Science.gov

Sample records for absorption peak due

  1. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  2. Microwave peak absorption frequency of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangze; Chen, Mingdong

    2008-09-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction is a new effective method which has practical applications in many fields. Microwave heating is one of its physical mechanisms, and it also has the characteristic of selectivity. When the applied microwave frequency equals a certain absorption frequency of the material (or specific component), the material will intensively absorb microwave energy. This is also known as resonant absorption, and the frequency is called the peak absorption frequency which depends on the physical structure of the material. In this work, dynamic hydrogen bond energy was included in molecular activation energy; with the liquid cell model, the expression of interaction energy between dipolar molecules was derived. The rotational relaxation time was gotten from the Eyring viscosity formula. Then based on the relationship between dielectric dissipation coefficient and relaxation time, the expression of microwave peak absorption frequency as a function of the material physical structure, rotational inertia and electrical dipole moment of molecules was established. These theoretical formulas were applied to water and benzene, and the calculated results agree fairly well with the experimental data. This work can not only deepen the study of the interaction between microwave and material, but also provide a possible guide for the experiment of microwave-assisted extraction.

  3. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  4. Peak, multi-peak and broadband absorption in graphene-based one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloua, R.; Kebbab, Z.; Chiker, F.; Khadraoui, M.; Sahraoui, K.; Bouzidi, A.; Medles, M.; Mathieu, C.; Benramdane, N.

    2014-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of enhancing light absorption in graphene-based one dimensional photonic crystal. We demonstrate that it is possible to achieve total light absorption at technologically important wavelengths using one-dimensional graphene-based photonic crystals. By means of the transfer matrix method, we investigate the effect of refractive indices and layer numbers on the optical response of the structure. We found that it is possible to achieve one peak, multi-peak or broadband, and complete optical absorption. As a result, the proposed photonic structures enable myriad potential applications such as photodetection, shielding and optical sensing.

  5. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  6. Twin-peaks absorption spectra of excess electron in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Kondoh, Takafumi; Yoshida, Yoichi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    The solvated electron in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been the subject of several investigations and several reports exist on its nature and absorption spectrum. These studies concluded that the solvated electron exhibits an absorption spectrum peaking in the 1000-1400 nm region; a second absorption band peaking in the UV region has been assigned to the hole or dication radicals simultaneously formed in the system. Here we report on the fate of the excess electron in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, P14+/NTf2- using nanosecond pulse radiolysis. Scavenging experiments allowed us to record and disentangle the complex spectrum measured in P14+/NTf2-. We identified a bi-component absorption spectrum, due to the solvated electron, the absorption maxima located at 1080 nm and around 300 nm, as predicted by previous ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations for the dry excess electron. We also measured the spectra using different ionic liquids and confirmed the same feature of two absorption peaks. The present results have important implications for the characterization of solvated electrons in ionic liquids and better understanding of their structure and reactivity.

  7. Weibel instability due to inverse bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.; Bendib, K.,; Bendib, A.; Bendib, K.; Sid, A.,; Bendib, K.,

    1997-06-01

    A new Weibel source due to the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption is presented. It has been shown that in homogeneous plasmas, this mechanism may drive strong collisionless Weibel modes with growth rates of order of {gamma}{approximately}10{sup 11}s{sup {minus}1} and negligible group velocities. In the laser-produced plasmas, for short laser wavelengths ({lambda}{sub L}{lt}1{mu}m) and high laser fluxes (I{gt}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}), this Weibel source is most efficient as the ones due to the heat flux and the plasma expansion. The useful scaling law of the convective e-foldings, with respect to the laser and the plasma parameters, is also derived. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Degradation of the Bragg peak due to inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Urie, M; Goitein, M; Holley, W R; Chen, G T

    1986-01-01

    The rapid fall-off of dose at the end of range of heavy charged particle beams has the potential in therapeutic applications of sparing critical structures just distal to the target volume. Here we explored the effects of highly inhomogeneous regions on this desirable depth-dose characteristic. The proton depth-dose distribution behind a lucite-air interface parallel to the beam was bimodal, indicating the presence of two groups of protons with different residual ranges, creating a step-like depth-dose distribution at the end of range. The residual ranges became more spread out as the interface was angled at 3 degrees, and still more at 6 degrees, to the direction of the beam. A second experiment showed little significant effect on the distal depth-dose of protons having passed through a mosaic of teflon and lucite. Anatomic studies demonstrated significant effects of complex fine inhomogeneities on the end of range characteristics. Monoenergetic protons passing through the petrous ridges and mastoid air cells in the base of skull showed a dramatic degradation of the distal Bragg peak. In beams with spread out Bragg peaks passing through regions of the base of skull, the distal fall-off from 90 to 20% dose was increased from its nominal 6 to well over 32 mm. Heavy ions showed a corresponding degradation in their ends of range. In the worst case in the base of skull region, a monoenergetic neon beam showed a broadening of the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak to over 15 mm (compared with 4 mm in a homogeneous unit density medium). A similar effect was found with carbon ions in the abdomen, where the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak (nominally 5.5 mm) was found to be greater than 25 mm behind gas-soft-tissue interfaces. We address the implications of these data for dose computation with heavy charged particles. PMID:3952143

  9. Asymmetric and symmetric absorption peaks observed in infrared spectra of CO2 adsorbed on TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Infrared spectra of CO2 physisorbed on titania nanotubes (TiNTs), predominantly in the anatase polymorph, were measured at 81 K. Asymmetric and symmetric absorption peaks due to the antisymmetric stretch vibration (ν3) of CO2 were observed at 2340 cm-1 and 2350 cm-1, respectively. On the basis of the exposure- and time-dependence of the spectrum, the 2340 cm-1 peak was attributed to CO2 at the defective sites related to subsurface O vacancies (Vos) while the 2350 cm-1 peak was assigned to that at the fivefold coordinated Ti4+ sites. It was found that the generalized Fano line shape was well fitted to the 2340 cm-1 peak. We also observed an absorption peak at 2372 cm-1, which was attributed to the combination band of ν3 and the external mode of CO2 at Ti4+.

  10. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  11. Spectral calibration for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer based on absorption peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, YaSheng; Chen, Yan; Liao, Ningfang; Lyu, Hang; He, Shufang; Wan, Lifang

    2015-08-01

    A new calibration method for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer is presented. Two kinds of common materials as Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films which have special absorption peaks in the infrared band were used in the calibration experiment. As the wavelengths at the sharp absorption peaks of the films are known, an infrared imaging spectrometer can be calibrated on spectra with two or three peaks. With high precision and stability, this method simplifies the calibration work. It is especially appropriate for the measuring condition with a lack of calibration equipment or with inconvenience to calibrate the multiple light sources outdoors.

  12. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  13. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-21

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications. PMID:27143336

  14. Absorption Peaks: α, β, γ and Their Covariance with Age and Hemoglobin in Human Blood Samples Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Domínguez, J. L.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, F. A.; Martínez-Ortiz, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.

    2012-11-01

    This study reports the absorption peaks α, β, γ in the Soret band of photoacoustic (PA) signals and their covariance with age and hemoglobin in human blood samples through PA spectroscopy. Samples were taken randomly from a masculine population grouped in three categories according to age: infants, young adults, and senior adults. Samples were prepared with two drops of blood from a 0.5 mL insulin syringe with a needle gauge 31G over 5 mm circles of filter paper. It was observed that the PA signal, the amplitude as a function of the wavelength, has a behavior as that reported for human blood for the three absorption peaks α, β, γ. In particular, the ratio γ/ β is due to electronic transitions associated with charge-transfer interactions of iron orbitals with the ligand states. Through an evaluation of optical absorption peaks in blood samples and their covariance with age and hemoglobin concentration, a relationship was found for the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with such parameters. Specifically, a negative covariance in the Soret band of the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with respect to both age and hemoglobin was found. This showed a tendency in their behavior. Further experiments of different populations may corroborate these conclusions.

  15. Assessing Watershed Sensitivity to Minimize Peak Flow Modification due to Logging After Forest Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, M.

    2007-12-01

    Forest cover is a key modifier of a watershed's peak flow regime. Where forest cover is reduced due to logging or natural disturbances such as fire and insect/disease outbreaks, peak flows are, in most cases, increased. Based on GIS data available for the entire province of British Columbia (BC), Canada, with its diverse climatic regimes, land cover and hydrologic processes, we developed a methodology that classifies the sensitivity of watersheds to peak flow modification based on input characteristics and hydrological runoff generation processes. The input model component uses climatic data to derive mean annual snowmelt and maximum rainfall rates for BC for each month at a 400m grid resolution. It calculates the time of occurrence of peak flow and the precipitation regime of a watershed: snowmelt-dominated, rainfall-dominated, and transitional. This allows mapping peak flow generating input for each 3rd order watershed in BC. The runoff generation model component delineates dominant peak flow producing hydrologic processes at the watershed level: channel interception, Hortonian Overland Flow, Saturation Overland Flow and Shallow Subsurface Flow. This delineation is based on a combination of factors such as land cover, relief, slope, aspect, drainage density, drainage pattern, and hillslope morphology. The model components are validated against provincial hydro-climatic data sets. Derived maps at 25m resolution are then used to classify the watershed into different peak flow regimes to derive a sensitivity rating for different disturbance scenarios. This rating is then incorporated into a framework to assess risks to infrastructure, drinking water, and fish habitat and to minimize peak flow modification by optimizing timing, extend and location of logging in watersheds.

  16. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  17. An analytic formula for heating due to ozone absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Will, D. I.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to devise a simple expression or formula to describe radiative heating in the atmosphere by ozone absorption. Such absorption occurs in the Hartley, Huggins, and Chappuis bands and is only slightly temperature and pressure dependent.

  18. ARE HIGH VELOCITY PEAKS IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE DUE TO THE BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-10

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (∼10%) are in a cold (σ{sub V} ≈ 30 km s{sup –1}) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s{sup –1}). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ∼8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  19. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  20. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  1. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  2. Declines in peak oxygen consumption due to both aging and chronic ethanol consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, R.P.; Walters, T.J.; Cartee, G.D.; Sweeney, H.L.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have previously reported that chronic ethanol consumption will depress peak oxygen consumption. This study was designed to determine whether the decline in peak oxygen consumption induced by chronic ethanol consumption was equivalent to that of aging and whether the interaction of aging and chronic ethanol consumption would further depress peak oxygen consumption. Male F344 rats 10 and 22 months of age were divided into 4 groups young pair-fed controls (YC), young ethanol (YE) old pair-fed control (OC) and old ethanol (OE). The YE and OE received 35% of their calories as ethanol in a liquid diet, while the pair-fed controls had dextrin isocalorically substituted for ethanol. All rats were kept on the diet for 10 weeks. The YE and OE rats averaged 10.1 +/- 0.15 g of ethanol/Kg over the 10 week protocol. The peak VO/sub 2/ declined 12% in the OC compared to YC. Chronic ethanol consumption depressed peak VO/sub 2/ 16% in YC compared to YE. In the OE the peak VO/sub 2/ was depressed 13% below that of OC.

  3. Enhancement of light absorption in polyazomethines due to plasmon excitation on randomly distributed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, P.; Antosiewicz, T. J.; Stefaniuk, T.; Ciesielski, A.; Iwan, A.; Wronkowska, A. A.; Wronkowski, A.; Szoplik, T.

    2015-05-01

    In photovoltaic devices, metal nanoparticles embedded in a semiconductor layer allow the enhancement of solar-toelectric energy conversion efficiency due to enhanced light absorption via a prolonged optical path, enhanced electric fields near the metallic inclusions, direct injection of hot electrons, or local heating. Here we pursue the first two avenues. In the first, light scattered at an angle beyond the critical angle for reflection is coupled into the semiconductor layer and confined within such planar waveguide up to possible exciton generation. In the second, light is trapped by the excitation of localized surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles leading to enhanced near-field plasmon-exciton coupling at the peak of the plasmon resonance. We report on results of a numerical experiment on light absorption in polymer- (fullerene derivative) blends, using the 3D FDTD method, where exact optical parameters of the materials involved are taken from our recent measurements. In simulations we investigate light absorption in randomly distributed metal nanoparticles dispersed in polyazomethine-(fullerene derivative) blends, which serve as active layers in bulkheterojunction polymer solar cells. In the study Ag and Al nanoparticles of different diameters and fill factors are diffused in two air-stable aromatic polyazomethines with different chemical structures (abbreviated S9POF and S15POF) mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) or [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). The mixtures are spin coated on a 100 nm thick Al layer deposited on a fused silica substrate. Optical constants of the active layers are taken from spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectance measurements using a rotating analyzer type ellipsometer with auto-retarder performed in the wavelength range from 225 nm to 2200 nm. The permittivities of Ag and Al particles of diameters from 20 to 60 nm are assumed to be equal to those measured on 100 to 200 nm thick metal films.

  4. Replicas of the Kondo peak due to electron-vibration interaction in molecular transport properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roura-Bas, P.; Tosi, L.; Aligia, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The low temperature properties of single level molecular quantum dots including both electron-electron and electron-vibration interactions, are theoretically investigated. The calculated differential conductance in the Kondo regime exhibits not only the zero bias anomaly but also side peaks located at bias voltages which coincide with multiples of the energy of vibronic mode V ˜ℏ Ω /e . We obtain that the evolution with temperature of the two main satellite conductance peaks follows the corresponding one of the Kondo peak when ℏ Ω ≫kBTK , TK being the Kondo temperature, in agreement with recent transport measurements in molecular junctions. However, we find that this is no longer valid when ℏ Ω is of the order of a few times kBTK .

  5. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  6. Tiny peaks vs mega backgrounds: a general spectroscopic method with applications in resonant Raman scattering and atmospheric absorptions.

    PubMed

    Auguié, Baptiste; Reigue, Antoine; Le Ru, Eric C; Etchegoin, Pablo G

    2012-09-18

    A simple method using standard spectrometers with charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors is described to routinely measure background-corrected spectra in situations where the signal is composed of weak spectral features (such as Raman peaks or absorption lines) engulfed in a much stronger (by as much as ∼10(5)) broad background. The principle of the method is to subtract the dominant fixed-structure noise and obtain a shot-noise limited spectrum. The final noise level can therefore be reduced as desired by sufficient integration time. The method requires multiple shifts of the diffraction gratings to extract the pixel-dependent noise structure, which is then used as a flat-field correction. An original peak-retrieval procedure is proposed, demonstrating accurate determination of peak lineshapes and linewidths and robustness on practical examples where conventional methods would not be applicable. Examples are discussed to illustrate the potential of the technique to perform routine resonant Raman measurements of fluorescent dyes with high quantum yield, using conventional Raman systems. The method can equally be applied to other situations where small features are masked by a broad overwhelming background. An explicit example is given with the measurement of weak absorption lines in atmospheric gases. PMID:22894881

  7. Peak flow rate records in the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to colophony.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, P S; O'Brien, I M; Harries, M G

    1979-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) has been measured hourly from waking to sleeping in 29 workers with respiratory symptoms exposed to the fumes of soft soldering fluxes containing colophony (pine resin). Thirty-nine records of mean length 33 days have been analysed, and the results compared with the occupational history and bronchial provocation testing in the same workers. From plots of daily mean, maximum, and minimum PEFR, recurring physiological patterns of asthma emerge. The most common pattern is for asthma to increase with each successive working day. Some workers have an equivalent deterioration each working day. Regular recovery patterns taking one, two, and three days are described. The combination of a three-day recovery pattern and a late asthmatic reaction on Monday results in Monday being the best day of each week. Assessment of these records has shown them to be specific and sensitive, provided the worker was not taking corticosteroids or sodium cromoglycate during the period of the record and that bronchodilator usage was kept constant on days at home and at work. The results of the PEFR records correlate well with bronchial provocation testing, and provide a suitable alternative to this for the diagnosis of mild to moderate occupational asthma. The records are of particular use for screening symptomatic workers whose symptoms appear unlikely to be related to work. PMID:483205

  8. Dielectric loss peak due to platinum electrode porosity in lead zirconate titanate thin-film capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, D. J.; Dawber, M.; Ruediger, A.; Scott, J. F.; Kim, H. H.; Kim, Kinam

    2002-09-01

    Impedance spectroscopy measurements were carried out in situ on lead zirconate titanate capacitors 1.2×1.2 μm2 in size on a Samsung 4 Mbit 6 in, wafer. We show here that large dielectric loss appears at low frequencies, which is a constriction effect due to the porosity of the platinum electrode. Porous platinum electrodes facilitate an oxygen electrode reaction. The effect may be removed by annealing the platinum electrode at moderate temperature (300 °C). Such an anneal should thus be considered an essential step in the fabrication of a ferroelectric thin-film capacitor on Pt.

  9. Experimental phasing using zinc and sulfur anomalous signals measured at the zinc absorption peak.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Min-Kyu; Ji, Chang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Won; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2013-10-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal required for bacterial growth and survival. Excess free iron can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species that can cause severe damage to cellular functions. Cells have developed iron-sensing regulators to maintain iron homeostasis at the transcription level. The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is an iron-responsive regulator that controls the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis, bacterial virulence, stress resistance, and redox metabolism. Here, we report the expression, purification, crystallization, and phasing of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis Fur (BsFur) in the absence of regulatory metal ions. Crystals were obtained by microbatch crystallization method at 295 K and diffraction data at a resolution of 2.6 Å was collected at the zinc peak wavelength (λ=1.2823 Å). Experimental phasing identified the positions of one zinc atom and four sulfur atoms of cysteine residues coordinating the zinc atom, indicating that the data contained a meaningful anomalous scattering originating from the ordered zinc-coordinating sulfur atoms, in spite of the small anomalous signals of sulfur atoms at the examined wavelength. PMID:24173644

  10. Glass Composition-Dependent Silicate Absorption Peaks in FTIR Spectroscopy: Implications for Measuring Sample Thickness and Molecular H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Nichols, A. R.; Schipper, C. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is often used to measure the H2O and CO2 contents of volcanic glasses. A key advantage of FTIR over other analytical techniques is that it can reveal not only total H2O concentration but also H2O speciation, i.e. how much H2O is present as molecular H2O (H2Om) and how much as hydroxyl groups (OH) bound to the silicate network. This H2O speciation data can be used to investigate cooling rate and glass transition temperature of volcanic glasses, and to interpret H2O contents of pyroclasts affected by partial bubble resorption during cooling or secondary hydration after deposition. FTIR in transmitted light requires sample wafers polished on both sides of known thickness. Thickness is commonly measured using a micrometer but this may damage fragile samples and in samples with non-uniform thickness, e.g. vesicular samples, it is difficult to position at the exact location of FTIR analysis. Furthermore, in FTIR images or maps of such samples it is impractical to determine the thickness across the whole of the analysed area, resulting either in only a selection of the collected data being processed quantitatively and the rest being unused, or results being presented in terms of absorbance, which does not account for variations in thickness.It is known that FTIR spectra contain absorption peaks related to the glass aluminosilicate network at wavenumbers of ~2000, ~1830 and ~1600 cm-1 [1]. These have been shown to be proportional to sample thickness at the analysis location for one obsidian composition with up to 0.66 wt% H2O [2]. We test whether this calibration can be applied more widely by analysing a range of synthetic and natural glasses (andesitic to rhyolitic) to examine how the position and relative intensities of the different silicate absorption peaks vary with composition and H2O content. Our data show that even minor differences in composition necessitate a unique calibration. Furthermore, importantly we show how

  11. Modeling Ionospheric HF/VHF Radio-Wave Absorption due to Solar Energetic Proton Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, H. H.; Wilkinson, D. C.

    2007-12-01

    Simple, one-parameter, algorithms have been applied to the observed energetic proton flux as provided by the GOES series of satellites to yield estimates of the high latitude HF and VHF radio-wave absorption for both day and night respectively. The twilight response is obtained as a bi-linear function of the solar zenith angle at the observation positions, and the latitude dependence of the absorption region near the edge of the absorbing region (the polar caps) are estimated from extant models of geomagnetic cut-offs and their dependence on geomagnetic activity. The approximate inverse square frequency dependence of ionospheric absorption is used to translate across the HF/VHF range and predictions of the minimum duration of events are determined. Calculations of the polar cap absorption of HF radio waves have been performed for eleven larger Solar Energetic Proton (SEP) events during the period from 1992 through 2002 and the results compared to observations of 30 MHz Riometers operated by the AFGL and located at Thule, Greenland. While discrepancies between the estimated and observed absorption using these procedures occur, especially at low absorption levels, this model has operational value in view of its simplicity and its being the only extant model, to our knowledge, which treats solar-illumination, geomagnetic cutoff variation, and frequency effects, at least to first order. Specimen graphical representations of the north and south polar caps illustrate the output of the model for the peak of the 12 December 2006 solar proton event. Given sufficient interest, improvements to the methodology used here are practicable and could be expected to achieve accuracies to the order of 25% or better.

  12. Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate improves calcium absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during peak production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Zhao, J P; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Zhang, Q; Lin, H

    2015-01-01

    The advantage of supplemental sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on eggshell quality in laying hens changes with age. Besides increasing calcium (Ca) secretion in the eggshell gland, it may improve Ca absorption in the intestine or kidney. Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384), 25 weeks of age, were allocated to two treatment groups in two experiments, each of which included 4 replicates of 24 hens. Hens were fed a basal diet (control) or the basal diet containing 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg for 50 or 20 weeks in Experiment 1 or 2, respectively. A 24-h continuous lighting regimen was used to allow hens to consume the dietary supplements during the period of active eggshell formation. In Experiment 1, particularly from 25 to 50 weeks of age, and in Experiment 2, NaHCO3 supplementation favoured hen-d egg production at the expense of lower egg weight. The increased eggshell thickness should have nothing to do with the additional eggshell formation, because of the unchanged egg mass and daily eggshell calcification. At 35 weeks of age in both experiments, NaHCO3 supplementation increased duodenal expression of calbindin-d28k (CaBP-D28k) protein, contributing to higher Ca retention and balance. From 50 to 75 weeks of age in Experiment 1, the hens had little response to NaHCO3 supplementation and showed a negative trend on eggshell thickness and strength. It is concluded that dietary supplementation with 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg improves Ca absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during the peak but not late production period, with the introduction of continuous lighting. PMID:26569471

  13. An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend therefore on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features within the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The developed method and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which implies direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by successive crystallization. Application of the method to

  14. Technical Note: An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak-height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend, therefore, on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features in the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak-height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The method developed and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which confirms direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by both direct nucleation and successive crystallization. Application of

  15. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  16. Identification of B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure peaks of boron nitride thin films prepared by sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Masahito; Miyamoto, Kazuyoshi; Mitamura, Tohru; Mochiji, Kozo

    2010-09-15

    Four {pi}{sup *} resonance peaks were observed in the B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of boron nitride thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering. In the past, these peaks have been explained as the K-absorption of boron atoms, which are present in environment containing nitrogen vacancies, the number of which is 1-3 corresponding to the three peaks at higher photon energy. However, the authors found that there was a strong correlation between the intensities of these three peaks and that of O-K absorption after wide range scanning and simultaneous measurement of nitrogen and oxygen K-absorptions of the BN films. Therefore, the authors conclude that these three peaks at the higher energy side correspond to boron atoms bound to one-to-three oxygen atoms instead of three nitrogen atoms surrounding the boron atom in the h-BN structure. The result of the first-principles calculation with a simple cluster model supported the validity of this explanation.

  17. Absorption of intense microwaves and ion acoustic turbulence due to heat transport

    SciTech Connect

    De Groot, J.S.; Liu, J.M.; Matte, J.P.

    1994-02-04

    Measurements and calculations of the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of intense microwaves are presented. The isotropic component of the electron distribution becomes flat-topped in agreement with detailed Fokker-Planck calculations. The plasma heating is reduced due to the flat-topped distributions in agreement with calculations. The calculations show that the heat flux at high microwave powers is very large, q{sub max} {approx} 0.3 n{sub e}v{sub e}T{sub e}. A new particle model to, calculate the heat transport inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence in ICF plasmas is also presented. One-dimensional PIC calculations of ion acoustic turbulence excited due to heat transport are presented. The 2-D PIC code is presently being used to perform calculations of heat flux inhibition due to ion acoustic turbulence.

  18. Enhancement of microbial motility due to speed-dependent nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Di Salvo, Mario E; Condat, C A

    2014-02-01

    Marine microorganisms often reach high swimming speeds, either to take advantage of evanescent nutrient patches or to beat Brownian forces. Since this implies that a sizable part of their energetic budget must be allocated to motion, it is reasonable to assume that some fast-swimming microorganisms may increase their nutrient intake by increasing their speed v. We formulate a model to investigate this hypothesis and its consequences, finding the steady-state solutions and analyzing their stability. Surprisingly, we find that even modest increases in nutrient absorption may lead to a significant increase of the microbial speed. In fact, evaluations obtained using realistic parameter values for bacteria indicate that the speed increase due to the enhanced nutrient absorption may be quite large. PMID:24451235

  19. Behavior of Propagation and Heating Due to Absorption of Ultrasound in Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaya, Chiaki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Recently, ultrasound waves have been put to practical use not only in diagnostic equipment but also in thermotherapy that uses the effect of ultrasound waves in a living body. The analysis of temperature rise due to the absorption of ultrasound in a soft tissue medium is an important analyzing object for the clarification of the effect of ultrasound waves in biological tissues and the estimation of medium constants. Three-dimensional simulations by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method which used the equations that considers the absorption attenuation based on acoustic basic equations (ABEs) and the Westervelt equation have been performed. The consistency between the ABEs and the Westervelt equation is confirmed. The results of temperature measurement that uses glycerin as the absorbing medium of ultrasound are compared with those of FDTD simulation. The temperature distribution obtained by FDTD simulation almost corresponds to that obtained by experiment.

  20. Selective spatial damping of propagating kink waves due to resonant absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradas, J.; Goossens, M.; Verth, G.

    2010-12-01

    Context. There is observational evidence of propagating kink waves driven by photospheric motions. These disturbances, interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are attenuated as they propagate upwards in the solar corona. Aims: We show that resonant absorption provides a simple explanation to the spatial damping of these waves. Methods: Kink MHD waves are studied using a cylindrical model of solar magnetic flux tubes, which includes a non-uniform layer at the tube boundary. Assuming that the frequency is real and the longitudinal wavenumber complex, the damping length and damping per wavelength produced by resonant absorption are analytically calculated in the thin tube (TT) approximation, valid for coronal waves. This assumption is relaxed in the case of chromospheric tube waves and filament thread waves. Results: The damping length of propagating kink waves due to resonant absorption is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency. For kink waves with low frequencies, the damping length is exactly inversely proportional to frequency, and we denote this as the TGV relation. When moving to high frequencies, the TGV relation continues to be an exceptionally good approximation of the actual dependency of the damping length on frequency. This dependency means that resonant absorption is selective as it favours low-frequency waves and can efficiently remove high-frequency waves from a broad band spectrum of kink waves. The efficiency of the damping due to resonant absorption depends on the properties of the equilibrium model, in particular on the width of the non-uniform layer and the steepness of the variation in the local Alfvén speed. Conclusions: Resonant absorption is an effective mechanism for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves. It is selective because the damping length is inversely proportional to frequency so that the damping becomes more severe with increasing frequency. This means that radial inhomogeneity can cause solar

  1. The {ital b} Distribution and the Velocity Structure of Absorption Peaks in the Ly{alpha} Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, L.

    1999-06-01

    A theory is developed that relates the observed {ital b} parameter of a Ly{alpha} absorption line to the velocity curvature of the corresponding peak in the optical depth fluctuation. Its relation to the traditional interpretation of {ital b} as the thermal broadening width is discussed. It is demonstrated that, independent of the details of the cosmological model, the differential {ital b} distribution has a high-{ital b} asymptote of dN/db{proportional_to}b{sup {minus}m}, where m{ge}5, when we make the reasonable assumption that low-curvature fluctuations are statistically favored over high-curvature ones. There in general always exist lines much broader than the thermal width. We develop a linear perturbative analysis of the optical depth fluctuation, which yields a single-parameter prediction for the full {ital b} distribution. In addition to exhibiting the high-velocity tail, it qualitatively explains the observed sharp low-{ital b} cutoff{emdash}a simple reflection of the fact that high-curvature fluctuations are relatively rare. Although the existence of the high-{ital b} asymptote, which is independent of the validity of the linear expansion, is consistent with the observed {ital b} distribution, a detailed comparison of the linear prediction with six observational data sets indicates that higher order corrections are not negligible. The perturbative analysis nonetheless offers valuable insights into the dependence of the {ital b} distribution on cosmological parameters such as {Omega} and the power spectrum. A key parameter is the effective smoothing scale of the optical depth fluctuation, which is in turn determined by three scales: the thermal broadening width, the baryon smoothing scale (approximately the Jeans scale), and the observation/simulation resolution. The first two are determined by reionization history, but are comparable in general, whereas the third varies by about an order of magnitude in current hydrodynamic simulations. Studies with non

  2. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB 080310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Ledoux, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Smette, A.; De Cia, A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Fox, A. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of Fe II, Fe III, Si II, C II and Cr II detected in Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array, which is presented in this paper, and Swift's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column density decrease of all observed Fe II levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the Fe III 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all Fe III) can only be explained through ionization of Fe II, as a large fraction of the ionized Fe II ions (we calculate 31% using the Flexible Atomic and Cowan codes) initially populate the 7S3 level of Fe III rather than the ground state. This channel for producing a significant Fe III 7S3 level population may be relevant for other objects in which absorption lines from this level, the UV34 triplet, are observed, such as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and η Carinae. This provides conclusive evidence for time-variable ionization in the circumburst medium, which to date has not been convincingly detected. However, the best-fit distance of the neutral absorbing cloud to the GRB is 200-400 pc, i.e. similar to GRB-absorber distance estimates for GRBs without any evidence for ionization. We find that the presence of time-varying ionization in GRB 080310 is likely due to a combination of the super-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H] = +0.2) and the low H I column density (log N(H i) = 18.7) in the host of GRB 080310. Finally

  3. Peak power fluctuation due to timing jitter in synchronized time-lens source for coherent Raman scattering microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Jiaqi; Qiu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Synchronized time-lens source is a promising source solution for coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy. Contrary to conventional (single) time-lens source which is driven by electrical signals from a fixed-frequency radio-frequency (RF) source, the synchronized time-lens source is driven by electrical signals from optoelectronic detection of the optical output of the mode-locked laser to which it is synchronized. Consequently, the driving frequency suffers from fluctuation if there is intrinsic timing jitter of the mode-locked laser output. In this paper through numerical simulation, we demonstrate that this timing jitter will be translated into pulse-to-pluse fluctuation of the peak power of the synchronized time-lens source. The larger the intrinsic timing jitter of the mode-locked laser is, the larger this peak power fluctuation of the synchronized time-lens source is. Besides, our results indicate that an effective means of suppressing this peak power fluctuation is to reduce the bandwidth of the RF filter for the phase modulators. PMID:27137577

  4. Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Daddy; Rohman, Budi

    2014-09-30

    Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

  5. Photoacoustic Experimental System to Confirm Infrared Absorption Due to Greenhouse Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Monjushiro, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kasai, Toshio; Harris, Harold H.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental system for detecting infrared absorption using the photoacoustic (PA) effect is described. It is aimed for use at high-school level to illustrate the difference in infrared (IR) absorption among the gases contained in the atmosphere in connection with the greenhouse effect. The experimental system can be built with readily…

  6. Removal of OH Absorption Bands Due to Pyrohydrolysis Reactions in Fluoride-Containing Borosilicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Keiji

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to decrease and to remove OH ions and H2O in borosilicate glasses. Fluoride-containing borosilicate glasses followed by dry-air-bubbling showed the significant decrease of OH absorption bands around 3500 cm-1. The decrease of OH absorption bands was elucidated by the use of pyrohydrolysis reactions in these glasses where fluoride ions react with OH ions or H2O during melting. The rates of the decrease of OH absorption bands substantially depend on high valence cations of fluorides. Particularly, the decrease rates of OH absorption coefficients were in the order of ZrF4-containing glass>AlF3-containing glass>ZnF2-containing glass. ZrF4-containing glass treated by dry-air-bubbling showed a good capability to remove OH absorption band. Fluoride-containing glasses showed the low flow point in comparison with fluoride-free glasses.

  7. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below. PMID:25150556

  8. Monochromatic calculations of atmospheric radiative transfer due to molecular line absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, M.-D.; Kouvaris, L.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivity studies related to the effects of line cutoff, spectral resolution, and temperature and pressure interpolations in radiative transfer have been performed so that a data set of absorption coefficients for water vapor, CO2, and O3 may be created efficiently. Results show that computations of absorption coefficients are affected only slightly by cutting a line off at a wave number 190 times the Lorentz half width from the center, or equivalently, cutting off 0.33 percent of the line intensity from the wings. To achieve a relative cooling rate error smaller than 2 percent, it is sufficient to precompute the absorption coefficient at three temperatures (210, 250, and 290 K) and 19 pressures with Delta (log 10 p) = 0.2. The absorption coefficient at other conditions can be interpolated linearly with pressure and exponentially with a quadratic in temperature. For the spectral resolution the absorption coefficients can be adequately computed at 0.01, 0.002, 0.005, and 0.025/cm intervals in the thermal water vapor, the CO2 and O3 bands, and the solar water vapor bands, respectively, which limits the error to only a few percent in the cooling and heating rates. Using the precomputed absorption coefficients, repeated monochromatic calculations of atmospheric heating/cooling rates for radiation model developments and for comparison with less detailed calculations are no longer difficult.

  9. Hydrogen bonding between acetate-based ionic liquids and water: Three types of IR absorption peaks and NMR chemical shifts change upon dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yuwei; Mu, Tiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonding interaction between acetate-based ionic liquids (AcIL) and water was investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) and 1H NMR. Interestingly, the relative change of chemical shift δ of 1H NMR upon dilution could be divided into three regions. All the H show an upfield shift in Regions 1 and 2 while a different tendency in Region 3 (upfield, no, and downfield shift classified as Types 1, 2, 3, respectively). For ATR-IR, the red, no, or blue shift of νOD (IR absorption peak of OD in D2O) and ν± (IR absorption peak of AcILs) also have three types, respectively. Two-Times Explosion Mechanism (TTEM) was proposed to interpret the dynamic processes of AcILs upon dilution macroscopically, meanwhile an Inferior Spring Model (ISM) was proposed to help to understand the TTEM microscopically, All those indicate that AcILs present the state of network, sub-network, cluster, sub-cluster, ion pairs and sub-ion pairs in sequence upon dilution by water and the elongation of hydrogen bonding between AcILs-water, between cation-anion of AcILs is plastic deformation rather than elastic deformation.

  10. Radiative absorption enhancements due to the mixing state of atmospheric black carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Cappa, Christopher D.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Massoli, Paola; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Bates, Timothy S.; Cross, Eben S.; Davidovits, Paul; Hakala, Jani; Hayden, Katherine; Jobson, Bertram Thomas; Kolesar, K. R.; Lack, D. A.; Lerner, Brian M.; Li, Shao-Meng; Mellon, Daniel; Nuaaman, Ibraheem; Olfert, Jason; Petaja, Tuukka; Quinn, P. K.; Song, Chen; Subramanian, R.; Williams, Eric; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-08-30

    Atmospheric particulate black carbon (BC) leads to warming of the Earth's climate. Many models that include forcing by BC assume that non-BC aerosol species internally mixed with BC enhance BC absorption, often by a factor of {approx}2. However, such model estimates have yet to be clearly validated through atmospheric observations. Here, we report on direct measurements of the absorption enhancement (Eabs) of BC in the atmosphere around California and find that it is negligible at 532 nm and much smaller than predicted from theoretical calculations that are uniquely constrained by observations, suggesting that the warming by BC may be significantly overestimated (factor of 2) in many climate models. Additionally, non-BC particulate matter is found to contribute {approx}10% to the total absorption at 405 nm.

  11. Absorption lines in the spectrum of Q0248 + 4302 due to a foreground tidal tail

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, W.L.W.; Steidel, C.C. California Univ., Berkeley )

    1990-08-01

    The strong absorption lines in the spectrum of the quasar Q0248 + 4302 are discussed. The absorption has been shown to be produced in a sinuous tidal tail which emanates from the nearby galaxy pair G0248 + 4302A,B. There is a velocity difference of about 260 km/s between the systemic redshift of the interacting galaxies and the redshift of the tidal tail at a galactocentric distance of about 11/h kpc. The large velocity spread observed in the tail gas is probably responsible for the unusual strength of the interstellar lines. 18 refs.

  12. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  13. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  14. A case of consciousness disturbance resulting from severe hypothyroidism due to chronic thyroiditis and excess iodine absorption.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Onodera, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kengo; Kataoka, Yuko; Tachikawa, Kazushige; Riku, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    An 82-year-old Japanese man had consciousness disturbance due to severe hypothyroidism triggered by percutaneous absorption of iodine from an iodine-containing ointment used in diabetic gangrene treatment. Laboratory data revealed extremely high urinary iodine concentrations, and chronic thyroiditis-induced hypothyroidism. Excess iodine intake can also cause hypothyroidism. It was unlikely that iodine intoxication or Hashimoto's encephalopathy had caused the consciousness disturbance. The patient regained consciousness after discontinuing the use of the ointment and commencing thyroid hormone therapy. We conclude that consciousness disturbance resulted from severe hypothyroidism caused by chronic thyroiditis and excess iodine absorption. PMID:22041370

  15. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  16. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  17. Tunable Optical Limiting Action due to Non-linear Absorption in ZnO/Ag Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhu, S.; Vijayan, C.; Sandeep, Suchand; Philip, Reji

    2011-07-01

    ZnO/Ag nanocomposites with different silver concentration are successfully synthesized by solvothermal method. The characterization of the as- synthesized samples is done using XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy and HRTEM and the results indicate that the composites consist of silver nanoparticles attached to the ZnO nanoparticles. The optical non-linearity in these samples is studied using open aperture Z-scan technique and the experimental results agree well with a theoretical model involving two- photon absorption. It is found that the parameters of optical limiting can be tuned in a broad band by varying the silver concentration in the samples.

  18. Enhancement of microbial motility due to advection-dependent nutrient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos A.; di Salvo, Mario E.

    2014-03-01

    In their classical work, Berg and Purcell [Biophys. J. 20, 193 (1977)] concluded that the motion of a small microorganism would not significantly increase its nutrient uptake rate, if the nutrient consisted of high diffusivity particles. As a result, it has been generally assumed that nutrient transport to small microorganisms such as bacteria is dominated by molecular diffusion and that swimming and feeding currents play a negligible role. On the other hand, recent studies have found that flagellar motion may increase advection-mediated uptake. We formulate a model to investigate the hypothesis that fast-moving microbes may enhance their swimming speed by taking advantage of advection to increase nutrient absorption. Surprisingly, using realistic parameter values for bacteria and algae, we find that even modest increases in nutrient absorption may lead to a significant increase of the microbial speed. We also show that, optimally, the rate of effective energy transfer to the microbial propulsion system should be proportional to the speed for slow motion, while it should be proportional to a power of the speed close to two for fast motion. We are grateful to SECyT-UNC and CONICET, Argentina, for financial support.

  19. Changes of color and water-absorption of Hungarian porous limestone due to biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhász, P.; Kopecskó, K.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria induced calcium carbonate precipitation nowadays is a widely examined process being a possible alternative for traditional stone conservation methods. While research has been mostly limited to laboratory measurements, application connected, further in situ experiments should be performed in order to evaluate the applicability of the method. In our experiment, several bio-based treating compounds were compared, which have already been analyzed in different laboratories. Method for the treatment was based on the treatment of a French research group, and the compounds were applied on Hungarian porous limestone slabs, in situ. For inoculation bacteria strains Bacillus cereus and Myxococcus xanthus were used, and non-inoculated compounds were also analyzed. After the treatment, specimens were analyzed by means of discoloration effect, water absorption and migration characteristics. Almost all the treating compounds gave favorable or acceptable results for the examined properties, comparing to the properties measured in the non-cured state. Measurements on the chromatic- and on the water absorption aspects gave significant results, while further measurements are running for the more exact evaluation of the migration characteristics, i.e. effective migration depth and wetted volume.

  20. Soliton Formation and Superluminality Effect due to Nonlinear Absorption of Femtosecond Laser Pulse Energy by the Medium Containing Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate a femtosecond pulse propagation in a medium, containing nanorods, with taking into account the dependence of multi-photon absorption from the aspect ratio of nanorods. Nanorods melting due to the laser energy absorption leads to the non-stationary interaction of laser pulse with the medium and time-dependent nanorod aspect ratio changing. Under certain conditions, we found out the soliton-like mode of a laser pulse propagation and the superluminality effect: acceleration of light (fast light) in comparison with light propagation in a linear medium. We discuss a physical mechanism of superluminality effect for considering laser pulse propagation. Using spatio-temporal analogy, one can see the similarity between the pulse centre evolution along longitudinal coordinate and the beam centre evolution under the infrared optical radiation propagation in a cloud, or fog, which moves across the beam, with taking into account its thermal blooming.

  1. Hospital admissions due to diseases of arteries and veins peaked at physiological equivalent temperature -10 to 10 °C in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to understand relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to diseases of arteries and veins by subtypes, which have been scarcely studied, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions from the included hospitals (n = 1,618) across Germany that were available between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified I70-I79 Diseases of arteries, arterioles and capillaries and I80-I89 Diseases of veins, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that covered 13 German states including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). Two-way fractional-polynomial prediction was plotted with 95 % confidence intervals. For most of the subtypes from diseases of arteries and veins, hospital admissions slightly peaked in spring and dropped when PET was at 10 °C. There were no other large differences across 12 months. Admissions of peripheral vascular diseases, arterial embolism and thrombosis, phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, oesophageal varices and nonspecific lymphadenitis peaked when PET was between 0 and -10 °C, while others peaked when PET was between 0 and 10 °C. More medical resources could have been needed on days when PETs were at -10 to 10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for health professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative. PMID:26631019

  2. Effect of a drag force due to absorption of solar radiation on solar sail orbital dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Vázquez-Poritz, Justin F.

    2013-03-01

    While solar electromagnetic radiation can be used to propel a solar sail, it is shown that the Poynting-Robertson effect related to the absorbed portion of the radiation leads to a drag force in the transversal direction. The Poynting-Robertson effect is considered for escape trajectories, Heliocentric bound orbits and non-Keplerian bound orbits. For escape trajectories, this drag force diminishes the cruising velocity, which has a cumulative effect on the Heliocentric distance. For Heliocentric and non-Keplerian bound orbits, the Poynting-Robertson effect decreases its orbital speed, thereby causing it to slowly spiral towards the Sun. Since the Poynting-Robertson effect is due to the absorbed portion of the electromagnetic radiation, degradation of a solar sail implies that this effect becomes enhanced during a mission.

  3. Dipping in CygnusX-2 in a multi-wavelength campaign due to absorption of extended ADC emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bałucińska-Church, M.; Schulz, N. S.; Wilms, J.; Gibiec, A.; Hanke, M.; Spencer, R. E.; Rushton, A.; Church, M. J.

    2011-06-01

    We report results of one-day simultaneous multiwavelength observations of CygnusX-2 using XMM, Chandra, the European VLBI Network and the XMM Optical Monitor. During the observations, the source did not exhibit Z-track movement, but remained in the vicinity of the soft apex. It was in a radio quiescent/quiet state of <150 μJy. Strong dip events were seen as 25% reductions in X-ray intensity. The use of broadband CCD spectra in combination with narrow-band grating spectra has now demonstrated for the first time that these dipping events in CygnusX-2 are caused by absorption in cool material in quite a unique way. In the band 0.2 - 10 keV, dipping appears to be due to progressive covering of the Comptonized emission of an extended accretion disk corona, the covering factor rising to 40% in deep dipping with an associated column density of 3 × 1023 atom cm-2. Remarkably, the blackbody emission of the neutron star is not affected by these dips, in strong contrast with observations of typical low mass X-ray binary dipping sources. The Chandra and XMM gratings directly measure the optical depths in absorption edges such as Ne K, Fe L, and O K and a comparison of the optical depths in the edges of non-dip and dip data reveals no increase of optical depth during dipping even though the continuum emission sharply decreases. Based on these findings, at orbital phase 0.35, we propose that dipping in this observation is caused by absorption in the outer disk by structures located opposite to the impact bulge of the accretion stream. With an inclination angle >60° these structures can still cover large parts of the extended ADC, without absorbing emission from the central neutral star.

  4. DEEP SILICATE ABSORPTION FEATURES IN COMPTON-THICK ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI PREDOMINANTLY ARISE DUE TO DUST IN THE HOST GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, A. D.; Forman, W. R.; Jones, C.; Trichas, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Mullaney, J. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Hickox, R. C.

    2012-08-10

    We explore the origin of mid-infrared (mid-IR) dust extinction in all 20 nearby (z < 0.05) bona fide Compton-thick (N{sub H} > 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}) active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with hard energy (E > 10 keV) X-ray spectral measurements. We accurately measure the silicate absorption features at {lambda} {approx} 9.7 {mu}m in archival low-resolution (R {approx} 57-127) Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectroscopy, and show that only a minority ( Almost-Equal-To 45%) of nearby Compton-thick AGNs have strong Si-absorption features (S{sub 9.7} = ln (f{sub int}/f{sub obs}) {approx}> 0.5) which would indicate significant dust attenuation. The majority ( Almost-Equal-To 60%) are star formation dominated (AGN:SB < 0.5) at mid-IR wavelengths and lack the spectral signatures of AGN activity at optical wavelengths, most likely because the AGN emission lines are optically extinguished. Those Compton-thick AGNs hosted in low-inclination-angle galaxies exhibit a narrow range in Si-absorption (S{sub 9.7} {approx} 0-0.3), which is consistent with that predicted by clumpy-torus models. However, on the basis of the IR spectra and additional lines of evidence, we conclude that the dominant contribution to the observed mid-IR dust extinction is dust located in the host galaxy (i.e., due to disturbed morphologies, dust lanes, galaxy inclination angles) and not necessarily a compact obscuring torus surrounding the central engine.

  5. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  6. Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

  7. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  8. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  9. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  10. Improvement in the photocurrent collection due to enhanced absorption of light by synthesizing staggered layers of silver nanoclusters in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Rout, Bibhudutta; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Lightbourne, Sherard; D’Souza, Francis

    2015-07-23

    The quest for increased efficiency of solar cells has driven the research in synthesizing photovoltaic cells involving Si based materials. The efficiency of solar cells involving crystalline Si is stalled around 25% for the last decade. Recently Shi et al. had shown that light trapping can be enhanced by fabricating double layers of Ag nanoparticles in silicon based materials. The light trapping is critically important in a photo devices such as solar cells in order to increase light absorption and efficiency. In the present work, we report enhancement in the absorption of light in Ag ion implanted Si substrates. Multiple low energies Ag ions, ranging from ∼80 keV to ∼30 keV, with different fluences ranging from ∼1 × 10{sup 16} to ∼1 × 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} were sequentially implanted into commercially available Si (100) substrates followed by post-thermal annealing to create different sizes of Ag nanoclusters (NC) at different depths in the top 100 nm of the Si. The absorbance of light is increased in Ag implanted Si with a significant increase in the current collection in I-V (current-voltage) photo switching measurements. The experimental photovoltaic cells fabricated with the Ag-implanted Si samples were optically characterized under AM (air mass) 1.5 solar radiation conditions (∼1.0 kW/m{sup 2}). An enhancement in the charge collection were measured in the annealed samples, where prominent Ag NCs were formed in the Si matrix compared to the as-implanted samples with amorphous layers. We believe the enhancement of the photo-current density from the samples with Ag NC is due to the improvement of efficiency of charge collection of e{sup −}-h{sup +} pairs produced by the incident light.

  11. Specific absorption rate variation in a brain phantom due to exposure by a 3G mobile phone: problems in dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2013-12-01

    A specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements system has been developed for compliance testing of personal mobile phone in a brain phantom material contained in a Perspex box. The volume of the box has been chosen corresponding to the volume of a small rat and illuminated by a 3G mobile phone frequency (1718.5 MHz), and the emitted radiation directed toward brain phantom .The induced fields in the phantom material are measured. Set up to lift the plane carrying the mobile phone is run by a pulley whose motion is controlled by a stepper motor. The platform is made to move at a pre-determined rate of 2 degrees per min limited up to 20 degrees. The measured data for induced fields in various locations are used to compute corresponding SAR values and inter comparison obtained. These data are also compared with those when the mobile phone is placed horizontally with respect to the position of the animal. The SAR data is also experimentally obtained by measuring a rise in temperature due to this mobile exposures and data compared with those obtained in the previous set. To seek a comparison with the safety criteria same set of measurements are performed in 10 g phantom material contained in a cubical box. These results are higher than those obtained with the knowledge of induced field measurements. It is concluded that SAR values are sensitive to the angular position of the moving platform and are well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure. The data are suggestive of having a fresh look to understand the mode of electromagnetic field -bio interaction. PMID:24579373

  12. Solar radiation absorption in the atmosphere due to water and ice clouds: Sensitivity experiments with plane-parallel clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.

    1995-09-01

    One cloud radiation issue that has been troublesome for several decades is the absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between observations and modeling results. A good review of these often-competing hypotheses has been provided by Stephens and Tsay. They characterize the available hypotheses as failing into three categories: (1) those linked to cloud microphysical and consequent optical properties; (2) those linked to the geometry and heterogeneity of clouds; and (3) those linked to atmospheric absorption.Current modeling practice is seriously inconsistent with new observational inferences concerning absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The author and her colleagues contend that an emphasis on R may, therefore, not be the optimal way of addressing the cloud solar absorption issue. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Variation of spectral properties of dielectric ionic crystal in the terahertz range due to the polariton absorption.

    PubMed

    Dzedolik, Igor V; Pereskokov, Vladislav

    2014-05-20

    The dispersion equations for polariton waves in dielectric ionic crystal with the absorption are obtained. The self-consistent solutions of the system of Maxwell electromagnetic field equations and the equations of motion of ions have been used. The elastic and absorption properties of the crystal are taken into account in the ion equations of motion. It is shown that the separated equations of motion for positive and negative ions allow obtaining all branches of phonon and polariton spectrum by the example of the ionic crystal of cubic symmetry at the terahertz range. It has been shown that the variation of absorption in the crystal leads to changing of the character of spectrum branch and the polariton velocities. PMID:24922221

  14. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  15. Ca II and Na I absorption in the QSO S4 0248 + 430 due to an intervening galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womble, Donna S.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Cohen, Ross D.; Burbidge, E. Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the QSO S4 0248 + 430 and a nearby anonymous galaxy are presented. Two absorption components are found in both Ca II H and K and Na I D1 and D2 at z(a) = 0.0515, 0.0523. Column densities of log N(Ca II) = 13.29, 13.50, and log N(Na I) = 13.79, 14.18 are found for z(a) = 0.0515, 0.0523 absorption systems, respectively. The column density ratios imply considerable calcium depletion and disk-type absorbing gas. At least one and possibly both absorption components are produced by high-velocity gas. A broadband image of the field shows an asymmetrical armlike feature or possible tidal tail covering and extending past the position of the QSO. The presence of this extended feature and the apparent difference between the absorption velocities and galaxy rotation velocity suggest that the absorbing gas is not ordinary disk gas, but rather is a result of tidal disruption.

  16. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  17. Assessment of the deformation of the Bateman bipolar hip prosthesis inner bearing due to moisture absorption and creep.

    PubMed

    Lockie, K; Binns, M; Fisher, J; Jobbins, B

    1992-01-01

    The mechanism of inner bearing stiffness of bipolar hip prostheses has been investigated. The Ultra-high Molecular Weight Polyethylene (UHMWPE) component of the Bateman bipolar hip prosthesis has been subjected to a series of static and dynamic tests to assess water absorption and creep. Although deformation of the UHMWPE occurred, this did not produce an increased resistance to movement in the inner bearing. PMID:1572706

  18. Correlated visible-light absorption and intrinsic magnetism of SrTiO3 due to oxygen deficiency: bulk or surface effect?

    PubMed

    Choi, Heechae; Song, Jin Dong; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol; Kim, Seungchul

    2015-04-20

    The visible-light absorption and luminescence of wide band gap (3.25 eV) strontium titanate (SrTiO3) are well-known, in many cases, to originate from the existence of natural oxygen deficiency in the material. In this study based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we provide, to the best of our knowledge, the first report indicating that oxygen vacancies in the bulk and on the surfaces of SrTiO3 (STO) play different roles in the optical and magnetic properties. We found that the doubly charged state of oxygen vacancy (VO(2+)) is dominant in bulk SrTiO3 and does not contribute to the sub-band gap photoexcitation or intrinsic magnetism of STO. Neutral oxygen vacancies (VO(0)) on (001) surfaces terminated with both TiO2 and SrO layers induce magnetic moments, which are dependent on the charged state of VO. The calculated absorption spectra for the (001) surfaces exhibit mid-infrared absorption (<0.5 eV) and sub-band gap absorption (2.5-3.1 eV) due to oxygen vacancies. In particular, VO(0) on the TiO2-terminated surface has a relatively low formation energy and magnetic moments, which can explain the recently observed spin-dependent photon absorptions of STO in a magnetic circular dichroism measurement [Rice, W. D.; et al. Nat. Mater.13, 481, 2014]. PMID:25815532

  19. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Jo, J.; Wulff, W. )

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is {minus}19{degree}K ({minus}34{degree}F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N{sub 2} in the code is estimated to be 9.9{degree}K (17.8{degree}F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N{sub 2} model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mohammad; Ghatak, Ananya; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2014-05-15

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  1. 4.6 micron absorption features due to solid phase CO and cyano group molecules toward compact infrared sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Baas, F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Van De Bult, C. E. P.; Persson, S. E.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Geballe, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra obtained at a resolving power of 840, for seven protostellar sources in the region of the 4.67-micron fundamental vibrational band of CO, indicate that the deep absorption feature in W33A near 4.61 microns consists of three features which are seen in other sources, but with varying relative strength. UV-irradiation laboratory experiments with 'dirty ice' temperature cycling allow the identification of two of the features cited with solid CO and CO complexed to other molecules. Cyano group-containing molecules have a lower vapor pressure than CO, and can therefore survive in much warmer environments. The formation and location of the CO- and CN-bearing grain mantles and sources of UV irradiation in cold molecular clouds are discussed. Plausible UV light sources can produce the observed cyano group features, but only under conditions in which local heat sources do not cause evaporation of the CO molecules prior to their photoprocessing.

  2. The enhancement of cosmic radio noise absorption due to hiss-driven energetic electron precipitation during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haimeng; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Wang, Dedong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Qiao, Zheng; Wygant, John R.

    2015-07-01

    The Van Allen probes, low-altitude NOAA satellite, MetOp satellite, and riometer are used to analyze variations of precipitating energetic electron fluxes and cosmic radio noise absorption (CNA) driven by plasmaspheric hiss with respect to geomagnetic activities. The hiss-driven energetic electron precipitations (at L ~ 4.7-5.3, magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 8-9) are observed during geomagnetic quiet condition and substorms, respectively. We find that the CNA detected by riometers increased very little in the hiss-driven event during quiet condition on 6 September 2012. The hiss-driven enhancement of riometer was still little during the first substorm on 30 September 2012. However, the absorption detected by the riometer largely increased, while the energies of the injected electrons became higher during the second substorm on 30 September 2012. The enhancement of CNA (ΔCNA) observed by the riometer and calculated with precipitating energetic electrons is in agreement during the second substorm, implying that the precipitating energetic electrons increase CNA to an obviously detectable level of the riometer during the second substorm on 30 September 2012. The conclusion is consistent with Rodger et al. (2012), which suggest that the higher level of ΔCNA prefers to occur in the substorms, because substorms may produce more intense energetic electron precipitation associated with electron injection. Furthermore, the combination of the observations and theory calculations also suggests that higher-energy electron (>55 keV) precipitation contributes more to the ΔCNA than the lower energy electron precipitation. In this paper, the higher-energy electron precipitation is related to lower frequency hiss.

  3. Relating Aerosol Absorption due to Soot, Organic Carbon, and Dust to Emission Sources Determined from In-situ Chemical Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cazorla, Alberto; Bahadur, R.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Cahill, John F.; Chand, Duli; Schmid, Beat; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-09-17

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies, and using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such an estimation. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) are used to develop a new methodology for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns are combined in order to validate the methodology for the estimation of aerosol composition using spectral optical properties. Results indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear. On the other hand, the knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  4. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong vs band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  5. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong n8 band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  6. Physiological roles of dietary glutamate signaling via gut-brain axis due to efficient digestion and absorption.

    PubMed

    Torii, Kunio; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Nakamura, Eiji

    2013-04-01

    Dietary glutamate (Glu) stimulates to evoke the umami taste, one of the five basic tastes, enhancing food palatability. But it is also the main gut energy source for the absorption and metabolism for each nutrient, thus, only a trace amount of Glu reaches the general circulation. Recently, we demonstrated a unique gut sensing system for free Glu (glutamate signaling). Glu is the only nutrient among amino acids, sugars and electrolytes that activates rat gastric vagal afferents from the luminal side specifically via metabotropic Glu receptors type 1 on mucosal cells releasing mucin and nitrite mono-oxide (NO), then NO stimulates serotonin (5HT) release at the enterochromaffin cell. Finally released 5HT stimulates 5HT3 receptor at the nerve end of the vagal afferent fiber. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI, 4.7 T) analysis revealed that luminal sensing with 1 % (w/v) monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) in rat stomach activates both the medial preoptic area (body temperature controller) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (basic metabolic regulator), resulting in diet-induced thermogenesis during mealing without changes of appetite for food. Interestingly, rats were forced to eat a high fat and high sugar diet with free access to 1 % (w/w) MSG and water in a choice paradigm and showed the strong preference for the MSG solution and subsequently, they displayed lower fat deposition, weight gain and blood leptin. On the other hand, these brain functional changes by the f-MRI signal after 60 mM MSG intubation into the stomach was abolished in the case of total vagotomized rats, suggesting that luminal glutamate signaling contributes to control digestion and thermogenesis without obesity. PMID:23463402

  7. Moderate-resolution spectroscopy of the lensed quasar 2237 + 0305 - A search for CA II absorption due to the interstellar medium in the foreground lensing galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Maran, Stephen P.; Michalitsianos, Andrew G.; Foltz, Craig B.; Chaffee, Frederic H., Jr.; Kafatos, Minas

    1990-01-01

    The gravitational lens system 2237+0305 consists of a low-redshift barred spiral galaxy (z = 0.0394) centered on a more distant quasar (z = 1.695). Because the lensing galaxy is nearly face on, spectroscopy of the background quasar affords a unique opportunity to study the interstellar medium in the galaxy's center and . We report moderate-resolution spectroscopy of QSO2237+0305 yielding a 3σ upper limit of 72 mÅ for the rest equivalent width of Ca II K absorption due to gas in the intervening galaxy. Since gas in the Milky Way "thick disk" typically produces 220 mÅ Ca II lines along lines of sight at high galactic latitude, while our line of sight to QSO 2237+0305 is effectively the weighted mean of four lines of sight, each of which transects an entire halo diameter in the lensing galaxy rather than just a radius, our Ca II upper limit argues against the presence of such a thick disk near the center of the lensing galaxy. Also, published studies indicate that at 8200 Å, QSO 2237+0305 suffers roughly 0.5 mag of extinction due to the leasing galaxy. Assuming a normal gas-to-dust ratio and allowing for various sources of uncertainty, this absorption estimate combined with our Ca II K upper limit implies that calcium is depleted with respect to hydrogen by at least 2.7-3.7 dex, compared to solar abundances. This depletion is similar to the more extreme cases seen in our own galaxy, and higher-dispersion observations may further decrease the upper limit on Ca II absorption.

  8. The first UV absorption band of l-tryptophan is not due to two simultaneous orthogonal electronic transitions differing in the dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Based on UV/Vis spectroscopic evidence obtained in this work, the first band in the absorption spectrum of l-tryptophan is largely due to a single electronic transition from the ground state to the (1)Lb excited state. However, emission spectra of this compound recorded at a variable temperature in ethanol, n-butanol and diethyl ether are structureless and considerably red-shifted at room temperature; also, lowering the temperature causes the emission to become structured and to undergo such a strong blue shift that it appears to be due to the (1)Lb state of the compound. Based on these findings, the formation (from the excited (1)Lb state) of the excited state responsible for the structureless, markedly red-shifted emission in l-tryptophan is strongly dependent not only on the viscosity of the medium, but also on its dipolarity. PMID:27197597

  9. A HIRES Detection of NA I D Absorption in the Spectrum of the QSO PKS 2020-370 Due to the Galaxy Klemola 31A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junkkarinen, V. T.; Barlow, T. A.

    1994-12-01

    By using the Keck telescope and HIRES spectrograph we have detected Na I D absorption lines in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 2020-370 (V = 17.5, z = 1.048) due to the galaxy Klemola 31A (z = 0.0288). The PKS 2020-370 line of sight is near an apparent spiral arm only 20" from the nucleus of Klemola 31A which corresponds to 17 kpc (H_o = 50 km s(-1) Mpc(-1) ). The spectrum of PKS 2020-370 has strong Ca II absorption lines (W_λ ~ 350 m Angstroms \\ for the K line) at the galaxy redshift (Boksenberg et al, 1980, ApJ, 242, L145), but previous attempts to detect Na I have resulted in upper limits (Boisse et al. 1988, A&A, 191, 193, Womble, 1992, thesis UCSD). We observed PKS 2020-370 with HIRES in May 1994 at a resolution of 8 km s(-1) FWHM for a total of 90 minutes. The Na I D doublet is detected with a total W_λ for the Na I 5891.6 Angstroms \\ (vac) absorption line of about 160 m Angstroms . The absorption appears as two main velocity components separated by 23 km s(-1) . The optically thin estimate for N(Na I) = 1.0 times 10(12) cm(-2) gives an estimated N(Ca II)/N(Na I) = 5. This value suggests that the gas in Klemola 31A along the QSO line of sight is ``halo like''. Along ``disk like'' lines of sight where Ca is thought to be depleted onto grains in our Galaxy, the N(Ca II)/N(Na I) ratio is usually small (<= 1). Other QSO--galaxy pairs often show disk like N(Ca II)/N(Na I) ratios when the line of sight intersects starlight at 25 mag per sq. arcsec (Womble, 1992 thesis UCSD). The PKS 2020-370 sightline is near the optical extent of Klemola 31A but the N(Ca II)/N(Na I) is consistent with the sightline passing through two clouds in the halo. This research has been supported in part by NASA NAS5--29293 and NAG5--1630.

  10. Multimodal tissue imaging: using coregistered optical tomography data to estimate tissue autofluorescence intensity change due to scattering and absorption by neoplastic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Cecic, Ivana; Lee, Anthony M D; Kyle, Alastair H; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre M

    2013-10-01

    Autofluorescence (AF) imaging provides valuable information about the structural and chemical states of tissue that can be used for early cancer detection. Optical scattering and absorption of excitation and emission light by the epithelium can significantly affect observed tissue AF intensity. Determining the effect of epithelial attenuation on the AF intensity could lead to a more accurate interpretation of AF intensity. We propose to use optical coherence tomography coregistered with AF imaging to characterize the AF attenuation due to the epithelium. We present imaging results from three vital tissue models, each consisting of a three-dimensional tissue culture grown from one of three epithelial cell lines (HCT116, OVCAR8, and MCF7) and immobilized on a fluorescence substrate. The AF loss profiles in the tissue layer show two different regimes, each approximately linearly decreasing with thickness. For thin cell cultures (<300 μm), the AF signal changes as AF(t)/AF(0)=1-1.3t (t is the thickness in millimeter). For thick cell cultures (>400 μm), the AF loss profiles have different intercepts but similar slopes. The data presented here can be used to estimate AF loss due to a change in the epithelial layer thickness and potentially to reduce AF bronchoscopy false positives due to inflammation and non-neoplastic epithelial thickening. PMID:24108573

  11. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Q. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.

  12. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  13. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-21

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues. PMID:24002053

  14. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  15. Peak Ring Craters and Multiring Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding of the mechanics of peak-ring crater and basin formation has expanded greatly due to the high precision data on lunar gravity from GRAIL. Peak rings coincide with the edges of underlying mantle uplifts on the Moon.

  16. Detection of a z=0.0515, 0.0522 absorption system in the QSO S4 0248+430 due to an intervening galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womble, Donna S.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Cohen, Ross D.; Burbidge, E. Margaret

    1990-01-01

    In some of the few cases where the line of sight to a Quasi-Stellar Object (QSO) passes near a galaxy, the galaxy redshift is almost identical to an absorption redshift in the spectrum of the QSO. Although these relatively low redshift QSO-galaxy pairs may not be typical of the majority of the narrow heavy-element QSO absorption systems, they provide a direct measure of column densities in the outer parts of galaxies and some limits on the relative abundances of the gas. Observations are presented here of the QSO S4 0248+430 and a nearby anonymous galaxy (Kuhr 1977). The 14 second separation of the line of sight to the QSO (z sub e = 1.316) and the z=0.052 spiral galaxy, (a projected separation of 20 kpc ((h sub o = 50, q sub o = 0)), makes this a particularly suitable pair for probing the extent and content of gas in the galaxy. Low resolution (6A full width half maximum), long slit charge coupled device (CCD) spectra show strong CA II H and K lines in absorption at the redshift of the galaxy (Junkkarinen 1987). Higher resolution spectra showing both Ca II H and K and Na I D1 and D2 in absorption and direct images are reported here.

  17. Enhanced photoluminescence due to two-photon enhanced three-photon absorption in Mn{sup 2+}-doped ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Subha, Radhu; Nalla, Venkatram; Ji, Wei; Feng, Xiaobo; Vijayan, C.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we have investigated the multi-photon absorption induced photoluminescence in Mn{sup 2+}-doped ZnS quantum dots in the wavelength range 860 – 1050 nm (Near-Infrared Window I). The observed three-photon action cross-section has been compared with the theoretical prediction under four band approximation. An enhancement of four to five orders has been observed in the range from 970 to 1050 nm compared to the theoretical value, which is attributed to two-photon enhanced three-photon absorption. Transient lifetime measurements reveal a lifetime of 0.35 ± 0.3 ms, which is four to five orders higher than other conventional fluorescent probes.

  18. Bias in Dobson total ozone measurements at high latitudes due to approximations in calculations of ozone absorption coefficients and air mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhard, G.; Evans, R. D.; Labow, G. J.; Oltmans, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The Dobson spectrophotometer is the primary standard instrument for ground-based measurements of total column ozone. The accuracy of its data depends on the knowledge of ozone absorption coefficients used for data reduction. We document an error in the calculations that led to the set of absorption coefficients currently recommended by the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO). This error has little effect because an empirical adjustment was applied to the original calculations before the coefficients were adopted by WMO. We provide evidence that this adjustment was physically sound. The coefficients recommended by WMO are applied in the Dobson network without correction for the temperature dependence of the ozone absorption cross sections. On the basis of data measured by Dobson numbers 80 and 82, which were operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory at the South Pole, we find that omission of temperature corrections may lead to systematic errors in Dobson ozone data of up to 4%. The standard Dobson ozone retrieval method further assumes that the ozone layer is located at a fixed height. This approximation leads to errors in air mass calculations, which are particularly relevant at high latitudes where ozone measurements are performed at large solar zenith angles (SZA). At the South Pole, systematic errors caused by this approximation may exceed 2% for SZAs larger than 80°. The bias is largest when the vertical ozone distribution is distorted by the "ozone hole" and may lead to underestimation of total ozone by 4% at SZA = 85° (air mass 9). Dobson measurements at the South Pole were compared with ozone data from a collocated SUV-100 UV spectroradiometer and Version 8 overpass data from NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS). Uncorrected Dobson ozone values tend to be lower than data from the two other instruments when total ozone is below 170 Dobson units or SZAs are larger than

  19. Effects of thermophoresis and heat generation/absorption on MHD flow due to an oscillatory stretching sheet with chemically reactive species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh, Mariam; Abbas, Zaheer

    2015-12-01

    The effects of chemical reaction and heat generation/absorption on MHD flow over an oscillatory stretching surface in a viscous fluid have been studied in the presence of thermophoresis. The porous plate is oscillated back and forth in its own plane and suction/injection is also taking into account. The similarity solution of the developed non-linear governing partial differential equations is constructed in the form of series using homotopy analysis method. The convergence of the obtained series solutions is discussed in the whole domain (0 ≤ η ≤ ∞) . A parametric study of the all governing parameters is accomplished and the physical results are shown graphically.

  20. Impaired Intestinal Calcium Absorption in Protein 4.1R-deficient Mice Due to Altered Expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase 1b (PMCA1b)*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Congrong; Weng, Haibao; Chen, Lixiang; Yang, Shaomin; Wang, Hua; Debnath, Gargi; Guo, Xinhua; Wu, Liancheng; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli

    2013-01-01

    Protein 4.1R was first identified in the erythrocyte membrane skeleton. It is now known that the protein is expressed in a variety of epithelial cell lines and in the epithelia of many tissues, including the small intestine. However, the physiological function of 4.1R in the epithelial cells of the small intestine has not so far been explored. Here, we show that 4.1R knock-out mice exhibited a significantly impaired small intestinal calcium absorption that resulted in secondary hyperparathyroidism as evidenced by increased serum 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone levels, decreased serum calcium levels, hyperplasia of the parathyroid, and demineralization of the bones. 4.1R is located on the basolateral membrane of enterocytes, where it co-localizes with PMCA1b (plasma membrane calcium ATPase 1b). Expression of PMCA1b in enterocytes was decreased in 4.1−/− mice. 4.1R directly associated with PMCA1b, and the association involved the membrane-binding domain of 4.1R and the second intracellular loop and C terminus of PMCA1b. Our findings have enabled us to define a functional role for 4.1R in small intestinal calcium absorption through regulation of membrane expression of PMCA1b. PMID:23460639

  1. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  2. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  3. Photovoltaic enhancement due to surface-plasmon assisted visible-light absorption at the inartificial surface of lead zirconate-titanate film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Fengang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Wen; Zhang, Jinxing; Shen, Mingrong; Dong, Wen; Fang, Liang; Bai, Yongbin; Shen, Xiaoqing; Sun, Hua; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-02-01

    PZT film of 300 nm thickness was deposited on tin indium oxide (ITO) coated quartz by a sol-gel method. Four metal electrodes, such as Pt, Au, Cu and Ag, were used as top electrodes deposited on the same PZT film by sputtering at room temperature. In ITO-PZT-Ag and ITO-PZT-Au structures, the visible light (400-700 nm) can be absorbed partially by a PZT film, and the maximum efficiency of photoelectric conversion of the ITO-PZT-Ag structure was enhanced to 0.42% (100 mW cm-2, AM 1.5G), which is about 15 times higher than that of the ITO-PZT-Pt structure. Numerical simulations show that the natural random roughness of polycrystalline-PZT-metal interface can offer a possibility of coupling between the incident photons and SPs at the metal surface. The coincidence between the calculated SP properties and the measured EQE spectra reveals the SP origin of the photovoltaic enhancement in these ITO-PZT-metal structures, and the improved photocurrent output is caused by the enhanced optical absorption in the PZT region near the metal surface, rather than by the direct charge-transfer process between two materials.PZT film of 300 nm thickness was deposited on tin indium oxide (ITO) coated quartz by a sol-gel method. Four metal electrodes, such as Pt, Au, Cu and Ag, were used as top electrodes deposited on the same PZT film by sputtering at room temperature. In ITO-PZT-Ag and ITO-PZT-Au structures, the visible light (400-700 nm) can be absorbed partially by a PZT film, and the maximum efficiency of photoelectric conversion of the ITO-PZT-Ag structure was enhanced to 0.42% (100 mW cm-2, AM 1.5G), which is about 15 times higher than that of the ITO-PZT-Pt structure. Numerical simulations show that the natural random roughness of polycrystalline-PZT-metal interface can offer a possibility of coupling between the incident photons and SPs at the metal surface. The coincidence between the calculated SP properties and the measured EQE spectra reveals the SP origin of the

  4. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  5. Magneto-thermoelectric effects in the two-dimensional electron gas of a HgTe quantum well due to THz laser heating by cyclotron resonance absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Bruene, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens; McCombe, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    HgTe quantum wells (QWs) have shown a number of interesting phenomena over the past 20 years, most recently the first two-dimensional topological insulating state. We have studied thermoelectric photovoltages of 2D electrons in a 6.1 nm wide HgTe quantum well induced by cyclotron resonance absorption (B = 2 - 5 T) of a focused THz laser beam. We have estimated thermo-power coefficients by detailed analysis of the beam profile at the sample surface and the photovoltage signals developed across various contacts of a large Hall bar structure at a bath temperature of 1.6 K. We obtain reasonable values of the magneto-thermopower coefficients. Work at UB was supported by NSF DMR 1008138 and the Office of the Provost, and at the University of Wuerzburg by DARPA MESO Contract N6601-11-1-4105, by DFG Grant HA5893/4-1 within SPP 1666 and the Leibnitz Program, and the EU ERC-AG Program (Project 3-TOP.

  6. Photovoltaic enhancement due to surface-plasmon assisted visible-light absorption at the inartificial surface of lead zirconate-titanate film.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fengang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Wen; Zhang, Jinxing; Shen, Mingrong; Dong, Wen; Fang, Liang; Bai, Yongbin; Shen, Xiaoqing; Sun, Hua; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-03-01

    PZT film of 300 nm thickness was deposited on tin indium oxide (ITO) coated quartz by a sol-gel method. Four metal electrodes, such as Pt, Au, Cu and Ag, were used as top electrodes deposited on the same PZT film by sputtering at room temperature. In ITO-PZT-Ag and ITO-PZT-Au structures, the visible light (400-700 nm) can be absorbed partially by a PZT film, and the maximum efficiency of photoelectric conversion of the ITO-PZT-Ag structure was enhanced to 0.42% (100 mW cm(-2), AM 1.5G), which is about 15 times higher than that of the ITO-PZT-Pt structure. Numerical simulations show that the natural random roughness of polycrystalline-PZT-metal interface can offer a possibility of coupling between the incident photons and SPs at the metal surface. The coincidence between the calculated SP properties and the measured EQE spectra reveals the SP origin of the photovoltaic enhancement in these ITO-PZT-metal structures, and the improved photocurrent output is caused by the enhanced optical absorption in the PZT region near the metal surface, rather than by the direct charge-transfer process between two materials. PMID:24477668

  7. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  8. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  9. Osteopetrorickets due to Snx10 Deficiency in Mice Results from Both Failed Osteoclast Activity and Loss of Gastric Acid-Dependent Calcium Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Liang; Morse, Leslie R.; Zhang, Li; Sasaki, Hajime; Mills, Jason C.; Odgren, Paul R.; Sibbel, Greg; Stanley, James R. L.; Wong, Gee; Zamarioli, Ariane; Battaglino, Ricardo A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in sorting nexin 10 (Snx10) have recently been found to account for roughly 4% of all human malignant osteopetrosis, some of them fatal. To study the disease pathogenesis, we investigated the expression of Snx10 and created mouse models in which Snx10 was knocked down globally or knocked out in osteoclasts. Endocytosis is severely defective in Snx10-deficent osteoclasts, as is extracellular acidification, ruffled border formation, and bone resorption. We also discovered that Snx10 is highly expressed in stomach epithelium, with mutations leading to high stomach pH and low calcium solubilization. Global Snx10-deficiency in mice results in a combined phenotype: osteopetrosis (due to osteoclast defect) and rickets (due to high stomach pH and low calcium availability, resulting in impaired bone mineralization). Osteopetrorickets, the paradoxical association of insufficient mineralization in the context of a positive total body calcium balance, is thought to occur due to the inability of the osteoclasts to maintain normal calcium–phosphorus homeostasis. However, osteoclast-specific Snx10 knockout had no effect on calcium balance, and therefore led to severe osteopetrosis without rickets. Moreover, supplementation with calcium gluconate rescued mice from the rachitic phenotype and dramatically extended life span in global Snx10-deficient mice, suggesting that this may be a life-saving component of the clinical approach to Snx10-dependent human osteopetrosis that has previously gone unrecognized. We conclude that tissue-specific effects of Snx10 mutation need to be considered in clinical approaches to this disease entity. Reliance solely on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation can leave hypocalcemia uncorrected with sometimes fatal consequences. These studies established an essential role for Snx10 in bone homeostasis and underscore the importance of gastric acidification in calcium uptake. PMID:25811986

  10. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  11. Plasmonic nature of the terahertz conductivity peak in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Hároz, Erik H; Jin, Zehua; Ren, Lei; Wang, Xuan; Arvidson, Rolf S; Lüttge, Andreas; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    Plasmon resonance is expected to occur in metallic and doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the terahertz frequency range, but its convincing identification has so far been elusive. The origin of the terahertz conductivity peak commonly observed for carbon nanotube ensembles remains controversial. Here we present results of optical, terahertz, and direct current (DC) transport measurements on highly enriched metallic and semiconducting nanotube films. A broad and strong terahertz conductivity peak appears in both types of films, whose behaviors are consistent with the plasmon resonance explanation, firmly ruling out other alternative explanations such as absorption due to curvature-induced gaps. PMID:24224898

  12. Hale Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the mountains that make up the central peak region of Hale Crater, located near 35.8oS, 36.5oW. Dark, smooth-surfaced sand dunes are seen to be climbing up the mountainous slopes. The central peak of a crater consists of rock brought up during the impact from below the crater floor. This autumn image is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  13. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  14. The effect of different particle sizes of polyethylene on the absorption of myrrh in mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Bin; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Cunlin

    2015-08-01

    Terahertz radiation lies between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Absorption spectra of different mass ratio of the myrrh and polyethylene can be gained by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in this paper. It is found that absorption spectra show a slight red-shift with the decrease of the mass ratio of myrrh and polyethylene. On the other hand, different particle sizes of polyethylene (PE) mixed with myrrh absorption spectra were measured. Due to the different sizes of polyethylene particles, there are some differences in the vibration peak intensity, peak position and peak numbers in the absorption spectra. The experimental results show that the scattering effect leads to this phenomenon.

  15. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  16. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  17. Peak of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    In three studies, we explore the existence of an evolved sensitivity to the peak as consistent with the evolutionary origins of many of our basic preferences. Activating the evolved motive of mating activates related adaptive mechanisms, including a general sensitivity to cues of growth and decay associated with determining mate value in human courtship. We establish that priming the mating goal also activates as well an evaluative bias that influences how people evaluate cues of growth. Specifically, living kinds that are immature or past their prime are devalued, whereas living kinds at their peak become increasingly valued. Study 1 establishes this goal-driven effect for human stimuli indirectly related to the mating goal. Studies 2 and 3 establish that the evaluative bias produced by the active mating goal extends to living kinds but not artifacts. PMID:18578847

  18. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  19. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  20. Terbium chloride--aluminum chloride vapor system. I. Absorption and excitation spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Caird, J.A.; Carnall, W.T.; Hessler, J.P.; Williams, C.W.

    1981-01-15

    The absorption spectrum of the vapor complex formed at elevated temperatures between TbCl/sub 3/ and AlCl/sub 3/ has been measured in the region 20 000--50 000 cm/sup -1/. Oscillator strengths of f--f absorption bands below 37 000 cm/sup -1/ were determined. Strong absorption due to opposite parity 4f/sup 7/5d states was observed in the 37 000 to 50 000 cm/sup -1/ region with a peak molar absorptivity of approximately 500 l/mol cm. Significant additional absorption attributed to a molecular complex was also observed in this region. By measuring the excitation spectrum it was found that the molecular absorption does not appear to lead to fluorescence of the /sup 5/D/sub 4/ state. In contrast, absorption by the 4f/sup 7/5d states does result in strong /sup 5/D/sub 4/ fluorescence.

  1. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  2. Effects of fictive temperature and halogen doping on the boson peak in silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimodaira, N.; Saito, K.; Hiramitsu, N.; Matsushita, S.; Ikushima, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of structural disorder on the boson peak in the Raman scattering of silica glass. The structural disorder was controlled in two ways: fictive temperature (Tf) and concentration of doped halogen element (F or Cl). As results, it has been simply demonstrated from nonreduced Raman spectra that (1) the peak position and full width at half maximum of the boson peak linearly increase with increasing Tf irrespective of the halogen concentrations, and in contrast, (2) the intensity is rather strongly dependent on the halogen concentrations than Tf . Since the result in (1) is much similar to the dependence on Tf and fluorine concentration for the IR absorption around 2260cm-1 , it has been concluded that the boson peak in silica glass is microscopically related to the average magnitude and distribution of Si-O-Si bond angles in glass network. The intensity enhancement in (2) has suggested two possibilities about the contribution of the doped halogen element to the boson peak: One is a direct contribution of F or Cl atoms due to diffusive motions falling within the range of the boson peak. The other is an indirect contribution introduced by the termination of Si-O-Si bridges to some sort of vibrational motions, which may be related to the boson peak.

  3. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  4. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  5. Growth of Au nanoparticle films and the effect of nanoparticle shape on plasmon peak wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Horikoshi, S. Matsumoto, N.; Kato, T.; Omata, Y.

    2014-05-21

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and thus have potential for use in a wide range of applications. A facile technique for the preparation of NP films using an electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma sputtering method without a dewetting process is described. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observations revealed that the Au NPs grew independently as island-like particles during the first stage of sputtering and then coalesced with one another as sputtering time increased to ultimately form a continuous film. A plasmon absorption peak was observed via optical measurement of absorption efficiency. The LSPR peak shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) with an increase in sputtering time. The cause of this plasmon peak shift was theoretically investigated using the finite-difference time-domain calculation method. A realistic statistical distribution of the particle shapes based on FE-SEM observations was applied for the analysis, which has not been previously reported. It was determined that the change in the shape of the NPs from spheroidal to oval or slender due to coalescence with neighbouring NPs caused the LSPR peak shift. These results may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling the characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as their size, shape, number density, and coverage.

  6. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Checking your peak flow is one of the best ways to control your asthma and to keep it from getting worse. Asthma attacks ... Most times, they build slowly. Checking your peak flow can tell you if an attack is coming, ...

  7. Investigation on optical absorption properties of ion irradiated single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vishalli, Dharamvir, Keya; Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Jeet, Kiran

    2015-08-28

    In the present study change in the optical absorption properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under nickel ion (60 MeV) irradiation at various fluences has been investigated. Langmuir Blodgett technique is used to deposit SWCNT thin film of uniform thickness. AFM analysis shows a network of interconnected bundles of nanotubes. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra indicate that the sample mainly contain SWCNTs of semiconducting nature. It has been found in absorption spectra that there is decrease in the intensity of the characteristic SWCNT peaks with increase in fluence. At fluence value 1×10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} there is almost complete suppression of the characteristic SWCNTs peaks.The decrease in the optical absorption with increase in fluence is due to the increase in the disorder in the system which leads to the decrease in optically active states.

  8. Effects of thermal motion on electromagnetically induced absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tilchin, E.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Firstenberg, O.

    2011-05-15

    We describe the effect of thermal motion and buffer-gas collisions on a four-level closed N system interacting with strong pump(s) and a weak probe. This is the simplest system that experiences electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) due to transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited state to the ground state. We investigate the influence of Doppler broadening, velocity-changing collisions (VCC), and phase-changing collisions (PCC) with a buffer gas on the EIA spectrum of optically active atoms. In addition to exact expressions, we present an approximate solution for the probe absorption spectrum, which provides physical insight into the behavior of the EIA peak due to VCC, PCC, and the wave-vector difference between the pump and probe beams. VCC are shown to produce a wide pedestal at the base of the EIA peak, which is scarcely affected by the pump-probe angular deviation, whereas the sharp central EIA peak becomes weaker and broader due to the residual Doppler-Dicke effect. Using diffusionlike equations for the atomic coherences and populations, we construct a spatial-frequency filter for a spatially structured probe beam and show that Ramsey narrowing of the EIA peak is obtained for beams of finite width.

  9. Tectonics, Climate and Earth's highest peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Prominent peaks characterized by high relief and steep slopes are among the most spectacular morphological features on Earth. In collisional orogens they result from the interplay of tectonically driven crustal thickening and climatically induced destruction of overthickened crust by erosional surface processes. The glacial buzz-saw hypothesis proposes a superior status of climate in limiting mountain relief and peak altitude due to glacial erosion. It implies that peak altitude declines with duration of glacial occupation, i.e., towards high latitudes. This is in strong contrast with high peaks existing in high latitude mountain ranges (e.g. Mt. St. Elias range) and the idea of peak uplift due to isostatic compensation of spatially variable erosional unloading an over-thickened orogenic crust. In this study we investigate landscape dissection, crustal thickness and vertical strain rates in tectonically active mountain ranges to evaluate the influence of erosion on (latitudinal) variations in peak altitude. We analyze the spatial distribution of serval thousand prominent peaks on Earth extracted from the global ETOPO1 digital elevation model with a novel numerical tool. We compare this dataset to crustal thickness, thickening rate (vertical strain rate) and mean elevation. We use the ratios of mean elevation to peak elevation (landscape dissection) and peak elevation to crustal thickness (long-term impact of erosion on crustal thickness) as indicators for the influence of erosional surface processes on peak uplift and the vertical strain rate as a proxy for the mechanical state of the orogen. Our analysis reveals that crustal thickness and peak elevation correlate well in orogens that have reached a mechanically limited state (vertical strain rate near zero) where plate convergence is already balanced by lateral extrusion and gravitational collapse and plateaus are formed. On the Tibetan Plateau crustal thickness serves to predict peak elevation up to an altitude

  10. Multiband microwave absorption films based on defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes added carbonyl iron/acrylic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Ni, Yuwei; Zhang, Song; Huang, Jie; Chen, Da; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-05-01

    Defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were introduced to the carbonyl iron (CI) based composites to improve its microwave absorption by a simple ultrasonic mixing process. The electromagnetic parameters were measured in the 2-18 GHz range. Microwave absorption of CI based composites with 2 mm in thickness was evidently enhanced by adding as little as 1.0 wt% defective MWCNTs with two well separated absorption peaks exceeding -20 dB, as compared with that of pure CI based and defective MWCNTs composites. The enhancement mechanism is thought due to the interaction and better electromagnetic match between defective MWCNTs and ferromagnetic CI particles.

  11. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  12. Decoupling approximation design using the peak to peak gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Linear system design for accurate decoupling approximation is examined using the peak to peak gain of the error system. The design problem consists in finding values of system parameters to ensure that this gain is small. For this purpose a computationally inexpensive upper bound on the peak to peak gain, namely the star norm, is minimized using a stochastic method. Examples of the methodology's application to tensegrity structures design are presented. Connections between the accuracy of the approximation, the damping matrix, and the natural frequencies of the system are examined, as well as decoupling in the context of open and closed loop control.

  13. Paleomagnetism of the Becker Peak stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. A.; Housen, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of plutonic rocks, although subject to uncertainty due to lack of paleohorizontal control, can provide important constrains of patterns of regional deformation, and can play a role in evaluation of tectonic models and reconstructions. Many plutonic rocks of the Cascades have been well-studied via paleomagnetism, but there are many that lack robust data sets. One such pluton, the Beckler Peak stock, is a late Cretaceous tonalitic stock, with biotite and amphibole K-Ar ages of 93 to 82 Ma (Engels and Crowder, 1971, Yeats and Engels, 1971). The Beckler Peak stock is considered to be a companion body to the larger Mt. Stuart Batholith, but is separated from the Mt. Stuart Batholith by the Evergreen Fault. For this study five paleomagnetic sites were sampled from the Beckler Peak stock near Skykomish, Washington. After low temperature and thermal demagnetization site means were calculated for the four sites where at least two samples survived demagnetization. Unblocking temperatures were indicative of magnetite and hematite as the carriers of remanence. Two of the site means were disregarded due to anomalous directions likely due to sites being from very large slump blocks. The two acceptable site means, along with a Beckler Peak stock site mean from Beck and Noson (1972) and another from Housen et al. (2003) give a stock-wide mean of D = 3.8°, I = 41.9°, k = 32.9, and α95 = 16.2°. This direction is consistent with mean directions for the Mount Stuart batholith determined by Beck and Noson (1972), Beck et al. (1981), and Housen et al. (2003). This directional consistency supports an association between the Beckler Peak stock and the Mt. Stuart Batholith, or at least that these two plutonic bodies were emplaced in the same structural block, and that any post-magnetization deformation (such as rotation and/or tilt associated with the Evergreen Fault) between the Beckler Peak stock and the Mt. Stuart Batholith was minor.

  14. Propagation, beam geometry, and detection distortions of peak shapes in two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra.

    PubMed

    Yetzbacher, Michael K; Belabas, Nadia; Kitney, Katherine A; Jonas, David M

    2007-01-28

    Using a solution of Maxwell's equations in the three-dimensional frequency domain, femtosecond two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectra that include distortions due to phase matching, absorption, dispersion, and noncollinear excitation and detection of the signal are calculated for Bloch, Kubo, and Brownian oscillator relaxation models. For sample solutions longer than a wavelength, the resonant propagation distortions are larger than resonant local field distortions by a factor of approximately L/lambda, where L is the sample thickness and lambda is the optical wavelength. For the square boxcars geometry, the phase-matching distortion is usually least important, and depends on the dimensionless parameter, L sin(2)(beta)Deltaomega/(nc), where beta is the half angle between beams, n is the refractive index, c is the speed of light, and Deltaomega is the width of the spectrum. Directional filtering distortions depend on the dimensionless parameter, [(Deltaomega)w(0) sin(beta)/c](2), where w(0) is the beam waist at the focus. Qualitatively, the directional filter discriminates against off diagonal amplitude. Resonant absorption and dispersion can distort 2D spectra by 10% (20%) at a peak optical density of 0.1 (0.2). Complicated distortions of the 2DFT peak shape due to absorption and dispersion can be corrected to within 10% (15%) by simple operations that require knowledge only of the linear optical properties of the sample and the distorted two-dimensional spectrum measured at a peak optical density of up to 0.5 (1). PMID:17286491

  15. Propagation, beam geometry, and detection distortions of peak shapes in two-dimensional Fourier transform spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetzbacher, Michael K.; Belabas, Nadia; Kitney, Katherine A.; Jonas, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Using a solution of Maxwell's equations in the three-dimensional frequency domain, femtosecond two-dimensional Fourier transform (2DFT) spectra that include distortions due to phase matching, absorption, dispersion, and noncollinear excitation and detection of the signal are calculated for Bloch, Kubo, and Brownian oscillator relaxation models. For sample solutions longer than a wavelength, the resonant propagation distortions are larger than resonant local field distortions by a factor of ˜L/λ, where L is the sample thickness and λ is the optical wavelength. For the square boxcars geometry, the phase-matching distortion is usually least important, and depends on the dimensionless parameter, Lsin2(β )Δω/(nc), where β is the half angle between beams, n is the refractive index, c is the speed of light, and Δω is the width of the spectrum. Directional filtering distortions depend on the dimensionless parameter, [(Δω )w0sin(β)/c]2, where w0 is the beam waist at the focus. Qualitatively, the directional filter discriminates against off diagonal amplitude. Resonant absorption and dispersion can distort 2D spectra by 10% (20%) at a peak optical density of 0.1 (0.2). Complicated distortions of the 2DFT peak shape due to absorption and dispersion can be corrected to within 10% (15%) by simple operations that require knowledge only of the linear optical properties of the sample and the distorted two-dimensional spectrum measured at a peak optical density of up to 0.5 (1).

  16. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  17. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  18. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications. PMID:23435006

  19. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  20. Nasal peak inspiratory flow at altitude.

    PubMed

    Barry, P W; Mason, N P; Richalet, J P

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated whether there are changes in nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) during hypobaric hypoxia under controlled environmental conditions. During operation Everest III (COMEX '97), eight subjects ascended to a simulated altitude of 8,848 m in a hypobaric chamber. NPIF was recorded at simulated altitudes of 0 m, 5,000 m and 8,000 m. Oral peak inspiratory and expiratory flow (OPIF, OPEF) were also measured. Ambient air temperature and humidity were controlled. NPIF increased by a mean +/- SD of 16 +/- 12% from sea level to 8,000 m, whereas OPIF increased by 47 +/- 14%. NPIF rose by 0.085 +/- 0.03 L x s(-1) per kilometre of ascent (p<0.05), significantly less than the rise in OPIF and OPEF of 0.35 +/- 0.10 and 0.33 +/- 0.04 L x s(-1) per kilometre (p<0.0005). Nasal peak inspiratory flow rises with ascent to altitude. The rise in nasal peak inspiratory flow with altitude was far less than oral peak inspiratory flow and less than the predicted rise according to changes in air density. This suggests flow limitation at the nose, and occurs under controlled environmental conditions, refuting the hypothesis that nasal blockage at altitude is due to the inhalation of cold, dry air. Further work is needed to determine if nasal blockage limits activity at altitude. PMID:11843316

  1. Visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Edward T.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    1981-01-01

    The visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene at ≈ 108 K from 5500 Å to 7200 Å was measured by using a pulsed tunable dye laser, immersed-transducer, gated-detection opto-acoustic spectroscopy technique. The absorption features show the strongest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈2 × 10-2 cm-1 and the weakest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈1 × 10-4 cm-1. Proposed assignments of the observed absorption peaks involve combinations of overtones of local and normal modes of vibration of ethylene. PMID:16592978

  2. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  3. Hubbert's Peak: A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Oil and its by-products, as used in manufacturing, agriculture, and transportation, are the lifeblood of today's 7 billion-person population and our 65T world economy. Despite this importance, estimates of future oil production seem dominated by wishful thinking rather than quantitative analysis. Better studies are needed. In 1956, Dr. M.King Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Thus, the peak of oil production is referred to as ``Hubbert's Peak.'' Prof. Al Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on population and oil. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. This paper extends this line of work to include analyses of individual countries, inclusion of multiple Gaussian peaks, and analysis of reserves data. While this is not strictly a predictive theory, we will demonstrate a ``closed'' story connecting production, oil-in-place, and reserves. This gives us the ``most likely'' estimate of future oil availability. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  4. Absorption spectra of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; Wu, M. F.; Hsieh, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The low-frequency optical absorption properties of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field are investigated by using the gradient approximation. The spectral function exhibits symmetric delta-function like prominent peaks structure in a uniform magnetic field, and changes to asymmetric square-root divergent peaks structure when subjecting to a composite field. These asymmetric divergent peaks can be further classified into principal and secondary peaks. The spectral intensity and frequency of the absorption peaks depend sensitively on the strength and modulation period of the composite field. The transition channels of the absorption peaks are also analyzed. There exists an optical selection rule which is caused by the orthogonal properties of the sublattice wave functions. The evolution of the spectral frequency of the absorption peaks with the field strength is explored.

  5. Stochastic acceleration in peaked spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zasenko, V.; Zagorodny, A.; Weiland, J.

    2005-06-15

    Diffusion in velocity space of test particles undergoing external random electric fields with spectra varying from low intensive and broad to high intensive and narrow (peaked) is considered. It is shown that to achieve consistency between simulation and prediction of the microscopic model, which is reduced to Fokker-Planck-type equation, it is necessary, in the case of peaked spectrum, to account for temporal variation of diffusion coefficient occurring in the early stage. An analytical approximation for the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with a time and velocity dependent diffusion coefficients is proposed.

  6. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  7. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  8. Peak Stress Testing Protocol Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of peak flows during wet weather is a common challenge across the country for municipal wastewater utilities with separate and/or combined sewer systems. Increases in wastewater flow resulting from infiltration and inflow (I/I) during wet weather events can result in op...

  9. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  10. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  11. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  12. Study on peak shape fitting method in radon progeny measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinmin; Zhang, Lei; Abdumomin, Kadir; Tang, Yushi; Guo, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    Alpha spectrum measurement is one of the most important methods to measure radon progeny concentration in environment. However, the accuracy of this method is affected by the peak tailing due to the energy losses of alpha particles. This article presents a peak shape fitting method that can overcome the peak tailing problem in most situations. On a typical measured alpha spectrum curve, consecutive peaks overlap even their energies are not close to each other, and it is difficult to calculate the exact count of each peak. The peak shape fitting method uses combination of Gaussian and exponential functions, which can depict features of those peaks, to fit the measured curve. It can provide net counts of each peak explicitly, which was used in the Kerr method of calculation procedure for radon progeny concentration measurement. The results show that the fitting curve fits well with the measured curve, and the influence of the peak tailing is reduced. The method was further validated by the agreement between radon equilibrium equivalent concentration based on this method and the measured values of some commercial radon monitors, such as EQF3220 and WLx. In addition, this method improves the accuracy of individual radon progeny concentration measurement. Especially for the (218)Po peak, after eliminating the peak tailing influence, the calculated result of (218)Po concentration has been reduced by 21 %. PMID:25920795

  13. Impact of intermediate localized states on nonlinear optical absorption of Ga-Ge-Se nanocolloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Indu; Divya, S.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Thomas, Sheenu

    2013-01-01

    We present the linear and nonlinear optical studies on nanocolloidal solutions of Ga9Ge27Se64 glass with varying concentrations. Optical bandgap of the material is found to vary with respect to the concentration of the solute in the solution. An intermediate peak in the band tail of the absorption spectra is observed due to the presence of energy band in the forbidden gap. The existence of fluorescence emission confirms the above argument. Nonlinear absorption is studied using open aperture Z-scan technique. The mechanism behind nonlinear absorption is predicted as two photon as well as two step photon absorption. Nonlinearity increases with decrease in optical bandgap which in turn depends on the concentration of the nanocolloidal solutions.

  14. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M.

    2013-02-07

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  15. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M.

    2013-02-01

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above ˜50 MW/cm2. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  16. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOEpatents

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  17. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  18. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon. PMID:16400712

  19. [Fast spectral modeling based on Voigt peaks].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-rong; Dai, Lian-kui

    2012-03-01

    Indirect hard modeling (IHM) is a recently introduced method for quantitative spectral analysis, which was applied to the analysis of nonlinear relation between mixture spectrum and component concentration. In addition, IHM is an effectual technology for the analysis of components of mixture with molecular interactions and strongly overlapping bands. Before the establishment of regression model, IHM needs to model the measured spectrum as a sum of Voigt peaks. The precision of the spectral model has immediate impact on the accuracy of the regression model. A spectrum often includes dozens or even hundreds of Voigt peaks, which mean that spectral modeling is a optimization problem with high dimensionality in fact. So, large operation overhead is needed and the solution would not be numerically unique due to the ill-condition of the optimization problem. An improved spectral modeling method is presented in the present paper, which reduces the dimensionality of optimization problem by determining the overlapped peaks in spectrum. Experimental results show that the spectral modeling based on the new method is more accurate and needs much shorter running time than conventional method. PMID:22582612

  20. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  1. Dual-peak dose measurement for radiochromic films by a newly developed spectral microdensitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Fung, K.K.L.; Kwok, C.S.

    2005-06-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry is usually based on densitometric methods which use an analyzing light source of a fixed or a broad spectrum of wavelengths. These methods have not exploited the sensitivity of the dose response of the RCF otherwise attainable by using a light source with wavelengths peaked at the two absorption peaks in the absorption spectrum of the RCF. A new algorithm of dual-peak dose measurement for the RCF has been proposed in this paper to make use of these dual absorption peaks to achieve the maximum attainable sensitivity. This technique relies on the measurement of the transmittance of the RCF at the wavelength of the major and minor absorption peaks, respectively. The dual-peak dose measurement is accomplished with the aid of a novel spectral microdensitometer developed in our Institute. The microdensitometer utilizes a monochromator to provide a light source of which the wavelength can be matched precisely to the wavelength of the absorption peaks of the RCF. The doses obtained at these wavelengths are fed into a weighted objective function and an optimum dose is searched by minimizing the objective function to give the best estimate of the dose deposited on the film. An initial test shows that there is a good agreement between the estimated and actual dose deposited; and the maximum discrepancy was found to be less than 1%.

  2. The Sacramento Peak fast microphotometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrambide, M. R.; Dunn, R. B.; Healy, A. W.; Porter, R.; Widener, A. L.; November, L. J.; Spence, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Sacramento Peak Observatory Fast Microphotometer translates an optical system that includes a laser and photodiode detector across the film to scan the Y direction. A stepping motor moves the film gate in the X direction. This arrangement affords high positional accuracy, low noise (0.002 RMS density units), modest speed (5000 points/second), large dynamic range (4.5 density units), high stability (0.005 density units), and low scattered light. The Fast Microphotometer is interfaced to the host computer by a 6502 microprocessor.

  3. Solar investigation at Terskol Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlov-Vasiljev, K. A.; Vasiljeva, I. E.

    2003-04-01

    During 1980--1990 regular observations of the solar disk spectrum and active solar structures were carried out with SEF-1 and ATsU-26 telescopes at Terskol Peak in the framework of the program ``Energy distribution in the solar spectrum in absolute energy units''. In order to refine the fine structure of telluric lines, observations with ATsU-26 telescope were carried out in parallel. This telescope was also used for the investigation of the solar active structures. In this paper the observational technique is described. The obtained results and energy distribution in the solar disk center in absolute energy units are presented.

  4. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  5. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  6. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  7. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-16

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  9. Broadband terahertz absorption enabled by coating an ultrathin antireflection film on doped semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxing; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2016-09-01

    We show that perfect absorption of terahertz wave can be achieved in a compact system where an ultrathin film of lossless dielectric is coated on a doped semiconductor substrate. Due to the nontrivial reflection phase shift at the interface between the two media, strong resonant behavior and the concomitant antireflection occur at wavelengths that are much larger than the thickness of the dielectric film, resulting in strong absorption of the incident wave in a wide frequency range. Using this mechanism, we design a broadband terahertz absorber by coating a Ge film on a highly doped GaAs substrate. We show that such a system not only has a perfect absorption peak, but also exhibits high absorptance (over 0.9) within a fractional bandwidth of over 20%. By varying the free carrier density in the GaAs substrate, the central frequency of the absorption band can be tuned from 1.79 to 2.69 THz. In addition, the absorption performance of the proposed system is shown to be insensitive to both incident angle and polarization. Our results offer a low-cost way for the design of absorption-based THz devices. PMID:27607670

  10. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  11. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  12. Plasma dispersion effect assisted nanoscopy based on tuning of absorption and scattering resonances of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danan, Yossef; Ilovitsh, Tali; Liu, Danping; Pinhas, Hadar; Sinvani, Moshe; Ramon, Yehonatan; Azougi, Jonathan; Douplik, Alexandre; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present gold nanoparticles coated with silicon that switch the order between the scattering and the absorption magnitude at the resonance peak and tune the plasmon resonance over the spectrum. This is obtained by modifying the refractive index of the silicon coating of the nanoparticle by illuminating it with a pumping light due to the plasma dispersion effect in silicon. We also report how changing the diffraction limited point spread function through the utilization of plasma dispersion effect of the above mentioned silicon coated nanoparticles allows doing imaging with sub wavelength resolution. The plasma dispersion effect can increase the absorption coefficient of the silicon, when illuminated with a focused laser beam and as explained above it can also tune the absorption versus scattering properties of the nanoparticle. Due to the Gaussian nature of the laser illumination which has higher intensity at its peak, the plasma dispersion effect is more significant at the center of the illumination. As a consequence, the reflected light from probe beam at the near infra-red region has a sub wavelength dip that overlaps with the location of the pump illumination peak. This dip has a higher spatial frequency than an ordinary Gaussian, which enables to achieve super resolution.

  13. Evidence for excitation of fluorescence in RPE melanin by multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Denton, Michael L.

    2002-06-01

    Previously, we reported that ultrashort, near infrared (NIR) laser pulses caused more DNA breakage in cultured retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells than did CW, NIR laser radiation delivering a similar radiant exposure. We hypothesized that this difference was due to multiphoton absorption in an intracellular chromophore such as the RPE melanin. We investigated two-photon excitation of fluorescence in a suspension of isolated bovine RPE melanosomes exposed to a 1-KHz train of approximately 50- fsec laser pulses at 810 nm from a Ti:Sapphire laser, and compared this to the fluorescence excited by CW exposures at 406 nm from a Krypton ion laser. Fluorescence was measured with a PC-based spectrometer. The CW sources excited fluorescence with a peak at 525 nm. The fluorescence intensity depended on the irradiance of the sample, as well as the melanosome concentration. Peak fluorescence was obtained with a suspension of ~2 x 107 melanin granules/ml. The 810-nm, ultrashort pulses also excited fluorescence, but with a broader, lower-amplitude peak. The weaker fluorescence signal excited by the 810-nm ultrashort pulse laser for a given melanosome concentration, compared to 406-nm CW excitation, is possibly due to the smaller two- photon absorption cross-section. These results indicate the involvement of multiphoton absorption in DNA damage.

  14. The electronic absorption edge of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, O.C.; Mitra-Kirtley, S.; Zhu, Yifu

    1992-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of more than 20 crude oils and asphaltenes are examined. The spectral location of the electronic absorption edge varies over a wide range, from the near-infrared for heavy oils and asphaltenes to the near-UV for gas condensates. The functional form of the electronic absorption edge for all crude oils (measured) is characteristic of the {open_quotes}Urbach tail,{close_quotes} a phenomenology which describes electronic absorption edges in wide-ranging materials. The crude oils all show similar Urbach widths, which are significantly larger than those generally found for various materials but are similar to those previously reported for asphaltenes. Monotonically increasing absorption at higher photon energy continues for all crude oils until the spectral region is reached where single-ring aromatics dominate absorption. However, the rate of increasing absorption at higher energies moderates, thereby deviating from the Urbach behavior. Fluorescence emission spectra exhibit small red shifts from the excitation wavelength and small fluorescence peak widths in the Urbach regions of different crude oils, but show large red shifts and large peak widths in spectral regions which deviate from the Urbach behavior. This observation implies that the Urbach spectral region is dominated by lowest-energy electronic absorption of corresponding chromophores. Thus, the Urbach tail gives a direct measure of the population distribution of chromophores in crude oils. Implied population distributions are consistent with thermally activated growth of large chromophores from small ones. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  16. Spatial variability of absorption properties in Lake Balaton, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, C. A.; Hunter, P. D.; Tyler, A. N.; Vicente, V. M.; Groom, S.; Horváth, H.; Kovacs, A.; Preston, T.; Presing, M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve robustness of current remote sensing algorithms for lake monitoring, it is vital to understand the variability of inherent optical properties (IOPs) within a lake. In this study, absorption coefficients were measured in situ at 38 stations in Lake Balaton, Hungary, using a WET Labs AC-S and AC-9 and compared to concurrent absorption measurements by dual beam spectrophotometry in the laboratory. The spatial variability of bulk and chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficients was examined across 5 basins, demonstrating a gradient in total absorption corresponding to the trophic gradient. Our data suggests that sampling conditions had an impact on particulate absorption, affecting the proportion attributed to non-algal particles (aNAP), phytoplankton (aph) or color dissolved organic matter (aCDOM). The specific absorption of phytoplankton (a*ph) spectra showed a distinct peak in the UV portion of the spectra in Basins 3 and 4 (east), which may be due to the presence of phytoplankton photoprotective pigments to compensate for lower CDOM levels in these basins. In contrast to oceans, particulate attenuation (cp) had a weaker relationship to chlorophyll-a (R2=0.15) than to total suspended matter (R2=0.84), particularly the inorganic fraction. Additionally, the relative contribution of particulate scattering (bp) to attenuation was significantly higher in Lake Balaton (up to 85-99%) than that found in previous lacustrine studies. bp also demonstrated a gradient across the lake, where values increased as the water progressed from phytoplankton-dominated to mineral-dominated. These results provide knowledge of the heterogeneity of the IOPs within Lake Balaton, which is to be considered for the future improvement of bio-optical algorithms for constituent retrieval in inland waters.

  17. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  18. Large persistent photochromic effect due to DX centers in AlSb doped with selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, P.; Witt, A.G.; Lagowski, J.; Walukiewicz, W.

    1995-04-01

    A large photochromic effect has been observed in bulk AlSb crystals doped with Se. Illumination with light of energy higher than 1 eV leads to an increase of the absorption coefficient in the spectral range 0.1 to 1.6 eV. The enhanced absorption is persistent at temperatures below about K. The effect is a manifestation of a DX-like bistability of Se donors. The illumination transfers the from the DX center to a metastable hydrogenic level. The increased absorption with peaks around 0.2 eV and 0.5 is due to photoionization from the donor level to X{sub l} and X{sub 3} minima of the conduction band.

  19. WEAK-LENSING PEAK FINDING: ESTIMATORS, FILTERS, AND BIASES

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Fabian

    2011-07-10

    Large catalogs of shear-selected peaks have recently become a reality. In order to properly interpret the abundance and properties of these peaks, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the clustering of source galaxies, among themselves and with the lens. In addition, the preferred selection of magnified galaxies in a flux- and size-limited sample leads to fluctuations in the apparent source density that correlate with the lensing field. In this paper, we investigate these issues for two different choices of shear estimators that are commonly in use today: globally normalized and locally normalized estimators. While in principle equivalent, in practice these estimators respond differently to systematic effects such as magnification and cluster member dilution. Furthermore, we find that the answer to the question of which estimator is statistically superior depends on the specific shape of the filter employed for peak finding; suboptimal choices of the estimator+filter combination can result in a suppression of the number of high peaks by orders of magnitude. Magnification and size bias generally act to increase the signal-to-noise {nu} of shear peaks; for high peaks the boost can be as large as {Delta}{nu} {approx} 1-2. Due to the steepness of the peak abundance function, these boosts can result in a significant increase in the observed abundance of shear peaks. A companion paper investigates these same issues within the context of stacked weak-lensing mass estimates.

  20. Determination of peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Kano, S; Burton, D L; Lanteri, C J; Sly, P D

    1993-10-01

    It is still unknown whether peak expiratory flow (PEF) is determined by "wave speed" flow limitation in the airways. To investigate the influences of airway mechanical properties on PEF, five healthy adults performed maximal forced expiratory effort (MFEE) manoeuvres, in the standard manner and following breathholds at total lung capacity (TLC) of 2 s and 10 s. Oesophageal pressure (Poes) was measured as an index of respiratory effort. Subjects also performed a MFEE following a 10 s breathhold during which intrathoracic pressure was voluntarily raised by a Valsalva manoeuvre, which would increase transmural pressure and cross-sectional area of the extrathoracic airway. Additional MFEEs were performed with the neck fully flexed and extended, to change longitudinal tracheal tension. In separate studies, PEF was measured with a spirometer and with a pneumotachograph. Breathholds at TLC (2 s and 10 s), and neck flexion reduced PEF by a mean of 9.8% (SD 2.9%), 9.6% (SD 1.6%), and 8.7% (SD 2.8%), respectively, when measured with the spirometer. The same pattern of results was seen when measured with the pneumotachograph. These reductions occurred despite similar respiratory effort. Voluntarily raising intrathoracic pressure during a 10 s breathhold did not reverse a fall in PEF. MFEE manoeuvre with neck extension did not result in an increase in PEF, the group mean % changes being -3.0% (SD 5.0%). We conclude that these results do not allow the hypothesis that "wave-speed" (Vws) is reached at PEF to be rejected. A breathhold at TLC could increase airway wall compliance by allowing stress-relaxation of the airway, thus reducing the "Vws" achievable. PMID:8287953

  1. Vibronic Structures in Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of Firefly Oxyluciferin in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Noguchi, Yoshifumi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the factors determining the spectral shapes and widths of the absorption and fluorescence spectra for keto and enol oxyluciferin and their conjugate bases in aqueous solutions, the intensities of vibronic transitions between their ground and first electronic excited states were calculated for the first time via estimation of the vibrational Franck-Condon factors. The major normal modes, overtones and combination tones in absorption and fluorescence spectra are similar for all species. The theoretical full widths at half maximum of absorption spectra are 0.4-0.7 eV and those for the fluorescence spectra are 0.4-0.5 eV, except for phenolate-keto that exhibits exceptionally sharp peak widths due to the dominance of the 0-0' or 0'-0 band. These spectral shapes and widths explain many relevant features of the experimentally observed spectra. PMID:25946599

  2. On the mechanism of electromagnetic microwave absorption in superfluid helium

    SciTech Connect

    Pashitskii, E. A. Pentegov, V. I.

    2012-08-15

    In experiments on electromagnetic (EM) wave absorption in the microwave range in superfluid (SF) helium [1-3], a narrow EM field absorption line with a width on the order of (20-200) kHz was observed against the background of a wide absorption band with a width of 30-40 GHz at frequencies f{sub 0} Almost-Equal-To 110-180 GHz corresponding to the roton gap energy {Delta}{sub r}(T) in the temperature range 1.4-2.2 K. Using the so-called flexoelectric mechanism of polarization of helium atoms ({sup 4}He) in the presence of density gradients in SF helium (HeII), we show that nonresonance microwave absorption in the frequency range 170-200 GHz can be due to the existence of time-varying local density gradients produced by roton excitations in the bulk HeII. The absorption bandwidth is determined by the roton-roton scattering time in an equilibrium Boltzmann gas of rotons, which is t{sub r-r} Almost-Equal-To 3.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} s at T = 1.4 K and decreases upon heating. We propose that the anomalously narrow microwave resonance absorption line in HeII at the roton frequency f{sub 0}(T) = {Delta}r(T)/2{pi}h appears due to the following two factors: (i) the discrete structure of the spectrum of the surface EM resonator modes in the form of a periodic sequence of narrow peaks and (ii) the presence of a stationary dipole layer in HeII near the resonator surface, which forms due to polarization of {sup 4}He atoms under the action of the density gradient associated with the vanishing of the density of the SF component at the solid wall. For this reason, the relaxation of nonequilibrium rotons generated in such a surface dipole layer is strongly suppressed, and the shape and width of the microwave resonance absorption line are determined by the roton density of states, which has a sharp peak at the edge of the roton gap in the case of weak dissipation. The effective dipole moments of rotons in the dipole layer can be directed either along or across the normal to

  3. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wm. Hayden; Conner, Charles P.; Baines, Kevin H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH4 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum.

  4. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH sub 4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, WM.H.; Conner, C.P.; Baines, K.H. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH{sub 4} 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum. 18 refs.

  5. Luminescence properties and optical absorption of X ray-irradiated KBr: Ce3(+), Tb(3+) crystals.

    PubMed

    Bangaru, S; Saradha, K; Muralidharan, G

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports that KBr doubly doped with Tb(3+) and Ce(3+) were prepared by Bridgman-Stockbarger method and characterized by Optical absorption, Photoluminescence (PL), Thermoluminescence (TL), Photo stimulated emission (PSL) and TL emission, after X-ray irradiation have been observed. The optical absorption measurement indicates that F and Z3 centers are formed in the crystal during X-ray irradiation process. It was attempted to incorporate a broad band of Ce(3+) sensitizer into the narrow band emission of Tb(3+) in the KBr host without reduction of emission intensity. Co-doping of Ce(3+) ions in KBr:Tb(3+) crystal showed a broad band emission due to the d-f transition of Ce(3+) and a reduction in the intensity of emission peaks due to (5)days → (7)F6 transition of Tb(3+) when they were excited at 250 nm. These results supported that an effective energy transfer occurs from Ce(3+) to Tb(3+) in the KBr host. Co-doping Ce(3+) ions greatly intensified the excitation peak at 260 nm for the emission at 390 nm of Tb(3+) which means that more lattice defects, involved in the energy absorption and transfer to Tb(3+), are formed by the Ce(3+) co-doping. The integrated light intensity is two orders of magnitude higher as compared to the undoped samples for similar doses of irradiation and heating rate. Thermoluminescence process has been identified due to thermal mobilization of F-electrons and this causes peaks at 371 K and at 427 K, 457 K in KBr: Ce(3+), Tb(3+) crystals. The defects generated by irradiation were monitored by optical absorption and trap parameters for the TL process were calculated and presented. PMID:25585645

  6. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    PubMed

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  7. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality

    PubMed Central

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O.; Lauridsen, Felicia B.; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  8. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  9. One- and two-photon absorption of a spiropyran-merocyanine system: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Nakatani, Keitaro; Yu, Pei; Murugan, N Arul; Zaleśny, Robert; Roztoczyńska, Agnieszka; Bednarska, Joanna; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Samoć, Marek

    2015-01-29

    We report on the nonlinear optical properties measurements and quantum-chemical calculations of a well-known photochromic system consisting of spiropyran and the merocyanine photoproduct. The study of nonlinear absorption and refraction properties of the molecules dissolved in chloroform were performed with the Z-scan technique, using femtosecond pulses in a wide range of wavelengths. Maxima in the two-photon absorption spectrum at 700 and 1050 nm were found for the merocyanine form, and the corresponding two-photon absorption cross section is 80 GM and 20 GM, respectively. The latter feature does not vanish completely in the nonlinear spectrum of the spiropyran form, possibly because of the existence of some photoconversion caused by the laser beam during the measurements. A nonlinear absorption peak at 900 nm is found in the spiropyran form with an effective cross section of about 20 GM; it is likely due to three-photon absorption or to absorption by some intermediate species. The experimental data are supported by calculations performed with the use of a hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics approach. PMID:25531561

  10. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  11. Discourse Peak as Zone of Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longacre, Robert E.

    Defining peak as the climax of discourse, this paper argues that it is important to identify peak in order to get at the overall grammar of a given discourse. The paper presents case studies in which four instances of peak in narrative discourses occur in languages from four different parts of the world. It also illustrates the occurrence of a…

  12. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1peak absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  13. Inhibition of norfloxacin absorption by dairy products.

    PubMed Central

    Kivistö, K T; Ojala-Karlsson, P; Neuvonen, P J

    1992-01-01

    Seven healthy subjects received, after an overnight fast, a single 200-mg oral dose of norfloxacin with water, whole milk, and unflavored yoghurt. Coadministration of milk or yoghurt reduced the extent of norfloxacin absorption and the mean peak concentration in plasma by approximately 50%. Taking of norfloxacin with these liquid dairy products should be avoided. PMID:1605619

  14. The use of the Kitt Peak IDS in determining galaxy redshifts - Results for five clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintzen, P.

    1980-06-01

    The redshifts of 71 galaxies in five clusters determined using the Kitt Peak Image Dissector Scanner (IDS) are presented and the accuracy of velocities determined with the IDS system is discussed. Data were obtained from observations of absorption or emission lines in the range 3600-5400 A using the IDS on a 2.1-m telescope and effective apertures of 3.8 x 10.3 arcsec from galaxies belonging to the AWM 7 = NGC 1129, A 1213, A 1795, A 2589 and A 2666 clusters. Wavelength errors due to mechanical flexure, off-center guiding and spectrum noise are estimated to provide an uncertainty of + or - 1.21 A or 92 km/sec in measurements of a given spectrum, and comparison of the velocities determined by the Kitt Peak IDS with those determined by the Lick IDS supports the error value. Implications of the mean heliocentric redshifts and relativistically correct velocity dispersions obtained for the structure and membership of the AWM 7 cluster are discussed.

  15. Absorption and subjective effects of caffeine from coffee, cola and capsules.

    PubMed

    Liguori, A; Hughes, J R; Grass, J A

    1997-11-01

    Coffee is often perceived as producing greater pharmacological effects than cola. The present study compared the magnitude and rapidity of peak caffeine levels and subjective effects between coffee and cola. Thirteen users of both coffee and cola (mean daily caffeine consumption = 456 mg) ingested 400 mg caffeine via 12 oz unsweetened coffee, 24 oz sugar-free cola or 2 capsules in a random, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design. Subjects provided a saliva sample and completed subjective effect scales 15 min before and 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min after ingestion. Mean peak saliva caffeine levels did not differ between coffee (9.7 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml) and cola (9.8 +/- 0.9 micrograms/ml) and appeared to be greater with these beverages than with the capsule (7.8 +/- 0.6 micrograms/ml; p = NS). Saliva caffeine levels peaked at similar times for coffee (42 +/- 5 min) and cola (39 +/- 5 min) but later for capsule (67 +/- 7 min; p = 0.004). There was no main effect of vehicle or interaction of vehicle and drug on magnitude of peak effect or time to peak increase on self-report scales. In summary, peak caffeine absorption, time to peak absorption, and subjective effects do not appear to be influenced by cola vs. coffee vehicle. Perceived differences in the effects of coffee vs. cola may be due to differences in dose, time of day, added sweetener, environmental setting or contingencies. PMID:9329065

  16. Understanding Human Motion Skill with Peak Timing Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ken; Furukawa, Koichi

    The careful observation of motion phenomena is important in understanding the skillful human motion. However, this is a difficult task due to the complexities in timing when dealing with the skilful control of anatomical structures. To investigate the dexterity of human motion, we decided to concentrate on timing with respect to motion, and we have proposed a method to extract the peak timing synergy from multivariate motion data. The peak timing synergy is defined as a frequent ordered graph with time stamps, which has nodes consisting of turning points in motion waveforms. A proposed algorithm, PRESTO automatically extracts the peak timing synergy. PRESTO comprises the following 3 processes: (1) detecting peak sequences with polygonal approximation; (2) generating peak-event sequences; and (3) finding frequent peak-event sequences using a sequential pattern mining method, generalized sequential patterns (GSP). Here, we measured right arm motion during the task of cello bowing and prepared a data set of the right shoulder and arm motion. We successfully extracted the peak timing synergy on cello bowing data set using the PRESTO algorithm, which consisted of common skills among cellists and personal skill differences. To evaluate the sequential pattern mining algorithm GSP in PRESTO, we compared the peak timing synergy by using GSP algorithm and the one by using filtering by reciprocal voting (FRV) algorithm as a non time-series method. We found that the support is 95 - 100% in GSP, while 83 - 96% in FRV and that the results by GSP are better than the one by FRV in the reproducibility of human motion. Therefore we show that sequential pattern mining approach is more effective to extract the peak timing synergy than non-time series analysis approach.

  17. Inversion of instantaneous equivalent absorption coefficient and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Weihua, W. )

    1992-01-01

    Absorption coefficient is an important parameter for reservoir description. The major troubles in extracting absorption coefficient from seismic data are amplitude and waveform distortions; they greatly restrict the inversion which is based on reflection amplitude variation or reflection frequency variation. This paper presents a new method which avoids amplitude and uses waveform variation gradient in wave propagation to make the inversion of absorption coefficient. Apparent absorption coefficient and pseudo absorption coefficient are adopted so as to remove the influence which the waveform distortion due to thin bed tuning brings to absorption coefficient extraction. The final instantaneous equivalent absorption coefficient, a true absorption coefficient which reflects real absorptive character of a seismic medium, can be obtained by subtracting the pseudo absorption coefficient (inversely calculated using maximum entropy) from the apparent absorption coefficient the authors have calculated.

  18. Absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of absorption heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the absorption heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of absorption heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.

  19. First attempt to monitor atmospheric glyoxal using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Lundin, Patrik; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Hu, Jiandong; Zhao, Guangyu; Svanberg, Sune; Bood, Joakim; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO), as an indicator of photochemical "hot spots", was for the first time the subject of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) campaign. The strongest absorption line of glyoxal in the blue wavelength region - 455.1 nm - was chosen as the experimental absorption wavelength. In order to handle the effects of absorption cross-section variation of the interfering gas - nitrogen dioxide (NO2) - three-wavelength DIAL measurements simultaneously detecting glyoxal and NO2, were performed. The differential absorption curves, recorded in July 2012, indicate an extremely low glyoxal concentration in Lund, Sweden, although it is expected to be peaking at this time of the year.

  20. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  1. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  2. On the trail of double peak hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Hissler, Christophe; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Juilleret, Jérôme; François Iffly, Jean; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    A double peak hydrograph features two peaks as a response to a unique rainfall pulse. The first peak occurs at the same time or shortly after the precipitation has started and it corresponds to a fast catchment response to precipitation. The delayed peak normally starts during the recession of the first peak, when the precipitation has already ceased. Double peak hydrographs may occur for various reasons. They can occur (i) in large catchments when lag times in tributary responses are large, (ii) in urban catchments where the first peak is often caused by direct surface runoff on impervious land cover, and the delayed peak to slower subsurface flow, and (iii) in non-urban catchments, where the first and the delayed discharge peaks are explained by different runoff mechanisms (e.g. overland flow, subsurface flow and/or deep groundwater flow) that have different response times. Here we focus on the third case, as a formal description of the different hydrological mechanisms explaining these complex hydrological dynamics across catchments with diverse physiographic characteristics is still needed. Based on a review of studies documenting double peak events we have established a formal classification of catchments presenting double peak events based on their regolith structure (geological substratum and/or its weathered products). We describe the different hydrological mechanisms that trigger these complex hydrological dynamics across each catchment type. We then use hydrometric time series of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture and groundwater levels collected in the Weierbach (0.46 km2) headwater catchment (Luxembourg) to better understand double peak hydrograph generation. Specifically, we aim to find out (1) if the generation of a double peak hydrograph is a threshold process, (2) if the hysteretic relationships between storage and discharge are consistent during single and double peak hydrographs, and (3) if different functional landscape units (the hillslopes

  3. Cause of absorption band shift of disperse red-13 attached on silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Hyung-Deok; Kim, Na-Rae; Bang, Byeong-Gyu; Park, Eun-Hye; Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2015-08-01

    A reversible color change and large absorption band shift have been observed for the disperse red-13 (DR-13) attached on the surface of the monodisperse silica spheres. Two step synthetic processes including urethane bond formation and hydrolysis-condensation reactions were used to attach the DR-13 on the surface of the silica spheres. After the reaction, the characteristic absorption peak at 2270 cm-1 representing the -N=C=O asymmetric stretching vibration disappeared, and the a new absorption peak at 1700 cm-1 corresponding the C=O stretching vibration appeared. A visual and reversible color change was observed before and after wetting in alcohol. Although the absorption peak of DR-13 in alcohol is at 510 nm, the absorption peak shifts to 788 nm when it is dried. The absorption peak shifts to 718 nm when it is wetted in alcohol. This result can be explained by the formation of intramolecular charge transfer band.

  4. Clustering properties of high matter density peaks from UVES observations of QSO pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.

    2003-06-01

    The association of high H 0 column density absorption systems in QSO spectra with galactic objects has been widely verified at redshifts up to z ~ 1, by direct imaging of QSO fields and follow-up spectroscopy (Guillemin & Bergeron 1997; Le Brun et al. 1997). We study the transverse clustering properties of these tracers of high matter density peaks, by looking for coincident absorption systems in adjacent lines of sight toward QSO pairs and groups (D'Odorico et al. 2002).

  5. X-Ray Absorption Spectra of Uranium by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hirohiko; Fujima, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuo; Miyake, Chie; Imoto, Shosuke

    1981-08-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of U, UO2 and UCl4 near the U OIV and OV thresholds have been measured by use of synchrotron radiation. The absorption peaks at about 100 eV and 110 eV are observed for all of these materials. However, the detailed structure of the spectra depend on the chemical state.

  6. Infra-red absorption lines by molecules in grain mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, W.; Allamandola, L. J.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1980-06-01

    The laboratory spectrum of a solid mixture of H2O, CO, CH3OH, and NH3 at a temperature of 10 K reproduces the shape and peak positions of interstellar features. It is shown that the broad absorption features evident in the MIR spectra of some astronomical objects associated with interstellar dust can be explained by absorptions of molecules in grain mantles.

  7. Peak suppression in ESEEM spectra of multinuclear spin systems.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Stefan; Calle, Carlos; Mitrikas, George; Schweiger, Arthur

    2005-11-01

    We have observed a disturbing suppression effect in three-pulse ESEEM and HYSCORE spectra of systems with more than one nucleus coupled to the electron spin. For such systems, the ESEEM signal contains internuclear combination peaks of varying intensity. At the same time, the peaks at the basic ESEEM frequencies are reduced in intensity, up to the point of complete cancellation. For both three-pulse ESEEM and HYSCORE, the amplitude of a peak of a given nucleus depends not only on its modulation depth parameter k and the tau-dependent blind-spot term b, but also on k and b of all other nuclei. Peaks of nuclei with shallow modulations can be strongly suppressed by nuclei with deep modulations. This cross-suppression effect explains the observation that HYSCORE (1)H peaks are often very weak or even undetectable in the presence of strong (14)N peaks. Due to this distortion of intensities, ESEEM spectra have to be analysed very carefully. We present a theoretical analysis of this effect based on the product rules, numerical computations, and illustrative experimental data on Cu(gly)(2). In experiments, the impact of this cross suppression can be alleviated by a proper choice of tau values, remote echo detection, and matched pulses. PMID:16112885

  8. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  9. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  10. THE KINEMATICS OF MULTIPLE-PEAKED Ly{alpha} EMISSION IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AT z {approx} 2-3

    SciTech Connect

    Kulas, Kristin R.; Shapley, Alice E.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Zheng Zheng; Steidel, Charles C.; Hainline, Kevin N.

    2012-01-20

    We present new results on the Ly{alpha} emission-line kinematics of 18 z {approx} 2-3 star-forming galaxies with multiple-peaked Ly{alpha} profiles. With our large spectroscopic database of UV-selected star-forming galaxies at these redshifts, we have determined that {approx}30% of such objects with detectable Ly{alpha} emission display multiple-peaked emission profiles. These profiles provide additional constraints on the escape of Ly{alpha} photons due to the rich velocity structure in the emergent line. Despite recent advances in modeling the escape of Ly{alpha} from star-forming galaxies at high redshifts, comparisons between models and data are often missing crucial observational information. Using Keck II NIRSPEC spectra of H{alpha} (z {approx} 2) and [O III]{lambda}5007 (z {approx} 3), we have measured accurate systemic redshifts, rest-frame optical nebular velocity dispersions, and emission-line fluxes for the objects in the sample. In addition, rest-frame UV luminosities and colors provide estimates of star formation rates and the degree of dust extinction. In concert with the profile sub-structure, these measurements provide critical constraints on the geometry and kinematics of interstellar gas in high-redshift galaxies. Accurate systemic redshifts allow us to translate the multiple-peaked Ly{alpha} profiles into velocity space, revealing that the majority (11/18) display double-peaked emission straddling the velocity-field zero point with stronger red-side emission. Interstellar absorption-line kinematics suggest the presence of large-scale outflows for the majority of objects in our sample, with an average measured interstellar absorption velocity offset of ({Delta}v{sub abs}) = -230 km s{sup -1}. A comparison of the interstellar absorption kinematics for objects with multiple- and single-peaked Ly{alpha} profiles indicate that the multiple-peaked objects are characterized by significantly narrower absorption line widths. We compare our data with the

  11. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  12. Impedance Characteristics of the Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazawa, Yohei

    2009-10-01

    The plasma absorption probe (PAP) is a diagnostics for determination of spatially resolved electron density.footnotetextH. Kokura, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38 5262 (1999). PAP has attracted considerable interest because of its applicability in a reactive plasma. The simple structure of the probe allows us a robust measurement while the mechanism of the absorption is complicated and there are still some uncertainty.footnotetextM. Lapke, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121502 (2007) In this study, we focus on the frequency characteristics of the impedance instead of the absorption spectrum. An electromagnetic field simulation reveals that there is only one parallel resonance in the impedance characteristics even in a case there are many peaks in absorption spectrum. Thus, the impedance characteristics provide a clue to understanding the mechanism.

  13. Measuring peak expiratory flow in general practice: comparison of mini Wright peak flow meter and turbine spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K P; Mullee, M A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare measurements of the peak expiratory flow rate taken by the mini Wright peak flow meter and the turbine spirometer. DESIGN--Pragmatic study with randomised order of use of recording instruments. Phase 1 compared a peak expiratory flow type expiration recorded by the mini Wright peak flow meter with an expiration to forced vital capacity recorded by the turbine spirometer. Phase 2 compared peak expiratory flow type expirations recorded by both meters. Reproducibility was assessed separately. SETTING--Routine surgeries at Aldermoor Health Centre, Southampton. SUBJECTS--212 Patients aged 4 to 78 presenting with asthma or obstructive airways disease. Each patient contributed only once to each phase (105 in phase 1, 107 in phase 2), but some entered both phases on separate occasions. Reproducibility was tested on a further 31 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--95% Limits of agreement between measurements on the two meters. RESULTS--208 (98%) Of the readings taken by the mini Wright meter were higher than the corresponding readings taken by the turbine spirometer, but the 95% limits of agreement (mean difference (2 SD] were wide (1 to 173 l/min). Differences due to errors in reproducibility were not sufficient to predict this level of disagreement. Analysis by age, sex, order of use, and the type of expiration did not detect any significant differences. CONCLUSIONS--The two methods of measuring peak expiratory flow rate were not comparable. The mini Wright meter is likely to remain the preferred instrument in general practice. PMID:2142611

  14. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  15. Pre-Peak and Post-Peak Rock Strain Characteristics During Uniaxial Compression by 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-07-01

    A non-contact optical method for strain measurement applying three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC) in uniaxial compression is presented. A series of monotonic uniaxial compression tests under quasi-static loading conditions on Hawkesbury sandstone specimens were conducted. A prescribed constant lateral-strain rate to control the applied axial load in a closed-loop system allowed capturing the complete stress-strain behaviour of the rock, i.e. the pre-peak and post-peak stress-strain regimes. 3D DIC uses two digital cameras to acquire images of the undeformed and deformed shape of an object to perform image analysis and provides deformation and motion measurements. Observations showed that 3D DIC provides strains free from bedding error in contrast to strains from LVDT. Erroneous measurements due to the compliance of the compressive machine are also eliminated. Furthermore, by 3D DIC technique relatively large strains developed in the post-peak regime, in particular within localised zones, difficult to capture by bonded strain gauges, can be measured in a straight forward manner. Field of strains and eventual strain localisation in the rock surface were analysed by 3D DIC method, coupled with the respective stress levels in the rock. Field strain development in the rock samples, both in axial and shear strain domains suggested that strain localisation takes place progressively and develops at a lower rate in pre-peak regime. It is accelerated, otherwise, in post-peak regime associated with the increasing rate of strength degradation. The results show that a major failure plane, due to strain localisation, becomes noticeable only long after the peak stress took place. In addition, post-peak stress-strain behaviour was observed to be either in a form of localised strain in a shearing zone or inelastic unloading outside of the shearing zone.

  16. Kinetic modelling of the optically stimulated conversion of peaks 5a and 5 to peak 4 in LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100).

    PubMed

    Weizman, Y; Horowitz, Y S; Oster, L

    2002-01-01

    The TC/LC conversion model for peaks 4, 5a and 5 in LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) has been studied by solution of the coupled differential equations describing the charge carrier traffic following optical stimulation. Aspects of the model investigated were (i) the two-component exponential decay of the composite peak 5 TL intensity following the bleach, (ii) the role of retrapping during bleaching, (iii) the hole nature of peak 4 and (iv) the conversion of peak 5a traps to peak 4 traps. The high conversion efficiency is naturally explained due to the absence of conduction band competitive mechanisms in the optical ionisation of the electron in the e-h occupied structure corresponding to peak 5a and thereby leading to the hole-only occupied TC/LC leading to peak 4. PMID:12382845

  17. Observation of confinement effects through liner and nonlinear absorption spectroscopy in cuprous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, H.; Rakesh Kumar, Y.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2015-02-01

    Cuprous oxide nano clusters, micro cubes and micro particles were successfully synthesized by reducing copper (II) salt with ascorbic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide via a co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of pure single phase cubic. Raman spectrum shows the inevitable presence of CuO on the surface of the Cu2O powders which may have an impact on the stability of the phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data revealed that the morphology evolves from nanoclusters to micro cubes and micro particles by increasing the concentration of NaOH. Linear optical measurements show that the absorption peak maximum shifts towards red with changing morphology from nano clusters to micro cubes and micro particles. The nonlinear optical properties were studied using open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Samples exhibited saturable as well as reverse saturable absorption. The results show that the transition from SA to RSA is ascribed to excited-state absorption (ESA) induced by two-photon absorption (TPA) process. Due to confinement effects (enhanced band gap) we observed enhanced nonlinear absorption coefficient (βeff) in the case of nano-clusters compared to their micro-cubes and micro-particles.

  18. Seismic signatures of carbonate caves affected by near-surface absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    The near-surface absorption within a low-velocity zone generally has an exponential attenuation effect on seismic waves. But how does this absorption affect seismic signatures of karstic caves in deep carbonate reservoirs? Seismic simulation and analysis reveals that, although this near-surface absorption attenuates the wave energy of a continuous reflection, it does not alter the basic kinematic shape of bead-string reflections, a special seismic characteristic associated with carbonate caves in the Tarim Basin, China. Therefore, the bead-strings in seismic profiles can be utilized, with a great certainty, for interpreting the existence of caves within the deep carbonate reservoirs and for evaluating their pore spaces. Nevertheless, the difference between the central frequency and the peak frequency is increased along with the increment in the absorption. While the wave energy of bead-string reflections remains strong, due to the interference of seismic multiples generated by big impedance contrast between the infill materials of a cave and the surrounding carbonate rocks, the central frequency is shifted linearly with respect to the near-surface absorption. These two features can be exploited simultaneously, for a stable attenuation analysis of field seismic data.

  19. The Boson peak in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line TW. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih. PMID:23771033

  20. Weld peaking on heavy aluminum structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Poorman, R.; Sexton, J.

    1978-01-01

    Weld peaking is usually undesirable in any welded structure. In heavy structures, the forces involved in the welding process become very large and difficult to handle. With the shuttle's solid rocket booster, the weld peaking resulted in two major problems: (1) reduced mechanical properties across the weld joint, and (2) fit-up difficulties in subsequent assembly operation. Peaking from the weld shrinkage forces can be fairly well predicted in simple structures; however, in welding complicated assemblies, the amount of peaking is unpredictable because of unknown stresses from machining and forming, stresses induced by the fixturing, and stresses from welds in other parts of the assembly. When excessive peaking is encountered, it can be corrected using the shrinkage forces resulting from the welding process. Application of these forces is discussed in this report.

  1. Multiscale peak alignment for chromatographic datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Lu, Hong-Mei; Tan, Bin-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Na; Ferro, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Chromatography has been extensively applied in many fields, such as metabolomics and quality control of herbal medicines. Preprocessing, especially peak alignment, is a time-consuming task prior to the extraction of useful information from the datasets by chemometrics and statistics. To accurately and rapidly align shift peaks among one-dimensional chromatograms, multiscale peak alignment (MSPA) is presented in this research. Peaks of each chromatogram were detected based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and aligned against a reference chromatogram from large to small scale gradually, and the aligning procedure is accelerated by fast Fourier transform cross correlation. The presented method was compared with two widely used alignment methods on chromatographic dataset, which demonstrates that MSPA can preserve the shapes of peaks and has an excellent speed during alignment. Furthermore, MSPA method is robust and not sensitive to noise and baseline. MSPA was implemented and is available at http://code.google.com/p/mspa. PMID:22222564

  2. Microwave absorption in s- and d-wave disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan

    2001-10-01

    We model s- and d-wave ceramic superconductors with a three-dimensional lattice of randomly distributed 0 and π Josephson junctions with finite self-inductance. The field and temperature dependences of the microwave absoption are obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin dynamical equations. We find that at magnetic field H=0 the microwave absoption of the s-wave samples, when plotted against the field, has a minimum at any temperature. In the case of d-wave superconductors one has a peak at H=0 in the temperature region where the paramagnetic Meissner effect is observable. These results agree with experiments. The dependence of the microwave absorption on the screening strength was found to be nontrivial due to the crossover from the weak to the strong screening regime.

  3. Multiscale peak detection in wavelet space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Tong, Xia; Peng, Ying; Ma, Pan; Zhang, Ming-Jin; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-12-01

    Accurate peak detection is essential for analyzing high-throughput datasets generated by analytical instruments. Derivatives with noise reduction and matched filtration are frequently used, but they are sensitive to baseline variations, random noise and deviations in the peak shape. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based method is more practical and popular in this situation, which can increase the accuracy and reliability by identifying peaks across scales in wavelet space and implicitly removing noise as well as the baseline. However, its computational load is relatively high and the estimated features of peaks may not be accurate in the case of peaks that are overlapping, dense or weak. In this study, we present multi-scale peak detection (MSPD) by taking full advantage of additional information in wavelet space including ridges, valleys, and zero-crossings. It can achieve a high accuracy by thresholding each detected peak with the maximum of its ridge. It has been comprehensively evaluated with MALDI-TOF spectra in proteomics, the CAMDA 2006 SELDI dataset as well as the Romanian database of Raman spectra, which is particularly suitable for detecting peaks in high-throughput analytical signals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that MSPD can detect more true peaks while keeping the false discovery rate lower than MassSpecWavelet and MALDIquant methods. Superior results in Raman spectra suggest that MSPD seems to be a more universal method for peak detection. MSPD has been designed and implemented efficiently in Python and Cython. It is available as an open source package at . PMID:26514234

  4. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  5. PeakRanger: A cloud-enabled peak caller for ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), coupled with massively parallel short-read sequencing (seq) is used to probe chromatin dynamics. Although there are many algorithms to call peaks from ChIP-seq datasets, most are tuned either to handle punctate sites, such as transcriptional factor binding sites, or broad regions, such as histone modification marks; few can do both. Other algorithms are limited in their configurability, performance on large data sets, and ability to distinguish closely-spaced peaks. Results In this paper, we introduce PeakRanger, a peak caller software package that works equally well on punctate and broad sites, can resolve closely-spaced peaks, has excellent performance, and is easily customized. In addition, PeakRanger can be run in a parallel cloud computing environment to obtain extremely high performance on very large data sets. We present a series of benchmarks to evaluate PeakRanger against 10 other peak callers, and demonstrate the performance of PeakRanger on both real and synthetic data sets. We also present real world usages of PeakRanger, including peak-calling in the modENCODE project. Conclusions Compared to other peak callers tested, PeakRanger offers improved resolution in distinguishing extremely closely-spaced peaks. PeakRanger has above-average spatial accuracy in terms of identifying the precise location of binding events. PeakRanger also has excellent sensitivity and specificity in all benchmarks evaluated. In addition, PeakRanger offers significant improvements in run time when running on a single processor system, and very marked improvements when allowed to take advantage of the MapReduce parallel environment offered by a cloud computing resource. PeakRanger can be downloaded at the official site of modENCODE project: http://www.modencode.org/software/ranger/ PMID:21554709

  6. Geological study of uranium potential of the Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley Region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, D.; Kettler, R.M.; Swanson, S.C.

    1980-09-01

    The results of a geological survey of the Kingston Peak Formation on the western slope of the Panamint Range near Death Valley are discussed. The geology of the Panamint mountains was mapped on topographic base maps of the Telescope Peak and Manly Peak quadrangles. Radiometric suveys of the area were conducted using gamma ray spectrometers. Samples of the conglomerate were analyzed using delayed neutron, neutron activation, atomic absorption, and LECO analysis. It is concluded that uranium mineralization in the Favorable Submember is significant and further exploration is warranted. The monazite-fenotime related uranium and thorium mineralization in the Mountain Girl quartz pebble conglomerate is of no economic interest. (DMC)

  7. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Liu, Guanghui; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Xianyi

    2015-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells are theoretically investigated within analytical wave functions and numerical quantized energy levels. Our results show that the inner radius, the outer radius and the cut-off angle of spherical dome shells have great influences on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the total optical absorption coefficients. It is found that with the increase of the inner radius and the outer radius, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients exhibit a blueshift and a redshift, respectively. However, with the increase of the cut-off angle, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients do not shift. Besides, the resonant peaks of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients climb up and then decrease with increasing the cut-off angle. The influences of the incident optical intensity on the total optical absorption coefficients are studied. It is found that the bleaching effect occurs at higher incident optical intensity.

  8. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-02-01

    Gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identifications typically involves locating spectral peaks and matching the spectral peaks with known nuclides in the knowledge base or database. Wavelet analysis, due to its ability for fitting localized features, offers the potential for automatic detection of spectral peaks. Past studies of wavelet technologies for gamma spectra analysis essentially focused on direct fitting of raw gamma spectra. Although most of those studies demonstrated the potentials of peak detection using wavelets, they often failed to produce new benefits to operational adaptations for radiological surveys. This work presents a different approach with the operational objective being to detect only the nuclides that do not exist in the environment (anomalous nuclides). With this operational objective, the raw-count spectrum collected by a detector is first converted to a count-rate spectrum and is then followed by background subtraction prior to wavelet analysis. The experimental results suggest that this preprocess is independent of detector type and background radiation, and is capable of improving the peak detection rates using wavelets. This process broadens the doors for a practical adaptation of wavelet technologies for gamma spectral surveying devices.

  9. Variable threshold method for ECG R-peak detection.

    PubMed

    Kew, Hsein-Ping; Jeong, Do-Un

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a wearable belt-type ECG electrode worn around the chest by measuring the real-time ECG is produced in order to minimize the inconvenient in wearing. ECG signal is detected using a potential instrument system. The measured ECG signal is transmits via an ultra low power consumption wireless data communications unit to personal computer using Zigbee-compatible wireless sensor node. ECG signals carry a lot of clinical information for a cardiologist especially the R-peak detection in ECG. R-peak detection generally uses the threshold value which is fixed. There will be errors in peak detection when the baseline changes due to motion artifacts and signal size changes. Preprocessing process which includes differentiation process and Hilbert transform is used as signal preprocessing algorithm. Thereafter, variable threshold method is used to detect the R-peak which is more accurate and efficient than fixed threshold value method. R-peak detection using MIT-BIH databases and Long Term Real-Time ECG is performed in this research in order to evaluate the performance analysis. PMID:21695499

  10. Peaks theory and the excursion set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-11-01

    We describe a model of dark matter halo abundances and clustering which combines the two most widely used approaches to this problem: that based on peaks and the other based on excursion sets. Our approach can be thought of as addressing the cloud-in-cloud problem for peaks and/or modifying the excursion set approach so that it averages over a special subset, rather than all possible walks. In this respect, it seeks to account for correlations between steps in the walk as well as correlations between walks. We first show how the excursion set and peaks models can be written in the same formalism, and then use this correspondence to write our combined excursion set peaks model. We then give simple expressions for the mass function and bias, showing that even the linear halo bias factor is predicted to be k-dependent as a consequence of the non-locality associated with the peak constraint. At large masses, our model has little or no need to rescale the variable δc from the value associated with spherical collapse, and suggests a simple explanation for why the linear halo bias factor appears to lie above that based on the peak-background split at high masses when such a rescaling is assumed. Although we have concentrated on peaks, our analysis is more generally applicable to other traditionally single-scale analyses of large-scale structure.

  11. DO RADIO MAGNETARS PSR J1550-5418 AND J1622-4950 HAVE GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA?

    SciTech Connect

    Kijak, J.; Tarczewski, L.; Lewandowski, W.; Melikidze, G.

    2013-07-20

    We study the radio spectra of two magnetars, PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950. We argue that they are good candidates for pulsars with gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS), as their observed flux density decreases at frequencies below 7 GHz. We suggest that this behavior is due to the influence of the pulsars' environments on radio waves. Both of the magnetars are associated with supernova remnants and thus are surrounded by hot, ionized gas, which can be responsible for the free-free absorption of radio waves. We conclude that the GPS feature of both magnetars and typical pulsars are formed by similar processes in the surrounding media rather than by different radio-emission mechanisms. Thus, the radio magnetars PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950 can be included in the class of GPS pulsars.

  12. Effect of migraine attacks on paracetamol absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Tokola, R A; Neuvonen, P J

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of effervescent paracetamol (1000 mg) was investigated in nine female patients during a migraine attack and in the same patients when headache free. Migraine attack decreased (P less than 0.05) the areas under the serum paracetamol concentration-time curves (AUC) of 0-2 h, 0-4 h and 0-6 h and the peak serum concentration. The severity of nausea correlated significantly with the decrease in the AUC values. Our results support findings of delayed gastric emptying in migraine attacks. Both a delay and an impairment of drug absorption may follow. PMID:6529526

  13. Dust-on-snow and the timing of peak streamflow in the upper Rio Grande

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust radiative forcing on high elevation snowpack is well-documented in the southern Rockies. Various field studies show that dust deposits decrease snow albedo and increase absorption of solar radiation, leading to earlier snowmelt and peak stream flows. These findings have implications for the use...

  14. Cumulative annoyance due to multiple aircraft flyover with differing peak noise levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, K. P.

    1981-01-01

    A laboratory study in which 160 subjects judged the annoyance of 30 minute sessions of aircraft noise is described. Each session contained nine flyovers consisting of various combinations of three takeoff recordings of Boeing 727. The subjects were asked to judge their annoyance in the simulated living room environment of the laboratory and also to assess how annoyed they would be if they heard the noise in their home during the day, evening, and night periods. The standard deviation of the sound level did not improve the predictive ability of L sub eq (equivalent continuous sound level) which performed as well or better than other noise measured. Differences were found between the projected home responses for the day, evening, and nighttime periods. Time of day penalties derived from these results showed reasonable agreement with those currently used in community noise indices.

  15. The temperature measurement research for high-speed flow based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yue; Jin, Yi; Jiang, Hong-liang; Zhai, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Due to the particularity of the high-speed flow, in order to accurately obtain its' temperature, the measurement system should has some characteristics of not interfereing with the flow, non-contact measurement and high time resolution. The traditional measurement method cannot meet the above requirements, however the measurement method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology can meet the requirements for high-speed flow temperature measurement. When the near-infared light of a specific frequency is through the media to be measured, it will be absorbed by the water vapor molecules and then the transmission light intensity is detected by the detector. The temperature of the water vapor which is also the high-speed flow temperature, can be accurately obtained by the Beer-Lambert law. This paper focused on the research of absorption spectrum method for high speed flow temperature measurement with the scope of 250K-500K. Firstly, spectral line selection method for low temperature measurement of high-speed flow is discussed. Selected absorption lines should be isolated and have a high peak absorption within the range of 250-500K, at the same time the interference of the other lines should be avoided, so that a high measurement accuracy can be obtained. According to the near-infrared absorption spectra characteristics of water vapor, four absorption lines at the near 1395 nm and 1409 nm are selected. Secondly, a system for the temperature measurement of the water vapor in the high-speed flow is established. Room temperature are measured through two methods, direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) ,the results show that this system can realize on-line measurement of the temperature and the measurement error is about 3%. Finally, the system will be used for temperature measurement of the high-speed flow in the shock tunnel, its feasibility of measurement is analyzed.

  16. In Brief: Timing of peak oil uncertain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    According to the Hubbert peak theory, oil production in any geographic area will follow a bellshaped curve. The timing of the `peak' in global oil production is important because after that point, there will be less and less oil available for consumption. A new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office found that most studies estimate that peak oil production will occur sometime between now and 2040. The uncertainty in these estimates could be reduced with better information about worldwide supply and demand, and alternative fuels and transportation technologies could mitigate the effects of a global decline in oil production. However, the report found no coordinated U.S. federal strategy to address these issues. The report, ``Uncertainty about Future Oil Supply Makes It Important to Develop a Strategy for Addressing a Peak and Decline in Oil Production,'' is available at http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-07-283

  17. Reducing Peak Demand by Time Zone Divisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2014-09-01

    For a large country like India, the electrical power demand is also large and the infrastructure cost for power is the largest among all the core sectors of economy. India has an emerging economy which requires high rate of growth of infrastructure in the power generation, transmission and distribution. The current peak demand in the country is approximately 1,50,000 MW which shall have a planned growth of at least 50 % over the next five years (Seventeenth Electric Power Survey of India, Central Electricity Authority, Government of India, March 2007). By implementing the time zone divisions each comprising of an integral number of contiguous states based on their total peak demand and geographical location, the total peak demand of the nation can be significantly cut down by spreading the peak demand of various states over time. The projected reduction in capital expenditure over a plan period of 5 years is substantial. Also, the estimated reduction in operations expenditure cannot be ignored.

  18. Flu Season Hasn't Peaked Yet

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157852.html Flu Season Hasn't Peaked Yet This year's vaccine ... 2016 FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- This flu season continues to be the mildest in the ...

  19. Observing at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Martin

    1981-01-01

    Presents an abridged version of a chapter from the author's book "In Quest of Telescopes." Includes personal experiences at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and comments on telescopes, photographs, and making observations. (SK)

  20. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  1. Forward-peaked scattering of polarized light.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julia P; Kim, Arnold D

    2014-11-15

    Polarized light propagation in a multiple scattering medium is governed by the vector radiative transfer equation. We analyze the vector radiative transfer equation in asymptotic limit of forward-peaked scattering and derive an approximate system of equations for the Stokes parameters, which we call the vector Fokker-Planck approximation. The vector Fokker-Planck approximation provides valuable insight into several outstanding issues regarding the forward-peaked scattering of polarized light such as the polarization memory phenomenon. PMID:25490484

  2. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  3. Peak Effect in High-Tc Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    1996-03-01

    Like many low-Tc superconductors, high-quality YBCO single crystals are found(X.S. Ling and J.I. Budnick, in Magnetic Susceptibility of Superconductors and Other Spin Systems), edited by R.A. Hein, T.L. Francavilla, and D.H. Liebenberg (Plenum Press, New York, 1991), p.377. to exhibit a striking peak effect. In a magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the critical current has a pronounced peak below T_c(H). Pippard(A.B. Pippard, Phil. Mag. 19), 217 (1969)., and subsequently Larkin and Ovchinnikov(A.I. Larkin and Yu.N. Ovchinnikov, J. Low Temp. Phys. 34), 409 (1979)., attributed the onset of the peak effect to a softening of the vortex lattice. In this talk, the experimental discovery^1 of the peak effect in high-Tc superconductors will be described, followed by a brief historical perspective of the understanding of this phenomenon and a discussion of a new model(X.S. Ling, C. Tang, S. Bhattacharya, and P.M. Chaikin, cond-mat/9504109, (NEC Preprint 1995).) for the peak effect. In this model, the peak effect is an interesting manifestation of the vortex-lattice melting in the presence of weak random pinning potentials. The rise of critical current with increasing temperature is a signature of the ``melting'' of the Larkin domains. This work is done in collaboration with Joe Budnick, Chao Tang, Shobo Bhattacharya, Paul Chaikin, and Boyd Veal.

  4. Mg I absorption features in the solar spectrum near 9 and 12 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenar, David A.; Reuter, Dennis C.; Deming, Drake; Chang, Edward S.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution FTS observations from the Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory and the Spacelab 3 ATMOS experiment have revealed additional infrared transitions due to Mg I in the spectra of both quiet sun and sunspot penumbra. In contrast to previous observations, these transitions are seen in absorption, not emission. Absorption intensities range from 1 to 7 percent of the continuum in the quiet sun. In the penumbra, the same features appear to show Zeeman splitting. Modeling of the line profiles in the photospheric spectrum shows evidence for a factor of three overabundance in the n = 5 or more levels of Mg I in the upper photosphere, but with no deviations from a Planck source function. It is concluded that whatever the process that produces the emission (including the Lemke and Holweger mechanism), it must occur well above the tau(5000) = 0.01 level.

  5. Visible light absorption and photo-sensitizing properties of spinach leaves and beetroot extracted natural dyes.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, D; Mondal, B; Mukherjee, K

    2015-09-01

    Herein, chlorophyll and betalain dyes are extracted from fresh spinach leaves and beetroots. Fourier transform infrared spectra are used to identify the characteristic peaks of the extracted dyes. UV-vis light absorption characteristics of the dyes and their mixed counterpart are investigated by varying their pH and temperature. These dyes are used as photo sensitizer for fabrication of zinc oxide photo-anode based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photo-voltaic characteristics of the developed DSSCs are measured under simulated solar light (power of incident light 100 mW cm(-2) from Air Mass 1.5G). The solar to electric conversion efficiencies for the chlorophyll, betalain and mixed dye based solar cells are estimated as 0.148%, 0.197% and 0.294% respectively. The highest conversion efficiency for mixed dye based solar cell is attributed due to the absorption of wider range of solar spectrum. PMID:25875029

  6. Visible light absorption and photo-sensitizing properties of spinach leaves and beetroot extracted natural dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Mondal, B.; Mukherjee, K.

    2015-09-01

    Herein, chlorophyll and betalain dyes are extracted from fresh spinach leaves and beetroots. Fourier transform infrared spectra are used to identify the characteristic peaks of the extracted dyes. UV-vis light absorption characteristics of the dyes and their mixed counterpart are investigated by varying their pH and temperature. These dyes are used as photo sensitizer for fabrication of zinc oxide photo-anode based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photo-voltaic characteristics of the developed DSSCs are measured under simulated solar light (power of incident light 100 mW cm-2 from Air Mass 1.5G). The solar to electric conversion efficiencies for the chlorophyll, betalain and mixed dye based solar cells are estimated as 0.148%, 0.197% and 0.294% respectively. The highest conversion efficiency for mixed dye based solar cell is attributed due to the absorption of wider range of solar spectrum.

  7. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a quantum dot due to external ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Zhi-yong; Xie, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the figure of merit of a quantum dot (QD) system irradiated with an external microwave filed by nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. Results show that the frequency of microwave field influence the figure of merit ZT significantly. At low temperature, a sharp peak can be observed in the figure of merit ZT as the frequency of ac field increases. As the frequency varies, several zero points and resonant peaks emerge in the figure of merit ZT. By adjusting the frequency of the microwave field, we can obtain high ZT. The figure of merit ZT increases with the decreasing of linewidth function Γ. In addition, Wiedemann-Franz law does not hold, particularly in the low frequency region due to multi-photon emission and absorption. Some novel thermoelectric properties are also found in two-level QD system.

  8. Determination of ²²⁶Ra, ²²⁸Ra and ²¹⁰Pb in NORM products from oil and gas exploration: problems in activity underestimation due to the presence of metals and self-absorption of photons.

    PubMed

    Landsberger, S; Brabec, C; Canion, B; Hashem, J; Lu, C; Millsap, D; George, G

    2013-11-01

    Typical calibration of solid environmental samples for the determination of (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (210)Pb entails the use of standard reference materials which have a very similar matrix. However, TENORM samples from the oil and gas exploration contain unusually high amounts of calcium, strontium and barium which can severely attenuate the photons of (210)Pb and (226)Ra with their characteristic 46.1 keV and 186.2 keV gamma-rays, respectively and to some extent (228)Ra with the characteristic gamma-rays of 911.2 keV and 969.0 keV. We used neutron activation analysis to evaluate the content of TENORM for calcium, barium and strontium and then used a software program SELABS to determine the self-absorption. Our results confirm that even in Petrie containers with small dimensions the (210)Pb can be underestimated by almost by a factor of four while (226)Ra can be underestimated by 5%. The (228)Ra activities are virtually unaffected due to the higher energy gamma-rays. However, the implications for TENORM studies that employ large Marinelli containers having sample sizes between 0.25 and 1.0 L may be severely compromised by the presence of high Z elements in elevated concentrations. The usual spectral interferences on (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (210)Pb coming from other radionuclides in the (234)U, (235)U and (238)U decay chains are virtually nonexistent due the very high activity levels of (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (210)Pb in the tens of thousands of Bq/kg. PMID:23514714

  9. Optical absorption components of light-modulated absorption spectrum of CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Long, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The amplitude and decay coefficient of light-induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) was measured as a function of wavelength from 535 to 850 nm for single-crystal CdS. The decay coefficient exhibited a discontinuous resonance at 710 nm which was due to the overlap and cancellation of two opposing absorption changes. A method was developed to separate these opposing absorption changes using the measured decay coefficients. The discrete-level-to-band energy for one absorption change was found to be 1.64 eV. An improved model was developed which contains two associated levels in the band gap separated by 0.32 eV.

  10. Origin of low-temperature shoulder internal friction peak of Snoek-Köster peak in a medium carbon high alloyed steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xianwen; Jin, Mingjiang; Zhao, Hongshan; Li, Wei; Jin, Xuejun

    2014-10-01

    A distinct internal friction peak located at the low-temperature shoulder of Snoek-Köster peak (LTS-SK) was found in Fe-0.39C-9.8Ni-1.56Si-2.0Mn steel and its evolution with respect to various aging treatments was investigated. The LTS-SK internal friction peak was found to occur when aged below 373 K. TEM observation confirmed that the ε-carbide precipitated beyond 373 K, providing an evidence that the LTS-SK peak cannot be caused by ε-carbide precipitation. The corresponding evolution on the S-K peak and thermoelectric power (TEP) illustrated that the carbon content in the solid solution decreases due to carbon atoms segregation on the surrounding dislocations during low-temperature aging. The origin of the LTS-SK peak is likely attributed to the interaction between the carbon atoms and twin boundaries in martensite.

  11. Origin of the first sharp diffraction peak in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, Cristina; Carini, Giuseppe; González, Miguel; D'Angelo, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    Although glasses have been largely used for a wide variety of technological applications, much of their underlying structure and dynamical properties remain puzzling. We present a detailed investigation of the intermediate-range structure of a series of alkaline borate glasses carried out by performing neutron diffraction measurements. We propose that the first sharp diffraction peak of glasses arises from the periodicity of the boundaries of voids in a random network and explain its compositional and pressure dependence. In this framework, the planar section of a void is an n -membered ring of all-side vertex sharing basic structural units. Furthermore, we suggest that thermally activated relaxations responsible for the ultrasonic absorption in borate glasses stem from transverse motions of atoms bridging structural units confining voids.

  12. Linewidth Extraction From the THz Absorption Spectra Using a Modified Lorentz Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Su, Haixia; Zhang, Han; Lan, Jinhui

    2013-10-01

    Identification of specific materials is one of the most promising THz applications. It is commonly achieved by comparing the experimental peak central frequencies of the transmission or absorption spectra with a database for known materials while neglecting the linewidths. However, due to the restriction of the signal-to-noise ratio, only a narrow band, extending from several hundred GHz to several THz, can be used. It is difficult to distinguish two materials from each other if their peaks' central frequencies are similar. In this paper, we present a modified Lorentz model by taking the scattering effect into account. The modified Lorentz model can be used for the extraction of reliable absorption peak parameters, i.e. the central frequency and linewidth. On comparison with our experiments, we observed that the parameters extracted using the modified Lorentz model in glutamine samples of different concentrations exhibited a better agreement than those obtained using the traditional model. Therefore, the utilization of the narrow THz band to identify materials can be improved by comparing both the central frequency and linewidth obtained from this method.

  13. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  14. The OH - absorption spectra of low doped lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yongfa; Zhang, Wanlin; Xu, Jingjun; Yan, Wenbo; Liu, Hongde; Xie, Xiang; Li, Xiaochun; Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Guangyin

    2004-07-01

    The OH - absorption spectra of low doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3) crystals have been investigated. Though no apparent band shift is observed in these absorption spectra, their shapes are quite different. In order to analyze the information on the defect structure underlying these OH - absorption bands, the normalization and difference methods were employed. It was found that although the doping concentrations are under the thresholds the doping ions have apparent affect to the site occupation of OH - ions. The OH - vibrations related to Mg Li+ (Mg 2+ occupying Li-site) and In Li2+ are 3483 and 3484 cm -1 in LiNbO 3:Mg and LiNbO 3:In crystals, respectively. The absorption peak of LiNbO 3:Ti (2.5 mol%) crystal at 3487 cm -1 is mainly related to Ti Li3+-OH - and the 3489 cm -1 peak of LiNbO 3:Mg (5.0 mol%), Ti (10.0 mol%) related to Mg Li+-OH -, Ti Nb--OH - and Ti Li3+-OH -. Doping with Na improves the peak intensity near 3466 cm -1 and induces a new absorption peak at 3470 cm -1. The absorption bands of LiNbO 3 crystals codoped with trivalent ions are associated with the co-effect of the doped ions and have some different characteristics from mono-doped crystals.

  15. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  16. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-01

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader π* and σ* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) — (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the π* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the "pre-peak", in the subtracted spectra and the π*/σ* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore, it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the π*/σ* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.

  17. Absorption spectra of monolayer MoS2 in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Duen; Her, Jim-Long; Takeyama, Shojiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Wang, Kai-Hsuan

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the absorption spectra of monolayer MoS2 film at several temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 52 T. At room temperature, the observed spectrum dominated by two main peaks, which are located at 660 nm and 606 nm. These peaks are ascribed to excition and trion absorption peaks respectively [1]. At low temperature (4.2 K), two peaks show the blue shift to 633 nm and 588 nm, respectively. Irrespective of the temperature, applying magnetic field does not show pronounced influence on the peaks even in 52 T.

  18. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  19. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  20. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  1. Extreme value statistics of weak lensing shear peak counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, R.; Maturi, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2016-02-01

    The statistics of peaks in weak gravitational lensing maps is a promising technique to constrain cosmological parameters in present and future surveys. Here we investigate its power when using general extreme value statistics which is very sensitive to the exponential tail of the halo mass function. To this end, we use an analytic method to quantify the number of weak lensing peaks caused by galaxy clusters, large-scale structures and observational noise. Doing so, we further improve the method in the regime of high signal-to-noise ratios dominated by non-linear structures by accounting for the embedding of those counts into the surrounding shear caused by large-scale structures. We derive the extreme value and order statistics for both overdensities (positive peaks) and underdensities (negative peaks) and provide an optimized criterion to split a wide field survey into subfields in order to sample the distribution of extreme values such that the expected objects causing the largest signals are mostly due to galaxy clusters. We find good agreement of our model predictions with a ray-tracing N-body simulation. For a Euclid-like survey, we find tight constraints on σ8 and Ωm with relative uncertainties of ˜10-3. In contrast, the equation of state parameter w0 can be constrained only with a 10 per cent level, and wa is out of reach even if we include redshift information.

  2. Excitonic Effects and Optical Absorption Spectrum of Doped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jornada, Felipe; Deslippe, Jack; Louie, Steven

    2012-02-01

    First-principles calculations based on the GW-Bethe-Salpeter Equation (GW-BSE) approach and subsequent experiments have shown large excitonic effects in the optical absorbance of graphene. Here we employ the GW-BSE formalism to probe the effects of charge carrier doping and of having an external electric field on the absorption spectrum of graphene. We show that the absorbance peak due to the resonant exciton exhibits systematic changes in both its position and profile when graphene is gate doped by carriers, in excellent agreement to very recent measurementsootnotetextTony F. Heinz, private communications.. We analyze the various contributions to these changes in the absorption spectrum, such as the effects of screening by carriers to the quasiparticle energies and electron-hole interactions. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and the U.S. DOD - Office of Naval Research under RTC Grant No. N00014-09-1-1066. Computer time was provided by NERSC.

  3. SPANISH PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation and a survey of mines and prospects were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas Counties, in south-central Colorado. Anomalous gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in rocks and in stream sediments from drainage basins in the vicinity of the old mines and prospects on West Spanish Peak indicate a substantiated mineral-resource potential for base and precious metals in the area surrounding this peak; however, the mineralized veins are sparse, small in size, and generally low in grade. There is a possibility that coal may underlie the study area, but it would be at great depth and it is unlikely that it would have survived the intense igneous activity in the area. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil and gas because of the lack of structural traps and the igneous activity.

  4. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  5. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  6. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  7. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  8. MOSES AND DENNISON PEAK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Lipton, David A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was conducted in the Moses and Dennison Peak Roadless Areas, southeastern Sierra Nevada, California. One area within the Moses Roadless Area is classified as having substantiated mineral-resource potential for small base-metal skarn deposits. Additionally, geochemical data indicate probable potential for small base-metal skarn deposits from one locality within Dennison Peak Roadless Area and for small tungsten skarn deposits from a region within Moses Roadless Area. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  9. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  10. Design of separately tunable terahertz two-peak absorber based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longhui; Hu, Fangrong; Xu, Xinlong; Wang, Yue'e.; Guo, Enze

    2016-06-01

    A separately tunable terahertz (THz) two-peak absorber based on graphene is presented. From bottom to top, the absorber contains four layers, i.e., gold reflector, graphene patch array, polyimide and metal split-ring resonator (SRR) array layer. The controlling voltage is applied between the reflector and two separated surface electrodes to tune the Fermi level of graphene. As a result, these two absorption peaks can be separately tuned by the controlling voltages. The finite integral technique (FIT) is used to study the absorption theory and modulation mechanism. The simulation results show that the absorption of low-frequency and that of high-frequency are 95.5% and 90.0%, respectively. And the maximum modulation depths of them are about 49% and 71%, respectively. Moreover, the absorber is insensitive to polarization and still has good absorption at large angle. The separately tunable THz two-peak absorber offers a new way for the development of frequency selective detectors working in the range of microwave, THz and infrared.

  11. Relationships between peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and modified mercalli intensity in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Heaton, T.H.; Kanamori, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed regression relationships between Modified Mercalli Intensity (Imm) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV) by comparing horizontal peak ground motions to observed intensities for eight significant California earthquakes. For the limited range of Modified Mercalli intensities (Imm), we find that for peak acceleration with V ??? Imm ??? VIII, Imm = 3.66 log(PGA) - 1.66, and for peak velocity with V ??? Imm ??? IX, Imm = 3.47 log(PGV) + 2.35. From comparison with observed intensity maps, we find that a combined regression based on peak velocity for intensity > VII and on peak acceleration for intensity < VII is most suitable for reproducing observed Imm patterns, consistent with high intensities being related to damage (proportional to ground velocity) and with lower intensities determined by felt accounts (most sensitive to higher-frequency ground acceleration). These new Imm relationships are significantly different from the Trifunac and Brady (1975) correlations, which have been used extensively in loss estimation.

  12. Switching from "absorption within transparency" to "transparency within transparency" in an electromagnetically induced absorption dominated transition.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Katrin; Molella, Luca Spani; Rinkleff, Rolf-Hermann; Danzmann, Karsten

    2008-05-01

    The absorption of a resonant coupling laser driving a closed degenerate two-level system in an atomic cesium beam was investigated as a function of the detuning of a second laser probing the same transition. The measurements were performed for four different polarization combinations of the two laser beams. Except for the beams of counterrotating polarizations all coupling-laser absorption profiles showed "absorption within transparency," i.e., the absorption in the region around the two-photon resonance was smaller than the absorption corresponding to the one-photon transition induced by the coupling laser, and an extra absorption peak was observed on this curve at the two-photon resonance. With regard to the beams of counterrotating polarizations we observed a switch from absorption within transparency to "transparency within transparency" when the probe-laser power exceeded the constant coupling-laser power. In other words, the cesium ensemble became mostly transparent to the coupling-laser beam at the two-photon resonance. PMID:18451960

  13. Large infrared absorptance of bimaterial microcantilevers based on silicon high contrast grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Beomjin; Seong, Myunghoon; Liu, Jui-Nung; Rosenberger, Matthew R.; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T.; King, William P.

    2013-10-01

    Manufacturing sensors for the mid-IR spectral region (3-11 μm) are especially challenging given the large spectral bandwidth, lack of convenient material properties, and need for sensitivity due to weak sources. Here, we present bimaterial microcantilevers based on silicon high contrast grating (HCG) as alternatives. The grating integrated into the cantilevers leverages the high refractive index contrast between the silicon and its surrounding medium, air. The cantilevers with HCG exhibit larger active spectral range and absorptance in mid-IR as compared to cantilevers without HCG. We design and fabricate two types of HCG bimaterial cantilevers such that the HCG resonance modes occur in mid-IR spectral region. Based on the measurements using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectrometer, we show that the HCG cantilevers have 3-4X wider total IR absorptance bandwidths and 30% larger absorptance peak amplitude than the cantilever without HCG, over the 3-11 μm wavelength region. Based on the enhanced IR absorptance, HCG cantilevers show 13-47X greater responsivity than the cantilever without HCG. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced IR sensitivity of the HCG cantilever enables transmission IR spectroscopy with a Michelson interferometer. The HCG cantilever shows comparable signal to noise ratio to a low-end commercial FTIR system and exhibits a linear response to incident IR power.

  14. 78 FR 53103 - Proposed Establishment of the Eagle Peak Mendocino County Viticultural Area and Realignments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... Peak Mendocino County Viticultural Area and Realignments of the Mendocino and Redwood Valley... Peak Mendocino County Viticultural Area and Realignments of the Mendocino and Redwood Valley... proposed rule published on June 27, 2013 (78 FR 38618), written comments are now due on or before...

  15. Correlated peak relative light intensity and peak current in triggered lightning subsequent return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between peak relative light intensity L(R) and stroke peak current I(R) is examined for 39 subsequent return strokes in two triggered lightning flashes. One flash contained 19 strokes and the other 20 strokes for which direct measurements were available of the return stroke peak current at ground. Peak currents ranged from 1.6 to 21 kA. The measurements of peak relative light intensity were obtained from photographic streak recordings using calibrated film and microsecond resolution. Correlations, significant at better than the 0.1 percent level, were found for several functional relationships. Although a relation between L(R) and I(R) is evident in these data, none of the analytical relations considered is clearly favored. The correlation between L(R) and the maximum rate of current rise is also examined, but less correlation than between L(R) and I(R) is found. In addition, the peak relative intensity near ground is evaluated for 22 dart leaders, and a mean ratio of peak dart leader to peak return stroke relative light intensity was found to be 0.1 with a range of 0.02-0.23. Using two different methods, the peak current near ground in these dart leaders is estimated to range from 0.1 to 6 kA.

  16. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Short, David

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in predicting peak winds at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron requested the AMU develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network , Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations, and CCAFS sounding s from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created mul tiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence , the temperature inversion depth and strength, wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft.

  17. Six Ways To Foster Peak Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevilla, Christine; Wells, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses six initiatives that organizations can support to ensure peak performance: individual knowledge portfolios; mentoring and apprenticeship relationships; electronic conferencing systems; organizational knowledge repository; community of practice; reward and recognition. Defines each initiative and describes how to make each one work in an…

  18. Avoiding the False Peaks in Correlation Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2009-07-31

    Fiducials imprinted on laser beams are used to perform video image based alignment of the 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In many video images, matched filtering is used to detect the location of these fiducials. Generally, the highest correlation peak is used to determine the position of the fiducials. However, when the signal to-be-detected is very weak compared to the noise, this approach totally breaks down. The highest peaks act as traps for false detection. The active target images used for automatic alignment in the National Ignition Facility are examples of such images. In these images, the fiducials of interest exhibit extremely low intensity and contrast, surrounded by high intensity reflection from metallic objects. Consequently, the highest correlation peaks are caused by these bright objects. In this work, we show how the shape of the correlation is exploited to isolate the valid matches from hundreds of invalid correlation peaks, and therefore identify extremely faint fiducials under very challenging imaging conditions.

  19. Hubbert's Peak: the Impending World oil Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffeyes, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Global oil production will probably reach a peak sometime during this decade. After the peak, the world's production of crude oil will fall, never to rise again. The world will not run out of energy, but developing alternative energy sources on a large scale will take at least 10 years. The slowdown in oil production may already be beginning; the current price fluctuations for crude oil and natural gas may be the preamble to a major crisis. In 1956, the geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s.1 Almost everyone, inside and outside the oil industry, rejected Hubbert's analysis. The controversy raged until 1970, when the U.S. production of crude oil started to fall. Hubbert was right. Around 1995, several analysts began applying Hubbert's method to world oil production, and most of them estimate that the peak year for world oil will be between 2004 and 2008. These analyses were reported in some of the most widely circulated sources: Nature, Science, and Scientific American.2 None of our political leaders seem to be paying attention. If the predictions are correct, there will be enormous effects on the world economy. Even the poorest nations need fuel to run irrigation pumps. The industrialized nations will be bidding against one another for the dwindling oil supply. The good news is that we will put less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The bad news is that my pickup truck has a 25-gallon tank.

  20. Peak structural response to nonstationary random excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozuka, M.; Yang, J.-N.

    1971-01-01

    Study establishes distribution function of peak response values, based on frequency interpretation. Excitations considered include impact loading on landing gears and aircraft gust loading. Because of relative severity of excitations, prediction of fatigue and maximum response characteristics is important part of task of structural analysis and design.

  1. Double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Wenbin; Chen, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs), which is unique subset of subauroral ion drifts (SAIDs). A statistical analysis has been carried out for the first time with a database of 454 DSAID events identified from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations from 1987 to 2012. Both case studies and statistical analyses show that the two velocity peaks of DSAIDs are associated with two ion temperature peaks and two region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) peaks in the midlatitude ionospheric trough located in the low-conductance subauroral region. DSAIDs are regional and vary significantly with magnetic local time. DSAIDs can evolve from/to SAIDs during their lifetimes, which are from several minutes to tens of minutes. Comparisons between the ionospheric parameters of DSAIDs and SAIDs indicate that double-layer region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) may be the main driver of DSAIDs. It is also found that DSAIDs happen during more disturbed conditions compared with SAIDs.

  2. Peak power scaling of thulium-doped ultrafast fiber laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Martin; Gaida, Christian; Stutzki, Fabian; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    We investigate challenges for scaling the output peak power of thulium-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplification systems (FCPA) to and beyond the GW-level. A major limitation for reaching high peak powers in the 2 μm regime is the presence of strong water vapor absorption features that cause detrimental propagation effects in the spatial and the temporal domain. Based on the investigation and understanding of these effects mitigation strategies have been developed, that have been one of the keys to demonstrate a new record pulse peak power of more than 200 MW from a thulium-based ultrafast fiber laser. Future experiments can ultimately lead to a further increase of pulse peak power way beyond the GW-level.

  3. Spanish Peaks, Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Spanish Peaks, on the eastern flank of the Sangre de Cristo range, abruptly rise 7,000 feet above the western Great Plains. Settlers, treasure hunters, trappers, gold and silver miners have long sighted on these prominent landmarks along the Taos branch of the Santa Fe trail. Well before the westward migration, the mountains figured in the legends and history of the Ute, Apache, Comanche, and earlier tribes. 'Las Cumbres Espanolas' are also mentioned in chronicles of exploration by Spaniards including Ulibarri in 1706 and later by de Anza, who eventually founded San Francisco (California). This exceptional view (STS108-720-32), captured by the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS108, portrays the Spanish Peaks in the context of the southern Rocky Mountains. Uplift of the Sangre de Cristo began about 75 million years ago and produced the long north-trending ridges of faulted and folded rock to the west of the paired peaks. After uplift had ceased (26 to 22 million years ago), the large masses of igneous rock (granite, granodiorite, syenodiorite) that form the Peaks were emplaced (Penn, 1995-2001). East and West Spanish Peaks are 'stocks'-bodies of molten rock that intruded sedimentary layers, cooled and solidified, and were later exposed by erosion. East Peak (E), at 12,708 ft is almost circular and is about 5 1/2 miles long by 3 miles wide, while West Peak (W), at 13,623 ft is roughly 2 3/4 miles long by 1 3/4 miles wide. Great dikes-long stone walls-radiate outward from the mountains like spokes of a wheel, a prominent one forms a broad arc northeast of East Spanish Peak. As the molten rock rose, it forced its way into vertical cracks and joints in the sedimentary strata; the less resistant material was then eroded away, leaving walls of hard rock from 1 foot to 100 feet wide, up to 100 feet high, and as long as 14 miles. Dikes trending almost east-west are also common in the region. For more information visit: Sangres.com: The Spanish Peaks (accessed January 16

  4. Opdic (optimized Peak, Distortion and Clutter) Detection Filter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Gregory Philip

    1995-01-01

    Detection is considered. This involves determining regions of interest (ROIs) in a scene: the locations of multiple object classes in a scene in clutter when object distortions and contrast differences are present. High probability of detection P_{D} is essential and low P_{FA } is desirable since subsequent stages in the full system will only decrease P_{FA } and cannot increase P_{D }. Low resolution blob objects and objects with more internal detail are considered with both 3-D aspect view and depression angle distortions present. Extensive tests were conducted on 56 scenes with object classes not present in the training set. A modified MINACE (Minimum Noise and Correlation Energy) distortion-invariant filter was used. This minimizes correlation plane energy due to distortions and clutter while satisfying correlation peak constraint values for various object-aspect views. The filter was modified with a new object model (to give predictable output peak values) and a new correlated noise clutter model; a white Gaussian noise model of distortion was used; and a new techniques to increase the number of training set images (N _{T}) included in the filter were developed. Excellent results were obtained. However, the correlation plane distortion and clutter energy functions were found to become worse as N_{T } was increased and no rigorous method exists to select the best N_{T} (when to stop filter synthesis). A new OPDIC (Optimized Peak, Distortion, and Clutter) filter was thus devised. This filter retained the new object, clutter and distortion models noted. It minimizes the variance of the correlation peak values for all training set images (not just the N_{T} images). As N _{T} increases, the peak variance and the objective functions (correlation plane distortion and clutter energy) are all minimized. Thus, this new filter optimizes the desired functions and provides an easy way to stop filter synthesis (when the objective function is minimized). Tests show

  5. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  6. The spatial resolution of epidemic peaks.

    PubMed

    Mills, Harriet L; Riley, Steven

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of novel respiratory pathogens can challenge the capacity of key health care resources, such as intensive care units, that are constrained to serve only specific geographical populations. An ability to predict the magnitude and timing of peak incidence at the scale of a single large population would help to accurately assess the value of interventions designed to reduce that peak. However, current disease-dynamic theory does not provide a clear understanding of the relationship between: epidemic trajectories at the scale of interest (e.g. city); population mobility; and higher resolution spatial effects (e.g. transmission within small neighbourhoods). Here, we used a spatially-explicit stochastic meta-population model of arbitrary spatial resolution to determine the effect of resolution on model-derived epidemic trajectories. We simulated an influenza-like pathogen spreading across theoretical and actual population densities and varied our assumptions about mobility using Latin-Hypercube sampling. Even though, by design, cumulative attack rates were the same for all resolutions and mobilities, peak incidences were different. Clear thresholds existed for all tested populations, such that models with resolutions lower than the threshold substantially overestimated population-wide peak incidence. The effect of resolution was most important in populations which were of lower density and lower mobility. With the expectation of accurate spatial incidence datasets in the near future, our objective was to provide a framework for how to use these data correctly in a spatial meta-population model. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental spatial resolution for any pathogen-population pair. If underlying interactions between pathogens and spatially heterogeneous populations are represented at this resolution or higher, accurate predictions of peak incidence for city-scale epidemics are feasible. PMID:24722420

  7. SIMPLE MODELS OF METAL-LINE ABSORPTION AND EMISSION FROM COOL GAS OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rubin, Kate

    2011-06-10

    We analyze the absorption and emission-line profiles produced by a set of simple, cool gas wind models motivated by galactic-scale outflow observations. We implement Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques that track the propagation of scattered and fluorescent photons to generate one-dimensional spectra and two-dimensional spectral images. We focus on the Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet and Fe II UV1 multiplet at {lambda} {approx} 2600 A, but the results are applicable to other transitions that trace outflows (e.g., Na I, H I Ly{alpha}, Si II). By design, the resonance transitions show blueshifted absorption but one also predicts strong resonance and fine-structure line emission at roughly the systemic velocity. This line-emission 'fills in' the absorption, reducing the equivalent width by up to 50%, shifting the absorption-line centroid by tens of km s{sup -1}, and reducing the effective opacity near systemic. Analysis of cool gas outflows that ignores this line emission may incorrectly infer that the gas is partially covered, measure a significantly lower peak optical depth, and/or conclude that gas at systemic velocity is absent (e.g., an interstellar or slowly infalling component). Because the Fe II lines are connected by optically thin transitions to fine-structure levels, their profiles more closely reproduce the intrinsic opacity of the wind. Together these results naturally explain the absorption and emission-line characteristics observed for star-forming galaxies at z < 1. We also study a scenario promoted to describe the outflows of z {approx} 3 Lyman break galaxies and find profiles inconsistent with the observations due to scattered photon emission. Although line emission complicates the analysis of absorption-line profiles, the surface brightness profiles offer a unique means of assessing the morphology and size of galactic-scale winds. Furthermore, the kinematics and line ratios offer powerful diagnostics of outflows, motivating deep

  8. Simple Models of Metal-line Absorption and Emission from Cool Gas Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Kasen, Daniel; Rubin, Kate

    2011-06-01

    We analyze the absorption and emission-line profiles produced by a set of simple, cool gas wind models motivated by galactic-scale outflow observations. We implement Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques that track the propagation of scattered and fluorescent photons to generate one-dimensional spectra and two-dimensional spectral images. We focus on the Mg II λλ2796, 2803 doublet and Fe II UV1 multiplet at λ ≈ 2600 Å, but the results are applicable to other transitions that trace outflows (e.g., Na I, H I Lyα, Si II). By design, the resonance transitions show blueshifted absorption but one also predicts strong resonance and fine-structure line emission at roughly the systemic velocity. This line-emission "fills in" the absorption, reducing the equivalent width by up to 50%, shifting the absorption-line centroid by tens of km s-1, and reducing the effective opacity near systemic. Analysis of cool gas outflows that ignores this line emission may incorrectly infer that the gas is partially covered, measure a significantly lower peak optical depth, and/or conclude that gas at systemic velocity is absent (e.g., an interstellar or slowly infalling component). Because the Fe II lines are connected by optically thin transitions to fine-structure levels, their profiles more closely reproduce the intrinsic opacity of the wind. Together these results naturally explain the absorption and emission-line characteristics observed for star-forming galaxies at z < 1. We also study a scenario promoted to describe the outflows of z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies and find profiles inconsistent with the observations due to scattered photon emission. Although line emission complicates the analysis of absorption-line profiles, the surface brightness profiles offer a unique means of assessing the morphology and size of galactic-scale winds. Furthermore, the kinematics and line ratios offer powerful diagnostics of outflows, motivating deep, spatially extended spectroscopic

  9. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  10. Tunable absorption in heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metallic film and Fibonacci fractal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Jie; Du, Gui-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the anomalous optical properties of heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metal film and a truncated Fibonacci fractal photonic crystal. It is found that one or multiple highly reflected peaks, even enhanced transmission narrowband, can be realized in the near-complete absorption broadband, where the photonic crystals are selected with various Fibonacci sequences or a given sequence as the basic unit. These properties are significant to design important reflection or transmission optical devices in the visible and near-infrared ranges.

  11. Abundances in 8 QSO Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauroesch, James Thomas

    1995-01-01

    An analysis is given of high resolution observations of metal-absorption line systems in the spectra of 4 QSOs made with the echelle spectrograph on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. High spectral -resolution (9 to 18 km cdot s^{ -1}) observations were obtained for the QSOs S5 0014 + 813, H 0913 + 072, B2 1225 + 317, and HS 1946 + 7658; column densities were derived for the heavy element line systems. Abundances and/or abundance ratios have been determined for 8 systems and a variety of H I column densities in the redshift range 1-3.4 are probed. The systems studies are generally relatively poor in heavy elements, and appear to be similar in heavy element abundances to the gas out of which the Galactic halo stars of similar metallicity formed. Indications of the halo star-abundance sample include the observed ratios of (N/Si), (Al/Si), and (Mn/Fe). The existence of associated H II regions is inferred for a number of damped systems, and it is suggested that the possibly significant amount of gas in H II regions in damped Lyman-alpha systems can be constrained by the comparison of the column densities of O I, N I, N II, Si II, and S II in these systems. The ratio of N(Al II)/N(Al III) is shown to be a poor indicator of the amount of ionized gas in some cases. The abundances of Si as determined from N(Si II)/N(H I) suggest that there is a relatively rapid decrease in abundances in these systems at z _sp{ ~}> 2. Such a decrease in abundances is what would be expected if the galactic (thin) disks did not form before redshifts of z {~} 2. The use of Si II is important, since the weakness of the Zn II lines at low abundances (due to the low relative abundance of Zn compared to elements such as Si) will result in few detections, and in upper limits that are difficult to interpret. The observed drop in abundances is consistent with the decrease in number of heavy-element absorption systems at high redshifts, a result that is found in

  12. Mountain substitutability and peak load pricing of high alpine peaks as a management tool to reduce environmental damage: a contingent valuation study.

    PubMed

    Loomis, John B; Keske, Catherine M

    2009-04-01

    High alpine peaks throughout the world are under increasing environmental pressure from hikers, trekkers, and climbers. Colorado's "Fourteeners", peaks with summits above 14,000 feet are no exception. Most of these peaks have no entrance fees, and reach ecological and social carrying capacity on weekends. This paper illustrates how a series of dichotomous choice contingent valuation questions can be used to evaluate substitutability between different alpine peaks and quantify the price responsiveness to an entrance fee. Using this approach, we find that peak load pricing would decrease use of popular Fourteeners in Colorado by 22%. This reduction is due almost entirely to substitution, rather than income effects. There is also price inelastic demand, as 60% of the hikers find no substitution for their specific Fourteener at the varying cost increases posed in the survey. The no substitute group has a mean net benefit of $294 per hiker, per trip, considerably higher than visitor net benefits in most recreational use studies. PMID:19111965

  13. Nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in a semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, D.; Chuang, S. L.

    1987-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear intersubband absorption in a semiconductor quantum well is studied theoretically using the density matrix formalism including intrasubband relaxation. It is shown that the peak absorption is reduced by half for an optical intensity 1 MW/sq cm for the well size L = 126.5 A with 3.0 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm electrons.

  14. No effect of food intake on clobazam absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Cenraud, B; Guyot, M; Levy, R H; Brachet-Liermain, A; Morselli, P L; Moreland, T A; Loiseau, P

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of clobazam taken 3 h before, during, and 3 h after a standard hospital meal were studied in six healthy volunteers. Peak plasma levels were significantly lower when the drug was taken with or after meals suggesting that the rate of absorption was reduced by food. The mean area under the concentration vs time curve was not affected by the time of drug administration indicating that the meal had no effect upon the extent of absorption. PMID:6661360

  15. Absorption chillers: Technology for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.W.; Garland, R.W.

    1997-12-31

    In an era of heightened awareness of energy efficiency and the associated environmental impacts, many industries worldwide are exploring ``environmentally friendly`` technologies that provide equivalent or improved performance while reducing or eliminating harmful side-effects. The refrigeration and air-conditioning industry, due to its reliance on CFCs and HCFCs, has invested in research in alternatives to the industry standard vapor compression machines. One alternative technology with great promise is chemical absorption. Absorption chillers offer comparable refrigeration output with reduced SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} emissions. Absorption chillers do not use CFCs or HCFCs, refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Additionally, gas-fired absorption chillers can save significant amounts in energy costs when used in combination with a vapor compression chiller in a hybrid system. The hybrid system can take advantage of the comparatively low price of natural gas (per unit ton) and rely on the high performance of vapor compression when electricity prices are lower. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction for those new to absorption technology as well as a discussion of selected high efficiency cycles, a discussion on the technology of coupling absorption with vapor compression systems to form a hybrid system, and the environmental impacts of absorption.

  16. Enhanced excitonic photoconductivity due to built-in internal electric field in TlGaSe{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Şale, Yasin; Balaban, Ertan

    2014-12-07

    The strong enhancement, by several orders of magnitude, of the excitonic peak within the photoconductivity spectrum of TlGaSe{sub 2} semiconductor was observed. The samples were polarized in external dc electric field, which was applied prior to the measurements. Due to the accumulation of charges near the surface, an internal electric field was formed. Electron-hole pairs that were created after the absorption of light are fallen in and then separated by the built-in electric field, which prevents radiative recombination process.

  17. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  18. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  20. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  1. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  2. Numerical and theoretical analysis on the absorption properties of metasurface-based terahertz absorbers with different thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaimin; Huang, Yongjun; Wanghuang, Tenglong; Chen, Weijian; Wen, Guangjun

    2015-01-10

    In this paper, we numerically and theoretically discuss the novel absorption properties of a conventional metasurface-based terahertz (THz) electromagnetic (EM) absorber with different dielectric thicknesses. Two absorption modes are presented in the considered frequency band due to the increased dielectric thickness, and both modes can achieve near-unity absorptions when the dielectric layers reach additional nλ(d)/2 (n=1, 2) thicknesses, where λ(d) is the operating wavelength at the peak absorption in the dielectric slabs. The surface currents between the metasurface resonators and ground plane are not associated any longer, different from the conventional thin absorbers. Moreover, the EM wave energies are completely absorbed by the metasurface resonators and dielectric layer, and the main function of ground plane is to reflect the incident EM waves back to the resonators. The discussed novel absorption properties are analyzed and explained by classical EM theory and interference theory after numerical demonstrations. These findings can broaden the potential applications of the metasurface-based absorbers in the THz frequency range for different requirements. PMID:25967629

  3. Predicting VO2peak from Submaximal- and Peak Exercise Models: The HUNT 3 Fitness Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Loe, Henrik; Nes, Bjarne M.; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) is seldom assessed in health care settings although being inversely linked to cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to develop VO2peak prediction models for men and women based on directly measured VO2peak from a large healthy population Methods VO2peak prediction models based on submaximal- and peak performance treadmill work were derived from multiple regression analysis. 4637 healthy men and women aged 20–90 years were included. Data splitting was used to generate validation and cross-validation samples. Results The accuracy for the peak performance models were 10.5% (SEE = 4.63 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) and 11.5% (SEE = 4.11 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) for men and women, respectively, with 75% and 72% of the variance explained. For the submaximal performance models accuracy were 14.1% (SEE = 6.24 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) and 14.4% (SEE = 5.17 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) for men and women, respectively, with 55% and 56% of the variance explained. The validation and cross-validation samples displayed SEE and variance explained in agreement with the total sample. Cross-classification between measured and predicted VO2peak accurately classified 91% of the participants within the correct or nearest quintile of measured VO2peak. Conclusion Judicious use of the exercise prediction models presented in this study offers valuable information in providing a fairly accurate assessment of VO2peak, which may be beneficial for risk stratification in health care settings. PMID:26794677

  4. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  5. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  6. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  7. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  8. Peak Oil, Food Systems, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Cindy L.; Kirschenmann, Frederick L.; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all. PMID:21778492

  9. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on... 12 and 13, T. 7 N., R. 4 W. on the Yountville U.S.G.S. map; (10) Then following the section boundary... elevation, located in section 10, T. N., R. 4 W.; (12) Then northwest in a straight line approximately...

  10. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on... 12 and 13, T. 7 N., R. 4 W. on the Yountville U.S.G.S. map; (10) Then following the section boundary... elevation, located in section 10, T. N., R. 4 W.; (12) Then northwest in a straight line approximately...

  11. Age does not alter acetaminophen absorption.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (age range, 22-78 years) received 650 mg of acetaminophen (AAP) on three separate occasions. The modes of administration were 1) intravenous, 5-minute infusion; 2) oral, with two 325-mg tablets; and 3) oral, with 650 mg as an elixir preparation. Plasma levels of AAP were determined in blood samples drawn up to 12 hours after the dose. The mean (+/- sd) kinetic variables for absorption of AAP from tablets in young and elderly were peak plasma concentration, 11.8 (+/- 4.2) vs 10.9 (+/- 4.1) micrograms/ml; peak time, 0.79 (+/- .54) vs 0.69 (+/- .40) hours after the dose; absorption half-life, 12.6 (+/- 9.8) vs. 8.2 (+/- 5.3) minutes; and absolute systemic availability, 79 (+/- 9) vs 72 (+/- 11) per cent. For AAP elixir, the corresponding values were 12.6 (+/- 5.4) vs 13.7 (+/- 6.0) micrograms/ml; 0.52 (+/- .24) vs 0.54 (+/- .51) hours; 8.6 (+/- 6.2) vs 6.1 (+/- 6.6) minutes; and 87 (+/- 9) vs 80 (+/- 9) per cent. Absolute bioavailability of both oral dosage forms was significantly less then 100 per cent in all groups. Elderly subjects tended to show lower availability of both oral preparations, but the difference was of borderline significance (P less than .50). Age did not influence any other measures of absorption. Since the absorption rate of acetaminophen may be indicative of the gastric emptying rate, age does not appear to alter this rate-limiting step in drug absorption. PMID:7069091

  12. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipway, B. J.

    2015-04-01

    Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment that can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down that can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. While multimodal aerosol with N different dispersion characteristics requires 2N+1 inputs to calculate the activation fraction, only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables are needed. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap, physically based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and Numerical Weather Prediction models.

  13. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Romero, E.; Vives, O.

    2016-02-01

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, ET^{miss} > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m_{tilde{g}} ≲ 1.2 TeV, together with a heavy neutralino NLSP of m_{tilde{χ }} ≳ 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out.

  14. Eyesight and the solar Wien peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James M.

    2003-03-01

    It is sometimes said that humans see best at yellow-green wavelengths because they have evolved under a Sun whose blackbody spectrum has a Wien peak in the green part of the spectrum. However, as a function of frequency, the solar blackbody spectrum peaks in the infrared. Why did human vision not evolve toward a peak sensitivity in this range, if the eye is an efficient quantum detector of photons? The puzzle is resolved if we assume that natural selection acted in such a way as to maximize the amount of energy that can be detected by the retina across a range of wavelengths (whose upper and lower limits are fixed by biological constraints). It is then found that our eyes are indeed perfectly adapted to life under a class G2 star. Extending this reasoning allows educated guesses to be made about the kind of eyesight that might have evolved in extrasolar planetary systems such as that of the red dwarf Gliese 876.

  15. Estimation of molar absorptivities and pigment sizes for eumelanin and pheomelanin using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piletic, Ivan R.; Matthews, Thomas E.; Warren, Warren S.

    2009-11-01

    Fundamental optical and structural properties of melanins are not well understood due to their poor solubility characteristics and the chemical disorder present during biomolecular synthesis. We apply nonlinear transient absorption spectroscopy to quantify molar absorptivities for eumelanin and pheomelanin and thereby get an estimate for their average pigment sizes. We determine that pheomelanin exhibits a larger molar absorptivity at near IR wavelengths (750nm), which may be extended to shorter wavelengths. Using the molar absorptivities, we estimate that melanin pigments contain ˜46 and 28 monomer units for eumelanin and pheomelanin, respectively. This is considerably larger than the oligomeric species that have been recently proposed to account for the absorption spectrum of eumelanin and illustrates that larger pigments comprise a significant fraction of the pigment distribution.

  16. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Lahiri, S. C.

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantfication of TNT was made using ɛ value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity ( EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  17. Quantifying peak discharges for historical floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    It is usually advantageous to use information regarding historical floods, if available, to define the flood-frequency relation for a stream. Peak stages can sometimes be determined for outstanding floods that occurred many years ago before systematic gaging of streams began. In the United States, this information is usually not available for more than 100-200 years, but in countries with long cultural histories, such as China, historical flood data are available at some sites as far back as 2,000 years or more. It is important in flood studies to be able to assign a maximum discharge rate and an associated error range to the historical flood. This paper describes the significant characteristics and uncertainties of four commonly used methods for estimating the peak discharge of a flood. These methods are: (1) rating curve (stage-discharge relation) extension; (2) slope conveyance; (3) slope area; and (4) step backwater. Logarithmic extensions of rating curves are based on theoretical plotting techniques that results in straight line extensions provided that channel shape and roughness do not change significantly. The slope-conveyance and slope-area methods are based on the Manning equation, which requires specific data on channel size, shape and roughness, as well as the water-surface slope for one or more cross-sections in a relatively straight reach of channel. The slope-conveyance method is used primarily for shaping and extending rating curves, whereas the slope-area method is used for specific floods. The step-backwater method, also based on the Manning equation, requires more cross-section data than the slope-area ethod, but has a water-surface profile convergence characteristic that negates the need for known or estimated water-surface slope. Uncertainties in calculating peak discharge for historical floods may be quite large. Various investigations have shown that errors in calculating peak discharges by the slope-area method under ideal conditions for

  18. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  19. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  20. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  1. The structure of the aggregate form of bacteriochlorophyll c showing the Q y absorption above 740 nm: a 1H-NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll c (3 1S, 8-isobutyl-12-ethyl, farnesyl) was dissolved in a mixture of methylene chloride and carbon tetrachloride (1 : 3), and changes in the 1H-NMR spectrum caused by the titration of methanol were traced. On the basis of the changes in chemical shift due to the ring-current effect of the neighboring macrocycles and in peak intensity (broadening) due to their stacking, the structure of the aggregate form showing the Q y absorption band above 740 nm is proposed: the macrocycles are stacked to form a one-dimensional inclined column, the y axis of each macrocycle being parallel to the long axis of the column.

  2. Deconvolution of mixed gamma emitters using peak parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Gadd, Milan S; Garcia, Francisco; Magadalena, Vigil M

    2011-01-14

    When evaluating samples containing mixtures of nuclides using gamma spectroscopy the situation sometimes arises where the nuclides present have photon emissions that cannot be resolved by the detector. An example of this is mixtures of {sup 241}Am and plutonium that have L x-ray emissions with slightly different energies which cannot be resolved using a high-purity germanium detector. It is possible to deconvolute the americium L x-rays from those plutonium based on the {sup 241}Am 59.54 keV photon. However, this requires accurate knowledge of the relative emission yields. Also, it often results in high uncertainties in the plutonium activity estimate due to the americium yields being approximately an order of magnitude greater than those for plutonium. In this work, an alternative method of determining the relative fraction of plutonium in mixtures of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu based on L x-ray peak location and shape parameters is investigated. The sensitivity and accuracy of the peak parameter method is compared to that for conventional peak decovolution.

  3. A naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible multiple peak metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heli; Song, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    We report a naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible metamaterial absorber. The visible metamaterial absorber consisting of a silver dendritic/dielectric/metal structure shows multiple absorption peaks. By incorporating a gain material (rhodamine B) into the dielectric layer, the maximal magnitude of the absorption peak can be improved by about 30%. As the metamaterial absorber is sensitive to the refractive index of glucose solutions, it can function as a sensor that quickly responds to variations of the refractive index of the liquid. Meanwhile, since the response is presented via color changes, it can be clearly observed by the naked eyes. Further experiments have confirmed that the sensor can be used repeatedly. PMID:25822141

  4. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, W. Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K.; Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within ±30 μm and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 μm. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound

  5. Electron beam stability and beam peak to peak motion data for NSLS X-Ray storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1993-07-01

    In the past two years, a significant reduction in electron beam motion has been achieved at the NSLS X-Ray storage ring. The implementation of global analog orbit feedbacks, based on a harmonics correction scheme, has reduced the beam motion globally. Implementation of six local analog feedback systems has reduced the beam motion even further at the corresponding beam line straight sections. This paper presents beam motion measurements, showing the improvement due to the feedback systems. Beam motion is measured using a spectrum analyzer and data is presented at various frequencies, where peaks were observed. Finally, some of the beam motion sources are discussed.

  6. Impact of nonlinear absorption on propagation of microwave in a plasma filled rectangular waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, H.; Vaziri, M.; Rooholamininejad, H.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    In collisional and ponderomotive predominant regimes, the propagation of microwave in rectangular waveguide filled with collisional plasma is investigated numerically. The dominant mode is excited through an evacuated waveguide and then enters a similar and co-axis waveguide filled with plasma. In collisional predominant regime, the amplitude of electric field is oscillated along propagation path; outset of propagation path due to the electron-ion collision, the intensity oscillations are reduced. Afterward, under competition between the collisional nonlinearity and absorption, the intensity is increased, so the electron density peak is created in middle of waveguide. In ponderomotive predominant regime, the intensity is slowly decreased due to collision, so the electron density is ramped. Control parameters, like the frequency, input power, collision frequency, and background electron density are surveyed that can be used to control propagation characteristics of microwave. This method can be used to control heating of fusion plasma and accelerate charged particle.

  7. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  8. Control of enhanced optical absorption in {mu}c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of grain size on the enhanced optical absorption of {micro}c-Si has been investigated using films of various grain sizes prepared by solid phase crystallization. The authors show that they can control this grain size and therefore the degree of absorption changes. For grain sizes below a threshold range significant absorption enhancement can be seen in the photon energy range of 1 to {approximately}3 eV and the absorption characteristics of these films show that the dominant mode of optical transitions is indirect. A correlation between first order Raman peak broadening and enhanced absorption was found suggesting both effects are related to confinement. A simple model was developed to see how confinement in the crystallites could influence indirect optical transitions.

  9. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  10. Measuring non-local Lagrangian peak bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Chan, Kwan Chuen; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2014-06-01

    We investigate non-local Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We begin by writing down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the non-local ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we develop a one-point cross-correlation technique to measure bias factors associated with χ2-distributed quantities. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before we apply it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order non-local contributions -2χ _{10}(k_1\\cdot k_2) and χ _{01}[3(k_1\\cdot k_2)^2-k_1^2 k_2^2], where k_1, k_2 are wave modes. We can reproduce our measurement of χ10 if we allow for an offset between the Lagrangian halo centre-of-mass and the peak position. The sign and magnitude of χ10 is consistent with Lagrangian haloes sitting near linear density maxima. The resulting contribution to the halo bias can safely be ignored for M = 1013 M⊙ h-1, but could become relevant at larger halo masses. For the second non-local bias χ01 however, we measure a much larger magnitude than predicted by our model. We speculate that some of this discrepancy might originate from non-local Lagrangian contributions induced by non-spherical collapse.

  11. Percutaneous absorption of Octopirox.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Kamat, V B

    1988-01-01

    containing 1% Octopirox is 29,400, so that the possibility of systemic effects due to absorption through the skin is remote. PMID:3345970

  12. Calculating weighted estimates of peak streamflow statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, Timothy A.; Berenbrock, Charles; Kiang, Julie E.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Federal guidelines for flood-frequency estimation, the uncertainty of peak streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flow at a streamgage, can be reduced by combining the at-site estimate with the regional regression estimate to obtain a weighted estimate of the flow statistic. The procedure assumes the estimates are independent, which is reasonable in most practical situations. The purpose of this publication is to describe and make available a method for calculating a weighted estimate from the uncertainty or variance of the two independent estimates.

  13. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  14. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported. PMID:26661473

  15. Intestinal Water Absorption Varies with Expected Dietary Water Load among Bats but Does Not Drive Paracellular Nutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Brun, Antonio; Gontero-Fourcade, Manuel; Fernández-Marinone, Guido; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rapid absorption and elimination of dietary water should be particularly important to flying species and were predicted to vary with the water content of the natural diet. Additionally, high water absorption capacity was predicted to be associated with high paracellular nutrient absorption due to solvent drag. We compared the water absorption rates of sanguivorous, nectarivorous, frugivorous, and insectivorous bats in intestinal luminal perfusions. High water absorption rates were associated with high expected dietary water load but were not highly correlated with previously measured rates of (paracellular) arabinose clearance. In conjunction with these tests, we measured water absorption and the paracellular absorption of nutrients in the intestine and stomach of vampire bats using luminal perfusions to test the hypothesis that the unique elongated vampire stomach is a critical site of water absorption. Vampire bats' gastric water absorption was high compared to mice but not compared to their intestines. We therefore conclude that (1) dietary water content has influenced the evolution of intestinal water absorption capacity in bats, (2) solvent drag is not the only driver of paracellular nutrient absorption, and (3) the vampire stomach is a capable but not critical location for water absorption. PMID:26658415

  16. The measurement of absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases - The absorption of CO and O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, William G.; Cohen, Edward A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Hillig, Kurt W., II

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus is described that will measure absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases. The method measures the change in the quality factor of a Fabry-Perot resonator with and without gas present. The magnitude of the change is interpreted in terms of the absorption of the lossy medium inside the resonator. Experiments have been performed on the 115-GHz CO line and the 119-GHz O2 line at two different temperatures to determine the linewidth parameter and the peak absorption value. These numbers can be combined to give the integrated intensity which can be accurately calculated from results of spectroscopy measurements. The CO results are within 2 percent percent of theoretically predicted valves. Measurements on O2 have shown that absorption can be measured as accurately as 0.5 dB/km with this technique. Results have been obtained for oxygen absolute absorption in the 60-80-GHz region.

  17. Documented and potential extreme peak discharges and relation between potential extreme peak discharges and probable maximum flood peak discharges in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, W.H.; Slade, R.M., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, conducted a study of extreme flood potential for Texas. Potential extreme peak discharges, derived from the relation between documented extreme peak discharges and their contributing drainage areas, can provide valuable information concerning the maximum expected peak discharge that could occur at a stream site. Documented extreme peak discharges and associated data were aggregated for 832 sites with and without streamflow-gaging stations in natural basins in Texas. A potential extreme peak discharge curve was developed for each of 11 hydrologic regions in Texas and for the State as a whole, based on documented extreme peak discharges and associated contributing drainage areas. The curve envelops, for a large range of drainage areas, the largest documented extreme peak discharges. Potential extreme peak discharges estimated from the curves were compared to probable maximum flood peak discharges estimated from various simulation models.

  18. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  19. Molecular conformation changes in alkylthiol ligands as a function of size in gold nanoparticles: X-ray absorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ramallo-Lopez, J. M.; Giovanetti, L. J.; Requejo, F. G.; Isaacs, S. R.; Shon, Y. S.; Salmeron, M.

    2006-08-15

    The bonding of hexanethiols to gold nanoparticles of 1.5, 2.0, and 3 nm was studied using x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The XANES spectra revealed that a substantial fraction of weakly bound hexanethiol molecules are present in addition to those forming covalent bonds with Au atoms. The weakly bound molecules can be removed by washing in dichloromethane. After removal of the weakly bound molecules the S K-edge XANES reveals peaks due to S-Au and S-C bonds with intensities that change as a function of particle size. Au L{sub 3}-edge EXAFS results indicate that these changes follow the changes in coordination number of Au to the S atoms at the surface of the particles.

  20. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  1. Low peak-power laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, S. G.; Cleary, A.; Veres, I. A.; Culshaw, B.; Thursby, G.; McKee, C.; Swift, C.; Armstrong, I.

    2011-09-01

    Techniques for the successful excitation of guided ultrasonic waves using a low peak-power laser ultrasonic source are discussed and compared with more conventional Q-switched laser sources. The paper considers acoustic propagation in thin plates, in which the frequencies used, typically only the fundamental guided wave modes, are considered. Aspects of excitation and detection geometry are considered along with the physical mechanisms of photo-acoustic generation and the practical issues surrounding available source wavelengths and power outputs. Understanding of the effects of these constraints is critical for the successful application of the technique. Continuous wave excitation and fully arbitrary modulation schemes are compared, and a technique to control the bandwidth of Golay code modulation is introduced. It is shown that earlier work by the authors was capable of guided wave detection at peak-power densities of 104 W cm- 2. Later work has focussed on the use of erbium-doped fibre amplifiers combined with Golay code modulation to improve the recovered signal-to-noise ratio. Two key applications of the techniques are considered: material properties measurements (using inversion of dispersion curve data) and acoustic emission system calibration.

  2. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with (1-/sup 14/C)glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused (3-/sup 3/H)glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation. That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery.

  3. Multiplasmon Absorption in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablan, Marinko; Chang, Darrick E.

    2015-06-01

    We show that graphene possesses a strong nonlinear optical response in the form of multiplasmon absorption, with exciting implications in classical and quantum nonlinear optics. Specifically, we predict that graphene nanoribbons can be used as saturable absorbers with low saturation intensity in the far-infrared and terahertz spectrum. Moreover, we predict that two-plasmon absorption and extreme localization of plasmon fields in graphene nanodisks can lead to a plasmon blockade effect, in which a single quantized plasmon strongly suppresses the possibility of exciting a second plasmon.

  4. Chaotic Systems with Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions Dq obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D1 in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results.

  5. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  6. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30-14:30 LT - local time).

  7. Inhibition of digoxin absorption by neomycin.

    PubMed

    Lindenbaum, J; Maulitz, R M; Butler, V P

    1976-09-01

    The effect of the administration of the antibiotic neomycin sulfate on the absorption of digoxin was assessed in crossover studies in normal human volunteers. Doses of neomycin (1 and 3 g) markedly depressed serum digoxin concentrations, the areas under the serum concentration-time curves, and cumulative 6-day urinary digoxin excretion after the oral ingestion of 0.5 mg of the cardiac glycoside in tablet form. Neomycin also prolonged the mean time at which peak serum digoxin levels were attained by 1.7 to 3 hr. The inhibition of digoxin absorption was also seen: (1) when the antibiotic was given 3 or 6 hr before the cardiac glycoside, (2) with digoxin tablets of varying dissolution rate, (3) when digoxin or neomycin solutions were used instead of tablets, and (4) in a patient who had had a total gastrectomy. When neomycin was administered with maintenance doses of digoxin, steady state serum digoxin concentrations were significantly reduced. When neomycin was given after a 9-day period of digitalization, the terminal serum digoxin half-life was not significantly shortened. Single doses of neomycin did not interfere with the extent of absorption of d-xylose. In vitro, neomycin did not affect the movement of digoxin across dialysis membranes, nor did it precipitate digoxin out of human bile or intestinal fluid. Neomycin thus clearly depresses the rate and extent of digoxin absorption in man. The mechanism of this effect remains to be established. PMID:950089

  8. Direction dependence of the magneto-optical absorption in nanowires with Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    We study the directional dependence of the absorption spectrum of ballistic nanowires in the presence of gate-controlled Rashba spin-orbit interaction and an in-plane magnetic field. In the weak Rashba regime, our analytical and numerical results show that the absorption peaks associated with the first and third intersubband transitions exhibit frequency shifts and strong amplitude modulations as the direction of the magnetic field changes. If the field is parallel to the nanowire axis, these peaks disappear and the resonance frequencies of the whole absorption spectrum are given merely in terms of the Zeeman splitting and the energy scale characterizing the confinement potential. The second transition has an absorption peak that suffers an opposite frequency shift with amplitude that is largely direction independent. The amplitude modulation and frequency shift of the absorption spectrum is periodic in the angle that the magnetic field makes with the nanowire axis.

  9. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  10. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-05-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed.

  11. Optical absorption and TEM studies of silver nanoparticle embedded BaO-CaF2-P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Manoj Kumar; Shashikala, H. D.

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticle embedded 30BaO-20CaF2-50P2O5-4Ag2O-4SnO glasses were prepared by melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment process. Silver-doped glasses were heat treated at temperatures 500 °C, 525°C and 550 °C for a fixed duration of 10 hours to incorporate metal nanoparticles into the glass matrix. Appearance and shift in peak positions of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands in the optical absorption spectra of heat treated glass samples indicated that both formation and growth of nanoparticle depended on heat treatment temperature. Glass sample heat treated at 525 °C showed a SPR peak around 3 eV, which indicated that spherical nanoparticles smaller than 20 nm were formed inside the glass matrix. Whereas sample heat treated at 550 °C showed a size dependent red shift in SPR peak due to the presence of silver nanoparticles of size larger than 20 nm. Size of the nanoparticles calculated using full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of absorption band showed a good agreement with the particle size obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis.

  12. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed of the day is an important forecast element in the 45th Weather Squadron's (45 WS) daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts. The forecasts are used for ground and space launch operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45 WS also issues wind advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect wind gusts to meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated peak wind speeds are challenging to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October - April. In Phase I of this task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool to help the 45 WS forecast non-convective winds at KSC/CCAFS for the 24-hour period of 0800 to 0800 local time. The tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displayed the forecast of peak wind speed, 5-minute average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, timing of the peak wind and probability the peak speed would meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt. For the current task (Phase II ), the 45 WS requested additional observations be used for the creation of the forecast equations by expanding the period of record (POR). Additional parameters were evaluated as predictors, including wind speeds between 500 ft and 3000 ft, static stability classification, Bulk Richardson Number, mixing depth, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion strength and depth and wind direction. Using a verification data set, the AMU compared the performance of the Phase I and II prediction methods. Just as in Phase I, the tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel GUI. The 45 WS requested the tool also be available in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The AMU first expanded the POR by two years by adding tower observations, surface observations and CCAFS (XMR) soundings for the cool season months of March 2007 to April 2009. The POR was expanded

  13. Hydrogen Absorption into Austenitic Stainless Steels Under High-Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen and Cathodic Charge in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Masato; Cheng, Lin; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Omura, Tomohiko; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Okuma, Ryuji

    2014-12-01

    Type 316L and Type 304 austenitic stainless steels, both deformed and non-deformed, were hydrogen charged cathodically in an aqueous solution as well as by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen in an attempt to identify suitable conditions of cathodic charge for simulating hydrogen absorption from gaseous hydrogen environments. Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was conducted, and the amount of absorbed hydrogen and the spectrum shape were compared between the two charging methods. Simulations were performed by means of the McNabb-Foster model to analyze the spectrum shape and peak temperature, and understand the effects of deformation on the spectra. It was revealed that the spectrum shape and peak temperature were dependent directly upon the initial distribution of hydrogen within the specimen, which varied widely according to the hydrogen charge condition. Deformation also had a marked effect on the amount of absorbed hydrogen in Type 304 steel due to the strain-induced martensitic transformation.

  14. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  15. Total absorption Cherenkov spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovski, E. I.

    2015-05-01

    A short review of 50 years of work done with Cherenkov detectors in laboratories at the Lebedev Physical Institute is presented. The report considers some issues concerning the use of Cherenkov total absorption counters based on lead glass and heavy crystals in accelerator experiments.

  16. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  17. ZINC ABSORPTION BY INFANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc absorption, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...

  18. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  19. Mineral resources of the Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas, Hinsdale County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, R.F.; Grauch, R.I.; Hon, K.; Bove, D.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Korzeb, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas are located 2-12 mi southwest of Lake City, CO. Much of the study areas has high mineral resource potential for precious and base metals in various ore deposit types. The rest of the study areas has moderate potential for these commodities. Two areas in the Redcloud Peak study area have moderate potential for molybdenum and copper in quartz monzonite-associated porphyry deposits. Part of the Handies Peak study area has moderate potential for molybdenum in granite-related porphyry deposits. The southwestern part of the Redcloud Peak study area has high potential for uranium in vein-type deposits. Moderate potential for this commodity extends over other parts of both study areas. The mineral resource potential for gold and silver (in clastic-sediment-hosted disseminated-type epithermal deposits) is low in those parts of both study areas underlain by the Henson Member of the Silverton Volcanics. The mineral and energy resource potential for aluminum (in alunite deposits), uranium (in disseminated deposits), and geothermal sources is low throughout both study areas. Based on currently available data, there is no energy resource potential for coal, oil, and natural gas. The study areas have no identified resources.

  20. Contributions of Astronauts Aerobic Exercise Intensity and Time on Change in VO2peak during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan E.; Buxton, Roxanne; Moore, Alan; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable variability among astronauts with respect to changes in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) during International Space Station (ISS) missions, ranging from a 5% increase to 30% decline. Individual differences may be due to in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity on change in VO2peak during ISS missions. METHODS: Astronauts (N=11) performed peak cycle tests approx 60 days before flight (L-60), on flight day (FD) approx 14, and every approx 30 days thereafter. Metabolic gas analysis and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the test using the portable pulmonary function system. HR and duration of each in-flight cycle ergometer and treadmill (TM) session were recorded and averaged in time segments corresponding to each peak test. Mixed effects linear regression with exercise mode (TM or cycle) as a categorical variable was used to assess the contributions of exercise intensity (%time >70% peak HR or %time >90% peak HR) and time (min/wk), adjusted for body weight, on %change in VO2peak during the mission, and incorporating the repeated-measures experimental design. RESULTS: 110 observations were included in the model (4-6 peak cycle tests per astronaut, 2 exercise devices). VO2peak was reduced from preflight throughout the mission (FD14: 13+/-13% and FD 105: 8+/-10%). Exercise intensity (%peak HR: FD14=66+/-14; FD105=75+/-8) and time (min/wk: FD14=82+/-46; FD105=158+/-40) increased during flight. The models showed main effects for exercise time and intensity with no interactions between time, intensity, and device (70% peak HR: time [z-score=2.39; P=0.017], intensity [z-score=3.51; P=0.000]; 90% peak HR: time [zscore= 3.31; P=0.001], intensity [z-score=2.24; P=0.025]). CONCLUSION: Exercise time and intensity independently contribute to %change in VO2peak during ISS missions, indicating that there are minimal values for exercise time and intensity

  1. Twin Peaks in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' approximately 1-2 kilometers away were imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. A lander petal and deflated airbag are at the bottom of the image.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  2. NMR solvent peak suppression by nonlinear excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1988-03-01

    Most existing NMR solvent peak suppression sequences provide a satisfactory dependence of the intensity of excited signals on frequency but poor phase characteristics. In practice this leads to spectral distortions which generally become more severe as the frequency selectivity of the sequence is increased. However, it is shown that by working well outside the linear response regime, excitation schemes which combine high frequency selectivity with good phase properties may be devised. Sequences of six rectangular radio-frequency pulses were discovered using a combination of coherent averaging theory to treat the near-resonant behavior and numerical simulation further from resonance. Extensive use of symmetry greatly simplifies both the coherent averaging calculations and the numerical simulations. The new pulse sequences have been given the acronym NERO (nonlinear excitation rejecting on-resonance). Experimental spectra of an enzyme in dilute aqueous solution are shown.

  3. BUFFALO PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Wood, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colorado. On the basis of this study there is a probable mineral-resource potential for silver vein and bedding replacement deposits along the Weston Pass fault zone, for hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits in the vicinity of the Parkdale iron pit, and for gold vein deposits in the parts of the Granite and Four Mile districts that are within the wilderness study area. A probable barite resource potential occurs at Rough and Tumbling Creek and near Spring Creek on the east side of the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  4. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  5. Two-dimensional probe absorption in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ningwu; Zhang, Yan; Kang, Chengxian; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) probe absorption in coupled quantum dots. It is found that, due to the position-dependent quantum interference effect, the 2D optical absorption spectrum can be easily controlled via adjusting the system parameters. Thus, our scheme may provide some technological applications in solid-state quantum communication.

  6. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  7. Doping dependent blue shift and linewidth broadening of intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-14

    Blue shift and broadening of the absorption spectra of mid-infrared intersubband transition in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN 10 quantum wells were observed with increasing doping density. As the doping density was increased from 6.6 × 10{sup 11} to 6.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} per a quantum well, the intersubband absorption peak energy shifted from 274.0 meV to 302.9 meV, and the full width at half maximum increased from 56.4 meV to 112.4 meV. Theoretical calculations reveal that the blue shift is due to many body effects, and the intersubband linewidth in doped AlGaN/GaN QW is mainly determined by scattering due to interface roughness, LO phonons, and ionized impurities.

  8. Doping dependent blue shift and linewidth broadening of intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Blue shift and broadening of the absorption spectra of mid-infrared intersubband transition in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN 10 quantum wells were observed with increasing doping density. As the doping density was increased from 6.6 × 1011 to 6.0 × 1012 cm-2 per a quantum well, the intersubband absorption peak energy shifted from 274.0 meV to 302.9 meV, and the full width at half maximum increased from 56.4 meV to 112.4 meV. Theoretical calculations reveal that the blue shift is due to many body effects, and the intersubband linewidth in doped AlGaN/GaN QW is mainly determined by scattering due to interface roughness, LO phonons, and ionized impurities.

  9. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. THE CASE OF EQUAL PEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.; Stevens, A. C.; Rosario, D. J. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: acs0196@mail.utexas.edu

    2012-06-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked narrow lines (DPAGNs) may be caused by kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs, bipolar outflows, or rotating gaseous disks. We examine the class of DPAGNs in which the two narrow-line components have closely similar intensity as being especially likely to involve disks or jets. Two spectroscopic indicators support this likelihood. For DPAGNs from Smith et al., the 'equal-peaked' objects (EPAGNs) have [Ne V]/[O III]ratios lower than for a control sample of non-double-peaked AGNs. This is unexpected for a pair of normal AGNs in a galactic merger, but may be consistent with [O III] emission from a rotating ring with relatively little gas at small radii. Also, [O III]/H{beta} ratios of the redshifted and blueshifted systems in the EPAGN are more similar to each other than in a control sample, suggestive of a single ionizing source and inconsistent with the binary interpretation.

  10. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  11. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cina, Jeffrey A.; Kovac, Philip A.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Dean, Jacob C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done.

  12. Hydrogen absorption behavior into boron films by glow discharges in hydrogen and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Natsir, M.; Inoue, N.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Motojima, O.; Mochizuki, T.; Hino, T.; Yamashina, T.

    1997-02-01

    Hydrogen absorption behavior into boron films deposited on graphite and stainless steel (SS) has been studied. Hydrogen absorption into a H-depleted boron film was investigated during a hydrogen glow discharge with pressure drop measured by a diaphragm gauge. It was found that, after strong but short time absorption at initial phase, hydrogen atoms were slowly (a few percents of injected H atoms) but continuously absorbed without saturation up to 3 h, which was not observed with SS liner without boron coating. Hydrogen atoms were not only desorbed but also implanted into the film during a helium glow discharge and thus, hydrogen atoms were accumulated in the film when H 2 and He discharges were repeated alternately. These accumulation effects enhanced by ions from the glow discharge were investigated quantitatively and the effect of bombarding ion species (H + or He +) was discussed. Depth profile of H atoms was measured by elastic recoil detection (ERD). The density of only near surface region was increased when the hydrogen atoms were injected. Longer time exposure to H 2 discharge resulted in increase in surface density and shift of the peak position to deeper into the film. These results were explained by diffusion of H atoms due to ion impact into the films with keeping its saturation level if we consider resolution of ERD method of 25 nm. From the results, applicability of boron film as protection layer of tritium permeation is discussed.

  13. Experimental and theoretical study of two-photon absorption in nitrofuran derivatives: Promising compounds for photochemotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boni, L.; Correa, D. S.; Silva, D. L.; Gonçalves, P. J.; Zilio, S. C.; Parra, G. G.; Borissevitch, I. E.; Canuto, S.; Mendonca, C. R.

    2011-01-01

    We report experimental and theoretical studies of the two-photon absorption spectrum of two nitrofuran derivatives: nitrofurantoine, (1-(5-nitro-2-furfurilideneamine)-hidantoine) and quinifuryl, 2-(5'-nitro-2'-furanyl)ethenyl-4-{N-[4'-(N,N-diethylamino)-1'-methylbutyl]carbamoyl} quinoline. Both molecules are representative of a family of 5-nitrofuran-ethenyl-quinoline drugs that have been demonstrated to display high toxicity to various species of transformed cells in the dark. We determine the two-photon absorption cross-section for both compounds, from 560 to 880 nm, which present peak values of 64 GM for quinifuryl and 20 GM for nitrofurantoine (1 GM = 1×10-50cm4.s.photon-1). Besides, theoretical calculations employing the linear and quadratic response functions were carried out at the density functional theory level to aid the interpretations of the experimental results. The theoretical results yielded oscillator strengths, two-photon transition probabilities, and transition energies, which are in good agreement with the experimental data. A higher number of allowed electronic transitions was identified for quinifuryl in comparison to nitrofurantoine by the theoretical calculations. Due to the planar structure of both compounds, the differences in the two-photon absorption cross-section values are a consequence of their distinct conjugation lengths.

  14. X-ray absorption spectroscopy from H-passivated porous Si and oxidized Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Schuppler, S.; Marcus, M.A.; Friedman, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    Quantum confinement in nanoscale Si structures is widely believed to be responsible for the visible luminescence observed from anodically etched porous silicon (por-Si), but little is known about the actual size or shape of these structures. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure data from a wide variety of por-Si samples show significantly reduced average Si coordination numbers due to the sizable contribution of surface-coordinated H. (The IUSI ratios, as large as 1.2, were independently confirmed by ir-absorption and {alpha}-recoil measurements.) The Si coordinations imply very large surface/volume ratios, enabling the average Si structures to be identified as crystalline particles (not wires) whose dimensions are typically <15 {Angstrom}. Comparison of the size-dependent peak luminescence energies with those of oxidized Si nanocrystals, whose shapes are known, shows remarkable agreement. Furthermore, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of the nanocrystals shows the outer oxide and interfacial suboxide layers to be constant over a wide range of nanocrystal sizes. The combination of these results effectively rules out surface species as being responsible for the observed visible luminescence in por-Si, and strongly supports quantum confinement as the dominant mechanism occurring in Si particles which are substantially smaller than previously reported or proposed.

  15. Exciton Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Wells Driven by a Strong Intersubband Pump Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    Optical interband excitonic absorption of semiconductor quantum wells (QW's) driven by a coherent pump field is investigated based on semiconductor Bloch equations. The pump field has a photon energy close to the intersubband spacing between the first two conduction subbands in the QW's. An external weak optical field probes the interband transition. The excitonic effects and pump-induced population redistribution within the conduction subbands in the QW system are included. When the density of the electron-hole pairs in the QW structure is low, the pump field induces an Autler-Townes splitting of the exciton absorption spectrum. The split size and the peak positions of the absorption doublet depend not only on the pump frequency and intensity but also on the carrier density. As the density of the electron-hole pairs is increased, the split contrast (the ratio between the maximum and minimum values) is decreased because the exciton effect is suppressed at higher densities due to the many-body screening.

  16. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules. PMID:27598527

  17. Absorption and pharmacokinetics of phenylbutazone in Welsh Mountain ponies.

    PubMed

    Maitho, T E; Lees, P; Taylor, J B

    1986-03-01

    The disposition of phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg), administered intravenously to six Welsh Mountain ponies, was described by a two-compartment open model. Pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different after morning dosing in comparison with afternoon dosing. When phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg) was administered orally to the same ponies, marked variations in time to peak concentrations were produced with different feeding schedules. When access to hay was permitted before and after dosing, the mean time to peak concentration was 13.2 +/- 1.2 h and double peaks in the plasma concentration-time curve were common. Double peaks were also encountered when phenylbutazone was given to ponies deprived of food prior to, and allowed access to hay after, dosing. In this circumstance, mean times to peak concentration were much shorter (3.8 +/- 1.3 h after morning dosing and 5.3 +/- 1.5 h followed afternoon dosing). Absorption was more regular and double peaks were less apparent when food was withheld both before and after dosing. In order to explain these findings, it is tentatively postulated that, whereas some of the administered dose of phenylbutazone may be absorbed quickly, some may become adsorbed on to the feed and subsequently released by fermentative digestion in the large intestine and/or caecum. The consequences of delayed absorption in fed animals for toxicity and clinical efficacy, and for the use of phenylbutazone in equestrian sports, are considered. Delayed absorption in ponies given access to hay was not accompanied by a significant reduction in total absorption. Bioavailability was estimated to be approximately 69% in fed and 78% in unfed ponies. Estimates of bioavailability gave similar values for morning (72%) and afternoon (71%) dosing. PMID:3701913

  18. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  19. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  20. Turbulence Hazard Metric Based on Peak Accelerations for Jetliner Passengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations are made of the approximate hazard due to peak normal accelerations of an airplane flying through a simulated vertical wind field associated with a convective frontal system. The calculations are based on a hazard metric developed from a systematic application of a generic math model to 1-cosine discrete gusts of various amplitudes and gust lengths. The math model simulates the three degree-of- freedom longitudinal rigid body motion to vertical gusts and includes (1) fuselage flexibility, (2) the lag in the downwash from the wing to the tail, (3) gradual lift effects, (4) a simplified autopilot, and (5) motion of an unrestrained passenger in the rear cabin. Airplane and passenger response contours are calculated for a matrix of gust amplitudes and gust lengths. The airplane response contours are used to develop an approximate hazard metric of peak normal accelerations as a function of gust amplitude and gust length. The hazard metric is then applied to a two-dimensional simulated vertical wind field of a convective frontal system. The variations of the hazard metric with gust length and airplane heading are demonstrated.

  1. Estimating instantaneous peak flow from mean daily flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    While instantaneous peak flow (IPF) records have historically been necessary for practical applications in flood risk management and hydraulic structure design, mean daily flow (MDF) values are often all that are available. To address this problem, we propose a simple method, which requires only MDF records as its input and uses the rising and falling slopes of daily hydrographs, to estimate IPFs. We applied this method to 144 catchments in Iowa, USA, with drainage areas ranging from about 7 to 220,000 km2. This application involves about 3800 peak flow events originating from different flood generation mechanisms over the period from 1997 to 2014. About 55% of the catchments have prediction errors within ±10%, and 85% of the catchments have predictions errors within ±20%. The method works well for catchments larger than 500 km2, poorly for catchments smaller than 100 km2, and fairly well for catchments in between these sizes. The reduction in the method's effectiveness with decreasing catchment size is due to the fact that the smaller the catchment, the more information is lost when using MDF to characterize the instantaneous flow processes. Our proposed method is simple and promising in terms of estimating IPFs from MDFs for areas where IPF records are unavailable or are insufficient.

  2. Peak phosphorus - peak food? The need to close the phosphorus cycle.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The peak in the world production of phosphorus has been predicted to occur in 2033, based on world reserves of rock phosphate (URR) reckoned at around 24,000 million tonnes (Mt), with around 18,000 Mt remaining. This figure was reckoned-up to 71,000 Mt, by the USGS, in 2012, but a production maximum during the present century is still highly probable. There are complex issues over what the demand will be for phosphorus in the future, as measured against a rising population (from 7 billion to over 9 billion in 2050), and a greater per capita demand for fertiliser to grow more grain, in part to feed animals and meet a rising demand for meat by a human species that is not merely more populous but more affluent. As a counterweight to this, we may expect that greater efficiencies in the use of phosphorus - including recycling from farms and of human and animal waste - will reduce the per capita demand for phosphate rock. The unseen game changer is peak oil, since phosphate is mined and recovered using machinery powered by liquid fuels refined from crude oil. Hence, peak oil and peak phosphorus might appear as conjoined twins. There is no unequivocal case that we can afford to ignore the likelihood of a supply-demand gap for phosphorus occurring sometime this century, and it would be perilous to do so. PMID:23901632

  3. Peaking at Zero: Null Subjects and Other Indicators of Peak in Konni Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahill, Mike

    An analysis of story telling in Konni, a language spoken in Ghana, focused on how the climax of a story is characterized. The texts studied are six oral folk tales; two are appended, and portions of all are used as illustrations in the text of the report. First, the definition and characteristics of "peak," or climax of a story are discussed. This…

  4. Chaotic systems with absorption.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Portela, Jefferson S E; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions D(q) obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D(1) in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results. PMID:24138240

  5. NOx control buys to peak in `98

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act provide the legislative framework for a huge NOx reduction program now in operation. This reduction will have a substantial effect in reducing ground-level ozone. A new McIlvaine report concludes that US utilities and industrial companies during the next 10 years will spend more than $800 million annually to meet CAA`s NOx-control regulations. Much of that investment will be for low-NOx burners, which minimize NOx formation. Many utilities and industrial boilers can be retrofitted with a new generation of burners; however, this technology achieves less than 50% NOx reduction. Post-combustion technologies, such as selective catalytic reduction and selective noncatalytic reduction, can reduce NOx as much as 90%. Therefore, plants needing greater NOx reduction will use post-combustion technologies, often in combination with low-NOx burners. The peak order year for NOx-control equipment will be 1998, primarily because Title IV of CAA requires utilities to comply by 2000. Many industrial sources also will be ordering equipment in 1998.

  6. North Twin Peak in super resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This pair of images shows the result of taking a sequence of 25 identical exposures from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) of the northern Twin Peak, with small camera motions, and processing them with the Super-Resolution algorithm developed at NASA's Ames Research Center.

    The upper image is a representative input image, scaled up by a factor of five, with the pixel edges smoothed out for a fair comparison. The lower image allows significantly finer detail to be resolved.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    The super-resolution research was conducted by Peter Cheeseman, Bob Kanefsky, Robin Hanson, and John Stutz of NASA's Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA. More information on this technology is available on the Ames Super Resolution home page at

    http://ic-www.arc.nasa.gov/ic/projects/bayes-group/ group/super-res/

  7. Pathways of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N

    2002-01-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal absorptive cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of absorptive cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224

  8. Absorption spectrum of DNA for wavelengths greater than 300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.

    1981-06-01

    Although DNA absorption at wavelengths greater than 300 nm is much weaker than that at shorter wavelengths, this absorption seems to be responsible for much of the biological damage caused by solar radiation of wavelengths less than 320 nm. Accurate measurement of the absorption spectrum of DNA above 300 nm is complicated by turbidity characteristic of concentrated solutions of DNA. We have measured the absorption spectra of DNA from calf thymus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, salmon testis, and human placenta using procedures which separate optical density due to true absorption from that due to turbidity. Above 300 nm, the relative absorption of DNA increases as a function of guanine-cytosine content, presumably because the absorption of guanine is much greater than the absorption of adenine at these wavelengths. This result suggests that the photophysical processes which follow absorption of a long-wavelength photon may, on the average, differ from those induced by shorter-wavelength photons. It may also explain the lower quantum yield for the killing of cells by wavelengths above 300 nm compared to that by shorter wavelengths.

  9. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-01

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile. PMID:23928555

  10. Peak picking and the assessment of separation performance in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm was developed for 2DHPLC that automated the process of peak recognition, measuring their retention times, and then subsequently plotting the information in a two-dimensional retention plane. Following the recognition of peaks, the software then performed a series of statistical assessments of the separation performance, measuring for example, correlation between dimensions, peak capacity and the percentage of usage of the separation space. Peak recognition was achieved by interpreting the first and second derivatives of each respective one-dimensional chromatogram to determine the 1D retention times of each solute and then compiling these retention times for each respective fraction 'cut'. Due to the nature of comprehensive 2DHPLC adjacent cut fractions may contain peaks common to more than one cut fraction. The algorithm determined which components were common in adjacent cuts and subsequently calculated the peak maximum profile by interpolating the space between adjacent peaks. This algorithm was applied to the analysis of a two-dimensional separation of an apple flesh extract separated in a first dimension comprising a cyano stationary phase and an aqueous/THF mobile phase as the first dimension and a second dimension comprising C18-Hydro with an aqueous/MeOH mobile phase. A total of 187 peaks were detected.

  11. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  12. Cloud geometry effects on atmospheric solar absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Q.; Cribb, M.C.; Barker, H.W.; Krueger, S.K.; Grossman, A.

    2000-04-15

    A 3D broadband solar radiative transfer scheme is formulated by integrating a Monte Carlo photon transport algorithm with the Fu-Liou radiation model. It is applied to fields of tropical mesoscale convective clouds and subtropical marine boundary layer clouds that were generated by a 2D cloud-resolving model. The effects of cloud geometry on the radiative energy budget are examined by comparing the full-resolution Monte Carlo results with those from the independent column approximation (ICA) that applies the plane-parallel radiation model to each column. For the tropical convective cloud system, it is found that cloud geometry effects always enhance atmospheric solar absorption regardless of solar zenith angle. In a large horizontal domain (512 km), differences in domain-averaged atmospheric absorption between the Monte Carlo and the ICA are less than 4 W m{sup {minus}2} in the daytime. However, for a smaller domain (e.g., 75 km) containing a cluster of deep convective towers, domain-averaged absorption can be enhanced by more than 20 W m{sup {minus}2}. For a subtropical marine boundary layer cloud system during the stratus-to-cumulus transition, calculations show that the ICA works very well for domain-averaged fluxes of the stratocumulus cloud fields even for a very small domain (4.8 km). For the trade cumulus cloud field, the effects of cloud sides and horizontal transport of photons become more significant. Calculations have also been made for both cloud systems including black carbon aerosol and a water vapor continuum. It is found that cloud geometry produces no discernible effects on the absorption enhancement due to the black carbon aerosol and water vapor continuum. The current study indicates that the atmospheric absorption enhancement due to cloud-related 3D photon transport is small. This enhancement could not explain the excess absorption suggested by recent studies.

  13. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  14. Chromatographic peak alignment using derivative dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Bork, Christopher; Ng, Kenneth; Liu, Yinhan; Yee, Alex; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chromatogram overlays are frequently used to monitor inter-batch performance of bioprocess purification steps. However, the objective analysis of chromatograms is difficult due to peak shifts caused by variable phase durations or unexpected process holds. Furthermore, synchronization of batch process data may also be required prior to performing multivariate analysis techniques. Dynamic time warping was originally developed as a method for spoken word recognition, but shows potential in the objective analysis of time variant signals, such as manufacturing data. In this work we will discuss the application of dynamic time warping with a derivative weighting function to align chromatograms to facilitate process monitoring and fault detection. In addition, we will demonstrate the utility of this method as a preprocessing step for multivariate model development. PMID:23292764

  15. Robust Majorana Conductance Peaks for a Superconducting Lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Vinkler-Aviv, Yuval; Glazman, Leonid I.; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Experimental evidence for Majorana bound states largely relies on measurements of the tunneling conductance. While the conductance into a Majorana state is in principle quantized to 2 e2/h , observation of this quantization has been elusive, presumably due to temperature broadening in the normal-metal lead. Here, we propose to use a superconducting lead instead, whose gap strongly suppresses thermal excitations. For a wide range of tunneling strengths and temperatures, a Majorana state is then signaled by symmetric conductance peaks at e V =±Δ of a universal height G =(4 -π )2 e2/h . For a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip, Majorana states appear as spatial conductance plateaus while the conductance varies with the local wave function for trivial Andreev bound states. We discuss effects of nonresonant (bulk) Andreev reflections and quasiparticle poisoning.

  16. Robust Majorana Conductance Peaks for a Superconducting Lead.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Vinkler-Aviv, Yuval; Glazman, Leonid I; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-12-31

    Experimental evidence for Majorana bound states largely relies on measurements of the tunneling conductance. While the conductance into a Majorana state is in principle quantized to 2e^{2}/h, observation of this quantization has been elusive, presumably due to temperature broadening in the normal-metal lead. Here, we propose to use a superconducting lead instead, whose gap strongly suppresses thermal excitations. For a wide range of tunneling strengths and temperatures, a Majorana state is then signaled by symmetric conductance peaks at eV=±Δ of a universal height G=(4-π)2e(2)/h. For a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip, Majorana states appear as spatial conductance plateaus while the conductance varies with the local wave function for trivial Andreev bound states. We discuss effects of nonresonant (bulk) Andreev reflections and quasiparticle poisoning. PMID:26765015

  17. Suppression of jet noise peak by velocity profile reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, S.; Nishiwaki, H.; Takeda, K.

    1981-07-01

    Proposed here is an efficient noise-abating system having the potential for application to a broad spectrum of turbofan engines. An exhaust system with the core nozzle reshaped into an elliptic exit section from the conventional circular nozzle is recommended. The comparison of the scale-model tests revealed that a 5 dB decrease in peak noise levels was realized with a slight increase of the sound pressure at large emission angles. A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to quantify the high-temperature flow turbulence. With the elliptic core nozzle, the jet flow was more diffused axially and spread radially along the major axis. The noise reduction was attributed to the enhancement of the sound refraction and to the lower sound generation, due to the turbulence suppression as well as the lowered mean density gradients at the noise source.

  18. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  19. Device level 3D characterization using PeakForce AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timoney, Padraig; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Vaid, Alok; Hand, Sean; Osborne, Jason; Milligan, Eric; Feinstein, Adam

    2016-03-01

    Traditional metrology solutions face a range of challenges at the 1X node such as three dimensional (3D) measurement capabilities, shrinking overlay and critical dimension (CD) error budgets driven by multi-patterning and via in trench CD measurements. With advent of advanced technology nodes and 3D processing, an increasing need is emerging for in-die metrology including across-structure and structure-to-structure characterization. A myriad of work has emerged in the past few years intending to address these challenges from various aspects; in-die OCD with reduced spot size and tilt beam on traditional critical dimension scanning electron microscopy (CDSEM) for height measurements. This paper explores the latest capability offered by PeakForceTM Tapping Atomic Force Microscopy (PFT-AFM). The use of traditional harmonic tapping mode for scanning high aspect ratio, and complex "3D" wafer structures, results in limited depth probing capability as well as excessive tip wear. These limitations arise due to the large tip-sample interaction volume in such confined spaces. PeakForce Tapping eliminates these limitations through direct real time control of the tip-sample interaction contact force. The ability of PeakForce to measure, and respond directly to tip- sample interaction forces results in more detailed feature resolution, reduced tip wear, and improved depth capability. In this work, the PFT-AFM tool was applied for multiple applications, including the 14nm fin and replacement metal gate (RMG) applications outlined below. Results from DOE wafers, detailed measurement precision studies and correlation to reference metrology are presented for validation of this methodology. With the fin application, precision of 0.3nm is demonstrated by measuring 5 dies with 10 consecutive runs. Capability to resolve within-die and localized within-macro height variation is also demonstrated. Results obtained from the fin measurements support the increasing trend that measurements

  20. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering Assessments and the Impact of City Size on Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe

    The general problem of urban pollution and its relation to the city population is examined in this dissertation. A simple model suggests that pollutant concentrations should scale approximately with the square root of city population. This model and its experimental evaluation presented here serve as important guidelines for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards including the limits that air pollution places on city population. The model was evaluated using measurements of air pollution. Optical properties of aerosol pollutants such as light absorption and scattering plus chemical species mass concentrations were measured with a photoacoustic spectrometer, a reciprocal nephelometer, and an aerosol mass spectrometer in Mexico City in the context of the multinational project "Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO)" in March 2006. Aerosol light absorption and scattering measurements were also obtained for Reno and Las Vegas, NV USA in December 2008-March 2009 and January-February 2003, respectively. In all three cities, the morning scattering peak occurs a few hours later than the absorption peak due to the formation of secondary photochemically produced aerosols. In particular, for Mexico City we determined the fraction of photochemically generated secondary aerosols to be about 75% of total aerosol mass concentration at its peak near midday. The simple 2-d box model suggests that commonly emitted primary air pollutant (e.g., black carbon) mass concentrations scale approximately as the square root of the urban population. This argument extends to the absorption coefficient, as it is approximately proportional to the black carbon mass concentration. Since urban secondary pollutants form through photochemical reactions involving primary precursors, in linear approximation their mass concentration also should scale with the square root of population. Therefore, the scattering coefficient, a proxy for particulate matter

  1. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  2. Surface sensitivity of elastic peak electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.

    2016-08-01

    New theoretical model describing the sampling depth of elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) has been proposed. Surface sensitivity of this technique can be generally identified with the maximum depth reached by trajectories of elastically backscattered electrons. A parameter called the penetration depth distribution function (PDDF) has been proposed for this description. Two further parameters are descendant from this definition: the mean penetration depth (MPD) and the information depth (ID). From the proposed theory, relatively simple analytical expressions describing the above parameters can be derived. Although the Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used to estimate the sampling depth of EPES, this approach may require a considerable amount of computations. In contrast, the analytical model proposed here (AN) is very fast and provides the parameters PDDF, MPD and ID that very well compare with results of MC simulations. As follows from detailed comparisons performed for four elements (Al, Ni, Pd and Au), the AN model practically reproduced complicated emission angle dependences of the MPDs and the IDs, correctly indicating numerous maximum and minimum positions. In the energy range from 200 eV to 5 keV, the averaged percentage differences between MPDs obtained from the MC and the AN models were close to 4%. An important conclusion resulting from the present studies refers to the procedure of determination of the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) from EPES. Frequently, the analyzed sample is deposited as a thin overlayer on a smooth substrate. From an analysis of the presently obtained IDs, is follows that 99% of trajectories in analyzed experimental configurations reaches depth not exceeding 2.39 in units of IMFP. Thus, one can postulate that a safe minimum thickness of an overlayer should be larger than about 3 IMFPs. For example, the minimum thickness of an Al overlayer shoud be about 8 nm at 5000 eV.

  3. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  4. Occupational asthma due to oil mists.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, A S; Weir, D C; Burge, P S

    1988-01-01

    Twenty five patients who were exposed to oil mists at their place of work were investigated for possible work related asthma. Serial peak expiratory flow recordings showed 13 to have definite work related asthma, seven equivocal work related asthma, and three asthma unrelated to work; two had normal recordings. Subjects with work related asthma often produced different patterns of peak flow response during the working week; patterns also varied between patients. Six of these patients had bronchial tests with oil from their place of work. Three had asthma induced by exposure to unused (clean) soluble oil and one reacted to used but not to clean oil. The challenge tests in the remaining two gave inconclusive results. It is concluded that occupational asthma due to oil mists is common, the peak flow response is heterogeneous, and the provoking agent within the oil may vary from worker to worker. PMID:3406905

  5. Time-varying sodium absorption in the Type Ia supernova 2013gh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, R.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Johansson, J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Butler, R. P.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Doran, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Freeland, E.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Lundqvist, P.; Mattila, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P. E.; Petrushevska, T.; Valenti, S.; Vogt, S.; Wozniak, P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. Aims: To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova (SN) evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernovae peak in the ultraviolet. We attempt, therefore, to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. Methods: We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13dge, to search for absorption-line variations. Furthermore, we study interstellar absorption features in relation to the observed photometric colours of the SNe. Results: Both SNe display deep Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features. Furthermore, small but significant variations are detected in a feature of the Na I D profile of SN 2013gh. The variations are consistent with either geometric effects of rapidly moving or patchy gas clouds or photoionisation of Na I gas at R ≈ 1019 cm from the explosion. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that it is necessary to focus on early phases to detect photoionisation effects of gases in the circumstellar medium of SNe Ia. Different absorbers such as Na I and Ca II can be used to probe for matter at different distances from the SNe. The nondetection of variations during early phases makes it possible to put limits on the abundance of the species at those distances. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only

  6. Polarized absorption spectra of (2,2) carbon nanotubes aligned in channels of an AEL crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanping; Zhai, Jianpang; Li, Irene Ling; Ruan, Shuangchen; Tang, Zikang

    2015-11-01

    We report polarized absorption spectra for the (2,2) tubes arrayed in the one-dimensional channels of an AlPO4-11 (AEL) single crystal. Strong polarization dependence is observed indicating a preferential optical dipole along the axis of carbon nanotubes. By correlating with the absorption spectra and First-principles local density function (LDA) calculation, the absorption peak at 2.95 eV is uniquely assigned to semiconducting type (2,2) tubes, and peaks at 2.67 and 2.40 eV are corresponding to metallic type (2,2) tubes.

  7. Tunable van Hove Singularities and Optical Absorption of Twisted Bilayer Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yufeng; Yang, Li

    2013-03-01

    We perform the first-principles GW-Bethe-Salpeter Equation (BSE) simulation to study the optical absorption spectra of isolated twisted bilayer graphene (TBLG). The twisting generates new van Hove singularities (VHS), and these VHSs and corresponding optical absorption peaks can be tuned in a wide range by the twist angle. Enhanced electron-electron and electron-hole interactions are shown to be important to understand both optical absorption peak positions and their lineshapes. With these many-electron effects included, our calculation satisfactorily explains recent experimental measurements.

  8. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  9. Temperature-dependent excitonic photoluminescence excited by two-photon absorption in perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ke; Xu, Zhongjie; Chen, Runze; Zheng, Xin; Cheng, Xiangai; Jiang, Tian

    2016-08-15

    Recently, lead halide perovskite quantum dots have been reported with potential for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their excellent luminescent properties. Herein excitonic photoluminescence (PL) excited by two-photon absorption in perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots (QDs) has been studied at a broad temperature range, from 80 to 380 K. Two-photon absorption has been investigated and the absorption coefficient is up to 0.085 cm/GW at room temperature. Moreover, the PL spectrum excited by two-photon absorption shows a linear blue-shift (0.32 meV/K) below the temperature of 220 K. However, for higher temperatures, the PL peak approaches a roughly constant value and shows temperature-independent chromaticity up to 380 K. This behavior is distinct from the general red-shift for semiconductors and can be attributed to the result of thermal expansion, electron-phonon interaction and structural phase transition around 360 K. The strong nonlinear absorption and temperature-independent chromaticity of CsPbBr3 QDs observed in temperature range from 220 to 380 K will offer new opportunities in nonlinear photonics, light-harvesting, and light-emitting devices. PMID:27519098

  10. ITALIAN PEAK AND ITALIAN PEAK MIDDLE ROADLESS AREAS, IDAHO AND MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skipp, Betty; Lambeth, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    The Italian Peak and Italian Peak Middle Roadless Areas, in southwestern Montana and east-central Idaho, contain areas of probable mineral-resource potential based on combined geologic, geophysical, and geochemical studies and prospect examination. Small areas along the western, southern, and northeastern boundaries of the roadless areas have probable mineral resource potential for zinc, lead, silver, and uranium. An area of probable resource potential just east of and including a part of the Birch Creek mining district, may contain stratabound and fault-controlled silver and base metals, even though geochemical anomalies are low, and extensive prospecting has not identified any significant mineralization. The roadless areas are a part of the overthrust belt, and oil and gas possibilities must be assessed.

  11. D-peaks: a visual tool to display ChIP-seq peaks along the genome.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-sequencing is a method of choice to localize the positions of protein binding sites on DNA on a whole genomic scale. The deciphering of the sequencing data produced by this novel technique is challenging and it is achieved by their rigorous interpretation using dedicated tools and adapted visualization programs. Here, we present a bioinformatics tool (D-peaks) that adds several possibilities (including, user-friendliness, high-quality, relative position with respect to the genomic features) to the well-known visualization browsers or databases already existing. D-peaks is directly available through its web interface http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/dpeaks/ as well as a command line tool. PMID:23132505

  12. Automatic quality assessment and peak identification of auditory brainstem responses with fitted parametric peaks.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Joaquin T; de la Torre, Angel; Alvarez, Isaac; Segura, Jose Carlos; Thornton, A Roger D; Sainz, Manuel; Vargas, Jose Luis

    2014-05-01

    The recording of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is used worldwide for hearing screening purposes. In this process, a precise estimation of the most relevant components is essential for an accurate interpretation of these signals. This evaluation is usually carried out subjectively by an audiologist. However, the use of automatic methods for this purpose is being encouraged nowadays in order to reduce human evaluation biases and ensure uniformity among test conditions, patients, and screening personnel. This article describes a new method that performs automatic quality assessment and identification of the peaks, the fitted parametric peaks (FPP). This method is based on the use of synthesized peaks that are adjusted to the ABR response. The FPP is validated, on one hand, by an analysis of amplitudes and latencies measured manually by an audiologist and automatically by the FPP method in ABR signals recorded at different stimulation rates; and on the other hand, contrasting the performance of the FPP method with the automatic evaluation techniques based on the correlation coefficient, FSP, and cross correlation with a predefined template waveform by comparing the automatic evaluations of the quality of these methods with subjective evaluations provided by five experienced evaluators on a set of ABR signals of different quality. The results of this study suggest (a) that the FPP method can be used to provide an accurate parameterization of the peaks in terms of amplitude, latency, and width, and (b) that the FPP remains as the method that best approaches the averaged subjective quality evaluation, as well as provides the best results in terms of sensitivity and specificity in ABR signals validation. The significance of these findings and the clinical value of the FPP method are highlighted on this paper. PMID:24661606

  13. The accuracy of portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Dickinson, S A; Hitchings, D J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is now commonly used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. It is essential for PEF meters to have a linear response in order to obtain an unbiased measurement of PEF variability. As the accuracy and linearity of portable PEF meters have not been rigorously tested in recent years this aspect of their performance has been investigated. METHODS: The response of several portable PEF meters was tested with absolute standards of flow generated by a computer driven, servo controlled pump and their response was compared with that of a pneumotachograph. RESULTS: For each device tested the readings were highly repeatable to within the limits of accuracy with which the pointer position can be assessed by eye. The between instrument variation in reading for six identical devices expressed as a 95% confidence limit was, on average across the range of flows, +/- 8.5 l/min for the Mini-Wright, +/- 7.9 l/min for the Vitalograph, and +/- 6.4 l/min for the Ferraris. PEF meters based on the Wright meter all had similar error profiles with overreading of up to 80 l/min in the mid flow range from 300 to 500 l/min. This overreading was greatest for the Mini-Wright and Ferraris devices, and less so for the original Wright and Vitalograph meters. A Micro-Medical Turbine meter was accurate up to 400 l/min and then began to underread by up to 60 l/min at 720 l/min. For the low range devices the Vitalograph device was accurate to within 10 l/min up to 200 l/min, with the Mini-Wright overreading by up to 30 l/min above 150 l/min. CONCLUSION: Although the Mini-Wright, Ferraris, and Vitalograph meters gave remarkably repeatable results their error profiles for the full range meters will lead to important errors in recording PEF variability. This may lead to incorrect diagnosis and bias in implementing strategies of asthma treatment based on PEF measurement. PMID:1465746

  14. Rapid Levothyroxine Absorption Testing: A Case Series of Nonadherent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Mamtha; Jhingan, Ram M.; Rubin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonadherence to levothyroxine therapy is one cause of persistent hypothyroidism. To distinguish nonadherence from malabsorption, a levothyroxine absorption test is required. Typically, this test measures the serum free thyroxine (FT4) response to 1000 mcg of oral levothyroxine over 4 to 24 hours. Published data indicate that serum levels of FT4 are at or near their peak 2 hours after levothyroxine ingestion. Objectives: We present the successful completion of 2-hour levothyroxine absorption testing in 3 patients as a retrospective case series. Patients and Methods: Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), FT4, and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were drawn at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after 1000 mcg of oral levothyroxine. Results: In all 3 cases, baseline thyroid function indicated the patients had taken their prescribed doses of levothyroxine prior to the absorption test. Despite high baseline levels both FT3 and FT4 increased during each absorption test, providing more evidence of adequate levothyroxine absorption. Subsequently, patients achieved normal TSH levels on lower doses of levothyroxine. Conclusions: Levothyroxine absorption testing over 2 hours may offer a more rapid alternative to the commonly used longer protocols to rule out malabsorption. Scheduling a levothyroxine absorption test may induce some patients to start adhering to levothyroxine therapy. PMID:26633982

  15. FE K EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE XMM-EPIC SPECTRUM OF THE SEYFERT GALAXY IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2001-01-01

    We present a re-analysis of the XMM-Newton long-look of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329a. The Fe K bandpass is dominated by two peaks, consistent with emission from neutral or near-neutral Fe Ka and KP. A relativistic diskline model whereby both peaks are the result of one doubly-peaked diskline profile is found to be a poor description of the data. Models using two relativistic disklines are found to describe the emission profile well. A low-inclination, moderately-relativistic dual-diskline model is possible if the contribution from narrow components, due to distant material, is small or absent. A high-inclination, moderately relativistic profile for each peak is possible if there are roughly equal contributions from both the broad and narrow components. Upper limits on Fe XXV and Fe XXVI emission and absorption at the systemic velocity of IC 4329a are obtained. We also present the results of RXTE monitoring of this source obtained so far; the combined XMM-Newton and RXTE data sets allow us to explore the time-resolved spectral behavior of this source on time scales ranging from hours to 2 years. We find no strong evidence for variability of the Fe Ka emission line on any time scale probed, likely due to the minimal level of continuum variability. We detect a narrow absorption line, at a energy of 7.68 keV in the rest frame of the source; its significance has been confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. This feature is most likely due to absorption from Fe XXVI blueshifted to approximately 0.1c relative to the systemic velocity, making IC 4329a the lowest-redshift AGN known with a high-velocity, highly-ionized outflow component. As is often the case with similar outflows seen in high-luminosity quasars, the estimated mass outflow rate is larger than the inflow accretion rate, signaling that the outflow represents a substantial portion of the total energy budget of the AGN. The outflow could arise from a radiatively-driven disk wind, or it may be in the

  16. Sensitivity in forward modeled hyperspectral reflectance due to phytoplankton groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana; Pinardi, Monica; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton is an integral part of the ecosystem, affecting trophic dynamics, nutrient cycling, habitat condition, and fisheries resources. The types of phytoplankton and their concentrations are used to describe the status of water and the processes inside of this. This study investigates bio-optical modeling of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) in terms of pigment composition demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to recognize freshwater phytoplankton. In particular, a sensitivity analysis of simulated hyperspectral water reflectance (with band setting of HICO, APEX, EnMAP, PRISMA and Sentinel-3) of productive eutrophic waters of Mantua lakes (Italy) environment is presented. The bio-optical model adopted for simulating the hyperspectral water reflectance takes into account the reflectance dependency on geometric conditions of light field, on inherent optical properties (backscattering and absorption coefficients) and on concentrations of water quality parameters (WQPs). The model works in the 400-750nm wavelength range, while the model parametrization is based on a comprehensive dataset of WQP concentrations and specific inherent optical properties of the study area, collected in field surveys carried out from May to September of 2011 and 2014. The following phytoplankton groups, with their specific absorption coefficients, a*Φi(λ), were used during the simulation: Chlorophyta, Cyanobacteria with phycocyanin, Cyanobacteria and Cryptophytes with phycoerythrin, Diatoms with carotenoids and mixed phytoplankton. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aΦ(λ) is modelled by multiplying the weighted sum of the PFTs, Σpia*Φi(λ), with the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). To highlight the variability of water reflectance due to variation of phytoplankton pigments, the sensitivity analysis was performed by keeping constant the WQPs (i.e., Chl-a=80mg/l, total suspended matter=12.58g/l and yellow substances=0.27m-1). The sensitivity analysis was

  17. Scattering with absorptive interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.

    1982-07-01

    The S matrix for a wide class of complex and nonlocal potentials is studied, with special attention given to the motion of singularities in the complex k plane as a function of the imaginary coupling strength. Modifications of Levinson's theorem are obtained and discussed. Analytic approximations to the S matrix in the vicinity of narrow resonances are exhibited and compared to numerical results of resonating-group calculations. The problem of defining resonances in the case of complex interactions is discussed, making contact with the usual analysis of scattering in terms of Argand diagrams. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for absorptive potentials.

  18. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  20. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  1. Thickness Optimization for Petroleum Coke in Microwave Dehydrating Based on the Analysis of Dynamic Absorption Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobiao; Chen, Junruo; Peng, Jinhui; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Weifeng; Guo, Shenghui; Chen, Guo

    2015-07-01

    An analytical approach is proposed to optimize the thickness of petroleum coke for achieving maximum microwave power absorption in microwave heating based on analysis of reflection loss (RL). The microwave RL of the petroleum coke layer was studied over the moisture content range of 1%-5% at 20 °C and the petroleum coke (10% moisture content) in the temperature range of 20 to 100 °C at 2.45 GHz. The results show that RL depends sensitively on the thickness of the petroleum coke and the absorption peak shifts towards a larger thickness as the moisture content of the petroleum coke increases. There exists a matching thickness corresponding to the maximum microwave absorption, the maximum absorbing peak decreases when the thickness of petroleum coke exceeds the matching thickness. We also show that the absorption peak is found to move towards a smaller thickness region with increasing petroleum coke temperature.

  2. IR absorption and Raman spectra of single crystals of stable germanium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavva, V. A.; Kotereva, T. V.; Lipskiy, V. A.; Nezhdanov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The Raman and IR absorption spectra of single crystals of germanium isotopes 72Ge, 73Ge, 74Ge, and 76Ge in the region of phonon absorption and interband electronic transitions are studied at room temperature. The dependence of the Raman peak position on the atomic mass has the form ν ~ M -1/2. The shifts of the phonon absorption peaks of individual isotopes with respect to germanium of natural isotopic composition natGe are determined. With increasing average atomic mass of germanium, these peaks shift to longer wavelengths. In the region of interband electronic transitions, the intrinsic absorption edge of 76Ge is observed to shift by 1 meV to higher energies with respect to Ge of natural isotopic composition. For isotopes with atomic masses close to that of natural germanium (72Ge,73Ge, 74Ge), we found no significant difference in the band gap width at room temperature.

  3. New Criterion for Evaluating the Peak Shear Strength of Rock Joints Under Different Contact States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhi Cheng; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen

    2016-04-01

    In practice, the peak shear strength of rock joints is not dictated only by the surface roughness, but also the degree of matching between the joint surfaces. The latter is due to alteration/dislocation caused by external factors, such as the vibration due to nearby blasting, excavation or earthquake. In the present study, the peak shear strengths of rock joints under different contact states are investigated by direct shear test using artificial rock joints. The rock joints under different contact states are modeled by imposing varying magnitude of horizontal dislocation along the shear direction between the upper and lower rock blocks. The peak shear strength was found to decrease with increasing dislocation. A new empirical shear strength criterion is put forward to capture the peak shear strength of un-matching rock joints as an extension of a previously published peak shear strength criterion for matching rock joints by the first author and his co-workers. In the present proposed criterion, a new joint contact state coefficient, which is a function of the normalized dislocation and the quantified three-dimensional roughness metric of joint surface, is proposed. The good agreement between calculated values and test results indicates that the proposed criterion is capable of estimating the peak shear strength of rock joints under different contact states. The proposed criterion is expressed in a quantitative way and the required parameters can be easily determined in the laboratory.

  4. Papilledema Due to Mirtazapine

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Evrensel, Alper; Cömert, Gökçe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mirtazapine is a tetracyclic antidepressant that enhances both noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission. The most common cause of papilledema is increased intracranial pressure due to brain tumor. Also it may occur as a result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, pseudo tumor cerebri). Moreover, papilledema may also develop due to retinitis, vasculitis, Graves’ disease, hypertension, leukemia, lymphoma, diabetes mellitus and radiation. Case Report: In this article, a patient who developed papilledema while under treatment with mirtazapine (30 mg/day) for two years and recovered with termination of mirtazapine treatment was discussed to draw the attention of clinicians to this side effect of mirtazapine. Conclusion: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and papilledema due to psychotropic drugs has been reported in the literature. Mirtazapine may rarely cause peripheral edema. However, papilledema due to mirtazapine has not been previously reported. Although papilledema is a very rare side effect of an antidepressant treatment, fundoscopic examinations of patients must be performed regularly. PMID:27308085

  5. Masked Areas in Shear Peak Statistics: A Forward Modeling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bard, D.; Kratochvil, J. M.; Dawson, W.

    2016-03-01

    The statistics of shear peaks have been shown to provide valuable cosmological information beyond the power spectrum, and will be an important constraint of models of cosmology in forthcoming astronomical surveys. Surveys include masked areas due to bright stars, bad pixels etc., which must be accounted for in producing constraints on cosmology from shear maps. We advocate a forward-modeling approach, where the impacts of masking and other survey artifacts are accounted for in the theoretical prediction of cosmological parameters, rather than correcting survey data to remove them. We use masks based on the Deep Lens Survey, and explore the impact of up to 37% of the survey area being masked on LSST and DES-scale surveys. By reconstructing maps of aperture mass the masking effect is smoothed out, resulting in up to 14% smaller statistical uncertainties compared to simply reducing the survey area by the masked area. We show that, even in the presence of large survey masks, the bias in cosmological parameter estimation produced in the forward-modeling process is ≈1%, dominated by bias caused by limited simulation volume. We also explore how this potential bias scales with survey area and evaluate how much small survey areas are impacted by the differences in cosmological structure in the data and simulated volumes, due to cosmic variance.

  6. New peak broadening parameter for the characterization of separation capability in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sursyakova, Viktoria V; Rubaylo, Anatoly I

    2015-02-01

    The influence of separation conditions on peak broadening is usually estimated by the number of theoretical plates. Using the data available in literature and experimental data, it is shown that in pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis the plate number is not directly related to the separation capability of conditions used. The experiments at different electrolyte flow velocities demonstrate that a higher plate number (the best separation efficiency) can be obtained with a lower peak resolution. Since ions are separated by electrophoresis due to the difference in electrophoretic mobilities, the peak width in terms of electrophoretic mobility is suggested as a new peak broadening parameter describing the separation capability of the conditions used. The parameter can be calculated using the tailing factor and the temporal peak width at 5% of the peak height. A simple equation for the resolution calculation is derived using the parameter. The advantage of the peak width in terms of mobility over other parameters is shown. The new parameter is recommended to be used not only in pressure-assisted capillary electrophoresis but also in general capillary electrophoresis when in a number of runs the virtual separative migration distance and separation capability of the conditions used change widely. PMID:25491508

  7. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... completed Peak Inventory Value Report is received by us. Coverage term. A period of time that begins on the... otherwise modify any other provision of your Nursery Crop Insurance Policy. 4. Peak Insurance Period... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163...

  8. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... completed Peak Inventory Value Report is received by us. Coverage term. A period of time that begins on the... otherwise modify any other provision of your Nursery Crop Insurance Policy. 4. Peak Insurance Period... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163...

  9. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... completed Peak Inventory Value Report is received by us. Coverage term. A period of time that begins on the... otherwise modify any other provision of your Nursery Crop Insurance Policy. 4. Peak Insurance Period... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163...

  10. Peak Shift Phenomenon: A Teaching Activity for Basic Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kenneth D.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulus discrimination is a standard subject in undergraduate courses presenting basic principles of learning, and a particularly interesting aspect of discrimination is the peak shift phenomenon. Peak shift occurs in generalization tests following intradimensional discrimination training as a displacement of peak responding away from the S+ (a…

  11. Reward Value Effects on Timing in the Peak Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effect of motivational variables on timing in the peak procedure. In Experiment 1, rats received a 60-s peak procedure that was coupled with long-term, between-phase changes in reinforcer magnitude. Increases in reinforcer magnitude produced a leftward shift in the peak that persisted for 20 sessions of training. In…

  12. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.163 Nursery peak inventory endorsement. Nursery Crop Insurance Peak Inventory Endorsement This endorsement is not continuous and must...

  13. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use

    PubMed Central

    Gleick, Peter H.; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of “peak oil”—a peaking and then decline in oil production—has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of “peak water”: peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak “ecological” water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use. PMID:20498082

  14. Determination of fixed water in rocks by infrared absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, I.A.; Chandler, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    An infrared absorption technique has been developed for the quantitative determination of "fixed water" (H2O+) in rocks. Potassium bromide disks containing 2-mg samples are scanned in the 3-??m spectral region and absorption at 2.96 ??m is determined. Although the exact nature of this peak is not known, other than that it is caused by an interaction between the potassium bromide and hydroxyl groups and water, it can be used for quantitative analysis. Rock samples, other than those containing significant percentages of clay minerals, can be analyzed with a standard deviation of 0.26%.

  15. Transient radiation-induced absorption in laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Paul J.

    1994-06-01

    Transient radiation-induced absorption losses in laser materials have been measured using a pulsed nuclear reactor. Reactor pulse widths of 70 to 90 microsecond(s) and absorbed doses of 1 to 7.5 krad have been used. Transmission recovery times and peak absorption coefficients are given. Materials tested include LiNbO3, GSGG, silica substrates, and filter glasses used in the laser cavity. The filter glasses are tested at discrete wavelengths in the range 440 - 750 nm. Lithium niobate, MgO-doped LiNbO3, GSGG, and the silica substrates are tested at 1061 nm.

  16. Infrared electronic absorption in a single-component molecular metal.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Sasa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Wakako; Fujiwara, Emiko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Okano, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2004-01-21

    The infrared spectra of the crystal of transition metal complex molecules with extended-TTF ligands, Ni(tmdt)2, which is the first single-component molecular metal that has a stable metallic state even at low temperatures, exhibited an extremely low-energy electronic absorption around 2200 cm-1 (tmdt = trimethylenetetrathiafulvalenedithiolate). The systematic shift of the absorption peaks for molecules similar to Ni(tmdt)2, which range from metallic to semiconducting crystals, shows that the single-component molecular conductors are composed of molecules with unprecedentedly small HOMO-LUMO gaps. PMID:14719914

  17. Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Harish

    2007-02-01

    Ge-doped crystalline quartz has been examined for its thermally stimulated luminescence and has been found to exhibit TL-glow peaks at 100, 200, and 310 degree sign C. While the peaks at 100 and 310 degree sign C have already been noticed in conventionally grown quartz, the new peak at 200 degree sign C, observed in the present studies, appears to be due to the presence of Ge in quartz lattice. The radiation dependence of this peak upon irradiation at 300 K by high energy electrons (1.75 MeV) has been presented and the results have been compared and discussed in terms of the hydroxyl defects in natural, cultured, and Ge-doped cultured quartz.

  18. An analysis of Super typhoon Rammasun's(2014) peak intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qinbo; Xu, Yinglong

    2016-04-01

    Super typhoon Rammasun (2014) made landfall over Hainan Island, China, at 0730UTC 18 July 2014. Due to the damage of the anemometers, the Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) and the bouy which by Rammasun passed, failed to obtain its peak wind. Lack of the direct evident, in real-time monitoring, its peak intensities were given by 110kts (.i.e. 60m/s)/910hPa,135kts/922hPa , and 90kts/935hPa based on Dvorak technique , which were made by China Meteorological Administration (CMA),Joint Typhoon Warning Center(JTWC), and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) respectively. However, a minimum pressure of 881.2hPa recorded by a barometer which located at Qixhou island (19.982︒N,111.269︒E) while Rammasun approaching, indicates that its intensity was under estimated. By using observation data such as AWS, satellite, Doppler radar and wind tower near the ground, this study performs a detail evaluation to obtain its actual intensity. At 0521UTC, Qizhou Island station recorded 881.2hPa of the minimum station pressure and 899.2hPa of minimum sea level pressure (MSLP) while the anemometer had been destroyed. These are the lowest records in Chinese history and also are ones of the global lowest pressures obtained directly by barometer. It is evident that Rammasun's eyewall did not pass across Qizhou Island directly, so the actual MSLP should be lower than 899.2hPa. By applying wind-pressure relationship, it is reckoned that the reasonable MSLP and peak wind of Rammasun should be 888hPa and 70-76m/s, which makes Rammasun the strongest typhoon ever made landfall in China's history. In order to intuitively investigate the real intensity of Ramasun, eyewall structures are compared with some historical extreme typhoons (hurricanes) such as Saomai(2006), Haiyan(2013) and Katrina(2005). Satellite images show that the dense overcast convection strength of Rammasun is stronger than those when Saomai and Katrina were in their peak intensities and before landing, but weaker than Haiyan. The

  19. Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Nanocomposite Infrared Photodetection by Intraband Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Kevin Richard

    Se CQDs embedded in the conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene)phenylene] (MEH-CN-PPV). Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy of MEH-CN-PPV thin films was conducted to determine the dependence of polymer morphology on deposition method in order to identify a reliable device fabrication technique. Three different deposition methods were investigated: drop-casting and spin-casting, which are solution-based; and matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), which is a vacuum-based method that gently evaporates polymers (or hybrid nanocomposites) and limits substrate exposure to solvents. It was found that MAPLE deposition provides repeatable control of the thin film morphology and thickness, which is important for nanocomposite device optimization. Ultra-fast PL spectroscopy of MEH-CN-PPV/CdSe thin films was investigated to determine the charge generation and relaxation dynamics in the hybrid nanocomposite thin films. The mathematical fitting of time-integrated and time-resolved PL provided a rigorous and unique model of the charge dynamics, which enabled calculation of the radiative and non-radiative decay lifetimes in the polymer and CQD. These results imply that long-lived electrons exist in the conduction band of the CQD, which demonstrate that it should be possible to generate a mid- to long-wave infrared photocurrent based on intraband transitions. In fact, room-temperature, intraband, mid-infrared absorption was measured in thin films of MEH-CN-PPV/CdSe hybrid nanocomposites by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorbance spectroscopy. In addition, the hybrid nanocomposite confined energy levels and corresponding oscillator strengths were calculated in order to model the absorption spectrum. The calculated absorption peaks agree well with the measured peaks, demonstrating that the developed computer model provides a useful design tool for determining the impact of important materials system properties, such as CQD size, organic

  20. Shape dependence of transmission, reflection, and absorption eigenvalue densities in disordered waveguides with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamilov, A.; Petrenko, S.; Sarma, R.; Cao, H.

    2016-03-01

    The universal bimodal distribution of transmission eigenvalues in lossless diffusive systems underpins such celebrated phenomena as universal conductance fluctuations, quantum shot noise in condensed matter physics, and enhanced transmission in optics and acoustics. Here, we show that in the presence of absorption, the density of the transmission eigenvalues depends on the confinement geometry of the scattering media. Furthermore, in an asymmetric waveguide, the densities of the reflection and absorption eigenvalues also depend on the side from which the waves are incident. With increasing absorption, the density of absorption eigenvalues transforms from a single-peak to a double-peak function. Our findings open an additional avenue for coherent control of wave transmission, reflection, and absorption in random media.

  1. Tunable diode laser measurements of CH3OOH absorption cross-sections near 1320 CM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. H.; Brockmann, K. J.; Bechara, J.

    Infrared absorption spectra and absorption cross-sections in the C-H deformation band of CH3OOH near 1320 cm-1 have been measured with a tunable diode laser spectrometer. Methylhydroperoxide concentrations in a slowly flowing gas mixture were determined by UV absorption. Peak absorption cross-sections of the strongest lines observed were found to lie in the range (0.5 -1.5) × 10-18 cm² under near Doppler-limited conditions. The dependence of the peak absorption cross-sections on total air pressure in the range 2.5-90 torr was also investigated, and the possibility of CH3OOH atmospheric mixing ratio measurement with a tunable diode laser assessed.

  2. Gas compression in lungs decreases peak expiratory flow depending on resistance of peak flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O F; Pedersen, T F; Miller, M R

    1997-11-01

    It has recently been shown (O. F. Pedersen T. R. Rasmussen, O. Omland, T. Sigsgaard, P. H. Quanjer. and M. R. Miller. Eur. Respir. J. 9: 828-833, 1996) that the added resistance of a mini-Wright peak flowmeter decreases peak expiratory flow (PEF) by approximately 8% compared with PEF measured by a pneumotachograph. To explore the reason for this, 10 healthy men (mean age 43 yr, range 33-58 yr) were examined in a body plethysmograph with facilities to measure mouth flow vs. expired volume as well as the change in thoracic gas volume (Vb) and alveolar pressure (PA). The subjects performed forced vital capacity maneuvers through orifices of different sizes and also a mini-Wright peak flowmeter. PEF with the meter and other added resistances were achieved when flow reached the perimeter of the flow-Vb curves. The mini-Wright PEF meter decreased PEF from 11.4 +/- 1.5 to 10.3 +/- 1.4 (SD) l/s (P < 0.001), PA increased from 6.7 +/- 1.9 to 9.3 +/- 2.7 kPa (P < 0.001), an increase equal to the pressure drop across the meter, and caused Vb at PEF to decrease by 0.24 +/- 0.09 liter (P < 0.001). We conclude that PEF obtained with an added resistance like a mini-Wright PEF meter is a wave-speed-determined maximal flow, but the added resistance causes gas compression because of increased PA at PEF. Therefore, Vb at PEF and, accordingly, PEF decrease. PMID:9375314

  3. Peak expiratory flow at increased barometric pressure: comparison of peak flow meters and volumetric spirometer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P S; Ng, C; Bennett, M

    2000-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an intensive care treatment, some of whom have pre-existing airway obstruction. Spirometers are the ideal instruments for measuring airway obstruction, but peak flow meters are useful and versatile devices. The behaviour of both types of device was therefore studied in a hyperbaric unit under conditions of increased pressure. It is important to have a non-electrical indicator of airway obstruction, to minimize the fire risk in the hyperoxic environment. The hypothesis was tested that, assuming that dynamic resistance is unchanged, both the Wright's standard and mini-peak flow meters would over-read peak expiratory flow (PEF) under increased pressure when compared with a volumetric spirometer, as the latter is unaffected by air density. It was postulated that a correction factor could be derived so that PEF meters could be used in this setting. Seven normal subjects performed volume-dependent spirometry to derive PEF, and manoeuvres using both standard and mini PEF meters at sea level, under hyperbaric conditions at 303, 253 and 152 kPa (3, 2.5 and 1.5 atmospheres respectively; 1 atmosphere absolute=101.08 kPa), and again at sea level. There was a progressive and significant decline in PEF with increasing pressure as measured by the spirometer (69.46+/-0.8% baseline at 303 kPa compared with 101 kPa), while the PEF meters showed a progressive increase in their readings (an increase of 7.86+/-1.69% at 303 kPa with the mini PEF meter). Using these data points, a correction factor was derived which allows appropriate values to be calculated from the Wright's meter readings under these conditions. PMID:10600666

  4. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  5. Thulium-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with 2 GW of peak power.

    PubMed

    Gaida, C; Gebhardt, M; Stutzki, F; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2016-09-01

    Thulium-doped fibers with ultra large mode-field areas offer new opportunities for the power scaling of mid-IR ultrashort-pulse laser sources. Here, we present a laser system delivering a pulse-peak power of 2 GW and a nearly transform-limited pulse duration of 200 fs in combination with 28.7 W of average power. This performance level has been achieved by optimizing the pulse shape, reducing the overlap with atmospheric absorption lines, and incorporating a climate chamber to reduce the humidity of the atmospheric environment. PMID:27607990

  6. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  7. Memory Effect Manifested by a Boson Peak in Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, P; Li, Y Z; Bai, H Y; Wen, P; Wang, W H

    2016-04-29

    We explore the correlation between a boson peak and structural relaxation in a typical metallic glass. Consistent with enthalpy recovery, a boson peak shows a memory effect in an aging-and-scan procedure. Single-step isothermal aging produces a monotonic decrease of enthalpy and boson peak intensity; for double-step isothermal aging, both enthalpy and boson peak intensity experience, coincidently, an incipient increase to a maximum and a subsequent decrease toward the equilibrium state. Our results indicate a direct link between slow structural relaxation and fast boson peak dynamics, which presents a profound understanding of the two dynamic behaviors in glass. PMID:27176528

  8. Memory Effect Manifested by a Boson Peak in Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wen, P.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the correlation between a boson peak and structural relaxation in a typical metallic glass. Consistent with enthalpy recovery, a boson peak shows a memory effect in an aging-and-scan procedure. Single-step isothermal aging produces a monotonic decrease of enthalpy and boson peak intensity; for double-step isothermal aging, both enthalpy and boson peak intensity experience, coincidently, an incipient increase to a maximum and a subsequent decrease toward the equilibrium state. Our results indicate a direct link between slow structural relaxation and fast boson peak dynamics, which presents a profound understanding of the two dynamic behaviors in glass.

  9. Combining hypoxic methods for peak performance.

    PubMed

    Millet, Gregoire P; Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Woorons, X; Richalet, J P

    2010-01-01

    increases beyond 16 h/day. The minimum daily dose for stimulating erythropoiesis seems to be 12 h/day. For non-haematological changes, the implementation of a much shorter duration of exposure seems possible. Athletes could take advantage of IHT, which seems more beneficial than IHE in performance enhancement. The intensity of hypoxic exercise might play a role on adaptations at the molecular level in skeletal muscle tissue. There is clear evidence that intense exercise at high altitude stimulates to a greater extent muscle adaptations for both aerobic and anaerobic exercises and limits the decrease in power. So although IHT induces no increase in VO(2max) due to the low 'altitude dose', improvement in athletic performance is likely to happen with high-intensity exercise (i.e. above the ventilatory threshold) due to an increase in mitochondrial efficiency and pH/lactate regulation. We propose a new combination of hypoxic method (which we suggest naming Living High-Training Low and High, interspersed; LHTLHi) combining LHTL (five nights at 3000 m and two nights at sea level) with training at sea level except for a few (2.3 per week) IHT sessions of supra-threshold training. This review also provides a rationale on how to combine the different hypoxic methods and suggests advances in both their implementation and their periodization during the yearly training programme of athletes competing in endurance, glycolytic or intermittent sports. PMID:20020784

  10. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  11. Specific absorption spectra of hemoglobin at different PO2 levels: potential noninvasive method to detect PO2 in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Zhu, Zhirong; Zeng, Changchun; Nie, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb), as one of main components of blood, has a unique quaternary structure. Its release of oxygen is controlled by oxygen partial pressure (PO2). We investigate the specific spectroscopic changes in Hb under different PO2 levels to optimize clinical methods of measuring tissue PO2. The transmissivity of Hb under different PO2 levels is measured with a UV/Vis fiber optic spectrometer. Its plotted absorption spectral curve shows two high absorption peaks at 540 and 576 nm and an absorption valley at 560 nm when PO2 is higher than 100 mm Hg. The two high absorption peaks decrease gradually with a decrease in PO2, whereas the absorption valley at 560 nm increases. When PO2 decreases to approximately 0 mm Hg, the two high absorption peaks disappear completely, while the absorption valley has a hypochromic shift (8 to 10 nm) and forms a specific high absorption peak at approximately 550 nm. The same phenomena can be observed in visible reflectance spectra of finger-tip microcirculation. Specific changes in extinction coefficient and absorption spectra of Hb occur along with variations in PO2, which could be used to explain pathological changes caused by tissue hypoxia and for early detection of oxygen deficiency diseases in clinical monitoring.

  12. Compositional Survey of Central Peaks in the South Pole-Aitken Basin from Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacson, P.; Nettles, J.; Boardman, J. W.; Petro, N. E.; Klima, R. L.; Taylor, L. A.; Pieters, C. M.; Cheek, L.; Clark, R. N.; Head, J. W.; Whitten, J.; Tompkins, S.; Besse, S.; Dhingra, D.; Moriarty, D.; Moon Mineralogy Mapper Team

    2010-12-01

    Orbital measurements allow the composition of planetary surfaces to be mapped globally, something not possible with returned samples. Optical instruments such as reflectance spectrometers, which are sensitive to the very uppermost surface (~1-2 mm depth), provide the highest spatial resolution of the various compositional remote sensing techniques. Major lunar rock-forming minerals exhibit diagnostic absorptions across visible to near-infrared (VNIR) wavelengths, and data returned by VNIR reflectance spectrometers can use these absorptions to map lunar mineralogy. However, on the Moon, much of the surface is dominated by mature lunar soils formed by the continual bombardment of the lunar surface over geologic time. This weathering process effectively weakens diagnostic mineral absorption features, complicating mineralogical analyses. Focused analyses of central peaks eliminate two of the drawbacks of remote VNIR reflectance spectroscopy. The steep slopes of central peaks inhibit the development of a thick regolith layer, meaning that central peaks are relatively optically immature and thus preserve the diagnostic spectral absorption features critical to compositional analyses. Furthermore, the crater formation process excavates materials from depth [e.g., Melosh, 1989, Cintala and Grieve, 1998], exposing materials that would otherwise be inaccessible to optical remote sensing. We are in the midst of a survey of lunar crater central peaks with Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) data, following the work of Tompkins and Pieters [1999], who used Clementine UVVIS multispectral data. We employ a band fitting procedure that gives estimates of the position, strength, and width of the mafic 1 μm absorption feature, which are used to evaluate the mineralogy of the central peaks. Within SPA are a number of craters of various sizes with well defined central peaks (e.g,. Bhabha, Fizeau, Finsen, Dryden) that presumably tap multiple depths across SPA, which itself excavated material

  13. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  14. Cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was developed to measure spectrally how light is scattered by clouds and to determine the single scattering albedo, important to meteorology and climate studies, with unprecedented accuracy. This measurement is based on ratios of downwelling to upwelling radiation within clouds, and so is not strongly dependent upon absolute radiometric calibration of the instrument. The CAR has a 5-inch aperture and 1 degree IFOV, and spatially scans in a plane orthogonal to the flight vector from the zenith to nadir at 1.7 revolutions per second. Incoming light is measured in 13 spectral bands, using silicon, germanium, and indium-antimonide detectors. Data from each channel is digitally recorded in flight with 10-bit (0.1 percent) resolution. The instrument incorporates several novel features. These features are briefly detailed.

  15. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  16. CO2 Absorption Spectroscopy and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Daniel; Mlawer, Eli; Mlynczak, Martin; Gero, Jon; Collins, William; Torn, Margaret

    2014-03-01

    Most of the absorption, and therefore radiative forcing, due to increased atmospheric CO2 occurs in line wings, so utilizing an accurate line shape is necessary for climate science. Recent advances in CO2 absorption spectroscopy have been incorporated into benchmark line-by-line radiative transfer models. These updates include the Energy Corrected Sudden Approximation to represent isolated line profiles, line mixing, and line clusters. The CO2 line profiles are sub-Lorentzian and are explicitly modeled up to 25 cm-1 from each line's center. Consistent continuum absorption is implemented over the remainder of the profile except for modest empirical adjustments based on observations. Thus, line-by-line models calculate the absorption effects of CO2 that agree with theory and measurements. This is validated with long-term spectroscopic measurements from the ARM program's AERI instrument. This spectroscopy trains computationally-efficient correlated-k methods for climate model radiative transfer, but they overpredict instantaneous radiative forcing from doubled CO2 by approximately 7% in part because they have larger errors handling the impact of increased CO2 in the stratosphere than the troposphere. The implications of this can be tested with supercomputers. This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Biol. & Env. Res., Clim. & Env. Sci. Div., of the U.S. D.O.E., Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 as part of the Atmos. Sys. Res.

  17. Providers get their due.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, J

    1994-11-01

    Providers are getting their due, but only after employing computer software programs to help sort through the complex managed-care contracts they've negotiated. More and more accounting departments are relying on contract management systems to ensure accurate billing. PMID:10138187

  18. Paying Their Dues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scalzo, Teresa

    1995-01-01

    Some colleges and universities have found that alumni prefer to have ownership of their alumni association, and such a membership program can raise revenues for the institution while providing a valuable communication tool. A strong dues program can work well with an annual giving campaign. A variety of membership structures is possible. Details…

  19. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  20. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  1. Enhanced broadband absorption in gold by plasmonic tapered coaxial holes.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lei; Yang, Liu; Nadzeyka, Achim; Bauerdick, Sven; He, Sailing

    2014-12-29

    Gold absorbers based on plasmonic tapered coaxial holes (PTCHs) are demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. An average absorption of over 0.93 is obtained theoretically in a broad wavelength range from 300 nm to 900 nm without polarization sensitivity due to the structural symmetry. Strong scattering of the incident light by the tapered coaxial holes is the main reason for the high absorption in the short wavelength range below about 550 nm, while gap surface plasmon polaritons propagating along the taper dominate the resonance-induced high absorption in the long wavelength range. Combining two PTCHs with different structural parameters can further enhance the absorption and thus increase the spectral bandwidth, which is verified by a sample fabricated by focused ion beam milling. This design is promising to be extended to other metals to realize effective and efficient light harvesting and absorption. PMID:25607189

  2. Photodissociation of carbon dioxide in singlet valence electronic states. II. Five state absorption spectrum and vibronic assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2013-06-01

    The absorption spectrum of CO2 in the wavelength range 120-160 nm is analyzed by means of quantum mechanical calculations performed using vibronically coupled potential energy surfaces of five singlet valence electronic states and the coordinate dependent transition dipole moment vectors. The thermally averaged spectrum, calculated for T = 190 K via Boltzmann averaging of optical transitions from many initial rotational states, accurately reproduces the experimental spectral envelope, consisting of a low and a high energy band, the positions of the absorption maxima, their FWHMs, peak intensities, and frequencies of diffuse structures in each band. Contributions of the vibronic interactions due to Renner-Teller coupling, conical intersections, and the Herzberg-Teller effect are isolated and the calculated bands are assigned in terms of adiabatic electronic states. Finally, diffuse structures in the calculated bands are vibronically assigned using wave functions of the underlying resonance states. It is demonstrated that the main progressions in the high energy band correspond to consecutive excitations of the pseudorotational motion along the closed loop of the CI seam, and progressions differ in the number of nodes along the radial mode perpendicular to the closed seam. Irregularity of the diffuse peaks in the low energy band is interpreted as a manifestation of the carbene-type "cyclic" OCO minimum.

  3. Long term NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 concentrations in the Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to concentrations reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time.

  4. Peak Oxygen Uptake during and after Long-duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Downs, Meghan E.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Knudsen, Poul; Evetts, Simon N.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic capacity (VO2peak) previously has not been measured during or after long-duration spaceflight. PURPOSE: To measure VO2peak and submaximal exercise responses during and after International Space Station (ISS) missions. METHODS: Astronauts (9 M, 5 F: 49 +/- 5 yr, 175 +/- 7 cm, 77.2 +/- 15.1 kg, 40.6 +/- 6.4 mL/kg/min [mean +/-SD]) performed graded peak cycle tests 90 days before spaceflight, 15 d (FD15) after launch and every 30 d thereafter during flight, and 1 (R+1), 10 (R+10), and 30 d (R+30) after landing. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were measured from rest to peak exercise, while cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (SV), and arterial-venous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) were measured only during rest and submaximal exercise. Data were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. Body mass contributed significantly to statistical models, and thus results are reported as modeled estimates for an average subject. RESULTS: Early inflight (FD15) VO2peak was 17% lower (95% CI = - 22%, -13%) than preflight. VO2peak increased during spaceflight (0.001 L/min/d, P = 0.02) but did not return to preflight levels. On R+1 VO2peak was 15% (95% CI = -19%, -10%) lower than preflight but recovered to within 2% of preflight by R+30 (95% CI = -6%, +3%). Peak HR was not significantly different from preflight at any time. Inflight submaximal VO2 and a-vO2diff were generally lower than preflight, but the Q vs. VO2 slope was unchanged. In contrast, the SV vs. VO2 slope was lower (P < 0.001), primarily due to elevated SV at rest, and the HR vs. VO2 slope was greater (P < 0.001), largely due to elevated HR during more intense exercise. On R+1 although the relationships between VO2 and Q, SV, and HR were not statistically different than preflight, resting and submaximal exercise SV was lower (P < 0.001), resting and submaximal exercise HR was higher (P < 0.002), and a-vO2diff was unchanged. HR and SV returned to preflight levels by R+30. CONCLUSION: In the average

  5. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  6. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  7. Quasi-static energy absorption of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Jacobsen, AJ; Chen, X

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive modeling and numerical study focusing on the energy quasi-static crushing behavior and energy absorption characteristics of hollow tube microlattice structures. The peak stress and effective plateau stress of the hollow microlattice structures are deduced for different geometrical parameters which gives volume and mass densities of energy absorption, D-v and D-m, scale with the relative density, (rho) over bar, as D-v similar to (rho) over bar (1) (5) and D-m similar to (rho) over bar (0 5), respectively, fitting very well to the experimental results of both 60 degrees inclined and 90 degrees predominately microlattices. Then the strategies for energy absorption enhancement are proposed for the engineering design of microlattice structures. By introducing a gradient in the thickness or radius of the lattice members, the buckle propagation can be modulated resulting in an increase in energy absorption density that can exceed 40%. Liquid filler is another approach to improve energy absorption by strengthening the microtruss via circumference expansion, and the gain may be over 100% in terms of volume density. Insight into the correlations between microlattice architecture and energy absorption performance combined with the high degree of architecture control paves the way for designing high performance microlattice structures for a range of impact and impulse mitigation applications for vehicles and structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Seasonal changes in lead absorption in laboratory rats

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.C.; Huster, W.J.

    1987-08-01

    A retrospective study of the relationship of season to the absorption of radiolead in laboratory rats was performed using data representing 305 animals from 36 experiments over 6 calendar years. Male Wistar rats weighting 200 to 250 g were given 1 ..mu..g of radiolabeled lead in an aqueous solution, pH 4.0, in isolated small intestine, and absorption of the radiolead was quantified after a 4-hour interval using whole-body counting. Similar values of absorption occurred in the summer (June-August) and fall (September-November), but significantly lower values occurred in the winter (December-February). Harmonic analysis yielded an excellent approximation of the mean quarterly absorption data. The resulting cosine function had a period of 4.08 +/- 0.05 quarter-years with an amplitude of 7.32 +/- 1.06%; predicted peak absorption values fell precisely between summer and fall. The relationships of these observations to possible mechanisms of lead absorption and to summertime epidemics of lead poisoning in children are discussed.

  9. Relationships between Electroencephalographic Spectral Peaks Across Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, S. J.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which electroencephalographic spectral peaks are independent, and the relationships between their frequencies have been debated. A novel fitting method was used to determine peak parameters in the range 2–35 Hz from a large sample of eyes-closed spectra, and their interrelationships were investigated. Findings were compared with a mean-field model of thalamocortical activity, which predicts near-harmonic relationships between peaks. The subject set consisted of 1424 healthy subjects from the Brain Resource International Database. Peaks in the theta range occurred on average near half the alpha peak frequency, while peaks in the beta range tended to occur near twice and three times the alpha peak frequency on an individual-subject basis. Moreover, for the majority of subjects, alpha peak frequencies were significantly positively correlated with frequencies of peaks in the theta and low and high beta ranges. Such a harmonic progression agrees semiquantitatively with theoretical predictions from the mean-field model. These findings indicate a common or analogous source for different rhythms, and help to define appropriate individual frequency bands for peak identification. PMID:23483663

  10. The relevance of food peak architecture in trophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Vatka, Emma; Orell, Markku; Rytkönen, Seppo

    2016-04-01

    Phenological shifts and associated changes in the temporal match between trophic levels have been a major focus of the study of ecological consequences of climate change. Previously, the food peak has been thought to respond as an entity to warming temperatures. However, food peak architecture, that is, timings and abundances of prey species and the level of synchrony between them, determines the timing and shape of the food peak. We demonstrate this with a case example of three passerine prey species and their predator. We explored temporal trends in the timing, height, width, and peakedness of prey availabilities and explained their variation with food peak architecture and ambient temperatures of prebreeding and breeding seasons. We found a temporal match between the predator's breeding schedule and food availability. Temporal trends in the timing of the food peak or in the synchrony between the prey species were not found. However, the food peak has become wider and more peaked over time. With more peaked food availabilities, predator's breeding success will depend more on the temporal match between its breeding schedule and the food peak, ultimately affecting the timing of breeding in the predator population. The height and width of the food peak depended on the abundances and breeding season lengths of individual prey species and their reciprocal synchronies. Peakednesses of separate prey species' availability distributions alone explained the peakedness of the food peak. Timing and quantity of food production were associated with temperatures of various time periods with variable relevance in different prey species. Alternating abundances of early and late breeding prey species caused high annual fluctuation in the timing of the food peak. Interestingly, the food peak may become later even when prey species' schedules are advanced. Climate warming can thus produce unexpected changes in the food availabilities, intervening in trophic interactions. PMID

  11. Pressure dependence of Se absorption lines in AlSb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L. |; Haller, E.E.; Ramdas, A.K.

    1996-09-01

    Using far infrared absorption spectroscopy, the authors have investigated electronic transition spectra of Se donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. At least two distinct ground to bound excited state transition lines, which depend quadratically on the pressure, can be seen. At pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the electronic transitions and a peak which they attribute to the 2 zone center LO phonon mode can be seen.

  12. [Using 2-DCOS to identify the molecular spectrum peaks for the isomer in the multi-component mixture gases Fourier transform infrared analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-Xin; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2014-10-01

    The generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared were used to identify hydrocarbon isomers in the mixed gases for absorption spectra resolution enhancement. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of n-butane and iso-butane and the two-dimensional correlation infrared spectrum of concentration perturbation were used for analysis as an example. The all band and the main absorption peak wavelengths of Fourier transform infrared spectrum for single component gas showed that the spectra are similar, and if they were mixed together, absorption peaks overlap and peak is difficult to identify. The synchronous and asynchronous spectrum of two-dimensional correlation spectrum can clearly identify the iso-butane and normal butane and their respective characteristic absorption peak intensity. Iso-butane has strong absorption characteristics spectrum lines at 2,893, 2,954 and 2,893 cm(-1), and n-butane at 2,895 and 2,965 cm(-1). The analysis result in this paper preliminary verified that the two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy can be used for resolution enhancement in Fourier transform infrared spectrum quantitative analysis. PMID:25739197

  13. Human due diligence.

    PubMed

    Harding, David; Rouse, Ted

    2007-04-01

    Most companies do a thorough job of financial due diligence when they acquire other companies. But all too often, deal makers simply ignore or underestimate the significance of people issues in mergers and acquisitions. The consequences are severe. Most obviously, there's a high degree of talent loss after a deal's announcement. To make matters worse, differences in decision-making styles lead to infighting; integration stalls; and productivity declines. The good news is that human due diligence can help companies avoid these problems. Done early enough, it helps acquirers decide whether to embrace or kill a deal and determine the price they are willing to pay. It also lays the groundwork for smooth integration. When acquirers have done their homework, they can uncover capability gaps, points of friction, and differences in decision making. Even more important, they can make the critical "people" decisions-who stays, who goes, who runs the combined business, what to do with the rank and file-at the time the deal is announced or shortly thereafter. Making such decisions within the first 30 days is critical to the success of a deal. Hostile situations clearly make things more difficult, but companies can and must still do a certain amount of human due diligence to reduce the inevitable fallout from the acquisition process and smooth the integration. This article details the steps involved in conducting human due diligence. The approach is structured around answering five basic questions: Who is the cultural acquirer? What kind of organization do you want? Will the two cultures mesh? Who are the people you most want to retain? And how will rank-and-file employees react to the deal? Unless an acquiring company has answered these questions to its satisfaction, the acquisition it is making will be very likely to end badly. PMID:17432159

  14. Absorption in X-ray spectra of high-redshift quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Wilkes, Belinda; Mcdowell, Jonathan; Bechtold, Jill

    1994-01-01

    We present evidence that X-ray absorption is common in high-redshift quasars. We have studied six high-redshift (z approximately 3) quasars with the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) of which four are in directions of low Galactic N(sub H). Three out of these four show excess absorption, while only three in approximately 50 z approximately less than 0.4 quasars do, indicating that such absorption must be common, but not ubiquitous, at high redshifts, and that the absorbers must lie at z greater than 0.4. The six quasars were: S5 0014+81, Q0420-388, PKS 0438-436, S4 0636+680. PKS 2000-330, PKS 2126-158, which have redshifts between 2.85 and 3.78. PKS 0438-436 and PKS 2126-158 show evidence for absorption above the local Galactic value at better than 99.999% confidence level. If the absorber is at the redshift of the quasar, then values of N(sub H) = (0.86(+0.49, -0.28)) x 10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm for PKS 0438-436, and N(sub H) = (1.45(+1.20, -0.64)) x 10(exp 22) atoms/ sq cm for PKS 2126-158, are implied, assuming solar abundances. The spectrum of S4 0636+680 also suggests the presence of a similarly large absorption column density at the 98% confidence level. This absorption reverses the trend for the most luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) to have the least X-ray absorption, so a new mechanism is likely to be responsible. Intervening absorption due to damped Lyman(alpha) systems is a plausible cause. We also suggest, as an intrinsic model, that intracluster material, e.g., a cooling flow, around the quasar could account for both the X-ray spectrum and other properties of these quasars. All the quasars are radio-loud and three are gigahertz peaked (two of the three showing absorption). No excess absorption above the Galactic value is seen toward Q0420-388. This quasar has two damped Lyman(alpha) systems at z = 3.08. The limit on the X-ray column density implies a low ionization fraction, N(H I)/N(H) approximately greater than 4 x 10(exp -3) (3

  15. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable␣size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable␣frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  16. Polarization-adjustable dual-band absorption in GHz-band metamaterial, based-on no-smoking symbol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, YoungPak; Lee, Myung Whan; Lee, Tae Gyun; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Jae Hyun

    2015-11-01

    We propose three kinds of the perfect metamaterial absorbers based on the well-known no-smoking symbol, which can adjust the absorption according to the polarization of incident electromagnetic wave. By modifying no-smoking symbol, a resonance absorption peak at 6.75 GHz can be controlled. In addition, a split-ring structure and the no-smoking symbol also adjust the absorption. We also demonstrate the absorption mechanism for all the structures. These results can be used in controlling absorption by the electromagnetic-wave detector.

  17. System effects in sample self-stacking CZE: single analyte peak splitting of salt-containing samples.

    PubMed

    Malá, Zdena; Gebauer, Petr; Bocek, Petr

    2009-03-01

    In CZE one often gets more peaks than the number of sample components. In practice the additional peaks are often left unexplained or assigned to unidentified impurities or system peaks although cases exist when one analyte forms two or more regular distinct zones. One source of such effects are samples with high salt content that are generally assumed to bring higher sensitivity due to the sample self-stacking mechanism. The subject of this contribution is the theoretical and experimental investigation of the electromigration behavior of salt-containing samples. It is shown that they can exhibit splitting of the analyte zone into mutually independent parts detectable as well-developed distinct peaks. Theory based on velocity diagrams and computer simulations reveals that these effects originate in the transient phase of separation where electromigration dispersion profiles and sharp boundaries are formed and evolve. During this, the sample may induce parallel existence of several transient sharp boundaries (including system boundaries) that are simultaneously capable of stacking an analyte. Their electromigration is convergent and depending on whether they merge before the analyte destacks from them, permanent or transient double or multiple peaks are formed. Presented examples of anionic and cationic systems show good agreement with theory. The appearance of multiple peaks can be very variable, ranging from double or triple peaks to a major peak with a minor peak quite apart. Knowledge of the peak-splitting mechanism allows both to identify its presence in a given BGE and sample and to find effective remedy. PMID:19197903

  18. Greater deciduous shrub abundance extends tundra peak season and increases modeled net CO2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shannan K; Griffin, Kevin L; Steltzer, Heidi; Gough, Laura; Boelman, Natalie T

    2015-06-01

    Satellite studies of the terrestrial Arctic report increased summer greening and longer overall growing and peak seasons since the 1980s, which increases productivity and the period of carbon uptake. These trends are attributed to increasing air temperatures and reduced snow cover duration in spring and fall. Concurrently, deciduous shrubs are becoming increasingly abundant in tundra landscapes, which may also impact canopy phenology and productivity. Our aim was to determine the influence of greater deciduous shrub abundance on tundra canopy phenology and subsequent impacts on net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) during the growing and peak seasons in the arctic foothills region of Alaska. We compared deciduous shrub-dominated and evergreen/graminoid-dominated community-level canopy phenology throughout the growing season using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). We used a tundra plant-community-specific leaf area index (LAI) model to estimate LAI throughout the green season and a tundra-specific NEE model to estimate the impact of greater deciduous shrub abundance and associated shifts in both leaf area and canopy phenology on tundra carbon flux. We found that deciduous shrub canopies reached the onset of peak greenness 13 days earlier and the onset of senescence 3 days earlier compared to evergreen/graminoid canopies, resulting in a 10-day extension of the peak season. The combined effect of the longer peak season and greater leaf area of deciduous shrub canopies almost tripled the modeled net carbon uptake of deciduous shrub communities compared to evergreen/graminoid communities, while the longer peak season alone resulted in 84% greater carbon uptake in deciduous shrub communities. These results suggest that greater deciduous shrub abundance increases carbon uptake not only due to greater leaf area, but also due to an extension of the period of peak greenness, which extends the period of maximum carbon uptake. PMID:25556338

  19. A compact nonlinear fiber-based optical autocorrelation peak discriminator.

    PubMed

    Fok, M P; Deng, Y; Prucnal, P R

    2009-06-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-based optical autocorrelation peak discriminator. The approach exploits four-wave mixing in a 37-cm highly-nonlinear bismuth-oxide fiber that provides a passive and compact means for rejecting cross-correlation peaks. The autocorrelation peak discriminator plays an important role in improving the detection of optical CDMA signals. Eye diagrams and bit-error rates are measured at different power ratios. Significant receiver sensitivity improvements are obtained and error-floors are removed. The experimental results show that the autocorrelation peak discriminator works well even when the amplitudes of individual cross-correlation peaks are higher than that of the autocorrelation peak. PMID:19506641

  20. Force Irregularity Following Maximal Effort: The After-Peak Reduction.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa; Spirduso, Waneen

    2016-08-01

    Irregularities in force output are present throughout human movement and can impair task performance. We investigated the presence of a large force discontinuity (after-peak reduction, APR) that appeared immediately following peak in maximal effort ramp contractions performed with the thumb adductor and ankle dorsiflexor muscles in 25 young adult participants (76% males, 24% females; M age 24.4 years, SD = 7.1). The after-peak reduction displayed similar parameters in both muscle groups with comparable drops in force during the after-peak reduction minima (thumb adductor: 27.5 ± 7.5% maximal voluntary contraction; ankle dorsiflexor: 25.8 ± 6.2% maximal voluntary contraction). A trend for the presence of fewer after-peak reductions with successive ramp trials was observed, suggesting a learning effect. Further investigation should explore underlying neural mechanisms contributing to the after-peak reduction. PMID:27502241

  1. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the ‘core/shell’ interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon. PMID:22548846

  2. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-26

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  3. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light. PMID:23387142

  4. Probing molecular chirality by coherent optical absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, W. Z.; Wei, L. F.

    2011-11-15

    We propose an approach to sensitively probe the chirality of molecules by measuring their coherent optical-absorption spectra. It is shown that quantum dynamics of the cyclic three-level chiral molecules driven by appropriately designed external fields is total-phase dependent. This will result in chirality-dependent absorption spectra for the probe field. As a consequence, the charality-dependent information in the spectra (such as the locations and relative heights of the characteristic absorption peaks) can be utilized to identify molecular chirality and determinate enantiomer excess (i.e., the percentages of different enantiomers). The feasibility of the proposal with chiral molecules confined in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber is also discussed.

  5. Risky intensity peaks resulting from nonlinear holographic imaging.

    PubMed

    Garanin, Sergey G; Epatko, Igor V; Istomin, Roman I; L'vov, Lev V; Malyutin, Alexander A; Serov, Rene V; Sukharev, Stanislaw A

    2011-07-20

    A study of the maximal intensity peaks due to nonlinear holographic images of obstacles such as obscurations or phase defects in a high-power laser system is presented. It is shown that the interference of the high-power plane wave and the converging image wave results in the formation of intensity maximums in the vicinity of the image plane, the values of which significantly exceed the intensity in the image plane itself. For round obstacles, analytical expressions that describe magnitudes and locations of the maxima depending on the radius and the type of obstacle are given. A procedure of numerical modeling that allows estimation of the influence of beam size, medium thickness, type, size, and shape of obstacles onto the properties of nonlinear images is described. It is demonstrated that for a given combination of the nonlinear medium and the high-power beam parameters, there is an intrinsic size of obstacles that is most harmful for the laser system components. PMID:21772354

  6. Absorption of impinging water droplet in porous stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Radu, A I; Vontobel, P; Derome, D; Carmeliet, J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation and numerical analysis of the absorption of water droplets impacting porous stones. The absorption process of an impinging droplet is here fully characterized from spreading to evaporation in terms of absorbed mass during droplet depletion and moisture content distribution in a time-resolved manner for three different natural stones. High-speed imaging and neutron radiography are used to quantify moisture absorption in porous stones of varying moisture properties from deposition until depletion. During impact and spreading, the droplet exhibits a dynamic non-wetting behavior. At maximum spreading, the droplet undergoes pinning, resulting into the contact radius remaining constant until droplet depletion. Absorption undergoes two phases: initially, absorption is hindered due a contact resistance attributed to entrapped air; afterwards, a more perfect capillary contact occurs and absorption goes on until depletion, concurrently with evaporation and further redistribution. A finite-element numerical model for isothermal unsaturated moisture transport in porous media captures the phases of mass absorption in good agreement with the experimental data. Droplet spreading and absorption are highly determined by the impact velocity of the droplet, while moisture content redistribution after depletion is much less dependent on impact conditions. PMID:26975034

  7. Intestinal folate absorption

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Williamson; Nixon, Peter F.; Bertino, Joseph B.; Binder, Henry J.

    1971-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of the monoglutamate form of the principal dietary and circulating folate compound, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-MTHF), was studied in the rat utilizing a synthetic highly purified radiolabeled diastereoisomer. Chromatography confirmed that the compound was not altered after transfer from the mucosa to the serosa. Accumulation against a concentration gradient was not observed in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal segments at 5-MTHF concentration from 0.5 to 500 nmoles/liter. Unidirectional transmural flux determination also did not indicate a significant net flux. Mucosal to serosal transfer of 5-MTHF was similar in all segments of the intestine and increased in a linear fashion with increased initial mucosal concentrations. Further, no alteration in 5-MTHF transfer was found when studied in the presence of metabolic inhibitors or folate compounds. These results indicate that 5-MTHF is not absorbed by the rat small intestine by a carrier-mediated system and suggest that 5-MTHF transfer most likely represents diffusion. Images PMID:5564397

  8. Separation of overlapping vibrational peaks in terahertz spectra using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ishii, Shinya; Otani, Chiko

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were measured during isothermal crystallization at 90-120 °C. The temporal changes in the absorption spectra were analyzed using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS). In the asynchronous plot, cross peaks were observed around 2.4 THz, suggesting that two vibrational modes overlap in the raw spectrum. By comparing this to the peak at 2.9 THz corresponding to the stretching mode of the helical structure of PHB and the assignment obtained using polarization spectroscopy, we concluded that the high-frequency band could be attributed to the vibration of the helical structure and the low-frequency band to the vibration between the helical structures. The exact frequencies of the overlapping vibrational bands and their assignments provide a new means to inspect the thermal behavior of the intermolecular vibrational modes. The large red-shift of the interhelix vibrational mode suggests a large anharmonicity in the vibrational potential.

  9. Snoek peaks of carbon in Fe-Ni meteorites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weller, M.; Wert, C.

    1996-12-01

    Most Fe-Ni meteorites are a two phase mixture of fcc and bcc phases. The authors secured six samples of Fe contents from 95% to 85% all of which were thought to contain small amounts of carbon. They found no Snoek peaks in the as-received condition for any of the six. After being heated and cooled, three showed pronounced Snoek peaks, three showed no Snoek peaks.

  10. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  11. Peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Christina; Lyke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Maslow (1970) defined peak experiences as the most wonderful experiences of a person's life, which may include a sense of awe, well-being, or transcendence. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that psilocybin can produce experiences subjectively rated as uniquely meaningful and significant (Griffiths et al. 2006). It is therefore possible that psilocybin may facilitate or change the nature of peak experiences in users compared to non-users. This study was designed to compare the peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users, to evaluate the frequency of peak experiences while under the influence of psilocybin, and to assess the perceived degree of alteration of consciousness during these experiences. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling from undergraduate classes and at a musical event. Participants were divided into three groups, those who reported a peak experience while under the influence of psilocybin (psilocybin peak experience: PPE), participants who had used psilocybin but reported their peak experiences did not occur while they were under the influence of psilocybin (non-psilocybin peak experience: NPPE), and participants who had never used psilocybin (non-user: NU). A total of 101 participants were asked to think about their peak experiences and complete a measure evaluating the degree of alteration of consciousness during that experience. Results indicated that 47% of psilocybin users reported their peak experience occurred while using psilocybin. In addition, there were significant differences among the three groups on all dimensions of alteration of consciousness. Future research is necessary to identify factors that influence the peak experiences of psilocybin users in naturalistic settings and contribute to the different characteristics of peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users. PMID:23909006

  12. Detection and classification of peaks in 5' cap RNA sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The large-scale sequencing of 5' cap enriched cDNA promises to reveal the diversity of transcription initiation across entire genomes. The process of transcription is noisy, and there is often no single, exact start site. This creates the need for a fast and simple method of identifying transcription start peaks based on this type of data. Due to both biological and technical noise, many of the peaks seen are not real transcription initiation events. Classification of the observed peaks is an essential filtering step in the discovery of genuine initiation locations. Results We develop a two-stage approach consisting of a fast and simple algorithm based on a sliding window with Poisson null distribution for detecting the genomic locations of peaks, followed by a linear support vector machine classifier to distinguish between peaks which represent the initiation of transcription and peaks that do not. Comparison of classification performance to the best existing method based on whole genome segmentation showed comparable precision and improved recall. Internal features, which are intrinsic to the data and require no further experiments, had high precision and recall rates. Addition of pooled external data or matched RNA sequencing data resulted in gains of recall with equivalent precision. Conclusions The Poisson sliding window model is an effective and fast way of taking the peak neighbourhood into account, and finding statistically significant peaks over a range of transcript expression values. It is orders of magnitude faster than doing whole genome segmentation. The support vector classification scheme has better precision and recall than existing methods. Integrating additional datasets is shown to provide minor gains in recall, in comparison to using only the cap-sequencing data. PMID:24564843

  13. Neutron absorption detector

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Zane William; Boatner, Lynn Allen

    2011-05-31

    A method of detecting an activator, the method including impinging a receptor material that is not predominately water and lacks a photoluminescent material with an activator and generating Cherenkov effect light due to the activator impinging the receptor material. The method further including identifying a characteristic of the activator based on the light.

  14. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  15. Diamond sensors and polycapillary lenses for X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ravel, B.; Attenkofer, K.; Bohon, J.; Muller, E.; Smedley, J.

    2013-10-15

    Diamond sensors are evaluated as incident beam monitors for X-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. These single crystal devices pose a challenge for an energy-scanning experiment using hard X-rays due to the effect of diffraction from the crystalline sensor at energies which meet the Bragg condition. This problem is eliminated by combination with polycapillary lenses. The convergence angle of the beam exiting the lens is large compared to rocking curve widths of the diamond. A ray exiting one capillary from the lens meets the Bragg condition for any reflection at a different energy from the rays exiting adjacent capillaries. This serves to broaden each diffraction peak over a wide energy range, allowing linear measurement of incident intensity over the range of the energy scan. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data are measured with a combination of a polycapillary lens and a diamond incident beam monitor. These data are of comparable quality to data measured without a lens and with an ionization chamber monitoring the incident beam intensity.

  16. Zener Relaxation Peak in an Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng-Cun; Cheng, He-Fa; Gong, Chen-Li; Wei, Jian-Ning; Han, Fu-Sheng

    2002-11-01

    We have studied the temperature spectra of internal friction and relative dynamic modulus of the Fe-(25 wt%)Cr-(5 wt%)Al alloy with different grain sizes. It is found that a peak appears in the internal friction versus temperature plot at about 550°C. The peak is of a stable relaxation and is reversible, which occurs not only during heating but also during cooling. Its activation energy is 2.5 (+/- 0.15) eV in terms of the Arrhenius relation. In addition, the peak is not obvious in specimens with a smaller grain size. It is suggested that the peak originates from Zener relaxation.

  17. Improved Peak Cancellation for PAPR Reduction in OFDM Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan, Lilin; Xiao, Yue; Ni, Wei; Li, Shaoqian

    This letter presents an improved peak cancellation (PC) scheme for peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) reduction in orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) systems. The main idea is based on a serial peak cancellation (SPC) mode for alleviating the peak regrowth of the conventional schemes. Based on the SPC mode, two particular algorithms are developed with different tradeoff between PAPR and computational complexity. Simulation shows that the proposed scheme has a better tradeoff among PAPR, complexity and signal distortion than the conventional schemes.

  18. Neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors from evaporation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, D. F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, T. J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 keV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si(μ -, nv), and 209Bi(π -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for a dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no difference between these three measurements has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies, we found similar results to ours except for those measurements using monoenergetic neutrons in which a significant variation with neutron energy has been observed.

  19. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Scott

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum and which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all of the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.

  20. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.