be recalculated when the scattering albedo or antenna incidence angle changes. The new procedure is computationally more efficient and accurate.

  4. Design and fabrication of an optical probe with a phase filter for extended depth of focus.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jingchao; Kim, Junyoung; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-01-25

    The trade-off between spot size and depth of focus (DOF) often limits the performance of optical systems, such as optical coherence tomography and optical tweezers. Although researchers have proposed various methods to extend the DOF in free-space optics, many are difficult to implement in miniaturized optical probes due to space limitations. In this study, we present an optical probe with an extended DOF using a binary phase spatial filter (BPSF). The BPSF pattern was fabricated on the distal tip of an optical probe with a diameter of 1 mm by replica molding soft lithography, which can be easily implemented in a miniaturized optical probe due to its simple configuration. We optimized the BPSF pattern to enhance DOF, spot diameter, and light efficiency. To evaluate the fabricated endoscopic optical probe, we measured the three-dimensional point spread function of the BPSF probe and compared it with a probe without BPSF. The BPSF probe has a spot diameter of 3.56 μm and a DOF of 199.7 μm, while the probe without BPSF has a spot diameter of 3.69 μm and a DOF of 73.9 μm, representing a DOF gain of 2.7. We anticipate that this optical probe can be used in biomedical applications, including optical imaging and optical trapping techniques. PMID:26832486

  5. Average depth of blood vessels in skin and lesions deduced by optical fiber spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.; Saidi, Iyad S.; Tittel, Frank K.

    1994-09-01

    The average depth of blood vessels in a cutaneous site, either normal or diseased, can be specified by a simple rapid noninvasive optical measurement. An optical fiber spectrophotometer delivers white light via optical fibers to a skin site. The light reflected by tissue scattering and successfully collected by optical fibers is carried to a diode array spectrophotometer for spectral analysis. The reflectance spectrum is analyzed to specify the component of the optical density (OD) spectrum which is attributed to the cutaneous blood. Then the ratio of the OD420 nm/OD585 nm provides a quantitative indication of the average depth of the blood in the skin site. The purple light (420 nm) less easily penetrates the skin to sample the cutaneous blood content than does the yellow light (585 nm). The calibration of the measurement was accomplished by Monte Carlo simulations of measurements on skin with a layer of blood at various depths. In a study of 47 neonates, the amount of blood content ranged from 4 - 12 mg hemoglobin/g tissue (equivalent to 0.8 - 2.4% of the skin volume being whole blood), and the average depth of blood ranged from 250 - 425 micrometers .

  6. Remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth using a smartphone sun photometer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, smart phones have been explored for making a variety of mobile measurements. Smart phones feature many advanced sensors such as cameras, GPS capability, and accelerometers within a handheld device that is portable, inexpensive, and consistently located with an end user. In this work, a smartphone was used as a sun photometer for the remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth. The top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) irradiance was estimated through the construction of Langley plots on days when the sky was cloudless and clear. Changes in optical depth were monitored on a different day when clouds intermittently blocked the sun. The device demonstrated a measurement precision of 1.2% relative standard deviation for replicate photograph measurements (38 trials, 134 datum). However, when the accuracy of the method was assessed through using optical filters of known transmittance, a more substantial uncertainty was apparent in the data. Roughly 95% of replicate smart phone measured transmittances are expected to lie within ±11.6% of the true transmittance value. This uncertainty in transmission corresponds to an optical depth of approx. ±0.12-0.13 suggesting the smartphone sun photometer would be useful only in polluted areas that experience significant optical depths. The device can be used as a tool in the classroom to present how aerosols and gases effect atmospheric transmission. If improvements in measurement precision can be achieved, future work may allow monitoring networks to be developed in which citizen scientists submit acquired data from a variety of locations. PMID:24416199

  7. Calculation of optical properties of dental composites as a basis for determining color impression and penetration depth of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weniger, Kirsten K.; Muller, Gerhard J.

    2005-03-01

    In order to achieve esthetic dental restorations, there should be no visible difference between restorative material and treated teeth. This requires a match of the optical properties of both restorative material and natural teeth. These optical properties are determined by absorption and scattering of light emerging not only on the surface but also inside the material. Investigating different dental composites in several shades, a method has been developed to calculate the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g and reduced scattering coefficient μs'. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer, followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Determination of optical properties is more precise and comprehensive than with the previously used Kubelka Munk theory because scattering can be looked at separated into pure scattering with the scattering coefficient μs and its direction with the anisotropy factor g. Moreover the use of the inverse Monte Carlo simulation not only minimizes systematic errors and considers the scattering phase function, but also takes into account the measuring geometry. The compilation of a data pool of optical parameters now enables the application of further calculation models as a basis for optimization of the composition of new materials. For example, a prediction of the general color impression for multiple layers can be carried out as well as the calculation of the wavelength dependent penetration depths of light with regard to photo polymerization. Further applications are possible in the area of laser ablation.

  8. Performance of reduced bit-depth acquisition for optical frequency domain imaging

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brian D.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Oh, Wang-Yuhl; Suter, Melissa J.; Waxman, Sergio; Freilich, Mark I.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2009-01-01

    High-speed optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) has enabled practical wide-field microscopic imaging in the biological laboratory and clinical medicine. The imaging speed of OFDI, and therefore the field of view, of current systems is limited by the rate at which data can be digitized and archived rather than the system sensitivity or laser performance. One solution to this bottleneck is to natively digitize OFDI signals at reduced bit depths, e.g., at 8-bit depth rather than the conventional 12–14 bit depth, thereby reducing overall bandwidth. However, the implications of reduced bit-depth acquisition on image quality have not been studied. In this paper, we use simulations and empirical studies to evaluate the effects of reduced depth acquisition on OFDI image quality. We show that image acquisition at 8-bit depth allows high system sensitivity with only a minimal drop in the signal-to-noise ratio compared to higher bit-depth systems. Images of a human coronary artery acquired in vivo at 8-bit depth are presented and compared with images at higher bit-depth acquisition. PMID:19770914

  9. Aerosol optical Depth Measurements in the UVB and visible at Ispra, Italy: 1992 TO 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gröbner, J.; Meleti, C.

    2003-04-01

    Since 1992 direct solar irradiance has been measured with a Brewer spectroradiometer typ MKIV at several wavelengths in the UVB (between 306 and 320 nm) and visible (between 431 and 453 nm) part of the solar spectrum. So far, the measurements in the UVB were only used to determine the total column Ozone while those in the visible were used for the total column Nitrogen Dioxide. Here we present a re-evaluation of the whole times series with respect to aerosol optical depth (aod) using the same direct solar irradiance measurements. AOD measurements since 1997 from a CIMEL spectrophotometer belonging to AERONET were used as a cross check to verify the quality of the retrieved Brewer data. In the UVB, the calibration is based on routine lamp measurements performed on the global irradiance port of the Brewer and then transferred to the direct irradiance port using a custom measurement procedure. The calibration in the visible is based on Langley-plots performed at Ispra. A second method to calculate the relative extraterrestrials constants (ETC) for the Brewer using CIMEL data was also applied. The estimated ETC of the two methods agree to better than 4.5%. Comparison between the aod as derived from the Brewer spectroradiometer and the aod at 440 nm from the CIMEL instrument shows that the data are strongly correlated, confirming that the Brewer direct sun measurements are able to provide reliable aod. A detailed study reveals that the NO2 absorption needs to be taken into account for more accurate aod estimations in these wavelength regions. Finally, the time series of the Å ngström exponent α calculated from the retrieved aod is presented and its performance discussed.

  10. Design of an optical system with large depth of field using in the micro-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rong; Chang, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-jing; Ye, Xin; Zheng, Hai-jing

    2013-08-01

    Micro system currently is the mainstream of application and demand of the field of micro fabrication of civilian and national defense. Compared with the macro assembly, the requirements on location accuracy of the micro-assembly system are much higher. Usually the dimensions of the components of the micro-assembly are mostly between a few microns to several hundred microns. The general assembly precision requires for the sub-micron level. Micro system assembly is the bottleneck of micro fabrication currently. The optical stereo microscope used in the field of micro assembly technology can achieve high-resolution imaging, but the depth of field of the optical imaging system is too small. Thus it's not conducive to the three-dimensional observation process of the micro-assembly. This paper summarizes the development of micro system assembly at home and abroad firstly. Based on the study of the core features of the technology, a program is proposed which uses wave front coding technology to increase the depth of field of the optical imaging system. In the wave front coding technology, by combining traditional optical design with digital image processing creatively, the depth of field can be greatly increased, moreover, all defocus-related aberrations, such as spherical aberration, chromatic aberration, astigmatism, Ptzvel(field) curvature, distortion, and other defocus induced by the error of assembling and temperature change, can be corrected or minimized. In this paper, based on the study of theory, a set of optical microscopy imaging system is designed. This system is designed and optimized by optical design software CODE V and ZEMAX. At last, the imaging results of the traditional optical stereo microscope and the optical stereo microscope applied wave front coding technology are compared. The results show that: the method has a practical operability and the phase plate obtained by optimized has a good effect on improving the imaging quality and increasing the

  11. Removing the depth-degeneracy in optical frequency domain imaging with frequency shifting

    PubMed Central

    Yun, S. H.; Tearney, G. J.; de Boer, J. F.; Bouma, B. E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel technique using an acousto-optic frequency shifter in optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) is presented. The frequency shift eliminates the ambiguity between positive and negative differential delays, effectively doubling the interferometric ranging depth while avoiding image cross-talk. A signal processing algorithm is demonstrated to accommodate nonlinearity in the tuning slope of the wavelength-swept OFDI laser source. PMID:19484034

  12. Study on distribution of aerosol optical depth in Chongqing urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiqi; Liu, Can; Gao, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    This paper selected 6S (second simulation of the satellite signal in the solar spectrum) model with dark pixel method to inversion aerosol optical depth by MODIS data, and got the spatial distribution and the temporal distribution of Chongqing urban area. By comparing with the sun photometer and API data, the result showed that the inversion method can be used in aerosol optical thickness monitoring in Chongqing urban area.

  13. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric optical depth using the Oxygen A-band at 765 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riris, H.; Rodriguez, M.; Allan, G. R.; Mao, J.; Hasselbrack, W.; Abshire, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen (O2) optical depth measurements with an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. Since O2 in uniformly mixed in the atmosphere, its absorption spectra can be used to estimate atmospheric pressure. In its airborne configuration, the IPDA lidar uses a doubled Erbium Doped Fiber amplifier and single photon counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at multiple discrete wavelengths in the oxygen A-band near 765 nm. This instrument has been deployed three times aboard NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory as part of campaigns to measure CO2 mixing ratios over a wide range of topography and weather conditions from altitudes between 3 km and 13 km. The O2 IPDA lidar flew seven flights in 2011 and six flights in 2013 in the continental United States and British Columbia, Canada. Our results from 2011 showed good agreement between the experimentally derived differential optical depth measurements with the theoretical predictions for aircraft altitudes from 3 to 13 km after a systematic bias correction of approximately 8% was applied. The random noise component was 2.5-3.0 %. The most recent data recorded in 2013 show better agreement between experimental optical depth measurements and theoretical predictions and much smaller systematic errors. The random error remained comparable with 2011 at 2-3%. The main source of random error is primarily the low energy (power) of the laser transmitter and the high solar background. We are in the process of addressing this issue with a new, higher energy amplifier that we anticipate will reduce the random noise component by a factor of 3-5 to less than 0.5%. The results from these flights show that the IPDA technique is a viable method

  14. Airborne imaging spectrometer data of the Ruby Mountains, Montana: Mineral discrimination using relative absorption band-depth images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Brickey, D.W.; Rowan, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometer data collected in the near-infrared (1.2-2.4 ??m) wavelength range were used to study the spectral expression of metamorphic minerals and rocks in the Ruby Mountains of southwestern Montana. The data were analyzed by using a new data enhancement procedure-the construction of relative absorption band-depth (RBD) images. RBD images, like bandratio images, are designed to detect diagnostic mineral absorption features, while minimizing reflectance variations related to topographic slope and albedo differences. To produce an RBD image, several data channels near an absorption band shoulder are summed and then divided by the sum of several channels located near the band minimum. RBD images are both highly specific and sensitive to the presence of particular mineral absorption features. Further, the technique does not distort or subdue spectral features as sometimes occurs when using other data normalization methods. By using RBD images, a number of rock and soil units were distinguished in the Ruby Mountains including weathered quartz - feldspar pegmatites, marbles of several compositions, and soils developed over poorly exposed mica schists. The RBD technique is especially well suited for detecting weak near-infrared spectral features produced by soils, which may permit improved mapping of subtle lithologic and structural details in semiarid terrains. The observation of soils rich in talc, an important industrial commodity in the study area, also indicates that RBD images may be useful for mineral exploration. ?? 1989.

  15. Optical Absorption Microspectroscopy (μ-OAS) Based on Schwarzschild-Type Cassegrain Optics.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Mathieu; Lelong, Gérald; van Nijnatten, Peter; Schoofs, Ivo; de Wolf, Jürgen; Galoisy, Laurence; Calas, Georges

    2015-04-01

    A new experimental setup, combining a custom-designed Schwarzschild-type Cassegrain-based microscope and an ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectrophotometer, has been developed, focusing the light beam down to 20 μm diameter. Optical absorption spectra (in the 300-2500 nm range) have been measured on micrometer-sized natural glass inclusions providing information on iron speciation in magmatic melts. The absence of contribution from the host crystal matrix provides a test of the efficiency of micro-focusing. A microthermometric stage has been adapted on the microscope for measuring optical absorption spectra up to 900 K with application to the thermochromism of minute natural spinel crystals (MgAl2O4:Fe(2+),Cr(3+)). This experimental setup provides an easy and fast way to follow the evolution of spectral properties and color of glasses or crystals with temperature as well as the possibility of measuring spatially resolved optical absorption spectra. PMID:25741926

  16. Lidar multiple scattering factors inferred from CALIPSO lidar and IIR retrievals of semi-transparent cirrus cloud optical depths over oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pelon, J.; Vaughan, M. A.; Winker, D. M.; Trepte, C. R.; Dubuisson, P.

    2015-07-01

    Cirrus cloud absorption optical depths retrieved at 12.05 μm are compared to extinction optical depths retrieved at 0.532 μm from perfectly co-located observations of single-layered semi-transparent cirrus over ocean made by the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) and the Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) flying on board the CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) satellite. IIR infrared absorption optical depths are compared to CALIOP visible extinction optical depths when the latter can be directly derived from the measured apparent two-way transmittance through the cloud. An evaluation of the CALIOP multiple scattering factor is inferred from these comparisons after assessing and correcting biases in IIR and CALIOP optical depths reported in version 3 data products. In particular, the blackbody radiance taken in the IIR version 3 algorithm is evaluated, and IIR retrievals are corrected accordingly. Numerical simulations and IIR retrievals of ice crystal sizes suggest that the ratios of CALIOP extinction and IIR absorption optical depths should remain roughly constant with respect to temperature. Instead, these ratios are found to increase quasi-linearly by about 40 % as the temperature at the layer centroid altitude decreases from 240 to 200 K. It is discussed that this behavior can be explained by variations of the multiple scattering factor ηT applied to correct the measured apparent two-way transmittance for contribution of forward-scattering. While the CALIOP version 3 retrievals hold ηT fixed at 0.6, this study shows that ηT varies with temperature (and hence cloud particle size) from ηT = 0.8 at 200 K to ηT = 0.5 at 240 K for single-layered semi-transparent cirrus clouds with optical depth larger than 0.3. The revised parameterization of ηT introduces a concomitant temperature dependence in the simultaneously derived CALIOP lidar ratios that is consistent with observed changes in CALIOP

  17. In-vivo measurements of penetration depth, oxygenation, and drug concentration using broadband absorption spectroscopy in human tissues before and after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hsing-Wen; Zhu, Timothy C.; Solonenko, Michael; Hahn, Stephen M.; Metz, James M.; Dimofte, Andrea; Mile, Jermy; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs a combination of photosensitizing chemical, light, and oxygen Knowledge of tissue optical properties, including absorption (μa) and reduce scattering coefficients (μs"), makes possible to derive blood oxygen saturation, light penetration depth, and drug concentration, which are important to ensure PDT treatment efficacy at the specific wavelengths. We have developed an absorption spectroscopy system to measure μa and μs" in the spectral range 600-800nm using a contact linear probe with a source fiber and multiple source-detector separation distances less than 1 cm. The μa and μs" were recovered based on diffusion approximations of the photon transport equation. We measured tissue optical properties among various organs of patients with intraperitoneal malignancies for an on-going Phase II PDT protocol. The results from 12 patients showed various effective penetration depth from site to site and from organ to organ. The percentage oxygen saturation (%StO2) are similar before and after PDT. Before PDT, meff (mean (standard deviation) (number of patients)) in cm-1 at 630nm are 2.4 (0.2) (12) in small bowel, 2.2(0.4) (9) in large bowel, 4.2(2.7) (7) in tumor, 3.3 (0.3) (10) in peritoneum, 2.7 (0.3) (11) in skin, and 10.1 (0.6) (10) in liver. %StO2 is 60-80% for most organs but 30-40% for tumor.

  18. Analysis of airborne imaging spectrometer data for the Ruby Mountains, Montana, by use of absorption-band-depth images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickey, David W.; Crowley, James K.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) data were obtained for an area of amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks that have moderate rangeland vegetation cover. Although rock exposures are sparse and patchy at this site, soils are visible through the vegetation and typically comprise 20 to 30 percent of the surface area. Channel averaged low band depth images for diagnostic soil rock absorption bands. Sets of three such images were combined to produce color composite band depth images. This relative simple approach did not require extensive calibration efforts and was effective for discerning a number of spectrally distinctive rocks and soils, including soils having high talc concentrations. The results show that the high spectral and spatial resolution of AIS-1 and future sensors hold considerable promise for mapping mineral variations in soil, even in moderately vegetated areas.

  19. NEUTRAL HYDROGEN OPTICAL DEPTH NEAR STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z Almost-Equal-To 2.4 IN THE KECK BARYONIC STRUCTURE SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Rakic, Olivera; Schaye, Joop; Steidel, Charles C.; Rudie, Gwen C.

    2012-06-01

    We study the interface between galaxies and the intergalactic medium by measuring the absorption by neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of star-forming galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 2.4. Our sample consists of 679 rest-frame UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts that have impact parameters <2 (proper) Mpc to the line of sight of one of the 15 bright, background QSOs and that fall within the redshift range of its Ly{alpha} forest. We present the first two-dimensional maps of the absorption around galaxies, plotting the median Ly{alpha} pixel optical depth as a function of transverse and line-of-sight separation from galaxies. The Ly{alpha} optical depths are measured using an automatic algorithm that takes advantage of all available Lyman series lines. The median optical depth, and hence the median density of atomic hydrogen, drops by more than an order of magnitude around 100 kpc, which is similar to the virial radius of the halos thought to host the galaxies. The median remains enhanced, at the >3{sigma} level, out to at least 2.8 Mpc (i.e., >9 comoving Mpc), but the scatter at a given distance is large compared with the median excess optical depth, suggesting that the gas is clumpy. Within 100 (200) kpc, and over {+-}165 km s{sup -1}, the covering fraction of gas with Ly{alpha} optical depth greater than unity is 100{sup +0}{sub -32}% (66% {+-} 16%). Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 0.1 are typically closer to galaxies than random. The mean galaxy overdensity around absorbers increases with the optical depth and also as the length scale over which the galaxy overdensity is evaluated is decreased. Absorbers with {tau}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 1 reside in regions where the galaxy number density is close to the cosmic mean on scales {>=}0.25 Mpc. We clearly detect two types of redshift space anisotropies. On scales <200 km s{sup -1}, or <1 Mpc, the absorption is stronger along the line of sight than in the transverse direction. This 'finger of God

  20. Parametric distortion of the optical absorption edge of a magnetic semiconductor by a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, O.A.C.

    1985-09-15

    The influence of a strong laser field on the optical absorption edge of a direct-gap magnetic semiconductor is considered. It is shown that as the strong laser intensity increases the absorption coefficient is modified so as to give rise to an absorption tail below the free-field forbidden gap. An application is made for the case of the EuO.

  1. INTEGRATING LIDAR AND SATELLITE OPTICAL DEPTH WITH AMBIENT MONITORING FOR 3-DIMENSIONAL PARTICULATE CHARACTERIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A combination of in-situ PM2.5, sunphotometers, upward pointing lidar and satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) instruments have been employed to better understand variability in the correlation between AOD and PM2.5 at the surface. Previous studies have shown good correlation be...

  2. Empirical Relationship between particulate matter and Aerosol Optical Depth over Northern Tien-Shan, Central Asia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements were obtained at two sites in northern Tien-Shan in Central Asia during a 1-year period beginning July 2008 to examine the statistical relationship between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and of fine [PM2.5, particles less than 2.5 μm aerodynamic diameter (AD)] and coars...

  3. Relative skills of soil moisture and vegetation optical depth retrievals for agricultural drought monitoring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil moisture condition is an important indicator for agricultural drought monitoring. Through the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), vegetation optical depth (VOD) as well as surface soil moisture (SM) can be retrieved simultaneously from brightness temperature observations from the Advanced Mi...

  4. Aerosol optical depth during episodes of Asian dust storms and biomass burning at Kwangju, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjobi, K. O.; He, Z.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, Y. J.

    Spectral daily aerosol optical depths (τ a λ) estimated from a multi-filter radiometer over Kwangju were analyzed from January 1999 to August 2001 (total of 277 days). Optical depths obtained showed a pronounced temporal trend, with maximum dust loading observed during spring time and biomass burning aerosol in early summer and autumn of each year. Result indicates that τ a501 nm increased from spring average of 0.45±0.02 to values >0.7 on 7 April 2000, and 13 April 2001. Daily mean spectral variations in the Ångström exponents α were also computed for various episode periods under consideration. A dramatic change in α value is noted especially at high aerosol optical depth when coarse mode aerosol dominates over the influence of accumulation-mode aerosol. High values of τ a λ associated with high values of α in early June and October are characteristics of smoke aerosol predominantly from biomass burning aerosol. Also, volume size distribution is investigated for different pollution episodes with result indicating that the peak in the distribution of the coarse mode volume radius and fine mode particles of dust and biomass-burning aerosol respectively increases as aerosol optical depth increases at Kwangju. Air-mass trajectory were developed on 7-8 April and 19-20 October, 2000 to explain the transport of Asian dust particle and biomass burning to Kwangju.

  5. Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”

    SciTech Connect

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2014-02-16

    In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

  6. Direct numerical modeling of Saturn's dense rings at high optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Morishima, Ryuji

    2015-11-01

    Saturn's B ring exhibits complex optical depth structure of uncertain origin. We are investigating the extent to which viscous overstability and/or gravitational wakes can give rise to this structure, via discrete particle numerical simulations. We use the parallelized N-body tree code pkdgrav with a soft-sphere collision model for detailed treatment of particle collisional physics, including multi-point persistent contact with static, sliding, rolling, and twisting friction forces. This enables us to perform local simulations with millions of particles, realistic sizes, and configurable material properties in high-optical-depth ring patches with near-linear scaling across multiple processors. Recent code improvements to the collision search algorithm provide a further roughly factor of 2 speedup. We present results from the first year of this study in which a library of simulations with different optical depths was constructed. Parameters explored include normal (dynamical) optical depths between 0.5 (approximately 100,000 particles) and 4.0 (approximately 8.3 million particles) in ring patches of dimension 6 by 6 critical Toomre wavelengths, using material parameters ranging from highly elastic smooth spheres to rough "gravel"-like particles. We also vary the particle internal densities to enhance (low density)/suppress (high density) viscous overstability in order to compare against gravitational instability in these different regimes. These libraries will be used to carry out simulated observations for comparison with Cassini CIRS temperature measurements and UVIS occulation data of Saturn's dense rings.

  7. Ripeness of 'Sun Bright' tomato using the optical absorption and scattering properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maturity is one of the most important factors in determining the processing and eating quality of tomato. The objective of this research was to test the suitability of optical absorption and scattering properties for evaluating the maturity of tomatoes. Optical absorption and reduced scattering coef...

  8. Continuous wavelet-transform analysis of photoacoustic signal waveform to determine optical absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirasawa, T.; Ishihara, M.; Tsujita, K.; Hirota, K.; Irisawa, K.; Kitagaki, M.; Fujita, M.; Kikuchi, M.

    2012-02-01

    In photo-acoustic (PA) imaging, valuable medical applications based on optical absorption spectrum such as contrast agent imaging and blood oxygen saturation measurement have been investigated. In these applications, there is an essential requirement to determine optical absorption coefficients accurately. In present, PA signal intensities have been commonly used to determine optical absorption coefficients. This method achieves practical accuracy by combining with radiative transfer analysis. However, time consumption of radiative transfer analysis and effects of signal generation efficiencies were problems of this method. In this research, we propose a new method to determine optical absorption coefficients using continuous wavelet transform (CWT). We used CWT to estimate instantaneous frequencies of PA signals which reflects optical absorption distribution. We validated the effectiveness of CWT in determination of optical absorption coefficients through an experiment. In the experiment, planar shaped samples were illuminated to generate PA signal. The PA signal was measured by our fabricated PA probe in which an optical fiber and a ring shaped P(VDFTrFE) ultrasound sensor were coaxially aligned. Optical properties of samples were adjusted by changing the concentration of dye solution. Tunable Ti:Sapphire laser (690 - 1000 nm) was used as illumination source. As a result, we confirmed strong correlation between optical absorption coefficients of samples and the instantaneous frequency of PA signal obtained by CWT. Advantages of this method were less interference of light transfer and signal generation efficiency.

  9. Microlensing Optical Depth towards the Galactic Bulge Using Clump Giants from the MACHO Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Popowski, P; Griest, K; Thomas, C L; Cook, K H; Bennett, D P; Becker, A C; Alves, D R; Minniti, D; Drake, A J; Alcock, C; Allsman, R A; Axelrod, T S; Freeman, K C; Geha, M; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Nelson, C A; Peterson, B A; Quinn, P J; Stubbs, C W; Sutherland, W; Vandehei, T; Welch, D

    2005-07-14

    Using 7 years of MACHO survey data, we present a new determination of the optical depth to microlensing towards the Galactic bulge. We select the sample of 62 microlensing events (60 unique) on clump giant sources and perform a detailed efficiency analysis. We use only the clump giant sources because these are bright bulge stars and are not as strongly affected by blending as other events. Using a subsample of 42 clump events concentrated in an area of 4.5 deg{sup 2} with 739000 clump giant stars, we find {tau} = 2.17{sub -0.38}{sup +0.47} x 10{sup -6} at (l,b) = (1{sup o}.50, -2{sup o}.68), somewhat smaller than found in most previous MACHO studies, but in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions. We also present the optical depth in each of the 19 fields in which we detected events, and find limits on optical depth for fields with no events. The errors in optical depth in individual fields are dominated by Poisson noise. We measure optical depth gradients of (1.06 {+-} 0.71) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} and (0.29 {+-} 0.43) x 10{sup -6}deg{sup -1} in the galactic latitude b and longitude l directions, respectively. Finally, we discuss the possibility of anomalous duration distribution of events in the field 104 centered on (l,b) = (3{sup o}.11, -3{sup o}.01) as well as investigate spatial clustering of events in all fields.

  10. The INTEGRAL/IBIS AGN catalogue - I. X-ray absorption properties versus optical classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malizia, A.; Bassani, L.; Bazzano, A.; Bird, A. J.; Masetti, N.; Panessa, F.; Stephen, J. B.; Ubertini, P.

    2012-11-01

    In this work we present the most comprehensive INTEGRAL active galactic nucleus (AGN) sample. It lists 272 AGN for which we have secure optical identifications, precise optical spectroscopy and measured redshift values plus X-ray spectral information, i.e. 2-10 and 20-100 keV fluxes plus column density. Here we mainly use this sample to study the absorption properties of active galaxies, to probe new AGN classes and to test the AGN unification scheme. We find that half (48 per cent) of the sample is absorbed, while the fraction of Compton-thick AGN is small (˜7 per cent). In line with our previous analysis, we have however shown that when the bias towards heavily absorbed objects which are lost if weak and at large distance is removed, as it is possible in the local Universe, the above fractions increase to become 80 and 17 per cent. We also find that absorption is a function of source luminosity, which implies some evolution in the obscuration properties of AGN. A few peculiar classes, so far poorly studied in the hard X-ray band, have been detected and studied for the first time such as 5 X-ray bright optically normal galaxies, 5 type 2 QSOs and 11 low-ionization nuclear emission regions. In terms of optical classification, our sample contains 57 per cent of type 1 and 43 per cent of type 2 AGN; this subdivision is similar to that found in X-rays if unabsorbed versus absorbed objects are considered, suggesting that the match between optical and X-ray classifications is overall good. Only a small percentage of sources (12 per cent) does not fulfil the expectation of the unified theory as we find 22 type 1 AGN which are absorbed and 10 type 2 AGN which are unabsorbed. Studying in depth these outliers we found that most of the absorbed type 1 AGN have X-ray spectra characterized by either complex or warm/ionized absorption more likely due to ionized gas located in an accretion disc wind or in the biconical structure associated with the central nucleus, therefore

  11. Laboratory atomic transition data for precise optical quasar absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Berengut, Julian C.

    2014-02-01

    Quasar spectra reveal a rich array of important astrophysical information about galaxies which intersect the quasar line of sight. They also enable tests of the variability of fundamental constants over cosmological time- and distance-scales. Key to these endeavours are the laboratory frequencies, isotopic and hyperfine structures of various metal-ion transitions. Here, we review and synthesize the existing information about these quantities for 43 transitions which are important for measuring possible changes in the fine-structure constant, α, using optical quasar spectra, i.e. those of Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Zn. We also summarize the information currently missing that precludes more transitions being used. We present an up-to-date set of coefficients, q, which define the sensitivity of these transitions to variations in α. New calculations of isotopic structures and q-coefficients are performed for Si II and Ti II, including Si II λ1808 and Ti IIλλ1910.6/1910.9 for the first time. Finally, simulated absorption-line spectra are used to illustrate the systematic errors expected if the isotopic/hyperfine structures are omitted from profile fitting analyses. To ensure transparency, repeatability and currency of the data and calculations, we supply a comprehensive data base as Supporting Information. This will be updated as new measurements and calculations are performed.

  12. Enhanced Optical Absorption Induced by Dense Nanocavities Inside Titania Nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Han,W.; Wu, L.; Klie, R.; Zhu, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Titania, a wide band gap semiconductor, can generate powerful oxidants and reductants by absorbing photon energies. Titania has been extensively used in photoelectrochemical systems, such as dye-sensitized titania, a wide band gap semiconductor, can generate powerful oxidants and reductants by absorbing photon energies. To improve the photoreactivity of titania, several approaches, including doping and metal loading have been proposed. Nanocavities are isolated entities inside a solid and hence are very different from nanoporous, whose pores (often amorphous and irregular) connect together and open to the surface. Dense polyhedral nanocavities inside single-crystalline anatase titania nanorods were successfully synthesized by simply heating titanate nanorods. The size of the nanocavities is typically about 10 nm. The surfaces of the nanocavity polyhedron are determined to be the crystallographic low-index planes of the titania crystal. We found that these dense nanocavities significantly enhance the optical absorption coefficient of titania in the near-ultraviolet region, thereby providing a new approach to increasing the photoreactivity of the titania nanorods in the applications related to absorbing photons.

  13. Optical absorption in ion-implanted lead lanthanum zirconate titanate ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Seager, C.H.; Land, C.E.

    1984-08-15

    Optical absorption measurements have been performed on unmodified and on ion-implanted lead lanthanum zirconate titanate ceramics using the photothermal deflection spectroscopy technique. Bulk absorption coefficients depend on the average grain size of the material while the absorption associated with the ion-damaged layers does not. The damage-induced surface absorptance correlates well with the photosensitivity observed in implanted PLZT devices, supporting earlier models for the enhanced imaging efficiency of the materials.

  14. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  15. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-01-01

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range. PMID:22089011

  16. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars- GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars- GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  17. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM’s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3 is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. Unrealistic energy absorption by uniform atmospheric dust leads to an unrealistic thermal energy balance on the polar caps. The outcome is an inaccurate cycle of condensation/sublimation of the polar caps and, as a consequence, an inaccurate cycle of total atmospheric mass and global-average surface pressure. Under an assumption of unchanged temperature profile and hydrostatic equilibrium, a given percentage change in surface pressure would produce a corresponding percentage change in density at all altitudes. Consequently, the final result of a change in surface pressure is an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, a density factor value was determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with MapYears 1 and 2 MGCM output

  18. Terminal speed of a gaseous stratus with finite optical depth over a luminous flat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Takao; Fukue, Jun

    2016-06-01

    We reexamine the terminal speed of a moving stratus irradiated by an infinite flat source, considering relativistic radiative transfer in the stratus. For the case of a particle, V. Icke (1989, A&A, 216, 294) analytically derived the terminal speed of (4-√{7})c/3 ˜ 0.45 c, whereas the terminal speed of a stratus with finite optical depth is calculated under the Eddington approximation (J. Fukue, 2014, PASJ, 66, 13), and becomes larger up to 0.7 c in the optically thin limit. In this paper, we numerically calculate radiative transfer in the stratus without the Eddington approximation, and obtain the terminal speed. In the optically thick limit the terminal speed approaches 0.47 c. In the optically thin limit, in contrast to the previous analytical study, it becomes small as the optical depth decreases, and approaches 0.26 c. This is due to the anisotropic effect of the radiation field in the optically thin regime.

  19. Terminal speed of a gaseous stratus with finite optical depth over a luminous flat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Takao; Fukue, Jun

    2016-04-01

    We reexamine the terminal speed of a moving stratus irradiated by an infinite flat source, considering relativistic radiative transfer in the stratus. For the case of a particle, V. Icke (1989, A&A, 216, 294) analytically derived the terminal speed of (4-√{7})c/3 ˜ 0.45 c, whereas the terminal speed of a stratus with finite optical depth is calculated under the Eddington approximation (J. Fukue, 2014, PASJ, 66, 13), and becomes larger up to 0.7 c in the optically thin limit. In this paper, we numerically calculate radiative transfer in the stratus without the Eddington approximation, and obtain the terminal speed. In the optically thick limit the terminal speed approaches 0.47 c. In the optically thin limit, in contrast to the previous analytical study, it becomes small as the optical depth decreases, and approaches 0.26 c. This is due to the anisotropic effect of the radiation field in the optically thin regime.

  20. Influence of the aerosol vertical distribution on the retrievals of aerosol optical depth from satellite radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quijano, Ana Lía; Sokolik, Irina N.; Toon, Owen B.

    2000-11-01

    We investigate the importance of the layered vertical distribution of absorbing and non-absorbing tropospheric aerosols for the retrieval of the aerosol optical depth from satellite radiances measured at visible wavelengths at a single viewing angle. We employ lidar and in-situ measurements of aerosol extinction coefficients and optical depths to model radiances which would have been observed by a satellite. Then, we determine the aerosol optical depth that would produce the observed radiance under various sets of assumptions which are often used in current retrieval algorithms. We demonstrate that, in the presence of dust or other absorbing aerosols, the retrieved aerosol optical depth can underestimate or overestimate the observed optical depth by a factor of two or more depending on the choice of an aerosol optical model and the relative position of different aerosol layers. The presence of undetected clouds provides a further complication.

  1. Regional Aerosol Optical Depth Characteristics from Satellite Observations: ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durkee, P. A.; Nielsen, K. E.; Smith, P. J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Holben, B. N.; Tomasi, C.; Vitale, V.; Collins, D.

    1999-01-01

    Analysis of the aerosol properties during 3 recent international field campaigns ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 are described using satellite retrievals from NOAA AVHRR data. Validation of the satellite retrieval procedure is performed with airborne, shipboard, and land-based sunphotometry during ACE-2. The intercomparison between satellite and surface optical depths has a correlation coefficient of 0.93 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.92 for 860 nm wavelength, The standard error of estimate is 0.025 for 630 nm wavelength and 0.023 for 860 nm wavelength. Regional aerosol properties are examined in composite analysis of aerosol optical properties from the ACE-1, TARFOX and ACE-2 regions. ACE-1 and ACE-2 regions have strong modes in the distribution of optical depth around 0.1, but the ACE-2 tails toward higher values yielding an average of 0.16 consistent with pollution and dust aerosol intrusions. The TARFOX region has a noticeable mode of 0.2, but has significant spread of aerosol optical depth values consistent with the varied continental aerosol constituents off the eastern North American Coast.

  2. MODA: a new algorithm to compute optical depths in multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perego, Albino; Gafton, Emanuel; Cabezón, Rubén; Rosswog, Stephan; Liebendörfer, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    Aims: We introduce the multidimensional optical depth algorithm (MODA) for the calculation of optical depths in approximate multidimensional radiative transport schemes, equally applicable to neutrinos and photons. Motivated by (but not limited to) neutrino transport in three-dimensional simulations of core-collapse supernovae and neutron star mergers, our method makes no assumptions about the geometry of the matter distribution, apart from expecting optically transparent boundaries. Methods: Based on local information about opacities, the algorithm figures out an escape route that tends to minimize the optical depth without assuming any predefined paths for radiation. Its adaptivity makes it suitable for a variety of astrophysical settings with complicated geometry (e.g., core-collapse supernovae, compact binary mergers, tidal disruptions, star formation, etc.). We implement the MODA algorithm into both a Eulerian hydrodynamics code with a fixed, uniform grid and into an SPH code where we use a tree structure that is otherwise used for searching neighbors and calculating gravity. Results: In a series of numerical experiments, we compare the MODA results with analytically known solutions. We also use snapshots from actual 3D simulations and compare the results of MODA with those obtained with other methods, such as the global and local ray-by-ray method. It turns out that MODA achieves excellent accuracy at a moderate computational cost. In appendix we also discuss implementation details and parallelization strategies.

  3. Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Optical Depth Using a Smartphone Sun Photometer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tingting; Thompson, Jonathan E.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, smart phones have been explored for making a variety of mobile measurements. Smart phones feature many advanced sensors such as cameras, GPS capability, and accelerometers within a handheld device that is portable, inexpensive, and consistently located with an end user. In this work, a smartphone was used as a sun photometer for the remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth. The top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) irradiance was estimated through the construction of Langley plots on days when the sky was cloudless and clear. Changes in optical depth were monitored on a different day when clouds intermittently blocked the sun. The device demonstrated a measurement precision of 1.2% relative standard deviation for replicate photograph measurements (38 trials, 134 datum). However, when the accuracy of the method was assessed through using optical filters of known transmittance, a more substantial uncertainty was apparent in the data. Roughly 95% of replicate smart phone measured transmittances are expected to lie within ±11.6% of the true transmittance value. This uncertainty in transmission corresponds to an optical depth of approx. ±0.12–0.13 suggesting the smartphone sun photometer would be useful only in polluted areas that experience significant optical depths. The device can be used as a tool in the classroom to present how aerosols and gases effect atmospheric transmission. If improvements in measurement precision can be achieved, future work may allow monitoring networks to be developed in which citizen scientists submit acquired data from a variety of locations. PMID:24416199

  4. Depth-resolved holographic optical coherence imaging using a high-sensitivity photorefractive polymer device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador, M.; Prauzner, J.; Köber, S.; Meerholz, K.; Jeong, K.; Nolte, D. D.

    2008-12-01

    We present coherence-gated holographic imaging using a highly sensitive photorefractive (PR) polymer composite as the recording medium. Due to the high sensitivity of the composite holographic recording at intensities as low as 5 mW/cm2 allowed for a frame exposure time of only 500ms. Motivated by regenerative medical applications, we demonstrate optical depth sectioning of a polymer foam for use as a cell culture matrix. An axial resolution of 18 μm and a transverse resolution of 30 μm up to a depth of 600 μm was obtained using an off-axis recording geometry.

  5. Optical depth retrievals from Delta-T SPN1 measurements of broadband solar irradiance at ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estelles, Victor; Serrano, David; Segura, Sara; Wood, John; Webb, Nick

    2016-04-01

    The SPN1 radiometer, manufactured by Delta-T Devices Ltd., is an instrument designed for the measurement of global solar irradiance and its components (diffuse, direct) at ground level. In the present study, the direct irradiance component has been used to retrieve an effective total optical depth, by applying the Beer-Lambert law to the broadband measurements. The results have been compared with spectral total optical depths derived from two Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01 sun-sky radiometers, located at the Burjassot site in Valencia (Spain), during years 2013 - 2015. The SPN1 is an inexpensive and versatile instrument for the measurement of the three components of the solar radiation without any mobile part and without any need to azimuthally align the instrument to track the sun (http://www.delta-t.co.uk). The three components of the solar radiation are estimated from a combination of measurements performed by 7 different miniature thermopiles. In turn, the Beer-Lambert law has been applied to the broadband direct solar component to obtain an effective total optical depth, representative of the total extinction in the atmosphere. For the assessment of the total optical depth values retrieved with the SPN1, two different sun-sky radiometers (Cimel CE318 and Prede POM01L) have been employed. Both instruments belong to the international networks AERONET and SKYNET. The modified SUNRAD package has been applied in both Cimel and Prede instruments. Cloud affected data has been removed by applying the Smirnov cloud-screening procedure in the SUNRAD algorithm. The broadband SPN1 total optical depth has been analysed by comparison with the spectral total optical depth from the sun-sky radiometer measurements at wavelengths 440, 500, 675, 870 and 1020 nm. The slopes and intercepts have been estimated to be 0.47 - 0.98 and 0.055 - 0.16 with increasing wavelength. The average correlation coefficients and RMSD were 0.80 - 0.83 and 0.034 - 0.036 for all the channels. The

  6. Grain depth distribution and the reality of optical transient candidates near the GRB 790325b position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudec, R.

    1993-03-01

    The method of grain depth distribution analysis has recently been suggested as a means of verifying the genuine astrophysical nature of optical candidates for gamma-ray burst sources. Application of this technique has raised doubts about the reality of several such candidates, including the multiple candidate near gamma-ray burst source 790325b. We analyze those results here on the basis of experience gained from the optical search for optical transients. It is concluded that the results are not convincing and that the true astrophysical origin of the optical candidate for gamma-ray source 790325b can neither be definitely proven nor definitely discarded on the basis of the present evidence.

  7. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements from GOES-13, Aircraft, AERONET and the Surface During DISCOVER-AQ in July 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, J. W.; Kondragunta, S.; Brent, L. C.; He, H.; Arkinson, H.; Dickerson, R. R.; Ciren, P.; Xu, C.; Holben, B.; Schafer, J. S.; Eck, T. F.; Giles, D. M.; Sorokin, M.; Smirnov, A.; Sinyuk, A.; Tran, A.; Kenny, P.; Slutsker, I.; Huang, C.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 DISCOVER-AQ campaign took place in July of 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington area, and included aircraft flights by the University of Maryland Cessna 402B, the NASA P-3, an intensive deployment of 44 sunphotometers from the DRAGON-USA network and numerous satellite overpasses including the NOAA GOES-13 satellite. Surface monitoring stations are placed strategically to represent air quality affecting numerous people, but they cannot monitor the areas in between. Air quality products from satellites offer the promise of filling those gaps. Comparison of aerosol optical depth data from the NOAA GOES-13 satellite to those from the DRAGON-USA reveals that the two measurements are strongly correlated overall and share a common diel cycle, with very little bias. Column profiles of scattering and aerosol absorption from the NASA P-3 and the UMD Cessna 402B are compared to aerosol optical depth as measured from satellites. Satellite column optical depths would be very useful for air quality attainment strategies if they can be tied to ground-based measurements of fine particle mass. Co-located spirals from the UMD Cessna's regular flights over the region, the DISCOVER-AQ campaign, and the DRAGON-USA intensive are used to determine the relationships between these quantities. Preliminary analysis of the dependence of the correlation between surface aerosol concentration and aerosol optical depth on boundary layer height and aerosol type will be presented.

  8. [Effect of fertilization depth on 15N-urea absorption, utilization and loss in dwarf apple trees].

    PubMed

    Ding, Ning; Chen, Qian; Xu, Hai-gang; Ji, Meng-meng; Jiang, Han; Jiang, Yuan-mao

    2015-03-01

    Five-year-old 'Fuji'3/M26/M. hupehensis Rehd. seedlings were treated by 15N tracer to study the effects of fertilization depth (0, 20 and 40 cm) on 15N-urea absorption, distribution, utilization and loss in soil. The results showed that the plant leaf area, chlorophyll content and total N of apple leaves in 20 cm treatment were obviously higher than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments. The 15N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) in different organs of apple plant under different depths were significantly different, and the Ndff was the highest in roots at the full-bloom stage, and then in perennial branches. During the shoot rapid-growing and flower bud differentiation stage, the Ndff of new organs higher than that of the storage organs, and the Ndff of different organs were high level at fruit rapid-expanding stage, and the Ndff of fruit was the highest. The distribution ratio of 15N at fruit maturity stage was significantly different under fertilization depths, and that of the vegetative and repro- ductive organs of 20 cm treatment were obviously higher than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments, but that of the storage organs of 20 cm treatment was lower than 0 cm and 40 cm treatments. At fruit maturity stage, 15N utilization rate of apple plant of 20 cm treatment was 24.0%, which was obviously higher than 0 cm (14.1%) and 40 cm (7.6%) treatments, and 15N loss rate was 54.0%, which was obviously lower than 0 cm (67.8%) and 40 cm (63.5%) treatments. With the increase of fertilization depths, the N residue in soil increased sharply. PMID:26211056

  9. Nocturnal Measurements of HONO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P.; McLaren, R.

    2011-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used to quantify the concentration of HONO, NO2 and SO2 in the nocturnal urban atmosphere at York University over a period of one year. These measurements form a comprehensive HONO data set, including a large range of temperatures, relative humidity, surface conditions (snow, water, dry, etc.) and NO2 concentrations. Laboratory studies and observations within the nocturnal boundary layer reported in the literature suggest heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surface adsorbed water as the major nighttime source of HONO. HONO formation and photolysis is believed to represent a major source term in the hydroxyl radical budget in polluted continental regions. Currently, most air quality models tend to significantly underpredict HONO, caused by the lack of understanding of HONO formation processes and the parameters that affect its concentration. Recently, we reported nocturnal pseudo steady states (PSS) of HONO in an aqueous marine environment and a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces was proposed. The data set collected at York University is being analyzed with a view towards further understanding the nighttime HONO formation mechanism and testing several hypotheses: 1) A HONO PSS can exist during certain times at night in an urban area in which the HONO concentration is independent of NO2, given the surface contains sufficient water coverage and is saturated with nitrogen containing precursors; 2) The concentration of HONO is positively correlated with temperature during periods where a PSS exists; 3) Different conversion efficiencies of NO2 to HONO exist on dry, wet and snow surfaces; 4) HONO formation has a NO2 order dependence between 0 and 2nd order, dependant on NO2 concentration, relative humidity, etc. The data set will be presented along with statistical analysis that sheds new light on the source of HONO in urban areas at night.

  10. Multi annual evolution and trends of surface visibility in Athens and its relationship with aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Founda, Dimitra; Kazadzis, Stelios; Mihalopoulos, Nikos

    2014-05-01

    Visibility concerns the visual air quality and constitutes an important feature of the climate and landscape of an area. Visibility impairment is the result of the absorption and scattering of light by gases and particles in the atmosphere. Low visibility could indicate fog or rain events but under cloudless sky conditions optical quality is mainly determined from the concentration of the aerosols in the atmosphere. For this reason, visibility data are broadly used as a surrogate for the investigation of long term trends of air quality. One of the largest long term datasets of daily observations of visibility, conducted at the National Observatory of Athens at 14.00 LST (LST= GMT+2hrs) since 1931, was used to built time series of monthly, seasonal and annual averages of visibility in the city of Athens. Annual and seasonal courses of visibility over the studied period exhibit small scale fluctuations but with marked long term decreasing trends. An obvious drop of visibility is observed during early 1950's, a decade characterized by intensified urbanization of the city of Athens. The long term linear trend over the entire studied period (1931-2012) is negative and exceeds - 300m/year. The trend is more pronounced in the warm and dry season of the year. This possibly indicates the major role of aerosol concentration rather than meteorological conditions (rain, fog etc) to visibility deterioration. A tendency for stabilization of the visibility in Athens is observed during the last decade. This is possibly related to a series of measures taken after 1990's, concerning the fuels quality and penetration of anti-pollution technology in industry and vehicles. Daily values of visibility in Athens were analysed along with daily values of (MODIS/Terra) satellite derived aerosol optical depth retrievals over the city since 2000, in order to investigate a possible correlation between the two variables. This will enable the reconstruction of aerosol optical depth time series

  11. Optical absorption components of light-modulated absorption spectrum of CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Long, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The amplitude and decay coefficient of light-induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) was measured as a function of wavelength from 535 to 850 nm for single-crystal CdS. The decay coefficient exhibited a discontinuous resonance at 710 nm which was due to the overlap and cancellation of two opposing absorption changes. A method was developed to separate these opposing absorption changes using the measured decay coefficients. The discrete-level-to-band energy for one absorption change was found to be 1.64 eV. An improved model was developed which contains two associated levels in the band gap separated by 0.32 eV.

  12. Depth profiling of photothermal compound concentrations using phase sensitive optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Guangying; Reif, Roberto; Huang, Zhihong; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2011-01-01

    A model that describes the concentration of photothermal (light-to-heat converters) compounds as a function of depth in a turbid medium is developed. The system consists of a pump laser (808 nm modulated at 400 Hz), which heats a photothermal compound, and a phase sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, which detects the changes in the optical path length of the sample induced by the temperature increase. The model is theoretically derived and the coefficients are empirically determined using solid homogeneous gel phantoms. The model is validated by reconstructing the concentration of a photothermal compound in thick single and double layer solid phantoms. PMID:22191920

  13. Evaluation of sulfate aerosol optical depths over the North Atlantic and comparison with satellite observations

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, C.M.; Ghan, S.J.; Benkovitz, C.M.; Wagener, R.; Nemesure, S.; Schwartz, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    It has been postulated that scattering of sunlight by aerosols can significantly reduce the amount of solar energy absorbed by the climate system. Aerosol measurement programs alone cannot provide all the information needed to evaluate the radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosols. Thus, comprehensive global-scale aerosol models, properly validated against surface-based and satellite measurements, are a fundamental tool for evaluating the impacts of aerosols on the planetary radiation balance. Analyzed meteorological fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts are used to drive a modified version of the PNL Global Chemistry Model, applied to the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The resulting sulfate fields are used to calculate aerosol optical depths, which in turn are compared to estimates of aerosol optical depth based on satellite observations.

  14. Optical depth measurements by shadow-band radiometers and their uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Mikhail; Kiedron, Peter; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Hodges, Gary; Flynn, Connor J.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2007-11-20

    Shadow-band radiometers in general, and especially the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), are widely used for atmospheric optical depth measurements. The major programs running MFRSR networks in the U.S. include DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, NOAA Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) Network, and NASA Solar Irradiance Research Network (SIRN). In this paper we discuss a number of technical issues specific for shadow-band radiometers and their impact on the optical depth measurements. These problems include instrument tilt and misalignment, as well as some data processing artifacts. Techniques for data evaluation and automatic detection of some of these problems are described.

  15. Optical depth measurements by shadow-band radiometers and their uncertainties

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Mikhail; Kiedron, Peter; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Hodges, Gary; Flynn, Connor J.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2007-11-15

    Shadow-band radiometers in general, and especially the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), are widely used for atmospheric optical depth measurements. The major programs running MFRSR networks in the U.S. include DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, NOAA Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) Network, and NASA Solar Irradiance Research Network (SIRN). In this paper we discuss a number of technical issues specific for shadow-band radiometers and their impact on the optical depth measurements. These problems include instrument tilt and misalignment, as well as somedata processing artifacts. Techniques for data evaluation and automatic detection of some of these problems are described.

  16. Constructing portable depth from defocus optical profilometers for surface roughness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Robert; Steiner, Matthew; Suhring, William; Agnew, Sean; Fitz-Gerald, James

    2015-03-01

    Hand portability of non-contact optical profilometers represents a significant technological breakthrough for wide-area industrial processes such as grit blasting, capable of replacing mechanical styluses and providing real time assessment of surface roughness without damaging sampled areas. This paper demonstrates the possibility of building depth from defocus profilometers using off the shelf components, allowing for improved portability, affordability, and customization compared to similar table-top commercial products. An outlined demonstration device is proven to be capable of matching the performance of an ISO/NIST standardized mechanical profilometer for isotropic rough surfaces in the 2-10 μm Ra range with R2 > 0.96, and important considerations for each component of the assembly are addressed in detail. A prototype for a next generation liquid-lens based depth from defocus optical profilometer is also presented along with the technological obstacles found to be associated with such devices.

  17. Research on the Relationship Between Cloud Temperature and Optical Depth Using Rotational and Vibrational Raman Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M. Patrick; Lei, Liqiao

    2016-06-01

    Clouds play a key role in the climate system, for they can result in a warming or a cooling effect according to their characteristics and altitudes. Raman Lidars have been proven to be a very useful remote sensing tool to characterize cloud properties and locations. In this paper, cloud temperature and optical depth are obtained using rotational Raman (RR) and vibrational Raman techniques. Results of cloud temperature and optical depth (OD) observed by the Hampton University (HU) Rotational-Vibrational Raman Lidar are presented. The paper discusses the influence of cloud OD on temperature of the cloud base and top. From these measurements, the relation of low-altitude cloud OD and temperature is summarized. These analyses are unique in that they combine simultaneous measurements of these quantities that can lead to an improvement in the understanding of cloud radiation transfer and effects.

  18. Ultra-long scan depth optical coherence tomography for imaging the anterior segment of human eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dexi; Shen, Meixiao; Leng, Lin

    2012-12-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was developed in order to image the anterior segment of human eye. The optical path at reference arm was switched to compensate the sensitivity drop in OCT images. An scan depth of 12.28 mm and an axial resolution of 12.8 μm in air were achieved. The anterior segment from cornea to posterior surface of crystalline lens was clearly imaged and measured using this system. A custom designed Badal optometer was coupled into the sample arm to induce the accommodation, and the movement of crystalline lens was traced after the image registration. Our research demonstrates that SD-OCT with ultra-long scan depth can be used to image the human eye for accommodation research.

  19. Tunable van Hove Singularities and Optical Absorption of Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yufeng; Yang, Li

    2013-03-01

    We perform the first-principles GW-Bethe-Salpeter Equation (BSE) simulation to study the optical absorption spectra of isolated twisted bilayer graphene (TBLG). The twisting generates new van Hove singularities (VHS), and these VHSs and corresponding optical absorption peaks can be tuned in a wide range by the twist angle. Enhanced electron-electron and electron-hole interactions are shown to be important to understand both optical absorption peak positions and their lineshapes. With these many-electron effects included, our calculation satisfactorily explains recent experimental measurements.

  20. Burn depth determination in human skin using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Mark C.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Park, Boris H.; Cense, Barry; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2003-07-01

    Accurate evaluation of the depth of injury in burn victims is of considerable practical value to the surgeon, both for initial determination of resuscitation fluid requirements, and in deciding whether excision and closure of the wound is necessary. Currently, burn depth is most accurately evaluated by visual inspection, though decisions concerning treatment may not be possible for a number of days post-injury. As part of our ongoing efforts to provide an objective, quantitative method for burn depth determination, we present here the results of a study using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to detect and measure thermally induced changes in collagen birefringence in skin excised from burn patients. We find that PS-OCT is capable of imaging and quantifying significantly reduced birefringence in burned human skin.

  1. Features of aerosol spectral optical depth at a tropical urban environment at Pune

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aher, G. R.; Shantikumar Singh, N.; Agashe, V. V.

    2000-08-01

    The authors used a sun-tracking multiple wavelength radiometer to study characteristics of atmospheric aerosols from Pune University campus. The study shows that there is a strong influence of weather parameters like relative humidity and surface wind and atmospheric boundary layer processes such as capped inversion and upper air circulation on the temporal variation of the aerosol spectral optical depth. These are described in the paper.

  2. Ice Cloud Optical Depth Mapping from MRO-CRISM Multispectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, David R.

    2015-11-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) multi-spectral mapping data are a reduced spectral sampling mapping set using only 72 of its 545 channels. This reduction allowed for greater spatial coverage and the creation of nearly complete maps after several sols of orbits. Using data from late 2006 through early 2008 I have created 6 such maps in order to measure ice cloud optical depth as a function of position for each of them. Optical depth is retrieved using a DISORT-based radiative transfer code[1].One of the inputs for the code is surface reflectance which is not known at each point, a priori, but instead is fit from a linear combination of surface endmember spectra—the endmember coefficients for each endmember, along with dust and ice optical depth, are adjustable model parameters that are varied until the RMS error between model and data is a minimum. Surface spectral endmembers are recovered through a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and target transformation (TT) which first reduces the dimensionality of the data (from 72 to 4) and then creates a data cloud in this space of possible potential endmembers derived from best fits of a spectral library [2-4]. The actual endmembers are chosen from extrema of this candidate cloud.I will present six ice cloud optical depth maps made using this technique with a 3-endmember surface model.[1] Wolff, M. J., personal communication.[2] Klassen, D. R. (2013) AAS/DPS Abstracts, 45, 313.05.[3] Klassen, D. R. (2014) LPI Contributions, 1791, 1384.[4] Klassen, D. R. (2014) The Fifth International Workshop on the Mars Atmosphere, 2303.

  3. Depth and Shape of the 0.94-microm Water Vapor Absorption Band for Clear and Cloudy Skies.

    PubMed

    Volz, F E

    1969-11-01

    Sky radiation near zenith and solar radiation in the rhosigmatau band region were recorded by means of a rotating interference filter (lambda0.98-0.88 microm) and a silicon detector. Although the spectral resolution of the simple spectrometer was not high, the water vapor content of the cloud free atmosphere was obtained with reasonable accuracy. The band depth of the radiation from thin, bright clouds was only slightly greater than that of the cloud free atmosphere, but dense and dark clouds showed deep bands mainly caused by increased path length as a result of multiple scattering. Considerable distortion of the band due to absorption by liquid water is observed in the radiation from very dark and dense clouds, and sometimes during snowfall. Some laboratory measurements are also discussed. PMID:20076009

  4. Analysis for nonlinear inversion technique developed to estimate depth-distribution of absorption by spatially resolved backscattering measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Kazuhiro; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-03-01

    We have proposed a new nonlinear inversion technique to estimate the spatial distribution of the absorption coefficient (μa) in the depth direction of a turbid medium by spatially resolved backscattering measurement. With this technique, we can obtain cross-sectional image of μa as deep as the backscattered light traveled even when the transmitted light through the medium cannot be detected. In this technique, the depth distribution of absorption coefficient is determined by iterative calculation using the spatial path-length distribution (SPD) of traveled photons as a function of source-detector distance. In this calculation, the variance of path-length of many photons in each layer is also required. The SPD and the variance of path-length are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation using a known reduced scattering coefficient (μs'). Therefore, we need to know the μs' of the turbid medium beforehand. We have shown in computer simulation that this technique works well when the μs' is the typical values of mammalian body tissue, or 1.0 /mm. In this study, the accuracy of the μa estimation was analyzed and its dependence on the μs' was clarified quantitatively in various situations expected in practice. 10% deviations in μs' resulted in about 30% error in μa estimation, in average. This suggested that the measurement or the appropriate estimation of μs' is required to utilize the proposed technique effectively. Through this analysis, the effectiveness and the limitation of the newly proposed technique were clarified, and the problems to be solved were identified.

  5. The optical depth sensor (ODS) for column dust opacity measurements and cloud detection on martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Foujols, T.

    2016-05-01

    A lightweight and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) able to measure alternatively scattered flux at zenith and the sum of the direct flux and the scattered flux in blue and red has been developed to work in martian environment. The principal goals of ODS are to perform measurements of the daily mean dust opacity and to retrieve the altitude and optical depth of high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in the understanding of martian meteorology. The retrieval procedure of dust opacity is based on the use of radiative transfer simulations reproducing observed changes in the solar flux during the day as a function of 4 free parameters: dust opacity in blue and red, and effective radius and effective width of dust size distribution. The detection of clouds is undertaken by looking at the time variation of the color index (CI), defined as the ratio between red and blue ODS channels, at twilight. The retrieval of altitude and optical depth of clouds is carried out using a radiative transfer model in spherical geometry to simulate the CI time variation at twilight. Here the different retrieval procedures to analyze ODS signals, as well as the results obtained in different sensitivity analysis are presented and discussed.

  6. The optical depth sensor (ODS) for column dust opacity measurements and cloud detection on martian atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Foujols, T.

    2016-08-01

    A lightweight and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) able to measure alternatively scattered flux at zenith and the sum of the direct flux and the scattered flux in blue and red has been developed to work in martian environment. The principal goals of ODS are to perform measurements of the daily mean dust opacity and to retrieve the altitude and optical depth of high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in the understanding of martian meteorology. The retrieval procedure of dust opacity is based on the use of radiative transfer simulations reproducing observed changes in the solar flux during the day as a function of 4 free parameters: dust opacity in blue and red, and effective radius and effective width of dust size distribution. The detection of clouds is undertaken by looking at the time variation of the color index (CI), defined as the ratio between red and blue ODS channels, at twilight. The retrieval of altitude and optical depth of clouds is carried out using a radiative transfer model in spherical geometry to simulate the CI time variation at twilight. Here the different retrieval procedures to analyze ODS signals, as well as the results obtained in different sensitivity analysis are presented and discussed.

  7. Determination of aerosol extinction coefficient profiles from LIDAR data using the optical depth solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aparna, John; Satheesh, S. K.; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2006-12-01

    The LIDAR equation contains four unknown variables in a two-component atmosphere where the effects caused by both molecules and aerosols have to be considered. The inversion of LIDAR returns to retrieve aerosol extinction profiles, thus, calls for some functional relationship to be assumed between these two. The Klett's method, assumes a functional relationship between the extinction and backscatter. In this paper, we apply a different technique, called the optical depth solution, where we made use of the total optical depth or transmittance of the atmosphere along the LIDAR-measurement range. This method provides a stable solution to the LIDAR equation. In this study, we apply this technique to the data obtained using a micro pulse LIDAR (MPL, model 1000, Science and Engineering Services Inc) to retrieve the vertical distribution of aerosol extinction coefficient. The LIDAR is equipped with Nd-YLF laser at an operating wavelength of 523.5 nm and the data were collected over Bangalore. The LIDAR data are analyzed to get to weighted extinction coefficient profiles or the weighted sum of aerosol and molecular extinction coefficient profiles. Simultaneous measurements of aerosol column optical depth (at 500 nm) using a Microtops sun photometer were used in the retrievals. The molecular extinction coefficient is determined assuming standard atmospheric conditions. The aerosol extinction coefficient profiles are determined by subtracting the molecular part from the weighted extinction coefficient profiles. The details of the method and the results obtained are presented.

  8. Preliminary results of the aerosol optical depth retrieval in Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, H. Q.; Kanniah, K. D.; Lau, A. M. S.

    2014-02-01

    Monitoring of atmospheric aerosols over the urban area is important as tremendous amounts of pollutants are released by industrial activities and heavy traffic flow. Air quality monitoring by satellite observation provides better spatial coverage, however, detailed aerosol properties retrieval remains a challenge. This is due to the limitation of aerosol retrieval algorithm on high reflectance (bright surface) areas. The aim of this study is to retrieve aerosol optical depth over urban areas of Iskandar Malaysia; the main southern development zone in Johor state, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) 500 m resolution data. One of the important steps is the aerosol optical depth retrieval is to characterise different types of aerosols in the study area. This information will be used to construct a Look Up Table containing the simulated aerosol reflectance and corresponding aerosol optical depth. Thus, in this study we have characterised different aerosol types in the study area using Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) data. These data were processed using cluster analysis and the preliminary results show that the area is consisting of coastal urban (65%), polluted urban (27.5%), dust particles (6%) and heavy pollution (1.5%) aerosols.

  9. Quantitative comparison of contrast and imaging depth of ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography images in 800–1700 nm wavelength region

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Shutaro; Nishizawa, Norihiko

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the wavelength dependence of imaging depth and clearness of structure in ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography over a wide wavelength range. We quantitatively compared the optical properties of samples using supercontinuum sources at five wavelengths, 800 nm, 1060 nm, 1300 nm, 1550 nm, and 1700 nm, with the same system architecture. For samples of industrially used homogeneous materials with low water absorption, the attenuation coefficients of the samples were fitted using Rayleigh scattering theory. We confirmed that the systems with the longer-wavelength sources had lower scattering coefficients and less dependence on the sample materials. For a biomedical sample, we observed wavelength dependence of the attenuation coefficient, which can be explained by absorption by water and hemoglobin. PMID:22312581

  10. Absorption line metrology by optical feedback frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkart, Johannes; Kassi, Samir

    2015-04-01

    Optical feedback frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (OFFS-CRDS) is a near-shot-noise-limited technique combining a sensitivity of with a highly linear frequency axis and sub-kHz resolution. Here, we give an in-depth review of the key elements of the experimental setup encompassing a highly stable V-shaped reference cavity, an integrated Mach-Zehnder modulator and a tightly locked ring-down cavity with a finesse of 450,000. Carrying out a detailed analysis of the spectrometer performance and its limitations, we revisit the photo-electron shot-noise limit in CRDS and discuss the impact of optical fringes. We demonstrate different active schemes for fringe cancelation by varying the phase of parasitic reflections. The proof-of-principle experiments reported here include a broadband high-resolution spectrum of carbon dioxide at 1.6 µm and an isolated line-shape measurement with a signal-to-noise ratio of 80,000. Beyond laboratory-based absorption line metrology for fundamental research, OFFS-CRDS holds a considerable potential for field laser measurements of trace gas concentrations and isotopic ratios by virtue of its small sample volume and footprint, the robust cavity-locking scheme and supreme precision.

  11. Tuning optical and three photon absorption properties in graphene oxide-polyvinyl alcohol free standing films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthikeyan, B.; Udayabhaskar, R.; Hariharan, S.

    2016-07-01

    We report the optical and nonlinear optical properties of graphene oxide (GO)-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) free standing films. The composite polymer films were prepared in ex-situ method. The variation in optical absorption spectra and optical constants with the amount of GO loading was noteworthy from the optical absorption spectroscopic studies. Nonlinear optical studies done at 532 nm using 5 ns laser pulses show three photon absorption like behaviour. Both steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies reveal that the GO was functioning as a pathway for the decay of fluorescence from PVA. This is attributed to the energy level modifications of GO through hydroxyl groups with PVA. Raman spectroscopy also supports the interaction between GO and PVA ions through OH radicals.

  12. Low photon scattering rates and large optical depths of atoms in donut modes of hollow core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechkis, Joseph A.; Fatemi, Fredrik K.

    2012-06-01

    We have guided cold rubidium atoms in blue-detuned hollow optical modes of a hollow fiber. These higher order modes allow large optical depth, low scattering rates, and efficient use of guide laser power. Atoms are transported through a 3-cm-long hollow fiber with a 100 micron diameter using the first three optical modes of the fiber. We compare guiding properties in the red-detuned, fundamental HE11 mode with the blue-detuned TE01 (first order) and HE12 (second order) modes. Using guide laser powers below 50 mW and detunings below 1.5 nm, we have directly measured recoil scattering rates in the three different guides and found that atoms in the HE12 mode typically have a 10x lower recoil scattering rate compared to the red-detuned HE11 mode for equal guide peak intensity. Furthermore, we have observed optical depths of ˜20 for the blue-detuned guides with recoil scattering rates below 10 Hz. We will discuss our ongoing experiments using the atoms in these guides. This work supported by the Office of Naval Research and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  13. Extended depth of focus adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuhiro; Kurokawa, Kazuhiro; Makita, Shuichi; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2012-01-01

    We present an adaptive optics spectral domain optical coherence tomography (AO-SDOCT) with a long focal range by active phase modulation of the pupil. A long focal range is achieved by introducing AO-controlled third-order spherical aberration (SA). The property of SA and its effects on focal range are investigated in detail using the Huygens-Fresnel principle, beam profile measurement and OCT imaging of a phantom. The results indicate that the focal range is extended by applying SA, and the direction of extension can be controlled by the sign of applied SA. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo human retinal imaging by altering the applied SA. PMID:23082278

  14. Dual-band Fourier domain optical coherence tomography with depth-related compensations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Ma, Lixin; Yu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Dual-band Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) provides depth-resolved spectroscopic imaging that enhances tissue contrast and reduces image speckle. However, previous dual-band FD-OCT systems could not correctly give the tissue spectroscopic contrast due to depth-related discrepancy in the imaging method and attenuation in biological tissue samples. We designed a new dual-band full-range FD-OCT imaging system and developed an algorithm to compensate depth-related fall-off and light attenuation. In our imaging system, the images from two wavelength bands were intrinsically overlapped and their intensities were balanced. The processing time of dual-band OCT image reconstruction and depth-related compensations were minimized by using multiple threads that execute in parallel. Using the newly developed system, we studied tissue phantoms and human cancer xenografts and muscle tissues dissected from severely compromised immune deficient mice. Improved spectroscopic contrast and sensitivity were achieved, benefiting from the depth-related compensations. PMID:24466485

  15. Retrievals of cloud optical depth and effective radius from Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yin B.; Vogelmann A.; Min Q.; Duan M.; Bartholomew M. J.; Turner D. D.

    2011-12-13

    A Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) was developed and deployed in a field test at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The TCRSR measures the forward-scattering lobe of the direct solar beam (i.e., the solar aureole) through an optically thin cloud (optical depth < 8). We applied the retrieval algorithm of Min and Duan (2005) to the TCRSR measurements of the solar aureole to derive simultaneously the cloud optical depth (COD) and cloud drop effective radius (DER), subsequently inferring the cloud liquid-water path (LWP). After careful calibration and preprocessing, our results indicate that the TCRSR is able to retrieve simultaneously these three properties for optically thin water clouds. Colocated instruments, such as the MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), and Microwave Radiometer (MWR), are used to evaluate our retrieval results. The relative difference between retrieved CODs from the TCRSR and those from the MFRSR is less than 5%. The distribution of retrieved LWPs from the TCRSR is similar to those from the MWR and AERI. The differences between the TCRSR-based retrieved DERs and those from the AERI are apparent in some time periods, and the uncertainties of the DER retrievals are discussed in detail in this article.

  16. Double peacock eye optical element for extended focal depth imaging with ophthalmic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Lenny A.; Millán, María S.; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kolodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2012-04-01

    The aged human eye is commonly affected by presbyopia, and therefore, it gradually loses its capability to form images of objects placed at different distances. Extended depth of focus (EDOF) imaging elements can overcome this inability, despite the introduction of a certain amount of aberration. This paper evaluates the EDOF imaging performance of the so-called peacock eye phase diffractive element, which focuses an incident plane wave into a segment of the optical axis and explores the element's potential use for ophthalmic presbyopia compensation optics. Two designs of the element are analyzed: the single peacock eye, which produces one focal segment along the axis, and the double peacock eye, which is a spatially multiplexed element that produces two focal segments with partial overlapping along the axis. The performances of the peacock eye elements are compared with those of multifocal lenses through numerical simulations as well as optical experiments in the image space. The results demonstrate that the peacock eye elements form sharper images along the focal segment than the multifocal lenses and, therefore, are more suitable for presbyopia compensation. The extreme points of the depth of field in the object space, which represent the remote and the near object points, have been experimentally obtained for both the single and the double peacock eye optical elements. The double peacock eye element has better imaging quality for relatively short and intermediate distances than the single peacock eye, whereas the latter seems better for far distance vision.

  17. An integral imaging method for depth extraction with lens array in an optical tweezer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulu; Liu, Wei-Wei; Wang, Anting; Li, Yinmei; Ming, Hai

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a new integral imaging method is proposed for depth extraction in an optical tweezer system. A mutual coherence algorithm of stereo matching are theoretically analyzed and demonstrated feasible by virtual simulation. In our design, optical tweezer technique is combined with integral imaging in a single microscopy system by inserting a lens array into the optical train. On one hand, the optical tweezer subsystem is built based on the modulated light field from a solid laser, and the strong focused beam forms a light trap to capture tiny specimens. On the other hand, through parameters optimization, the microscopic integral imaging subsystem is composed of a microscope objective, a lens array (150x150 array with 0.192mm unit size and 9mm focal length) and a single lens reflex (SLR). Pre-magnified by the microscope objective, the specimens formed multiple images through the lens array. A single photograph of a series of multiple sub-images has recorded perspective views of the specimens. The differences between adjacent sub-images have been analyzed for depth extraction with the mutual coherence algorithm. The experimental results show that the axial resolution can reach to 1μm -1 and lateral resolution can reach to 2 μm -1.

  18. Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Southern Ocean Within the Framework of Maritime Aerosol Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sayer, A. M.; Sakerin, S. M.; Radionov, V. F.; Courcoux, Y.; Broccardo, S. P.; Evangelista, H.; Croot, P. L.; Disterhoft, P.; Piketh, S.; Milinevsky, G. P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Slutsker, I.; Giles, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol production sources over the World Ocean and various factors determining aerosol spatial and temporal distribution are important for understanding the Earth's radiation budget and aerosol-cloud interactions. The Maritime Aerosol Network (MAN) as a component of AERONET has been collecting aerosol optical depth data over the oceans since 2006. A significant progress has been made in data acquisition over areas that previously had very little or no coverage. Data collection included intensive study areas in the Southern Ocean and off the coast of Antarctica including a number of circumnavigation cruises in high southern latitudes. It made an important contribution to MAN and provided a valuable reference point in atmospheric aerosol optical studies. The paper presents results of this international and multi-agency effort in studying aerosol optical properties over Southern Ocean and adjacent areas. The ship-borne aerosol optical depth measurements offer an excellent opportunity for comparison with global aerosol transport models, satellite retrievals and provide useful information on aerosol distribution over the World Ocean. A public domain web-based database dedicated to the MAN activity can be found at http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/new_web/maritime_aerosol_network.html.

  19. Improvement of Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over Hong Kong from a Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Using Critical Reflectance with Background Optical Depth Correction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Mijin; Kim, Jhoon; Wong, Man Sing; Yoon, Jongmin; Lee, Jaehwa; Wu, Dong L.; Chan, P.W.; Nichol, Janet E.; Chung, Chu-Yong; Ou, Mi-Lim

    2014-01-01

    Despite continuous efforts to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) using a conventional 5-channelmeteorological imager in geostationary orbit, the accuracy in urban areas has been poorer than other areas primarily due to complex urban surface properties and mixed aerosol types from different emission sources. The two largest error sources in aerosol retrieval have been aerosol type selection and surface reflectance. In selecting the aerosol type from a single visible channel, the season-dependent aerosol optical properties were adopted from longterm measurements of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-photometers. With the aerosol optical properties obtained fromthe AERONET inversion data, look-up tableswere calculated by using a radiative transfer code: the Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). Surface reflectance was estimated using the clear sky composite method, awidely used technique for geostationary retrievals. Over East Asia, the AOD retrieved from the Meteorological Imager showed good agreement, although the values were affected by cloud contamination errors. However, the conventional retrieval of the AOD over Hong Kong was largely underestimated due to the lack of information on the aerosol type and surface properties. To detect spatial and temporal variation of aerosol type over the area, the critical reflectance method, a technique to retrieve single scattering albedo (SSA), was applied. Additionally, the background aerosol effect was corrected to improve the accuracy of the surface reflectance over Hong Kong. The AOD retrieved froma modified algorithmwas compared to the collocated data measured by AERONET in Hong Kong. The comparison showed that the new aerosol type selection using the critical reflectance and the corrected surface reflectance significantly improved the accuracy of AODs in Hong Kong areas,with a correlation coefficient increase from0.65 to 0.76 and a regression line change from tMI [basic algorithm] = 0

  20. A Neural Network Approach to Infer Optical Depth of Thick Ice Clouds at Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnis, P.; Hong, G.; Sun-Mack, S.; Chen, Yan; Smith, W. L., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    One of the roadblocks to continuously monitoring cloud properties is the tendency of clouds to become optically black at cloud optical depths (COD) of 6 or less. This constraint dramatically reduces the quantitative information content at night. A recent study found that because of their diffuse nature, ice clouds remain optically gray, to some extent, up to COD of 100 at certain wavelengths. Taking advantage of this weak dependency and the availability of COD retrievals from CloudSat, an artificial neural network algorithm was developed to estimate COD values up to 70 from common satellite imager infrared channels. The method was trained using matched 2007 CloudSat and Aqua MODIS data and is tested using similar data from 2008. The results show a significant improvement over the use of default values at night with high correlation. This paper summarizes the results and suggests paths for future improvement.

  1. Multi-spectral optical absorption in substrate-free nanowire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Junpeng; Chia, Andrew; Boulanger, Jonathan; LaPierre, Ray; Dhindsa, Navneet; Khodadad, Iman; Saini, Simarjeet

    2014-09-22

    A method is presented of fabricating gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowire arrays of controlled diameter and period by reactive ion etching of a GaAs substrate containing an indium gallium arsenide (InGaP) etch stop layer, allowing the precise nanowire length to be controlled. The substrate is subsequently removed by selective etching, using the same InGaP etch stop layer, to create a substrate-free GaAs nanowire array. The optical absorptance of the nanowire array was then directly measured without absorption from a substrate. We directly observe absorptance spectra that can be tuned by the nanowire diameter, as explained with rigorous coupled wave analysis. These results illustrate strong optical absorption suitable for nanowire-based solar cells and multi-spectral absorption for wavelength discriminating photodetectors. The solar-weighted absorptance above the bandgap of GaAs was 94% for a nanowire surface coverage of only 15%.

  2. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  3. CALIPSO and MODIS Observations of Increases in Aerosol Optical Depths near Marine Stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coakley, J. A.; Tahnk, W. R.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosols not only affect droplet sizes and number concentrations in marine stratocumulus but in turn the near cloud environment gives rise to changes in the aerosol particle concentrations and sizes. In addition, the clouds serve as reflectors that illuminate the adjacent cloud-free air. This extra illumination leads to overestimates of aerosol optical depths and fine mode fractions retrieved from multispectral satellite imagery. Large cloud-free ocean regions bounded on both ends, or if sufficiently large (>100 km), on at least one end by layers of marine stratocumulus, as deduced from CALIPSO lidar returns, were examined to deduce the effects of the clouds on the properties of nearby aerosols. CALIPSO aerosol optical depths composited for more than a year and covering the global oceans, 60°S-60°N, reveal that the fractional increase in aerosol optical depth in going from a cloud-free 5-km region more than 10 to 15 km from a cloud boundary to one adjacent the clouds is 10%-15% at both 532 and 1064 nm for both daytime and nighttime observations. All of the changes are statistically significant at the 90% confidence level or greater. The associated reduction in the 532/1064 Ånsgtröm Exponent is 0.023 for the nighttime observations, but owing to a poorer signal to noise ratio, no change in the Exponent is detected for the daytime observations. For comparison, the MODIS aerosol optical depths collocated with the daytime CALIPSO optical depths suggest that the fractional increases in aerosol optical depths in going from a cloud-free 10-km region 15 km from a cloud boundary to one adjacent the clouds is about 5% at both 550 and 850 nm. The associated reduction in the 550/850 Ånsgtröm Exponent is 0.053. The changes in aerosol properties die away within 10 to 20 km from the marine stratocumulus. The increases in aerosol scattering and reductions in Ånsgtröm Exponent suggest that near the clouds, the aerosol particles become larger. The fine mode fraction found in

  4. Experimental measurements of the spectral absorption coefficient of pure fused silica optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Travis J; Jones, Matthew R

    2015-02-20

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption coefficient of fused silica optical fibers is important in modeling heat transfer in the processes and applications in which these fibers are used. An experimental method used to measure the spectral absorption coefficient of optical fibers is presented. Radiative energy from a blackbody radiator set at different temperatures is directed through the optical fibers and into an FTIR spectrometer. Spectral instrument response functions are calculated for different fiber lengths. The ratios of the slopes of the instrument response functions for the different lengths of fibers are used to solve for the spectral absorption coefficient of the fibers. The spectral absorption coefficient of low OH pure fused silica optical fibers is measured between the wavelengths 1.5 and 2.5 μm. PMID:25968202

  5. AEROSOL OPTICAL PROPERTIES AND BIOGENIC SOA: EFFECT ON HYGROSCOPIC PROPERTIES AND LIGHT ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study will provide a comprehensive characterization of optical properties of biogenic SOA and their sensitivity to anthropogenic influence. Several parameters critical for climate modeling, such as absorption cross-section, single scattering albedo and sensitivity to R...

  6. Observation of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton groups from space using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy on SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Astrid; Dinter, Tilman; Burrows, John P.; Vountas, Marco; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Peeken, Ilka

    In order to understand the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles it is necessary to derive global information on the distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFT) in the world oceans. In our study we use instead of the common ocean color sensors such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, with rather low spectral resolution, the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to study the retrieval of phytoplankton distribution and absorption with the satellite sensor Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). SCIAMACHY measures back scattered solar radiation in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral region with a high spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). We used in-situ measured phytoplankton absorption spectra from two different RV Polarstern expeditions where different phytoplankton groups were representing or dominating the phytoplankton composition in order to identify these characteristic absorption spectra in SCIAMACHY data in the range of 430 to 500 nm and also to identify absorption from cyanobacterial photosynthetic pigment phycoerythrin. Our results show clearly these absorptions in the SCIAMACHY data. The conversion of these differential absorptions by including the information of the light penetration depth (according to Vountas et al., Ocean Science, 2007) globally distributed pigment concentrations for these characteristic phytoplankton groups for two monthly periods (Feb-March 2004, Oct-Nov 2005 and Oct-Nov 2007) are derived. The satellite retrieved information on cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. and Prochlorococcus sp.) and diatoms distribution matches well with the concentration measured from collocated water samples with HPLC technique and also to global model analysis with the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM from http://reason.gsfc.nasa.gov/OPS/Giovanni/) according to Gregg and Casey 2006 and Gregg 2006. Results are of great importance for global modelling of

  7. Discrepancy between ambient annealing and H+ implantation in optical absorption of ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jinpeng; Li, Chundong

    2016-05-01

    The discrepancy between sub-bandgap absorption in ZnO induced by thermal annealing and H+ implantation is investigated in this study for the first time. Results indicate that nonreductive annealing-induced optical absorption is independent of annealing ambient, and can be assigned to VO, whereas the absorption centers caused by H+ implantation and H2 annealing are primarily associated with VO and ionized Zni.

  8. Effect of UV Absorption on Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ying; Sharma, Anup; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    UV light is used to fabricate fiber-optic gratings also heats up the fiber due to absorption by either the fiber-buffer, fiber-cladding, doped with titania or a thin coating of paint. Significant enhancement in the rate of grating fabrication is observed due to UV light absorption.

  9. OPTICAL ABSORPTION AND PHOTOLUMINESCENCE IN PRISTINE AND PHOTOPOLYMERIZED C60 SOLID FILMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The optical absorption (OA) and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of pristine, oxygen-free C60 films in the vicinity of the absorption edge across the highest-occupied-molecular-orbital to lowest-unoccupied-molecular-orbital (HOMO-LUMO) gap are studied to elucidate the nature of the...

  10. Differential optical absorption techniques for diagnostics of coal gasification. Technical progress report, April-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    The application of differential optical absorption (DOA) techniques for the in-situ determination of the chemical composition of coal gasification process streams is investigated. Absorption spectra of relevant molecular species and the temperature and pressure effects on DOA-determined spectral characteristics of these species will be determined and cataloged. A system will be configured, assembled, and tested. 10 references, 1 figure.

  11. THE ORIGIN AND OPTICAL DEPTH OF IONIZING RADIATION IN THE 'GREEN PEA' GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2013-04-01

    Although Lyman-continuum (LyC) radiation from star-forming galaxies likely drove the reionization of the universe, observations of star-forming galaxies at low redshift generally indicate low LyC escape fractions. However, the extreme [O III]/[O II] ratios of the z = 0.1-0.3 Green Pea galaxies may be due to high escape fractions of ionizing radiation. To analyze the LyC optical depths and ionizing sources of these rare, compact starbursts, we compare nebular photoionization and stellar population models with observed emission lines in the Peas' Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. We focus on the six most extreme Green Peas, the galaxies with the highest [O III]/[O II] ratios and the best candidates for escaping ionizing radiation. The Balmer line equivalent widths and He I {lambda}3819 emission in the extreme Peas support young ages of 3-5 Myr, and He II {lambda}4686 emission in five extreme Peas signals the presence of hard ionizing sources. Ionization by active galactic nuclei or high-mass X-ray binaries is inconsistent with the Peas' line ratios and ages. Although stacked spectra reveal no Wolf-Rayet (WR) features, we tentatively detect WR features in the SDSS spectra of three extreme Peas. Based on the Peas' ages and line ratios, we find that WR stars, chemically homogeneous O stars, or shocks could produce the observed He II emission. If hot stars are responsible, then the Peas' optical depths are ambiguous. However, accounting for emission from shocks lowers the inferred optical depth and suggests that the Peas may be optically thin. The Peas' ages likely optimize the escape of LyC radiation; they are old enough for supernovae and stellar winds to reshape the interstellar medium, but young enough to possess large numbers of UV-luminous O or WR stars.

  12. Spectroscopic Combustion Temperature Measurements: Effect Of Optical Depth In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetstone, J. R.; Charagundla, S. R.; Macek, A.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1988-11-01

    Results of a study directed toward using observed spectroscopic features for the measurement of temperature in the combustion zone of recovery boilers are described. Emissions of the potassium doublets at 404 and 766 nanometers (nm) have been observed in recovery boilers and temperature and self absorption effects on lines shapes have been modeled. Predicted emission line shapes are strongly dependent upon predicted concentration values of potassium. Proper selection of concentration ranges results in good qualitative agreement of predicted line shapes with those observed in boilers and laboratory flame experiments. These results indicate that the temperature dependence of potassium emissions is complicated by self-absorption effects which limit the optical pathlength over which emissions are practically observable. Temperature measurement may be feasible using pattern recognition methods coupled with algorithms based on an emission model and realistic estimates of the emitting species concentration.

  13. Unified theory of electron-phonon renormalization and phonon-assisted optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, Christopher E.; Giustino, Feliciano

    2014-09-01

    We present a theory of electronic excitation energies and optical absorption spectra which incorporates energy-level renormalization and phonon-assisted optical absorption within a unified framework. Using time-independent perturbation theory we show how the standard approaches for studying vibronic effects in molecules and those for addressing electron-phonon interactions in solids correspond to slightly different choices for the non-interacting Hamiltonian. Our present approach naturally leads to the Allen-Heine theory of temperature-dependent energy levels, the Franck-Condon principle, the Herzberg-Teller effect and to phonon-assisted optical absorption in indirect band gap materials. In addition, our theory predicts sub-gap phonon-assisted optical absorption in direct gap materials, as well as an exponential edge which we tentatively assign to the Urbach tail. We also consider a semiclassical approach to the calculation of optical absorption spectra which simultaneously captures energy-level renormalization and phonon-assisted transitions and is especially suited to first-principles electronic structure calculations. We demonstrate this approach by calculating the phonon-assisted optical absorption spectrum of bulk silicon.

  14. THE OPTICAL DEPTH OF H II REGIONS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pellegrini, E. W.; Oey, M. S.; Jaskot, A. E.; Zastrow, J.; Winkler, P. F.; Points, S. D.; Smith, R. C.

    2012-08-10

    We exploit ionization-parameter mapping (IPM) as a powerful tool to measure the optical depth of star-forming H II regions. Our simulations using the photoionization code CLOUDY and our new, SURFBRIGHT surface-brightness simulator demonstrate that this technique can directly diagnose most density-bounded, optically thin nebulae using spatially resolved emission-line data. We apply this method to the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC), using the data from the Magellanic Clouds Emission Line Survey. We generate new H II region catalogs based on photoionization criteria set by the observed ionization structure in the [S II]/[O III] ratio and H{alpha} surface brightness. The luminosity functions from these catalogs generally agree with those from H{alpha}-only surveys. We then use IPM to crudely classify all the nebulae into optically thick versus optically thin categories, yielding fundamental new insights into Lyman-continuum (LyC) radiation transfer. We find that in both galaxies, the frequency of optically thin objects correlates with H{alpha} luminosity, and that the numbers of these objects dominate above log L/(erg s{sup -1}) {>=} 37.0. The frequencies of optically thin objects are 40% and 33% in the LMC and SMC, respectively. Similarly, the frequency of optically thick regions correlates with H I column density, with optically thin objects dominating at the lowest N(H I). The integrated escape luminosity of ionizing radiation is dominated by the largest regions and corresponds to luminosity-weighted, ionizing escape fractions from the H II region population of {>=}0.42 and {>=}0.40 in the LMC and SMC, respectively. These values correspond to global galactic escape fractions of 4% and 11%, respectively. This is sufficient to power the ionization rate of the observed diffuse ionized gas in both galaxies. Since our optical depth estimates tend to be underestimates, and also omit the contribution from field stars without nebulae, our results suggest

  15. Aerosol Radiative Effects: Expected Variations in Optical Depth Spectra and Climate Forcing, with Implications for Closure Experiment Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Philip B.; Stowe, L. L.; Hobbs, P. V.; Podolske, James R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We examine measurement strategies for reducing uncertainties in aerosol direct radiative forcing by focused experiments that combine surface, air, and space measurements. Particularly emphasized are closure experiments, which test the degree of agreement among different measurements and calculations of aerosol properties and radiative effects. By combining results from previous measurements of large-scale smokes, volcanic aerosols, and anthropogenic aerosols with models of aerosol evolution, we estimate the spatial and temporal variability in optical depth spectra to be expected in the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, planned for summer 1996 off the Eastern U.S. seaboard). In particular, we examine the expected changes in the wavelength dependence of optical depth as particles evolve through nucleation, growth by condensation and coagulation, and removal via sedimentation. We then calculate the expected radiative climate forcing (i.e. change in net radiative flux) for typical expected aerosols and measurement conditions (e.g. solar elevations, surface albedos, radiometer altitudes). These calculations use new expressions for flux and albedo changes, which account not only for aerosol absorption, but also for instantaneous solar elevation angles and the dependence of surface albedo on solar elevation. These factors, which are usually ignored or averaged in calculations of global aerosol effects, can have a strong influence on fluxes measured in closure experiments, and hence must be accounted for in calculations if closure is to be convincingly tested. We compare the expected measurement signal to measurement uncertainties expected for various techniques in various conditions. Thereby we derive recommendations for measurement strategies that combine surface, airborne, and spaceborne measurements.

  16. Noncontact depth-resolved micro-scale optical coherence elastography of the cornea

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shang; Larin, Kirill V.

    2014-01-01

    High-resolution elastographic assessment of the cornea can greatly assist clinical diagnosis and treatment of various ocular diseases. Here, we report on the first noncontact depth-resolved micro-scale optical coherence elastography of the cornea achieved using shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT) combined with the spectral analysis of the corneal Lamb wave propagation. This imaging method relies on a focused air-puff device to load the cornea with highly-localized low-pressure short-duration air stream and applies phase-resolved OCT detection to capture the low-amplitude deformation with nano-scale sensitivity. The SWI-OCT system is used here to image the corneal Lamb wave propagation with the frame rate the same as the OCT A-line acquisition speed. Based on the spectral analysis of the corneal temporal deformation profiles, the phase velocity of the Lamb wave is obtained at different depths for the major frequency components, which shows the depthwise distribution of the corneal stiffness related to its structural features. Our pilot experiments on ex vivo rabbit eyes demonstrate the feasibility of this method in depth-resolved micro-scale elastography of the cornea. The assessment of the Lamb wave dispersion is also presented, suggesting the potential for the quantitative measurement of corneal viscoelasticity. PMID:25426312

  17. Examination of Optical Depth Effects on Fluorescence Imaging of Cardiac Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Mark-Anthony; Wikswo, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Optical mapping with voltage-sensitive dyes provides a high-resolution technique to observe cardiac electrodynamic behavior. Although most studies assume that the fluorescent signal is emitted from the surface layer of cells, the effects of signal attenuation with depth on signal interpretation are still unclear. This simulation study examines the effects of a depth-weighted signal on epicardial activation patterns and filament localization. We simulated filament behavior using a detailed cardiac model, and compared the signal obtained from the top (epicardial) layer of the spatial domain with the calculated weighted signal. General observations included a prolongation of the action upstroke duration, early upstroke initiation, and reduction in signal amplitude in the weighted signal. A shallow filament was found to produce a dual-humped action potential morphology consistent with previously reported observations. Simulated scroll wave breakup exhibited effects such as the false appearance of graded potentials, apparent supramaximal conduction velocities, and a spatially blurred signal with the local amplitude dependent upon the immediate subepicardial activity; the combination of these effects produced a corresponding change in the accuracy of filament localization. Our results indicate that the depth-dependent optical signal has significant consequences on the interpretation of epicardial activation dynamics. PMID:14645100

  18. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  19. Two-photon absorption and optical-limiting properties of a novel organic compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Lihua; Zhang, Junxiang; Cui, Yiping; Li, Zhenhua; He, Anzhi

    2002-09-01

    The two-photon absorption and applications become the hot points in the recent photoelectronic material research field. The two-photon absorption materials can be applied to many fields such as up-conversion lasing, optical limiting, optical stabilization, three-dimension optical storage, three-dimension micro-machining, et al. Especially studies of optical power limiting have become more interesting to the research community because of the need for automatic protection of optical sensors against intense laser radiation. Here we report the observation of the TPA and optical power limiting property of a novel double conjugated molecule DSBDR1 in solution. The linear absorption spectral is observed using a scanning spectrophotometer. Using Nd:YAG laser pulse as exciting laser, the incident pulse energy and the transmitted pulse energy are respectively recorded by an energy meter. Then we obtain the nonlinear absorption coefficient of the novel double conjugated molecule in THF. Figures show that the molecule exhibts the large TPA cross-section and excellent optical limiting at 1064 nm. The nonlinear absorption mechanism of the novel organic compound is finally analyzed.

  20. Empirical analysis of aerosol and thin cloud optical depth effects on CO2 retrievals from GOSAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; O'Neill, N. T.; Strong, K.; Nakajima, T.; Uchino, O.; Shiobara, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground-based sunphotometer observations of aerosol and cloud optical properties at AEROCAN / AERONET sites co-located with TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) were used to investigate the aerosol and cloud influence on column-averaged dry-air mole fraction of carbon dioxide (XCO2) retrieved from the TANSO-FTS (Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation - FTS) of GOSAT (Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite). This instrument employs high resolution spectra measured in the Short-Wavelength InfraRed (SWIR) band to retrieve XCO2estimates. GOSAT XCO2 retrievals are nominally corrected for the contaminating backscatter influence of aerosols and thin clouds. However if the satellite-retrieved aerosol and thin cloud optical depths applied to the CO2 correction is biased then the correction and the retrieved CO2 values will be biased. We employed independent ground based estimates of both cloud screened and non cloud screened AOD (aerosol optical depth) in the CO2 SWIR channel and compared this with the GOSAT SWIR-channel OD retrievals to see if that bias was related to variations in the (generally negative) CO2 bias (ΔXCO2= XCO2(GOSAT) - XCO2(TCCON)). Results are presented for a number of TCCON validation sites.

  1. Relating Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth in the Summertime Continental Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Attwood, A. R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Brown, S. S.; McComiskey, A. C.; Gordon, T. D.; Welti, A.; Carlton, A. G.; Murphy, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD), the column-integrated ambient aerosol light extinction, is determined from satellite and ground-based remote sensing measurements. AOD is the parameter most often used to validate earth system model simulations of aerosol mass. Relating aerosol mass to AOD, however, is problematic due to issues including aerosol water uptake as a function of relative humidity (RH) and the complicated relationship between aerosol physicochemical properties and light extinction. Measurements of aerosol microphysical, chemical, and optical properties help to constrain the relationship between aerosol mass and optical depth because aerosol extinction at ambient RH is a function of the abundance, composition and size distribution of the aerosol. We use vertical profiles of humidity and dry aerosol extinction observed in the southeastern United States (U.S.) to examine the relationship between submicron aerosol mass concentration and extinction at ambient RH. We show that the κ-Köhler parameterization directly, and without additional Mie calculations, describes the change in extinction with varying RH as a function of composition for both aged aerosols typical of the polluted summertime continental boundary layer and the biomass burning aerosols we encountered. We calculate how AOD and the direct radiative effect in the eastern U.S. have likely changed due to trends in aerosol composition in recent decades. We also examine the sensitivity of AOD to the RH profile and to aerosol composition, size distribution and abundance.

  2. Extension of depth-resolved reconstruction of attenuation coefficients in optical coherence tomography for slim samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohmann, Martin; Lengenfelder, B.; Kanawade, R.; Klämpfl, F.; Schmidt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Coherent light propagating through turbid media is attenuated due to scattering and absorption. The decrease of the intensity of the coherent light is described by the attenuation coefficient. The measured decay of the coherent light through turbid media with optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to reconstruct the attenuation coefficient. Since most of the OCT systems work in the near-infrared region, they are the optical window from 800-1400 nm in tissue. Hence, the most part of the attenuation coefficient is caused due to the scattering. Therefore, deriving the attenuation coefficient is one way to get an approximation of the scattering coefficient which is difficult to access even up to day. Moreover, OCT measurements are one of the few possibilities to derive physical properties with micrometre resolution of the media under investigation.

  3. Absorption Coefficient Imaging by Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paula, Ana M.; Chaves, Claudilene R.; Silva, Haroldo B.; Weber, Gerald

    2003-06-01

    We present a method for obtaining a position-dependent absorption coefficient from near-field scanning optical transmission microscopy. We show that the optical transmission intensity can be combined with the topography, resulting into an absorption coefficient that simplifies the analysis of different materials within a sample. The method is tested with the dye rhodamine 6G, and we show some analysis in biological samples such as bacteria Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa . The calculated absorption coefficient images show important details of the bacteria, in particular for P. aeruginosa , in which membrane vesicles are clearly seen.

  4. The microlensing event rate and optical depth toward the galactic bulge from MOA-II

    SciTech Connect

    Sumi, T.; Suzuki, D.; Wada, K.; Collaboration: MOA Collaboratoin; and others

    2013-12-01

    We present measurements of the microlensing optical depth and event rate toward the Galactic Bulge (GB) based on two years of the MOA-II survey. This sample contains ∼1000 microlensing events, with an Einstein radius crossing time of t {sub E} ≤ 200 days in 22 bulge fields covering ∼42 deg{sup 2} between –5° < l < 10° and –7° < b < –1°. Our event rate and optical depth analysis uses 474 events with well-defined microlensing parameters. In the central fields with |l| < 5°, we find an event rate of Γ = [2.39 ± 1.1]e {sup [0.60±0.05](3–|b|)} × 10{sup –5} star{sup –1} yr{sup –1} and an optical depth (for events with t {sub E} ≤ 200 days) of τ{sub 200} = [2.35 ± 0.18]e {sup [0.51±0.07](3–|b|)} × 10{sup –6} for the 427 events, using all sources brighter than I{sub s} ≤ 20 mag. The distribution of observed fields is centered at (l, b) = (0.°38, –3.°72). We find that the event rate is maximized at low latitudes and a longitude of l ≈ 1°. For the 111 events in 3.2 deg{sup 2} of the central GB at |b| ≤ 3.°0 and 0.°0 ≤ l ≤ 2.°0, centered at (l, b) = (0.°97, –2.°26), we find Γ=4.57{sub −0.46}{sup +0.51}×10{sup −5} star{sup –1} yr{sup –1} and τ{sub 200}=3.64{sub −0.45}{sup +0.51}×10{sup −6}. We also consider a red clump giant (RCG) star sample with I{sub s} < 17.5, and we find that the event rate for the RCG sample is slightly lower than but consistent with the all-source event rate. The main difference is the lack of long duration events in the RCG sample due to a known selection effect. Our results are consistent with previous optical depth measurements, but they are somewhat lower than previous all-source measurements, and slightly higher than previous RCG optical depth measurements. This suggests that the previously observed difference in optical depth measurements between all-source and RCG samples may largely be due to statistical fluctuations. These event rate measurements toward the central GB

  5. Systems having optical absorption layer for mid and long wave infrared and methods for making the same

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzmenko, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    An optical system according to one embodiment includes a substrate; and an optical absorption layer coupled to the substrate, wherein the optical absorption layer comprises a layer of diamond-like carbon, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). A method for applying an optical absorption layer to an optical system according to another embodiment includes depositing a layer of diamond-like carbon of an optical absorption layer above a substrate using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, wherein the optical absorption layer absorbs at least 50% of mid wave infrared light (3-5 .mu.m wavelength) and at least 50% of long wave infrared light (8-13 .mu.m wavelength). Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  6. AERONET-based models of smoke-dominated aerosol near source regions and transported over oceans, and implications for satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2014-10-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol system. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of aerosol microphysical/optical parameters at 10 sites reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke observed at coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at the near-source sites. Differences between sites tend to be larger than variability at an individual site, although optical properties for some sites in different regions can be quite similar. Across the sites, typical midvisible SSA ranges from ~ 0.95-0.97 (sites dominated by boreal forest or peat burning, typically with larger fine-mode particle radius and spread) to ~ 0.88-0.9 (sites most influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning, typically smaller fine-mode particle radius and spread). The tropical forest site Alta Floresta (Brazil) is closer to this second category, although with intermediate SSA ~ 0.92. The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savannah at Mongu (Zambia), with average midvisible SSA ~ 0.85. Sites with stronger absorption also tend to have stronger spectral gradients in SSA, becoming more absorbing at longer wavelengths. Microphysical/optical models are presented in detail so as to facilitate their use in radiative transfer calculations, including extension to UV (ultraviolet) wavelengths, and lidar ratios. One intended application is to serve as candidate optical models for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean often have insufficient absorption (i.e. too high SSA) to represent these biomass burning aerosols. The underestimates in satellite-retrieved AOD in smoke outflow regions, which have important consequences for applications of these satellite data sets, are consistent with

  7. Designing Ligand-Enhanced Optical Absorption of Thiolated Gold Nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Dass, Amala; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2015-05-07

    The optical spectra of thiolated Au25(SR)18/Au23(SR)16 clusters with different R residues are investigated via TDDFT simulations. Significant enhancements in the optical region and effective electron delocalization are simultaneously achieved by tuning the ligands' steric hindrance and electronic conjugating features, producing a resonance phenomenon between the Au–S core motif and the ligand fragments.

  8. Herschel-Planck dust optical depth and column density maps. II. Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zari, Eleonora; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, João; Lada, Charles J.; Bouy, Hervé

    2016-03-01

    We present optical depth and temperature maps of the Perseus molecular cloud, obtained combining dust emission data from the Herschel and Planck satellites and 2MASS/NIR dust extinction maps. The maps have a resolution of 36 arcsec in the Herschel regions, and of 5 arcmin elsewhere. The dynamic range of the optical depth map ranges from 1 × 10-2 mag up to 20 mag in the equivalent K-band extinction. We also evaluate the ratio between the 2.2 μm extinction coefficient and the 850 μm opacity. The value we obtain is close to the one found in the Orion B molecular cloud. We show that the cumulative and the differential area function of the data (which is proportional to the probability distribution function of the cloud column density) follow power laws with an index of respectively ≃-2, and ≃-3. We use WISE data to improve current YSO catalogs based mostly on Spitzer data and we build an up-to-date selection of Class I/0 objects. Using this selection, we evaluate the local Schmidt law, ΣYSO ∝ Σgasβ, showing that β = 2.4 ± 0.6. Finally, we show that the area-extinction relation is important for determining the star-formation rate in the cloud, which is in agreement with other recent works. The optical depth and temperature maps (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A106

  9. Noninvasive Evaluation of Oral Lesions Using Depth-Sensitive Optical Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Richard A.; Gao, Wen; Weber, Crystal Redden; Kurachi, Cristina; Lee, J. Jack; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Gillenwater, Ann M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optical spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique with potential applications for diagnosis of oral dysplasia and early cancer. In this study we evaluated the diagnostic performance of a depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy (DSOS) system for distinguishing dysplasia and carcinoma from non-neoplastic oral mucosa. METHODS Patients with oral lesions and volunteers without any oral abnormalities were recruited to participate. Autofluorescence and diffuse reflectance spectra of selected oral sites were measured using the DSOS system. 424 oral sites in 124 subjects were measured and analyzed, including 154 sites in 60 patients with oral lesions and 270 sites in 64 normal volunteers. Measured optical spectra were used to develop computer-based algorithms to identify the presence of dysplasia or cancer. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated using a gold standard of histopathology for patient sites and clinical impression for normal volunteer sites. RESULTS Differences in oral spectra were observed in: (1) neoplastic vs. non-neoplastic sites, (2) keratinized vs. non-keratinized tissue, and (3) shallow vs. deep depths within oral tissue. Algorithms based on spectra from 310 non-keratinized anatomic sites (buccal, tongue, floor of mouth, and lip) yielded an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.96 in the training set and 0.93 in the validation set. CONCLUSIONS The ability to selectively target epithelial and shallow stromal depth regions appears diagnostically useful. For non-keratinized oral sites the sensitivity and specificity of this objective diagnostic technique are comparable to that of clinical diagnosis by expert observers. Thus DSOS has potential to augment oral cancer screening efforts in community settings. PMID:19170229

  10. The Use of Aerosol Optical Depth in Estimating Trace Gas Emissions from Biomass Burning Plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, N.; Paton-Walsh, C.; Wilson, S.; Meier, A.; Deutscher, N.; Griffith, D.; Murcray, F.

    2003-12-01

    We have observed significant correlations between aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 500 nm and column amounts of a number of biomass burning indicators (carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, formaldehyde and ammonia) in bushfire smoke plumes over SE Australia during the 2001/2002 and 2002/2003 fire seasons from remote sensing measurements. The Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, operates a high resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), in the city of Wollongong, approximately 80 km south of Sydney. During the recent bushfires we collected over 1500 solar FTIR spectra directly through the smoke over Wollongong. The total column amounts of the biomass burning indicators were calculated using the profile retrieval software package SFIT2. Using the same solar beam, a small grating spectrometer equipped with a 2048 pixel CCD detector array, was used to calculate simultaneous aerosol optical depths. This dataset is therefore unique in its temporal sampling, location to active fires, and range of simultaneously measured constituents. There are several important applications of the AOD to gas column correlation. The estimation of global emissions from biomass burning currently has very large associated uncertainties. The use of visible radiances measured by satellites, and hence AOD, could significantly reduce these uncertainties by giving a direct estimate of global emissions of gases from biomass burning through application of the AOD to gas correlation. On a more local level, satellite-derived aerosol optical depth maps could be inverted to infer approximate concentration levels of smoke-related pollutants at the ground and in the lower troposphere, and thus can be used to determine the nature of any significant health impacts.

  11. Effect of Binary Source Companions on the Microlensing Optical Depth Determination toward the Galactic Bulge Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Cheongho

    2005-11-01

    Currently, gravitational microlensing survey experiments toward the Galactic bulge field use two different methods of minimizing the blending effect for the accurate determination of the optical depth τ. One is measuring τ based on clump giant (CG) source stars, and the other is using ``difference image analysis'' (DIA) photometry to measure the unblended source flux variation. Despite the expectation that the two estimates should be the same assuming that blending is properly considered, the estimates based on CG stars systematically fall below the DIA results based on all events with source stars down to the detection limit. Prompted by the gap, we investigate the previously unconsidered effect of companion-associated events on τ determination. Although the image of a companion is blended with that of its primary star and thus not resolved, the event associated with the companion can be detected if the companion flux is highly magnified. Therefore, companions work effectively as source stars to microlensing, and thus the neglect of them in the source star count could result in a wrong τ estimation. By carrying out simulations based on the assumption that companions follow the same luminosity function as primary stars, we estimate that the contribution of the companion-associated events to the total event rate is ~5fbi% for current surveys and can reach up to ~6fbi% for future surveys monitoring fainter stars, where fbi is the binary frequency. Therefore, we conclude that the companion-associated events comprise a nonnegligible fraction of all events. However, their contribution to the optical depth is not large enough to explain the systematic difference between the optical depth estimates based on the two different methods.

  12. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  13. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  14. Influence of laser radiation on induced absorption spectra of pure quartz glass optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianov, Y. M.; Karpechev, V. N.; Korniyenko, L. S.; Rybaltovskiy, A. O.; Chernov, P. V.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of laser radiation on radiation color centers and their associated induced absorption in the spectra of irradiated glass optical fibers is investigated. The glass fiber specimens employed had 40 to 50 micron diameter cores made of day pure quartz glass. The optical fibers were 6 to 20 meters long, produced by chemical precipitation from the gaseous phase and clad with reflecting borosilicate glass. Spectral measurements of the induced absorption in the ultraviolet region were made using an FEU-71 photodetector and a sounding radiation source. The stimulated laser emission power in the cross section of the optical fiber was measured by a photodiode; the absorption spectra were recorded by the fragment method. Eight different types of color centers were isolated whose bands cover practically the entire observed absorption spectra. The connection found between color centers and a 340 nm absorption band, and color center with absorption in the infrared band, indicate that absorption in the ultraviolet band can have a significant influence on the amount of induced absorption in the infrared band.

  15. Investigation on optical absorption properties of ion irradiated single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vishalli, Dharamvir, Keya; Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Jeet, Kiran

    2015-08-28

    In the present study change in the optical absorption properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under nickel ion (60 MeV) irradiation at various fluences has been investigated. Langmuir Blodgett technique is used to deposit SWCNT thin film of uniform thickness. AFM analysis shows a network of interconnected bundles of nanotubes. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra indicate that the sample mainly contain SWCNTs of semiconducting nature. It has been found in absorption spectra that there is decrease in the intensity of the characteristic SWCNT peaks with increase in fluence. At fluence value 1×10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} there is almost complete suppression of the characteristic SWCNTs peaks.The decrease in the optical absorption with increase in fluence is due to the increase in the disorder in the system which leads to the decrease in optically active states.

  16. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in laser speckle rheology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2014-01-01

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  17. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in Laser Speckle Rheology measurements.

    PubMed

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2014-03-24

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  18. Impact of intermediate localized states on nonlinear optical absorption of Ga-Ge-Se nanocolloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Indu; Divya, S.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Thomas, Sheenu

    2013-01-01

    We present the linear and nonlinear optical studies on nanocolloidal solutions of Ga9Ge27Se64 glass with varying concentrations. Optical bandgap of the material is found to vary with respect to the concentration of the solute in the solution. An intermediate peak in the band tail of the absorption spectra is observed due to the presence of energy band in the forbidden gap. The existence of fluorescence emission confirms the above argument. Nonlinear absorption is studied using open aperture Z-scan technique. The mechanism behind nonlinear absorption is predicted as two photon as well as two step photon absorption. Nonlinearity increases with decrease in optical bandgap which in turn depends on the concentration of the nanocolloidal solutions.

  19. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  20. Aerosol Optical Depth Model Assessment With High-Resolution Multiple Angle Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. S.; Nielsen, K. E.; Vincent, D. A.; Durkee, P. A.; Reid, J. S.

    2005-12-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School Aerosol Optical Depth (NPS AOD) model has been used successfully to retrieve aerosol optical depths over water using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery. In this work, the NPS AOD model is applied to the QuickBird high-resolution commercial satellite imagery collected at multiple zenith angles around Sir Bu Nuair Island, United Arab Emirates in September 2004 during the Unified Aerosol Experiment, United Arab Emirates (UAE2) Campaign. The QuickBird-retrieved aerosol optical depths are compared to other satellite and ground-based optical depth retrievals, including those from the Aeerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), and AVHRR. Adapting the NPS AOD model to the nominally 2.4-meter resolution imagery from QuickBird required using modal radiances determined over an area that matched the lower resolution imagers (~ 275 meters to 1 kilometer). Additionally, the NPS AOD model was originally developed for the AVHRR imager on the NOAA-14 satellite. The NPS AOD model selects a modeled aerosol size distribution and scattering phase function based on the ratio the red and near-infrared channels of the AVHRR and the scattering angle derived from solar-sensor geometry. As such, the LUT that relates the ratio of red and near-infrared radiances was based on the center effective wavelengths of the NOAA-14 channels. The AOD retrievals from the other imagers must be adjusted to account for the changes in center effective wavelengths of the red and near-IR channels. Results show that the application of the NPS AOD model to QuickBird data yields findings that are consistent with other satellite and ground-based retrievals. In general, the NPS AOD model works well for nadir and near-nadir view angles, but not for zenith angles greater than 50 degrees. A non-linearized single scattering model and additional scattering streams will be

  1. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K. Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    Doppler Lidar and Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) observations are utilized to show wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth (AOD) during daytime boundary layer evolution over the Himalayan region. Fourier analysis depicted 60-80 min periods dominant during afternoon hours, implying that observed modulations could be plausible reason for the AOD forenoon-afternoon asymmetry which was previously reported. Inclusion of wave amplitude in diurnal variation of aerosol radiative forcing estimates showed ~40% additional warming in the atmosphere relative to mean AOD. The present observations emphasize the importance of wave induced variations in AOD and radiation budget over the site.

  2. Transient vision loss at depth due to presumed barotraumatic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hexdall, Eric J; Butler, Frank K

    2012-01-01

    Pressure-related vision loss has been reported during ascent to altitude. We report the case of an otherwise healthy diver who suffered painless, sudden-onset binocular vision loss at depth, followed by complete recovery immediately upon surfacing. We examine the dive and briefly discuss the differential diagnosis of transient vision loss in the setting of ambient pressure changes. We conclude that the diver likely suffered from sphenoid sinus barotrauma, possibly in association with dehiscence of the bony canals of the optic nerves as they travel in close proximity to the walls of the sphenoid sinus. PMID:23045919

  3. Properties of multilayer optical systems formed by layers with small absorption in inclined falling of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyaev, Konstantin V.; Zhoga, Eugene V.; Putilin, Eduard S.

    2000-10-01

    Multilayer dielectric systems find wide employment in different fields of science and engineering. Dielectric systems, formed by layers with small absorption, attract particular interest. Value of absorption, as a rule, depends on structure of the system (order and optical thickness of layers), angle of incidence and wavelength of radiation. Experiment shows that there are peaks of absorption on certain angles of incidence and wavelength, but behavior of absorption wasn't studied well. Model of a system, formed by isotropic layers settled on semiinfinite substate proved to be a good approximation for many of real optical systems. We studied pecularities in spectral dependencies of reflection, transmission and absorption coefficients in dependance on the angle of incidence and wavelength of falling radiation with flat wave front. Problem was solved on the basis of Maxwell equations and corresponding boundary conditions.

  4. Optical depth measurements and atmospheric correction of remotely sensed data for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrigley, R. C.; Slye, R. E.; Pueschel, R. F.; Spanner, M. A.; Livingston, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Data derived from an airborne tracking-sun photometer are used to provide quantitative corrections for atmospheric effects in remotely sensed data. The atmospheric correction involves the validation of radiometric and atmospheric measurements and the application of single scattering approximation which permits the separation of Rayleigh scattering from aerosol scattering. Sun-photometer data are used to generate plots of spectral optical depths, aerosol size distributions, aerosol phase functions, and aerosol single-scattering albedos. The atmospheric correction model and the atmospheric optical properties are incorporated into a program which is applied to two flightlines of data. Atmospheric corrections tested on remotely sensed data permitted the removal of limb brightening, although the results require verification by means of ground measurements.

  5. First measurements of aerosol optical depth and Angstrom exponent number from AERONET's Kuching site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Santo V.; Chew, Boon N.; Mohamad, M.; Mahmud, M.; Liew, Soo C.

    2013-10-01

    We report our first measurements, over the 2011 dry season period, of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent number and its fine mode counterpart obtained from photometric measurements at AERONET's newest site located at the city of Kuching, Sarawak, East Malaysia. This site was set up as part of the collaborative efforts of the Seven South East Asian Studies (7SEAS) regional aerosol measurements initiative. Located at the converging zone between peninsular Malaysia and the land masses of Sumatra, Borneo, Java and Sulawesi, this site is expected to provide first hand evidence about the physical and optical characteristics of the regional aerosol environment, specially during the biomass burning months. Moreover, given its relative proximity to our Singapore radiation measurement super-site, Kuching is expected to provide further insight on aerosol transport pathways caused by seasonal winds transporting smoke to other parts of the maritime continent and the South Asia region.

  6. An ultra-high optical depth cold atomic ensemble for quantum memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparkes, B. M.; Bernu, J.; Hosseini, M.; Geng, J.; Glorieux, Q.; Altin, P. A.; Lam, P. K.; Robins, N. P.; Buchler, B. C.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum memories for light lie at the heart of long-distance provably-secure communication. Demand for a functioning quantum memory, with high efficiency and coherence times approaching a millisecond, is therefore at a premium. Here we report on work towards this goal, with the development of a 87Rb magneto-optical trap with a peak optical depth of 1000 for the D2 F = 2 → F' = 3 transition using spatial and temporal dark spots. With this purpose-built cold atomic ensemble we implemented the gradient echo memory (GEM) scheme on the D1 line. Our data shows a memory efficiency of 80 ± 2% and coherence times up to 195 μs.

  7. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments. PMID:21343997

  8. Generating Nanostructures with Multiphoton Absorption Polymerization using Optical Trap Assisted Nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Cheng; Leitz, Karl-Heinz; Fardel, Romain; Schmidt, Michael; Arnold, Craig B.

    The need to generate sub 100 nm features is of interest for a variety of applications including optics, optoelectronics, and plasmonics. To address this requirement, several advanced optical lithography techniques have been developed based on either multiphoton absorption polymerization or near-field effects. In this paper, we combine strengths from multiphoton absorption and near field using optical trap assisted nanopatterning (OTAN). A Gaussian beam is used to position a microsphere in a polymer precursor fluid near a substrate. An ultrafast laser is focused by that microsphere to induce multiphoton polymerization in the near field, leading additive direct-write nanoscale processing.

  9. Broadband optical mammography instrument for depth-resolved imaging and local dynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kainerstorfer, Jana M.; Sassaroli, Angelo; Anderson, Pamela G.; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    We present a continuous-wave instrument for non-invasive diffuse optical imaging of the breast in a parallel-plate transmission geometry. The instrument measures continuous spectra in the wavelength range 650-1000 nm, with an intensity noise level <1.5% and a spatial sampling rate of 5 points/cm in the x- and y-directions. We collect the optical transmission at four locations, one collinear and three offset with respect to the illumination optical fiber, to recover the depth of optical inhomogeneities in the tissue. We imaged a tissue-like, breast shaped, silicone phantom (6 cm thick) with two embedded absorbing structures: a black circle (1.7 cm in diameter) and a black stripe (3 mm wide), designed to mimic a tumor and a blood vessel, respectively. The use of a spatially multiplexed detection scheme allows for the generation of on-axis and off-axis projection images simultaneously, as opposed to requiring multiple scans, thus decreasing scan-time and motion artifacts. This technique localizes detected inhomogeneities in 3D and accurately assigns their depth to within 1 mm in the ideal conditions of otherwise homogeneous tissue-like phantoms. We also measured induced hemodynamic changes in the breast of a healthy human subject at a selected location (no scanning). We applied a cyclic, arterial blood pressure perturbation by alternating inflation (to a pressure of 200 mmHg) and deflation of a pneumatic cuff around the subject's thigh at a frequency of 0.05 Hz, and measured oscillations with amplitudes up to 1 μM and 0.2 μM in the tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, respectively. These hemodynamic oscillations provide information about the vascular structure and functional integrity in tissue, and may be used to assess healthy or abnormal perfusion in a clinical setting.

  10. Broadband optical mammography instrument for depth-resolved imaging and local dynamic measurements.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Nishanth; Kainerstorfer, Jana M; Sassaroli, Angelo; Anderson, Pamela G; Fantini, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    We present a continuous-wave instrument for non-invasive diffuse optical imaging of the breast in a parallel-plate transmission geometry. The instrument measures continuous spectra in the wavelength range 650-1000 nm, with an intensity noise level <1.5% and a spatial sampling rate of 5 points/cm in the x- and y-directions. We collect the optical transmission at four locations, one collinear and three offset with respect to the illumination optical fiber, to recover the depth of optical inhomogeneities in the tissue. We imaged a tissue-like, breast shaped, silicone phantom (6 cm thick) with two embedded absorbing structures: a black circle (1.7 cm in diameter) and a black stripe (3 mm wide), designed to mimic a tumor and a blood vessel, respectively. The use of a spatially multiplexed detection scheme allows for the generation of on-axis and off-axis projection images simultaneously, as opposed to requiring multiple scans, thus decreasing scan-time and motion artifacts. This technique localizes detected inhomogeneities in 3D and accurately assigns their depth to within 1 mm in the ideal conditions of otherwise homogeneous tissue-like phantoms. We also measured induced hemodynamic changes in the breast of a healthy human subject at a selected location (no scanning). We applied a cyclic, arterial blood pressure perturbation by alternating inflation (to a pressure of 200 mmHg) and deflation of a pneumatic cuff around the subject's thigh at a frequency of 0.05 Hz, and measured oscillations with amplitudes up to 1 μM and 0.2 μM in the tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, respectively. These hemodynamic oscillations provide information about the vascular structure and functional integrity in tissue, and may be used to assess healthy or abnormal perfusion in a clinical setting. PMID:26931870

  11. Luminescence and photoinduced absorption in ytterbium-doped optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Rybaltovsky, A A; Aleshkina, S S; Likhachev, M E; Bubnov, M M; Umnikov, A A; Yashkov, M V; Gur'yanov, Aleksei N; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2011-12-31

    Photochemical reactions induced in the glass network of an ytterbium-doped fibre core by IR laser pumping and UV irradiation have been investigated by analysing absorption and luminescence spectra. We have performed comparative studies of the photoinduced absorption and luminescence spectra of fibre preforms differing in core glass composition: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} : SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} : Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} : SiO{sub 2}, and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} : Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} : SiO{sub 2}. The UV absorption spectra of unirradiated preform core samples show strong bands peaking at 5.1 and 6.5 eV, whose excitation plays a key role in photoinduced colour centre generation in the glass network. 'Direct' UV excitation of the 5.1- and 6.5-eV absorption bands at 244 and 193 nm leads to the reduction of some of the Yb{sup 3+} ions to Yb{sup 2+}. The photodarkening of ytterbium-doped fibres by IR pumping is shown to result from oxygen hole centre generation. A phenomenological model is proposed for the IR-pumping-induced photodarkening of ytterbium-doped fibres. The model predicts that colour centre generation in the core glass network and the associated absorption in the visible range result from a cooperative effect involving simultaneous excitation of a cluster composed of several closely spaced Yb{sup 3+} ions.

  12. Deriving in situ phytoplankton absorption for bio-optical productivity models in turbid waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Matthew J.; Schofield, Oscar; Bergmann, Trisha; Glenn, Scott; Orrico, Cristina; Moline, Mark

    2004-07-01

    As part of Hyperspectral Coupled Ocean Dynamics Experiment, a high-resolution hydrographic and bio-optical data set was collected from two cabled profilers at the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO). Upwelling- and downwelling-favorable winds and a buoyant plume from the Hudson River induced large changes in hydrographic and optical structure of the water column. An absorption inversion model estimated the relative abundance of phytoplankton, colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and detritus, as well as the spectral exponential slopes of CDOM and detritus from in situ WET Labs nine-wavelength absorption/attenuation meter (ac-9) absorption data. Derived optical weights were proportional to the parameter concentrations and allowed for their absorptions to be calculated. Spectrally weighted phytoplankton absorption was estimated using modeled spectral irradiances and the phytoplankton absorption spectra inverted from an ac-9. Derived mean spectral absorption of phytoplankton was used in a bio-optical model estimating photosynthetic rates. Measured radiocarbon uptake productivity rates extrapolated with water mass analysis and the bio-optical modeled results agreed within 20%. This approach is impacted by variability in the maximum quantum yield (ϕmax) and the irradiance light-saturation parameter (Ek(PAR)). An analysis of available data shows that ϕmax variability is relatively constrained in temperate waters. The variability of Ek(PAR) is greater in temperate waters, but based on a sensitivity analysis, has an overall smaller impact on water-column-integrated productivity rates because of the exponential decay of light. This inversion approach illustrates the utility of bio-optical models in turbid coastal waters given the measurements of the bulk inherent optical properties.

  13. A One-Dimensional Solution of the Photoacoustic Wave Equation and its Relationship with Optical Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywiak, D.; Barreiro-Argüelles, M. D.; Cywiak, M.; Landa-Curiel, A.; Garcia-Segundo, C.; Gutierrez-Juárez, G.

    2013-09-01

    A study based on the general solution of the one-dimensional photoacoustic (PA) wave equation for an acoustic plane source is presented. This study relies on obtaining the impulse response of the PA system considering a heating function proportional to the Lambert-Beer law and spatially bounded by a rectangle function. The PA pressure is obtained by convoluting the impulse response with the temporal profile of the exciting pulse of light. With the obtained solution, it is possible to comprise, on a single expression, the PA pressure profile for optically thin samples (whose dimensions are smaller than the optical absorption length) and optically opaque samples (whose dimensions are larger than the optical absorption length). In the limit of weak absorption, the solution is in good agreement with the one for a uniform distribution of energy. Also, a study of the dependence of the acoustic pressure with the duration of the laser pulse is included.

  14. Defects forming the optical absorption edge in TlGaSe2 layered crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu.; Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Şale, Yasin

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of optical experiments designed to investigate the changes in optical absorption spectra of TlGaSe2 ferroelectric-semiconductor with incommensurate (INC) phase in experimental conditions where crystal is kept several hours within the INC-phase (the regime of so called "memory" effect). The fundamental absorption of TlGaSe2, experimentally investigated by optical transmission measurements performed in the temperature range 15-300 K. An extraordinary modification of the optical absorption edge in the range of Urbach's tail is discovered as a result of the annealing within the INC-phase. The role of native defects forming the band edge in the observed phenomena in TlGaSe2 is discussed.

  15. Effect of Aerosol Size and Hygroscopicity on Aerosol Optical Depth in the Southeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles; Wagner, Nick; Gordon, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol optical depth (AOD) is affected by the size, optical characteristics, and hygroscopicity of particles, confounding attempts to link remote sensing observations of AOD to measured or modeled aerosol mass concentrations. In situ airborne observations of aerosol optical, chemical, microphysical and hygroscopic properties were made in the southeastern United States in the daytime in summer 2013. We use these observations to constrain a simple model that is used to test the sensitivity of AOD to the various measured parameters. As expected, the AOD was found to be most sensitive to aerosol mass concentration and to aerosol water content, which is controlled by aerosol hygroscopicity and the ambient relative humidity. However, AOD was also fairly sensitive to the mean particle diameter and the width of the size distribution. These parameters are often prescribed in global models that use simplified modal parameterizations to describe the aerosol, suggesting that the values chosen could substantially bias the calculated relationship between aerosol mass and optical extinction, AOD, and radiative forcing.

  16. Active probing of cloud thickness and optical depth using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60{sup o} full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Section 2 covers the up-to-date evolution of the nighttime WAIL instrument at LANL. Section 3 reports our progress towards daytime capability for WAIL, an important extension to full diurnal cycle monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter. Section 4 describes briefly how the important cloud properties can be inferred from WAIL signals.

  17. Determination of the diffusion length and the optical self absorption coefficient using EBIC model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermazi, S.; Guermazi, H.; Mlik, Y.; El Jani, B.; Grill, C.; Toureille, A.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a model of calculation of the induced current due to an electron beam. The expression for the electron beam induced current (EBIC) with an extended generation profile is obtained via the resolution of a steady state continuity equation by the Green function method, satisfying appropriated boundary conditions to the physical model. The generation profile takes into account the lateral diffusion, the effect of defects, dislocations and recombination surfaces besides the number of absorbed electrons and that of diffuse electrons as a function of the depth. In the case of a Schottky diode Au/GaAs obtained by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) method, the theoretical induced current profile is compared to the experimental one and to theoretical profiles whose analytical expressions are given by van Roosbroeck and Bresse. The minority carriers diffusion length L_n = 2 μm and the optical self-absorption coefficient a=0.034 μm^{-1} can be deduced from the experimental current profile, measured by scanning electron microscopy. The theoretical curve, obtained from the proposed model is in a good agreement with the experimental one for surface recombination velocity 10^6 cm s^{-1} except for distances far from the depletion layer (x_0 > 2.3 μm) where the photocurrent produced by the multiple process of the reabsorbed recombination radiation is preponderant. Our results are in agreement with those obtained by other experimental techniques on the same samples.

  18. Multi-wavelength measurements of aerosol optical absorption coefficients using a photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiang; Huang, Hong-Hua; Wang, Yao; Wang, Gui-Shi; Cao, Zhen-Song; Liu, Kun; Chen, Wei-Dong; Gao, Xiao-Ming

    2014-06-01

    The atmospheric aerosol absorption capacity is a critical parameter determining its direct and indirect effects on climate. Accurate measurement is highly desired for the study of the radiative budget of the Earth. A multi-wavelength (405 nm, 532 nm, 780 nm) aerosol absorption meter based on photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) invovling a single cylindrical acoustic resonator is developed for measuring the aerosol optical absorption coefficients (OACs). A sensitivity of 1.3 Mm-1 (at 532 nm) is demonstrated. The aerosol absorption meter is successfully tested through measuring the OACs of atmospheric nigrosin and ambient aerosols in the suburbs of Hefei city. The absorption cross section and absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) for ambient aerosol are determined for characterizing the component of the ambient aerosol.

  19. The Origin and Optical Depth of Ionizing Photons in the Green Pea Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    Our understanding of radiative feedback and star formation in galaxies at high redshift is hindered by the rarity of similar systems at low redshift. However, the recently identified Green Pea (GP) galaxies are similar to high-redshift galaxies in their morphologies and star formation rates and are vital tools for probing the generation and transmission of ionizing photons. The GPs contain massive star clusters that emit copious amounts of high-energy radiation, as indicated by intense [OIII] 5007 emission and HeII 4686 emission. We focus on six GP galaxies with high ratios of [O III] 5007,4959/[O II] 3727 ~10 or more. Such high ratios indicate gas with a high ionization parameter or a low optical depth. The GP line ratios and ages point to chemically homogeneous massive stars, Wolf-Rayet stars, or shock ionization as the most likely sources of the He II emission. Models including shock ionization suggest that the GPs may have low optical depths, consistent with a scenario in which ionizing photons escape along passageways created by recent supernovae. The GPs and similar galaxies can shed new light on cosmic reionization by revealing how ionizing photons propagate from massive star clusters to the intergalactic medium.

  20. Composite axilens-axicon diffractive optical elements for generation of ring patterns with high focal depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmavarapu, Raghu; Vijayakumar, A.; Brunner, R.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-03-01

    A binary Fresnel Zone Axilens (FZA) is designed for the infinite conjugate mode and the phase profile of a refractive axicon is combined with it to generate a composite Diffractive Optical Element (DOE). The FZA designed for two focal lengths generates a line focus along the propagation direction extending between the two focal planes. The ring pattern generated by the axicon is focused through this distance and the radius of the ring depends on the propagation distance. Hence, the radius of the focused ring pattern can be tuned, during the design process, within the two focal planes. The integration of the two functions was carried out by shifting the location of zones of FZA with respect to the phase profile of the refractive axicon resulting in a binary composite DOE. The FZAs and axicons were designed for different focal depth values and base angles respectively, in order to achieve different ring radii within the focal depth of each element. The elements were simulated using scalar diffraction formula and their focusing characteristics were analyzed. The DOEs were fabricated using electron beam direct writing and evaluated using a fiber coupled diode laser. The tunable ring patterns generated by the DOEs have prospective applications in microdrilling as well as microfabrication of circular diffractive and refractive optical elements.

  1. Aerosol optical depth, physical properties and radiative forcing over the Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S. K.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Takemura, T.

    2006-01-01

    The Arabian Sea region (4° N 20° N to 50° E 78° E) has a unique weather pattern on account of the Indian monsoon and the associated winds that reverse direction seasonally. The aerosol data, collected using ship-borne and island platforms (for 8 years from 1995 to 2002) along with MODIS (onboard TERRA satellite) data (from 2000 to 2003) have been used to evolve a comprehensive characterisation of the spatial and temporal variation in the physical, chemical, and radiative properties of aerosols over the Arabian Sea. The aerosol optical depth (AOD) was found to increase with latitude between the equator and 12° N. Over the northern Arabian Sea (regions lying north of 12° N), AODs do not show significant latitudinal variations; the average aerosol optical depth for this region was 0.29±0.12 during winter monsoon season (WMS; November to March) and 0.47±0.14 during summer monsoon season (SMS; April/May to September). The corresponding Angstrom exponents were 0.7±0.12 and 0.3±0.08, respectively. The low values of the exponent during SMS indicate the dominance of large aerosols (mainly dust particles >1 µm). The latitudinal gradient in AOD in the southern Arabian Sea is larger during SMS compared to WMS.

  2. THEMIS Observations of Mars Aerosol Optical Depth from 2002-2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    We use infrared images obtained by the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) instrument on-board Mars Odyssey to retrieve the optical depth of dust and water ice aerosols over more than 3.5 martian years between February 2002 (MY 25, Ls=330 ) and December 2008 (MY 29, Ls=183). These data provide an important bridge between earlier TES observations and recent observations from Mars Express and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. An improvement to our earlier retrieval to include atmospheric temperature information from THEMIS Band 10 observations leads to much improved retrievals during the largest dust storms. The new retrievals show moderate dust storm activity during Mars Years 26 and 27, although details of the strength and timing of dust storms is different from year to year. A planet-encircling dust storm event was observed during Mars Year 28 near Southern Hemisphere Summer solstice. A belt of low-latitude water ice clouds was observed during the aphelion season during each year, Mars Years 26 through 29. The optical depth of water ice clouds is somewhat higher in the THEMIS retrievals at approximately 5:00 PM local time than in the TES retrievals at approximately 2:00 PM, suggestive of possible local time variation of clouds.

  3. CALIOP and AERONET Aerosol Optical Depth Comparisons: One Size Fits None

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, A. H.; Winker, D. M.; Tackett, J. L.; Giles, D. M.; Kar, J.; Liu, Z.; Vaughan, M. A.; Powell, K. A.; Trepte, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    We compare the aerosol optical depths (AOD) retrieved from backscatter measurements of the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) aboard the Cloud Aerosol Lidar Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) satellite with coincident Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. Overpass coincidence criteria of +/- 2 h and within a 40 km radius are satisfied at least once at 149 globally distributed AERONET sites from 2006 to 2010. Most data pairs (>80%) use AERONET measurements acquired +/- 30 min of the overpass. We examine the differences in AOD estimates between CALIOP and AERONET for various aerosol, environmental, and geographic conditions. Results show CALIOP AOD are lower than AERONET AOD especially at low optical depths as measured by AERONET (500 nm AOD<0.1). Furthermore, the median relative AOD difference between the two measurements is 25% of the AERONET AOD for AOD>0.1. Differences in AOD between CALIOP and AERONET are possibly due to cloud contamination, scene inhomogeneity, instrument view angle differences, CALIOP retrieval errors, and detection limits. Comparison of daytime to nighttime number of 5 km 60m (60m in the vertical) features detected by CALIOP show that there are 20% more aerosol features at night. We find that CALIPSO and AERONET do not agree on the cloudiness of scenes. Of the scenes that meet the above coincidence criteria, CALIPSO finds clouds in more than 45% of the coincident atmospheric columns AERONET classifies as clear.

  4. Aerosol Optical Depth at Cape Grim 1986 - 2014: What does it tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station is located near the northwest tip of Tasmania (Australia), a site chosen to permit measurement of the atmospheric environment over the southern oceans. Atmospheric measurements began in the late 1970s, and observations of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) using automated sunphotometers began in 1986. Since then, measurements have continued with a range of different instruments operating at a varying number of wavelengths. The site is challenging for these measurements as it is exposed to a sea-salt laden atmosphere, which presents both instrumental issues (corrosion) and measurement complications (salt fouling of the windows) in addition to the high frequency of cloud. The dataset has been processed to produce a record of half-hourly AOD for the period 1986 - 2014 and investigated for internal consistency. In general the AOD is small (around 0.05 at 500nm). The impact of the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991 can be clearly observed, along with a persistent annual cycle. This has been further analyzed fitting to all wavelengths measured to derive an averaged optical depth (at 500 nm) and some preliminary aerosol size distribution information.

  5. Ship-based Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements in the Atlantic Ocean, Comparison with Satellite Retrievals and GOCART Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.; Sakerin, S.; Kabanov, D.; Slutsker, I.; Remer, L. A.; Kahn, R.; Ignatov, A.; Chin, M.; Diehl, T. L.; Mishchenko, M.; Liu, L.; Kucsera, T. L.; Giles, D.; Eck, T. F.; Torres, O.; Kopelevich, O.

    2005-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth measurements were made in October -December 2004 aboard of R/V Akademik Sergey Vavilov. The cruise area included the Atlantic transect from North Sea to Cape Town and then a crossing in the South Atlantic to Ushuaia, Argentina. The hand-held Microtops II sunphotometer was used to acquire 314 series of measurements spanning 38 days. The sunphotometer was pre-calibrated at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center against a master sun/sky radiometer instrument of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The direct sun measurements were acquired in five spectral channels: 340, 440, 675, 870 and 940 nm. To retrieve aerosol optical depths we applied AERONET processing algorithm (Version 2) to the raw data. Aerosol optical depth values were close to background oceanic conditions (0.04-0.08) in the open oceanic areas not influenced by continental sources. Spectral dependence can be described as almost neutral (Angstrom parameter was less than 0.6), especially in the Southern Atlantic. A notable latitudinal variability of optical depth was observed between 15N and 21S, which was associated with the aerosol transport from Africa. Correlations between optical depth and meteorological parameters were considered and comparison between ship-based measurements and AERONET sites along the cruise track was made. Aerosol optical depths were compared to the global transport model (GOCART) simulations and satellite retrievals from MODIS, MISR, and AVHRR.

  6. Monitoring transformer oil insulation using optical absorption properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Benjamin P.

    As the electrical power distribution system ages, new methods of determining the quality of electrical transformer units are needed. Due to the relatively high expense of loss of service and safety hazards, a relatively cheap sensor to track the age of the insulation would aide in the progress of an intelligent power grid. The degradation of solid insulating paper releases some of the age indicating organic compounds into the oil. At present, the only available method to determine the concentration of those compounds is to perform high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) testing in a laboratory. This is an expensive and time consuming activity that also requires transformer to be taken offline. Currently there are no sensors that can directly (on-line) measure the chemical integrity of the material. This research was focused upon one of the well known organic compounds released by paper into the transformer oil - 2-furfuraldehyde (2FAL). Previous methods of 2FAL detection were explored and expounded upon. A device was constructed to utilize light emitting diodes to optically interrogate solid discs made out of chemically active material in multiple tests. A 10 kVA distribution transformer was fitted with a special device allowing a continuous oil circulation and the optical setup. The transformer was tested while being loaded under accelerated ageing conditions. A premature failure of the distribution transformer did not allow any correlation between concentration of 2FAL and the optical signals. Previously sampled oils for a current transformer (CT) were also tested for chemical analysis in the laboratory and optical signals from the newly developed optical device were obtained. A 95% linear correlation was found between the age of the CT oil and the output of the optical device. Although the technique was validated and does seem to have merit, more tests are needed before the optical device can be recommended for use in the field.

  7. Ultra-high modulation depth exceeding 2,400% in optically controlled topological surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sangwan; Jang, Houk; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Moon, Jisoo; Sung, Ji Ho; Park, Jun; Cha, Soonyoung; Oh, Seongshik; Jo, Moon-Ho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2015-10-01

    Modulating light via coherent charge oscillations in solids is the subject of intense research topics in opto-plasmonics. Although a variety of methods are proposed to increase such modulation efficiency, one central challenge is to achieve a high modulation depth (defined by a ratio of extinction with/without light) under small photon-flux injection, which becomes a fundamental trade-off issue both in metals and semiconductors. Here, by fabricating simple micro-ribbon arrays of topological insulator Bi2Se3, we report an unprecedentedly large modulation depth of 2,400% at 1.5 THz with very low optical fluence of 45 μJ cm-2. This was possible, first because the extinction spectrum is nearly zero due to the Fano-like plasmon-phonon-destructive interference, thereby contributing an extremely small denominator to the extinction ratio. Second, the numerator of the extinction ratio is markedly increased due to the photoinduced formation of massive two-dimensional electron gas below the topological surface states, which is another contributor to the ultra-high modulation depth.

  8. Ultra-high modulation depth exceeding 2,400% in optically controlled topological surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Sangwan; Jang, Houk; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Moon, Jisoo; Sung, Ji Ho; Park, Jun; Cha, Soonyoung; Oh, Seongshik; Jo, Moon-Ho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2015-01-01

    Modulating light via coherent charge oscillations in solids is the subject of intense research topics in opto-plasmonics. Although a variety of methods are proposed to increase such modulation efficiency, one central challenge is to achieve a high modulation depth (defined by a ratio of extinction with/without light) under small photon-flux injection, which becomes a fundamental trade-off issue both in metals and semiconductors. Here, by fabricating simple micro-ribbon arrays of topological insulator Bi2Se3, we report an unprecedentedly large modulation depth of 2,400% at 1.5 THz with very low optical fluence of 45 μJ cm−2. This was possible, first because the extinction spectrum is nearly zero due to the Fano-like plasmon–phonon-destructive interference, thereby contributing an extremely small denominator to the extinction ratio. Second, the numerator of the extinction ratio is markedly increased due to the photoinduced formation of massive two-dimensional electron gas below the topological surface states, which is another contributor to the ultra-high modulation depth. PMID:26514372

  9. Ultra-high modulation depth exceeding 2,400% in optically controlled topological surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Sim, Sangwan; Jang, Houk; Koirala, Nikesh; Brahlek, Matthew; Moon, Jisoo; Sung, Ji Ho; Park, Jun; Cha, Soonyoung; Oh, Seongshik; Jo, Moon-Ho; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Choi, Hyunyong

    2015-01-01

    Modulating light via coherent charge oscillations in solids is the subject of intense research topics in opto-plasmonics. Although a variety of methods are proposed to increase such modulation efficiency, one central challenge is to achieve a high modulation depth (defined by a ratio of extinction with/without light) under small photon-flux injection, which becomes a fundamental trade-off issue both in metals and semiconductors. Here, by fabricating simple micro-ribbon arrays of topological insulator Bi2Se3, we report an unprecedentedly large modulation depth of 2,400% at 1.5 THz with very low optical fluence of 45 μJ cm(-2). This was possible, first because the extinction spectrum is nearly zero due to the Fano-like plasmon-phonon-destructive interference, thereby contributing an extremely small denominator to the extinction ratio. Second, the numerator of the extinction ratio is markedly increased due to the photoinduced formation of massive two-dimensional electron gas below the topological surface states, which is another contributor to the ultra-high modulation depth. PMID:26514372

  10. The Importance of Optical Pathlength Control for Plasma Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, M.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An inductively coupled GEC Cell with modified viewing ports has been used to measure in-situ absorption in CF4 plasmas via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, and the results compared to those obtained in a standard viewport configuration. The viewing ports were modified so that the window boundary is inside, rather than outside, of the GEC cell. Because the absorption obtained is a spatially integrated absorption, measurements made represent an averaging of absorbing species inside and outside of the plasma. This modification is made to reduce this spatial averaging and thus allow a more accurate estimation of neutral species concentrations and temperatures within the plasmas. By reducing this pathlength, we find that the apparent CF4 consumption increases from 65% to 95% and the apparent vibrational temperature of CF4 rises by 50-75 K. The apparent fraction of etch product SiF4 decreases from 4% to 2%. The data suggests that these density changes may be due to significant temperature gradients between the plasma and chamber viewports.

  11. On the assimilation of optical reflectances and snow depth observations into a detailed snowpack model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrois, Luc; Cosme, Emmanuel; Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Morin, Samuel; Libois, Quentin; Picard, Ghislain

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the ability of optical reflectance data assimilation to improve snow depth and snow water equivalent simulations from a chain of models with the SAFRAN meteorological model driving the detailed multilayer snowpack model Crocus now including a two-stream radiative transfer model for snow, TARTES. The direct use of reflectance data, allowed by TARTES, instead of higher level snow products, mitigates uncertainties due to commonly used retrieval algorithms.Data assimilation is performed with an ensemble-based method, the Sequential Importance Resampling Particle filter, to represent simulation uncertainties. In snowpack modeling, uncertainties of simulations are primarily assigned to meteorological forcings. Here, a method of stochastic perturbation based on an autoregressive model is implemented to explicitly simulate the consequences of these uncertainties on the snowpack estimates.Through twin experiments, the assimilation of synthetic spectral reflectances matching the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spectral bands is examined over five seasons at the Col du Lautaret, located in the French Alps. Overall, the assimilation of MODIS-like data reduces by 45 % the root mean square errors (RMSE) on snow depth and snow water equivalent. At this study site, the lack of MODIS data on cloudy days does not affect the assimilation performance significantly. The combined assimilation of MODIS-like reflectances and a few snow depth measurements throughout the 2010/2011 season further reduces RMSEs by roughly 70 %. This work suggests that the assimilation of optical reflectances has the potential to become an essential component of spatialized snowpack simulation and forecast systems. The assimilation of real MODIS data will be investigated in future works.

  12. Optical absorption properties of dispersed gold and silver alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wilcoxon, Jess

    2009-03-01

    The oldest topic in nanoscience is the size-dependent optical properties of gold and silver colloids or nanoparticles, first investigated scientifically by Michael Faraday in 1857. In the modern era, advances in both synthesis and characterization have resulted in new insights into the size-dependent absorbance of Au and Ag nanoparticles with sizes below the classical limit for Mie theory. In this paper we discuss the synthesis and properties of core/shell and nanoalloy particles of Au and Ag, compare them to particles of pure gold and silver, and discuss how alloying affects nanoparticle chemical stability. We show that composition, size, and nanostructure (e.g., core/shell vs quasi-random nanoalloy) can all be employed to adjust the optical absorbance properties. The type of nanostructure--core/shell vs alloy--is reflected in their optical absorbance features. PMID:19708105

  13. Depth discrimination in acousto-optic cerebral blood flow measurement simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsalach, A.; Schiffer, Z.; Ratner, E.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.; Balberg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) is crucial, as inadequate perfusion, even for relatively short periods of time, may lead to brain damage or even death. Thus, significant research efforts are directed at developing reliable monitoring tools that will enable continuous, bed side, simple and cost-effective monitoring of CBF. All existing non invasive bed side monitoring methods, which are mostly NIRS based, such as Laser Doppler or DCS, tend to underestimate CBF in adults, due to the indefinite effect of extra-cerebral tissues on the obtained signal. If those are to find place in day to day clinical practice, the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues must be eliminated and data from the depth (brain) should be extracted and discriminated. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133Xe SPECT and laser Doppler. We have assembled a comprehensive computerized simulation, modeling this acousto-optic technique in a highly scattering media. Using the combination of light and ultrasound, we show how depth information may be extracted, thus distinguishing between flow patterns taking place at different depths. Our algorithm, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented and examined in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is presented, suggesting that using such method one can effectively nullify the extra-cerebral tissues influence on the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

  14. Focusing of photomechanical waves with an optical lens for depth-targeted molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takuichirou; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2014-02-01

    We have been developing molecular delivery systems based on photomechanical waves (PMWs), which are generated by the irradiation of a laser absorbing material with nanosecond laser pulses. This method enables highly site-specific delivery in the horizontal plane of the tissue. However, targeting in the vertical direction is a remaining challenge. In this study, we developed a novel PMW focusing device for deeper tissue targeting. A commercial optical concave lens and black natural rubber sheet (laser absorber) were attached to the top and bottom end of a cylindrical spacer, respectively, which was filled with water. A laser pulse was transmitted through the lens and water and hit the rubber sheet to induce a plasma, generating a PMW. The PMW was propagated both downward and upward. The downward wave (1st wave) was diffused, while the upward (2nd wave) wave was reflected with the concave surface of the lens and focused at a depth determined by the geometrical parameters. To attenuate the 1st wave, a small-diameter silicon sponge rubber disk was adhered just under the rubber sheet concentrically with the laser axis. With the lens of f = -40 mm, the 2nd wave was focused to a diameter of 5.7 mm at a targeted depth of 20 mm, which was well agreed with the result of calculation by ray tracing. At a laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2, peak pressure of the PMW reached ~40 MPa at the depth of 20 mm. Under this condition, we examined depth-targeted gene delivery to the rat skin.

  15. Selectivity of the optical-absorption method based on an instrumental pick out of Fourier components in the absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Kolesnikov, S. A.; Kolesnikova, E. S.; Turutin, Yu. A.; Konopelko, L. A.; Shor, N. B.

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of interference-polarization filters (IPFs) in the structure of an optical-absorption analyzer makes it possible to pick out a harmonic (a Fourier component of the absorption spectrum) providing measurement with the highest sensitivity. The selectivity of such a method of analysis is determined by overlapping the oscillations of the measured and interfering components. By the example of measurement in benzene in the presence of an interfering component (toluene), the possibility is considered for the optimization of selectivity due to the variation of the path-difference dispersion for ordinary and extraordinary interfering rays. The metrological characteristics of the interference-polarization analyzer of C6H6 confirming the results of calculations are given.

  16. Method of optical coherence tomography with parallel depth-resolved signal reception and fibre-optic phase modulators

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A N; Turchin, I V

    2013-12-31

    The method of optical coherence tomography with the scheme of parallel reception of the interference signal (P-OCT) is developed on the basis of spatial paralleling of the reference wave by means of a phase diffraction grating producing the appropriate time delay in the Mach–Zehnder interferometer. The absence of mechanical variation of the optical path difference in the interferometer essentially reduces the time required for 2D imaging of the object internal structure, as compared to the classical OCT that uses the time-domain method of the image construction, the sensitivity and the dynamic range being comparable in both approaches. For the resulting field of the interfering object and reference waves an analytical expression is derived that allows the calculation of the autocorrelation function in the plane of photodetectors. For the first time a method of linear phase modulation by 2π is proposed for P-OCT systems, which allows the use of compact high-frequency (a few hundred kHz) piezoelectric cell-based modulators. For the demonstration of the P-OCT method an experimental setup was created, using which the images of the inner structure of biological objects at the depth up to 1 mm with the axial spatial resolution of 12 μm were obtained. (optical coherence tomography)

  17. Subwavelength-resolution photoacoustic microscopy for label-free detection of optical absorption in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chi; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    Mainstream optical microscopy technologies normally detect fluorescence or scattering, which may require undesirable labeling, but cannot directly sense optical absorption, which provides essential biological functional information. Here we reported in vivo and label-free subwavelength-resolution photoacoustic microscopy (SW-PAM) by using a waterimmersion optical objective with a 1.23 NA. Capable of detecting nonfluorescent endogenous pigments, SW-PAM provides exquisitely high optical-absorption contrast. And, as a result of background-free detection, the sensitivity of SW-PAM to optical absorption reaches 100%. SW-PAM was demonstrated with wide-field optical microscopy by imaging gold nanospheres, ex vivo cells, and in vivo vasculature and melanoma. It was shown that SW-PAM has approached the ultimate diffraction-limited optical resolution-220 nm resolution at 532 nm wavelength. Subcellular organelles, such as melanosomes, can be resolved by SW-PAM. Vasculature and early-stage melanoma were imaged with 21:1 and 34:1 contrasts, respectively, without labeling. For all these applications, SW-PAM has contrasts orders of magnitude higher than wide-field optical microscopy. Therefore, SW-PAM is expected to join the mainstream microscopy technologies.

  18. Software-Assisted Depth Analysis of Optic Nerve Stereoscopic Images in Telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Xia, Tian; Patel, Shriji N; Szirth, Ben C; Kolomeyer, Anton M; Khouri, Albert S

    2016-01-01

    Background. Software guided optic nerve assessment can assist in process automation and reduce interobserver disagreement. We tested depth analysis software (DAS) in assessing optic nerve cup-to-disc ratio (VCD) from stereoscopic optic nerve images (SONI) of normal eyes. Methods. In a prospective study, simultaneous SONI from normal subjects were collected during telemedicine screenings using a Kowa 3Wx nonmydriatic simultaneous stereoscopic retinal camera (Tokyo, Japan). VCD was determined from SONI pairs and proprietary pixel DAS (Kowa Inc., Tokyo, Japan) after disc and cup contour line placement. A nonstereoscopic VCD was determined using the right channel of a stereo pair. Mean, standard deviation, t-test, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCC) were calculated. Results. 32 patients had mean age of 40 ± 14 years. Mean VCD on SONI was 0.36 ± 0.09, with DAS 0.38 ± 0.08, and with nonstereoscopic 0.29 ± 0.12. The difference between stereoscopic and DAS assisted was not significant (p = 0.45). ICCC showed agreement between stereoscopic and software VCD assessment. Mean VCD difference was significant between nonstereoscopic and stereoscopic (p < 0.05) and nonstereoscopic and DAS (p < 0.005) recordings. Conclusions. DAS successfully assessed SONI and showed a high degree of correlation to physician-determined stereoscopic VCD. PMID:27190507

  19. Software-Assisted Depth Analysis of Optic Nerve Stereoscopic Images in Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Patel, Shriji N.; Szirth, Ben C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Software guided optic nerve assessment can assist in process automation and reduce interobserver disagreement. We tested depth analysis software (DAS) in assessing optic nerve cup-to-disc ratio (VCD) from stereoscopic optic nerve images (SONI) of normal eyes. Methods. In a prospective study, simultaneous SONI from normal subjects were collected during telemedicine screenings using a Kowa 3Wx nonmydriatic simultaneous stereoscopic retinal camera (Tokyo, Japan). VCD was determined from SONI pairs and proprietary pixel DAS (Kowa Inc., Tokyo, Japan) after disc and cup contour line placement. A nonstereoscopic VCD was determined using the right channel of a stereo pair. Mean, standard deviation, t-test, and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICCC) were calculated. Results. 32 patients had mean age of 40 ± 14 years. Mean VCD on SONI was 0.36 ± 0.09, with DAS 0.38 ± 0.08, and with nonstereoscopic 0.29 ± 0.12. The difference between stereoscopic and DAS assisted was not significant (p = 0.45). ICCC showed agreement between stereoscopic and software VCD assessment. Mean VCD difference was significant between nonstereoscopic and stereoscopic (p < 0.05) and nonstereoscopic and DAS (p < 0.005) recordings. Conclusions. DAS successfully assessed SONI and showed a high degree of correlation to physician-determined stereoscopic VCD. PMID:27190507

  20. Ultrahigh resolution optical coherence elastography using a Bessel beam for extended depth of field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curatolo, Andrea; Villiger, Martin; Lorenser, Dirk; Wijesinghe, Philip; Fritz, Alexander; Kennedy, Brendan F.; Sampson, David D.

    2016-03-01

    Visualizing stiffness within the local tissue environment at the cellular and sub-cellular level promises to provide insight into the genesis and progression of disease. In this paper, we propose ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence elastography, and demonstrate three-dimensional imaging of local axial strain of tissues undergoing compressive loading. The technique employs a dual-arm extended focus optical coherence microscope to measure tissue displacement under compression. The system uses a broad bandwidth supercontinuum source for ultrahigh axial resolution, Bessel beam illumination and Gaussian beam detection, maintaining sub-2 μm transverse resolution over nearly 100 μm depth of field, and spectral-domain detection allowing high displacement sensitivity. The system produces strain elastograms with a record resolution (x,y,z) of 2×2×15 μm. We benchmark the advances in terms of resolution and strain sensitivity by imaging a suitable inclusion phantom. We also demonstrate this performance on freshly excised mouse aorta and reveal the mechanical heterogeneity of vascular smooth muscle cells and elastin sheets, otherwise unresolved in a typical, lower resolution optical coherence elastography system.

  1. Theoretical prediction of optical absorption maxima for photosensory receptor mutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Yamato, Takahisa

    2006-10-01

    We found a linear correlation between the theoretically predicted shifts and experimentally observed absorption spectra for various mutants of photoactive yellow protein, a photosensory receptor. Excitation energies of mutants were evaluated by the combination of the high level ab initio calculation for the chromophore inside and the low level ab initio calculation for the surrounding protein environment. Importantly, the electronic states of these two regions were treated both as variables and they are solved consistently to each other. The protein-chromophore interaction has been accurately reproduced by this method.

  2. Confined optical-phonon-assisted cyclotron resonance in quantum wells via two-photon absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuc, Huynh Vinh; Hien, Nguyen Dinh; Dinh, Le; Phong, Tran Cong

    2016-06-01

    The effect of confined phonons on the phonon-assisted cyclotron resonance (PACR) via both one and two photon absorption processes in a quantum well is theoretically studied. We consider cases when electrons are scattered by confined optical phonons described by the Fuchs-Kliewer slab, Ridley's guided, and Huang-Zhu models. The analytical expression of the magneto-optical absorption coefficient (MOAC) is obtained by relating it to the transition probability for the absorption of photons. It predicts resonant peaks caused by transitions between Landau levels and electric subband accompanied by confined phonons emission in the absorption spectrum. The MOAC and the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) for the intra- and inter-subband transitions are given as functions of the magnetic field, temperature, and quantum well width. In narrow quantum wells, the phonon confinement becomes more important and should be taken into account in studying FWHM.

  3. Magnetic field control of the intraband optical absorption in two-dimensional quantum rings

    SciTech Connect

    Olendski, O.; Barakat, T.

    2014-02-28

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of the two-dimensional semiconductor ring in the perpendicular magnetic field B are calculated within independent electron approximation. Characteristic feature of the energy spectrum are crossings of the levels with adjacent nonpositive magnetic quantum numbers as the intensity B changes. It is shown that the absorption coefficient of the associated optical transition is drastically decreased at the fields corresponding to the crossing. Proposed model of the Volcano disc allows to get simple mathematical analytical results, which provide clear physical interpretation. An interplay between positive linear and intensity-dependent negative cubic absorption coefficients is discussed; in particular, critical light intensity at which additional resonances appear in the total absorption dependence on the light frequency is calculated as a function of the magnetic field and levels' broadening.

  4. Recombination line intensities for hydrogenic ions. III - Effects of finite optical depth and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Storey, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the recombination spectrum of hydrogen arising from: (1) finite optical thickness in the Lyman lines; (2) the overlapping of Lyman lines near the series limit; (3) the absorption of Lyman lines by dust or photoionization, and (4) the long-wave radiation emitted by dust is examined. Full account is taken of electron and heavy particle collisions in redistributing energy and angular momentum. It is seen that each of these deviations from the classical Case B leads to observable effects, and that dust influences the recombination spectrum in characteristic ways that may make possible new observational constraints on dust properties in nebulosities. On the basis of these calculations it is believed that the uncertainty in the determination of the helium-to-hydrogen abundance ratio in the universe may be larger than currently claimed.

  5. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  6. Optical nonlinear absorption characteristics of Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Muralikrishna, Molli Kiran, Aditha Sai Ravikanth, B. Sowmendran, P. Muthukumar, V. Sai Venkataramaniah, Kamisetti

    2014-04-24

    In this work, we report for the first time, the nonlinear optical absorption properties of antimony selenide (Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}) nanoparticles synthesized through solvothermal route. X-ray diffraction results revealed the crystalline nature of the nanoparticles. Electron microscopy studies revealed that the nanoparticles are in the range of 10 - 40 nm. Elemental analysis was performed using EDAX. By employing open aperture z-scan technique, we have evaluated the effective two-photon absorption coefficient of Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanoparticles to be 5e-10 m/W at 532 nm. These nanoparticles exhibit strong intensity dependent nonlinear optical absorption and hence could be considered to have optical power limiting applications in the visible range.

  7. Enhanced light absorption in graphene via a liquid-crystalline optical diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantazi, Aikaterini Iria; Yannopapas, Vassilios

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate theoretically that light absorption in graphene can be boosted via a light-trapping mechanism based on a liquid-crystalline optical diode. The optical diode consists of twisted-nematic and nematic liquid-crystalline slabs. In particular, we show that, using a proper optical-diode setup, the absorption in a single graphene layer can be enhanced by a factor of four. By varying the pitch of the twisted-nematic liquid-crystalline slabs comprising the diode, one can tune the operating spectral region of the diode and thus enhance the absorption of graphene within a desired spectral window. Our calculations are based on Berreman's 4×4 method which treats anisotropic, isotropic and/ or inhomogeneous layered systems on equal footing.

  8. Strain- and twist-engineered optical absorption of few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qian; Kong, XiangHua; Qiao, JingSi; Ji, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Density functional and many-body perturbation theories calculations were carried out to investigate fundamental and optical bandgap, exciton binding energy and optical absorption property of normal and strain- and twist-engineered few-layer black phosphorus (BP). We found that the fundamental bandgaps of few layer BP can be engineered by layer stacking and in-plane strain, with linear relationships to their associated exciton binding energies. The strain-dependent optical absorption behaviors are also anisotropic that the position of the first absorption peak monotonically blue-shifts as the strain applies to either direction for incident light polarized along the armchair direction, but this is not the case for that along the zigzag direction. Given those striking properties, we proposed two prototype devices for building potentially more balanced light absorbers and light filter passes, which promotes further applications and investigations of BP in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics.

  9. 1- and 2-photon absorption by laser-cooled 85Rb using an optical nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L.; Daly, M.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of a cold cloud of 85Rb can be non-destructively examined using an optical nanofiber. The nanofiber is a submicron-diameter cylindrical waveguide fabricated from commercially-available optical fiber using a heat-and-pull rig. The nanofiber can be used as a 'dark' or 'bright' probe depending on whether laser light is coupled into the nanofiber. We demonstrate the use of an optical nanofiber as an absorption spectroscopy tool for cold atoms. A frequency-scanned probe beam is launched through the nanofiber and the resonant light is absorbed at the waist of the nanofiber by nearby cold 85Rb atoms. We present recent singlephoton absorption results and comment on the role of surface interactions. Future work on 2-photon absorption using excited state electronic transitions in 85Rb is discussed.

  10. [Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 by multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-hua; Si, Fu-qi; Dou, Ke; Li, Ang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-qing

    2010-09-01

    A method of retrieving NO2 in troposphere based on multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was introduced. The differential slant column density (dSCD) of NO2 was evaluated by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), removing the Fraunhofer structure and Ring effect. Combining the results of different observing directions, the tropospheric NO2 differential slant column density (deltaSCD) was evaluated, and the air mass factor (AMF) was calculated with the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN and the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) was retrieved. To ensure the accuracy of the results, it was compared with the results of long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS), a good accordance was shown with the correlation coefficients of 0.94027 and 0.96924. PMID:21105419

  11. Instability of photoinduced optical absorption of Bi12SiO20: Al crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, T. V.; Dyachenko, A. A.; Khmelenko, O. V.

    2015-04-01

    The results of the experimental investigation of the instability of the establishment and relaxation of a photochromic effect in aluminum-doped Bi12SiO20 crystals have been presented. The oscillating and nonmonotonic kinetic dependences of the photoinduced optical absorption have been observed. The absorption oscillations are associated with the competition of the formation and destruction of [AlSiO4]0 photochromic centers.

  12. Optical absorption of Ni2+ and Ni3+ ions in gadolinium gallium garnet epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileva, N. V.; Gerus, P. A.; Sokolov, V. O.; Plotnichenko, V. G.

    2012-12-01

    Single-crystal Ni-doped gadolinium gallium garnet films were grown for the first time from supercooled Bi2O3-B2O3-based melt solutions by liquid-phase epitaxy. Optical absorption bands due to Ni2+, Ni3+ and Bi3+ ions were observed in those films. Interpretation and tabulation of all absorption bands of nickel ions occupying octahedral and tetrahedral sites in the garnet lattice are presented.

  13. Global and Seasonal Aerosol Optical Depths Derived From Ultraviolet Observations by Satellites (TOMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, J. R.; Torres, O.

    1999-01-01

    It has been shown that absorbing aerosols (dust, smoke, volcanic ash) can be detected in the ultraviolet wavelengths (331 nm to 380 nm) from satellite observations (TOMS, Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) over both land and water. The theoretical basis for these observations and their conversions to optical depths is discussed in terms of an aerosol index AI or N-value residue (assigned positive for absorbing aerosols). The theoretical considerations show that negative values of the AI frequently represent the presence of non-absorbing aerosols (NA) in the troposphere (mostly pollution in the form of sulfates, hydrocarbons, etc., and some natural sulfate aerosols) with particle sizes near 0.1 to 0.2 microns or less. The detection of small-particle non-absorbing aerosols from the measured backscattered radiances is based on the observed wavelength dependence from Mie scattering after the background Rayleigh scattering is subtracted. The Mie scattering from larger particles, 1 micron or more (e.g., cloud water droplets) has too small a wavelength dependence to be detected by this method. In regions that are mostly cloud free, aerosols of all sizes can be seen in the single channel 380 nm or 360 nm radiance data. The most prominent Al feature observed is the strong asymmetry in aerosol amount between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, with the large majority of NA occurring above 20degN latitude. The maximum values of non-absorbing aerosols are observed over the eastern U.S. and most of western Europe corresponding to the areas of highest industrial pollution. Annual cycles in the amount of NA are observed over Europe and North America with maxima occurring in the summer corresponding to times of minimum wind transport. Similarly, the maxima in the winter over the Atlantic Ocean occurs because of wind borne transport from the land. Most regions of the world have the maximum amount of non-absorbing aerosol in the December to January period except for the eastern

  14. Polyethylene laser welding based on optical absorption variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtieri, G.; Visco, A.; Nocita, D.; Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Scolaro, C.

    2016-04-01

    Polymeric materials, both pure and containing nanostructures, can be prepared as thin sheets in order to produce joints with an interface between an optically transparent sheet and an optically absorbent substrate to be welded by infrared pulsed laser irradiation. The Laser Transmission Welding (LTW) technique has been successfully applied in order to join two or more thermoplastic polymeric sheets that must have a similar chemical composition. In this research work, polymeric joints of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene sheets were realized, characterized and welded. Some polymer sheets were doped, at different concentrations, with carbon nano-particles absorbent the laser radiation. A pulsed laser operating in the wavelength region 532 nm with intensity of the order of 109 Watt/cm2 was employed to be transmitted by the transparent polymer and to be absorbed by the carbon enriched surface. At the interface of the two polymers the released energy induces melting, that is assisted by pressure, producing a fast and resistant welding zone. Mechanical and optical characterizations and surface analyses are presented and discussed.

  15. Charge-transfer optical absorption mechanism of DNA:Ag-nanocluster complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuinhos, R.; Lúcio, A. D.; Chacham, H.; Alexandre, S. S.

    2016-05-01

    Optical properties of DNA:Ag-nanoclusters complexes have been successfully applied experimentally in Chemistry, Physics, and Biology. Nevertheless, the mechanisms behind their optical activity remain unresolved. In this work, we present a time-dependent density functional study of optical absorption in DNA:Ag4. In all 23 different complexes investigated, we obtain new absorption peaks in the visible region that are not found in either the isolated Ag4 or isolated DNA base pairs. Absorption from red to green are predominantly of charge-transfer character, from the Ag4 to the DNA fragment, while absorption in the blue-violet range are mostly associated to electronic transitions of a mixed character, involving either DNA-Ag4 hybrid orbitals or intracluster orbitals. We also investigate the role of exchange-correlation functionals in the calculated optical spectra. Significant differences are observed between the calculations using the PBE functional (without exact exchange) and the CAM-B3LYP functional (which partly includes exact exchange). Specifically, we observe a tendency of charge-transfer excitations to involve purines bases, and the PBE spectra error is more pronounced in the complexes where the Ag cluster is bound to the purines. Finally, our results also highlight the importance of adding both the complementary base pair and the sugar-phosphate backbone in order to properly characterize the absorption spectrum of DNA:Ag complexes.

  16. Absorption spectroscopy of powdered materials using time-resolved diffuse optical methods.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Farina, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2012-11-10

    In this paper a novel method, based on time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy, is proposed to measure the absorption of small amounts of nanostructured powder materials independent of scattering. Experimental validation, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, has been carried out on India Inkparticles. The effectiveness of the technique to measure scattering-free absorption is demonstrated on carbon nanotubes. The comparison between the absorption spectra acquired by the proposed method and conventional measurements performed with a commercial spectrophotometer is discussed. PMID:23142900

  17. Ultraviolet absorption of common spacecraft contaminants. [to control effects of contaminants on optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Organic contamination of ultraviolet optical systems is discussed. Degradation of signal by reflection, scattering, interference, and absorption is shown. The first three processes depend on the physical state of the contaminant while absorption depends on its chemical structure. The latter phenomenon is isolated from the others by dissolving contaminants in cyclohexane and determining absorption spectra from 2100A to 3600A. A variety of materials representing the types of contaminants responsible for most spaceflight hardware problems is scanned and the spectra is presented. The effect of thickness is demonstrated for the most common contaminant, di(2 ethyl hexyl)phthalate, by scanning successive dilutions.

  18. The Optical Absorption Coefficient of Bean Seeds Investigated Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, G.; Hernandez-Aguilar, C.; Dominguez-Pacheco, A.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Perez-Reyes, M. C. J.; Martinez, E. Moreno

    2015-06-01

    A knowledge about seed optical parameters is of great relevance in seed technology practice. Such parameters provide information about its absorption and reflectance, which could be useful for biostimulation processes, by light sources, in early stages of seed germination. In the present research photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and the Rosencwaig and Gersho model were used to determine the optical absorption coefficient () of five varieties of bean seeds ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.), of different productive cycles; the seeds were biostimulated by laser treatment to evaluate the effects of biostimulation pre-sowing. It was found that the bean varieties V1, V2, V4, and V5 were optically opaque in the visible spectrum; in the case of the V3 variety, this sample was optically transparent from 680 nm. The varieties of the studied bean seeds showed significant statistical differences in sizes and also in their optical absorption spectra. The biostimulation effects showed that the seed samples with a higher optical penetration length had a positive biostimulation, in the percentage of germination, obtaining an enhancement of 47 % compared to the control sample. The utility of PAS for the optical characterization of seeds has been demonstrated in this study of the laser biostimulation process of this kind of samples.

  19. Optical absorption and luminescence study of cobalt-doped magnesium aluminosilicate glass ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyarevich, A. M.; Denisov, I. A.; Yumashev, K. V.; Dymshits, O. S.; Zhilin, A. A.

    2002-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of cobalt-doped magnesium aluminosilicate transparent glass ceramics that were prepared under different conditions have been studied. It has been shown that absorption and luminescence spectra and absorption bleaching of these glass ceramics are defined mainly by tetrahedrally coordinated Co 2+ ions located in magnesium aluminum spinel nanocrystals. The lifetimes of the 4 T 1 ( 4 F) and 4 T 2 ( 4 F) excited states of the tetrahedral Co 2+ ions were found to be in the ranges 2540 and 120450 ns, respectively, depending on the Co concentration. 2002 Optical Society of America

  20. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  1. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-16

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Laser modulation of optical absorption in ZnSe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The possibility of producing and detecting laser induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) in ZnSe crystals using a moderate laser intensity of about 6 mw output was investigated. The modulation is smaller than that previously obtained with higher laser photon flux, but is not too difficult to detect. Modulation of the order of a few parts in 10 to the 5th power, up to one part in 10 to the 4th power appears typical at the present. LIMA pulse shapes were recorded with varying system resolutions at a half dozen wavelengths in the visible, from 4800 A to 6000 A. Detailed data were taken, particularly at 5000 A, for a range of time intervals following laser pulse turn-on. Quantitative study of the excitation and decay kinetics of these is underway, though analysis is not complete. Major features are discussed with attention centered upon the detailed measurements made most recently at 5000 A.

  3. Assessment of Error in Aerosol Optical Depth Measured by AERONET Due to Aerosol Forward Scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinyuk, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Smirnov, Alexander; Eck, Thomas F.; Slustsker, Ilya; Schafer, Joel S.; Giles, David M.; Sorokin, Michail

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the effect of aerosol forward scattering on the accuracy of aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured by CIMEL Sun photometers. The effect is quantified in terms of AOD and solar zenith angle using radiative transfer modeling. The analysis is based on aerosol size distributions derived from multi-year climatologies of AERONET aerosol retrievals. The study shows that the modeled error is lower than AOD calibration uncertainty (0.01) for the vast majority of AERONET level 2 observations, 99.53%. Only 0.47% of the AERONET database corresponding mostly to dust aerosol with high AOD and low solar elevations has larger biases. We also show that observations with extreme reductions in direct solar irradiance do not contribute to level 2 AOD due to low Sun photometer digital counts below a quality control cutoff threshold.

  4. Preliminary investigations toward nighttime aerosol optical depth retrievals from the VIIRS day/night band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. S.; Zhang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Miller, S. D.; Reid, J. S.

    2013-01-01

    A great need exists for reliable nighttime aerosol products at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this concept demonstration study, using Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) observations on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, a new method is proposed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical depth (τ) using the contrast between regions with and without artificial surface lights. Evaluation of the retrieved τ values against daytime AERONET data from before and after the overpass of the VIIRS satellite over the Cape Verde, Grand Forks, and Alta Floresta AERONET stations yields a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.71. This study suggests that the VIIRS DNB has the potential to provide useful nighttime aerosol detection and property retrievals.

  5. Preliminary investigations toward nighttime aerosol optical depth retrievals from the VIIRS Day/Night Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. S.; Zhang, J.; Hyer, E. J.; Miller, S. D.; Reid, J. S.

    2013-05-01

    A great need exists for reliable nighttime aerosol products at high spatial and temporal resolution. In this concept demonstration study, using Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day/Night Band (DNB) observations on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite, a new method is proposed for retrieving nighttime aerosol optical depth (τ) using the contrast between regions with and without artificial surface lights. Evaluation of the retrieved τ values against daytime AERONET data from before and after the overpass of the VIIRS satellite over the Cape Verde, Grand Forks, and Alta Floresta AERONET stations yields a coefficient of determination (r2) of 0.71. This study suggests that the VIIRS DNB has the potential to provide useful nighttime aerosol detection and property retrievals.

  6. Atmospheric optical depth effects on angular anisotropy of plant canopy reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deering, Donald W.; Eck, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of varying atmospheric aerosol optical depth on the bidirectional reflectance distribution of vegetation canopies is investigated. The reflectance distributions of two pasture grass canopies and one soya bean canopy under different sky irradiance distributions were measured, and the data were analyzed in the visible and IR spectral bands. It is observed that, for the pasture grass canopies, the change in reflectance is due to the percentage of shadowed area viewed by the sensor, and for the soya bean, the specular reflection effect and increased diffuse irradiance penetration into the canopy cause reflectance changes. It is detected that the reflectivity for the soya bean canopy on a hazy day is lower than on a clear day; however, the opposite change is observed for the pasture grass. It is also detected that the normalized difference vegetation index values differ under clear and hazy conditions for the same vegetation canopy conditions.

  7. Measurement of depth-resolved thermal deformation distribution using phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun; Dong, Bo; Bai, Yulei; Ye, Shuangli; Lei, Zhenkun; Zhou, Yanzhou

    2015-10-19

    An updated B-scan method is proposed for measuring the evolution of thermal deformation fields in polymers. In order to measure the distributions of out-of-plane deformation and normal strain field, phase-contrast spectral optical coherence tomography (PC-SOCT) was performed with the depth range and resolution of 4.3 mm and 10.7 μm, respectively, as thermal loads were applied to three different multilayer samples. The relation between temperature and material refractive index was predetermined before the measurement. After accounting for the refractive index, the thermal deformation fields in the polymer were obtained. The measured thermal expansion coefficient of silicone sealant was approximately equal to its reference value. This method allows correctly assessing the mechanical properties in semitransparent polymers. PMID:26480464

  8. The optical depth of the Universe seen through ultrahigh energy cosmic ray spectacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotera, K.; Lemoine, M.

    2008-11-01

    We provide an analytical description of the transport of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays in a universe made up of magnetized scattering centers, with negligible magnetic fields between them. Magnetic deflection is no longer a continuous process: it is rather dominated by scattering events. We calculate the optical depth of the Universe to cosmic ray scattering and discuss its phenomenological consequences for various source scenarios. It is found that part of the correlation reported recently by the Pierre Auger Observatory between active galactic nuclei and the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays may be affected by a scattering delusion. This experiment may be observing in part the last scattering surface of particles, rather than their source population.

  9. Estimating object proper motion using optical flow, kinematics, and depth information.

    PubMed

    Schmüdderich, Jens; Willert, Volker; Eggert, Julian; Rebhan, Sven; Goerick, Christian; Sagerer, Gerhard; Körner, Edgar

    2008-08-01

    For the interaction of a mobile robot with a dynamic environment, the estimation of object motion is desired while the robot is walking and/or turning its head. In this paper, we describe a system which manages this task by combining depth from a stereo camera and computation of the camera movement from robot kinematics in order to stabilize the camera images. Moving objects are detected by applying optical flow to the stabilized images followed by a filtering method, which incorporates both prior knowledge about the accuracy of the measurement and the uncertainties of the measurement process itself. The efficiency of this system is demonstrated in a dynamic real-world scenario with a walking humanoid robot. PMID:18632403

  10. Reconstruction of long-term aerosol optical depth series with sunshine duration records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Romero, A.; Sanchez-Lorenzo, A.; González, J. A.; Calbó, J.

    2016-02-01

    We report the suitability of sunshine duration (SD) records as a proxy for the reconstruction of atmospheric aerosol content, for which little information exists, especially prior to the 1980s. Specifically, we have treated cloudless summer days in 16 stations throughout Spain. For almost all sites we find statistically significant relationships between aerosol optical depth (AOD) and daily SD. The correlation coefficient presents a mean value of -0.72, and slope values of the linear regressions are within the range [-0.11, -0.36]. The relationships are used to generate AOD series back to the 1960s (to the 1920s for Madrid). These reconstructed series show an increase in AOD from the mid-1960s to the 1980s, followed by a decrease until the present, in agreement with changes in anthropogenic aerosol emissions and with opposite trends of solar irradiance. The method can be used to reconstruct AOD from the late nineteenth century at many stations worldwide.

  11. Optical gesture sensing and depth mapping technologies for head-mounted displays: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, Bernard; Lee, Johnny

    2013-05-01

    Head Mounted Displays (HMDs), and especially see-through HMDs have gained renewed interest in recent time, and for the first time outside the traditional military and defense realm, due to several high profile consumer electronics companies presenting their products to hit market. Consumer electronics HMDs have quite different requirements and constrains as their military counterparts. Voice comments are the de-facto interface for such devices, but when the voice recognition does not work (not connection to the cloud for example), trackpad and gesture sensing technologies have to be used to communicate information to the device. We review in this paper the various technologies developed today integrating optical gesture sensing in a small footprint, as well as the various related 3d depth mapping sensors.

  12. SAGE and SAM II measurements of global stratospheric aerosol optical depth and mass loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Mccormick, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Several volcanic eruptions between November 1979 and April 1981 have injected material into the stratosphere. The SAGE and SAM II satellite systems have measured, with global coverage, the 1-micron extinction produced by this material, and examples of the data product are shown in the form of global maps of stratospheric optical depth and altitude-latitude plots of zonal mean extinction. These data, and that for the volcanically quiet period in early 1979, have been used to determine the changes in the total stratospheric mass loading. Estimates have also been made of the contribution to the total aerosol mass from each eruption. It has been found that between 1979 and mid-1981, the total stratospheric aerosol mass increased from a background level of approximately 570,000 metric tons to a peak of approximately 1,300,000 metric tons.

  13. Spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric aerosol optical depth at the ARM CART Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.M.; Cheng, M.D.

    1998-02-01

    In an effort to better characterize the inputs to radiative transfer models and research-grade global climate simulation models (GCMs) the columnar aerosol loading, measured as the aerosol optical depth (AOD), has been computed for five facilities within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site. Characterization of the AOD reported here show clear evidence that the spatial and temporal gradient exists at a much finer linear scale than those of the CART site. The annual variations of median AOD are on the order of 0.30 at all five facilities. The Spearman correlation and varimax-rotated PCA indicated the AOD values vary consistently across the CART site. The Northwest corner facility (EF-1) was the single facility that behaved differently from the rest. This sub-GCM grid variation can not be ignored if the model is to be used to accurately predict future climate change.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations in the atmospheric aerosol optical depth at the ARM CART Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.M.; Cheng, M.D.

    1998-12-31

    In an effort to better characterize the inputs to radiative transfer models and research-grade global climate simulation models (GCMs) the columnar aerosol loading, measured as the aerosol optical depth (AOD), has been computed for five facilities within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site. Characterization of the AOD reported here show clear evidence that the spatial and temporal gradient exists at a much finer linear scale than those of the CART site. The annual variations of median AOD are on the order of 0.30 at all five facilities. The Spearman correlation and varimax-rotated PCA indicated the AOD values vary consistently across the CART site. The Northwest corner facility (EF-1) was the single facility that behaved differently from the rest. This sub-GCM grid variation can not be ignored if the model it to be used to accurately predict future climate change.

  15. In-vivo full depth of eye imaging spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Cuixia; Zhou, Chuanqing; Jiao, Shuliang; Xi, Peng; Ren, Qiushi

    2011-09-01

    It is necessary to apply the spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to image the whole eye segment for practically iatrical application, but the imaging depth of SD-OCT is limited by the spectral resolution of the spectrometer. By now, no result about this research has been reported. In our study, a new dual channel dual focus OCT system is adopted to image the whole eye segment. The cornea and the crystalline lens are simultaneously imaged by using full range complex spectral-domain OCT in one channel, the retina is detected by the other. The new system was successfully tested in imaging of the volunteer' eye in vivo. The preliminary results presented in this paper demonstrated the feasibility of this approach.

  16. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  17. Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Precision of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with TES observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  18. Aerosol optical depth derived from solar radiometry observations at northern mid-latitude sites

    SciTech Connect

    Laulainen, N.S.; Larson, N.R.; Michalsky, J.J.; Harrison, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    Routine, automated solar radiometry observations began with the development of the Mobile Automated Scanning Photometer (MASP) and its installation at the Rattlesnake Mountain Observatory (RMO). We have introduced a microprocessor controlled rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR), both the single detector and the multi-filter/detector (MFRSR) versions to replace the MASP. The operational mode of the RSRs is substantially different than the MASP or other traditional sun-tracking radiometers, because, by virtue of the automated rotating shadowband, the total and diffuse irradiance on a horizontal plane are measured and the direct-normal component deduced through computation from the total and diffuse components by the self-contained microprocessor. Because the three irradiance components are measured using the same detector for a given wavelength, the calibration coefficients are identical for each component, thus reducing errors when comparing them. The MFRSR is the primary radiometric instrument in the nine-station Quantitative Links Network (QLN) established in the eastern United States in late 1991. Data from this network are being used to investigate how cloud- and aerosol-induced radiative effects vary in time and with cloud structure and type over a mid-latitude continental region. This work supports the DOE Quantitative Links Program to quantify linkages between changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. In this paper we describe the setup of the QLN and present aerosol optical depth results from the on-going measurements at PNL/RMO, as well as preliminary results from the QLN. From the time-series of data at each site, we compare seasonal variability and geographical differences, as well as the effect of the perturbation to the stratosphere by Mt. Pinatubo. Analysis of the wavelength dependence of optical depth also provides information on the evolution and changes in the size distribution of the aerosols.

  19. Evaluation of Operationally Derived Aerosol Optical Depth from MSG-SEVIRI over Central Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, C.; Riffler, M.; Emili, E.; Petitta, M.; Wunderle, S.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosol parameters derived from geostationary remote sensing instruments can complement those obtained from polar orbiting sensors (e.g. MODIS, MERIS, or AVHRR). The high scanning frequency of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on-board the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites of 15 minutes significantly broadens the potential diurnal coverage over Europe and Africa. Therefore, these data allow to better account for the occasionally high spatial and temporal variabilities of atmospheric aerosols, for instance in cases such as desert dust outbreaks, forest fires, or the evolution of high particulate matter concentrations during stable weather conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate operationally derived aerosol optical depth maps based on imagery acquired by MSG-SEVIRI between December 2007 and November 2008. A one-channel multi-temporal approach is used in order to daily estimate aerosol optical depth for each slot between 6:12 and 18:12 UTC. The resulting SEVIRI AOD values are related to Sun photometer measurements from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). 22 AERONET sites within the study area of central Europe provide cloud-screened level1.5 data for the investigation period. Overall, nearly ten thousand instantaneous SEVIRI and Sun photometer AOD values are compared and a correlation of 0.75 as well as a root-mean-square-error of 0.07 is found. Further, about 75% of all SEVIRI AOD values fall within the MODIS expected error over land of +/-(0.05+0.15*AOD). Finally, the computed statistical parameters for each individual season do not vary strongly. Taken together, the performance of the operational SEVIRI AOD estimation is comparable to the ones based on data from sensors on-board polar orbiting satellites. Therefore, these aerosol information of high temporal frequency can be of great interest e.g. for tracking pollutant transport, for comparisons with aerosol modelling results, or for synergistic use with additional

  20. Characteristics of atmospheric aerosol optical depth variation in China during 1993-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X.; Qiu, J.; Xia, X.; Sun, L.; Min, M.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a critical physical parameter for indicating atmospheric turbidity and aerosol content, and is also a key factor in determining the aerosol radiative forcing effects. This study gives the long-term variation characteristics of atmospheric aerosol optical depth at 14 first-class solar radiation stations in China during 1993-2012. Based on the broadband extinction method (BEM), we retrieve the AOD from the hourly accumulated direct solar radiation. Using a AOD selection method, we derive and analyze the monthly, seasonal and annual averaged AOD. The results show that (1) the mean AOD ranges from 0.135 (Lhasa) to 0.678 (Zhengzhou). Shenyang has the maximum standard deviation of 0.109, while Ejin Banner has the minimum value of 0.021. The mean value for all years and stations is 0.423. (2) At most stations, the largest AOD appears in spring and the smallest in autumn. The seasonal averaged AOD of all years and stations is 0.487 (spring), 0.456 (summer), 0.364 (autumn) and 0.381 (winter). (3) As to the variation trend, an increasing trend appeared at five stations (Kashi, Kunming, Zhengzhou, Wuhan and Shanghai), while a decreasing trend is found at two stations (Guangzhou and Beijing). After analyzing the correlations between AOD and the meteorological factors (i.e. temperature, pressure, humidity and visibility), we find that AOD has a positive correlation with temperature, and a negative correlation with pressure and visibility at most of the stations.

  1. Optical absorption enhancement of CdTe nanostructures by low-energy nitrogen ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Asl Soleimani, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanostructures by means of RF magnetron sputtering followed by low-energy ion implantation and post-thermal treatment. We have thoroughly studied the structural, optical, and morphological properties of these nanostructures. The effects of nitrogen ion bombardment on the structural parameters of CdTe nanostructures such as crystal size, microstrain, and dislocation density have been examined. From x-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis it could be deduced that N+ ion fluence and annealing treatment helps to form (3 0 0) orientation in the crystalline structure of cadmium-telluride films. Fluctuations in optical properties like the optical band gap and absorption coefficient as a function of N+ ion fluences have been observed. The annealing of the sample irradiated by a dose of 1018 ions cm-2 has led to great enhancement in the optical absorption over a wide range of wavelengths with a thickness of 250 nm. The enhanced absorption is significantly higher than the observed value in the original CdTe layer with a thickness of 3 μm. Surface properties such as structure, grain size and roughness are noticeably affected by varying the nitrogen fluences. It is speculated that nitrogen bombardment and post-annealing treatment results in a smaller optical band gap, which in turn leads to higher absorption. Nitrogen bombardment is found to be a promising method to increase efficiency of thin film solar cells.

  2. Optical Estimation of Depth and Current in a Ebb Tidal Delta Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, R. A.; Stanley, J.

    2012-12-01

    A key limitation to our ability to make nearshore environmental predictions is the difficulty of obtaining up-to-date bathymetry measurements at a reasonable cost and frequency. Due to the high cost and complex logistics of in-situ methods, research into remote sensing approaches has been steady and has finally yielded fairly robust methods like the cBathy algorithm for optical Argus data that show good performance on simple barred beach profiles and near immunity to noise and signal problems. In May, 2012, data were collected in a more complex ebb tidal delta environment during the RIVET field experiment at New River Inlet, NC. The presence of strong reversing tidal currents led to significant errors in cBathy depths that were phase-locked to the tide. In this paper we will test methods for the robust estimation of both depths and vector currents in a tidal delta domain. In contrast to previous Fourier methods, wavenumber estimation in cBathy can be done on small enough scales to resolve interesting nearshore features.

  3. Extended scan depth optical coherence tomography for evaluating ocular surface shape

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meixiao; Cui, Lele; Li, Ming; Zhu, Dexi; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua

    2011-01-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with extended scan depth makes it possible for quantitative measurement of the entire ocular surface shape. We proposed a novel method for ocular surface shape measurement using a custom-built anterior segment SD-OCT, which will serve on the contact lens fitting. A crosshair alignment system was applied to reduce the misalignment and tilting of the eye. An algorithm was developed to automatically segment the ocular surface. We also described the correction of the image distortion from the segmented dataset induced by the nontelecentric scanning system and tested the accuracy and repeatability. The results showed high accuracy of SD-OCT in measuring a bicurved test surface with a maximum height error of 17.4 μm. The repeatability of in vivo measurement was also good. The standard deviations of the height measurement within a 14-mm wide range were all less than 35 μm. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using extended depth SD-OCT to perform noninvasive evaluation of the ocular surface shape. PMID:21639575

  4. Extended scan depth optical coherence tomography for evaluating ocular surface shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Meixiao; Cui, Lele; Li, Ming; Zhu, Dexi; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua

    2011-05-01

    Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) with extended scan depth makes it possible for quantitative measurement of the entire ocular surface shape. We proposed a novel method for ocular surface shape measurement using a custom-built anterior segment SD-OCT, which will serve on the contact lens fitting. A crosshair alignment system was applied to reduce the misalignment and tilting of the eye. An algorithm was developed to automatically segment the ocular surface. We also described the correction of the image distortion from the segmented dataset induced by the nontelecentric scanning system and tested the accuracy and repeatability. The results showed high accuracy of SD-OCT in measuring a bicurved test surface with a maximum height error of 17.4 μm. The repeatability of in vivo measurement was also good. The standard deviations of the height measurement within a 14-mm wide range were all less than 35 μm. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using extended depth SD-OCT to perform noninvasive evaluation of the ocular surface shape.

  5. Optical depth of cirrus and embedded contrails from airborne Lidar and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, U.; Wirth, M.

    2009-04-01

    A new developed high performance airborne Lidar is applied to measure the backscatter, extinction, depolarization and water vapor profiles from above a thin cirrus cloud along a flight path of about 1000 km over Germany with high temporal/spatial resolution (about 0.2 s, 40 m). The observations revealed surprisingly many embedded contrails within the cirrus. The observations are roughly explained by a simple multiple-plume model simulating the many contrails that formed during the four hours before the observations. Direct airborne measurements of the optical thickness tau of thin cirrus layers have been performed using the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) channel at 532 nm wavelength of the Lidar instrument called WALES (Water Vapour Lidar Experiment in Space). During the 4 h flight, more than 1000 aircraft passed below the flight path of the Falcon. The observations show variable optical depth with a mean value of about 0.3 and large fluctuations with many sharp isolated peaks of typically 200 - 1000 m width up to or even exceeding unity. The observations are explained using a combination of two models versions. First we use the ice water content and extinction predicted with various versions of weather prediction models (ECMWF and COSMO, initiated at various times between 3 and 12 hours before start of the observations). These models explain roughly the mean behavior of the measured tau. The peaky structure of the tau signal is qualitatively explained by a multiple-plume contrail model. This model is based on a Gaussian plume model. It uses the known air traffic waypoint sequences for all the aircraft passing Germany during the day before the observations (provided by air traffic control, DFS). For each waypoint a Lagrangian calculation is started identifying flights under ambient conditions for which contrails are expected to form according to the Schmidt-Appleman criterion. The plume moves horizontally with the wind at constant potential temperature. This

  6. HAC: Band Gap, Photoluminescence, and Optical/Near-Infrared Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Ryutov, Dimitri; Furton, Douglas G.

    1996-01-01

    We report results of laboratory measurements which illustrate the wide range of physical properties found among hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) solids. Within this range, HAC can match quantitatively the astronomical phenomena ascribed to carbonaceous coatings on interstellar grains. We find the optical band gap of HAC to be well correlated with other physical properties of HAC of astronomical interest, and conclude that interstellar HAC must be fairly hydrogen-rich with a band gap of E(sub g) is approx. greater than 2.0 eV.

  7. Effect of Sn on the optical band gap determined using absorption spectrum fitting method

    SciTech Connect

    Heera, Pawan; Kumar, Anup; Sharma, Raman

    2015-05-15

    We report the preparation and the optical studies on tellurium rich glasses thin films. The thin films of Se{sub 30}Te{sub 70-x} Sn{sub x} system for x= 0, 1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 glassy alloys prepared by melt quenching technique are deposited on the glass substrate using vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The analysis of absorption spectra in the spectral range 400nm–4000 nm at room temperature obtained from UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer [Perkin Elmer Lamda-750] helps us in the optical characterization of the thin films under study. The absorption spectrum fitting method is applied by using the Tauc’s model for estimating the optical band gap and the width of the band tail of the thin films. The optical band gap is calculated and is found to decrease with the Sn content.

  8. Aeronet-based Microphysical and Optical Properties of Smoke-dominated Aerosol near Source Regions and Transported over Oceans, and Implications for Satellite Retrievals of Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Hsu, N. C.; Eck, T. F.; Smirnov, A.; Holben, B. N.

    2013-01-01

    Smoke aerosols from biomass burning are an important component of the global aerosol cycle. Analysis of Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals of size distribution and refractive index reveals variety between biomass burning aerosols in different global source regions, in terms of aerosol particle size and single scatter albedo (SSA). Case studies of smoke transported to coastal/island AERONET sites also mostly lie within the range of variability at near-source sites. Two broad families of aerosol properties are found, corresponding to sites dominated by boreal forest burning (larger, broader fine mode, with midvisible SSA 0.95), and those influenced by grass, shrub, or crop burning with additional forest contributions (smaller, narrower particles with SSA 0.88-0.9 in the midvisible). The strongest absorption is seen in southern African savanna at Mongu (Zambia), with average SSA 0.85 in the midvisible. These can serve as candidate sets of aerosol microphysicaloptical properties for use in satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval algorithms. The models presently adopted by these algorithms over ocean are often insufficiently absorbing to represent these biomass burning aerosols. A corollary of this is an underestimate of AOD in smoke outflow regions, which has important consequences for applications of these satellite datasets.

  9. Monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Cecchi, G.; Pantani, L.; Ferrara, R.; Caltabiano, T.

    1998-10-01

    The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in integrated gas column assessment are expected and observed, mostly connected to complex scattering conditions influencing the passive measurements. Since such measurements are much employed in routine volcanic monitoring it is of great interest to model and provide corrections to the raw data obtained. Lidar measurements proved to be quite useful for this purpose. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, SO2 fluxes of the order of 1000, 100, and 10 tonnes/day were measured for Mt. Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano, respectively.

  10. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2015-09-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for present-day fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). We only find a modest increase of nitrate optical depth (< 30 %) in response to the projected changes in the emissions of SO2 (-40 %) and ammonia (+38 %) from 2010 to 2050. Nitrate burden is projected to increase in the tropics and in the free troposphere, but to decrease at the surface in the midlatitudes because of lower nitric acid concentrations. Our results suggest that better constraints on the heterogeneous chemistry of nitric acid on dust, on tropical ammonia emissions, and on the transport of ammonia to the free troposphere are needed to improve projections of aerosol optical depth.

  11. Depths-encoded angular compounding for speckle reduction in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhaoyuan; Qian, Jie; Chen, Xinjian; Mo, Jianhua

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is one of the successful inventions in medical imaging as a clinic routine in the past decades. This imaging technique is based on low coherence interferometer and consequently suffers from speckle noise inherently, which can degrade image quality and obscure micro-structures. Therefore, effective speckle reduction techniques have been always desired and researched since optical coherence tomography was invented. In this study, we proposed an angular compounding method to reduce speckle noise of OCT image. Two different angular light paths are created on the sample arm using two beam splitters. The epi-detection scheme creates three different combinations of the two angular light paths above, which produce three images in single B-scan. To compound these three images, these three images are separated in depth by delaying one light path relative to the other. Compared to those reported angular compounding methods, our method showed an advantage of faster imaging speed. This method was evaluated on an artificial eye model. The results demonstrated a 1.46-fold improvement in speckle contrast.

  12. Investigating Methods for Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval Using the VIIRS Day/Night Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHardy, T. M.; Zhang, J.; Reid, J. S.; Hyer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Most of the existing aerosol sensitive passive sensors focus on detecting day time aerosol properties. The Visible/Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) contains a Day/Night Band (DNB) which is capable of remote sensing of aerosol signals at night. This brings an opportunity for studying nighttime aerosol optical properties at a high spatial and temporal resolution. Using VIIRS DNB data, several methods are developed for retrieving aerosol optical depth values over regions with artificial city lights. These methods are based on changes in diffuse scattering of artificial light due to particles in the atmosphere. The first method compares average radiance values of artificial light sources against that of nearby dark pixels. The second method examines the dispersion of radiance values above an artificial light source. The strengths and weaknesses of each method are investigated over selected artificial city light sources that are within close proximity to Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites. This study suggests that nighttime retrievals of aerosol properties at high spatial and temporal resolution using the VIIRS DNB may be viable in the future.

  13. Optical Depth Sensor (ODS) for the measurement of dust and clouds properties in the Mars atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2014-04-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in both Martian and Earth environments. The principal goal of ODS is to carry out the opacity due to the Martian dust as well as to characterize the high altitude clouds at twilight, crucial parameters in understanding of Martian meteorology. The instrument was initially designed for the failed MARS96 Russian mission, and also was included in the payload of several other missions [1]. Until recently, it was selected (NASA/ESA AO) in the payload of the atmospheric package DREAMS onboard the MARS 2016 mission. But following a decision of the CNES, it is no more included in the payload. In order to study the performance of ODS under a wide range of conditions as well as its capable to provide daily measurements of both dust optical thickness and high altitude clouds properties, the instrument has participated in different terrestrial campaigns. A good performance of ODS prototype (Figure 1) on cirrus clouds detection and in dust opacity estimation was previously archived in Africa during 2004-2005 and in Brasil from 2012 to nowadays. Moreover, a campaign in the arctic is expected before 2016 where fifteen ODSs will be part of an integrated observing system over the Arctic Ocean, allowing test the ODS performance in extreme conditions. In this presentation we present main principle of the retrieval, the instrumental concept, the result of the tests performed and the principal objectives of ODS in Mars.

  14. Observed aerosol optical depth and angstrom exponent in urban area of Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu; Wang, Tijian; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties at Gulou station in Nanjing, China were measured and analyzed from April 2011 to April 2012. The annual median of aerosol optical depth (hereafter called as AOD) at 440 nm was 0.73 and the corresponding annual median of angstrom exponent (hereafter called as AE) between 440 nm and 870 nm was 1.28. The monthly median of AOD440nm presented a seasonal variation, which revealed a maximum in August (1.22) and a minimum in February (0.51), while the monthly median of AE showed a minimum in May (0.79) and a maximum in December (1.42). AOD and AE accumulated mainly between 0.40-0.90 (68%) and 1.20-1.50 (68%) respectively in Nanjing. The observation data showed that high AODs (>1.00) were clustered in the fine mode growth wing and the coarse mode. Comparison was made between two typical cases under different weather conditions and the results showed that Nanjing is influenced by the dust aerosol from Northwest China and Mongolia under dust weather in spring and the anthropogenic aerosol from local emission and surrounding industrialization region under haze weather.

  15. Spectral aerosol optical depth characterization of desert dust during SAMUM 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledano, C.; Wiegner, M.; Garhammer, M.; Seefeldner, M.; Gasteiger, J.; Müller, D.; Koepke, P.

    2009-02-01

    ABSTRACT The aerosol optical depth (AOD) in the range 340-1550nm was monitored at Ouarzazate (Morocco) during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) experiment in May-June 2006. Two different sun photometers were used for this purpose. The mean AOD at 500nm was 0.28, with a maximum of 0.83, and the mean Ångström exponent (AE) was 0.35. The aerosol content over the site changed alternatively from very low turbidity, associated to Atlantic air masses, to moderate dust load, associated to air masses arriving in the site from Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. The dusty conditions were predominant in the measurement period (78% of data), with AOD (500nm) above 0.15 and AE below 0.4. The spectral features of the AOD under dusty conditions are discussed. Air mass back trajectory analysis is carried out to investigate the origin and height patterns of the dust loaded air masses. The advection of dust occurred mainly at atmospheric heights below 3000m, where east flow is the predominant. At the 5000m level, the air masses originate mainly over the Atlantic Ocean. Finally the Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) model is used to perform a set of simulations with different aerosol mixtures to illustrate the measured AOD and AE values under varying dust concentrations, and a brief comparison with other measurement sites is presented.

  16. a Novel Index for Atmospheric Aerosol Types Categorization with Spectral Optical Depths from Satellite Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tang-Huang; Liu, Gin-Rong; Liu, Chian-Yi

    2016-06-01

    In general, the type of atmospheric aerosols can be efficiently identified with the characteristics of optical properties, such as Ångström exponent (AE) and single scattering albedo (SSA). However, the retrieval of SSA is not frequently available to global area which may cause the difficulty in the identification of aerosol type. Since aerosol optical depth (AOD) can be easily requested, a novel index in terms of AOD, Normalized Gradient Aerosol Index (NGAI), is proposed to get over the constraint on SSA providing. With the NGAI derived from MODIS AOD products, the type of atmospheric aerosols can be clearly categorized between mineral dusts, biomass burning and anthropogenic pollutants. The results of aerosol type categorization show the well agreement with the ground-based observations (AERONET) in AE and SSA properties, implying that the proposed index equips highly practical for the application of aerosols type categorization by means of remote sensing. In addition, the fraction of AOD compositions can be potentially determined according to the value of index after compared with the products of CALIPSO Aerosol Subtype.

  17. Variability of aerosol optical depth and their impact on cloud properties in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan; Khan, Rehana; Blaschke, Thomas; Mukhtiar, Azam

    2014-01-01

    This study analyzes seasonal and temporal variations in aerosol optical depth (AOD), and the impact of these variations on the properties of clouds over five cities in Pakistan, using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, obtained from the Terra satellite during the period (2001-2011). The obtained results indicated seasonal variation in AOD, with a high value of 2.3, in summer and low values of 0.2, in winter for the costal part of the region. The relationship between AOD and other cloud parameters, namely water vapor (WV), cloud fraction (CF), cloud optical thickness (COT), cloud liquid water path (CLWP), cloud top temperature (CTT), and cloud top pressure (CTP) were analyzed. On a temporal scale, latitudinal variations of both WV and AOD produce high correlations (>0.6) in some regions, and moderate correlations (0.4-0.6) in the other regions. An increasing trend in CF with AOD was found over urban regions in the period of observations. The CF values were higher for Lahore than the other selected regions during the whole period. During autumn and winter seasons the correlation was found to be positive between AOD and CLWP, while negative correlation was observed during the other seasons for all the selected regions. COT showed negative correlation with AOD at all locations except Karachi during spring and summer seasons.

  18. Titan's 2 micron Surface Albedo and Haze Optical Depth in 1996-2004

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbard, S; de Pater, I; Macintosh, B; Roe, H; Max, C; Young, E; McKay, C

    2004-05-04

    We observed Titan in 1996-2004 with high-resolution 2 {micro}m speckle and adaptive optics imaging at the W.M. Keck Observatory. By observing in a 2 {micro}m broadband filter we obtain images that have contributions from both Titan's surface and atmosphere. We have modeled Titan's atmosphere using a plane-parallel radiative transfer code that has been corrected to agree with 3-D Monte Carlo predictions. We find that Titan's surface albedo ranges from {le} 0:02 in the darkest equatorial region of the trailing hemisphere to {approx_equal} 0:1 in the brightest areas of the leading hemisphere. Over the past quarter of a Saturnian year haze optical depth in Titan's Southern hemisphere has decreased substantially from a value of 0.48 in 1996 down to 0.18 in 2004, while the northern haze has been increasing over the past few years. As a result of these changes, in 2004 the North/South haze asymmetry at K' band has disappeared.

  19. Retrievals of Thick Cloud Optical Depth from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) by Calibration of Solar Background Signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Yuekui; Marshak, Alexander; Chiu, J. Christine; Wiscombe, Warren J.; Palm, Stephen P.; Davis, Anthony B.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Nguyen, Louis; Spinhirne, James D.; Minnis, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Laser beams emitted from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), as well as other space-borne laser instruments, can only penetrate clouds to a limit of a few optical depths. As a result, only optical depths of thinner clouds (< about 3 for GLAS) are retrieved from the reflected lidar signal. This paper presents a comprehensive study of possible retrievals of optical depth of thick clouds using solar background light and treating GLAS as a solar radiometer. To do so we first calibrate the reflected solar radiation received by the photon-counting detectors of GLAS' 532 nm channel, which is the primary channel for atmospheric products. The solar background radiation is regarded as a noise to be subtracted in the retrieval process of the lidar products. However, once calibrated, it becomes a signal that can be used in studying the properties of optically thick clouds. In this paper, three calibration methods are presented: (I) calibration with coincident airborne and GLAS observations; (2) calibration with coincident Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and GLAS observations of deep convective clouds; (3) calibration from the first principles using optical depth of thin water clouds over ocean retrieved by GLAS active remote sensing. Results from the three methods agree well with each other. Cloud optical depth (COD) is retrieved from the calibrated solar background signal using a one-channel retrieval. Comparison with COD retrieved from GOES during GLAS overpasses shows that the average difference between the two retrievals is 24%. As an example, the COD values retrieved from GLAS solar background are illustrated for a marine stratocumulus cloud field that is too thick to be penetrated by the GLAS laser. Based on this study, optical depths for thick clouds will be provided as a supplementary product to the existing operational GLAS cloud products in future GLAS data releases.

  20. Measurements of the optical absorption coefficient of Ar8+ ion implanted silicon layers using the photothermal radiometry and the modulated free carrier absorption methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrobak, Ł.; Maliński, M.; Pawlak, M.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a method of the measurement of the optical absorption coefficient of the Ar8+ ions implanted layers in the p-type silicon substrate. The absorption coefficient is calculated using a value of the attenuation of amplitudes of a photothermal radiometry (PTR) and/or a modulation free carrier absorption (MFCA) signals and the implanted layer thickness calculated by means of the TRIM program. The proposed method can be used to indicate the amorphization of the ions implanted layers.

  1. Depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy for noninvasive diagnosis of oral neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Richard Alan

    Oral cancer is the 11th most common cancer in the world. Cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx account for more than 7,500 deaths each year in the United States alone. Major advances have been made in the management of oral cancer through the combined use of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, improving the quality of life for many patients; however, these advances have not led to a significant increase in survival rates, primarily because diagnosis often occurs at a late stage when treatment is more difficult and less successful. Accurate, objective, noninvasive methods for early diagnosis of oral neoplasia are needed. Here a method is presented to noninvasively evaluate oral lesions using depth-sensitive optical spectroscopy (DSOS). A ball lens coupled fiber-optic probe was developed to enable preferential targeting of different depth regions in the oral mucosa. Clinical studies of the diagnostic performance of DSOS in 157 subjects were carried out in collaboration with the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. An overall sensitivity of 90% and specificity of 89% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue relative to histopathology. Based on these results a compact, portable version of the clinical DSOS device with real-time automated diagnostic capability was developed. The portable device was tested in 47 subjects and a sensitivity of 82% and specificity of 83% were obtained for nonkeratinized oral tissue. The diagnostic potential of multimodal platforms incorporating DSOS was explored through two pilot studies. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with widefield imaging was carried out in 29 oral cancer patients, resulting in a combined sensitivity of 94% and specificity of 69%. Widefield imaging and spectroscopy performed slightly better in combination than each method performed independently. A pilot study of DSOS in combination with the optical contrast agents 2-NBDG, EGF-Alexa 647, and proflavine was carried out in resected tissue

  2. Optical Estimation of Depth Induced Wave Breaking Distributions over Complex Bathymetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, A. S.; Holman, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    Parametric depth-induced-breaking dissipation models have shown great skill at predicting time averaged wave heights across the surf zone. First proposed by Battjes & Janssen (1978), these models balance the incoming wave energy flux with a roller dissipation term. This roller dissipation term is estimated by calculating the dissipation for one characteristic broken wave and then multiplying this quantity by the fraction of broken waves. To describe the fraction of broken waves, a typical assumption asserts that wave heights are nearly Rayleigh distributed [Thornton & Guza (1983)] allowing a sea state to be described by only a few parameters. While many experiments have validated the cross shore wave height profiles, few field experiments have been performed to analyze the probability distribution of breaking wave heights over a barred beach profile. The goal of the present research is to determine the distribution of broken and unbroken wave heights across a natural barred beach profile. Field data collected during the Surf Zone Optics experiment (a Multi-disciplinary University Research Initiative) in Duck, North Carolina, consisted of an array of in-situ pressure sensors and optical remote sensing cameras. Sea surface elevation time series from the in-situ pressure sensors are used here to resolve wave height distributions at multiple locations across the surf zone. Breaking wave height distributions are resolved based upon a combination of the pressure sensor and optically based breaker detection algorithm. Since breaking is easily able to be tracked by video imaging, breaking waves are flagged in the sea surface elevation series and binned into a broken wave height distribution. Results of this analysis are compared with model predictions based upon the Battjes & Janssen (1978), Thornton & Guza (1983) and Janssen & Battjes (2007) models to assess the validity of each wave height distribution model.

  3. Quantifying the sensitivity of aerosol optical depths retrieved from MSG SEVIRI to a priori data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgin, C. E.; Palmer, P. I.; Merchant, C. J.; Siddans, R.; Poulsen, C.; Grainger, R. G.; Thomas, G.; Carboni, E.; McConnell, C.; Highwood, E.

    2009-12-01

    Radiative forcing contributions from aerosol direct and indirect effects remain one of the most uncertain components of the climate system. Satellite observations of aerosol optical properties offer important constraints on atmospheric aerosols but their sensitivity to prior assumptions must be better characterized before they are used effectively to reduce uncertainty in aerosol radiative forcing. We assess the sensitivity of the Oxford-RAL Aerosol and Cloud (ORAC) optimal estimation retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) to a priori aerosol data. SEVIRI is a geostationary satellite instrument centred over Africa and the neighbouring Atlantic Ocean, routinely sampling desert dust and biomass burning outflow from Africa. We quantify the uncertainty in SEVIRI AOD retrievals in the presence of desert dust by comparing retrievals that use prior information from the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Cloud (OPAC) database, with those that use measured aerosol properties during the Dust Outflow and Deposition to the Ocean (DODO) aircraft campaign (August, 2006). We also assess the sensitivity of retrieved AODs to changes in solar zenith angle, and the vertical profile of aerosol effective radius and extinction coefficient input into the retrieval forward model. Currently the ORAC retrieval scheme retrieves AODs for five aerosol types (desert dust, biomass burning, maritime, urban and continental) and chooses the most appropriate AOD based on the cost functions. We generate an improved prior aerosol speciation database for SEVIRI based on a statistical analysis of a Saharan Dust Index (SDI) determined using variances of different brightness temperatures, and organic and black carbon tracers from the GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model. This database is described as a function of season and time of day. We quantify the difference in AODs between those chosen based on prior information from the SDI and GEOS

  4. Using Artificial Sky Glow to Retrieve Night Time Aerosol Optical Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubé, M.; O'Neill, N. T.; Giguère, J.-D.; Royer, A.

    2009-04-01

    Measuring the Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is of particular importance in monitoring aerosol contributions to global radiative forcing. Most measuring methods are based on direct or indirect observation of sunlight and thus are only available for use during daylight hours. Attempts have been made to measure AOD behavior at night from star photometry, and more recently moon photometry. Star photometry method uses spectrally calibrated stars as reference targets this provides somewhat more flexibility than a sunphotometer but there are low-signal and calibration issues which can make these measurements problematic. Moon photometry is only possible when the moon is present in the sky. We suggest a complementary method, based on the observation of artificial hemispheric sky glow generated by light pollution. The methodology requires (1) the implementation of an heterogeneous 3D light pollution model and (2) the design of an automated light pollution spectrometer. This instrument designated as the Spectrometer for Aerosol Night Detection (SAND) is now in it's third version. Basically, SAND-3 is a CCD based, long-slit spectrometer with a non imaging optical head. SAND-3 is protected from inclement weather by a transparent acrylic dome; it can run autonomously with minimal maintenance. The system can be remotely controlled via a web browser or via a secure shell client. Preliminary field measurements acquired at the Mont-Mégantic astronomical observatory (Québec, Canada) and in Sherbrooke (Québec, Canada) will be reported. We will also show preliminary day/night (continuity) comparisons with AERONET/AEROCAN sunphotometer AOD measurements and nightime comparisons with aerosol backscatter lidar profiles acquired at the nearby optical observatory in Sherbrooke Québec, Canada. The performance and the potential of this approach will be discussed in conjunction with the implementation of the light pollution model.

  5. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  6. Macroscopic optical imaging technique for wide-field estimation of fluorescence depth in optically turbid media for application in brain tumor surgical guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolste, Kolbein K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Valdés, Pablo A.; Jermyn, Michael; Wilson, Brian C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-02-01

    A diffuse imaging method is presented that enables wide-field estimation of the depth of fluorescent molecular markers in turbid media by quantifying the deformation of the detected fluorescence spectra due to the wavelength-dependent light attenuation by overlying tissue. This is achieved by measuring the ratio of the fluorescence at two wavelengths in combination with normalization techniques based on diffuse reflectance measurements to evaluate tissue attenuation variations for different depths. It is demonstrated that fluorescence topography can be achieved up to a 5 mm depth using a near-infrared dye with millimeter depth accuracy in turbid media having optical properties representative of normal brain tissue. Wide-field depth estimates are made using optical technology integrated onto a commercial surgical microscope, making this approach feasible for real-world applications.

  7. Macroscopic optical imaging technique for wide-field estimation of fluorescence depth in optically turbid media for application in brain tumor surgical guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kolste, Kolbein K.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Valdés, Pablo A.; Jermyn, Michael; Wilson, Brian C.; Roberts, David W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Leblond, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A diffuse imaging method is presented that enables wide-field estimation of the depth of fluorescent molecular markers in turbid media by quantifying the deformation of the detected fluorescence spectra due to the wavelength-dependent light attenuation by overlying tissue. This is achieved by measuring the ratio of the fluorescence at two wavelengths in combination with normalization techniques based on diffuse reflectance measurements to evaluate tissue attenuation variations for different depths. It is demonstrated that fluorescence topography can be achieved up to a 5 mm depth using a near-infrared dye with millimeter depth accuracy in turbid media having optical properties representative of normal brain tissue. Wide-field depth estimates are made using optical technology integrated onto a commercial surgical microscope, making this approach feasible for real-world applications. PMID:25652704

  8. Effects of Configuration of Optical Combiner on Near-Field Depth Perception in Optical See-Through Head-Mounted Displays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangyoon; Hua, Hong

    2016-04-01

    The ray-shift phenomenon means the apparent distance shift in the display image plane between virtual and physical objects. It is caused by the difference in the refraction of virtual display and see-through optical paths derived from optical combiners that are necessary to provide a see-through capability in optical see-through head-mounted displays. In this work, through a human-subject experiment, we investigated the effects of ray-shift phenomenon induced by the optical combiner on depth perception for near-field distances (40 cm-100 cm). In our experiment, we considered three different configurations of optical combiner: horizontal-tilt and vertical-tilt configurations (using plate beamsplitters horizontally and vertically tilted by 45°, respectively), and non-tilt configuration (using rectangular solid waveguides). Participants' depth perception errors in these configurations were compared with those in an ordinary condition (i.e., the condition where physical objects are directly shown without the displays) and theoretically estimated ones. According to the experimental results, the measured percentage depth perception errors were similar to the theoretically estimated ones, where the amount of estimated percentage depth errors was greater than 0.3%. Furthermore, the participants showed significantly larger depth perception errors in the horizontal-tilt configuration than in an ordinary condition, while no large errors were found in the vertical-tilt configuration. In the non-tilt configuration, the results were dependent on the thickness of optical combiner and target distance. PMID:26780807

  9. Gas concentration measurement by optical similitude absorption spectroscopy: methodology and experimental demonstration.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Christophe; Welschinger, Jean-Yves; Cariou, Jean-Pierre; Miffre, Alain; Rairoux, Patrick

    2016-06-13

    We propose a new methodology to measure gas concentration by light-absorption spectroscopy when the light source spectrum is larger than the spectral width of one or several molecular gas absorption lines. We named it optical similitude absorption spectroscopy (OSAS), as the gas concentration is derived from a similitude between the light source and the target gas spectra. The main OSAS-novelty lies in the development of a robust inversion methodology, based on the Newton-Raphson algorithm, which allows retrieving the target gas concentration from spectrally-integrated differential light-absorption measurements. As a proof, OSAS is applied in laboratory to the 2ν3 methane absorption band at 1.66 µm with uncertainties revealed by the Allan variance. OSAS has also been applied to non-dispersive infra-red and the optical correlation spectroscopy arrangements. This all-optics gas concentration retrieval does not require the use of a gas calibration cell and opens new tracks to atmospheric gas pollution and greenhouse gases sources monitoring. PMID:27410280

  10. Greatly Enhanced Optical Absorption of a Defective MoS2 Monolayer through Oxygen Passivation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Huabing; Li, Yunhai; Niu, Xianghong; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-05-25

    Structural defects in the molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer are widely reported and greatly degrade the transport and photoluminescence. However, how they influence the optical absorption properties remains unclear. In this work, by employing many-body perturbation theory calculations, we investigate the influence of sulfur vacancies (SVs), the main type of intrinsic defects in the MoS2 monolayer, on the optical absorption and exciton effect. Our calculations reveal that the presence of SVs creates localized midgap states in the bandgap, which results in a dramatic red-shift of the absorption peak and stronger absorbance in the visible light and near-infrared region. Nevertheless, the SVs can be finely repaired by oxygen passivation and are beneficial to the formation of the stable localized excitons, which greatly enhance the optical absorption in the spectral range. The defect-mediated/-engineered absorption mechanism is well understood, which offers insightful guides for improving the performance of two-dimensional dichalcogenide-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:27144902

  11. Optical constants and transient absorption of solution-deposited RuO2 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owrutsky, Jeffrey; Compton, Ryan; Long, James; Chrevin, Christopher; Bussmann, Konrad; Dunkelberger, Adam; Spann, Bryan; Palin, Irina; Rolison, Debra; Cunningham, Paul; Melinger, Joseph; Desario, Paul; Weidinger, Dan; Heilweil, Edwin

    2015-03-01

    Optical and electrical conductivity properties are determined for the promising, broadband transparent conductor material, solution-deposited RuO2 nanostructured films. The 10-30 nm thick films or nanoskins are less conductive but more optically transmissive than polycrystalline, sputtered RuO2 films which are inherently metallic. The optical constants (0.6 to 4.5 eV) determined by ellipsometry show that ɛ1 is positive for the nanoskins in the spectral region investigated so they are not plasmonic. Transient picosecond absorption with visible (400 nm) pump and various probe wavelengths (visible and THz) are performed for nanoskins calcined to different temperatures. When heated to 200°C the absorption increases in the visible and THz. After heating to 300°C, the films become more polycrystalline and there is evidence for the appearance of a new absorption. Deceased absorptions or bleaches are observed in the THz and for longer visible wavelengths (> 750 nm). The absorption is ascribed to a damped plasmon band of the crystalline nanoparticles formed in the film upon heating.

  12. Optical elements with extended depth of focus and arbitrary distribution of intensity along the focal segment obtained by angular modulation of the optical power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakarenko, K.; Ducin, I.; Jaroszewicz, Z.; Kołodziejczyk, A.; Petelczyc, K.; Stompor, A.; Sypek, M.

    2015-04-01

    Light Sword Lens (LSL), i.e., an optical element with extended depth of focus (EDOF) characterized by angular modulation of the optical power in its conventional form is characterized by a linear relationship between the optical power and the angular coordinate of the corresponding angular lens sector. This dependence may be manipulated in function of the required design needs. In the present communicate this additional degree of freedom of design is used for elimination of the LSL shape discontinuity.

  13. Fabricating silver nanoplate/hybrid silica gel glasses and investigating their nonlinear optical absorption behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chan; Wenzhe, Chen; Xiaoyun, Ye; Cai, Shuguang; Xiao, Xueqing

    2014-03-01

    Silver nanoplate/hybrid silica gel glasses were prepared via the sol-gel technique. Analysis of ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy extinction spectra confirmed the successful incorporation of silver nanoplates into the hybrid silica gel glasses. The silver nanoplate/hybrid silica gel glass composites are completely noncrystalline because of their low doping level compared with that of the silica matrix. The nonlinear optical absorption behavior of the silver nanoplate/hybrid silica gel glass composites was studied via open-aperture Z-scan technique with 4 ns pulse durations at 532 nm and 1064 nm. The nonlinear optical properties of silver nanoplates are maintained after they were introduced into silica gel glasses. Furthermore, the silver nanoplate/hybrid silica gel glasses exhibit intensity-dependent transformation from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA). The SA behavior at low excitation intensity can be attributed to the bleaching of ground-state surface plasmon resonance absorption induced by the retarded electronic relaxation process in solid-state gel glasses. By contrast, the RSA at high incident influence may have resulted from excited-state absorption and two-photon absorption.

  14. Relationship of the optical absorption and scattering properties with mechanical and structural properties of apple tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optical absorption and scattering properties of fruit change with the physiological and biochemical activities in the tissue during ripening and postharvest storage. But it has not been well understood on how these changes are related to the structural and mechanical properties of fruit. This resear...

  15. Atomistic simulations of the optical absorption of type-II CdSe/ZnTe superlattices

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We perform accurate tight binding simulations to design type-II short-period CdSe/ZnTe superlattices suited for photovoltaic applications. Absorption calculations demonstrate a very good agreement with optical results with threshold strongly depending on the chemical species near interfaces. PMID:23031315

  16. Optical absorption and luminescence in neutron-irradiated, silica-based fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Clinard, F.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this work are to assess the effects of thermal annealing and photobleaching on the optical absorption of neutron-irradiated, silica fibers of the type proposed for use in ITER diagnostics, and to measure x-ray induced luminescence of unirradiated (virgin) and neutron-irradiated fibers.

  17. LONG PATH DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AND EPA-APPROVED FIXED POINT METHODS INTERCOMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) has been used by a number of investigators over the past 10 years to measure a wide range of gaseous air pollutants. ecently OPSIS AB, Lund, Sweden, has developed and made commercially available DOAS instrument that has a number...

  18. AIR QUALITY MONITORING IN ATLANTA WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. ver path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen d...

  19. Improving optical absorptivity of natural dyes for fabrication of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmatzadeh, Reza; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and cheap dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using natural dyes from Pastinaca sativa and Beta vulgaris. Natural dyes are environmentally and economically superior to ruthenium-based dyes because they are nontoxic and cheap. However, the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on natural dyes is low. One way to improve the DSSC performance is to enhance the absorptivity of extracted dyes. We investigated the influence of various factors in the extraction process, such as utilization of different extraction approaches, the acidity of extraction solvent, and different compounds of solvents on the optical absorption spectra. It was found that we could considerably enhance the optical absorptivity of dye and consequently the performance of DSSC by choosing a proper mixture of ethanol and water for extracting solvent and also the acidity of dye solution.

  20. Cell damage in near-infrared multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Liang, H.; Berns, M. W.; Tromberg, B. J.

    1996-07-01

    We report on cell damage of single cells confined in continuous-wave (cw), near-infrared (NIR) multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption phenomena. Trapping beams at NIR wavelengths less than 800 nm are capable of damaging cells through a two-photon absorption process. Cell damage is more pronounced in multimode cw traps compared with single-frequency true cw NIR traps because of transient power enhancement by longitudinal mode beating. Partial mode locking in tunable cw Ti:sapphire lasers used as trapping beam sources can produce unstable subnanosecond pulses at certain wavelengths that amplify multiphoton absorption effects significantly. We recommend the use of single-frequency long-wavelength NIR trapping beams for optical micromanipulation of vital cells.

  1. Optical absorption of neutron-irradiated silica fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, D.W.; Farnum, E.H.; Bennett, B.L.

    1996-10-01

    Induced-loss spectra of silica-based optical fibers exposed to high (10{sup 23} n-m{sup {minus}2}) and low (10{sup 21} n-m{sup {minus}2}) fluences of neutrons at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) have been measured. Two types of fibers consisting of a pure fused silica core with fluorine-doped ({approximately}4 mole %) cladding were obtained from Fiberguide Industries and used in the as-received condition. Anhydroguide{trademark} and superguide{trademark} fibers contained less than 1 ppm, and 600 to 800 ppm of OH, respectively. The data suggest that presently available silica fibers can be used in plasma diagnostics, but the choice and suitability depends upon the spectral region of interest. Low-OH content fibers can be used for diagnostic purposes in the interval {approximately}800 to 1400 mn if the exposure is to high-fluence neutrons. For low-fluence neutron exposures, the low-OH content fibers are best suited for use in the interval {approximately}800 to 2000 nm, and the high-OH content fibers are the choice for the interval {approximately}400 to 800 nm.

  2. The impact of absorption coefficient on polarimetric determination of Berry phase based depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples: a polarized Monte Carlo investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Koju, Vijay; John, Dwayne O

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the state of polarization of photons due to scatter generates associated geometric phase that is being investigated as a means for decreasing the degree of uncertainty in back-projecting the paths traversed by photons detected in backscattered geometry. In our previous work, we established that polarimetrically detected Berry phase correlates with the mean photon penetration depth of the backscattered photons collected for image formation. In this work, we report on the impact of state-of-linear-polarization (SOLP) filtering on both the magnitude and population distributions of image forming detected photons as a function of the absorption coefficient of the scattering sample. The results, based on Berry phase tracking implemented Polarized Monte Carlo Code, indicate that sample absorption plays a significant role in the mean depth attained by the image forming backscattered detected photons.

  3. Sensitivity of nitrate aerosols to ammonia emissions and to nitrate chemistry: implications for present and future nitrate optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulot, F.; Ginoux, P.; Cooke, W. F.; Donner, L. J.; Fan, S.; Lin, M.-Y.; Mao, J.; Naik, V.; Horowitz, L. W.

    2016-02-01

    We update and evaluate the treatment of nitrate aerosols in the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmospheric model (AM3). Accounting for the radiative effects of nitrate aerosols generally improves the simulated aerosol optical depth, although nitrate concentrations at the surface are biased high. This bias can be reduced by increasing the deposition of nitrate to account for the near-surface volatilization of ammonium nitrate or by neglecting the heterogeneous production of nitric acid to account for the inhibition of N2O5 reactive uptake at high nitrate concentrations. Globally, uncertainties in these processes can impact the simulated nitrate optical depth by up to 25 %, much more than the impact of uncertainties in the seasonality of ammonia emissions (6 %) or in the uptake of nitric acid on dust (13 %). Our best estimate for fine nitrate optical depth at 550 nm in 2010 is 0.006 (0.005-0.008). In wintertime, nitrate aerosols are simulated to account for over 30 % of the aerosol optical depth over western Europe and North America. Simulated nitrate optical depth increases by less than 30 % (0.0061-0.010) in response to projected changes in anthropogenic emissions from 2010 to 2050 (e.g., -40 % for SO2 and +38 % for ammonia). This increase is primarily driven by greater concentrations of nitrate in the free troposphere, while surface nitrate concentrations decrease in the midlatitudes following lower concentrations of nitric acid. With the projected increase of ammonia emissions, we show that better constraints on the vertical distribution of ammonia (e.g., convective transport and biomass burning injection) and on the sources and sinks of nitric acid (e.g., heterogeneous reaction on dust) are needed to improve estimates of future nitrate optical depth.

  4. Quantification and parametrization of non-linearity effects by higher-order sensitivity terms in scattered light differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puķīte, Jānis; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We address the application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of scattered light observations in the presence of strong absorbers (in particular ozone), for which the absorption optical depth is a non-linear function of the trace gas concentration. This is the case because Beer-Lambert law generally does not hold for scattered light measurements due to many light paths contributing to the measurement. While in many cases linear approximation can be made, for scenarios with strong absorptions non-linear effects cannot always be neglected. This is especially the case for observation geometries, for which the light contributing to the measurement is crossing the atmosphere under spatially well-separated paths differing strongly in length and location, like in limb geometry. In these cases, often full retrieval algorithms are applied to address the non-linearities, requiring iterative forward modelling of absorption spectra involving time-consuming wavelength-by-wavelength radiative transfer modelling. In this study, we propose to describe the non-linear effects by additional sensitivity parameters that can be used e.g. to build up a lookup table. Together with widely used box air mass factors (effective light paths) describing the linear response to the increase in the trace gas amount, the higher-order sensitivity parameters eliminate the need for repeating the radiative transfer modelling when modifying the absorption scenario even in the presence of a strong absorption background. While the higher-order absorption structures can be described as separate fit parameters in the spectral analysis (so-called DOAS fit), in practice their quantitative evaluation requires good measurement quality (typically better than that available from current measurements). Therefore, we introduce an iterative retrieval algorithm correcting for the higher-order absorption structures not yet considered in the DOAS fit as well as the absorption dependence on

  5. Observation of temperature dependence of the IR hydroxyl absorption bands in silica optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Bonnell, Elizabeth; Homa, Daniel; Pickrell, Gary; Wang, Anbo; Ohodnicki, P. R.; Woodruff, Steven; Chorpening, Benjamin; Buric, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This study reports on the temperature dependent behavior of silica based optical fibers upon exposure to high temperatures in hydrogen and ambient air. The hydroxyl absorption bands in the wavelength range of 1000-2500 nm of commercially available multimode fibers with pure silica and germanium doped cores were examined in the temperature range of 20-800 °C. Two hydroxyl-related infrared absorption bands were observed: ∼2200 nm assigned to the combination of the vibration mode of Si-OH bending and the fundamental hydroxyl stretching mode, and ∼1390 nm assigned to the first overtone of the hydroxyl stretching. The absorption in the 2200 nm band decreased in intensity, while the 1390 nm absorption band shifted to longer wavelengths with an increase in temperature. The observed phenomena were reversible with temperature and suspected to be due, in part, to the conversion of the OH spectral components into each other and structural relaxation.

  6. Optical design of transparent metal grids for plasmonic absorption enhancement in ultrathin organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inho; Lee, Taek Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2013-07-01

    Transparent metal grid combining with plasmonic absorption enhancement is a promising replacement to indium tin oxide thin films. We numerically demonstrate metal grids in one or two dimension lead to plasmonic absorption enhancements in ultrathin organic solar cells. In this paper, we study optical design of metal grids for plasmonic light trapping and identify different plasmonic modes of the surface plasmon polaritons excited at the interfaces of glass/metal grids, metal grids/active layers, and the localized surface plasmon resonance of the metal grids using numerical calculations. One dimension metal grids with the optimal design of a width and a period lead to the absorption enhancement in the ultrathin active layers of 20 nm thickness by a factor of 2.6 under transverse electric polarized light compared to the case without the metal grids. Similarly, two dimensional metal grids provide the absorption enhancement by a factor of 1.8 under randomly polarized light. PMID:24104493

  7. Fast and automatic depth control of iterative bone ablation based on optical coherence tomography data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Alexander; Pengel, Steffen; Bergmeier, Jan; Kahrs, Lüder A.; Ortmaier, Tobias

    2015-07-01

    Laser surgery is an established clinical procedure in dental applications, soft tissue ablation, and ophthalmology. The presented experimental set-up for closed-loop control of laser bone ablation addresses a feedback system and enables safe ablation towards anatomical structures that usually would have high risk of damage. This study is based on combined working volumes of optical coherence tomography (OCT) and Er:YAG cutting laser. High level of automation in fast image data processing and tissue treatment enables reproducible results and shortens the time in the operating room. For registration of the two coordinate systems a cross-like incision is ablated with the Er:YAG laser and segmented with OCT in three distances. The resulting Er:YAG coordinate system is reconstructed. A parameter list defines multiple sets of laser parameters including discrete and specific ablation rates as ablation model. The control algorithm uses this model to plan corrective laser paths for each set of laser parameters and dynamically adapts the distance of the laser focus. With this iterative control cycle consisting of image processing, path planning, ablation, and moistening of tissue the target geometry and desired depth are approximated until no further corrective laser paths can be set. The achieved depth stays within the tolerances of the parameter set with the smallest ablation rate. Specimen trials with fresh porcine bone have been conducted to prove the functionality of the developed concept. Flat bottom surfaces and sharp edges of the outline without visual signs of thermal damage verify the feasibility of automated, OCT controlled laser bone ablation with minimal process time.

  8. Absorption and spectra of optical parameters in amorphous solid solutions of the Se-S system

    SciTech Connect

    Djalilov, N. Z.; Damirov, G. M.

    2011-04-15

    A study of the optical properties of the Se-S system has revealed a correlation between the dependences of optical absorption coefficient {alpha}, effective concentration of charged defects N{sub t}, and characteristic energy E{sub 0} corresponding to the Urbach optical absorption in the spectral region where the Urbach rule works for the Se-S system on the S concentration. These optical properties are controlled by charged defects. It is shown that concentrations of intrinsic charged defects can be changed by variation in composition of the Se-S system. Reflectance spectra of amorphous solid solutions of the Se-S system are studied within the energy range 1-6 eV. Using the Kramers-Kronig method, spectral dependences of optical constants and derivative optical and dielectric functions are calculated. Variation in the spectra of optical parameters with composition of the Se-S system are explained within a cluster model in which the density of electron states is a function of atomic configurations in clusters, i.e., of the character of a short-range order.

  9. Optical absorption in lithiated tungsten oxide thin films: Experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berggren, Lars; Jonsson, Jacob C.; Niklasson, Gunnar A.

    2007-10-01

    Amorphous tungsten oxide exhibits electrochromism when intercalated with protons, lithium, sodium, and other ions. Thin films of the material were prepared by dc magnetron sputtering and then electrochemically intercalated with lithium. The optical absorption in the wavelength range of 300-2500nm was measured for a number of lithium concentrations. The optical absorption shows a maximum for lithium/tungsten ratios of 0.3-0.5. The optical spectra can be fitted by a superposition of three Gaussian peaks, representing the three possible electronic transitions between W6+, W5+, and W4+ sites. The variation of the peak strength with lithium concentration is consistent with an extended site-saturation theory.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Simple Algorithm to Find Cloud Optical Depth with Emphasis on Thin Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, James C.; Long, Charles N.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Freer, Matthew; McFarquhar, Greg

    2008-04-14

    We present here an algorithm for determining cloud optical depth, τ, using data from shortwave broadband irradiances, focusing on the case of optically thin clouds. This method is empirical and consists of applying a one-line equation to the shortwave flux analysis described by Long and Ackerman (2000). We apply this method to cirrus clouds observed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s (ARM) Darwin, Australia site during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) campaign and cirrus clouds observed at ARM’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. These cases were chosen because independent verification of cloud optical depth retrievals is possible. For the TWP-ICE case, the calculated optical depths compare favorably (to within about 1 unit) with a “first principles” τ calculated from a vertical profile of ice particle size distributions obtained from an aircraft sounding. For the SGP case, the results from the algorithm correspond reasonably well with τ values obtained from an average over other methods; some of which have been subject to independent verification. The medians of the two time series are 0.79 and 0.81, for the empirical and averaged values, respectively (although such close agreement is likely to be fortuitous). This tool may be applied wherever measurements of the three components of the shortwave broadband flux are available at 1- to 5-minute resolution. Because these measurements are made across the world, it then becomes possible to estimate optical depth at many locations.

  11. Improving Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    Extensively utilized for numerous mission applications, the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model. In a Monte-Carlo mode, Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is used to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). Mars-GRAM has been found to be inexact when used during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3. Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) from the surface to 80 km altitude. Mars-GRAM with the MapYear parameter set to 0 utilizes results from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 at all locations for the entire year. Imprecise atmospheric density and pressure at all altitudes is a consequence of this use of MGCM with tau=3. Density factor values have been determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 as a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem. These factors adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. These density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls and are included in Mars-GRAM Release 1.3. Work currently being done, to derive better multipliers by including variations with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data, will be highlighted in the presentation. The TES limb data utilized in this process has been validated by a comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). This comparison study was undertaken for locations on Mars of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST. The more precise density factors will be included in Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 and thus improve the results of future sensitivity studies done for large

  12. Anterior segment biometry during accommodation imaged with ultra-long scan depth optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chixin; Shen, Meixiao; Li, Ming; Zhu, Dexi; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To measure by ultra-long scan depth optical coherence tomography (UL-OCT) dimensional changes in the anterior segment of human eyes during accommodation. Design Evaluation of diagnostic test or technology. Participants Forty-one right eyes of healthy subjects with a mean age of 34 years (range, 22–41 years) and a mean refraction of −2.5±2.6 diopters (D) were imaged in two repeated measurements at minimal and maximal accommodation. Methods A specially adapted designed UL-OCT instrument was used to image from the front surface of the cornea to the back surface of the crystalline lens. Custom software corrected the optical distortion of the images and yielded the biometric measurements. The coefficient of repeatability (COR) and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) were calculated to evaluate the repeatability and reliability. Main Outcome Measures Anterior segment parameters and associated repeatability and reliability upon accommodation. The dimensional results included central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth and width (ACD, ACW), pupil diameter (PD), lens thickness (LT), anterior segment length (ASL=ACD+LT), lens central position (LCP=ACD+1/2LT) and horizontal radii of the lens anterior and posterior surface curvatures (LAC, LPC). Results Repeated measurements of each variable within each accommodative state did not differ significantly (P>0.05). The CORs and ICCs for CCT, ACW, ACD, LT, LCP, and ASL were excellent (1.2% to 3.59% and 0.998 to 0.877, respectively). They were higher for PD (18.90% to 21.63% and 0.880 to 0.874, respectively), and moderate for LAC and LPC (34.86% to 42.72% and 0.669 to 0.251, respectively) in the two accommodative states. Compared to minimal accommodation, PD, ACD, LAC, LPC, and LCP decreased and LT and ASL increased significantly at maximal accommodation (P<0.05), while CCT and ACW did not change (P>0.05). Conclusions UL-OCT measured changes in anterior segment dimensions during accommodation with

  13. Evaluation of CALIOP 532-nm Aerosol Optical Depth Over Opaque Water Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Z.; Winker, D.; Omar, A.; Vaughan, M.; Kar, J.; Trepte, C.; Hu, Y.; Schuster, G.

    2015-01-01

    With its height-resolved measurements and near global coverage, the CALIOP lidar onboard the CALIPSO satellite offers a new capability for aerosol retrievals in cloudy skies. Validation of these retrievals is difficult, however, as independent, collocated and co-temporal data sets are generally not available. In this paper, we evaluate CALIOP aerosol products above opaque water clouds by applying multiple retrieval techniques to CALIOP Level 1 profile data and comparing the results. This approach allows us to both characterize the accuracy of the CALIOP above-cloud aerosol optical depth (AOD) and develop an error budget that quantifies the relative contributions of different error sources. We focus on two spatial domains: the African dust transport pathway over the tropical North Atlantic and the African smoke transport pathway over the southeastern Atlantic. Six years of CALIOP observations (2007-2012) from the northern hemisphere summer and early fall are analyzed. The analysis is limited to cases where aerosol layers are located above opaque water clouds so that a constrained retrieval technique can be used to directly retrieve 532 nm aerosol optical depth and lidar ratio. For the moderately dense Sahara dust layers detected in the CALIOP data used in this study, the mean/median values of the lidar ratios derived from a constrained opaque water cloud (OWC) technique are 45.1/44.4 +/- 8.8 sr, which are somewhat larger than the value of 40 +/- 20 sr used in the CALIOP Level 2 (L2) data products. Comparisons of CALIOP L2 AOD with the OWC-retrieved AOD reveal that for nighttime conditions the L2 AOD in the dust region is underestimated on average by approx. 26% (0.183 vs. 0.247). Examination of the error sources indicates that errors in the L2 dust AOD are primarily due to using a lidar ratio that is somewhat too small. The mean/median lidar ratio retrieved for smoke is 70.8/70.4 +/- 16.2 sr, which is consistent with the modeled value of 70 +/- 28 sr used in the

  14. Absorptive carbon nanotube electrodes: Consequences of optical interference loss in thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Jeffrey G.; de Volder, Michaël F. L.; Cheyns, David; Heremans, Paul; Rand, Barry P.

    2015-04-01

    A current bottleneck in the thin film photovoltaic field is the fabrication of low cost electrodes. We demonstrate ultrasonically spray coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) layers as opaque and absorptive metal-free electrodes deposited at low temperatures and free of post-deposition treatment. The electrodes show sheet resistance as low as 3.4 Ω □-1, comparable to evaporated metallic contacts deposited in vacuum. Organic photovoltaic devices were optically simulated, showing comparable photocurrent generation between reflective metal and absorptive CNT electrodes for photoactive layer thickness larger than 600 nm when using archetypal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) : (6,6)-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) cells. Fabricated devices clearly show that the absorptive CNT electrodes display comparable performance to solution processed and spray coated Ag nanoparticle devices. Additionally, other candidate absorber materials for thin film photovoltaics were simulated with absorptive contacts, elucidating device design in the absence of optical interference and reflection.A current bottleneck in the thin film photovoltaic field is the fabrication of low cost electrodes. We demonstrate ultrasonically spray coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) layers as opaque and absorptive metal-free electrodes deposited at low temperatures and free of post-deposition treatment. The electrodes show sheet resistance as low as 3.4 Ω □-1, comparable to evaporated metallic contacts deposited in vacuum. Organic photovoltaic devices were optically simulated, showing comparable photocurrent generation between reflective metal and absorptive CNT electrodes for photoactive layer thickness larger than 600 nm when using archetypal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) : (6,6)-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) cells. Fabricated devices clearly show that the absorptive CNT electrodes display comparable performance to solution processed and spray coated Ag nanoparticle

  15. Instrument calibration and aerosol optical depth validation of the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Che, Huizheng; Zhang, Xiaoye; Chen, Hongbin; Damiri, Bahaiddin; Goloub, Philippe; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Xiaochun; Wei, Yao; Zhou, Huaigang; Dong, Fan; Li, Deping; Zhou, Tianming

    2009-02-01

    This paper introduced the calibration of the CE-318 sunphotometer of the China Aerosol Remote Sensing Network (CARSNET) and the validation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) by AOD module of ASTPWin software compared with the simultaneous measurements of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)/Photométrie pour le Traitement Opérationnel de Normalization Satellitaire (PHOTONS) and PREDE skyradiometer. The results show that the CARSNET AOD measurements have the same accuracy as the AERONET/PHOTONS. On the basis of a comparison between CARSNET and AERONET, the AODs from CARSNET at 1020, 870, 670, and 440 nm are about 0.03, 0.01, 0.01, and 0.01 larger than those from AERONET, respectively. The aerosol optical properties over Beijing acquired through the CE-318 sunphotometers of one AERONET/PHOTONS site and two CARSNET sites were analyzed on the basis of 4-year measurements. It was obvious that the AOD of the Shangdianzi site (rural site) was lower than that of the two urban sites (the Institute of Atmospheric Physics (IAP) site (north urban site) and the Beijing Meteorological Observatory (BJO) site (south urban site)). The AOD of BJO was about 0.05, 0.04, 0.05, and 0.06 larger than that of IAP at 1020, 870, 670, and 440 nm, respectively, indicating that there is more local pollution in the south part of Beijing. The highest AOD was found in summer because of the stagnation planetary boundary layer and transport of pollutants from large pollution centers south of Beijing. The high temperature and relative humidity in summer also favor the production of aerosol precursor and the hygroscopic growth of the existing particles locally, which results in high AOD. In contrast, the lowest AOD at the two urban sites and one rural site in Beijing occurred in winter as the frequent cold air masses help pollutants diffuse easily.

  16. Retrieval of aerosol optical depth in the visible range with a Brewer spectrophotometer in Athens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diémoz, Henri; Eleftheratos, Kostas; Kazadzis, Stelios; Amiridis, Vassilis; Zerefos, Christos S.

    2016-04-01

    A MkIV Brewer spectrophotometer has been operating in Athens since 2004. Direct-sun measurements originally scheduled for nitrogen dioxide retrievals were reprocessed to provide aerosol optical depths (AODs) at a wavelength of about 440 nm. A novel retrieval algorithm was specifically developed and the resulting AODs were compared to those obtained from a collocated Cimel filter radiometer belonging to the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The series are perfectly correlated, with Pearson's correlation coefficients being as large as 0.996 and with 90 % of AOD deviations between the two instruments being within the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) traceability limits. In order to reach such a high agreement, several instrumental factors impacting the quality of the Brewer retrievals must be taken into account, including sensitivity to the internal temperature, and the state of the external optics and pointing accuracy must be carefully checked. Furthermore, the long-term radiometric stability of the Brewer was investigated and the performances of in situ Langley extrapolations as a way to track the absolute calibration of the Brewer were assessed. Other sources of error, such as slight shifts of the wavelength scale, are discussed and some recommendations to Brewer operators are drawn. Although MkIV Brewers are rarely employed to retrieve AODs in the visible range, they represent a key source of information about aerosol changes in the past three decades and a potential worldwide network for present and future coordinated AOD measurements. Moreover, a better understanding of the AOD retrieval at visible wavelengths will also contribute in improving similar techniques in the more challenging UV range.

  17. Accuracy of near-surface aerosol extinction determined from columnar aerosol optical depth measurements in Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present work is a detailed analysis of aerosol columnar optical depth as a tool to determine near-surface aerosol extinction in Reno, Nevada, USA, during the summer of 2012. Ground and columnar aerosol optical properties were obtained by use of in situ Photoacoustic and Integrated Nephelometer and Cimel CE-318 Sun photometer instruments, respectively. Both techniques showed that seasonal weather changes and fire plumes had enormous influence on local aerosol optics. The apparent optical height followed the shape but not magnitude of the development of the convective boundary layer when fire conditions were not present. Back trajectory analysis demonstrated that a local flow known as the Washoe Zephyr circulation often induced aerosol transport from Northern California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains that increased the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm during afternoons when compared with mornings. Aerosol fine mode fraction indicated that afternoon aerosols in June and July and fire plumes in August were dominated by submicron particles, suggesting upwind urban plume biogenically enhanced evolution toward substantial secondary aerosol formation. This fine particle optical depth was inferred to be beyond the surface, thereby complicating use of remote sensing measurements for near-ground aerosol extinction measurements. It is likely that coarse mode depletes fine mode aerosol near the surface by coagulation and condensation of precursor gases.

  18. Impact of the optical depth of field on cytogenetic image quality.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuchen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Yuhua; Zheng, Bin; Li, Shibo; Chen, Wei R; Liu, Hong

    2012-09-01

    In digital pathology, clinical specimen slides are converted into digital images by microscopic image scanners. Since random vibration and mechanical drifting are unavoidable on even high-precision moving stages, the optical depth of field (DOF) of microscopic systems may affect image quality, in particular when using an objective lens with high magnification power. The DOF of a microscopic system was theoretically analyzed and experimentally validated using standard resolution targets under 60× dry and 100× oil objective lenses, respectively. Then cytogenetic samples were imaged at in-focused and off-focused states to analyze the impact of DOF on the acquired image qualities. For the investigated system equipped with the 60× dry and 100× oil objective lenses, the theoretical estimation of the DOF are 0.855 μm and 0.703 μm, and the measured DOF are 3.0 μm and 1.8 μm, respectively. The observation reveals that the chromosomal bands of metaphase cells are distinguishable when images are acquired up to approximately 1.5 μm or 1 μm out of focus using the 60× dry and 100× oil objective lenses, respectively. The results of this investigation provide important designing trade-off parameters to optimize the digital microscopic image scanning systems in the future. PMID:23085918

  19. Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval by NPS Model Modified for SEAWIFS Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brady A.

    2002-03-01

    Using visible wavelength radiance data obtained from the spaceborne Sea-viewing Wide Field of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS), during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia), an analysis of aerosol optical depth (AOD) was completed by modification to the NPS AOD Model previously compiled for NOAA geosynchronous- and polar-orbiting satellites. The objective of the analysis was to calibrate the linearized, single-scatter algorithm, estimated bi-directional surface reflectance, and phase function parameters. The intent of the study was to provide enhanced temporal AOD coverage with the addition of the orbiting SeaWiFS eight-channel radiometer to the established NOAA constellation of five-channel AVHRR-equipped satellites. The work has operational significance in providing timely, accurate remote information to military operators of identification and targeting systems. Possible applications include detection and warning of international treaty violation of reducing the adverse public health effects by weapons of mass destruction of pollution advection on global weather patterns.

  20. Theoretical gravity darkening as a function of optical depth. A first approach to fast rotating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claret, A.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: Recent observations of very fast rotating stars show systematic deviations from the von Zeipel theorem and pose a challenge to the theory of gravity-darkening exponents (β1). In this paper, we present a new insight into the problem of temperature distribution over distorted stellar surfaces to try to reduce these discrepancies. Methods: We use a variant of the numerical method based on the triangles strategy, which we previously introduced, to evaluate the gravity-darkening exponents. The novelty of the present method is that the theoretical β1 is now computed as a function of the optical depth, that is, β1 ≡ β1(τ). The stellar evolutionary models, which are necessary to obtain the physical conditions of the stellar envelopes/atmospheres inherent to the numerical method, are computed via the code GRANADA. Results: When the resulting theoretical β1(τ) are compared with the best accurate data of very fast rotators, a good agreement for the six systems is simultaneously achieved. In addition, we derive an equation that relates the locus of constant convective efficiency in the Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram with gravity-darkening exponents.

  1. Process output nonclassicality and nonclassicality depth of quantum-optical channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabapathy, Krishna Kumar

    2016-04-01

    We introduce a quantum-optical notion of nonclassicality that we call the process output nonclassicality for multimode quantum channels. The motivation comes from an information-theoretic point of view and the emphasis is on the output states of a channel. We deem a channel to be "classical" if its outputs are always classical irrespective of the input, i.e., if the channel is nonclassicality breaking, and nonclassical otherwise. Our condition is stronger than the one considered by Rahimi-Keshari et al., [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 160401 (2013)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.160401 and we compare the two approaches. Using our framework we then quantify the nonclassicality of a quantum process by introducing a noise-robustness type of measure that we call the nonclassicality depth of a channel. It characterizes a certain threshold noise beyond which a given channel outputs only classical states. We achieve this by generalizing a prescription by Lee [Phys. Rev. A 44, R2775 (1991), 10.1103/PhysRevA.44.R2775] to multimode states and then by extension to multimode channels.

  2. High Resolution Aerosol Optical Depth Mapping of Beijing Using LANSAT8 Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Yuanliang; Wu, Jianliang

    2016-06-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) is one of the most important parameters in the atmospheric correction of remote sensing images. We present a new method of per pixel AOD retrieval using the imagery of Landsat8. It is based on Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum (6S). General dark target method takes dense vegetation pixels as dark targets and derives their 550nm AODs directly from the LUT, and interpolates the AODs of other pixels according to spatial neighbourhood using those of dark target pixels. This method will down estimate the AOD levels for urban areas. We propose an innovative method to retrieval the AODs using multiple temporal data. For a pixel which has nothing change between the associated time, there must exists an intersection of surface albedo. When there are enough data to find the intersection it ought to be a value that meet the error tolerance. In this paper, we present an example of using three temporal Landsat ETM+ image to retrieve AOD taking Beijing as the testing area. The result is compared to the commonly employed dark target algorithm to show the effectiveness of the methods.

  3. Towards next-generation time-domain diffuse optics for extreme depth penetration and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Mora, Alberto Dalla; Contini, Davide; Arridge, Simon; Martelli, Fabrizio; Tosi, Alberto; Boso, Gianluca; Farina, Andrea; Durduran, Turgut; Martinenghi, Edoardo; Torricelli, Alessandro; Pifferi, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Light is a powerful tool to non-invasively probe highly scattering media for clinical applications ranging from oncology to neurology, but also for molecular imaging, and quality assessment of food, wood and pharmaceuticals. Here we show that, for a paradigmatic case of diffuse optical imaging, ideal yet realistic time-domain systems yield more than 2-fold higher depth penetration and many decades higher contrast as compared to ideal continuous-wave systems, by adopting a dense source-detector distribution with picosecond time-gating. Towards this aim, we demonstrate the first building block made of a source-detector pair directly embedded into the probe based on a pulsed Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL) to allow parallelization for dense coverage, a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to maximize light harvesting, and a Single-Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) to demonstrate the time-gating capability on the basic SiPM element. This paves the way to a dramatic advancement in terms of increased performances, new high impact applications, and availability of devices with orders of magnitude reduction in size and cost for widespread use, including quantitative wearable imaging. PMID:26137377

  4. Trends in aerosol optical depth in northern China retrieved from sunshine duration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Liu, Run; Liu, Shaw Chen; Shiu, Chein-Jung; Wang, Jingli; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2016-01-01

    A new method has been developed to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from sunshine duration (SSD). Retrieved AODs from SSD at the six stations in northern China in 2003-2005 agree reasonably well with AODs retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer observations near the six stations. Values and trends in AOD retrieved from SSD in Beijing and Tianjin in the period 1961-2005 also agree with those retrieved from solar radiation and visibility. These agreements allow the retrieval of credible upper and lower limits for anthropogenic AODs from SSD at the six stations during 1961-2005. The trends in anthropogenic AODs are approximately a factor of 3 to 5 lower than the trends in emissions of gas-phase precursors of aerosols in 1973-2005, implying a significant sublinear relationship between the level of aerosols and emissions of their gas phase precursors. This finding has important implications for formulating a control strategy for PM2.5 or haze pollution in northern China.

  5. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, K.  Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  6. Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth in Vicinity of Broken Clouds from Reflectance Ratios: Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Berg, Larry K.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris A.; Alexandrov, Mikhail

    2010-10-06

    A recently developed reflectance ratio (RR) method for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) is evaluated using extensive airborne and ground-based data sets collected during the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) and the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS), which took place in June 2007 over the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains site. A detailed case study is performed for a field of single-layer shallow cumuli observed on June 12, 2007. The RR method is applied to retrieve the spectral values of AOD from the reflectance ratios measured by the MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) for two pairs of wavelengths (660 and 470 nm and 870 and 470 nm) collected at a spatial resolution of 0.05 km. The retrieval is compared with an independent AOD estimate from three ground-based Multi-filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometers (MFRSRs). The interpolation algorithm that is used to project MFRSR point measurements onto the aircraft flight tracks is tested using AOD derived from NASA Langley High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The RR AOD estimates are in a good agreement (within 5%) with the MFRSR-derived AOD values for the 660-nm wavelength. The AODs obtained from MAS reflectance ratios overestimate those derived from MFRSR measurements by 15-30% for the 470-nm wavelength and underestimate the 870-nm AOD by the same amount.

  7. Controlling electron trap depth to enhance optical properties of persistent luminescence nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

    PubMed

    Maldiney, Thomas; Lecointre, Aurélie; Viana, Bruno; Bessière, Aurélie; Bessodes, Michel; Gourier, Didier; Richard, Cyrille; Scherman, Daniel

    2011-08-01

    Focusing on the use of nanophosphors for in vivo imaging and diagnosis applications, we used thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) measurements to study the influence of trivalent lanthanide Ln(3+) (Ln = Dy, Pr, Ce, Nd) electron traps on the optical properties of Mn(2+)-doped diopside-based persistent luminescence nanoparticles. This work reveals that Pr(3+) is the most suitable Ln(3+) electron trap in the diopside lattice, providing optimal trap depth for room temperature afterglow and resulting in the most intense luminescence decay curve after X-ray irradiation. This luminescence dependency toward the electron trap is maintained through additional doping with Eu(2+), allowing UV-light excitation, critical for bioimaging applications in living animals. We finally identify a novel composition (CaMgSi(2)O(6):Eu(2+),Mn(2+),Pr(3+)) for in vivo imaging, displaying a strong near-infrared afterglow centered on 685 nm, and present evidence that intravenous injection of such persistent luminescence nanoparticles in mice allows not only improved but highly sensitive detection through living tissues. PMID:21702453

  8. Observationally-constrained estimates of aerosol optical depths (AODs) over East Asia via data assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Song, C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Not only aerosol's direct effect on climate by scattering and absorbing the incident solar radiation, but also they indirectly perturbs the radiation budget by influencing microphysics and dynamics of clouds. Aerosols also have a significant adverse impact on human health. With an importance of aerosols in climate, considerable research efforts have been made to quantify the amount of aerosols in the form of the aerosol optical depth (AOD). AOD is provided with ground-based aerosol networks such as the Aerosol Robotic NETwork (AERONET), and is derived from satellite measurements. However, these observational datasets have a limited areal and temporal coverage. To compensate for the data gaps, there have been several studies to provide AOD without data gaps by assimilating observational data and model outputs. In this study, AODs over East Asia simulated with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model and derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) observation are interpolated via different data assimilation (DA) techniques such as Cressman's method, Optimal Interpolation (OI), and Kriging for the period of the Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) Campaign (March - May 2012). Here, the interpolated results using the three DA techniques are validated intensively by comparing with AERONET AODs to examine the optimal DA method providing the most reliable AODs over East Asia.

  9. Choroidal changes observed with enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomography in patients with mild Graves orbitopathy.

    PubMed

    Özkan, B; Koçer, Ç A; Altintaş, Ö; Karabaş, L; Acar, A Z; Yüksel, N

    2016-07-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the choroidal thickness in patients with Graves orbitopathy (GO) using enhanced depth imaging-optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT).MethodsThirty-one patients with GO were evaluated prospectively. All subjects underwent ophthalmologic examination including best-corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure measurement, biomicroscopic, and fundus examination. Choroidal thickness was measured at the central fovea. In addition, visual evoked potential measurement and visual field evaluation were performed.ResultsThe mean choroidal thickness was 377.8±7.4 μ in the GO group, and 334±13.7 μ in the control group. (P=0.004). There was a strong correlation between the choridal thickness and the clinical activity scores (CAS) of the patients (r=0.281, P=0.027). Additionally, there was a correlation between the choroidal thickness and the visual-evoked potential (VEP) P100 latency measurements of the patients (r=0.439, P=0.001).ConclusionsThe results of this study demonstrate that choroid is thicker in patients with GO. The choroidal thickness is also correlated with the CAS and VEP P100 latency measurements in these patients. PMID:27315349

  10. Comparison of trend between aerosol optical depth and PM in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KIM, S. H.; Kim, J.; Choi, M.; KIM, M.; Jeong, U.

    2014-12-01

    East Asia is one of major source region of aerosol emission. For decades, vast amount of aerosol, which is emitted and transported from emission region such as desert and industrialized area, has significant effect in the air quality and public health. Moreover, by scattering solar radiation and moderating cloud microphysical system, aerosol plays an important role in climate system. As the Korean peninsula is located in the downwind side of East Asia, the distribution of aerosol in this region is affected by continental outflow and local emission, This study shows the long-term trend and regional distribution of PM10 concentration over 28 Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) sites and aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) at 550nm channel during the period from March 2011 to March 2014. Though AOD is a good indicator of PM10 concentration, there are some uncertainties in AOD caused largely by aerosol type, surface reflectance, and those in PM by relative humidity (RH), boundary layer height (BLH) and so on. In this study, retrieved AODs were compared with the observed PM10, and trends and correlations between AOD and PM10 have been calculated for different region and season over the Korean peninsula.

  11. Study of satellite retrieved aerosol optical depth spatial resolution effect on particulate matter concentration prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandgren, J.; Mei, L.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) spatial resolution effect is investigated for the linear correlation between satellite retrieved AOD and ground level particulate matter concentrations (PM2.5). The Multi-Angle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC) algorithm was developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) for obtaining AOD with a high spatial resolution of 1 km and provides a good dataset for the study of the AOD spatial resolution effect on the particulate matter concentration prediction. 946 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground monitoring stations across the contiguous US have been used to investigate the linear correlation between AOD and PM2.5 using AOD at different spatial resolutions (1, 3 and 10 km) and for different spatial scales (urban scale, meso-scale and continental scale). The main conclusions are: (1) for both urban, meso- and continental scale the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD increased significantly with increasing spatial resolution of the AOD, (2) the correlation between AOD and PM2.5 decreased significantly as the scale of study region increased for the eastern part of the US while vice versa for the western part of the US, (3) the correlation between PM2.5 and AOD is much more stable and better over the eastern part of the US compared to western part due to the surface characteristics and atmospheric conditions like the fine mode fraction.

  12. Spatio-temporal evaluation of resolution enhancement for passive microwave soil moisture and vegetation optical depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevaert, A. I.; Parinussa, R. M.; Renzullo, L. J.; van Dijk, A. I. J. M.; de Jeu, R. A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Space-borne passive microwave radiometers are used to derive land surface parameters such as surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth (VOD). However, the value of such products in regional hydrology is limited by their coarse resolution. In this study, the land parameter retrieval model (LPRM) is used to derive enhanced resolution (∼10 km) soil moisture and VOD from advanced microwave scanning radiometer (AMSR-E) brightness temperatures sharpened by a modulation technique based on high-frequency observations. A precipitation mask based on brightness temperatures was applied to remove precipitation artefacts in the sharpened LPRM products. The spatial and temporal patterns in the resulting products are evaluated against field-measured and modeled soil moisture as well as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) over mainland Australia. Results show that resolution enhancement accurately sharpens the boundaries of different vegetation types, lakes and wetlands. Significant changes in temporal agreement between LPRM products and related datasets are limited to specific areas, such as lakes and coastal areas. Spatial correlations, on the other hand, increase over most of Australia. In addition, hydrological signals from irrigation and water bodies that were absent in the low-resolution soil moisture product become clearly visible after resolution enhancement. The increased information detail in the high-resolution LPRM products should benefit hydrological studies at regional scales.

  13. The uncertainty of MODIS C6 aerosol optical depth product over land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yerong; de Graaf, Martin; Menenti, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) has an important impact on climate change and air quality. A number of AOD satellite data products have been released, like Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD product, which are further applied for monitoring PM2.5, for long-term aerosol trend analysis, and for estimating aerosol radiative forcing. However, the accuracy of MODIS AOD product with ±0.03 or 15-20% of global mean value over land is still low for extensive scientific research. To investigate the accuracy of the product, a synthetic experiment was designed where the errors introduced by both radiometry and algorithm, e.g. instrument calibration, gas correction and cloud mask, and some assumptions on aerosol properties can be removed. Through analysis of the mean value of retrieved AOD over 1520 observational configurations, the algorithm performs very well with small errors (up to 0.2%) for most cases, while for some extreme cases (eg., AOD=5.0), it performs less accurately (> 3%). The uncertainty also shows a trend related to the geometry of observations (e.g., scattering angle). The results suggest higher accuracy at large scattering angles, and lower accuracy at small scattering angles. The main reason for the uncertainty is an inappropriate assumption on surface reflectance, where surface reflectance is regarded as a function of aerosol loading and mixing ratio. Therefore, a more accurate representation of the surface reflectance will increase the accuracy of the MODIS AOD product.

  14. Analysis of the weekly cycle of aerosol optical depth using AERONET and MODIS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xiangao; Eck, Tom F.; Holben, Brent N.; Phillippe, Goloub; Chen, Hongbin

    2008-07-01

    Multi-year Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth (AOD) data are used to study AOD weekly variations at the global scale. A clear weekly cycle of AOD is observed in the United States (U.S.) and Central Europe. AOD during the weekday is larger than that during the weekend in 36 out of 43 AERONET sites in the U.S. The average U.S. weekend effect (the percent difference in AOD during the weekday and the weekend) is 3.8%. A weekly periodicity with lower AODs on Sunday and Monday and higher AODs from Wednesday until Saturday is revealed over Central Europe and the average weekend effect there is 4.0%. The weekly cycle in urban sites is greater than that in rural sites. AOD during the weekday is also significantly larger than that during the weekend in urban AERONET sites in South America and South Korea. However, a reversed AOD weekly cycle is observed in the Middle East and India. AODs on Thursday and Friday, the "weekend" for Middle East cultures, are relatively lower than AODs on other days. There is no clear weekly variation of AOD over eastern China. The striking feature in this region is the occurrence of much higher AOD on Sunday and this phenomenon is independent of season. The analysis of MODIS aerosol data is in good agreement with that of AERONET data.

  15. Electron beam and optical depth-profiling of quasi-bulk GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyak, L.; Osinsky, A.; Nootz, G.; Schulte, A.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Look, D.C.; Molnar, R.J.

    2000-11-22

    Electron beam and optical depth-profiling of thick (5.5-64 mm) quasi-bulk n-type GaN samples, grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE), were carried out using electron beam induced current (EBIC), micro-photoluminescence (PL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minority carrier diffusion length, L, was found to increase linearly from 0.25 mm, at a distance of about 5 mm from the GaN/sapphire interface, to 0.63 mm at the GaN surface, for a 36-mm-thick sample. The increase in L was accompanied by a corresponding increase in PL band-to-band radiative transition intensity as a function of distance from the GaN/sapphire interface. We attribute the latter changes in PL intensity and minority carrier diffusion length to a reduced carrier mobility and lifetime at the interface, due to scattering at threading dislocations. The results of EBIC and PL measurements are in good agreement with the values for dislocation density, obtained using TEM.

  16. Electron beam and optical depth profiling of quasibulk GaN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, L.; Osinsky, A.; Nootz, G.; Schulte, A.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Look, D. C.; Molnar, R. J.

    2000-10-01

    Electron beam and optical depth profiling of thick (5.5-64 μm) quasibulk n-type GaN samples, grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy, were carried out using electron beam induced current (EBIC), microphotoluminescence (PL), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minority carrier diffusion length, L, was found to increase linearly from 0.25 μm, at a distance of about 5 μm from the GaN/sapphire interface, to 0.63 μm at the GaN surface, for a 36-μm-thick sample. The increase in L was accompanied by a corresponding increase in PL band-to-band radiative transition intensity as a function of distance from the GaN/sapphire interface. We attribute the latter changes in PL intensity and minority carrier diffusion length to a reduced carrier mobility and lifetime at the interface, due to scattering at threading dislocations. The results of EBIC and PL measurements are in good agreement with the values for dislocation density obtained using TEM.

  17. Electron beam and optical depth profiling of quasibulk GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Chernyak, L.; Osinsky, A.; Nootz, G.; Schulte, A.; Jasinski, J.; Benamara, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Look, D. C.; Molnar, R. J.

    2000-10-23

    Electron beam and optical depth profiling of thick (5.5--64 {mu}m) quasibulk n-type GaN samples, grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy, were carried out using electron beam induced current (EBIC), microphotoluminescence (PL), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The minority carrier diffusion length, L, was found to increase linearly from 0.25 {mu}m, at a distance of about 5 {mu}m from the GaN/sapphire interface, to 0.63 {mu}m at the GaN surface, for a 36-{mu}m-thick sample. The increase in L was accompanied by a corresponding increase in PL band-to-band radiative transition intensity as a function of distance from the GaN/sapphire interface. We attribute the latter changes in PL intensity and minority carrier diffusion length to a reduced carrier mobility and lifetime at the interface, due to scattering at threading dislocations. The results of EBIC and PL measurements are in good agreement with the values for dislocation density obtained using TEM.

  18. Comparison of Satellite Observations of Aerosol Optical Depth to Surface Monitor Fine Particle Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleb, Mary M.; AlSaadi, Jassim A.; Neil, Doreen O.; Pierce, Robert B.; Pippin, Margartet R.; Roell, Marilee M.; Kittaka, Chieko; Szykman, James J.

    2004-01-01

    Under NASA's Earth Science Applications Program, the Infusing satellite Data into Environmental Applications (IDEA) project examined the relationship between satellite observations and surface monitors of air pollutants to facilitate a more capable and integrated observing network. This report provides a comparison of satellite aerosol optical depth to surface monitor fine particle concentration observations for the month of September 2003 at more than 300 individual locations in the continental US. During September 2003, IDEA provided prototype, near real-time data-fusion products to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) directed toward improving the accuracy of EPA s next-day Air Quality Index (AQI) forecasts. Researchers from NASA Langley Research Center and EPA used data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument combined with EPA ground network data to create a NASA-data-enhanced Forecast Tool. Air quality forecasters used this tool to prepare their forecasts of particle pollution, or particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in diameter (PM2.5), for the next-day AQI. The archived data provide a rich resource for further studies and analysis. The IDEA project uses data sets and models developed for tropospheric chemistry research to assist federal, state, and local agencies in making decisions concerning air quality management to protect public health.

  19. A Critical Look at Deriving Monthly Aerosol Optical Depth from Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, R. C.; Leptoukh, Gregory, G.; Kahn, Ralph; Gopalan, Arun

    2009-01-01

    Satellite-derived aerosol data sets, such as those provided by NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments, are greatly improving our understanding of global aerosol optical depth (AOD). Yet, there are sampling issues. MODIS specific orbital geometry, convolved with the need to avoid bright surfaces (glint, desert, clouds, etc.), means that AOD can be under- or over-sampled in places. When deriving downstream products, such as daily or monthly gridded AOD, one must consider the spatial and temporal density of the measurements relative to the gradients of the true AOD. Additionally, retrieval confidence criteria should be considered. Averaged products are highly dependent on choices made for data aggregation and weighting, and sampling errors can be further propagated when deriving regional or global mean AOD. Different choices for aggregation and weighting result in estimates of regional and global means varying by 30% or more. The impacts of a particular averaging algorithm vary by region and surface type and can be shown to represent different tolerance for clouds and retrieval confidence.

  20. Estimation of aerosol optical depth at different wavelengths by multiple regression method.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fuyi; Lim, Hwee San; Abdullah, Khiruddin; Holben, Brent

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to investigate and establish a suitable model that can help to estimate aerosol optical depth (AOD) in order to monitor aerosol variations especially during non-retrieval time. The relationship between actual ground measurements (such as air pollution index, visibility, relative humidity, temperature, and pressure) and AOD obtained with a CIMEL sun photometer was determined through a series of statistical procedures to produce an AOD prediction model with reasonable accuracy. The AOD prediction model calibrated for each wavelength has a set of coefficients. The model was validated using a set of statistical tests. The validated model was then employed to calculate AOD at different wavelengths. The results show that the proposed model successfully predicted AOD at each studied wavelength ranging from 340 nm to 1020 nm. To illustrate the application of the model, the aerosol size determined using measure AOD data for Penang was compared with that determined using the model. This was done by examining the curvature in the ln [AOD]-ln [wavelength] plot. Consistency was obtained when it was concluded that Penang was dominated by fine mode aerosol in 2012 and 2013 using both measured and predicted AOD data. These results indicate that the proposed AOD prediction model using routine measurements as input is a promising tool for the regular monitoring of aerosol variation during non-retrieval time. PMID:26438373