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Sample records for absorption peak due

  1. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  2. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  3. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  4. Twin-peaks absorption spectra of excess electron in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Kondoh, Takafumi; Yoshida, Yoichi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    The solvated electron in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been the subject of several investigations and several reports exist on its nature and absorption spectrum. These studies concluded that the solvated electron exhibits an absorption spectrum peaking in the 1000-1400 nm region; a second absorption band peaking in the UV region has been assigned to the hole or dication radicals simultaneously formed in the system. Here we report on the fate of the excess electron in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, P14+/NTf2- using nanosecond pulse radiolysis. Scavenging experiments allowed us to record and disentangle the complex spectrum measured in P14+/NTf2-. We identified a bi-component absorption spectrum, due to the solvated electron, the absorption maxima located at 1080 nm and around 300 nm, as predicted by previous ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations for the dry excess electron. We also measured the spectra using different ionic liquids and confirmed the same feature of two absorption peaks. The present results have important implications for the characterization of solvated electrons in ionic liquids and better understanding of their structure and reactivity.

  5. Weibel instability due to inverse bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bendib, A.; Bendib, K.,; Bendib, A.; Bendib, K.; Sid, A.,; Bendib, K.,

    1997-06-01

    A new Weibel source due to the inverse bremsstrahlung absorption is presented. It has been shown that in homogeneous plasmas, this mechanism may drive strong collisionless Weibel modes with growth rates of order of {gamma}{approximately}10{sup 11}s{sup {minus}1} and negligible group velocities. In the laser-produced plasmas, for short laser wavelengths ({lambda}{sub L}{lt}1{mu}m) and high laser fluxes (I{gt}10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}), this Weibel source is most efficient as the ones due to the heat flux and the plasma expansion. The useful scaling law of the convective e-foldings, with respect to the laser and the plasma parameters, is also derived. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Mass spectral peak distortion due to Fourier transform signal processing.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Alan L; Erve, John C L

    2014-12-01

    Distortions of peaks can occur when one uses the standard method of signal processing of data from the Orbitrap and other FT-based methods of mass spectrometry. These distortions arise because the standard method of signal processing is not a linear process. If one adds two or more functions, such as time-dependent signals from a Fourier transform mass spectrometer and performs a linear operation on the sum, the result is the same as if the operation was performed on separate functions and the results added. If this relationship is not valid, the operation is non-linear and can produce unexpected and/or distorted results. Although the Fourier transform itself is a linear operator, the standard algorithm for processing spectra in Fourier transform-based methods include non-linear mathematical operators such that spectra processed by the standard algorithm may become distorted. The most serious consequence is that apparent abundances of the peaks in the spectrum may be incorrect. In light of these considerations, we performed theoretical modeling studies to illustrate several distortion effects that can be observed, including abundance distortions. In addition, we discuss experimental systems where these effects may manifest, including suggested systems for study that should demonstrate these peak distortions. Finally, we point to several examples in the literature where peak distortions may be rationalized by the phenomena presented here.

  7. Degradation of the Bragg peak due to inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Urie, M; Goitein, M; Holley, W R; Chen, G T

    1986-01-01

    The rapid fall-off of dose at the end of range of heavy charged particle beams has the potential in therapeutic applications of sparing critical structures just distal to the target volume. Here we explored the effects of highly inhomogeneous regions on this desirable depth-dose characteristic. The proton depth-dose distribution behind a lucite-air interface parallel to the beam was bimodal, indicating the presence of two groups of protons with different residual ranges, creating a step-like depth-dose distribution at the end of range. The residual ranges became more spread out as the interface was angled at 3 degrees, and still more at 6 degrees, to the direction of the beam. A second experiment showed little significant effect on the distal depth-dose of protons having passed through a mosaic of teflon and lucite. Anatomic studies demonstrated significant effects of complex fine inhomogeneities on the end of range characteristics. Monoenergetic protons passing through the petrous ridges and mastoid air cells in the base of skull showed a dramatic degradation of the distal Bragg peak. In beams with spread out Bragg peaks passing through regions of the base of skull, the distal fall-off from 90 to 20% dose was increased from its nominal 6 to well over 32 mm. Heavy ions showed a corresponding degradation in their ends of range. In the worst case in the base of skull region, a monoenergetic neon beam showed a broadening of the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak to over 15 mm (compared with 4 mm in a homogeneous unit density medium). A similar effect was found with carbon ions in the abdomen, where the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak (nominally 5.5 mm) was found to be greater than 25 mm behind gas-soft-tissue interfaces. We address the implications of these data for dose computation with heavy charged particles.

  8. Degradation of the Bragg peak due to inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Urie, M; Goitein, M; Holley, W R; Chen, G T

    1986-01-01

    The rapid fall-off of dose at the end of range of heavy charged particle beams has the potential in therapeutic applications of sparing critical structures just distal to the target volume. Here we explored the effects of highly inhomogeneous regions on this desirable depth-dose characteristic. The proton depth-dose distribution behind a lucite-air interface parallel to the beam was bimodal, indicating the presence of two groups of protons with different residual ranges, creating a step-like depth-dose distribution at the end of range. The residual ranges became more spread out as the interface was angled at 3 degrees, and still more at 6 degrees, to the direction of the beam. A second experiment showed little significant effect on the distal depth-dose of protons having passed through a mosaic of teflon and lucite. Anatomic studies demonstrated significant effects of complex fine inhomogeneities on the end of range characteristics. Monoenergetic protons passing through the petrous ridges and mastoid air cells in the base of skull showed a dramatic degradation of the distal Bragg peak. In beams with spread out Bragg peaks passing through regions of the base of skull, the distal fall-off from 90 to 20% dose was increased from its nominal 6 to well over 32 mm. Heavy ions showed a corresponding degradation in their ends of range. In the worst case in the base of skull region, a monoenergetic neon beam showed a broadening of the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak to over 15 mm (compared with 4 mm in a homogeneous unit density medium). A similar effect was found with carbon ions in the abdomen, where the full width at half maximum of the Bragg peak (nominally 5.5 mm) was found to be greater than 25 mm behind gas-soft-tissue interfaces. We address the implications of these data for dose computation with heavy charged particles. PMID:3952143

  9. Electron heating due to resonant absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, K.; Spielman, R.B.; DeGroot, J.S.; Bollen, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Intense, p-polarized microwaves (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/<1) are incident on an imhomogeneous plasma (10/sup 2/absorption near the critical surface (where the plasma frequency equals microwave frequency). Suprathermal electrons are heated by resonantly driven electrostatic field to produce a hot Maxwellian distribution. Most of the heated electrons flow towards the overdense region and are absorbed by the anode at the far end of the overdense region. At high power (v/sub os//v/sub eo-/>0.2), strong heating of thermal electrons, large amplitude ion acoustic turbulence, and a self-consistent dc electric field are observed near the critical surface. This dc electric field is enhanced by applying a weak magnetic field (..omega../sub ce//..omega../sub o/ approx. = 10/sup -2/).

  10. THERMAL ABSORPTION AS THE CAUSE OF GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA IN PULSARS AND MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Rożko, Karolina; Kijak, Jarosław; Melikidze, George I.

    2015-07-20

    We present a model that explains the observed deviation of the spectra of some pulsars and magnetars from the power-law spectra that are seen in the bulk of the pulsar population. Our model is based on the assumption that the observed variety of pulsar spectra can be naturally explained by the thermal free–free absorption that takes place in the surroundings of the pulsars. In this context, the variety of the pulsar spectra can be explained according to the shape, density, and temperature of the absorbing media and the optical path of the line of sight across it. We have put specific emphasis on the case of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900 (also known as the Sgr A* magnetar), modeling the rapid variations of the pulsar spectrum after the outburst of 2013 April as due to the free–free absorption of the radio emission in the electron material ejected during the magnetar outburst. The ejecta expands with time and consequently the absorption rate decreases and the shape of the spectrum changes in such a way that the peak frequency shifts toward the lower radio frequencies. In the hypothesis of an absorbing medium, we also discuss the similarity between the spectral behavior of the binary pulsar B1259–63 and the spectral peculiarities of isolated pulsars.

  11. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  12. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-21

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications. PMID:27143336

  13. Identification of infrared absorption peaks of amorphous silicon-carbon alloy by thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Hsiung-Kuang; Lee, Si-Chen; Sah, Wen-Jyh; Tzeng, Wen-Jer

    1987-12-01

    Amorphous silicon-carbon hydrogen alloy was prepared by radio frequency glow discharge decomposition of a silane-methane mixture. The infrared absorption spectra were measured at various stages of thermal annealing. By observing the change of relative intensities between these peaks the hydrogen bonding responsible for the absorption peaks could be assigned more accurately, for example, the stretching mode of monohydride Si-H is determined by its local environment, which supports H. Wagner's and W. Beyer's results [Solid State Commun. 48, 585 (1983)] but is inconsistent with the commonly believed view. It is also found that a significant fraction of carbon atoms are introduced into the film in -CH3 configuration which forms a local void and enhances the formation of polysilane chain and dangling bond defects. Only after high-temperature annealing are the hydrogen atoms driven out, and Si and C start to form a better silicon carbide network.

  14. Anisotropic Peak Effect due to Structural Phase Transition in the Vortex Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Knigavko, Anton

    1999-07-01

    It is shown that the recently observed new peak effect in YBCO could be explained by the softening of the vortex lattice due to a structural phase transition in the vortex lattice. At this transition square lattice transforms into a distorted hexagonal one. While conventional peak effect is associated with the softening of shear modes (elastic modulus c66 vanishes) at melting, in this case the relevant mode is ``squash'' mode ( c11+c22-2c12 vanishes).

  15. Anisotropic peak effect due to structural phase transition in the vortex lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenstein, Baruch; Knigavko, Anton

    2000-05-01

    The recently observed new peak effect in YBCO is explained by softening of the vortex lattice (VL) due to a structural phase transition in the VL. At this transition, square lattice transforms into a distorted hexagonal one. While conventional peak effect is associated with softening of shear modes at melting, in this case the relevant mode is the point. The squash mode is highly anisotropic and we point out some peculiar effects associated with this feature.

  16. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  17. Absorptive potentials due to ionization and thermal diffuse scattering by fast electrons in crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, L.J. ); Rossouw, C.J. )

    1990-12-15

    An expression for the Fourier coefficients of the absorptive potential due to electron-impact ionization in crystals is derived and the cross section is given in terms of these Fourier components. Absorptive potentials due to {ital K}-shell ionization and thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) are calculated with use of a hydrogenic model and an Einstein model, respectively. Inelastic potentials require integration over all states of the scattered electron and, for {ital K}-shell ionization, integration over all states of the ejected electron. These potentials are thus dependent on incident-beam energy, in contrast with the elastic potential. The projected spatial distribution of these potentials are plotted and compared with the elastic potential for CdTe, GaAs, Si, and diamond. The delocalization of the ionization absorptive potential is similar to that expected from classical impact-parameter arguments. The form of the TDS potential is substantially different from that due to elastic scattering, being extremely peaked on atomic positions with no absorption in the channels between atomic planes.

  18. An analytic formula for heating due to ozone absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Will, D. I.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to devise a simple expression or formula to describe radiative heating in the atmosphere by ozone absorption. Such absorption occurs in the Hartley, Huggins, and Chappuis bands and is only slightly temperature and pressure dependent.

  19. ARE HIGH VELOCITY PEAKS IN THE MILKY WAY BULGE DUE TO THE BAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhao-Yu; Shen, Juntai; Rich, R. Michael; Kunder, Andrea; Mao, Shude

    2014-04-10

    Recently the commissioning APOGEE observations of the Galactic bulge reported that a significant fraction of stars (∼10%) are in a cold (σ{sub V} ≈ 30 km s{sup –1}) high velocity peak (Galactocentric radial velocity ≈200 km s{sup –1}). These stars are speculated to reflect the stellar orbits in the Galactic bar. In this study, we use two N-body models of a Milky Way-like disk galaxy with different bar strengths to critically examine this possibility. The general trends of the Galactocentric radial velocity distribution in observations and simulations are similar, but neither our models nor the BRAVA data reveal a statistically significant cold high velocity peak. A Monte Carlo test further suggests that it is possible for a spurious high velocity peak to appear if there are only a limited number of stars observed. Thus, the reported cold high velocity peak, even if it is real, is unlikely due to stars on the bar-supporting orbits. Our models do predict an excess of stars with high radial velocity, but not in a distinct peak. In the distance-velocity diagram, the high velocity particles in different fields exist at a similar distance ∼8.5 ± 1 kpc away from the Sun. This result may be explained by geometric intersections between the line-of-sight and the particle orbits; high velocity stars naturally exist approximately at the tangent point, without constituting a distinct peak. We further demonstrate that even without the presence of a bar structure, particle motions in an axisymmetric disk can also exhibit an excess of high velocity stars.

  20. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1-30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1-30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3-4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  1. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  2. Electromagnetic power absorption and temperature changes due to brain machine interface operation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Abraham, Doney; Rennaker, Robert L

    2007-05-01

    To fully understand neural function, chronic neural recordings must be made simultaneously from 10s or 100s of neurons. To accomplish this goal, several groups are developing brain machine interfaces. For these devices to be viable for chronic human use, it is likely that they will need to be operated and powered externally via a radiofrequency (RF) source. However, RF exposure can result in tissue heating and is regulated by the FDA/FCC. This paper provides an initial estimate of the amount of tissue heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the operation of a brain-machine interface (BMI). The operation of a brain machine interface was evaluated in an 18-tissue anatomically detailed human head mesh using simulations of electromagnetics and bio-heat phenomena. The simulations were conducted with a single chip, as well as with eight chips, placed on the surface of the human brain and each powered at four frequencies (13.6 MHz, 1.0 GHz, 2.4 GHz, and 5.8 GHz). The simulated chips consist of a wire antenna on a silicon chip covered by a Teflon dura patch. SAR values were calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method and used to predict peak temperature changes caused by electromagnetic absorption in the head using two-dimensional bio-heat equation. Results due to SAR alone show increased heating at higher frequencies, with a peak temperature change at 5.8 GHz of approximately 0.018 degrees C in the single-chip configuration and 0.06 degrees C in the eight-chip configuration with 10 mW of power absorption (in the human head) per chip. In addition, temperature elevations due to power dissipation in the chip(s) were studied. Results show that for the neural tissue, maximum temperature rises of 3.34 degrees C in the single-chip configuration and 7.72 degrees C in the eight-chip configuration were observed for 10 mW dissipation in each chip. Finally, the maximum power dissipation allowable in each chip before a 1.0 degrees C temperature

  3. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  4. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  5. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  6. Enhancement of light absorption in polyazomethines due to plasmon excitation on randomly distributed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, P.; Antosiewicz, T. J.; Stefaniuk, T.; Ciesielski, A.; Iwan, A.; Wronkowska, A. A.; Wronkowski, A.; Szoplik, T.

    2015-05-01

    In photovoltaic devices, metal nanoparticles embedded in a semiconductor layer allow the enhancement of solar-toelectric energy conversion efficiency due to enhanced light absorption via a prolonged optical path, enhanced electric fields near the metallic inclusions, direct injection of hot electrons, or local heating. Here we pursue the first two avenues. In the first, light scattered at an angle beyond the critical angle for reflection is coupled into the semiconductor layer and confined within such planar waveguide up to possible exciton generation. In the second, light is trapped by the excitation of localized surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles leading to enhanced near-field plasmon-exciton coupling at the peak of the plasmon resonance. We report on results of a numerical experiment on light absorption in polymer- (fullerene derivative) blends, using the 3D FDTD method, where exact optical parameters of the materials involved are taken from our recent measurements. In simulations we investigate light absorption in randomly distributed metal nanoparticles dispersed in polyazomethine-(fullerene derivative) blends, which serve as active layers in bulkheterojunction polymer solar cells. In the study Ag and Al nanoparticles of different diameters and fill factors are diffused in two air-stable aromatic polyazomethines with different chemical structures (abbreviated S9POF and S15POF) mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) or [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). The mixtures are spin coated on a 100 nm thick Al layer deposited on a fused silica substrate. Optical constants of the active layers are taken from spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectance measurements using a rotating analyzer type ellipsometer with auto-retarder performed in the wavelength range from 225 nm to 2200 nm. The permittivities of Ag and Al particles of diameters from 20 to 60 nm are assumed to be equal to those measured on 100 to 200 nm thick metal films.

  7. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  8. Peak flow rate records in the diagnosis of occupational asthma due to colophony.

    PubMed Central

    Burge, P S; O'Brien, I M; Harries, M G

    1979-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) has been measured hourly from waking to sleeping in 29 workers with respiratory symptoms exposed to the fumes of soft soldering fluxes containing colophony (pine resin). Thirty-nine records of mean length 33 days have been analysed, and the results compared with the occupational history and bronchial provocation testing in the same workers. From plots of daily mean, maximum, and minimum PEFR, recurring physiological patterns of asthma emerge. The most common pattern is for asthma to increase with each successive working day. Some workers have an equivalent deterioration each working day. Regular recovery patterns taking one, two, and three days are described. The combination of a three-day recovery pattern and a late asthmatic reaction on Monday results in Monday being the best day of each week. Assessment of these records has shown them to be specific and sensitive, provided the worker was not taking corticosteroids or sodium cromoglycate during the period of the record and that bronchodilator usage was kept constant on days at home and at work. The results of the PEFR records correlate well with bronchial provocation testing, and provide a suitable alternative to this for the diagnosis of mild to moderate occupational asthma. The records are of particular use for screening symptomatic workers whose symptoms appear unlikely to be related to work. PMID:483205

  9. Hydrogen Balmer beta: The separation between line peaks for plasma electron density diagnostics and self-absorption test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivković, Milivoje; Konjević, Nikola; Pavlović, Zoran

    2015-03-01

    We propose a diagnostic technique for the measurement of plasma electron number density, Ne, based on the wavelength separation between peaks, ΔλPS, of hydrogen Balmer beta line, Hβ. In favor of the proposed diagnostic technique we demonstrate high sensitivity of ΔλPS on Ne and low sensitivity on plasma elementary processes and plasma parameters that may distort the line profile. These properties of ΔλPS enable reliable Ne plasma diagnostics in the presence of considerable self-absorption. On the basis of available theoretical data tables for the Hβ line profiles, simple Ne=f(ΔλPS) formulas are proposed. Their validity is experimentally confirmed in a low initial pressure pulsed discharge for the Ne range of (0.2-7)*1023 m-3. The agreement of the proposed formulas with another diagnostic technique is well within 10%. In addition, the difference in Ne values obtained from peak separation and from the Hβ line width is successfully used as a self-absorption test for line profile.

  10. Glass Composition-Dependent Silicate Absorption Peaks in FTIR Spectroscopy: Implications for Measuring Sample Thickness and Molecular H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Nichols, A. R.; Schipper, C. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is often used to measure the H2O and CO2 contents of volcanic glasses. A key advantage of FTIR over other analytical techniques is that it can reveal not only total H2O concentration but also H2O speciation, i.e. how much H2O is present as molecular H2O (H2Om) and how much as hydroxyl groups (OH) bound to the silicate network. This H2O speciation data can be used to investigate cooling rate and glass transition temperature of volcanic glasses, and to interpret H2O contents of pyroclasts affected by partial bubble resorption during cooling or secondary hydration after deposition. FTIR in transmitted light requires sample wafers polished on both sides of known thickness. Thickness is commonly measured using a micrometer but this may damage fragile samples and in samples with non-uniform thickness, e.g. vesicular samples, it is difficult to position at the exact location of FTIR analysis. Furthermore, in FTIR images or maps of such samples it is impractical to determine the thickness across the whole of the analysed area, resulting either in only a selection of the collected data being processed quantitatively and the rest being unused, or results being presented in terms of absorbance, which does not account for variations in thickness.It is known that FTIR spectra contain absorption peaks related to the glass aluminosilicate network at wavenumbers of ~2000, ~1830 and ~1600 cm-1 [1]. These have been shown to be proportional to sample thickness at the analysis location for one obsidian composition with up to 0.66 wt% H2O [2]. We test whether this calibration can be applied more widely by analysing a range of synthetic and natural glasses (andesitic to rhyolitic) to examine how the position and relative intensities of the different silicate absorption peaks vary with composition and H2O content. Our data show that even minor differences in composition necessitate a unique calibration. Furthermore, importantly we show how

  11. Techniques for estimating the percutaneous absorption of chemicals due to occupational and environmental exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Hon-Wing; Paustenbach, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    This article reviews the scientific principles involved in determining the percutaneous absorption of chemicals. To assist industrial hygienists in assessing the risks of dermal uptake of chemicals in workplaces, lists of absorption rates and example calculations including the use of wipe sampling to estimate skin exposure are presented. Recent advances in the use of mathematical models to examine the various factors influencing the percutaneous absorption of chemicals from matrices are discussed. Results from various models suggest that the skin uptake of nonvolatile, highly lipophilic chemicals in soil will range from about 30 percent to 50 percent, while the uptake of volatile chemicals will usually be less than 5 percent. The available published information suggests the following rules of thumb: (1) the bioavailability of chemicals in media vary widely; consequently, it is important to account for matrix effects; (2) proper wipe sampling should be conducted to estimate the degree of skin contact with contaminated surfaces; (3) the hazards posed by dermal contact with certain chemicals in the workplace, particularly those with a high n-octanol:water partition coefficient, can produce an appreciable degree of the daily absorbed dose, and the dose from percutaneous absorption can often be as much as one-half that due to inhalation; and (4) the contribution to overall uptake from percutaneous absorption of chemical vapors can be significant if the atmospheric concentration of the chemicals is tenfold to one thousandfold higher than the threshold limit value, even when the worker wears protective clothing and adequate respiratory protection. 92 refs., 5 tabs.

  12. Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate improves calcium absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during peak production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Zhao, J P; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Zhang, Q; Lin, H

    2015-01-01

    The advantage of supplemental sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on eggshell quality in laying hens changes with age. Besides increasing calcium (Ca) secretion in the eggshell gland, it may improve Ca absorption in the intestine or kidney. Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384), 25 weeks of age, were allocated to two treatment groups in two experiments, each of which included 4 replicates of 24 hens. Hens were fed a basal diet (control) or the basal diet containing 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg for 50 or 20 weeks in Experiment 1 or 2, respectively. A 24-h continuous lighting regimen was used to allow hens to consume the dietary supplements during the period of active eggshell formation. In Experiment 1, particularly from 25 to 50 weeks of age, and in Experiment 2, NaHCO3 supplementation favoured hen-d egg production at the expense of lower egg weight. The increased eggshell thickness should have nothing to do with the additional eggshell formation, because of the unchanged egg mass and daily eggshell calcification. At 35 weeks of age in both experiments, NaHCO3 supplementation increased duodenal expression of calbindin-d28k (CaBP-D28k) protein, contributing to higher Ca retention and balance. From 50 to 75 weeks of age in Experiment 1, the hens had little response to NaHCO3 supplementation and showed a negative trend on eggshell thickness and strength. It is concluded that dietary supplementation with 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg improves Ca absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during the peak but not late production period, with the introduction of continuous lighting.

  13. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  14. Experimental observation of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the two plasmon decay instability and resonance absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in two experimental devices. In the first device an investigation was made of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the parametric decay of microwaves into electron plasma waves (Two Plasmon Decay instability, TPDI), modeling a process which can occur near the quarter critical surface in laser driven pellets. P-polarized microwave (f = 1.2 GHz, P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 12 kW) are applied to an essentially collisionless, inhomogeneous plasma, in an oversized waveguide, in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III device. The initial density scale length near the quarter critical surface is quite long (L/lambda/sub De/ approx. = 3000 or k/sub 0/L approx. = 15). The observed threshold power for the TPDI is quite low (P/sub T/approx. = 0.1 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ approx. = 0.1). Near the threshold the decay waves only occur near the quarter critical surface. As the incident power is increased above threshold, the decay waves spread to lower densities, and for P/sub 0/ greater than or equal to lkW, (v/sub os//v/sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.3) suprathermal electron heating is strong for high powers (T/sub H/ less than or equal to 12 T/sub e/ for P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 8 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.9).

  15. On-line spectrophotometric method for monitoring weak residual absorption of CaMoO{sub 4} single crystals near the intrinsic luminescence peak

    SciTech Connect

    Buzanov, O. A.; Kanevskii, V. M.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Nabatov, B. V.; Nabatov, V. V.; Fedorov, V. A.

    2013-11-15

    The optical and spectral characteristics of isotopically enriched Czochralski-grown {sup 40}Ca{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} single crystals have been investigated. This material is promising for detecting double neutrinoless {beta} decay. The possibility and the technique of spectrophotometric monitoring of weak residual absorption near the intrinsic luminescence peak of this scintillation material, which is designed for developing new-generation detectors of elementary particles, are considered.

  16. Spatial Damping of Propagating Kink Waves Due to Resonant Absorption: Effect of Background Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, R.; Terradas, J.; Goossens, M.

    2011-06-01

    Observations show the ubiquitous presence of propagating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) kink waves in the solar atmosphere. Waves and flows are often observed simultaneously. Due to plasma inhomogeneity in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, kink waves are spatially damped by resonant absorption. The presence of flow may affect the wave spatial damping. Here, we investigate the effect of longitudinal background flow on the propagation and spatial damping of resonant kink waves in transversely nonuniform magnetic flux tubes. We combine approximate analytical theory with numerical investigation. The analytical theory uses the thin tube (TT) and thin boundary (TB) approximations to obtain expressions for the wavelength and the damping length. Numerically, we verify the previously obtained analytical expressions by means of the full solution of the resistive MHD eigenvalue problem beyond the TT and TB approximations. We find that the backward and forward propagating waves have different wavelengths and are damped on length scales that are inversely proportional to the frequency as in the static case. However, the factor of proportionality depends on the characteristics of the flow, so that the damping length differs from its static analog. For slow, sub-Alfvénic flows the backward propagating wave gets damped on a shorter length scale than in the absence of flow, while for the forward propagating wave the damping length is longer. The different properties of the waves depending on their direction of propagation with respect to the background flow may be detected by the observations and may be relevant for seismological applications.

  17. Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Setyawan, Daddy; Rohman, Budi

    2014-09-30

    Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

  18. Photoacoustic Experimental System to Confirm Infrared Absorption Due to Greenhouse Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Monjushiro, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kasai, Toshio; Harris, Harold H.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental system for detecting infrared absorption using the photoacoustic (PA) effect is described. It is aimed for use at high-school level to illustrate the difference in infrared (IR) absorption among the gases contained in the atmosphere in connection with the greenhouse effect. The experimental system can be built with readily…

  19. Removal of OH Absorption Bands Due to Pyrohydrolysis Reactions in Fluoride-Containing Borosilicate Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Keiji

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to decrease and to remove OH ions and H2O in borosilicate glasses. Fluoride-containing borosilicate glasses followed by dry-air-bubbling showed the significant decrease of OH absorption bands around 3500 cm-1. The decrease of OH absorption bands was elucidated by the use of pyrohydrolysis reactions in these glasses where fluoride ions react with OH ions or H2O during melting. The rates of the decrease of OH absorption bands substantially depend on high valence cations of fluorides. Particularly, the decrease rates of OH absorption coefficients were in the order of ZrF4-containing glass>AlF3-containing glass>ZnF2-containing glass. ZrF4-containing glass treated by dry-air-bubbling showed a good capability to remove OH absorption band. Fluoride-containing glasses showed the low flow point in comparison with fluoride-free glasses.

  20. Proton-induced coloring of multicomponent glasses. [absorption saturation due to irradiation in space environment simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartusiak, M. F.; Becher, J.

    1979-01-01

    The paper describes the coloring induced by 85-MeV protons in three Schott glasses representative of glass types used as focusing elements in the International Ultraviolet Explorer Fine Error Sensor. It is shown that the absorption (i.e., coloring) induced in each glass by the radiation can be resolved into three optical absorption bands in the near UV-visible range. It is also discussed how that absorption grows with increasing dosages of protons, thus providing the means to predict degradation in any of the three glasses for a particular fluence of proton radiation.

  1. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below. PMID:25150556

  2. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below.

  3. Peak shifts due to B{sup (*)}-B{sup (*)} rescattering in {upsilon}(5S) dipion transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Meng Ce; Chao Kuangta

    2008-08-01

    We study the energy distributions of dipion transitions {upsilon}(5S) to {upsilon}(1S,2S,3S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} in the final-state rescattering model. Since the {upsilon}(5S) is well above the open bottom thresholds, the dipion transitions are expected to mainly proceed through the real processes {upsilon}(5S){yields}B{sup (*)}B{sup (*)} and B{sup (*)}B{sup (*)}{yields}{upsilon}(1S,2S,3S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. We find that the energy distributions of {upsilon}(1S,2S,3S){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} markedly differ from that of {upsilon}(5S){yields}B{sup (*)}B{sup (*)}. In particular, the resonance peak will be pushed up by about 7-20 MeV for these dipion transitions relative to the main hadronic decay modes. These predictions can be used to test the final-state rescattering mechanism in hadronic transitions for heavy quarkonia above the open flavor thresholds.

  4. Absorption lines in the spectrum of Q0248 + 4302 due to a foreground tidal tail

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, W.L.W.; Steidel, C.C. California Univ., Berkeley )

    1990-08-01

    The strong absorption lines in the spectrum of the quasar Q0248 + 4302 are discussed. The absorption has been shown to be produced in a sinuous tidal tail which emanates from the nearby galaxy pair G0248 + 4302A,B. There is a velocity difference of about 260 km/s between the systemic redshift of the interacting galaxies and the redshift of the tidal tail at a galactocentric distance of about 11/h kpc. The large velocity spread observed in the tail gas is probably responsible for the unusual strength of the interstellar lines. 18 refs.

  5. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  6. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions.

  7. Absorption fever characteristics due to percutaneous renal biopsy-related hematoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tingyang; Liu, Qingquan; Xu, Qin; Liu, Hui; Feng, Yan; Qiu, Wenhui; Huang, Fei; Lv, Yongman

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to describe the unique characteristics of absorption fever in patients with a hematoma after percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) and distinguish it from secondary infection of hematoma.We retrospectively studied 2639 percutaneous renal biopsies of native kidneys. We compared the clinical characteristics between 2 groups: complication group (gross hematuria and/or perirenal hematoma) and no complication group. The axillary temperature of patients with a hematoma who presented with fever was measured at 06:00, 10:00, 14:00, and 18:00. The onset and duration of fever and the highest body temperature were recorded. Thereafter, we described the time distribution of absorption fever and obtained the curve of fever pattern.Of 2639 patients, PRB complications were observed in 154 (5.8%) patients. Perirenal hematoma was the most common complication, which occurred in 118 (4.5%) of biopsies, including 74 small hematoma cases (thickness ≤3 cm) and 44 large hematoma cases (thickness >3 cm). Major complications were observed in only 6 (0.2%) cases resulting from a large hematoma. Of 118 patients with a perirenal hematoma, absorption fever was observed in 48 cases. Furthermore, large hematomas had a 5.23-fold higher risk for absorption fever than the small ones.Blood pressure, renal insufficiency, and prothrombin time could be risk factors for complications. Fever is common in patients with hematoma because of renal biopsy and is usually noninfectious. Evaluation of patients with post-biopsy fever is necessary to identify any obvious infection sources. If no focus is identified, empiric antibiotic therapy should not be initiated nor should prophylactic antibiotics be extended for prolonged durations. Absorption fevers will resolve in time without specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:27631225

  8. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  9. A case of consciousness disturbance resulting from severe hypothyroidism due to chronic thyroiditis and excess iodine absorption.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masayuki; Onodera, Kazunari; Suzuki, Kengo; Kataoka, Yuko; Tachikawa, Kazushige; Riku, Shigeo; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    An 82-year-old Japanese man had consciousness disturbance due to severe hypothyroidism triggered by percutaneous absorption of iodine from an iodine-containing ointment used in diabetic gangrene treatment. Laboratory data revealed extremely high urinary iodine concentrations, and chronic thyroiditis-induced hypothyroidism. Excess iodine intake can also cause hypothyroidism. It was unlikely that iodine intoxication or Hashimoto's encephalopathy had caused the consciousness disturbance. The patient regained consciousness after discontinuing the use of the ointment and commencing thyroid hormone therapy. We conclude that consciousness disturbance resulted from severe hypothyroidism caused by chronic thyroiditis and excess iodine absorption. PMID:22041370

  10. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  11. Changes of color and water-absorption of Hungarian porous limestone due to biomineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juhász, P.; Kopecskó, K.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria induced calcium carbonate precipitation nowadays is a widely examined process being a possible alternative for traditional stone conservation methods. While research has been mostly limited to laboratory measurements, application connected, further in situ experiments should be performed in order to evaluate the applicability of the method. In our experiment, several bio-based treating compounds were compared, which have already been analyzed in different laboratories. Method for the treatment was based on the treatment of a French research group, and the compounds were applied on Hungarian porous limestone slabs, in situ. For inoculation bacteria strains Bacillus cereus and Myxococcus xanthus were used, and non-inoculated compounds were also analyzed. After the treatment, specimens were analyzed by means of discoloration effect, water absorption and migration characteristics. Almost all the treating compounds gave favorable or acceptable results for the examined properties, comparing to the properties measured in the non-cured state. Measurements on the chromatic- and on the water absorption aspects gave significant results, while further measurements are running for the more exact evaluation of the migration characteristics, i.e. effective migration depth and wetted volume.

  12. Off-resonance energy absorption in a linear Paul trap due to mass selective resonant quenching.

    PubMed

    Sivarajah, I; Goodman, D S; Wells, J E; Narducci, F A; Smith, W W

    2013-11-01

    Linear Paul traps (LPT) are used in many experimental studies such as mass spectrometry, atom-ion collisions, and ion-molecule reactions. Mass selective resonant quenching (MSRQ) is implemented in LPT either to identify a charged particle's mass or to remove unwanted ions from a controlled experimental environment. In the latter case, MSRQ can introduce undesired heating to co-trapped ions of different mass, whose secular motion is off resonance with the quenching ac field, which we call off-resonance energy absorption (OREA). We present simulations and experimental evidence that show that the OREA increases exponentially with the number of ions loaded into the trap and with the amplitude of the off-resonance external ac field. PMID:24289382

  13. Features in optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of organic solar cells due to organic/organic interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Yasser A. M.; Soga, Tetsuo; Jimbo, Takashi

    2011-05-01

    We surprisingly found that, organic/organic interface had a direct and pronounced impact on optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of organic solar cell at a favorable wavelength region of the visible solar spectrum. The organic/organic interface was formed as a result of connection between coumarin 6 (C6): [6,6]-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend films and indium-tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) doped with poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) electrode. Optical absorption measurement was carried out for ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM films, while external quantum efficiency measurement was carried out for ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM/Al solar cells, with varying C6:PCBM blend concentration. We found that, the C6:PCBM blend in the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM films had an additional feature in the absorption spectra at the wavelength range of 520-800 nm, at which the C6 dye, PCBM, PEDOT:PSS, and ITO were transparent. An additional feature, also, appeared in photocurrent spectra of the C6:PCBM films in the ITO/PEDOT:PSS/C6:PCBM/Al solar cells at the same wavelength range. The new features in the optical absorption and photocurrent spectra of the investigated solar cells originated, in all probability, due to optically induced sup-band transitions in the C6:PCBM blend films at the interface with ITO/PEDOT:PSS electrode. Thus, the C6:PCBM blend films produced a charge carrier generation interface due to connection with ITO/PEDOT:PSS electrode. As a result of this charge carrier generation interface, the power conversion efficiency of the corresponding solar cell is improved. Taking into consideration these new findings, the high-band-gap organic materials will take more importance as sensitizers in organic optoelectronic applications.

  14. Temperature waves arising due to absorption of electromagnetic radiation in laminated media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khabibullin, I. L.; Konovalova, S. I.; Sadykova, L. A.

    2015-05-01

    Propagation of electromagnetic radiation in a moving three-layer medium is studied. It is shown that travelling temperature waves are formed due to interference of the incident wave with the wave reflected from the interface between the layers with radiation energy dissipation. The frequency, length, and velocity of these waves are found to depend on the electromagnetic radiation frequency, electrophysical and thermophysical parameters of the medium, and velocity of medium motion.

  15. A study of the H2O absorption line shifts in the visible spectrum region due to air pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossmann, B. E.; Browell, E. V.; Bykov, A. D.; Kapitanov, V. A.; Korotchenko, E. A.

    1990-01-01

    Results of measured and calculated shift coefficients are presented for 170 absorption lines of H2O in five vibrational-rotational bands. The measurements have been carried out using highly sensitive laser spectrometers with a resolution of at least 0.01/cm; the calculations are based on the Anderson-Tsao-Curnutte-Frost method. Good agreement is obtained between the theoretical and experimental values of the shift coefficients of H2O lines due to N2, O2, and air pressure.

  16. Communication: Systematic shifts of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital peak in x-ray absorption for a series of 3d metal porphyrins.

    PubMed

    García-Lastra, J M; Cook, P L; Himpsel, F J; Rubio, A

    2010-10-21

    Porphyrins are widely used as dye molecules in solar cells. Knowing the energies of their frontier orbitals is crucial for optimizing the energy level structure of solar cells. We use near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy to obtain the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) with respect to the N(1s) core level of the molecule. A systematic energy shift of the N(1s) to LUMO transition is found along a series of 3d metal octaethylporphyrins and explained by density functional theory. It is mainly due to a shift of the N(1s) level rather than a shift of the LUMO or a change in the electron-hole interaction of the core exciton.

  17. Hospital admissions due to diseases of arteries and veins peaked at physiological equivalent temperature -10 to 10 °C in Germany in 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to understand relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to diseases of arteries and veins by subtypes, which have been scarcely studied, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions from the included hospitals (n = 1,618) across Germany that were available between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified I70-I79 Diseases of arteries, arterioles and capillaries and I80-I89 Diseases of veins, lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes by International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that covered 13 German states including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). Two-way fractional-polynomial prediction was plotted with 95 % confidence intervals. For most of the subtypes from diseases of arteries and veins, hospital admissions slightly peaked in spring and dropped when PET was at 10 °C. There were no other large differences across 12 months. Admissions of peripheral vascular diseases, arterial embolism and thrombosis, phlebitis and thrombophlebitis, oesophageal varices and nonspecific lymphadenitis peaked when PET was between 0 and -10 °C, while others peaked when PET was between 0 and 10 °C. More medical resources could have been needed on days when PETs were at -10 to 10 °C than on other days. Adaptation to such weather change for health professionals and the general public would seem to be imperative. PMID:26631019

  18. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  19. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  20. Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

  1. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  2. Measurement of tropospheric OH by long-path laser absorption at Fritz Peak Observatory, Colorado, during the OH Photochemistry Experiment, fall 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, George H.; Brault, James W.; Johnston, Paul V.; Marovich, Edward; Jakoubek, Roger O.; Volpe, Cassandra J.; Harder, Jerald; Olson, Jane

    1997-03-01

    The determination of the concentration of hydroxyl (OH) in the Earth's troposphere is of fundamental importance to an understanding of the chemistry of the lower atmosphere. This paper describes the results from the laser long-path spectroscopic OH experiment used in the Tropospheric OH Photochemistry Experiment (TOHPE) held at Fritz Peak, Colorado, in fall 1993. A primary goal of TOHPE was to compare the OH concentrations measured using a variety of different techniques: a long-path spectroscopic instrument [Mount, 1992], an in situ ion-assisted chemical conversion instrument (Eisele and Tanner, 1991, 1993), a laser resonance fluorescence instrument [Stevens et al., 1994), and a liquid scrubber instrument (X. Chen and K. Mopper, unpublished data,; 1996), all with sensitivities at or below 1×106 molecules cm-3. In addition to the OH measurements, a nearly complete suite of trace gas species that affect the OH concentration were measured simultaneously, using both in situ and/or long-path techniques, to provide the information necessary to understand the OH variation and concentration differences observed. Measurements of OH, NO2, CH2O, SO2, H2O, and O3 were made using long-path spectroscopic absorption of white light or laser light and OH, NO, NO2, NOy, O3, CO, SO2, CH2O, j(O3), j(NO2), RO2/HO2, HO2, H2O, SO2, PAN, PPN, HNO3, and aerosols (size and composition) and ozone and nitrogen dioxide j-values were measured using in situ instruments. Meteorological parameters at each end of the long path and at the Idaho Hill in situ site were also measured. The comparison of the long-path and in situ species from this set of complementary measurements provides an effective way of interpreting air masses over the long path with those at the in situ site; this is a critical issue since the long-path spectroscopic OH determinations provide a nonchemical and well-calibrated measurement of OH which must be compared in a meaningful manner with the in situ determinations. Over

  3. Artifacts in spatiochromatic stimuli due to variations in preretinal absorption and axial chromatic aberration: implications for color physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottaris, Nicolas P.

    2003-09-01

    The spatiochromatic receptive-field structure of neurons in the macaque visual system has been studied almost exclusively with stimuli based on the human foveal cone fundamentals of Smith and Pokorny [Vision Res. 15, 161 (1975)] and generated on cathode ray tube displays. In the current study the artifacts evoked by cone-isolating, spatially structured stimuli due to variations in the eye's preretinal absorption characteristics and axial chromatic aberration are quantified. In addition, the luminance artifacts evoked by nominally isoluminant sinusoidal grating stimuli due to the same factors are quantified. The results indicate that the spatiochromatic stimuli commonly employed to map receptive fields of neurons at eccentricities >10 deg are especially prone to artifacts and that these artifacts are maximal for the high-contrast S-cone-isolating stimuli that are often used. On the basis of these simulations, a method is introduced that improves spatiochromatic receptive-field estimates by compensating for response contributions from the incompletely silenced cone mosaics during cone-isolating stimulation.

  4. Improvement in the photocurrent collection due to enhanced absorption of light by synthesizing staggered layers of silver nanoclusters in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Dhoubhadel, Mangal S.; Lakshantha, Wickramaarachchige J.; Rout, Bibhudutta; McDaniel, Floyd D.; Lightbourne, Sherard; D’Souza, Francis

    2015-07-23

    The quest for increased efficiency of solar cells has driven the research in synthesizing photovoltaic cells involving Si based materials. The efficiency of solar cells involving crystalline Si is stalled around 25% for the last decade. Recently Shi et al. had shown that light trapping can be enhanced by fabricating double layers of Ag nanoparticles in silicon based materials. The light trapping is critically important in a photo devices such as solar cells in order to increase light absorption and efficiency. In the present work, we report enhancement in the absorption of light in Ag ion implanted Si substrates. Multiple low energies Ag ions, ranging from ∼80 keV to ∼30 keV, with different fluences ranging from ∼1 × 10{sup 16} to ∼1 × 10{sup 17} atoms/cm{sup 2} were sequentially implanted into commercially available Si (100) substrates followed by post-thermal annealing to create different sizes of Ag nanoclusters (NC) at different depths in the top 100 nm of the Si. The absorbance of light is increased in Ag implanted Si with a significant increase in the current collection in I-V (current-voltage) photo switching measurements. The experimental photovoltaic cells fabricated with the Ag-implanted Si samples were optically characterized under AM (air mass) 1.5 solar radiation conditions (∼1.0 kW/m{sup 2}). An enhancement in the charge collection were measured in the annealed samples, where prominent Ag NCs were formed in the Si matrix compared to the as-implanted samples with amorphous layers. We believe the enhancement of the photo-current density from the samples with Ag NC is due to the improvement of efficiency of charge collection of e{sup −}-h{sup +} pairs produced by the incident light.

  5. Solar radiation absorption in the atmosphere due to water and ice clouds: Sensitivity experiments with plane-parallel clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Gautier, C.

    1995-09-01

    One cloud radiation issue that has been troublesome for several decades is the absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain the discrepancies between observations and modeling results. A good review of these often-competing hypotheses has been provided by Stephens and Tsay. They characterize the available hypotheses as failing into three categories: (1) those linked to cloud microphysical and consequent optical properties; (2) those linked to the geometry and heterogeneity of clouds; and (3) those linked to atmospheric absorption.Current modeling practice is seriously inconsistent with new observational inferences concerning absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere. The author and her colleagues contend that an emphasis on R may, therefore, not be the optimal way of addressing the cloud solar absorption issue. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Relationship between light scattering and absorption due to cytochrome c oxidase reduction during loss of tissue viability in brains of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Ooigawa, Hidetoshi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Miya; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2008-02-01

    We performed simultaneous measurement of light scattering and absorption due to reduction of cytochrome c oxidase as intrinsic optical signals that are related to morphological characteristics and energy metabolism, respectively, for rat brains after oxygen/glucose deprivation by saline infusion. To detect change in light scattering, we determined the wavelength that was the most insensitive to change in light absorption due to the reduction of cytochrome c oxidase on the basis of multiwavelength analysis of diffuse reflectance data set for each rat. Then the relationships between scattering signal and absorption signals related to the reductions of heme aa 3 (605 nm) and CuA (830 nm) in cytochrome c oxidase were examined. Measurements showed that after starting saline infusion, the reduction of heme aa 3 started first; thereafter triphasic, large scattering change occurred (200-300 s), during which the reduction of CuA started. Despite such complex behaviors of IOSs, almost linear correlations were seen between the scattering signal and the heme aa 3-related absorption signal, while a relatively large animal-to-animal variation was observed in the correlation between the scattering signal and CuA-related absorption signal. Transmission electron microscopic observation revealed that dendritic swelling and mitochondrial deformation occurred in the cortical surface tissue after the triphasic scattering change. These results suggest that mitochondrial energy failure accompanies morphological alteration in the brain tissue and results in change in light scattering; light scattering will become an important indicator of tissue viability in brain.

  7. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  8. Peak-bridges due to in-column analyte transformations as a new tool for establishing molecular connectivities by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Jean-Jacques; Cocolo, Nicolas; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2015-02-27

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) has been shown to permit for the unprecedented chromatographic resolution of volatile analytes encompassing various families of organic compounds. However, peak identification based on retention time, two-dimensional mapping, and mass spectrometric fragmentation only, is not a straightforward task yet. The possibility to establish molecular links between constituents is of crucial importance to understand the overall chemistry of any sample, especially in natural extracts where biogenetically related isomeric structures are often abundant. We here present a new way of using GC×GC that allows searching for those molecular connectivities. Analytical investigations of essential oil constituents by means of GC×GC-MS permitted to observe in real time the thermally-induced transformations of various sesquiterpenic derivatives. These transformations generated a series of well-defined two-dimensional peak bridges within the 2D-chromatograms connecting parent and daughter molecules, thus permitting to build a clear scheme of structural relationship between the different constituents. GC×GC-MS appears here as a tool for investigating chromatographic phenomena and analyte transformations that could not be understood with conventional GC-MS only. PMID:25622519

  9. Assessment of the Losses Due to Self Absorption by Mass Loading on Radioactive Particulate Air Stack Sample Filters

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Brian M.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2011-01-18

    This report discusses the effect of mass loading of a membrane filter on the self absorption of radioactive particles. A relationship between mass loading and percent loss of activity is presented. Sample filters were collected from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) facilities in order to analyze the current self absorption correction factor of 0.85 that is being used for both alpha and beta particles. Over an eighteen month period from February 2009 to July 2010, 116 samples were collected and analyzed from eight different building stacks in an effort coordinated by the Effluent Management group. Eleven unused filters were also randomly chosen to be analyzed in order to determine background radiation. All of these samples were collected and analyzed in order to evaluate the current correction factor being used.

  10. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mohammad; Ghatak, Ananya; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2014-05-15

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  11. Bias in peak clad temperature predictions due to uncertainties in modeling of ECC bypass and dissolved non-condensable gas phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Neymotin, L.Y.; Jo, J.; Wulff, W. )

    1990-09-01

    This report describes a general method for estimating the effect on the Reflood Phase PCT from systematic errors (biases) associated with the modelling of the ECCS and dissolved nitrogen, and the application of this method in estimating biases in the Reflood Phase PCT (second PCT) predicted by the TRAC/PF1/MOD1, Version 14.3. The bias in the second PCT due to the uncertainty in the existing code models for ECCS related phenomena is {minus}19{degree}K ({minus}34{degree}F). The negative bias implies that the code models for this phenomena are conservative. The bias in the second PCT due to the lack of modelling of dissolved N{sub 2} in the code is estimated to be 9.9{degree}K (17.8{degree}F). The positive bias implies that the absence of dissolved N{sub 2} model makes the code prediction of PCT non-conservative. The bias estimation in this report is a major exception among all other uncertainty and bias assessments performed in conjunction with the CSAU methodology demonstration, because this bias estimation benefitted from using full-scale test data from the full-scale Upper Plenum Test Facility (UPTF). Thus, the bias estimates presented here are unaffected by scale distortions in test facilities. Data from small size facilities were also available and an estimate of bias based on these data will be conservative. 35 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Electromagnetic absorption in the head of adults and children due to mobile phone operation close to the head.

    PubMed

    de Salles, Alvaro A; Bulla, Giovani; Rodriguez, Claudio E Fernández

    2006-01-01

    The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) produced by mobile phones in the head of adults and children is simulated using an algorithm based on the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Realistic models of the child and adult head are used. The electromagnetic parameters are fitted to these models. Comparison also are made with the SAR calculated in the children model when using adult human electromagnetic parameters values. Microstrip (or patch) antennas and quarter wavelength monopole antennas are used in the simulations. The frequencies used to feed the antennas are 1850 MHz and 850 MHz. The SAR results are compared with the available international recommendations. It is shown that under similar conditions, the 1g-SAR calculated for children is higher than that for the adults. When using the 10-year old child model, SAR values higher than 60% than those for adults are obtained.

  13. 4.6 micron absorption features due to solid phase CO and cyano group molecules toward compact infrared sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Baas, F.; Allamandola, L. J.; Van De Bult, C. E. P.; Persson, S. E.; Mcgregor, P. J.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Geballe, T. R.

    1984-01-01

    Spectra obtained at a resolving power of 840, for seven protostellar sources in the region of the 4.67-micron fundamental vibrational band of CO, indicate that the deep absorption feature in W33A near 4.61 microns consists of three features which are seen in other sources, but with varying relative strength. UV-irradiation laboratory experiments with 'dirty ice' temperature cycling allow the identification of two of the features cited with solid CO and CO complexed to other molecules. Cyano group-containing molecules have a lower vapor pressure than CO, and can therefore survive in much warmer environments. The formation and location of the CO- and CN-bearing grain mantles and sources of UV irradiation in cold molecular clouds are discussed. Plausible UV light sources can produce the observed cyano group features, but only under conditions in which local heat sources do not cause evaporation of the CO molecules prior to their photoprocessing.

  14. Relating aerosol absorption due to soot, organic carbon, and dust to emission sources determined from in-situ chemical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazorla, A.; Bahadur, R.; Suski, K. J.; Cahill, J. F.; Chand, D.; Schmid, B.; Ramanathan, V.; Prather, K. A.

    2013-09-01

    Estimating the aerosol contribution to the global or regional radiative forcing can take advantage of the relationship between the spectral aerosol optical properties and the size and chemical composition of aerosol. Long term global optical measurements from observational networks or satellites can be used in such studies. Using in-situ chemical mixing state measurements can help us to constrain the limitations of such estimates. In this study, the Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) and the Scattering Ångström Exponent (SAE) derived from 10 operational AERONET sites in California are combined for deducing chemical speciation based on wavelength dependence of the optical properties. In addition, in-situ optical properties and single particle chemical composition measured during three aircraft field campaigns in California between 2010 and 2011 are combined in order to validate the methodology used for the estimates of aerosol chemistry using spectral optical properties. Results from this study indicate a dominance of mixed types in the classification leading to an underestimation of the primary sources, however secondary sources are better classified. The distinction between carbonaceous aerosols from fossil fuel and biomass burning origins is not clear, since their optical properties are similar. On the other hand, knowledge of the aerosol sources in California from chemical studies help to identify other misclassification such as the dust contribution.

  15. Moderate-resolution spectroscopy of the lensed quasar 2237 + 0305 - A search for CA II absorption due to the interstellar medium in the foreground lensing galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintzen, Paul; Maran, Stephen P.; Michalitsianos, Andrew G.; Foltz, Craig B.; Chaffee, Frederic H., Jr.; Kafatos, Minas

    1990-01-01

    The gravitational lens system 2237+0305 consists of a low-redshift barred spiral galaxy (z = 0.0394) centered on a more distant quasar (z = 1.695). Because the lensing galaxy is nearly face on, spectroscopy of the background quasar affords a unique opportunity to study the interstellar medium in the galaxy's center and . We report moderate-resolution spectroscopy of QSO2237+0305 yielding a 3σ upper limit of 72 mÅ for the rest equivalent width of Ca II K absorption due to gas in the intervening galaxy. Since gas in the Milky Way "thick disk" typically produces 220 mÅ Ca II lines along lines of sight at high galactic latitude, while our line of sight to QSO 2237+0305 is effectively the weighted mean of four lines of sight, each of which transects an entire halo diameter in the lensing galaxy rather than just a radius, our Ca II upper limit argues against the presence of such a thick disk near the center of the lensing galaxy. Also, published studies indicate that at 8200 Å, QSO 2237+0305 suffers roughly 0.5 mag of extinction due to the leasing galaxy. Assuming a normal gas-to-dust ratio and allowing for various sources of uncertainty, this absorption estimate combined with our Ca II K upper limit implies that calcium is depleted with respect to hydrogen by at least 2.7-3.7 dex, compared to solar abundances. This depletion is similar to the more extreme cases seen in our own galaxy, and higher-dispersion observations may further decrease the upper limit on Ca II absorption.

  16. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Q. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.

  17. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  18. Terahertz absorption spectra of oxidized polyethylene and their analysis by quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Marina; Hosobuchi, Masashi; Xie, Xiaojun; Cheng, Yonghong; Furukawa, Yukio; Mizuno, Maya; Fukunaga, Kaori; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2014-09-01

    Low-density polyethylene, either cross-linked or not, was oxidized and its absorption spectra were measured in the terahertz (THz) range and infrared range. The absorption was increased by the oxidation in the whole THz range. In accord with this, infrared absorption due to carbonyl groups appears. Although these results indicate that the increase in absorption is induced by oxidation, its attribution to resonance or relaxation is unclear. To clarify this point, the vibrational frequencies of three-dimensional polyethylene models with and without carbonyl groups were quantum chemically calculated. As a result, it was clarified that optically inactive skeletal vibrations in polyethylene become active upon oxidation. Furthermore, several absorption peaks due to vibrational resonances are induced by oxidation at wavenumbers from 20 to 100 cm-1. If these absorption peaks are broadened and are superimposed on each other, the absorption spectrum observed experimentally can be reproduced. Therefore, the absorption is ascribable to resonance.

  19. Electric modulation of optical absorption in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-11-01

    We have calculated the effect of an external electric field on the intersubband optical absorption of a nanowire subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field and Rashba effect. The absorption peaks due to optical transitions that are forbidden in the absence of the intersubband coupling experience strong amplitude modulation. This effect is quadratic in electric fields applied along the direction of quantum confinement or perpendicularly to tune the Rashba parameter. The electric field also induces frequency modulation in the associated spectrum. On the other hand, transitions that are normally allowed show, to a large extent, a parallel band effect, and accordingly they are responsible for strong optical absorption.

  20. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-21

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues. PMID:24002053

  1. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues.

  2. Errors in spectroscopic measurements of SO/sub 2/ due to nonexponential absorption of laser radiation, with application to the remote monitoring of atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Brassington, D.J.; Moncrieff, T.M.; Felton, R.C.; Jolliffe, B.W.; Marx, B.R.; Rowley, W.R.C.; Woods, P.T.

    1984-02-01

    Methods of measuring the concentration of atmospheric pollutants by laser absorption spectroscopy, such as differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and integrated long-path techniques, all rely on the validity of Beer's exponential absorption law. It is shown here that departures from this law occur if the probing laser has a bandwidth larger than the wavelength scale of structure in the absorption spectrum of the pollutant. A comprehensive experimental and theoretical treatment of the errors resulting from these departures is presented for the particular case of SO/sub 2/ monitoring at approx.300 nm. It is shown that the largest error occurs where the initial calibration measurement of absorption cross section is made at low pressure, in which case errors in excess of 5% in the cross section could occur for laser bandwidths >0.01 nm. Atmospheric measurements by DIAL or long-path methods are in most cases affected less, because pressure broadening smears the spectral structure, but when measuring high concentrations errors can exceed 5%.

  3. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  4. Impaired drug absorption due to high stomach pH: a review of strategies for mitigation of such effect to enable pharmaceutical product development.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Amitava; Kesisoglou, Filippos

    2013-11-01

    Published reports have clearly shown that weakly basic drugs which have low solubility at high pH could have impaired absorption in patients with high gastric pH thus leading to reduced and variable bioavailability. Since such reduction in exposure can lead to significant loss of efficacy, it is imperative to (1) understand the behavior of the compound as a function of stomach pH to inform of any risk of bioavailability loss in clinical studies and (2) develop a robust formulation which can provide adequate exposure in achlorhydric patients. In this review paper, we provide an overview of the factors that can cause high gastric pH in human, discuss clinical and preclinical pharmacokinetic data for weak bases under conditions of normal and high gastric pH, and give examples of formulation strategies to minimize or mitigate the reduced absorption of weakly basic drugs under high gastric pH conditions. It should be noted that the ability to overcome pH sensitivity issues is highly compound dependent and there are no obvious and general solutions to overcome such effect. Further, we discuss, along with several examples, the use of biopharmaceutical tools such as in vitro dissolution, absorption modeling, and gastric pH modified animal models to assess absorption risk of weak bases in high gastric pH and also the use of these tools to enable development of formulations to mitigate such effects.

  5. Enhanced photoluminescence due to two-photon enhanced three-photon absorption in Mn{sup 2+}-doped ZnS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Subha, Radhu; Nalla, Venkatram; Ji, Wei; Feng, Xiaobo; Vijayan, C.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we have investigated the multi-photon absorption induced photoluminescence in Mn{sup 2+}-doped ZnS quantum dots in the wavelength range 860 – 1050 nm (Near-Infrared Window I). The observed three-photon action cross-section has been compared with the theoretical prediction under four band approximation. An enhancement of four to five orders has been observed in the range from 970 to 1050 nm compared to the theoretical value, which is attributed to two-photon enhanced three-photon absorption. Transient lifetime measurements reveal a lifetime of 0.35 ± 0.3 ms, which is four to five orders higher than other conventional fluorescent probes.

  6. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  7. Absorption of ultraviolet radiation by antarctic phytoplankton

    SciTech Connect

    Vernet, M.; Mitchell, B.G. )

    1990-01-09

    Antarctic phytoplankton contain UV-absorbing compounds that may block damaging radiation. Compounds that absorb from 320-340 nm were observed in spectral absorption of both particulates and in methanol extracts of the particulates. The decrease in the total concentration of these UV compounds with respect to chlorophyll a, as measured by the ratio of in vitro absorption at 335 nm to absorption at 665 nm is variable and decreases with depth. We observed up to 5-fold decrease in this ratio for samples within the physically mixes surface layer. The absorption of UV radiation in methanol extracts, which peaks from 320 to 340 nm, may be composed of several compounds. Shifts in peak absorption with depth (for example, from 331 nm at surface to 321 nm at 75 m), may be interpreted as a change in composition. Ratios of protective yellow xanthophylls (diadinoxanthin + diatoxanthin) to photosynthetic fucoxanthin-like pigments have highest values in surface waters. As these pigments also absorb in the near UV, their function might extend to protection as well as utilization of UV radiation for photosynthesis. We document strong absorption in the UV from 320-330 nm for Antarctic marine particulates. Below this region of the solar energy spectrum, absolute energy levels of incident radiation drop off dramatically. Only wavelengths shorter than about 320 nm will be significantly enhanced due to ozone depletion. If the absorption we observed serves a protective role for phytoplankton photosynthesis, it appears the peak band is in the region where solar energy increases rapidly, and not in the region where depletion would cause significant variations in absolute flux.

  8. Magneto-thermoelectric effects in the two-dimensional electron gas of a HgTe quantum well due to THz laser heating by cyclotron resonance absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakmehr, Mehdi; Bruene, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens; McCombe, Bruce

    2015-03-01

    HgTe quantum wells (QWs) have shown a number of interesting phenomena over the past 20 years, most recently the first two-dimensional topological insulating state. We have studied thermoelectric photovoltages of 2D electrons in a 6.1 nm wide HgTe quantum well induced by cyclotron resonance absorption (B = 2 - 5 T) of a focused THz laser beam. We have estimated thermo-power coefficients by detailed analysis of the beam profile at the sample surface and the photovoltage signals developed across various contacts of a large Hall bar structure at a bath temperature of 1.6 K. We obtain reasonable values of the magneto-thermopower coefficients. Work at UB was supported by NSF DMR 1008138 and the Office of the Provost, and at the University of Wuerzburg by DARPA MESO Contract N6601-11-1-4105, by DFG Grant HA5893/4-1 within SPP 1666 and the Leibnitz Program, and the EU ERC-AG Program (Project 3-TOP.

  9. Photovoltaic enhancement due to surface-plasmon assisted visible-light absorption at the inartificial surface of lead zirconate-titanate film.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fengang; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Wen; Zhang, Jinxing; Shen, Mingrong; Dong, Wen; Fang, Liang; Bai, Yongbin; Shen, Xiaoqing; Sun, Hua; Hao, Jianhua

    2014-03-01

    PZT film of 300 nm thickness was deposited on tin indium oxide (ITO) coated quartz by a sol-gel method. Four metal electrodes, such as Pt, Au, Cu and Ag, were used as top electrodes deposited on the same PZT film by sputtering at room temperature. In ITO-PZT-Ag and ITO-PZT-Au structures, the visible light (400-700 nm) can be absorbed partially by a PZT film, and the maximum efficiency of photoelectric conversion of the ITO-PZT-Ag structure was enhanced to 0.42% (100 mW cm(-2), AM 1.5G), which is about 15 times higher than that of the ITO-PZT-Pt structure. Numerical simulations show that the natural random roughness of polycrystalline-PZT-metal interface can offer a possibility of coupling between the incident photons and SPs at the metal surface. The coincidence between the calculated SP properties and the measured EQE spectra reveals the SP origin of the photovoltaic enhancement in these ITO-PZT-metal structures, and the improved photocurrent output is caused by the enhanced optical absorption in the PZT region near the metal surface, rather than by the direct charge-transfer process between two materials. PMID:24477668

  10. Assignment of infrared absorption bands in ZnGeP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, Nancy C.; Bai, Lihua; Garces, Nelson Y.; Pollak, Thomas M.; Schunemann, Peter G.

    2004-06-01

    Zinc germanium diphosphide (ZnGeP2) is a nonlinear optical material useful for frequency conversion applications in the midinfrared. A broad absorption band peaking near 1.2 microns and extending past 2 microns is often observed. To identify the defects responsible for these absorption losses, we have performed an optical absorption investigation from 10 to 296 K on bulk crystals of ZnGeP2 grown by the horizontal gradient-freeze method. Three broad absorption bands in the spectral range from 1 to 4 microns are observed that are due to native defects. Comparison of photoinduced changes in absorption with photoinduced changes in EPR spectra allowed specific defects to be associated with each of the three absorption bands. A band peaking near 1.2 microns and another band peaking near 2.2 microns involve transitions associated with singly ionized zinc vacancies. A third absorption band, peaking near 2.3 microns and extending from 1.5 microns to beyond 4 microns, involves neutral phosphorus vacancies. Absorption bands due to anion-site donor impurities Se and S have also been studied.

  11. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  12. The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 106, 1976: Decreased absorption of calcium, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus by humans due to increased fiber and phosphorus consumption as wheat bread.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, J G; Faradji, B; Abadi, P; Ismail-Beigi, F

    1991-07-01

    During a 20 day period of high fiber consumption in the form of bread made partly from wheaten wholemeal, two men developed negative balances of calcium, magnesium, zinc and phosphorus due to increased fecal excretion of each element. The fecal losses correlated closely with fecal dry matter and phosphorus. Fecal dry matter, in turn, was directly proportional to fecal fiber excretion. Balances of nitrogen remained positive. Mineral elements were well-utilized by the same subjects during a 20 day period of white bread consumption.

  13. Assessment of soil screening levels due to ingestion and dermal absorption of chrysene and benzo[k]fluoranthene and appropriate remediation method for Dorson Abad.

    PubMed

    Gitipour, Saeid; Firouzbakht, Saeid; Mirzaee, Ehsan; Alimohammadi, Masoumeh

    2014-06-01

    For years, the Dorson Abad region has been extremely polluted by Tehran Oil Refinery due to leaking from its underground pipelines, storage tanks, and evaporation ponds. To assess the concentrations of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, soil samples were collected from the grounds at and adjacent to a polluted stream located in the study area. The samples were then analyzed, and the results revealed that 12 of the 16 USEPA PAHs were noticeably present in the soil, which, among them, benzo[k]fluoranthene and chrysene had the highest concentrations with averages of 357.17 and 173.38 mg/kg, respectively. A comparison of the obtained concentrations with the soil screening levels indicated that both benzo[k]fluoranthene and chrysene concentrations were substantially higher than EPA screening level values, signifying the necessity of soil remediation for these contaminants in the area. Techniques such as soil washing/flushing, high temperature thermal desorption, and solidification/stabilization were investigated for treatment of the contaminated soil; solidification/stabilization is recommended as an applicable and cost-effective remediation method for Dorson Abad due to the size of the region, relatively low cost of the binder (cement), and low volatility of benzo[k]fluoranthene and chrysene.

  14. Pikes Peak, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunstein, Craig; Quesenberry, Carol; Davis, John; Jackson, Gene; Scott, Glenn R.; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Swibas, Ed; Carter, Lorna; McKinney, Kevin; Cole, Jim

    2006-01-01

    For 200 years, Pikes Peak has been a symbol of America's Western Frontier--a beacon that drew prospectors during the great 1859-60 Gold Rush to the 'Pikes Peak country,' the scenic destination for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and an enduring source of pride for cities in the region, the State of Colorado, and the Nation. November 2006 marks the 200th anniversary of the Zebulon M. Pike expedition's first sighting of what has become one of the world's most famous mountains--Pikes Peak. In the decades following that sighting, Pikes Peak became symbolic of America's Western Frontier, embodying the spirit of Native Americans, early explorers, trappers, and traders who traversed the vast uncharted wilderness of the Western Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. High-quality printed paper copies of this poster are available at no cost from Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  15. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  16. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  17. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  18. Correlation-Peak Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, A.; Metzler, A.; Köckenberger, W.; Izquierdo, M.; Komor, E.; Haase, A.; Décorps, M.; von Kienlin, M.

    1996-08-01

    Identification and quantitation in conventional1H spectroscopic imagingin vivois often hampered by the small chemical-shift range. To improve the spectral resolution of spectroscopic imaging, homonuclear two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy has been combined with phase encoding of the spatial dimensions. From the theoretical description of the coherence-transfer signal in the Fourier-transform domain, a comprehensive acquisition and processing strategy is presented that includes optimization of the width and the position of the acquisition windows, matched filtering of the signal envelope, and graphical presentation of the cross peak of interest. The procedure has been applied to image the spatial distribution of the correlation peaks from specific spin systems in the hypocotyl of castor bean (Ricinus communis) seedlings. Despite the overlap of many resonances, correlation-peak imaging made it possible to observe a number of proton resonances, such as those of sucrose, β-glucose, glutamine/glutamate, lysine, and arginine.

  19. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  20. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  1. Peak of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    In three studies, we explore the existence of an evolved sensitivity to the peak as consistent with the evolutionary origins of many of our basic preferences. Activating the evolved motive of mating activates related adaptive mechanisms, including a general sensitivity to cues of growth and decay associated with determining mate value in human courtship. We establish that priming the mating goal also activates as well an evaluative bias that influences how people evaluate cues of growth. Specifically, living kinds that are immature or past their prime are devalued, whereas living kinds at their peak become increasingly valued. Study 1 establishes this goal-driven effect for human stimuli indirectly related to the mating goal. Studies 2 and 3 establish that the evaluative bias produced by the active mating goal extends to living kinds but not artifacts. PMID:18578847

  2. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  3. A Peak of Interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color rendering of an image taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a view of the peak-like outcrop atop 'West Spur.' Spirit will attempt to drive up the north slope of the 'Columbia Hills' to reach similar rock outcrops and investigate the composition of the hills. The image was taken on sol 178 (July 4, 2004) using the camera's 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  4. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  5. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  6. Origin of weak lensing convergence peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Weak lensing convergence peaks are a promising tool to probe nonlinear structure evolution at late times, providing additional cosmological information beyond second-order statistics. Previous theoretical and observational studies have shown that the cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 are improved by a factor of up to ≈2 when peak counts and second-order statistics are combined, compared to using the latter alone. We study the origin of lensing peaks using observational data from the 154 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. We found that while high peaks (with height κ >3.5 σκ , where σκ is the rms of the convergence κ ) are typically due to one single massive halo of ≈1 015M⊙ , low peaks (κ ≲σκ ) are associated with constellations of 2-8 smaller halos (≲1 013M⊙ ). In addition, halos responsible for forming low peaks are found to be significantly offset from the line of sight towards the peak center (impact parameter ≳ their virial radii), compared with ≈0.25 virial radii for halos linked with high peaks, hinting that low peaks are more immune to baryonic processes whose impact is confined to the inner regions of the dark matter halos. Our findings are in good agreement with results from the simulation work by Yang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 84, 043529 (2011)].

  7. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides.

  8. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  9. Ultrasensitive optical absorption in graphene based on bound states in the continuum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingda; Zhang, Xiangdong

    2015-01-01

    We have designed a sphere-graphene-slab structure so that the electromagnetic wave can be well confined in the graphene due to the formation of a bound state in a continuum (BIC) of radiation modes. Based on such a bound state, we have realized strong optical absorption in the monolayer graphene. Such a strong optical absorption exhibits many advantages. It is ultrasensitive to the wavelength because the Q factor of the absorption peak can be more than 2000. By taking suitable BICs, the selective absorption for S and P waves has not only been realized, but also all-angle absorption for the S and P waves at the same time has been demonstrated. We have also found that ultrasensitive strong absorptions can appear at any wavelength from mid-infrared to far-infrared band. These phenomena are very beneficial to biosensing, perfect filters and waveguides. PMID:25652437

  10. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  11. Electron paramagnetic resonance and low-field microwave absorption in the manganese-gallium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montiel, H.; Alvarez, G.; Conde-Gallardo, A.; Zamorano, R.

    2015-07-01

    Microwave absorption measurements in MnGa2O4 powders are carried out at X-band (8.8-9.8 GHz) in 92-296 K temperature range. For all temperatures, the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra show a single broad line due to Mn2+ ions. Temperature dependence of the EPR parameters: the peak-to-peak linewidth (ΔHpp), the integrated intensity (IEPR) and the g-factor, suggests the presence of magnetic fluctuations that precede to antiferromagnetic ordering at low temperature. Additionally, the low-field microwave absorption (LFMA) is used to give further information on this material, giving also evidence of these magnetic fluctuations.

  12. Sunset over Twin Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  13. Investigation on optical absorption properties of ion irradiated single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vishalli, Dharamvir, Keya; Kaur, Ramneek; Raina, K. K.; Avasthi, D. K.; Jeet, Kiran

    2015-08-28

    In the present study change in the optical absorption properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under nickel ion (60 MeV) irradiation at various fluences has been investigated. Langmuir Blodgett technique is used to deposit SWCNT thin film of uniform thickness. AFM analysis shows a network of interconnected bundles of nanotubes. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra indicate that the sample mainly contain SWCNTs of semiconducting nature. It has been found in absorption spectra that there is decrease in the intensity of the characteristic SWCNT peaks with increase in fluence. At fluence value 1×10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} there is almost complete suppression of the characteristic SWCNTs peaks.The decrease in the optical absorption with increase in fluence is due to the increase in the disorder in the system which leads to the decrease in optically active states.

  14. Segmental dependent transport of low permeability compounds along the small intestine due to P-glycoprotein: the role of efflux transport in the oral absorption of BCS class III drugs.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of P-gp efflux in the in vivo intestinal absorption process of BCS class III P-gp substrates, i.e. high-solubility low-permeability drugs. The in vivo permeability of two H (2)-antagonists, cimetidine and famotidine, was determined by the single-pass intestinal perfusion model in different regions of the rat small intestine, in the presence or absence of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil. The apical to basolateral (AP-BL) and the BL-AP transport of the compounds in the presence or absence of various efflux transporters inhibitors (verapamil, erythromycin, quinidine, MK-571 and fumitremorgin C) was investigated across Caco-2 cell monolayers. P-gp expression levels in the different intestinal segments were confirmed by immunoblotting. Cimetidine and famotidine exhibited segmental dependent permeability through the gut wall, with decreased P(eff) in the distal ileum in comparison to the proximal regions of the intestine. Coperfusion of verapamil with the drugs significantly increased the permeability in the ileum, while no significant change in the jejunal permeability was observed. Both drugs exhibited significantly greater BL-AP than AP-BL Caco-2 permeability, indicative of net mucosal secretion. Concentration dependent decrease of this secretion was obtained by the P-gp inhibitors verapamil, erythromycin and quinidine, while no effect was evident by the MRP2 inhibitor MK-571 and the BCRP inhibitor FTC, indicating that P-gp is the transporter mediates the intestinal efflux of cimetidine and famotidine. P-gp levels throughout the intestine were inversely related to the in vivo permeability of the drugs from the different segments. The data demonstrate that for these high-solubility low-permeability P-gp substrates, P-gp limits in vivo intestinal absorption in the distal segments of the small intestine; however P-gp plays a minimal role in the proximal intestinal segments due to significant lower P-gp expression levels

  15. Growth of Au nanoparticle films and the effect of nanoparticle shape on plasmon peak wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Horikoshi, S. Matsumoto, N.; Kato, T.; Omata, Y.

    2014-05-21

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and thus have potential for use in a wide range of applications. A facile technique for the preparation of NP films using an electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma sputtering method without a dewetting process is described. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observations revealed that the Au NPs grew independently as island-like particles during the first stage of sputtering and then coalesced with one another as sputtering time increased to ultimately form a continuous film. A plasmon absorption peak was observed via optical measurement of absorption efficiency. The LSPR peak shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) with an increase in sputtering time. The cause of this plasmon peak shift was theoretically investigated using the finite-difference time-domain calculation method. A realistic statistical distribution of the particle shapes based on FE-SEM observations was applied for the analysis, which has not been previously reported. It was determined that the change in the shape of the NPs from spheroidal to oval or slender due to coalescence with neighbouring NPs caused the LSPR peak shift. These results may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling the characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as their size, shape, number density, and coverage.

  16. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon.

  17. Multiband microwave absorption films based on defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes added carbonyl iron/acrylic resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Chen, Changxin; Pan, Xiaoyan; Ni, Yuwei; Zhang, Song; Huang, Jie; Chen, Da; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-05-01

    Defective multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were introduced to the carbonyl iron (CI) based composites to improve its microwave absorption by a simple ultrasonic mixing process. The electromagnetic parameters were measured in the 2-18 GHz range. Microwave absorption of CI based composites with 2 mm in thickness was evidently enhanced by adding as little as 1.0 wt% defective MWCNTs with two well separated absorption peaks exceeding -20 dB, as compared with that of pure CI based and defective MWCNTs composites. The enhancement mechanism is thought due to the interaction and better electromagnetic match between defective MWCNTs and ferromagnetic CI particles.

  18. Thickness Dependence of Infrared Reflection Absorption in Vacuum-Deposited Thin Film of Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Kunisuke; Terashima, Hidenobu; Kikuma, Kazuhiro

    1990-06-01

    Reflection absorption intensities for p-polarized infrared rays are shown as a function of thickness (d) of vacuum-deposited films of polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), which were deposited on Ag-covered mica substrates held at 25°C. Each absorption due to α-type polycrystalline film at 1412, 1215, 1185, 1150, 1070, 875 and 615 cm-1 increases linearly with increasing d. Some structural relaxation during the growth of PVDF film is discussed for interpretation of the result that absorption at 1215, 1185 and 875 cm-1 is not observed and the peak height at 882 cm-1 is seen clearly for films at d<15 nm.

  19. Tectonics, Climate and Earth's highest peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Prominent peaks characterized by high relief and steep slopes are among the most spectacular morphological features on Earth. In collisional orogens they result from the interplay of tectonically driven crustal thickening and climatically induced destruction of overthickened crust by erosional surface processes. The glacial buzz-saw hypothesis proposes a superior status of climate in limiting mountain relief and peak altitude due to glacial erosion. It implies that peak altitude declines with duration of glacial occupation, i.e., towards high latitudes. This is in strong contrast with high peaks existing in high latitude mountain ranges (e.g. Mt. St. Elias range) and the idea of peak uplift due to isostatic compensation of spatially variable erosional unloading an over-thickened orogenic crust. In this study we investigate landscape dissection, crustal thickness and vertical strain rates in tectonically active mountain ranges to evaluate the influence of erosion on (latitudinal) variations in peak altitude. We analyze the spatial distribution of serval thousand prominent peaks on Earth extracted from the global ETOPO1 digital elevation model with a novel numerical tool. We compare this dataset to crustal thickness, thickening rate (vertical strain rate) and mean elevation. We use the ratios of mean elevation to peak elevation (landscape dissection) and peak elevation to crustal thickness (long-term impact of erosion on crustal thickness) as indicators for the influence of erosional surface processes on peak uplift and the vertical strain rate as a proxy for the mechanical state of the orogen. Our analysis reveals that crustal thickness and peak elevation correlate well in orogens that have reached a mechanically limited state (vertical strain rate near zero) where plate convergence is already balanced by lateral extrusion and gravitational collapse and plateaus are formed. On the Tibetan Plateau crustal thickness serves to predict peak elevation up to an altitude

  20. Decoupling approximation design using the peak to peak gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Linear system design for accurate decoupling approximation is examined using the peak to peak gain of the error system. The design problem consists in finding values of system parameters to ensure that this gain is small. For this purpose a computationally inexpensive upper bound on the peak to peak gain, namely the star norm, is minimized using a stochastic method. Examples of the methodology's application to tensegrity structures design are presented. Connections between the accuracy of the approximation, the damping matrix, and the natural frequencies of the system are examined, as well as decoupling in the context of open and closed loop control.

  1. Absorption property and nanosensing via double metal films with rectangle holes array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Huafeng

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical investigation of plasmonic absorption and nanosensing based on a three dimensional nanostructure is presented. The structure consists of double metal films covered with rectangle nanoholes array. A dielectric layer is located between the double metal films with the function of confining electromagnetic fields. Optical absorption properties of the designed nanostructure are investigated by finite-difference time-domain method, obvious peaks appear in the absorption spectra is due to the Fabry-Perot resonance effect and localized surface plasmon resonance of the rectangle nanoholes. The absorption spectra dependence on the environmental and dielectric layer refractive index, which makes it an outstanding candidate for nanosensing. The results of this study may have potential application in absorption switching and nanosensors.

  2. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  3. [Light absorption by suspended particulate matter in Chagan Lake, Jilin].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan-Dong; Liu, Dian-Wei; Song, Kai-Shan; Zhang, Bai; Wang, Zong-Ming; Jiang, Guang-Ji; Tang, Xu-Guang; Lei, Xiao-Chun; Wu, Yan-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Spectral characteristics and the magnitudes of light absorption by suspended particulate matter were determined by spectrophotometry in this optically complex Lake Chagan waters for the purpose of surveying the natural variability of the absorption coefficients to parameterize the bio-optical models for converting satellite or in-situ water reflectance signatures into water quality information. Experiments were carried out on seasonal frozen Lake Chagan, one representative inland case-2 water body in Northeast of China. Particulate absorption properties analyzed using the field data on July 15th and October 12th 2009 were measured using the quantitative filter technique to produce absorption spectra containing several fractions that could be attributed to two main optical active constituents (OACs) phytoplankton pigments and non-algal particulates (mineral sediments, and organic detritus). Results suggested that the suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration was higher while phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll-a concentration) was lower in July and that in October. The spectral shape of total suspended particulate matter resembled that of non-algal particulates which contributed greater than phytoplankton in total particulate absorption during both periods. An obvious absorption peak occurring at around 440 nm exhibited an increase in phytoplankton contribution in October. Non-algal particulate absorption at 440 nm (a(NAP) (440)) had better correlation with total suspended particulate matter concentration than that with chlorophyll-a over the two periods. Light absorption by phytoplankton pigments in the Chagan lake region was generally lower than that of non-algal components. Chl. a dominating phytoplankton pigment composition functioned exponentially with its absorption coefficients at 440 and 675 nm specifically, the average values of which in July were 0.146 8 m2 x mg(-1) and 0.050 3 respectively while in October they were 0.153 3 and 0.013 2 m2 x mg(-1

  4. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  5. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications. PMID:23435006

  6. Optical absorption analysis and optimization of gold nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Tuersun, Paerhatijiang; Han, Xiang'e

    2013-02-20

    Gold nanoshells, consisting of a nanoscale dielectric core coated with an ultrathin gold shell, have wide biomedical applications due to their strong optical absorption properties. Gold nanoshells with high absorption efficiencies can help to improve these applications. We investigate the effects of the core material, surrounding medium, core radius, and shell thickness on the absorption spectra of gold nanoshells by using the light-scattering theory of a coated sphere. Our results show that the position and intensity of the absorption peak can be tuned over a wide range by manipulating the above-mentioned parameters. We also obtain the optimal absorption efficiencies and structures of hollow gold nanoshells and gold-coated SiO(2) nanoshells embedded in water at wavelengths of 800, 820, and 1064 nm. The results show that hollow gold nanoshells possess the maximum absorption efficiency (5.42) at a wavelength of 800 nm; the corresponding shell thickness and core radius are 4.8 and 38.9 nm, respectively. They can be used as the ideal photothermal conversation particles for biomedical applications.

  7. Absorption mode Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hilger, Ryan T; Wyss, Phillip J; Santini, Robert E; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-09-01

    In Fourier transform mass spectrometry, it is well-known that plotting the spectrum in absorption mode rather than magnitude mode has several advantages. However, magnitude spectra remain commonplace due to difficulties associated with determining the phase of each frequency at the onset of data acquisition, which is required for generating absorption spectra. The phasing problem for electrostatic traps is much simpler than for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) instruments, which greatly simplifies the generation of absorption spectra. Here, we present a simple method for generating absorption spectra from a Fourier transform electrostatic linear ion trap mass spectrometer. The method involves time shifting the data prior to Fourier transformation in order to synchronize the onset of data acquisition with the moment of ion acceleration into the electrostatic trap. Under these conditions, the initial phase of each frequency at the onset of data acquisition is zero. We demonstrate that absorption mode provides a 1.7-fold increase in resolution (full width at half maximum, fwhm) as well as reduced peak tailing. We also discuss methodology that may be applied to unsynchronized data in order to determine the time shift required to generate an absorption spectrum.

  8. Effective absorption in cladding-pumped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zervas, Michalis N.; Marshall, Andy; Kim, Jaesun

    2011-02-01

    We investigate experimentally and theoretically the wavelength dependence of the pump absorption along Yb3+-doped fibers, for cladding-pumped single as well as coupled multimode (GTWaveTM) fibers. We show that significant spectral absorption distortions occur along the length with the 976nm absorption peak affected the most. We have developed a novel theoretical approach, based on coupled mode theory, to explain the observed effects. We have also investigated the mode mixing requirements in order to improve the absorption spectral distribution along the increase the overall absorption efficiency and discuss the implications on fiber laser performance.

  9. Effect of quantum interference on absorption of light in metamaterial hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mahi R.; Davieau, Kieffer; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the effect of quantum interference on the absorption of light in a quantum emitter and metamaterial system. The system was comprised of a dielectric substrate doped with quantum emitters and metallic split ring resonators that included metallic rods. At the interface between the dielectric substrate and the metal are surface plasmon polaritons; these interact with excitons, which are present in quantum emitters. Quantum interference occurs due to the interaction between excitons and surface plasmon polaritons. It is also considered that excitons decay from an excited state to the ground state due to the radiative and nonradiative decay processes. The quantum interference phenomenon occurs between excitons decay rates. The density matrix method is used to calculate the absorption of light in the presence of both radiative and nonradiative processes. It is found that there is a decrease in the absorption of light by metamaterial hybrids due to quantum interference. There is also an increase in the absorption of light when the resonant frequencies of two excitons are in resonance with the surface plasmon polariton. Absorption peaks are shifted and broadened due to the surface plasmon polariton coupling. These findings suggest that the optical absorption properties of a metamaterial hybrid can be tuned by doping the supporting substrate with quantum emitters.

  10. Boson Peaks in Crystals and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumhansl, James

    2004-03-01

    In spite of the impression that phonon physics had been well understood by the mid 1900's, particularly with the advent of inelastic neutron scattering, when a number of workers in the later 1900's measured the low temperature heat capacity of some glasses they found, on comparing with Debye theory, a large peaked excess density of states in the energy region 0.1-0.5 Tdeb. The states obeyed boson statistics with variation of T, thus the "boson peak". Over the period after Born, so many measurements of heat capacity on crystals followed Debye theory so well, "within a few percent", that these newer results on glasses were then presented with great excitement to indicate the presence of very complex non-phonon states due to the loss of long range order. For several decades, even until the present, the boson peak has been assumed to hold answers to the physics of the glassy state. I have attempted to understand this phenomenon over the past several years, by careful quantitative analysis of data on materials which can be prepared in either crystalline or amorphous form, e.g. Ge. To my surprise; first, purely from experimental data, many good crystalline materials also have boson peaks essentially identical to those in their amorphous form; loss of long range order certainly does not occur there nor is relevant!! Second, in fact, given the neutron data for Ge, a semi-quantitative thermodynamic Green's function can produce the crystalline boson peak. In short, the boson peaks are not special physical excitations associated with glassy materials, but rather are artifacts of questionable data interpretation approximations. Many experimental data will be cited, as well as the quartz anomaly.

  11. Absorption spectra of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; Wu, M. F.; Hsieh, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The low-frequency optical absorption properties of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field are investigated by using the gradient approximation. The spectral function exhibits symmetric delta-function like prominent peaks structure in a uniform magnetic field, and changes to asymmetric square-root divergent peaks structure when subjecting to a composite field. These asymmetric divergent peaks can be further classified into principal and secondary peaks. The spectral intensity and frequency of the absorption peaks depend sensitively on the strength and modulation period of the composite field. The transition channels of the absorption peaks are also analyzed. There exists an optical selection rule which is caused by the orthogonal properties of the sublattice wave functions. The evolution of the spectral frequency of the absorption peaks with the field strength is explored.

  12. Light absorption measurements: new techniques.

    PubMed

    Hänel, G; Busen, R; Hillenbrand, C; Schloss, R

    1982-02-01

    A new radiometer is described which simplifies measurement of the radiation supply of solar wavelengths. Two methods of measuring the radiant energy absorbed by aerosol particles are described: A photometric technique is used for particles collected on filters, and a calorimetric technique is used for in situ measurements. Data collected with the radiometer and the light absorption techniques yield the heating rate of the atmosphere due to light absorption by the particles. Sample measurements show substantial atmospheric temperature increases due to absorption, especially in industrial regions.

  13. Hubbert's Peak: A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Oil and its by-products, as used in manufacturing, agriculture, and transportation, are the lifeblood of today's 7 billion-person population and our 65T world economy. Despite this importance, estimates of future oil production seem dominated by wishful thinking rather than quantitative analysis. Better studies are needed. In 1956, Dr. M.King Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Thus, the peak of oil production is referred to as ``Hubbert's Peak.'' Prof. Al Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on population and oil. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. This paper extends this line of work to include analyses of individual countries, inclusion of multiple Gaussian peaks, and analysis of reserves data. While this is not strictly a predictive theory, we will demonstrate a ``closed'' story connecting production, oil-in-place, and reserves. This gives us the ``most likely'' estimate of future oil availability. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  14. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  15. Interfacial Wave Motions Due to Marangoni Instability.

    PubMed

    Wierschem; Velarde; Linde; Waldhelm

    1999-04-15

    In annular containers, traveling periodic wavetrains are generated in liquid layers due to the surface adsorption and subsequent liquid absorption of a miscible surface-active substance. First, localized nucleation of shock-wave-like disturbances are generated by the Marangoni effect. Then, these disturbances yield to surface-wave trains with three-dimensional features which travel through the annular container or to stationary source-and-sink states. To illustrate these phenomena we provide shadowgraph pictures of the waves, space-time diagrams showing the wave evolution and wave modulation, mean frequency of wavetrains as a function of the wave mode, surface deformation, peak-to-trough wave amplitudes, wave sources and sinks, and the time evolution of the estimated Marangoni number. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  17. Double-peaked Acetaminophen Concentration Secondary to Intestinal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Alyahya, B; Tamur, S; Aljenedil, S; Larocuque, A; Holody, E; Gosselin, S

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundReduced gastrointestinal motility can alter the toxicokinetics of acetaminophen poisoning. We report a case of altered acetaminophen toxicokinetics due to delayed gastrointestinal absorption, likely secondary to intestinal trauma/surgery.  Case ReportA 37-year-old woman ingested an unknown amount of acetaminophen and ethanol then stabbed herself in the abdomen. The initial acetaminophen was 1,285.9 μmol/L and the time of ingestion was not known. Intravenous acetylcysteine protocol was started. She developed an ileus post-surgery for the stab wounds. At 31 hours post-presentation, the acetaminophen returned undetectable, and the transaminases were normal. After the resolution of the ileus, repeated acetaminophen peaked at 363.3 μmol/L 52 hours post-admission. At 76 hours post-admission, the acetaminophen was undetectable, and transaminases and coagulation parameters were normal. ConclusionsReduction in gastrointestinal motility secondary to trauma and/or surgery must be considered when determining when to initiate or discontinue treatment as well as how long to monitor acetaminophen concentrations. PMID:27463118

  18. What are the gigahertz peaked-spectrum radio sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dea, C. P.; Baum, S. A.; Stanghellini, C.

    1991-01-01

    The astrophysical implications of recent radio and optical observations of the powerful compact gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio sources are discussed. Some tentative conclusions are presented and a scenario based on the existing data is suggested. It is argued that the spectrum is due to synchrotron self-absorption, which is assumed as the basis for the present inferences from the radio spectral shape. The finding that some GPS sources have a very narrow spectral shape is consistent with the hypothesis that there is a narrow range of size scales which dominate the radio luminosity. The highly inverted LF radio spectrum is consistent with the hypothesis that the radio source is tightly confined. The conclusion that the radio polarization of these sources is systematically low is consistent either with a very tangled magnetic field or very large Faraday rotation measures. It is suggested that GPS radio sources are formed when the radio plasma is confined on the scale of the narrow-line region by an unusually dense and clumpy ISM. The existing optical spectroscopic results are also consistent with the existence of a dense and dusty nuclear ISM.

  19. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  20. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  1. Decoupling and tuning the light absorption and scattering resonances in metallic composite nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Danan, Yossef; Ramon, Yehonatan; Azougi, Jonathan; Douplik, Alexandre; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-11-01

    Utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effect of metallic nanoparticles enables their usage as contrast agents in a variety of applications for medical diagnostics and treatment. Those applications can use both the very strong absorption and scattering properties of the metallic nanoparticle due to their LSPR effects. There are certain applications where domination of the scattering over absorption or vice versa would be an advantage. However, the scattering and absorption resonance peaks have practically the same spectral location for solid noble metal nanoparticles at a certain domination of one over the other. In this paper we present gold nanoparticles coated with silicon that switches the order between the scattering and the absorption magnitude at the resonance peak by up to 34% in scattering-absorption ratio and tune the plasmon resonance over the spectrum by up to 56nm. This is obtained by modifying the refractive index of the silicon coating of the nanoparticle by illuminating it with a pumping light due to the plasma dispersion effect in silicon.

  2. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  3. Peak Stress Testing Protocol Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of peak flows during wet weather is a common challenge across the country for municipal wastewater utilities with separate and/or combined sewer systems. Increases in wastewater flow resulting from infiltration and inflow (I/I) during wet weather events can result in op...

  4. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  5. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  6. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOEpatents

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  7. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  8. [Fast spectral modeling based on Voigt peaks].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-rong; Dai, Lian-kui

    2012-03-01

    Indirect hard modeling (IHM) is a recently introduced method for quantitative spectral analysis, which was applied to the analysis of nonlinear relation between mixture spectrum and component concentration. In addition, IHM is an effectual technology for the analysis of components of mixture with molecular interactions and strongly overlapping bands. Before the establishment of regression model, IHM needs to model the measured spectrum as a sum of Voigt peaks. The precision of the spectral model has immediate impact on the accuracy of the regression model. A spectrum often includes dozens or even hundreds of Voigt peaks, which mean that spectral modeling is a optimization problem with high dimensionality in fact. So, large operation overhead is needed and the solution would not be numerically unique due to the ill-condition of the optimization problem. An improved spectral modeling method is presented in the present paper, which reduces the dimensionality of optimization problem by determining the overlapped peaks in spectrum. Experimental results show that the spectral modeling based on the new method is more accurate and needs much shorter running time than conventional method. PMID:22582612

  9. Dual-peak dose measurement for radiochromic films by a newly developed spectral microdensitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Fung, K.K.L.; Kwok, C.S.

    2005-06-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry is usually based on densitometric methods which use an analyzing light source of a fixed or a broad spectrum of wavelengths. These methods have not exploited the sensitivity of the dose response of the RCF otherwise attainable by using a light source with wavelengths peaked at the two absorption peaks in the absorption spectrum of the RCF. A new algorithm of dual-peak dose measurement for the RCF has been proposed in this paper to make use of these dual absorption peaks to achieve the maximum attainable sensitivity. This technique relies on the measurement of the transmittance of the RCF at the wavelength of the major and minor absorption peaks, respectively. The dual-peak dose measurement is accomplished with the aid of a novel spectral microdensitometer developed in our Institute. The microdensitometer utilizes a monochromator to provide a light source of which the wavelength can be matched precisely to the wavelength of the absorption peaks of the RCF. The doses obtained at these wavelengths are fed into a weighted objective function and an optimum dose is searched by minimizing the objective function to give the best estimate of the dose deposited on the film. An initial test shows that there is a good agreement between the estimated and actual dose deposited; and the maximum discrepancy was found to be less than 1%.

  10. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-16

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm{sup 2}.

  11. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  12. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  13. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  14. Broadband terahertz absorption enabled by coating an ultrathin antireflection film on doped semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxing; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2016-09-01

    We show that perfect absorption of terahertz wave can be achieved in a compact system where an ultrathin film of lossless dielectric is coated on a doped semiconductor substrate. Due to the nontrivial reflection phase shift at the interface between the two media, strong resonant behavior and the concomitant antireflection occur at wavelengths that are much larger than the thickness of the dielectric film, resulting in strong absorption of the incident wave in a wide frequency range. Using this mechanism, we design a broadband terahertz absorber by coating a Ge film on a highly doped GaAs substrate. We show that such a system not only has a perfect absorption peak, but also exhibits high absorptance (over 0.9) within a fractional bandwidth of over 20%. By varying the free carrier density in the GaAs substrate, the central frequency of the absorption band can be tuned from 1.79 to 2.69 THz. In addition, the absorption performance of the proposed system is shown to be insensitive to both incident angle and polarization. Our results offer a low-cost way for the design of absorption-based THz devices. PMID:27607670

  15. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  16. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  17. Plasma dispersion effect assisted nanoscopy based on tuning of absorption and scattering resonances of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danan, Yossef; Ilovitsh, Tali; Liu, Danping; Pinhas, Hadar; Sinvani, Moshe; Ramon, Yehonatan; Azougi, Jonathan; Douplik, Alexandre; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present gold nanoparticles coated with silicon that switch the order between the scattering and the absorption magnitude at the resonance peak and tune the plasmon resonance over the spectrum. This is obtained by modifying the refractive index of the silicon coating of the nanoparticle by illuminating it with a pumping light due to the plasma dispersion effect in silicon. We also report how changing the diffraction limited point spread function through the utilization of plasma dispersion effect of the above mentioned silicon coated nanoparticles allows doing imaging with sub wavelength resolution. The plasma dispersion effect can increase the absorption coefficient of the silicon, when illuminated with a focused laser beam and as explained above it can also tune the absorption versus scattering properties of the nanoparticle. Due to the Gaussian nature of the laser illumination which has higher intensity at its peak, the plasma dispersion effect is more significant at the center of the illumination. As a consequence, the reflected light from probe beam at the near infra-red region has a sub wavelength dip that overlaps with the location of the pump illumination peak. This dip has a higher spatial frequency than an ordinary Gaussian, which enables to achieve super resolution.

  18. Spatial variability of absorption properties in Lake Balaton, Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, C. A.; Hunter, P. D.; Tyler, A. N.; Vicente, V. M.; Groom, S.; Horváth, H.; Kovacs, A.; Preston, T.; Presing, M.

    2013-12-01

    In order to improve robustness of current remote sensing algorithms for lake monitoring, it is vital to understand the variability of inherent optical properties (IOPs) within a lake. In this study, absorption coefficients were measured in situ at 38 stations in Lake Balaton, Hungary, using a WET Labs AC-S and AC-9 and compared to concurrent absorption measurements by dual beam spectrophotometry in the laboratory. The spatial variability of bulk and chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficients was examined across 5 basins, demonstrating a gradient in total absorption corresponding to the trophic gradient. Our data suggests that sampling conditions had an impact on particulate absorption, affecting the proportion attributed to non-algal particles (aNAP), phytoplankton (aph) or color dissolved organic matter (aCDOM). The specific absorption of phytoplankton (a*ph) spectra showed a distinct peak in the UV portion of the spectra in Basins 3 and 4 (east), which may be due to the presence of phytoplankton photoprotective pigments to compensate for lower CDOM levels in these basins. In contrast to oceans, particulate attenuation (cp) had a weaker relationship to chlorophyll-a (R2=0.15) than to total suspended matter (R2=0.84), particularly the inorganic fraction. Additionally, the relative contribution of particulate scattering (bp) to attenuation was significantly higher in Lake Balaton (up to 85-99%) than that found in previous lacustrine studies. bp also demonstrated a gradient across the lake, where values increased as the water progressed from phytoplankton-dominated to mineral-dominated. These results provide knowledge of the heterogeneity of the IOPs within Lake Balaton, which is to be considered for the future improvement of bio-optical algorithms for constituent retrieval in inland waters.

  19. Resonant Orbits and the High Velocity Peaks toward the Bulge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molloy, Matthew; Smith, Martin C.; Evans, N. Wyn; Shen, Juntai

    2015-10-01

    We extract the resonant orbits from an N-body bar that is a good representation of the Milky Way, using the method recently introduced by Molloy et al. By decomposing the bar into its constituent orbit families, we show that they are intimately connected to the boxy-peanut shape of the density. We highlight the imprint due solely to resonant orbits on the kinematic landscape toward the Galactic center. The resonant orbits are shown to have distinct kinematic features and may be used to explain the cold velocity peak seen in the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment commissioning data. We show that high velocity peaks are a natural consequence of the motions of stars in the 2:1 orbit family and that stars on other higher order resonances can contribute to the peaks. The locations of the peaks vary with bar angle and, with the tacit assumption that the observed peaks are due to the 2:1 family, we find that the locations of the high velocity peaks correspond to bar angles in the range {10}\\circ ≲ {θ }{bar}≲ 25^\\circ . However, some important questions about the nature of the peaks remain, such as their apparent absence in other surveys of the Bulge and the deviations from symmetry between equivalent fields in the north and south. We show that the absence of a peak in surveys at higher latitudes is likely due to the combination of a less prominent peak and a lower number density of bar supporting orbits at these latitudes.

  20. Making sense of peak load cost allocations

    SciTech Connect

    Power, T.M.

    1995-03-15

    When it comes to cost allocation, common wisdom assigns costs in proportion to class contributions to peak loads, The justification is simple: Since the equipment had to be sized to meet peak day loads, those costs should be allocated on the same basis. Many different peak allocators have been developed on this assumption: single coincident peak contribution, sum of coincident peaks, noncoincident peak, average and excess demand, peak and average demand, base and extra capacity, and so on. Such pure peak-load allocators may not be politically acceptable, but conceptually, at least, they appear to offer the only defensible approach. Nevertheless, where capacity can be added with significant economies of scale, making cost allocations in proportion to peak loads violates well-known relationships between economics and engineering. What is missing is any tracing of the way in which the peak-load design criteria actually influence the cost incurred.

  1. Large persistent photochromic effect due to DX centers in AlSb doped with selenium

    SciTech Connect

    Becla, P.; Witt, A.G.; Lagowski, J.; Walukiewicz, W.

    1995-04-01

    A large photochromic effect has been observed in bulk AlSb crystals doped with Se. Illumination with light of energy higher than 1 eV leads to an increase of the absorption coefficient in the spectral range 0.1 to 1.6 eV. The enhanced absorption is persistent at temperatures below about K. The effect is a manifestation of a DX-like bistability of Se donors. The illumination transfers the from the DX center to a metastable hydrogenic level. The increased absorption with peaks around 0.2 eV and 0.5 is due to photoionization from the donor level to X{sub l} and X{sub 3} minima of the conduction band.

  2. Sound absorption in metallic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, T. J.; Hess, Audrey; Ashby, M. F.

    1999-06-01

    The sound absorption capacity of one type of aluminum alloy foams—trade name Alporas—is studied experimentally. The foam in its as-received cast form contains closed porosities, and hence does not absorb sound well. To make the foam more transparent to air motion, techniques based on either rolling or hole drilling are used. Under rolling, the faces of some of the cells break to form small sharp-edged cracks as observed from a scanning electronic microscope. These cracks become passage ways for the in-and-out movement of air particles, resulting in sound absorption improvement. The best performance is nevertheless achieved via hole drilling where nearly all of the sound can be absorbed at selected frequencies. Combining rolling with hole drilling does not appear to lend additional benefits for sound absorption. Image analysis is carried out to characterize the changes in cell morphologies due to rolling/compression, and the drop in elastic modulus due to the formation of cracks is recorded. The effects of varying the relative foam density and panel thickness on sound absorption are measured, and optimal relative density and thickness of the panel are identified. Analytical models are used to explain the measured increase in sound absorption due to rolling and/or drilling. Sound absorbed by viscous flow across small cracks appears to dominate over that dissipated via other mechanisms.

  3. Vibronic Structures in Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of Firefly Oxyluciferin in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Noguchi, Yoshifumi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate the factors determining the spectral shapes and widths of the absorption and fluorescence spectra for keto and enol oxyluciferin and their conjugate bases in aqueous solutions, the intensities of vibronic transitions between their ground and first electronic excited states were calculated for the first time via estimation of the vibrational Franck-Condon factors. The major normal modes, overtones and combination tones in absorption and fluorescence spectra are similar for all species. The theoretical full widths at half maximum of absorption spectra are 0.4-0.7 eV and those for the fluorescence spectra are 0.4-0.5 eV, except for phenolate-keto that exhibits exceptionally sharp peak widths due to the dominance of the 0-0' or 0'-0 band. These spectral shapes and widths explain many relevant features of the experimentally observed spectra. PMID:25946599

  4. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  5. Establishment of peak bone mass.

    PubMed

    Mora, Stefano; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2003-03-01

    Among the main areas of progress in osteoporosis research during the last decade or so are the general recognition that this condition, which is the cause of so much pain in the elderly population, has its antecedents in childhood and the identification of the structural basis accounting for much of the differences in bone strength among humans. Nevertheless, current understanding of the bone mineral accrual process is far from complete. The search for genes that regulate bone mass acquisition is ongoing, and current results are not sufficient to identify subjects at risk. However, there is solid evidence that BMD measurements can be helpful for the selection of subjects that presumably would benefit from preventive interventions. The questions regarding the type of preventive interventions, their magnitude, and duration remain unanswered. Carefully designed controlled trials are needed. Nevertheless, previous experience indicates that weight-bearing activity and possibly calcium supplements are beneficial if they are begun during childhood and preferably before the onset of puberty. Modification of unhealthy lifestyles and increments in exercise or calcium assumption are logical interventions that should be implemented to improve bone mass gains in all children and adolescents who are at risk of failing to achieve an optimal peak bone mass. PMID:12699292

  6. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wm. Hayden; Conner, Charles P.; Baines, Kevin H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH4 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum.

  7. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH sub 4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, WM.H.; Conner, C.P.; Baines, K.H. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH{sub 4} 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum. 18 refs.

  8. Weak-lensing Peak Finding: Estimators, Filters, and Biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Rozo, Eduardo

    2011-07-01

    Large catalogs of shear-selected peaks have recently become a reality. In order to properly interpret the abundance and properties of these peaks, it is necessary to take into account the effects of the clustering of source galaxies, among themselves and with the lens. In addition, the preferred selection of magnified galaxies in a flux- and size-limited sample leads to fluctuations in the apparent source density that correlate with the lensing field. In this paper, we investigate these issues for two different choices of shear estimators that are commonly in use today: globally normalized and locally normalized estimators. While in principle equivalent, in practice these estimators respond differently to systematic effects such as magnification and cluster member dilution. Furthermore, we find that the answer to the question of which estimator is statistically superior depends on the specific shape of the filter employed for peak finding; suboptimal choices of the estimator+filter combination can result in a suppression of the number of high peaks by orders of magnitude. Magnification and size bias generally act to increase the signal-to-noise ν of shear peaks; for high peaks the boost can be as large as Δν ≈ 1-2. Due to the steepness of the peak abundance function, these boosts can result in a significant increase in the observed abundance of shear peaks. A companion paper investigates these same issues within the context of stacked weak-lensing mass estimates.

  9. Enhanced photon absorption in spiral nanostructured solar cells using layered 2D materials.

    PubMed

    Tahersima, Mohammad H; Sorger, Volker J

    2015-08-28

    Recent investigations of semiconducting two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have provided evidence for strong light absorption relative to its thickness attributed to high density of states. Stacking a combination of metallic, insulating, and semiconducting 2D materials enables functional devices with atomic thicknesses. While photovoltaic cells based on 2D materials have been demonstrated, the reported absorption is still just a few percent of the incident light due to their sub-wavelength thickness leading to low cell efficiencies. Here we show that taking advantage of the mechanical flexibility of 2D materials by rolling a molybdenum disulfide (MoS(2))/graphene (Gr)/hexagonal boron nitride stack to a spiral solar cell allows for optical absorption up to 90%. The optical absorption of a 1 μm long hetero-material spiral cell consisting of the aforementioned hetero stack is about 50% stronger compared to a planar MoS(2) cell of the same thickness; although the volumetric absorbing material ratio is only 6%. A core-shell structure exhibits enhanced absorption and pronounced absorption peaks with respect to a spiral structure without metallic contacts. We anticipate these results to provide guidance for photonic structures that take advantage of the unique properties of 2D materials in solar energy conversion applications.

  10. One- and two-photon absorption of a spiropyran-merocyanine system: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Nakatani, Keitaro; Yu, Pei; Murugan, N Arul; Zaleśny, Robert; Roztoczyńska, Agnieszka; Bednarska, Joanna; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Samoć, Marek

    2015-01-29

    We report on the nonlinear optical properties measurements and quantum-chemical calculations of a well-known photochromic system consisting of spiropyran and the merocyanine photoproduct. The study of nonlinear absorption and refraction properties of the molecules dissolved in chloroform were performed with the Z-scan technique, using femtosecond pulses in a wide range of wavelengths. Maxima in the two-photon absorption spectrum at 700 and 1050 nm were found for the merocyanine form, and the corresponding two-photon absorption cross section is 80 GM and 20 GM, respectively. The latter feature does not vanish completely in the nonlinear spectrum of the spiropyran form, possibly because of the existence of some photoconversion caused by the laser beam during the measurements. A nonlinear absorption peak at 900 nm is found in the spiropyran form with an effective cross section of about 20 GM; it is likely due to three-photon absorption or to absorption by some intermediate species. The experimental data are supported by calculations performed with the use of a hybrid quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics approach. PMID:25531561

  11. Acoustic Power Absorption and its Relation to Vector Magnetic Field of a Sunspot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosain, S.; Mathew, S. K.; Venkatakrishnan, P.

    2011-02-01

    The distribution of acoustic power over sunspots shows an enhanced absorption near the umbra - penumbra boundary. Previous studies revealed that the region of enhanced absorption coincides with the region of strongest transverse potential field. The aim of this paper is to i) utilize the high-resolution vector magnetograms derived using Hinode SOT/SP observations and study the relationship between the vector magnetic field and power absorption and ii) study the variation of power absorption in sunspot penumbrae due to the presence of spine-like radial structures. It is found that i) both potential and observed transverse fields peak at a similar radial distance from the center of the sunspot, and ii) the magnitude of the transverse field, derived from Hinode observations, is much larger than the potential transverse field derived from SOHO/MDI longitudinal-field observations. In the penumbra, the radial structures called spines (intra-spines) have stronger (weaker) field strength and are more vertical (horizontal). The absorption of acoustic power in the spine and intra-spine shows different behavior, with the absorption being larger in the spine as compared to the intra-spine.

  12. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-08-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children.

  13. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed Central

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children. PMID:6476870

  14. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1peak absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  15. Peak-valley-peak pattern of histone modifications delineates active regulatory elements and their directionality.

    PubMed

    Pundhir, Sachin; Bagger, Frederik O; Lauridsen, Felicia B; Rapin, Nicolas; Porse, Bo T

    2016-05-19

    Formation of nucleosome free region (NFR) accompanied by specific histone modifications at flanking nucleosomes is an important prerequisite for enhancer and promoter activity. Due to this process, active regulatory elements often exhibit a distinct shape of histone signal in the form of a peak-valley-peak (PVP) pattern. However, different features of PVP patterns and their robustness in predicting active regulatory elements have never been systematically analyzed. Here, we present PARE, a novel computational method that systematically analyzes the H3K4me1 or H3K4me3 PVP patterns to predict NFRs. We show that NFRs predicted by H3K4me1 and me3 patterns are associated with active enhancers and promoters, respectively. Furthermore, asymmetry in the height of peaks flanking the central valley can predict the directionality of stable transcription at promoters. Using PARE on ChIP-seq histone modifications from four ENCODE cell lines and four hematopoietic differentiation stages, we identified several enhancers whose regulatory activity is stage specific and correlates positively with the expression of proximal genes in a particular stage. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PVP patterns delineate both the histone modification landscape and the transcriptional activities governed by active enhancers and promoters, and therefore can be used for their prediction. PARE is freely available at http://servers.binf.ku.dk/pare. PMID:27095194

  16. Peak width issues with generalised 2D correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, Gemma M.; Adams, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional spectral correlation analysis is shown to be sensitive to fluctuations in spectral peak width as a function of perturbation variable. This is particularly significant where peak width fluctuations are of similar order of magnitude as the peak width values themselves and where changes in peak width are not random but are, for example, proportional to intensity. In such cases these trends appear in the asynchronous matrix as false peaks that serve to interfere with interpretation of the data. Complex, narrow band spectra such as provided by 1H NMR spectroscopy are demonstrated to be prone to such interference. 2D correlation analysis was applied to a series of NMR spectra corresponding to a commercial wine fermentation, in which the samples collected over a period of several days exhibit dramatic changes in concentration of minor and major components. The interference due to changing peak width effects is eliminated by synthesizing the recorded spectra using a constant peak width value prior to performing 2D correlation analysis.

  17. Absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of absorption heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the absorption heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of absorption heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.

  18. Discourse Peak as Zone of Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longacre, Robert E.

    Defining peak as the climax of discourse, this paper argues that it is important to identify peak in order to get at the overall grammar of a given discourse. The paper presents case studies in which four instances of peak in narrative discourses occur in languages from four different parts of the world. It also illustrates the occurrence of a…

  19. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  20. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atlas Peak. 9.140 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.140 Atlas Peak. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Atlas Peak.”...

  1. Determinants of peak flow rate among Hutterite farmers.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, E; Parry, R R; Schlenker, E H

    1993-05-01

    Observations from respiratory studies of over 1000 Hutterites and 200 control subjects indicated that the percent predicted peak flow rate values were 20% lower among Hutterites than control subjects. The purpose of this study was to determine if the decreased peak flow rate values among male Hutterites were a function of decreased airway patency or decreased respiratory muscle strength. Peak flow rate, muscle and lung function and the prevalence of respiratory symptomatology and disease were evaluated in 27 males from two Hutterite colonies. In one group almost all members consistently used masks while performing farming tasks, while 41% of members from the other colony used masks intermittently. Results suggest that peak flow rate values are decreased predominantly due to decreased airway patency associated with a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and disease and are not limited by respiratory muscle strength. PMID:8516681

  2. Stability of widely tuneable, continuous wave external-cavity quantum cascade laser for absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasyutich, Vasili L.; Raja Ibrahim, R. K.; Martin, Philip A.

    2010-09-01

    The performance of widely tuneable, continuous wave (cw) external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) has been evaluated for direct absorption spectroscopy measurements of nitric oxide (NO) in the wavenumber range 1872-1958 cm -1 and with a 13.5 cm long optical cell. In order to reduce the absorption measurement errors due to the large variations of laser intensity, normalisation with a reference channel was used. Wavelength stability within the scans was analysed using the Allan plot technique for the reduced wavenumber range of 1892.4-1914.5 cm -1. The Allan variances of the NO absorption peak centres and areas were observed to increase with successive scan averaging for all absorption peaks across the wavelength scan, thus revealing short- and long-term drifts of the cw EC-QCL wavelength between successive scans. As an example application, the cw EC-QCL was used for NO measurements in the exhaust of an atmospheric pressure packed-bed plasma reactor applied to the decomposition of dichloromethane in waste gas streams. Etalon noise was reduced by subtracting a reference spectrum recorded when the plasma was off. The NO limit of detection (SNR = 1) was estimated to be ˜2 ppm at atmospheric pressure in a 20.5 cm long optical cell with a double pass and a single 7 s scan over 1892.4-1914.5 cm -1.

  3. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  4. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption.

    PubMed

    Malara, P; Campanella, C E; Giorgini, A; Avino, S; De Natale, P; Gagliardi, G

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator's quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  5. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  6. The use of the Kitt Peak IDS in determining galaxy redshifts - Results for five clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintzen, P.

    1980-06-01

    The redshifts of 71 galaxies in five clusters determined using the Kitt Peak Image Dissector Scanner (IDS) are presented and the accuracy of velocities determined with the IDS system is discussed. Data were obtained from observations of absorption or emission lines in the range 3600-5400 A using the IDS on a 2.1-m telescope and effective apertures of 3.8 x 10.3 arcsec from galaxies belonging to the AWM 7 = NGC 1129, A 1213, A 1795, A 2589 and A 2666 clusters. Wavelength errors due to mechanical flexure, off-center guiding and spectrum noise are estimated to provide an uncertainty of + or - 1.21 A or 92 km/sec in measurements of a given spectrum, and comparison of the velocities determined by the Kitt Peak IDS with those determined by the Lick IDS supports the error value. Implications of the mean heliocentric redshifts and relativistically correct velocity dispersions obtained for the structure and membership of the AWM 7 cluster are discussed.

  7. Understanding Human Motion Skill with Peak Timing Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ken; Furukawa, Koichi

    The careful observation of motion phenomena is important in understanding the skillful human motion. However, this is a difficult task due to the complexities in timing when dealing with the skilful control of anatomical structures. To investigate the dexterity of human motion, we decided to concentrate on timing with respect to motion, and we have proposed a method to extract the peak timing synergy from multivariate motion data. The peak timing synergy is defined as a frequent ordered graph with time stamps, which has nodes consisting of turning points in motion waveforms. A proposed algorithm, PRESTO automatically extracts the peak timing synergy. PRESTO comprises the following 3 processes: (1) detecting peak sequences with polygonal approximation; (2) generating peak-event sequences; and (3) finding frequent peak-event sequences using a sequential pattern mining method, generalized sequential patterns (GSP). Here, we measured right arm motion during the task of cello bowing and prepared a data set of the right shoulder and arm motion. We successfully extracted the peak timing synergy on cello bowing data set using the PRESTO algorithm, which consisted of common skills among cellists and personal skill differences. To evaluate the sequential pattern mining algorithm GSP in PRESTO, we compared the peak timing synergy by using GSP algorithm and the one by using filtering by reciprocal voting (FRV) algorithm as a non time-series method. We found that the support is 95 - 100% in GSP, while 83 - 96% in FRV and that the results by GSP are better than the one by FRV in the reproducibility of human motion. Therefore we show that sequential pattern mining approach is more effective to extract the peak timing synergy than non-time series analysis approach.

  8. Converting Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Absorption coefficients measured by the chamber method are referred to as Sabine absorption coefficients, which sometimes exceed unity due to the finite size of a sample and non-uniform intensity in the reverberation chambers under test. In this study, conversion methods from Sabine absorption coefficients to random incidence absorption coefficients are proposed. The overestimations of the Sabine absorption coefficient are investigated theoretically based on Miki's model for porous absorbers backed by a rigid wall or an air cavity, resulting in conversion factors. Additionally, three optimizations are suggested: An optimization method for the surface impedances for locally reacting absorbers, the flow resistivity for extendedly reacting absorbers, and the flow resistance for fabrics. With four porous type absorbers, the conversion methods are validated. For absorbers backed by a rigid wall, the surface impedance optimization produces the best results, while the flow resistivity optimization also yields reasonable results. The flow resistivity and flow resistance optimization for extendedly reacting absorbers are also found to be successful. However, the theoretical conversion factors based on Miki's model do not guarantee reliable estimations, particularly at frequencies below 250 Hz and beyond 2500 Hz.

  9. On the trail of double peak hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Hissler, Christophe; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Juilleret, Jérôme; François Iffly, Jean; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    A double peak hydrograph features two peaks as a response to a unique rainfall pulse. The first peak occurs at the same time or shortly after the precipitation has started and it corresponds to a fast catchment response to precipitation. The delayed peak normally starts during the recession of the first peak, when the precipitation has already ceased. Double peak hydrographs may occur for various reasons. They can occur (i) in large catchments when lag times in tributary responses are large, (ii) in urban catchments where the first peak is often caused by direct surface runoff on impervious land cover, and the delayed peak to slower subsurface flow, and (iii) in non-urban catchments, where the first and the delayed discharge peaks are explained by different runoff mechanisms (e.g. overland flow, subsurface flow and/or deep groundwater flow) that have different response times. Here we focus on the third case, as a formal description of the different hydrological mechanisms explaining these complex hydrological dynamics across catchments with diverse physiographic characteristics is still needed. Based on a review of studies documenting double peak events we have established a formal classification of catchments presenting double peak events based on their regolith structure (geological substratum and/or its weathered products). We describe the different hydrological mechanisms that trigger these complex hydrological dynamics across each catchment type. We then use hydrometric time series of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture and groundwater levels collected in the Weierbach (0.46 km2) headwater catchment (Luxembourg) to better understand double peak hydrograph generation. Specifically, we aim to find out (1) if the generation of a double peak hydrograph is a threshold process, (2) if the hysteretic relationships between storage and discharge are consistent during single and double peak hydrographs, and (3) if different functional landscape units (the hillslopes

  10. REPORTING PEAK EXPIRATORY FLOW IN OLDER PERSONS

    PubMed Central

    Vaz Fragoso, Carlos A.; Gahbauer, Evelyne A.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Gill, Thomas M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Peak expiratory flow (“peak flow”) predicts important outcomes in older persons. Nevertheless, its clinical application is uncertain because prior strategies for reporting peak flow may not be valid. We thus determined the frequency distribution of peak flow by the conventional strategy of percent predicted (%predicted) and by an alternative method termed standardized residual (SR) percentile, and evaluated how these two metrics relate to health status in older persons. Methods Participants included 754 community-living persons aged ≥ 70 years. Data included chronic conditions, frailty indicators, and peak flow. Results Mean age was 78.4 years, with 63.7% reporting a smoking history, 17.4% chronic lung disease, and 77.1% having one or more frailty indicators. Peak flow ≥ 80 %predicted was recorded in 67.5% of participants, whereas peak flow ≥ 80th SR-percentile was only noted in 15.9%. A graded relationship was observed between peak flow and health status, but %predicted yielded health risk at peak flows currently considered normal (80–100 %predicted), whereas SR-percentile conferred health risk only at severely reduced peak flows (< 50th SR-percentile). Conclusions Peak flow expressed as SR-percentile attains a frequency distribution more consistent with the characteristics of our elderly cohort, and establishes health risk at more appropriate levels of reduced peak flow. These findings establish the need for longitudinal studies based on SR-percentile to further evaluate the use of peak flow as a risk assessment tool in older persons, and to determine if pulmonary function, in general, is better reported in older persons as SR-percentile, rather than as %predicted. PMID:17921429

  11. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  12. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks.

    PubMed

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic-antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  13. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  14. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  15. Black carbon and wavelength-dependent aerosol absorption in the North China Plain based on two-year aethalometer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, L.; Deng, Z. Z.; Wang, P. C.; Xia, X. A.

    2016-10-01

    Light-absorbing components of atmospheric aerosols have gained particular attention in recent years due to their climatic and environmental effects. Based on two-year measurements of aerosol absorption at seven wavelengths, aerosol absorption properties and black carbon (BC) were investigated in the North China Plain (NCP), one of the most densely populated and polluted regions in the world. Aerosol absorption was stronger in fall and the heating season (from November to March) than in spring and summer at all seven wavelengths. Similar spectral dependence of aerosol absorption was observed in non-heating seasons despite substantially strong absorption in fall. With an average absorption Angström exponent (α) of 1.36 in non-heating seasons, freshly emitted BC from local fossil fuel burning was thought to be the major component of light-absorbing aerosols. In the heating season, strong ultraviolet absorption led to an average α of 1.81, clearly indicating the importance of non-BC light-absorbing components, which were possibly from coal burning for domestic heating and aging processes on a regional scale. Diurnally, the variation of BC mass concentrations experienced a double-peak pattern with a higher level at night throughout the year. However, the diurnal cycle of α in the heating season was distinctly different from that in non-heating seasons. α peaked in the late afternoon in non-heating seasons with concomitantly observed low valley in BC mass concentrations. In contrast, α peaked around the midnight in the heating season and lowered down during the daytime. The relationship of aerosol absorption and winds in non-heating seasons also differed from that in the heating season. BC mass concentrations declined while α increased with increasing wind speed in non-heating seasons, which suggested elevated non-BC light absorbers in transported aged aerosols. No apparent dependence of α on wind speed was found in the heating season, probably due to well mixed

  16. Seismic signatures of carbonate caves affected by near-surface absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    The near-surface absorption within a low-velocity zone generally has an exponential attenuation effect on seismic waves. But how does this absorption affect seismic signatures of karstic caves in deep carbonate reservoirs? Seismic simulation and analysis reveals that, although this near-surface absorption attenuates the wave energy of a continuous reflection, it does not alter the basic kinematic shape of bead-string reflections, a special seismic characteristic associated with carbonate caves in the Tarim Basin, China. Therefore, the bead-strings in seismic profiles can be utilized, with a great certainty, for interpreting the existence of caves within the deep carbonate reservoirs and for evaluating their pore spaces. Nevertheless, the difference between the central frequency and the peak frequency is increased along with the increment in the absorption. While the wave energy of bead-string reflections remains strong, due to the interference of seismic multiples generated by big impedance contrast between the infill materials of a cave and the surrounding carbonate rocks, the central frequency is shifted linearly with respect to the near-surface absorption. These two features can be exploited simultaneously, for a stable attenuation analysis of field seismic data.

  17. Observation of confinement effects through liner and nonlinear absorption spectroscopy in cuprous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, H.; Rakesh Kumar, Y.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2015-02-01

    Cuprous oxide nano clusters, micro cubes and micro particles were successfully synthesized by reducing copper (II) salt with ascorbic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide via a co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of pure single phase cubic. Raman spectrum shows the inevitable presence of CuO on the surface of the Cu2O powders which may have an impact on the stability of the phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data revealed that the morphology evolves from nanoclusters to micro cubes and micro particles by increasing the concentration of NaOH. Linear optical measurements show that the absorption peak maximum shifts towards red with changing morphology from nano clusters to micro cubes and micro particles. The nonlinear optical properties were studied using open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Samples exhibited saturable as well as reverse saturable absorption. The results show that the transition from SA to RSA is ascribed to excited-state absorption (ESA) induced by two-photon absorption (TPA) process. Due to confinement effects (enhanced band gap) we observed enhanced nonlinear absorption coefficient (βeff) in the case of nano-clusters compared to their micro-cubes and micro-particles.

  18. Thermoluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption in natural and synthetic rhodonite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paião, J. R. B.; Watanabe, S.

    2008-10-01

    Thermoluminescence, electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption properties of rhodonite, a natural silicate mineral, have been investigated and compared to those of synthetic crystal, pure and doped. The TL peaks grow linearly for radiation dose up to 4 kGy, and then saturate. In all the synthetic samples, 140 and 340°C TL peaks are observed; the difference occurs in their relative intensities, but only 340°C peak grows strongly for high doses. Al2O3 and Al2O3 + CaO-doped synthetic samples presented several decades intenser TL compared to that of synthetic samples doped with other impurities. A heating rate of 4°C/s has been used in all the TL readings. The EPR spectrum of natural rhodonite mineral has only one huge signal around g = 2.0 with width extending from 1,000 to 6,000 G. This is due to Mn dipolar interaction, a fact proved by numerical calculation based on Van Vleck dipolar broadening expression. The optical absorption spectrum is rich in absorption bands in near-UV, visible and near-IR intervals. Several bands in the region from 540 to 340 nm are interpreted as being due to Mn3+ in distorted octahedral environment. A broad and intense band around 1,040 nm is due to Fe2+. It decays under heating up to 900°C. At this temperature it is reduced by 80% of its original intensity. The pink, natural rhodonite, heated in air starts becoming black at approximately 600°C.

  19. Measuring peak expiratory flow in general practice: comparison of mini Wright peak flow meter and turbine spirometer.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K P; Mullee, M A

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare measurements of the peak expiratory flow rate taken by the mini Wright peak flow meter and the turbine spirometer. DESIGN--Pragmatic study with randomised order of use of recording instruments. Phase 1 compared a peak expiratory flow type expiration recorded by the mini Wright peak flow meter with an expiration to forced vital capacity recorded by the turbine spirometer. Phase 2 compared peak expiratory flow type expirations recorded by both meters. Reproducibility was assessed separately. SETTING--Routine surgeries at Aldermoor Health Centre, Southampton. SUBJECTS--212 Patients aged 4 to 78 presenting with asthma or obstructive airways disease. Each patient contributed only once to each phase (105 in phase 1, 107 in phase 2), but some entered both phases on separate occasions. Reproducibility was tested on a further 31 patients. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--95% Limits of agreement between measurements on the two meters. RESULTS--208 (98%) Of the readings taken by the mini Wright meter were higher than the corresponding readings taken by the turbine spirometer, but the 95% limits of agreement (mean difference (2 SD] were wide (1 to 173 l/min). Differences due to errors in reproducibility were not sufficient to predict this level of disagreement. Analysis by age, sex, order of use, and the type of expiration did not detect any significant differences. CONCLUSIONS--The two methods of measuring peak expiratory flow rate were not comparable. The mini Wright meter is likely to remain the preferred instrument in general practice. PMID:2142611

  20. Pre-Peak and Post-Peak Rock Strain Characteristics During Uniaxial Compression by 3D Digital Image Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-07-01

    A non-contact optical method for strain measurement applying three-dimensional digital image correlation (3D DIC) in uniaxial compression is presented. A series of monotonic uniaxial compression tests under quasi-static loading conditions on Hawkesbury sandstone specimens were conducted. A prescribed constant lateral-strain rate to control the applied axial load in a closed-loop system allowed capturing the complete stress-strain behaviour of the rock, i.e. the pre-peak and post-peak stress-strain regimes. 3D DIC uses two digital cameras to acquire images of the undeformed and deformed shape of an object to perform image analysis and provides deformation and motion measurements. Observations showed that 3D DIC provides strains free from bedding error in contrast to strains from LVDT. Erroneous measurements due to the compliance of the compressive machine are also eliminated. Furthermore, by 3D DIC technique relatively large strains developed in the post-peak regime, in particular within localised zones, difficult to capture by bonded strain gauges, can be measured in a straight forward manner. Field of strains and eventual strain localisation in the rock surface were analysed by 3D DIC method, coupled with the respective stress levels in the rock. Field strain development in the rock samples, both in axial and shear strain domains suggested that strain localisation takes place progressively and develops at a lower rate in pre-peak regime. It is accelerated, otherwise, in post-peak regime associated with the increasing rate of strength degradation. The results show that a major failure plane, due to strain localisation, becomes noticeable only long after the peak stress took place. In addition, post-peak stress-strain behaviour was observed to be either in a form of localised strain in a shearing zone or inelastic unloading outside of the shearing zone.

  1. Microwave absorption in s- and d-wave disordered superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mai Suan

    2001-10-01

    We model s- and d-wave ceramic superconductors with a three-dimensional lattice of randomly distributed 0 and π Josephson junctions with finite self-inductance. The field and temperature dependences of the microwave absoption are obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin dynamical equations. We find that at magnetic field H=0 the microwave absoption of the s-wave samples, when plotted against the field, has a minimum at any temperature. In the case of d-wave superconductors one has a peak at H=0 in the temperature region where the paramagnetic Meissner effect is observable. These results agree with experiments. The dependence of the microwave absorption on the screening strength was found to be nontrivial due to the crossover from the weak to the strong screening regime.

  2. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  3. Training Lessons Learned from Peak Performance Episodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fobes, James L.

    A major challenge confronting the United States Army is to obtain optimal performance from both its human and machine resources. This study examines episodes of peak performance in soldiers and athletes. Three cognitive components were found to enable episodes of peak performance: psychological readiness (activating optimal arousal and emotion…

  4. Do dark matter halos explain lensing peaks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorrilla Matilla, José Manuel; Haiman, Zoltán; Hsu, Daniel; Gupta, Arushi; Petri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated a recently proposed halo-based model, Camelus, for predicting weak-lensing peak counts, and compared its results over a collection of 162 cosmologies with those from N-body simulations. While counts from both models agree for peaks with S /N >1 (where S /N is the ratio of the peak height to the r.m.s. shape noise), we find ≈50 % fewer counts for peaks near S /N =0 and significantly higher counts in the negative S /N tail. Adding shape noise reduces the differences to within 20% for all cosmologies. We also found larger covariances that are more sensitive to cosmological parameters. As a result, credibility regions in the {Ωm,σ8} are ≈30 % larger. Even though the credible contours are commensurate, each model draws its predictive power from different types of peaks. Low peaks, especially those with 2 peaks (S /N >3 ). Our results confirm the importance of using a cosmology-dependent covariance with at least a 14% improvement in parameter constraints. We identified the covariance estimation as the main driver behind differences in inference, and suggest possible ways to make Camelus even more useful as a highly accurate peak count emulator.

  5. The role of nutrition on optimizing peak bone mass.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Connie M

    2008-01-01

    The growth years provide an important window of opportunity for building peak bone mass. More than one-fourth of adult bone mass is acquired between the ages of 12 to 14 years in girls and 13 to 15 years in boys. Although genetics determine 60-80% of peak bone mass, lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity are also predictors of bone accrual during growth. Calcium and vitamin D are two nutrients that are most likely to be deficient. Dietary calcium predicts 10-15% of skeletal calcium retention during adolescence with race and sexual maturity in the models. Boys retain more calcium than girls and black girls retain more calcium than whites girls. The role of Vitamin D status on peak bone mass is not well understood. Results of randomized, controlled trials are mixed and the effects of vitamin D supplementation on calcium absorption in children has not been studied. Dietary salt increases urinary calcium excretion. Exercise can enhance the effect of dietary calcium through enhanced bone geometry.

  6. Weld peaking on heavy aluminum structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Poorman, R.; Sexton, J.

    1978-01-01

    Weld peaking is usually undesirable in any welded structure. In heavy structures, the forces involved in the welding process become very large and difficult to handle. With the shuttle's solid rocket booster, the weld peaking resulted in two major problems: (1) reduced mechanical properties across the weld joint, and (2) fit-up difficulties in subsequent assembly operation. Peaking from the weld shrinkage forces can be fairly well predicted in simple structures; however, in welding complicated assemblies, the amount of peaking is unpredictable because of unknown stresses from machining and forming, stresses induced by the fixturing, and stresses from welds in other parts of the assembly. When excessive peaking is encountered, it can be corrected using the shrinkage forces resulting from the welding process. Application of these forces is discussed in this report.

  7. Multiscale peak detection in wavelet space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Tong, Xia; Peng, Ying; Ma, Pan; Zhang, Ming-Jin; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-12-01

    Accurate peak detection is essential for analyzing high-throughput datasets generated by analytical instruments. Derivatives with noise reduction and matched filtration are frequently used, but they are sensitive to baseline variations, random noise and deviations in the peak shape. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based method is more practical and popular in this situation, which can increase the accuracy and reliability by identifying peaks across scales in wavelet space and implicitly removing noise as well as the baseline. However, its computational load is relatively high and the estimated features of peaks may not be accurate in the case of peaks that are overlapping, dense or weak. In this study, we present multi-scale peak detection (MSPD) by taking full advantage of additional information in wavelet space including ridges, valleys, and zero-crossings. It can achieve a high accuracy by thresholding each detected peak with the maximum of its ridge. It has been comprehensively evaluated with MALDI-TOF spectra in proteomics, the CAMDA 2006 SELDI dataset as well as the Romanian database of Raman spectra, which is particularly suitable for detecting peaks in high-throughput analytical signals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that MSPD can detect more true peaks while keeping the false discovery rate lower than MassSpecWavelet and MALDIquant methods. Superior results in Raman spectra suggest that MSPD seems to be a more universal method for peak detection. MSPD has been designed and implemented efficiently in Python and Cython. It is available as an open source package at .

  8. Peak tree: a new tool for multiscale hierarchical representation and peak detection of mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Houqiang; Wang, Honghui; Wong, Stephen T C; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is one of the most important steps in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. However, the detection result is greatly affected by severe spectrum variations. Unfortunately, most current peak detection methods are neither flexible enough to revise false detection results nor robust enough to resist spectrum variations. To improve flexibility, we introduce peak tree to represent the peak information in MS spectra. Each tree node is a peak judgment on a range of scales, and each tree decomposition, as a set of nodes, is a candidate peak detection result. To improve robustness, we combine peak detection and common peak alignment into a closed-loop framework, which finds the optimal decomposition via both peak intensity and common peak information. The common peak information is derived and loopily refined from the density clustering of the latest peak detection result. Finally, we present an improved ant colony optimization biomarker selection method to build a whole MS analysis system. Experiment shows that our peak detection method can better resist spectrum variations and provide higher sensitivity and lower false detection rates than conventional methods. The benefits from our peak-tree-based system for MS disease analysis are also proved on real SELDI data.

  9. DO RADIO MAGNETARS PSR J1550-5418 AND J1622-4950 HAVE GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA?

    SciTech Connect

    Kijak, J.; Tarczewski, L.; Lewandowski, W.; Melikidze, G.

    2013-07-20

    We study the radio spectra of two magnetars, PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950. We argue that they are good candidates for pulsars with gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS), as their observed flux density decreases at frequencies below 7 GHz. We suggest that this behavior is due to the influence of the pulsars' environments on radio waves. Both of the magnetars are associated with supernova remnants and thus are surrounded by hot, ionized gas, which can be responsible for the free-free absorption of radio waves. We conclude that the GPS feature of both magnetars and typical pulsars are formed by similar processes in the surrounding media rather than by different radio-emission mechanisms. Thus, the radio magnetars PSR J1550-5418 and J1622-4950 can be included in the class of GPS pulsars.

  10. Dust-on-snow and the timing of peak streamflow in the upper Rio Grande

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust radiative forcing on high elevation snowpack is well-documented in the southern Rockies. Various field studies show that dust deposits decrease snow albedo and increase absorption of solar radiation, leading to earlier snowmelt and peak stream flows. These findings have implications for the use...

  11. Transient absorption and laser output of YAG : Nd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvapil, Jiří; Kvapil, Jos; Kubelka, J.; Kubeček, V.

    1981-06-01

    YAG : Nd grown under 98% Ar 2% H2 protective atmosphere free of nitrogen or hydrocarbons showed after UV irradiation broad absorption peaked at ˜1·9×104 cm-1 which disappeared relatively slowly at room temperature. It was more intensive in oxygen treated samples than in those annealed in hydrogsn. Transient absorption suppresses laser output by the increase of absorption at 0·94×104 cm-1 (1064 nm) and, particularly in CW mode, by the anomalous rod deformation. YAG : Nd containing Fe ions (≲2·10-4 wt%) showed no transient absorption.

  12. Variable threshold method for ECG R-peak detection.

    PubMed

    Kew, Hsein-Ping; Jeong, Do-Un

    2011-10-01

    In this paper, a wearable belt-type ECG electrode worn around the chest by measuring the real-time ECG is produced in order to minimize the inconvenient in wearing. ECG signal is detected using a potential instrument system. The measured ECG signal is transmits via an ultra low power consumption wireless data communications unit to personal computer using Zigbee-compatible wireless sensor node. ECG signals carry a lot of clinical information for a cardiologist especially the R-peak detection in ECG. R-peak detection generally uses the threshold value which is fixed. There will be errors in peak detection when the baseline changes due to motion artifacts and signal size changes. Preprocessing process which includes differentiation process and Hilbert transform is used as signal preprocessing algorithm. Thereafter, variable threshold method is used to detect the R-peak which is more accurate and efficient than fixed threshold value method. R-peak detection using MIT-BIH databases and Long Term Real-Time ECG is performed in this research in order to evaluate the performance analysis.

  13. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2012-02-01

    Gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identifications typically involves locating spectral peaks and matching the spectral peaks with known nuclides in the knowledge base or database. Wavelet analysis, due to its ability for fitting localized features, offers the potential for automatic detection of spectral peaks. Past studies of wavelet technologies for gamma spectra analysis essentially focused on direct fitting of raw gamma spectra. Although most of those studies demonstrated the potentials of peak detection using wavelets, they often failed to produce new benefits to operational adaptations for radiological surveys. This work presents a different approach with the operational objective being to detect only the nuclides that do not exist in the environment (anomalous nuclides). With this operational objective, the raw-count spectrum collected by a detector is first converted to a count-rate spectrum and is then followed by background subtraction prior to wavelet analysis. The experimental results suggest that this preprocess is independent of detector type and background radiation, and is capable of improving the peak detection rates using wavelets. This process broadens the doors for a practical adaptation of wavelet technologies for gamma spectral surveying devices.

  14. Theoretical calculation of the OH vibrational overtone spectra of 1-n alkane diols (n = 2-4): origin of disappearing hydrogen-bonded OH peak.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Lung; Chen, Hui-Yi; Takahashi, Kaito

    2011-06-01

    In this theoretical study, we simulated the vibrational overtone spectrum of ethylene glycol (EG), 1-3 propanediol (PD), and 1-4 butanediol (BD). Using the local mode model along with the potential energy curve and dipole moment function calculated by B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) and QCISD/6-311++G(3df,3pd), we obtained the theoretical peak position and integrated absorption coefficient. Furthermore, the vibrational spectra was simulated using a Voigt function using homogeneous and inhomogenous width obtained from quantum chemical calculation methods. Previously, Howard and Kjaergaard recorded the second and third overtone photoacoustic spectra of the three aforementioned alkane diols in the gas phase and observed that the intramolecular hydrogen bonded OH peak becomes difficult to observe as the intramolecular hydrogen bonding strength increased, that is, as the chain length was increased. In this paper we show that the disappearance of the hydrogen-bonded OH peak for the OH stretching overtone excitation for BD is partly due to the increase in homogeneous width due to the increase in the hydrogen bond strength and partly due to the decrease in the relative population of the intramolecular hydrogen-bonded conformers as the chain length is increased. This latter feature is a consequence of the unfavorable strained geometry needed to form the intramolecular hydrogen bond in longer alkane chains. PMID:21568300

  15. Visible light absorption and photo-sensitizing properties of spinach leaves and beetroot extracted natural dyes.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, D; Mondal, B; Mukherjee, K

    2015-09-01

    Herein, chlorophyll and betalain dyes are extracted from fresh spinach leaves and beetroots. Fourier transform infrared spectra are used to identify the characteristic peaks of the extracted dyes. UV-vis light absorption characteristics of the dyes and their mixed counterpart are investigated by varying their pH and temperature. These dyes are used as photo sensitizer for fabrication of zinc oxide photo-anode based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photo-voltaic characteristics of the developed DSSCs are measured under simulated solar light (power of incident light 100 mW cm(-2) from Air Mass 1.5G). The solar to electric conversion efficiencies for the chlorophyll, betalain and mixed dye based solar cells are estimated as 0.148%, 0.197% and 0.294% respectively. The highest conversion efficiency for mixed dye based solar cell is attributed due to the absorption of wider range of solar spectrum.

  16. Visible light absorption and photo-sensitizing properties of spinach leaves and beetroot extracted natural dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, D.; Mondal, B.; Mukherjee, K.

    2015-09-01

    Herein, chlorophyll and betalain dyes are extracted from fresh spinach leaves and beetroots. Fourier transform infrared spectra are used to identify the characteristic peaks of the extracted dyes. UV-vis light absorption characteristics of the dyes and their mixed counterpart are investigated by varying their pH and temperature. These dyes are used as photo sensitizer for fabrication of zinc oxide photo-anode based dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The photo-voltaic characteristics of the developed DSSCs are measured under simulated solar light (power of incident light 100 mW cm-2 from Air Mass 1.5G). The solar to electric conversion efficiencies for the chlorophyll, betalain and mixed dye based solar cells are estimated as 0.148%, 0.197% and 0.294% respectively. The highest conversion efficiency for mixed dye based solar cell is attributed due to the absorption of wider range of solar spectrum.

  17. Absorption spectra of blue-light-emitting oligoquinolines from time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jianmin; Tretiak, Sergei; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2008-11-01

    Recently, it has been discovered that a series of four conjugated oligomers, oligoquinolines, exhibits many desirable properties of organic materials for developing high-performance light-emitting diodes: good blue color purity, high brightness, high efficiency, and high glass-transition temperatures. In this work, we investigate the optical absorption of oligoquinolines in the gas phase and chloroform (CHCl3) solution, respectively, using time-dependent density functional theory with the adiabatic approximation for the dynamical exchange-correlation potential. Our calculations show that the first peak of optical absorption corresponds to the lowest singlet excited state, whereas several quasi-degenerate excited states contribute to the experimentally observed higher-frequency peak. We find that, compared with the gas phase, there is a moderate red shift in excitation energy in solution due to the solute-solvent interaction simulated using the polarizable continuum model. Our results show that the lowest singlet excitation energies of oligoquinolines in chloroform solution calculated with the adiabatic hybrid functional PBE0 are in a good agreement with experiments. Our simulated optical absorption agrees well with the experimental data. Finally, analysis of the natural transition orbitals corresponding to the excited states in question underscores the underlying electronic delocalization properties. PMID:18844398

  18. Infrared laboratory absorbance spectra of olivine: using classical dispersion analysis to extract peak parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, K. M.; Dijkstra, C.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Speck, A. K.

    2010-07-01

    Laboratory measurements quantifying the effect of Fe substituting for Mg in olivine are needed to distinguish compositional from temperature, grain size and grain shape effects in observational data. To address this need, we study room temperature absorption spectra of a large suite of olivines evenly spaced across Mg and Fe compositions. We apply the principle that classical dispersion theory may be used to determine peak positions as well as peak widths, strengths and possibly optical function (n(λ) and k(λ)) estimates from absorption spectra of thin film samples of these olivines and two additional isotropic and anisotropic minerals with varying hardness and numbers of spectral bands. For olivine, we find that this method provides good estimates of peak position and that accounting for asymmetric peak shapes in this way increases the error on full width at half-maximum and oscillator strengths. Values from classical dispersion fits better match published n and k derived from reflectivity of single crystals when the dust proxy is soft and the thickness of the sample is independently constrained. Electronic data and peak parameter trends for the laboratory olivine absorption spectra and the viability of the extracted n and k are discussed with regard to astronomy.

  19. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  20. Reducing Peak Demand by Time Zone Divisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2014-09-01

    For a large country like India, the electrical power demand is also large and the infrastructure cost for power is the largest among all the core sectors of economy. India has an emerging economy which requires high rate of growth of infrastructure in the power generation, transmission and distribution. The current peak demand in the country is approximately 1,50,000 MW which shall have a planned growth of at least 50 % over the next five years (Seventeenth Electric Power Survey of India, Central Electricity Authority, Government of India, March 2007). By implementing the time zone divisions each comprising of an integral number of contiguous states based on their total peak demand and geographical location, the total peak demand of the nation can be significantly cut down by spreading the peak demand of various states over time. The projected reduction in capital expenditure over a plan period of 5 years is substantial. Also, the estimated reduction in operations expenditure cannot be ignored.

  1. LNG production for peak shaving operations

    SciTech Connect

    Price, B.C.

    1999-07-01

    LNG production facilities are being developed as an alternative or in addition to underground storage throughout the US to provide gas supply during peak gas demand periods. These facilities typically involved a small liquefaction unit with a large LNG storage tank and gas sendout facilities capable of responding to peak loads during the winter. Black and Veatch is active in the development of LNG peak shaving projects for clients using a patented mixed refrigerant technology for efficient production of LNG at a low installed cost. The mixed refrigerant technology has been applied in a range of project sizes both with gas turbine and electric motor driven compression systems. This paper will cover peak shaving concepts as well as specific designs and projects which have been completed to meet this market need.

  2. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  3. Observing at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Martin

    1981-01-01

    Presents an abridged version of a chapter from the author's book "In Quest of Telescopes." Includes personal experiences at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and comments on telescopes, photographs, and making observations. (SK)

  4. Enhancement of the thermoelectric figure of merit in a quantum dot due to external ac field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qiao; Wang, Zhi-yong; Xie, Zhong-Xiang

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the figure of merit of a quantum dot (QD) system irradiated with an external microwave filed by nonequilibrium Green's function (NGF) technique. Results show that the frequency of microwave field influence the figure of merit ZT significantly. At low temperature, a sharp peak can be observed in the figure of merit ZT as the frequency of ac field increases. As the frequency varies, several zero points and resonant peaks emerge in the figure of merit ZT. By adjusting the frequency of the microwave field, we can obtain high ZT. The figure of merit ZT increases with the decreasing of linewidth function Γ. In addition, Wiedemann-Franz law does not hold, particularly in the low frequency region due to multi-photon emission and absorption. Some novel thermoelectric properties are also found in two-level QD system.

  5. Microwave absorption in single crystals of lanthanum aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuccaro, Claudio; Winter, Michael; Klein, Norbert; Urban, Knut

    1997-12-01

    A very sensitive dielectric resonator technique is employed to measure loss tangent tan δ and relative permittivity ɛr of lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO3) single crystals at 4-300 K and 4-12 GHz. A variety of single crystals grown by different techniques and purchased from different suppliers are considered. For T>150 K the loss tangent tan δ is almost sample independent with linear frequency dependence and monotonous temperature variation from 8×10-6 at 300 K to 2.5×10-6 at 150 K and 4.1 GHz. In this temperature range the experimental data are explained by a model based on lifetime broadened two-phonon difference processes. The loss tangent below 150 K is characterized by a peak in tan δ(T) at about 70 K. The height of this peak is frequency and strongly sample dependent. This leads to a variation of the loss tangent from 10-6 to 1.5×10-5 at 77 K and 8.6 GHz, the lowest values are generally achieved with Verneuil grown crystals and approach the intrinsic lower limit predicted by the phonon model. The peak is explained by defect dipole relaxation (local motions of ions). The activation energy of the relaxation process is determined from the measured data to be 31 meV. This low value indicates that the defect dipoles are associated with interstitials, possibly impurities in interstitial positions. Considering absorption due to phonons and due to defect dipole relaxation the loss tangent is calculated for a wide frequency range.

  6. Linewidth Extraction From the THz Absorption Spectra Using a Modified Lorentz Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Su, Haixia; Zhang, Han; Lan, Jinhui

    2013-10-01

    Identification of specific materials is one of the most promising THz applications. It is commonly achieved by comparing the experimental peak central frequencies of the transmission or absorption spectra with a database for known materials while neglecting the linewidths. However, due to the restriction of the signal-to-noise ratio, only a narrow band, extending from several hundred GHz to several THz, can be used. It is difficult to distinguish two materials from each other if their peaks' central frequencies are similar. In this paper, we present a modified Lorentz model by taking the scattering effect into account. The modified Lorentz model can be used for the extraction of reliable absorption peak parameters, i.e. the central frequency and linewidth. On comparison with our experiments, we observed that the parameters extracted using the modified Lorentz model in glutamine samples of different concentrations exhibited a better agreement than those obtained using the traditional model. Therefore, the utilization of the narrow THz band to identify materials can be improved by comparing both the central frequency and linewidth obtained from this method.

  7. On Absorption-Enhanced Organic Photovoltaic By Incorporating Metallic Nano Pyramid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qasem, Hussamaldeen Saif

    A lattice structure of metallic Nano pyramids (NPY) particles was planted on the interface between hole transport layer (HTL) and the transparent conductive layer (TCL) of an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Standard metal evaporation along with Nano sphere lithography was used to grow the metallic NPY mesh structure. Silver (Ag) and Gold (Au) were the primary choice of the NPY mesh structure due to the excellent overlap of their peak localized surface Plasmon resonance (LSPR) frequency with the active layer absorption wavelengths. The current-voltage curve displayed an improvement in the efficiency and fill factor values of OPVs that used NPY lattice structure over devices that used regular sphere-shaped Nano particles. Despite the better-shaped and strong (LSPR) peak frequency of the Ag NPY lattice structure, Au NPY lattice structure exhibited an enhanced absorption and overall efficiency, which was owed to the wider (LSPR) frequency peak that Au possesses. The effect of NPY lattice structure could be further investigated with several approaches such as using different NPY materials, using core-shill approach, and growing the NPY on different layers or interfaces.

  8. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  9. Peak Effect in High-Tc Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    1996-03-01

    Like many low-Tc superconductors, high-quality YBCO single crystals are found(X.S. Ling and J.I. Budnick, in Magnetic Susceptibility of Superconductors and Other Spin Systems), edited by R.A. Hein, T.L. Francavilla, and D.H. Liebenberg (Plenum Press, New York, 1991), p.377. to exhibit a striking peak effect. In a magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the critical current has a pronounced peak below T_c(H). Pippard(A.B. Pippard, Phil. Mag. 19), 217 (1969)., and subsequently Larkin and Ovchinnikov(A.I. Larkin and Yu.N. Ovchinnikov, J. Low Temp. Phys. 34), 409 (1979)., attributed the onset of the peak effect to a softening of the vortex lattice. In this talk, the experimental discovery^1 of the peak effect in high-Tc superconductors will be described, followed by a brief historical perspective of the understanding of this phenomenon and a discussion of a new model(X.S. Ling, C. Tang, S. Bhattacharya, and P.M. Chaikin, cond-mat/9504109, (NEC Preprint 1995).) for the peak effect. In this model, the peak effect is an interesting manifestation of the vortex-lattice melting in the presence of weak random pinning potentials. The rise of critical current with increasing temperature is a signature of the ``melting'' of the Larkin domains. This work is done in collaboration with Joe Budnick, Chao Tang, Shobo Bhattacharya, Paul Chaikin, and Boyd Veal.

  10. Double peak sensory responses: effects of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Aprile, I; Tonali, P; Stalberg, E; Di Stasio, E; Caliandro, P; Foschini, M; Vergili, G; Padua, L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study is to verify whether degeneration of skin receptors or intradermal nerve endings by topical application of capsaicin modifies the double peak response obtained by submaximal anodal stimulation. Five healthy volunteers topically applied capsaicin to the finger-tip of digit III (on the distal phalanx) four times daily for 4-5 weeks. Before and after local capsaicin applications, we studied the following electrophysiological findings: compound sensory action potential (CSAP), double peak response, sensory threshold and double peak stimulus intensity. Local capsaicin application causes disappearance or decrease of the second component of the double peak, which gradually increases after the suspension of capsaicin. Conversely, no significant differences were observed for CSAP, sensory threshold and double peak stimulus intensity. This study suggests that the second component of the double peak may be a diagnostic tool suitable to show an impairment of the extreme segments of sensory nerve fibres in distal sensory axonopathy in the early stages of damage, when receptors or skin nerve endings are impaired but undetectable by standard nerve conduction studies.

  11. On the Ammonia Absorption on Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejfel, Victor G.; Karimov, A. M.; Lyssenko, P. G.; Kharitonova, G. A.

    2015-11-01

    The ammonia absorption bands centered at wavelengths of 645 and 787 nm in the visible spectrum of Saturn are very weak and overlapped with more strong absorption bands of methane. Therefore, the allocation of these bands is extremely difficult. In fact, the NH3 band 787 nm is completely masked by methane. The NH3 645 nm absorption band is superimposed on a relatively weak shortwave wing of CH4 band, in which the absorption maximum lies at the wavelength of 667 nm. In 2009, during the equinox on Saturn we have obtained the series of zonal spectrograms by scanning of the planet disk from the southern to the northern polar limb. Besides studies of latitudinal variation of the methane absorption bands we have done an attempt to trace the behavior of the absorption of ammonia in the band 645 nm. Simple selection of the pure NH3 profile of the band was not very reliable. Therefore, after normalizing to the ring spectrum and to the level of the continuous spectrum for entire band ranging from 630 to 680 nm in the equivalent widths were calculated for shortwave part of this band (630-652 nm), where the ammonia absorption is present, and a portion of the band CH4 652-680 nm. In any method of eliminating the weak part of the methane uptake in the short wing show an increased ammonia absorption in the northern hemisphere compared to the south. This same feature is observed also in the behavior of weak absorption bands of methane in contrast to the more powerful, such as CH4 725 and 787 nm. This is due to the conditions of absorption bands formation in the clouds at multiple scattering. Weak absorption bands of methane and ammonia are formed on the large effective optical depths and their behavior reflects the differences in the degree of uniformity of the aerosol component of the atmosphere of Saturn.

  12. Extraordinary Absorption of Decorated Undoped Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauber, T.; Gómez-Santos, G.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2014-02-01

    We theoretically study absorption by an undoped graphene layer decorated with arrays of small particles. We discuss periodic and random arrays within a common formalism, which predicts a maximum absorption of 50% for suspended graphene in both cases. The limits of weak and strong scatterers are investigated, and an unusual dependence on particle-graphene separation is found and explained in terms of the effective number of contributing evanescent diffraction orders of the array. Our results can be important to boost absorption by single-layer graphene due to its simple setup with potential applications to light harvesting and photodetection based on energy (Förster) rather than charge transfer.

  13. Fluctuation sound absorption in quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerbikov, B. O.; Lukashov, M. S.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the sound absorption in quark matter due to the interaction of the sound wave with the precritical fluctuations of the diquark-pair field above Tc. The soft collective mode of the pair field is derived using the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau functional with random Langevin forces. The strong absorption near the phase transition line may be viewed as a manifestation of Mandelshtam-Leontovich slow relaxation time theory.

  14. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-02

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader {pi}* and {sigma}* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) - (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the {pi}* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the 'pre-peak', in the subtracted spectra and the {pi}*/{sigma}* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore, it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the {pi}*/{sigma}* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.

  15. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  16. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  17. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  18. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  19. Energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study on the energy absorption characteristics of selected composite material systems are presented and the results compared with aluminum. Composite compression tube specimens were fabricated with both tape and woven fabric prepreg using graphite/epoxy (Gr/E), Kevlar (TM)/epoxy (K/E) and glass/epoxy (Gl/E). Chamfering and notching one end of the composite tube specimen reduced the peak load at initial failure without altering the sustained crushing load, and prevented catastrophic failure. Static compression and vertical impact tests were performed on 128 tubes. The results varied significantly as a function of material type and ply orientation. In general, the Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the Gl/E or K/E tubes for the same ply orientation. The 0/ + or - 15 Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the aluminum tubes. Gr/E and Gl/E tubes failed in a brittle mode and had negligible post crushing integrity, whereas the K/E tubes failed in an accordian buckling mode similar to the aluminum tubes. The energy absorption and post crushing integrity of hybrid composite tubes were not significantly better than that of the single material tubes.

  20. The peaks and geometry of fitness landscapes.

    PubMed

    Crona, Kristina; Greene, Devin; Barlow, Miriam

    2013-01-21

    Fitness landscapes are central in the theory of adaptation. Recent work compares global and local properties of fitness landscapes. It has been shown that multi-peaked fitness landscapes have a local property called reciprocal sign epistasis interactions. The converse is not true. We show that no condition phrased in terms of reciprocal sign epistasis interactions only, implies multiple peaks. We give a sufficient condition for multiple peaks phrased in terms of two-way interactions. This result is surprising since it has been claimed that no sufficient local condition for multiple peaks exist. We show that our result cannot be generalized to sufficient conditions for three or more peaks. Our proof depends on fitness graphs, where nodes represent genotypes and where arrows point toward more fit genotypes. We also use fitness graphs in order to give a new brief proof of the equivalent characterizations of fitness landscapes lacking genetic constraints on accessible mutational trajectories. We compare a recent geometric classification of fitness landscape based on triangulations of polytopes with qualitative aspects of gene interactions. One observation is that fitness graphs provide information that are not contained in the geometric classification. We argue that a qualitative perspective may help relating theory of fitness landscapes and empirical observations.

  1. Large infrared absorptance of bimaterial microcantilevers based on silicon high contrast grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Beomjin; Seong, Myunghoon; Liu, Jui-Nung; Rosenberger, Matthew R.; Schulmerich, Matthew V.; Bhargava, Rohit; Cunningham, Brian T.; King, William P.

    2013-10-01

    Manufacturing sensors for the mid-IR spectral region (3-11 μm) are especially challenging given the large spectral bandwidth, lack of convenient material properties, and need for sensitivity due to weak sources. Here, we present bimaterial microcantilevers based on silicon high contrast grating (HCG) as alternatives. The grating integrated into the cantilevers leverages the high refractive index contrast between the silicon and its surrounding medium, air. The cantilevers with HCG exhibit larger active spectral range and absorptance in mid-IR as compared to cantilevers without HCG. We design and fabricate two types of HCG bimaterial cantilevers such that the HCG resonance modes occur in mid-IR spectral region. Based on the measurements using a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectrometer, we show that the HCG cantilevers have 3-4X wider total IR absorptance bandwidths and 30% larger absorptance peak amplitude than the cantilever without HCG, over the 3-11 μm wavelength region. Based on the enhanced IR absorptance, HCG cantilevers show 13-47X greater responsivity than the cantilever without HCG. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced IR sensitivity of the HCG cantilever enables transmission IR spectroscopy with a Michelson interferometer. The HCG cantilever shows comparable signal to noise ratio to a low-end commercial FTIR system and exhibits a linear response to incident IR power.

  2. Visible absorption properties of radiation exposed XR type-T radiochromic film.

    PubMed

    Butson, Martin J; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K N

    2004-10-01

    The visible absorption spectra of Gafchromic XR type-T radiochromic film have been investigated to analyse the dosimetry characteristics of the film with visible light densitometers. Common densitometers can use photospectrometry, fluorescent light (broad-band visible), helium neon (632 nm), light emitting diode (LED) or other specific bandwidth spectra. The visible absorption spectra of this film when exposed to photon radiation show peaks at 676 nm and 618 nm at 2 Gy absorbed doses which shift to slightly lower wavelengths (662 nm and 612 nm at 8 Gy absorbed dose) at higher doses. This is similar to previous models of Gafchromic film such as MD-55-2 and HS but XR type-T also includes a large absorption at lower visible wavelengths due to 'yellow' dyes placed within the film to aid with visible recognition of the film exposure level. The yellow dye band pass is produced at approximately 520 nm to 550 nm and absorbs wavelengths lower than this value within the visible spectrum. This accounts for the colour change from yellow to brown through the added absorption in the red wavelengths with radiation exposure. The film produces a relatively high dose sensitivity with up to 0.25 OD units per Gy change at 672 nm at 100 kVp x-ray energy. Variations in dose sensitivity can be achieved by varying wavelength analysis.

  3. Extreme value statistics of weak lensing shear peak counts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reischke, R.; Maturi, M.; Bartelmann, M.

    2016-02-01

    The statistics of peaks in weak gravitational lensing maps is a promising technique to constrain cosmological parameters in present and future surveys. Here we investigate its power when using general extreme value statistics which is very sensitive to the exponential tail of the halo mass function. To this end, we use an analytic method to quantify the number of weak lensing peaks caused by galaxy clusters, large-scale structures and observational noise. Doing so, we further improve the method in the regime of high signal-to-noise ratios dominated by non-linear structures by accounting for the embedding of those counts into the surrounding shear caused by large-scale structures. We derive the extreme value and order statistics for both overdensities (positive peaks) and underdensities (negative peaks) and provide an optimized criterion to split a wide field survey into subfields in order to sample the distribution of extreme values such that the expected objects causing the largest signals are mostly due to galaxy clusters. We find good agreement of our model predictions with a ray-tracing N-body simulation. For a Euclid-like survey, we find tight constraints on σ8 and Ωm with relative uncertainties of ˜10-3. In contrast, the equation of state parameter w0 can be constrained only with a 10 per cent level, and wa is out of reach even if we include redshift information.

  4. SPANISH PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation and a survey of mines and prospects were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas Counties, in south-central Colorado. Anomalous gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in rocks and in stream sediments from drainage basins in the vicinity of the old mines and prospects on West Spanish Peak indicate a substantiated mineral-resource potential for base and precious metals in the area surrounding this peak; however, the mineralized veins are sparse, small in size, and generally low in grade. There is a possibility that coal may underlie the study area, but it would be at great depth and it is unlikely that it would have survived the intense igneous activity in the area. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil and gas because of the lack of structural traps and the igneous activity.

  5. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  6. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  7. Compact program resolves overlapping voltammetric peaks.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, Jordan D

    2004-05-01

    A simple self-contained program designed to separate overlapping peaks from electrochemical analyses is presented. Combining an original interactive way to define initial parameter estimates with nonlinear curve fitting based on the simplex method of optimization, it allows the user to resolve voltammograms consisting of 2 to 5 analytical peaks raised on a straight base line. The program provides highly intuitive interface, easy operation, and straightforward result documentation. A free package including the program, three data files and user instructions is available on request.

  8. Separating Peaks in X-Ray Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David; Taylor, Clayborne; Wade, Thomas

    1987-01-01

    Deconvolution algorithm assists in analysis of x-ray spectra from scanning electron microscopes, electron microprobe analyzers, x-ray fluorescence spectrometers, and like. New algorithm automatically deconvolves x-ray spectrum, identifies locations of spectral peaks, and selects chemical elements most likely producing peaks. Technique based on similarities between zero- and second-order terms of Taylor-series expansions of Gaussian distribution and of damped sinusoid. Principal advantage of algorithm: no requirement to adjust weighting factors or other parameters when analyzing general x-ray spectra.

  9. Spectral properties of microwave graphs with local absorption.

    PubMed

    Allgaier, Markus; Gehler, Stefan; Barkhofen, Sonja; Stöckmann, H-J; Kuhl, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    The influence of absorption on the spectra of microwave graphs has been studied experimentally. The microwave networks were made up of coaxial cables and T junctions. First, absorption was introduced by attaching a 50Ω load to an additional vertex for graphs with and without time-reversal symmetry. The resulting level-spacing distributions were compared with a generalization of the Wigner surmise in the presence of open channels proposed recently by Poli et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 174101 (2012)]. Good agreement was found using an effective coupling parameter. Second, absorption was introduced along one individual bond via a variable microwave attenuator, and the influence of absorption on the length spectrum was studied. The peak heights in the length spectra corresponding to orbits avoiding the absorber were found to be independent of the attenuation, whereas, the heights of the peaks belonging to orbits passing the absorber once or twice showed the expected decrease with increasing attenuation.

  10. X-ray Absorption Spectra of Dissolved Polysulfides in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries from First-Principles.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Tod A; Wujcik, Kevin H; Velasco-Velez, Juan; Wu, Chenghao; Teran, Alexander A; Kapilashrami, Mukes; Cabana, Jordi; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel; Balsara, Nitash; Prendergast, David

    2014-05-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) of lithium polysulfides (Li2Sx) of various chain lengths (x) dissolved in a model solvent are obtained from first-principles calculations. The spectra exhibit two main absorption features near the sulfur K-edge, which are unambiguously interpreted as a pre-edge near 2471 eV due to the terminal sulfur atoms at either end of the linear polysulfide dianions and a main-edge near 2473 eV due to the (x - 2) internal atoms in the chain, except in the case of Li2S2, which only has a low-energy feature. We find an almost linear dependence between the ratio of the peaks and chain length, although the linear dependence is modified by the delocalized, molecular nature of the core-excited states that can span up to six neighboring sulfur atoms. Thus, our results indicate that the ratio of the peak area, and not the peak intensities, should be used when attempting to differentiate the polysulfides from XAS.

  11. Tunable absorption in heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metallic film and Fibonacci fractal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Jie; Du, Gui-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the anomalous optical properties of heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metal film and a truncated Fibonacci fractal photonic crystal. It is found that one or multiple highly reflected peaks, even enhanced transmission narrowband, can be realized in the near-complete absorption broadband, where the photonic crystals are selected with various Fibonacci sequences or a given sequence as the basic unit. These properties are significant to design important reflection or transmission optical devices in the visible and near-infrared ranges.

  12. Relationships between peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and modified mercalli intensity in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Heaton, T.H.; Kanamori, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed regression relationships between Modified Mercalli Intensity (Imm) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV) by comparing horizontal peak ground motions to observed intensities for eight significant California earthquakes. For the limited range of Modified Mercalli intensities (Imm), we find that for peak acceleration with V ??? Imm ??? VIII, Imm = 3.66 log(PGA) - 1.66, and for peak velocity with V ??? Imm ??? IX, Imm = 3.47 log(PGV) + 2.35. From comparison with observed intensity maps, we find that a combined regression based on peak velocity for intensity > VII and on peak acceleration for intensity < VII is most suitable for reproducing observed Imm patterns, consistent with high intensities being related to damage (proportional to ground velocity) and with lower intensities determined by felt accounts (most sensitive to higher-frequency ground acceleration). These new Imm relationships are significantly different from the Trifunac and Brady (1975) correlations, which have been used extensively in loss estimation.

  13. Using Classical Dispersion Analysis to Extract Peak Parameters, Optical Constants from IR Lab Absorbance Spectra: Olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitman, Karly M.; Dijkstra, C. R.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Speck, A. K.

    2009-05-01

    Laboratory measurements quantifying the effect of Fe substituting for Mg in olivine are needed to distinguish compositional from temperature effects in observational data. Because most olivine samples are too small to acquire reflectivity data used to obtain the optical functions n(λ) and k(λ) needed for radiative transfer models, we apply the principle that classical dispersion theory may be used to determine peak positions, widths, strengths, and n and k estimates from absorption spectra of thin film samples. We study room temperature absorption spectra of a large suite of olivines evenly spaced across Mg and Fe compositions, and isotropic and anisotropic minerals with varying hardness and numbers of spectral bands. For olivine, adding accounting for asymmetric peak shapes does not substantially alter estimates of peak position but increases the error on FWHM and oscillator strengths. Values from classical dispersion fits match published n and k derived from reflectivity (better agreement in k) when the dust proxy is soft and the thickness of the sample is independently constrained. Electronic data and peak parameter trends for the laboratory olivine absorption spectra and the viability of the extracted n and k are discussed with regard to astronomy.

  14. Direct Observation of Two-Step Photon Absorption in an InAs/GaAs Single Quantum Dot for the Operation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    We present the first direct observation of two-step photon absorption in an InAs/GaAs single quantum dot (QD) using photocurrent spectroscopy with two lasers. The sharp peaks of the photocurrent are shifted due to the quantum confined Stark effect, indicating that the photocurrent from a single QD is obtained. In addition, the intensity of the peaks depends on the power of the secondary laser. These results reveal the direct demonstration of the two-step photon absorption in a single QD. This is an essential result for both the fundamental operation and the realization of ultrahigh solar-electricity energy conversion in quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells.

  15. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  16. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  17. Absorption by oxygen and water vapor in the real atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A M; Casanova, J L

    1987-02-01

    Unexpected absorption in the real atmosphere in the window from 840 to 890 nm has been clearly observed through measurements of direct solar spectral irradiance under clear, cloud-free skies. This absorption is not predicted by the known theoretical models. The cause of this apparent absorption may be due to the presence of high thin nonvisible cirrus clouds. A quantitative evaluation of this absorption and an improvement of oxygen absorption coefficients has been carried out after a comparison of more than seventy experimental spectra. Moreover, it is necessary to take into account the different behavior of modeled and experimental data at low and high air masses.

  18. Correlated peak relative light intensity and peak current in triggered lightning subsequent return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between peak relative light intensity L(R) and stroke peak current I(R) is examined for 39 subsequent return strokes in two triggered lightning flashes. One flash contained 19 strokes and the other 20 strokes for which direct measurements were available of the return stroke peak current at ground. Peak currents ranged from 1.6 to 21 kA. The measurements of peak relative light intensity were obtained from photographic streak recordings using calibrated film and microsecond resolution. Correlations, significant at better than the 0.1 percent level, were found for several functional relationships. Although a relation between L(R) and I(R) is evident in these data, none of the analytical relations considered is clearly favored. The correlation between L(R) and the maximum rate of current rise is also examined, but less correlation than between L(R) and I(R) is found. In addition, the peak relative intensity near ground is evaluated for 22 dart leaders, and a mean ratio of peak dart leader to peak return stroke relative light intensity was found to be 0.1 with a range of 0.02-0.23. Using two different methods, the peak current near ground in these dart leaders is estimated to range from 0.1 to 6 kA.

  19. Radiation Emission and Re-Absorption Mechanisms in Dense Mediums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavi, M.; Ghazizadeh, S. F.

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, the Bremsstrahlung emission and re-absorption mechanisms are studied mainly through Inverse Bremsstrahlung and Compton Scattering. The Radiation Specific Power is calculated numerically assuming the suitable forms of Energy Distribution Function in plasma conditions. The calculation of Spectral Emission shows that, the Bremsstrahlung emission is strongly forward and backward peak relative to electron direction in overdense and high temperature plasma. Finally, some of the conditions for dominant of the re-absorption mechanism are explained.

  20. Double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Wenbin; Chen, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs), which is unique subset of subauroral ion drifts (SAIDs). A statistical analysis has been carried out for the first time with a database of 454 DSAID events identified from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations from 1987 to 2012. Both case studies and statistical analyses show that the two velocity peaks of DSAIDs are associated with two ion temperature peaks and two region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) peaks in the midlatitude ionospheric trough located in the low-conductance subauroral region. DSAIDs are regional and vary significantly with magnetic local time. DSAIDs can evolve from/to SAIDs during their lifetimes, which are from several minutes to tens of minutes. Comparisons between the ionospheric parameters of DSAIDs and SAIDs indicate that double-layer region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) may be the main driver of DSAIDs. It is also found that DSAIDs happen during more disturbed conditions compared with SAIDs.

  1. Hubbert's Peak: the Impending World oil Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffeyes, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Global oil production will probably reach a peak sometime during this decade. After the peak, the world's production of crude oil will fall, never to rise again. The world will not run out of energy, but developing alternative energy sources on a large scale will take at least 10 years. The slowdown in oil production may already be beginning; the current price fluctuations for crude oil and natural gas may be the preamble to a major crisis. In 1956, the geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s.1 Almost everyone, inside and outside the oil industry, rejected Hubbert's analysis. The controversy raged until 1970, when the U.S. production of crude oil started to fall. Hubbert was right. Around 1995, several analysts began applying Hubbert's method to world oil production, and most of them estimate that the peak year for world oil will be between 2004 and 2008. These analyses were reported in some of the most widely circulated sources: Nature, Science, and Scientific American.2 None of our political leaders seem to be paying attention. If the predictions are correct, there will be enormous effects on the world economy. Even the poorest nations need fuel to run irrigation pumps. The industrialized nations will be bidding against one another for the dwindling oil supply. The good news is that we will put less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The bad news is that my pickup truck has a 25-gallon tank.

  2. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Short, David

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in predicting peak winds at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron requested the AMU develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network , Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations, and CCAFS sounding s from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created mul tiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence , the temperature inversion depth and strength, wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft.

  3. Some Phenomenological Aspects of the Peak Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; Bartlett, Iris

    1976-01-01

    This article relates the psychological dynamics of "peak experiences" to two concepts, intentionality and paradoxical intention, within the philosophical orientation of phenomenology. A review of early philosophical theories of self (Kant and Hume) is presented and compared with the experiential emphasis found in the phenomenology of Husserl.…

  4. Effects of milk and food on the absorption of enoxacin.

    PubMed

    Lehto, P; Kivistö, K T

    1995-02-01

    The effects of milk and a standard breakfast on the oral absorption of enoxacin were evaluated in eight healthy volunteers in a randomized, balanced, four-way crossover study. After an overnight fast, 400 mg enoxacin was given with water, milk, a breakfast or with a breakfast and milk. The extent of enoxacin absorption was not affected by any of the three treatments, and no statistically significant changes were found with respect to peak plasma enoxacin concentration or time to peak. We conclude that enoxacin can be taken together with food and dairy products.

  5. Spanish Peaks, Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Spanish Peaks, on the eastern flank of the Sangre de Cristo range, abruptly rise 7,000 feet above the western Great Plains. Settlers, treasure hunters, trappers, gold and silver miners have long sighted on these prominent landmarks along the Taos branch of the Santa Fe trail. Well before the westward migration, the mountains figured in the legends and history of the Ute, Apache, Comanche, and earlier tribes. 'Las Cumbres Espanolas' are also mentioned in chronicles of exploration by Spaniards including Ulibarri in 1706 and later by de Anza, who eventually founded San Francisco (California). This exceptional view (STS108-720-32), captured by the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS108, portrays the Spanish Peaks in the context of the southern Rocky Mountains. Uplift of the Sangre de Cristo began about 75 million years ago and produced the long north-trending ridges of faulted and folded rock to the west of the paired peaks. After uplift had ceased (26 to 22 million years ago), the large masses of igneous rock (granite, granodiorite, syenodiorite) that form the Peaks were emplaced (Penn, 1995-2001). East and West Spanish Peaks are 'stocks'-bodies of molten rock that intruded sedimentary layers, cooled and solidified, and were later exposed by erosion. East Peak (E), at 12,708 ft is almost circular and is about 5 1/2 miles long by 3 miles wide, while West Peak (W), at 13,623 ft is roughly 2 3/4 miles long by 1 3/4 miles wide. Great dikes-long stone walls-radiate outward from the mountains like spokes of a wheel, a prominent one forms a broad arc northeast of East Spanish Peak. As the molten rock rose, it forced its way into vertical cracks and joints in the sedimentary strata; the less resistant material was then eroded away, leaving walls of hard rock from 1 foot to 100 feet wide, up to 100 feet high, and as long as 14 miles. Dikes trending almost east-west are also common in the region. For more information visit: Sangres.com: The Spanish Peaks (accessed January 16

  6. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  7. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  8. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  9. Nuclear collision processes around the Bragg peak in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Yuka; Date, Hiroyuki; Sutherland, Kenneth Lee; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    In the physical processes of proton interaction in bio-materials, most of the proton energy is transferred to electrons. Ionization and excitation occur most frequently around the Bragg peak region, where nuclear reactions also exist. In this study, we investigated the processes of energy deposition by considering interactions including the nuclear reactions between protons and water molecules by a Monte Carlo simulation for proton therapy. We estimated the number of particles produced by a variety of nuclear reactions, and we focused on the interaction in the low-energy region (below 1 MeV). Furthermore, we considered the charge-changing processes in the low-energy region (less than a few hundred keV). Finally, we evaluated the total dose and the contribution of primary protons and secondary particles through nuclear reactions to the absorbed dose. The results showed that the protons generate numerous neutrons via nuclear reactions. Particularly, neutrons with relatively low energies produce recoil protons by elastic collisions with the hydrogen atoms. Around the Bragg peak, low-energy primary protons (slowed-down protons) are prevalent, whereas recoil (secondary) protons gradually become dominant behind the distal falloff region of the Bragg peak. Therefore, around the Bragg peak, the main contribution to the absorbed dose is that of the primary protons (from 80 to 90%), whereas secondary protons created by primary proton-induced reactions contribute to the dose from 20 to 5%. Behind the distal endpoint of the Bragg peak, the absorbed dose is mainly due to the protons produced by (1)H(n, p), and the contribution of these is about 70%. PMID:20821107

  10. Opdic (optimized Peak, Distortion and Clutter) Detection Filter.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Gregory Philip

    1995-01-01

    Detection is considered. This involves determining regions of interest (ROIs) in a scene: the locations of multiple object classes in a scene in clutter when object distortions and contrast differences are present. High probability of detection P_{D} is essential and low P_{FA } is desirable since subsequent stages in the full system will only decrease P_{FA } and cannot increase P_{D }. Low resolution blob objects and objects with more internal detail are considered with both 3-D aspect view and depression angle distortions present. Extensive tests were conducted on 56 scenes with object classes not present in the training set. A modified MINACE (Minimum Noise and Correlation Energy) distortion-invariant filter was used. This minimizes correlation plane energy due to distortions and clutter while satisfying correlation peak constraint values for various object-aspect views. The filter was modified with a new object model (to give predictable output peak values) and a new correlated noise clutter model; a white Gaussian noise model of distortion was used; and a new techniques to increase the number of training set images (N _{T}) included in the filter were developed. Excellent results were obtained. However, the correlation plane distortion and clutter energy functions were found to become worse as N_{T } was increased and no rigorous method exists to select the best N_{T} (when to stop filter synthesis). A new OPDIC (Optimized Peak, Distortion, and Clutter) filter was thus devised. This filter retained the new object, clutter and distortion models noted. It minimizes the variance of the correlation peak values for all training set images (not just the N_{T} images). As N _{T} increases, the peak variance and the objective functions (correlation plane distortion and clutter energy) are all minimized. Thus, this new filter optimizes the desired functions and provides an easy way to stop filter synthesis (when the objective function is minimized). Tests show

  11. The spatial resolution of epidemic peaks.

    PubMed

    Mills, Harriet L; Riley, Steven

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of novel respiratory pathogens can challenge the capacity of key health care resources, such as intensive care units, that are constrained to serve only specific geographical populations. An ability to predict the magnitude and timing of peak incidence at the scale of a single large population would help to accurately assess the value of interventions designed to reduce that peak. However, current disease-dynamic theory does not provide a clear understanding of the relationship between: epidemic trajectories at the scale of interest (e.g. city); population mobility; and higher resolution spatial effects (e.g. transmission within small neighbourhoods). Here, we used a spatially-explicit stochastic meta-population model of arbitrary spatial resolution to determine the effect of resolution on model-derived epidemic trajectories. We simulated an influenza-like pathogen spreading across theoretical and actual population densities and varied our assumptions about mobility using Latin-Hypercube sampling. Even though, by design, cumulative attack rates were the same for all resolutions and mobilities, peak incidences were different. Clear thresholds existed for all tested populations, such that models with resolutions lower than the threshold substantially overestimated population-wide peak incidence. The effect of resolution was most important in populations which were of lower density and lower mobility. With the expectation of accurate spatial incidence datasets in the near future, our objective was to provide a framework for how to use these data correctly in a spatial meta-population model. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental spatial resolution for any pathogen-population pair. If underlying interactions between pathogens and spatially heterogeneous populations are represented at this resolution or higher, accurate predictions of peak incidence for city-scale epidemics are feasible. PMID:24722420

  12. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  13. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  14. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  15. Influence of plasma parameters on the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Zhang, X. Yu, L.; Zhao, X.

    2014-12-15

    In tokamaks, fusion generated α particles may absorb lower hybrid (LH) wave energy, thus reducing the LH current drive efficiency. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles changing with some typical parameters is calculated in this paper. Results show that γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ‖}, while decreases with the frequency of LH waves ω over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption. The absorption coefficient γ{sub α} increases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} ≤ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}, while decreases with n{sub e} when n{sub e} becomes larger, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e} ≈ 8 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −1} for the ITER-like scenario. The influence of spectral broadening in parametric decay instabilities on the absorption coefficient is evaluated. The value of γ{sub α} with n{sub ‖} being 2.5 is almost two times larger than that with n{sub ‖} being 2.0 and is even lager in the case of 2.9, which will obviously increase the absorption of the LH power by alpha particles.

  16. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  17. [Microwave absorption by magnetic nanoparticles in organisms].

    PubMed

    Bingi, V N

    2011-01-01

    An estimate of the rate of absorption of the electromagnetic microwaves by magnetic nanoparticles in organisms is presented. The absorption takes place due to the energy dissipation at the ferromagnetic resonance. Based on the known solution of the Landau-Lifshitz equation, the imaginary part of the complex magnetic susceptibility is evaluated that gives the absorption rate. It is shown that even in the conditions of thermal isolation of the particles, their temperature growth would be insignificant at absorption of the emission with the energy flux density of the order of 1 mW/cm2, and the given mechanism is unrelated to the observable effects of low-intensity microwaves. PMID:22279759

  18. Enhanced excitonic photoconductivity due to built-in internal electric field in TlGaSe{sub 2} layered semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Seyidov, MirHasan Yu. Suleymanov, Rauf A.; Şale, Yasin; Balaban, Ertan

    2014-12-07

    The strong enhancement, by several orders of magnitude, of the excitonic peak within the photoconductivity spectrum of TlGaSe{sub 2} semiconductor was observed. The samples were polarized in external dc electric field, which was applied prior to the measurements. Due to the accumulation of charges near the surface, an internal electric field was formed. Electron-hole pairs that were created after the absorption of light are fallen in and then separated by the built-in electric field, which prevents radiative recombination process.

  19. Effect of reservoir storage on peak flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, William D.

    1962-01-01

    For observation of small-basin flood peaks, numerous crest-stage gages now are operated at culverts in roadway embankments. To the extent that they obstruct the natural flood plains of the streams, these embankments serve to create detention reservoirs, and thus to reduce the magnitude of observed peak flows. Hence, it is desirable to obtain a factor, I/O, by which the observed outflow peaks may be adjusted to corresponding inflow peaks. The problem is made more difficult by the fact that, at most of these observation sites, only peak stages and discharges are observed, and complete hydrographs are not available. It is postulated that the inflow hydrographs may be described in terms of Q, the instantaneous discharge; A, the size of drainage area; Pe, the amount of rainfall excess; H, the time from beginning of rainfall excess; D, the duration of rainfall excess; and T and k, characteristic times for the drainage area, and indicative of the time lag between rainfall and runoff. These factors are combined into the dimensionless ratios (QT/APe), (H/T), (k/T), and (D/T), leading to families of inflow hydrographs in which the first ratio is the ordinate, the second is the abscissa, and the third and fourth are distinguishing parameters. Sixteen dimensionless inflow hydrographs have been routed through reservoir storage to obtain 139 corresponding outflow hydrographs. In most of the routings it has been assumed that the storage-outflow relation is linear; that is, that storage is some constant, K, times the outflow. The existence of nonlinear storage is recognized, and exploratory nonlinear routings are described, but analyses and conclusions are confined to the problems of linear storage. Comparisons between inflow hydrographs and outflow hydrographs indicate that, at least for linear storage, I/O=f(k/T, D/T, K/T) in which I and O are, respectively, the magnitudes of the inflow and the outflow peaks, and T, k, D, and K are as defined above. Diagrams are presented to

  20. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  1. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  2. Correction methodology for the spectral interfering γ-rays overlapping to the analytical peaks used in the analysis of 232Th.

    PubMed

    Yücel, H; Köse, E; Esen, A N; Bor, D

    2011-06-01

    In the γ-ray spectrometric analysis of the radionuclides, a correction factor is generally required for the spectral interfering γ-rays in determining the net areas of the analytical peaks because some interfering γ-rays often might contribute to the analytical peaks of interest. In present study, a correction methodology for the spectral interfering γ-rays (CSI) is described. In particular, in the analysis of (232)Th contained in samples, the interfering γ-rays due to (226)Ra, (235)U, (238)U and their decay products often overlap to the peaks of interest from (232)Th decay products, and vise versa. For the validation of the proposed CSI method, several certified reference materials (CRM) containing U and Th were measured by using a 76.5% efficient n-type Ge detector. The required correction factors were quantified for spectral interference, self-absorption and true coincidence summing (TCS) effects for the relevant γ-rays. The measured results indicate that if one ignores the contributions of the interfering γ-rays to the analytical peaks at 583.2 keV of (208)Tl and 727.3 keV of (212)Bi, this leads to a significantly systematic influence on the resulted activities of (232)Th. The correction factors required for spectral interference and TCS effects are estimated to be ∼13.6% and ∼15.4% for 583.2 keV peak. For the 727.3 keV peak, the correction factor is estimated to be ∼15% for spectral interference, and ∼5% for the TCS effects at the presently used detection geometry. On the other hand, the measured results also indicate that ignoring the contribution of the interfering γ-rays to the areas of the analytical peaks at 860.6 keV of (208)Tl, 338.3 and 911.2 keV of (228)Ac does not lead to any significant systematic influence on the (232)Th analysis. Because these factors are remained generally less than ∼5%, i.e., within overall uncertainty limits. The present study also showed that in view of both the spectral interference and TCS effects, the

  3. The peak effect of the photocurrent from thylakoids on the concentration of electron mediators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yue; Zuo, Fulin; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2014-03-01

    Photocurrent extracted from the thylakoids has been studied as a function of electron mediator concentration. The electron mediators are used to facilitate the charge transfer from the thylakoid's charge transport chain to the outside medium. This measured photocurrent has been checked to originate from the photosynthesis on the thylakoid membranes. The photocurrent has a linear dependence on light intensity. It shares similar frequency dependence as that of absorption spectrum of chlorophyll and it decreases or disappears with the application of an inhibitor. We report here a new peak effect in the photocurrent as a function of the concentration of electron mediators. A simplistic model is proposed to explain the peak effect.

  4. HST Ultraviolet Spectrum of ARP 102B, the Prototypical Double-Peaked Emission-Line AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eracleous, M.; Filippenko, A. V.; Halpern, J. P.; Chen, K.

    1995-12-01

    UV spectra of the nucleus of the elliptical galaxy Arp 102B were obtained with the HST's Faint Object Spectrograph in order to investigate the UV emission-line counterparts of its unusual double-peaked Balmer lines. Broad Mg II lambda 2798 is present with nearly the same profile as the Balmer lines (peaks separated by ~ 12,000 km s(-1) ), and a typical Mg II/Hβ ratio of 1. But there is little, if any C III] lambda 1909 or C IV lambda 1550 emission corresponding to the displaced Balmer-line peaks. Most important, there is no double-peaked component detected in Lyalpha ; the Lyalpha /Hβ ratio is < 0.12 in the displaced peaks. However, there is an ``ordinary,'' non-displaced broad-line component with FWHM ~ 3500 km s(-1) in all of the permitted lines, demonstrating the need to invoke different locations and different physical conditions for double-peaked and single-peaked line components in the same object. The striking absence of displaced peaks in Lyalpha cannot be explained solely by reddening. Rather, it indicates that high density and large optical depth in Lyalpha are required to destroy the line photons by collisional deexcitation and possibly by bound-free absorption out of the n=2 level of hydrogen. These results strongly support the application, at least to Arp 102B, of the accretion-disk model of Dumont and Collin-Souffrin, in which the disk produces only low-ionization lines and a Lyalpha /Hβ ratio that agrees with our upper limit. Also present is an extraordinary system of absorption lines at the systemic redshift of Arp 102B, in which metastable levels of Fe II up to 1.1 eV above the ground state participate in addition to the more common resonance transitions. Absorption from metastable levels has been seen previously only in two unusual, low-ionization BALQSOs, Q0059--2735 and Mrk 231. Why they are seen in absorption in Arp 102B, a relatively unobscured AGN, but in no other appropriately observed Seyfert or radio galaxy, is a mystery.

  5. Additive and subtractive coherence peaks in pump and probe experiments with high repetition rate fs laser pulses in a flowing malachite green solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watermann, V.; Waltinger, T.; Eichler, H. J.

    1995-02-01

    Pump and probe absorption bleaching experiments with femtosecond laser pulses in a flowing dye solution lead to a coherence peak or coherence dip at zero time delay. The size and sign of this peak are strongly affected by the flow velocity of the solution. Experimental results are in good agreement with a two-wave mixing theory, which takes pump and probe coupling by an absorption and a temperature grating into account.

  6. Peak Oil, Food Systems, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Cindy L.; Kirschenmann, Frederick L.; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all. PMID:21778492

  7. Central peaking of magnetized gas dischargesa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2013-05-01

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature Te, drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This "universal" profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a.

  8. Peak oil, food systems, and public health.

    PubMed

    Neff, Roni A; Parker, Cindy L; Kirschenmann, Frederick L; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all.

  9. Random matrix definition of the boson peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, M. Lisa; Liu, Andrea J.

    2014-03-01

    The density of vibrational states for glasses and jammed solids exhibits universal features, including an excess of modes above the Debye prediction known as the boson peak, located at a frequency ω*. We show that the eigenvector statistics for modes in the boson peak are universal and emerge from the interplay of disorder and global translation invariance in the dynamical matrix. We demonstrate that a very large class of random matrices contains a band of modes with this same universal structure, and conjecture the existence of a new universality class. We characterize the eigenvector statistics as a function of coordination number, and find that one member of this new class reproduces the scaling of ω* with coordination number that is observed near the jamming transition.

  10. Improved peak shape fitting in alpha spectra.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Caro Marroyo, B

    2015-02-01

    Peak overlap is a recurrent issue in alpha-particle spectrometry, not only in routine analyses but also in the high-resolution spectra from which reference values for alpha emission probabilities are derived. In this work, improved peak shape formulae are presented for the deconvolution of alpha-particle spectra. They have been implemented as fit functions in a spreadsheet application and optimum fit parameters were searched with built-in optimisation routines. Deconvolution results are shown for a few challenging spectra with high statistical precision. The algorithm outperforms the best available routines for high-resolution spectrometry, which may facilitate a more reliable determination of alpha emission probabilities in the future. It is also applicable to alpha spectra with inferior energy resolution. PMID:25497323

  11. Eyesight and the solar Wien peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James M.

    2003-03-01

    It is sometimes said that humans see best at yellow-green wavelengths because they have evolved under a Sun whose blackbody spectrum has a Wien peak in the green part of the spectrum. However, as a function of frequency, the solar blackbody spectrum peaks in the infrared. Why did human vision not evolve toward a peak sensitivity in this range, if the eye is an efficient quantum detector of photons? The puzzle is resolved if we assume that natural selection acted in such a way as to maximize the amount of energy that can be detected by the retina across a range of wavelengths (whose upper and lower limits are fixed by biological constraints). It is then found that our eyes are indeed perfectly adapted to life under a class G2 star. Extending this reasoning allows educated guesses to be made about the kind of eyesight that might have evolved in extrasolar planetary systems such as that of the red dwarf Gliese 876.

  12. GLACIER PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WASHINGTON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Stotelmeyer, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Geologic, geochemical, gravity, aeromagnetic, and mine and prospect surveys were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Glacier Peak Wilderness study area and proposed additions in Washington. In the study area, six areas containing several base and precious metals have been identified that have substantiated mineral-resource potential, two of which are in areas recommended for wilderness addition. An additional 10 areas have probable mineral-resource potential. The most important demonstrated resource identified is the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit at Glacier Peak mine near the center of the wilderness study area, where a deposit totaling 1. 9 billion tons of mineralized rock has been delineated by drilling. A possible geothermal potential exists on the east side of the Glacier Peak volcano, and a possible 24-million-cu-yd cinder resource is identified at the White Chuck Cinder Cone in the wilderness study area, but both are remote and no resources were identified. No other energy resource potential was identified in this study.

  13. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  14. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  15. A naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible multiple peak metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heli; Song, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    We report a naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible metamaterial absorber. The visible metamaterial absorber consisting of a silver dendritic/dielectric/metal structure shows multiple absorption peaks. By incorporating a gain material (rhodamine B) into the dielectric layer, the maximal magnitude of the absorption peak can be improved by about 30%. As the metamaterial absorber is sensitive to the refractive index of glucose solutions, it can function as a sensor that quickly responds to variations of the refractive index of the liquid. Meanwhile, since the response is presented via color changes, it can be clearly observed by the naked eyes. Further experiments have confirmed that the sensor can be used repeatedly. PMID:25822141

  16. A Naked Eye Refractive Index Sensor with a Visible Multiple Peak Metamaterial Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Heli; Song, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    We report a naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible metamaterial absorber. The visible metamaterial absorber consisting of a silver dendritic/dielectric/metal structure shows multiple absorption peaks. By incorporating a gain material (rhodamine B) into the dielectric layer, the maximal magnitude of the absorption peak can be improved by about 30%. As the metamaterial absorber is sensitive to the refractive index of glucose solutions, it can function as a sensor that quickly responds to variations of the refractive index of the liquid. Meanwhile, since the response is presented via color changes, it can be clearly observed by the naked eyes. Further experiments have confirmed that the sensor can be used repeatedly. PMID:25822141

  17. Impact of nonlinear absorption on propagation of microwave in a plasma filled rectangular waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobhani, H.; Vaziri, M.; Rooholamininejad, H.; Bahrampour, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    In collisional and ponderomotive predominant regimes, the propagation of microwave in rectangular waveguide filled with collisional plasma is investigated numerically. The dominant mode is excited through an evacuated waveguide and then enters a similar and co-axis waveguide filled with plasma. In collisional predominant regime, the amplitude of electric field is oscillated along propagation path; outset of propagation path due to the electron-ion collision, the intensity oscillations are reduced. Afterward, under competition between the collisional nonlinearity and absorption, the intensity is increased, so the electron density peak is created in middle of waveguide. In ponderomotive predominant regime, the intensity is slowly decreased due to collision, so the electron density is ramped. Control parameters, like the frequency, input power, collision frequency, and background electron density are surveyed that can be used to control propagation characteristics of microwave. This method can be used to control heating of fusion plasma and accelerate charged particle.

  18. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  19. Quantifying peak discharges for historical floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    It is usually advantageous to use information regarding historical floods, if available, to define the flood-frequency relation for a stream. Peak stages can sometimes be determined for outstanding floods that occurred many years ago before systematic gaging of streams began. In the United States, this information is usually not available for more than 100-200 years, but in countries with long cultural histories, such as China, historical flood data are available at some sites as far back as 2,000 years or more. It is important in flood studies to be able to assign a maximum discharge rate and an associated error range to the historical flood. This paper describes the significant characteristics and uncertainties of four commonly used methods for estimating the peak discharge of a flood. These methods are: (1) rating curve (stage-discharge relation) extension; (2) slope conveyance; (3) slope area; and (4) step backwater. Logarithmic extensions of rating curves are based on theoretical plotting techniques that results in straight line extensions provided that channel shape and roughness do not change significantly. The slope-conveyance and slope-area methods are based on the Manning equation, which requires specific data on channel size, shape and roughness, as well as the water-surface slope for one or more cross-sections in a relatively straight reach of channel. The slope-conveyance method is used primarily for shaping and extending rating curves, whereas the slope-area method is used for specific floods. The step-backwater method, also based on the Manning equation, requires more cross-section data than the slope-area ethod, but has a water-surface profile convergence characteristic that negates the need for known or estimated water-surface slope. Uncertainties in calculating peak discharge for historical floods may be quite large. Various investigations have shown that errors in calculating peak discharges by the slope-area method under ideal conditions for

  20. Percutaneous absorption of Octopirox.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Kamat, V B

    1988-01-01

    containing 1% Octopirox is 29,400, so that the possibility of systemic effects due to absorption through the skin is remote. PMID:3345970

  1. Deconvolution of mixed gamma emitters using peak parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Gadd, Milan S; Garcia, Francisco; Magadalena, Vigil M

    2011-01-14

    When evaluating samples containing mixtures of nuclides using gamma spectroscopy the situation sometimes arises where the nuclides present have photon emissions that cannot be resolved by the detector. An example of this is mixtures of {sup 241}Am and plutonium that have L x-ray emissions with slightly different energies which cannot be resolved using a high-purity germanium detector. It is possible to deconvolute the americium L x-rays from those plutonium based on the {sup 241}Am 59.54 keV photon. However, this requires accurate knowledge of the relative emission yields. Also, it often results in high uncertainties in the plutonium activity estimate due to the americium yields being approximately an order of magnitude greater than those for plutonium. In this work, an alternative method of determining the relative fraction of plutonium in mixtures of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu based on L x-ray peak location and shape parameters is investigated. The sensitivity and accuracy of the peak parameter method is compared to that for conventional peak decovolution.

  2. Intestinal Water Absorption Varies with Expected Dietary Water Load among Bats but Does Not Drive Paracellular Nutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Brun, Antonio; Gontero-Fourcade, Manuel; Fernández-Marinone, Guido; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rapid absorption and elimination of dietary water should be particularly important to flying species and were predicted to vary with the water content of the natural diet. Additionally, high water absorption capacity was predicted to be associated with high paracellular nutrient absorption due to solvent drag. We compared the water absorption rates of sanguivorous, nectarivorous, frugivorous, and insectivorous bats in intestinal luminal perfusions. High water absorption rates were associated with high expected dietary water load but were not highly correlated with previously measured rates of (paracellular) arabinose clearance. In conjunction with these tests, we measured water absorption and the paracellular absorption of nutrients in the intestine and stomach of vampire bats using luminal perfusions to test the hypothesis that the unique elongated vampire stomach is a critical site of water absorption. Vampire bats' gastric water absorption was high compared to mice but not compared to their intestines. We therefore conclude that (1) dietary water content has influenced the evolution of intestinal water absorption capacity in bats, (2) solvent drag is not the only driver of paracellular nutrient absorption, and (3) the vampire stomach is a capable but not critical location for water absorption.

  3. Intestinal Water Absorption Varies with Expected Dietary Water Load among Bats but Does Not Drive Paracellular Nutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Brun, Antonio; Gontero-Fourcade, Manuel; Fernández-Marinone, Guido; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rapid absorption and elimination of dietary water should be particularly important to flying species and were predicted to vary with the water content of the natural diet. Additionally, high water absorption capacity was predicted to be associated with high paracellular nutrient absorption due to solvent drag. We compared the water absorption rates of sanguivorous, nectarivorous, frugivorous, and insectivorous bats in intestinal luminal perfusions. High water absorption rates were associated with high expected dietary water load but were not highly correlated with previously measured rates of (paracellular) arabinose clearance. In conjunction with these tests, we measured water absorption and the paracellular absorption of nutrients in the intestine and stomach of vampire bats using luminal perfusions to test the hypothesis that the unique elongated vampire stomach is a critical site of water absorption. Vampire bats' gastric water absorption was high compared to mice but not compared to their intestines. We therefore conclude that (1) dietary water content has influenced the evolution of intestinal water absorption capacity in bats, (2) solvent drag is not the only driver of paracellular nutrient absorption, and (3) the vampire stomach is a capable but not critical location for water absorption. PMID:26658415

  4. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  5. Peak-shifting in real-time time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Provorse, Makenzie R; Habenicht, Bradley F; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-10-13

    In recent years, the development and application of real-time time-dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT) has gained momentum as a computationally efficient method for modeling electron dynamics and properties that require going beyond a linear response of the electron density. However, the RT-TDDFT method within the adiabatic approximation can unphysically shift absorption peaks throughout the electron dynamics. Here, we investigate the origin of these time-dependent resonances observed in RT-TDDFT spectra. Using both exact exchange and hybrid exchange-correlation approximate functionals, adiabatic RT-TDDFT gives time-dependent absorption spectra in which the peaks shift in energy as populations of the excited states fluctuate, while exact wave function methods yield peaks that are constant in energy but vary in intensity. The magnitude of the RT-TDDFT peak shift depends on the frequency and intensity of the applied field, in line with previous studies, but it oscillates as a function of time-dependent molecular orbital populations, consistent with a time-dependent superposition electron density. For the first time, we provide a rationale for the direction and magnitude of the time-dependent peak shifts based on the molecular electronic structure. For three small molecules, H2, HeH(+), and LiH, we give contrasting examples of peak-shifting to both higher and lower energies. The shifting is explained as coupled one-electron transitions to a higher and a lower lying state. Whether the peak shifts to higher or lower energies depends on the relative energetics of these one-electron transitions. PMID:26574268

  6. The measurement of absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases - The absorption of CO and O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, William G.; Cohen, Edward A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Hillig, Kurt W., II

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus is described that will measure absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases. The method measures the change in the quality factor of a Fabry-Perot resonator with and without gas present. The magnitude of the change is interpreted in terms of the absorption of the lossy medium inside the resonator. Experiments have been performed on the 115-GHz CO line and the 119-GHz O2 line at two different temperatures to determine the linewidth parameter and the peak absorption value. These numbers can be combined to give the integrated intensity which can be accurately calculated from results of spectroscopy measurements. The CO results are within 2 percent percent of theoretically predicted valves. Measurements on O2 have shown that absorption can be measured as accurately as 0.5 dB/km with this technique. Results have been obtained for oxygen absolute absorption in the 60-80-GHz region.

  7. Ionoacoustic characterization of the proton Bragg peak with submillimeter accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, W. Reinhardt, S.; Lehrack, S.; Edlich, A.; Thirolf, P. G.; Parodi, K.; Kellnberger, S.; Omar, M.; Ntziachristos, V.; Moser, M.; Dollinger, G.

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Range verification in ion beam therapy relies to date on nuclear imaging techniques which require complex and costly detector systems. A different approach is the detection of thermoacoustic signals that are generated due to localized energy loss of ion beams in tissue (ionoacoustics). Aim of this work was to study experimentally the achievable position resolution of ionoacoustics under idealized conditions using high frequency ultrasonic transducers and a specifically selected probing beam. Methods: A water phantom was irradiated by a pulsed 20 MeV proton beam with varying pulse intensity and length. The acoustic signal of single proton pulses was measured by different PZT-based ultrasound detectors (3.5 and 10 MHz central frequencies). The proton dose distribution in water was calculated by Geant4 and used as input for simulation of the generated acoustic wave by the matlab toolbox k-WAVE. Results: In measurements from this study, a clear signal of the Bragg peak was observed for an energy deposition as low as 10{sup 12} eV. The signal amplitude showed a linear increase with particle number per pulse and thus, dose. Bragg peak position measurements were reproducible within ±30 μm and agreed with Geant4 simulations to better than 100 μm. The ionoacoustic signal pattern allowed for a detailed analysis of the Bragg peak and could be well reproduced by k-WAVE simulations. Conclusions: The authors have studied the ionoacoustic signal of the Bragg peak in experiments using a 20 MeV proton beam with its correspondingly localized energy deposition, demonstrating submillimeter position resolution and providing a deep insight in the correlation between the acoustic signal and Bragg peak shape. These results, together with earlier experiments and new simulations (including the results in this study) at higher energies, suggest ionoacoustics as a technique for range verification in particle therapy at locations, where the tumor can be localized by ultrasound

  8. Calculation of laser absorption by metal powders in additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Boley, C D; Khairallah, S A; Rubenchik, A M

    2015-03-20

    We have calculated the absorption of laser light by a powder of metal spheres, typical of the powder employed in laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing. Using ray-trace simulations, we show that the absorption is significantly larger than its value for normal incidence on a flat surface, due to multiple scattering. We investigate the dependence of absorption on powder content (material, size distribution, and geometry) and on beam size.

  9. Electron beam stability and beam peak to peak motion data for NSLS X-Ray storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, O.

    1993-07-01

    In the past two years, a significant reduction in electron beam motion has been achieved at the NSLS X-Ray storage ring. The implementation of global analog orbit feedbacks, based on a harmonics correction scheme, has reduced the beam motion globally. Implementation of six local analog feedback systems has reduced the beam motion even further at the corresponding beam line straight sections. This paper presents beam motion measurements, showing the improvement due to the feedback systems. Beam motion is measured using a spectrum analyzer and data is presented at various frequencies, where peaks were observed. Finally, some of the beam motion sources are discussed.

  10. Connection between ozone concentration and atmosphere circulation at peak Moussala

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojarov, Peter; Ivanov, Peter; Kalapov, Ivo; Penev, Ilia; Drenska, Mirolujba

    2009-09-01

    Connection between ozone concentration and atmosphere circulation is investigated based on measurements at BEO station, peak Moussala (2,925 m a.s.l.), for the period 09 August 2006 to 29 January 2008. Ozone concentration data are collected with UV-analyzer “Environnement O3 42” and meteo data with weather station “Vaisala”. There are measurements of 7Be. Data from NOAA HYSPLIT model for particle trajectories are also used. Eight wind directions and three ranges of wind velocities are employed in the analysis. A comparison of ozone concentrations in upward and downward air transport according to HYSPLIT model is made. The number of cases with ozone concentration above 63 ppb has been counted. Mann-Whitney nonparametric test is employed as a basic statistical method. Correlation between atmosphere pressure and tropospheric ozone content is made. The same is done for 7Be and ozone. The main conclusion is that there is not any local or regional pollution effect detectable at peak Moussala, but most of the ozone measured is due to emissions of hydrocarbons and NO x over a larger region. There could be some regional sources of ozone building substances in southwest direction from peak Moussala. Air transported from the north quarter has higher ozone concentrations compared to the south quarter. In vertical direction, upward transport of air masses shows higher values of ozone concentration. Higher wind velocity is associated with low ozone concentrations at peak Moussala. The annual course of ozone concentration has summer maximum and winter minimum. There is right connection between air pressure and ozone concentration. The same is valid for the correlation between 7Be and ozone. Diurnal ozone course shows daytime maximum in winter and nighttime maximum in summer.

  11. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  12. Molecular conformation changes in alkylthiol ligands as a function of size in gold nanoparticles: X-ray absorption studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ramallo-Lopez, J. M.; Giovanetti, L. J.; Requejo, F. G.; Isaacs, S. R.; Shon, Y. S.; Salmeron, M.

    2006-08-15

    The bonding of hexanethiols to gold nanoparticles of 1.5, 2.0, and 3 nm was studied using x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The XANES spectra revealed that a substantial fraction of weakly bound hexanethiol molecules are present in addition to those forming covalent bonds with Au atoms. The weakly bound molecules can be removed by washing in dichloromethane. After removal of the weakly bound molecules the S K-edge XANES reveals peaks due to S-Au and S-C bonds with intensities that change as a function of particle size. Au L{sub 3}-edge EXAFS results indicate that these changes follow the changes in coordination number of Au to the S atoms at the surface of the particles.

  13. Exciton absorption in narrow armchair graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-11-01

    We develop an analytical approach to the exciton optical absorption for narrow gap armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNR). We focus on the regime of dominant size quantization in combination with the attractive electron-hole interaction. An adiabatic separation of slow and fast motions leads via the two-body Dirac equation to the isolated and coupled subband approximations. Discrete and continuous exciton states are in general coupled and form quasi-Rydberg series of purely discrete and resonance type character. The corresponding oscillator strengths and widths are derived. We show that the exciton peaks are blue-shifted, become broader and increase in magnitude upon narrowing the ribbon. At the edge of a subband the singularity related to the 1D density of states is transformed into finite absorption via the presence of the exciton. Our analytical results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods including numerical approaches. Estimates of the expected experimental values are provided for realistic AGNR.

  14. Electromagnetic wave absorption properties of composites with ultrafine hollow magnetic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jin Woo; Lee, Sang Bok; Kim, Jin Bong; Lee, Sang Kwan; Park, O. Ok

    2014-06-01

    Ultrafine hollow magnetic fibers were prepared by electroless plating using hydrolyzed polyester fiber as a sacrificial substrate. These hollow fibers can be served for lightweight and efficient electromagnetic (EM) absorbing materials. As observed from SEM and EDS analysis, hollow structures consisting of Ni inner layer and Fe or Fe-Co outer layer were obtained. By introducing Co onto Fe, oxidation of the Fe layer was successfully prevented making it possible to enhance the complex permeability compared to a case in which only Fe was used. Polymeric composites containing the hollow fibers with different weight fractions and fiber lengths were prepared by a simple mixing process. The electromagnetic wave properties of the composites were measured by a vector network analyzer and it was found that the hollow magnetic fibers show a clear resonance peak of the complex permittivity around the X-band range (8-12 GHz) and the resonance frequency strongly depends on the fiber concentration and length. A possible explanation for the unique resonance is that the hollow fibers possess relatively low electrical conductivity and a long mean free path due to their oxidized phase and hollow structure. The calculated EM wave absorption with the measured EM wave properties showed that the composite containing 30 wt% hollow Ni/Fe-Co (7:3) fibers in length of 180 μm exhibited multiple absorbance peaks resulting in a broad absorption bandwidth of 4.2 GHz. It is obvious that this multiple absorbance is attributed to the resonance characteristic of the composite.

  15. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30-14:30 LT - local time).

  16. Calculating weighted estimates of peak streamflow statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, Timothy A.; Berenbrock, Charles; Kiang, Julie E.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Federal guidelines for flood-frequency estimation, the uncertainty of peak streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flow at a streamgage, can be reduced by combining the at-site estimate with the regional regression estimate to obtain a weighted estimate of the flow statistic. The procedure assumes the estimates are independent, which is reasonable in most practical situations. The purpose of this publication is to describe and make available a method for calculating a weighted estimate from the uncertainty or variance of the two independent estimates.

  17. LARAMIE PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Weisner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, most of the Laramie Peak Wilderness study area in Wyoming was concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Only three small areas in the northern part, one extending outside the study area to Esterbrook, were found to have probable mineral-resource potential for copper and lead. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil-fuel resources in the study area. There are no surface indications that geothermal energy could be developed within or near the study area.

  18. Direction dependence of the magneto-optical absorption in nanowires with Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    We study the directional dependence of the absorption spectrum of ballistic nanowires in the presence of gate-controlled Rashba spin-orbit interaction and an in-plane magnetic field. In the weak Rashba regime, our analytical and numerical results show that the absorption peaks associated with the first and third intersubband transitions exhibit frequency shifts and strong amplitude modulations as the direction of the magnetic field changes. If the field is parallel to the nanowire axis, these peaks disappear and the resonance frequencies of the whole absorption spectrum are given merely in terms of the Zeeman splitting and the energy scale characterizing the confinement potential. The second transition has an absorption peak that suffers an opposite frequency shift with amplitude that is largely direction independent. The amplitude modulation and frequency shift of the absorption spectrum is periodic in the angle that the magnetic field makes with the nanowire axis.

  19. High-Frequency Absorption Properties of Three Kinds of Hollow Multiphase Ceramic Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Hongfei; Wang, Jianjiang; Hou, Yongshen; He, Ming; Zhao, Zhining

    2014-02-01

    Al-TiO2-Fe2O3-MnO2-Fe-Sucrose-Epoxy Resin as reaction system and self-reactive quenching technology which combines flame thermal spraying, self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and rapid solidification, were used to prepare three kinds of hollow multiphase ceramic microspheres (HMCMs) in different feeding gas (N2, O2) and dimension (coarse, fine). The characteristic results of three kinds of HMCMs indicated that various process parameters containing feeding gas and initial agglomerate size in this study can result in the change of surface organization, composition, morphology, and dimension. Investigation of microwave electromagnetic (EM) characteristics of three kinds of HMCMs showed that intrinsic characteristics play an important role in the determining the resulting properties. At 10-14.5 GHz, No. 3 HMCMs possess weak absorption intensity and narrow effective bandwidth (<-10 dB) owing to smaller dimension, but in higher-frequency band (14.5-17 GHz), an obvious absorption peak appears due to good EM match and nano-effects. Compared with No. 1 (O2 coarse) and No. 3 (O2 fine) HMCMs, enhanced absorption intensity and effective bandwidth (<-10 dB) were observed in No. 2 (N2 coarse) HMCMs. Enhancements of absorption intensity and effective bandwidth are associated with extra nitride (AlN, FeN), partial open microspheres, M-hexagonal crystal and micro-nano thick dendrite. No. 2 HMCMs presented excellent microwave-absorption property, with the minimum reflectivity ( R L) of -27.7 dB at 12.9 GHz. The effective bandwidth (<-10 dB) could reach to 4.1 GHz (10.9-15 GHz). This may be ascribed to the increased conductance loss, multiple scattering, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and shape anisotropy.

  20. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-05-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed.

  1. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  2. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported. PMID:26661473

  3. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported.

  4. Semi-automated peak trapping recycle chromatography instrument for peak purity investigations.

    PubMed

    Trone, Mark D; Vaughn, Michael S; Cole, Steven R

    2006-11-10

    A peak trapping recycle chromatography system has been developed and optimized for peak purity assessment of active pharmaceutical ingredients analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). After being analyzed using a reversed phase analytical column, peaks of interest are trapped and are subsequently introduced to a recycle chromatography system. In addition to the increased effective length afforded the recycling system, the small selectivity difference between the analytical and recycling methods help separate potential impurities under the main peak. For more difficult to separate components, the increased efficiency of recycle chromatography provides the necessary resolution. Over 227,000 theoretical plates have been obtained in the recycle dimension for some compounds. The sensitivity of the system fell short of the target (0.1%), but it did show sensitivity (0.5%) comparable to other peak purity techniques commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry. The recovery and repeatability have also been shown to be adequate for peak purity assessment. The system has also been automated using a Visual Basic macro, simplifying the interface allowing it to be used as an open access instrument.

  5. Optical absorption and TEM studies of silver nanoparticle embedded BaO-CaF2-P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Manoj Kumar; Shashikala, H. D.

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticle embedded 30BaO-20CaF2-50P2O5-4Ag2O-4SnO glasses were prepared by melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment process. Silver-doped glasses were heat treated at temperatures 500 °C, 525°C and 550 °C for a fixed duration of 10 hours to incorporate metal nanoparticles into the glass matrix. Appearance and shift in peak positions of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands in the optical absorption spectra of heat treated glass samples indicated that both formation and growth of nanoparticle depended on heat treatment temperature. Glass sample heat treated at 525 °C showed a SPR peak around 3 eV, which indicated that spherical nanoparticles smaller than 20 nm were formed inside the glass matrix. Whereas sample heat treated at 550 °C showed a size dependent red shift in SPR peak due to the presence of silver nanoparticles of size larger than 20 nm. Size of the nanoparticles calculated using full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of absorption band showed a good agreement with the particle size obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis.

  6. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  7. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  8. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  9. Impulse absorption by horizontal magnetic granular chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Dingxin; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Guijie; Sun, Lingyu

    2016-02-01

    The granular medium is known as a protecting material for shock mitigation. We study the impulse absorption of an alignment of magnetic spheres placed horizontally under a non-uniform magnetic field. The phenomenon of the wave dispersion is presented. This system can absorb 85% ˜ 95% (88% ˜ 98%) of the incident peak force (energy) under the applied magnetic field strength in 0.1 T ˜ 1.0 T. The shock attenuation capacities are enhanced by the increment of field strength. With an intelligent control system, it is conceivable that the magnetic granular chain may offer possibilities in developing adaptive shock protectors.

  10. The Compact Steep-Spectrum and Gigahertz Peaked-Spectrum Radio Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1998-05-01

    I review the radio to X-ray properties of gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources, the current hypotheses for their origin, and their use to constrain the evolution of powerful radio galaxies. The GPS and CSS sources are compact, powerful radio sources with well-defined peaks in their radio spectra (near 1 GHz in the GPS and near 100 MHz in the CSS). The GPS sources are entirely contained within the extent of the narrow-line region (<~1 kpc), while the CSS sources are contained entirely within the host galaxy (<~15 kpc). The peaks in the spectra are probably due to synchrotron self-absorption, though free-free absorption through an inhomogeneous screen may also play a role. The turnover frequency varies with linear size l as nu_m~l^-0.65, suggesting a simple physical relationship between these parameters. The radio morphologies are strikingly like those of the large-scale classical doubles, though some sources can have very distorted morphologies suggestive of interactions. Radio polarization tends to be low, and in some cases the Faraday rotation measures can be extremely large. The IR properties are consistent with stellar populations and active galactic nucleus (AGN) bolometric luminosity similar to that of the 3CR classical doubles. The optical host galaxy properties (absolute magnitude, Hubble diagram, evidence for interaction) are consistent with those of the 3CR classical doubles. CSS sources at all redshifts exhibit high surface brightness optical light (most likely emission-line gas) that is aligned with the radio axis. The optical emission-line properties suggest (1) interaction of the radio source with the emission-line gas and (2) the presence of dust toward the emission-line regions. X-ray observations of high-redshift GPS quasars and a couple of GPS galaxies suggest the presence of significant columns of gas toward the nuclei. Searches for cold gas in the host galaxies have revealed large amounts of molecular gas and

  11. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  12. , Recorded at Ladron Peak, Central New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricketts, J. W.; Kelley, S.; Read, A. S.; Karlstrom, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Ladron Peak, situated on the western flank of the Rio Grande rift ~30 miles NW of Socorro, NM, is composed of Precambrian granitic and metamorphic assemblages that have been faulted and uplifted during the late Tertiary formation of the rift. The area is bounded on three sides by normal faults, including the anomalously low-angle (~26°) Jeter fault to the east, which places Precambrian rocks in the footwall against Paleozoic and Mesozoic fault slivers, and mainly Cenozoic Santa Fe Group basin fill in the hanging wall. New apatite fission track (AFT) thermochronological data collected at 22 locations along the NE and SE margins of Ladron Peak give a range of ages from 10.9 ± 1.9 to 20.4 ± 8.6 Ma. Samples within the footwall include granitic and metasedimentary rocks that have mean track lengths of 13.1 to 14.1 μm; one quartzite sample has a mean track length of 12.5 μm, suggesting time in the partial annealing zone. Within the hanging wall block, new AFT ages from the Permian Bursum and Abo Formations give cooling ages of 23.1 ± 3.3 Ma. and 59.9 ± 12.4 Ma., respectively. The Bursum Formation sample, with a track length of 13.7 μm, cooled below the 110°C isotherm during the Miocene, while the Abo Formation sample, with a track length of 11.2 μm, was only partially reset prior to rift-related deformation. Mylonitized granitic and metamorphic rocks in the immediate footwall preserve dip-slip lineations that are parallel to slip on the Jeter fault. This suggests that strain associated with exhumation was recorded by both brittle and ductile deformation. Although this type of deformation is common within metamorphic core complexes in highly extended terranes, ductile normal faulting has not been recognized within the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico, though there is some suggestion of ductile deformation around Blanca Peak in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. These observations imply one or both of the following: (1) Ductile deformation at Ladron Peak was

  13. Hydrogen Absorption into Austenitic Stainless Steels Under High-Pressure Gaseous Hydrogen and Cathodic Charge in Aqueous Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Masato; Cheng, Lin; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Omura, Tomohiko; Sakai, Jun'ichi; Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Okuma, Ryuji

    2014-12-01

    Type 316L and Type 304 austenitic stainless steels, both deformed and non-deformed, were hydrogen charged cathodically in an aqueous solution as well as by exposure to high-pressure gaseous hydrogen in an attempt to identify suitable conditions of cathodic charge for simulating hydrogen absorption from gaseous hydrogen environments. Thermal desorption analysis (TDA) was conducted, and the amount of absorbed hydrogen and the spectrum shape were compared between the two charging methods. Simulations were performed by means of the McNabb-Foster model to analyze the spectrum shape and peak temperature, and understand the effects of deformation on the spectra. It was revealed that the spectrum shape and peak temperature were dependent directly upon the initial distribution of hydrogen within the specimen, which varied widely according to the hydrogen charge condition. Deformation also had a marked effect on the amount of absorbed hydrogen in Type 304 steel due to the strain-induced martensitic transformation.

  14. Two-dimensional probe absorption in coupled quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ningwu; Zhang, Yan; Kang, Chengxian; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) probe absorption in coupled quantum dots. It is found that, due to the position-dependent quantum interference effect, the 2D optical absorption spectrum can be easily controlled via adjusting the system parameters. Thus, our scheme may provide some technological applications in solid-state quantum communication.

  15. Triplet absorption spectroscopy and electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghafoor, F.; Nazmitdinov, R. G.

    2016-09-01

    Coherence phenomena in a four-level atomic system, cyclically driven by three coherent fields, are investigated thoroughly at zero and weak magnetic fields. Each strongly interacting atomic state is converted to a triplet due to a dynamical Stark effect. Two dark lines with a Fano-like profile arise in the triplet absorption spectrum with anomalous dispersions. We provide conditions to control the widths of the transparency windows by means of the relative phase of the driving fields and the intensity of the microwave field, which closes the optical system loop. The effect of Doppler broadening on the results of the triplet absorption spectroscopy is analysed in detail.

  16. Monitoring of MOCVD reactants by UV absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Baucom, K.C.; Killeen, K.P.; Moffat, H.K.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper, we describe how UV absorption measurements can be used to measure the flow rates of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) reactants. This method utilizes the calculation of UV extinction coefficients by measuring the total pressure and absorbance in the neat reactant system. The development of this quantitative reactant flow rate monitor allows for the direct measurement of the efficiency of a reactant bubbler. We demonstrate bubbler efficiency results for TMGa, and then explain some discrepancies found in the TMAl system due to the monomer to dimer equilibrium. Also, the UV absorption spectra of metal organic and hydride MOCVD reactants over the wavelength range 185 to 400 nm are reported.

  17. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  18. Doping dependent blue shift and linewidth broadening of intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-14

    Blue shift and broadening of the absorption spectra of mid-infrared intersubband transition in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN 10 quantum wells were observed with increasing doping density. As the doping density was increased from 6.6 × 10{sup 11} to 6.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} per a quantum well, the intersubband absorption peak energy shifted from 274.0 meV to 302.9 meV, and the full width at half maximum increased from 56.4 meV to 112.4 meV. Theoretical calculations reveal that the blue shift is due to many body effects, and the intersubband linewidth in doped AlGaN/GaN QW is mainly determined by scattering due to interface roughness, LO phonons, and ionized impurities.

  19. Statistical analysis of the low-temperature internal friction dislocation peak (Bordoni peak) in nanostructured copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatazhuk, E. N.; Natsik, V. D.

    2011-07-01

    The frequency-temperature relations for internal friction in nanostructured samples of Cu and of fiber composite Cu-32 vol.% Nb with structural fragment sizes of ˜200 nm are analyzed. Data from earlier experiments are used in which a Bordoni peak characteristic of highly deformed copper was found to be localized near a temperature of 90 K in the temperature dependence of the damping decrement for the oscillations (frequencies 73-350 kHz). This peak is caused by a resonance interaction of sound with a system of thermally activated relaxation oscillators, but its width is substantially greater than the width of the standard internal friction peak with a single relaxation time. The peak is analyzed statistically under the assumption that the broadening is caused by the random spread in the activation energy of the relaxation oscillators owing to strong distortions of the crystalline structure of the copper. Good agreement is obtained between the experimental data and the theory of Seeger in which the relaxation oscillators for the Bordoni peak are assumed to be thermally activated kink pairs in rectilinear segments of dislocation lines located in valleys of the Peierls potential relief. It is shown that the experimentally observed height of the peak corresponds to the presence, on the average, of one dislocation segment within a copper crystallite of size 200 nm. Empirical estimates of σP ≈ 2.107 Pa for the Peierls critical stress and ρd ≈ 1013 m-2 for the integrated density of intragrain dislocations are obtained. Nb fibers in the Cu-Nb composite facilitate the formation of nanostructured copper, but have no significant effect on the Bordoni peak.

  20. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed of the day is an important forecast element in the 45th Weather Squadron's (45 WS) daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts. The forecasts are used for ground and space launch operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45 WS also issues wind advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect wind gusts to meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated peak wind speeds are challenging to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October - April. In Phase I of this task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool to help the 45 WS forecast non-convective winds at KSC/CCAFS for the 24-hour period of 0800 to 0800 local time. The tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displayed the forecast of peak wind speed, 5-minute average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, timing of the peak wind and probability the peak speed would meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt. For the current task (Phase II ), the 45 WS requested additional observations be used for the creation of the forecast equations by expanding the period of record (POR). Additional parameters were evaluated as predictors, including wind speeds between 500 ft and 3000 ft, static stability classification, Bulk Richardson Number, mixing depth, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion strength and depth and wind direction. Using a verification data set, the AMU compared the performance of the Phase I and II prediction methods. Just as in Phase I, the tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel GUI. The 45 WS requested the tool also be available in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The AMU first expanded the POR by two years by adding tower observations, surface observations and CCAFS (XMR) soundings for the cool season months of March 2007 to April 2009. The POR was expanded

  1. [Simulation of TDLAS direct absorption based on HITRAN database].

    PubMed

    Qi, Ru-birn; He, Shu-kai; Li, Xin-tian; Wang, Xian-zhong

    2015-01-01

    Simulating of the direct absorption TDLAS spectrum can help to comprehend the process of the absorbing and understand the influence on the absorption signal with each physical parameter. Firstly, the basic theory and algorithm of direct absorption TDLAS is studied and analyzed thoroughly, through giving the expressions and calculating steps of parameters based on Lambert-Beer's law, such as line intensity, absorption cross sections, concentration, line shape and gas total partition functions. The process of direct absorption TDLAS is simulated using MATLAB programs based on HITRAN spectra database, with which the absorptions under a certain temperature, pressure, concentration and other conditions were calculated, Water vapor is selected as the target gas, the absorptions of which under every line shapes were simulated. The results were compared with that of the commercial simulation software, Hitran-PC, which showed that, the deviation under Lorentz line shape is less than 0. 5%, and that under Gauss line shape is less than 2. 5%, while under Voigt line shape it is less than 1%. It verified that the algorithm and results of this work are correct and accurate. The absorption of H2O in v2 + v3 band under different pressure and temperature is also simulated. In low pressure range, the Doppler broadening dominant, so the line width changes little with varied.pressure, while the line peak increases with rising pressure. In high pressure range, the collision broadening dominant, so the line width changes wider with increasing pressure, while the line peak approaches to a constant value with rising pressure. And finally, the temperature correction curve in atmosphere detection is also given. The results of this work offer the reference and instruction for the application of TDLAS direct absorption. PMID:25993843

  2. Theoretical study of firefly luciferin pKa values--relative absorption intensity in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2013-01-01

    Ground-state vibrational analyses of firefly luciferin and its conjugate acids and bases are performed. The Gibbs free energies obtained from these analyses are used to estimate pKa values for phenolic hydroxy and carboxy groups and the N-H(+) bond in the N-protonated thiazoline or benzothiazole ring of firefly luciferin. The theoretical pKa values are corrected using the experimental values. The concentrations of these chemical species in solutions with different pH values are estimated from their corrected pKa values, and the pH dependence of their relative absorption intensities is elucidated. With the results obtained we assign the experimental spectra unequivocally. Especially, the small peak near 400 nm at pH 1-2 in experimental absorption spectra is clarified to be due to the excitation of carboxylate anion with N-protonated thiazoline ring of firefly luciferin. Our results show that the pKa values of chemical species, which are contained in the aqueous solutions, are effective to assign experimental absorption spectra. PMID:23360188

  3. Theoretical study of firefly luciferin pKa values--relative absorption intensity in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Hiyama, Miyabi; Akiyama, Hidefumi; Yamada, Kenta; Koga, Nobuaki

    2013-01-01

    Ground-state vibrational analyses of firefly luciferin and its conjugate acids and bases are performed. The Gibbs free energies obtained from these analyses are used to estimate pKa values for phenolic hydroxy and carboxy groups and the N-H(+) bond in the N-protonated thiazoline or benzothiazole ring of firefly luciferin. The theoretical pKa values are corrected using the experimental values. The concentrations of these chemical species in solutions with different pH values are estimated from their corrected pKa values, and the pH dependence of their relative absorption intensities is elucidated. With the results obtained we assign the experimental spectra unequivocally. Especially, the small peak near 400 nm at pH 1-2 in experimental absorption spectra is clarified to be due to the excitation of carboxylate anion with N-protonated thiazoline ring of firefly luciferin. Our results show that the pKa values of chemical species, which are contained in the aqueous solutions, are effective to assign experimental absorption spectra.

  4. X-ray absorption spectroscopy from H-passivated porous Si and oxidized Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Schuppler, S.; Marcus, M.A.; Friedman, S.L.

    1994-11-01

    Quantum confinement in nanoscale Si structures is widely believed to be responsible for the visible luminescence observed from anodically etched porous silicon (por-Si), but little is known about the actual size or shape of these structures. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure data from a wide variety of por-Si samples show significantly reduced average Si coordination numbers due to the sizable contribution of surface-coordinated H. (The IUSI ratios, as large as 1.2, were independently confirmed by ir-absorption and {alpha}-recoil measurements.) The Si coordinations imply very large surface/volume ratios, enabling the average Si structures to be identified as crystalline particles (not wires) whose dimensions are typically <15 {Angstrom}. Comparison of the size-dependent peak luminescence energies with those of oxidized Si nanocrystals, whose shapes are known, shows remarkable agreement. Furthermore, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of the nanocrystals shows the outer oxide and interfacial suboxide layers to be constant over a wide range of nanocrystal sizes. The combination of these results effectively rules out surface species as being responsible for the observed visible luminescence in por-Si, and strongly supports quantum confinement as the dominant mechanism occurring in Si particles which are substantially smaller than previously reported or proposed.

  5. Exciton Absorption in Semiconductor Quantum Wells Driven by a Strong Intersubband Pump Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Ansheng; Ning, Cun-Zheng

    1999-01-01

    Optical interband excitonic absorption of semiconductor quantum wells (QW's) driven by a coherent pump field is investigated based on semiconductor Bloch equations. The pump field has a photon energy close to the intersubband spacing between the first two conduction subbands in the QW's. An external weak optical field probes the interband transition. The excitonic effects and pump-induced population redistribution within the conduction subbands in the QW system are included. When the density of the electron-hole pairs in the QW structure is low, the pump field induces an Autler-Townes splitting of the exciton absorption spectrum. The split size and the peak positions of the absorption doublet depend not only on the pump frequency and intensity but also on the carrier density. As the density of the electron-hole pairs is increased, the split contrast (the ratio between the maximum and minimum values) is decreased because the exciton effect is suppressed at higher densities due to the many-body screening.

  6. Z-scan theory for nonlocal nonlinear media with simultaneous nonlinear refraction and nonlinear absorption.

    PubMed

    Rashidian Vaziri, Mohammad Reza

    2013-07-10

    In this paper, the Z-scan theory for nonlocal nonlinear media has been further developed when nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction appear simultaneously. To this end, the nonlinear photoinduced phase shift between the impinging and outgoing Gaussian beams from a nonlocal nonlinear sample has been generalized. It is shown that this kind of phase shift will reduce correctly to its known counterpart for the case of pure refractive nonlinearity. Using this generalized form of phase shift, the basic formulas for closed- and open-aperture beam transmittances in the far field have been provided, and a simple procedure for interpreting the Z-scan results has been proposed. In this procedure, by separately performing open- and closed-aperture Z-scan experiments and using the represented relations for the far-field transmittances, one can measure the nonlinear absorption coefficient and nonlinear index of refraction as well as the order of nonlocality. Theoretically, it is shown that when the absorptive nonlinearity is present in addition to the refractive nonlinearity, the sample nonlocal response can noticeably suppress the peak and enhance the valley of the Z-scan closed-aperture transmittance curves, which is due to the nonlocal action's ability to change the beam transverse dimensions.

  7. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  8. Two-photon absorption spectroscopy of rubrene single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irkhin, Pavel; Biaggio, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    We determine the wavelength dependence of the two-photon absorption cross section in rubrene single crystals both by direct measurement of nonlinear transmission and from the two-photon excitation spectrum of the photoluminescence. The peak two-photon absorption coefficient for b-polarized light was found to be (4.6±1)×10-11 m/W at a wavelength of 850±10 nm. It is 2.3 times larger for c-polarized light. The lowest energy two-photon excitation peak corresponds to an excited state energy of 2.92±0.04 eV and it is followed by a vibronic progression of higher energy peaks separated by ˜0.14 eV.

  9. [Transient UV absorption spectra of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide].

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan-Jun; Ping, Li; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Qi-Ming; Xue, Jun-Peng; Wu, Da-Cheng; Li, Rui-Xia

    2009-03-01

    UV absorption spectrum of artemisinin and transient absorption spectra of various concentrations of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide were measured by using an intensified spectroscopic detector ICCD. The exposure time of each spectrum was 0.1 ms. Results indicate that artemisinin has an obvious UV absorption band centered at 212.52 nm and can react with sodium hydroxide easily. All absorption spectra of different concentrations of artemisinin reacting with sodium hydroxide have the similar changes, but the moment at which the changes happened is different. After adding sodium hydroxide into artemisinin in ethanol solution, there was a new absorption band centered at 288 nm appearing firstly. As reaction went on, the intensity of another absorption band centered at 260 nm increased gradually. At the end of the reaction, a continuous absorption band from 200 to 350 nm with the peak at 245 nm formed finally. No other transient absorption spectral data are available on the reaction of artemisinin with sodium hydroxide currently. The new spectral information obtained in this experiment provides very important experimental basis for understanding the properties of artemisinin reacting with alkaline medium and is useful for correctly using of artemisinin as a potential anticancer drug.

  10. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules. PMID:27598527

  11. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules.

  12. Nasal Absorption of Macromolecules from Powder Formulations and Effects of Sodium Carboxymethyl Cellulose on Their Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Akiko; Furubayashi, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akifumi; Inoue, Daisuke; Kimura, Shunsuke; Katsumi, Hidemasa; Sakane, Toshiyasu; Yamamoto, Akira

    2016-01-01

    The nasal absorption of macromolecules from powder formulations and the effect of sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC-Na) as a pharmaceutical excipient on their absorption were studied. Model macromolecules were fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled dextran (average molecular weight of 4.4kDa, FD4) and insulin. The plasma concentration of FD4 after application of the powder containing 50% starch (control) was higher than that after application of the solution, and the absorption from 50% starch powder was enhanced by the substitution of starch with CMC-Na. The fractional absorption of FD4 after administration of the CMC-Na powder formulation was 30% and 40% higher than that after administration from the solution and the starch powder, respectively. The nasal absorption of insulin from the powder and the effect of CMC-Na were similar with those of FD4. The effective absorption of FD4 and insulin after application of powder with CMC-Na could be due to the increase in the nasal residence of FD4 and insulin. No damage in the nasal mucosa or dysfunction of the mucociliary clearance was observed after application of the drug powder and CMC-Na. The present findings indicate that nasal delivery of powder formulations with the addition of CMC-Na as an excipient is a promising approach for improving the nasal absorption of macromolecules. PMID:27598527

  13. Contributions of Astronauts Aerobic Exercise Intensity and Time on Change in VO2peak during Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downs, Meghan E.; Buxton, Roxanne; Moore, Alan; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable variability among astronauts with respect to changes in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2peak) during International Space Station (ISS) missions, ranging from a 5% increase to 30% decline. Individual differences may be due to in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity. PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of in-flight aerobic exercise time and intensity on change in VO2peak during ISS missions. METHODS: Astronauts (N=11) performed peak cycle tests approx 60 days before flight (L-60), on flight day (FD) approx 14, and every approx 30 days thereafter. Metabolic gas analysis and heart rate (HR) were measured continuously during the test using the portable pulmonary function system. HR and duration of each in-flight cycle ergometer and treadmill (TM) session were recorded and averaged in time segments corresponding to each peak test. Mixed effects linear regression with exercise mode (TM or cycle) as a categorical variable was used to assess the contributions of exercise intensity (%time >70% peak HR or %time >90% peak HR) and time (min/wk), adjusted for body weight, on %change in VO2peak during the mission, and incorporating the repeated-measures experimental design. RESULTS: 110 observations were included in the model (4-6 peak cycle tests per astronaut, 2 exercise devices). VO2peak was reduced from preflight throughout the mission (FD14: 13+/-13% and FD 105: 8+/-10%). Exercise intensity (%peak HR: FD14=66+/-14; FD105=75+/-8) and time (min/wk: FD14=82+/-46; FD105=158+/-40) increased during flight. The models showed main effects for exercise time and intensity with no interactions between time, intensity, and device (70% peak HR: time [z-score=2.39; P=0.017], intensity [z-score=3.51; P=0.000]; 90% peak HR: time [zscore= 3.31; P=0.001], intensity [z-score=2.24; P=0.025]). CONCLUSION: Exercise time and intensity independently contribute to %change in VO2peak during ISS missions, indicating that there are minimal values for exercise time and intensity

  14. Light absorption enhancement in Ge nanomembrane and its optoelectronic application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Munho; Liu, Shih-Chia; Kim, Tong June; Lee, Jaeseong; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhou, Weidong; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2016-07-25

    In this study, the light absorption property of Ge nanomembrane (Ge NM), which incorporates hydrogen (H), in near-infrared (NIR) wavelength range was analyzed. Due to the presence of a large amount of structural defects, the light absorption coefficient of the Ge layer becomes much higher (10 times) than that of bulk Ge in the wavelength range of 1000 ~1600 nm. Increased light absorption was further measured from released Ge NM that has H incorporation in comparison to that of bulk Ge, proving the enhanced light absorption coefficient of H incorporated Ge. Finally, metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors were demonstrated using the H incorporated Ge on GeOI.

  15. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters

    PubMed Central

    Takara, Glaucia Nency; Ruas, Gualberto; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; Jamami, Luciana Kawakami; Di Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires; Jamami, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF) from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. METHODS Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® peak flow meters. The highest value recorded for each subject for each device was compared to the corresponding spirometric values using Friedman’s test with Dunn’s post-hoc (p<0.05), Spearman’s correlation test and Bland-Altman’s agreement test. RESULTS The median and interquartile ranges for the spirometric values and the Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® meters were 428 (263–688 L/min), 450 (350–800 L/min), 420 (310–720 L/min), 380 (300–735 L/min), 400 (310–685 L/min) and 415 (335–610 L/min), respectively. Significant differences were found when the spirometric values were compared to those recorded by the Air Zone® (p<0.001) and Galemed ® (p<0.01) meters. There was no agreement between the spirometric values and the five PEF meters. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that the values recorded from Galemed® meters may underestimate the actual value, which could lead to unnecessary interventions, and that Air Zone® meters overestimate spirometric values, which could obfuscate the need for intervention. These findings must be taken into account when interpreting both devices’ results in younger people. These differences should also be considered when directly comparing values from different types of PEF meters. PMID:20535364

  16. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  17. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  18. Caffeine supplementation and peak anaerobic power output.

    PubMed

    Glaister, Mark; Muniz-Pumares, Daniel; Patterson, Stephen D; Foley, Paul; McInnes, Gillian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine supplementation on peak anaerobic power output (Wmax). Using a counterbalanced, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled design, 14 well-trained men completed three trials of a protocol consisting of a series of 6-s cycle ergometer sprints, separated by 5-min passive recovery periods. Sprints were performed at progressively increasing torque factors to determine the peak power/torque relationship and Wmax. Apart from Trial 1 (familiarisation), participants ingested a capsule containing 5 mg·kg(-1) of caffeine or placebo, one hour before each trial. The effects of caffeine on blood lactate were investigated using capillary samples taken after each sprint. The torque factor which produced Wmax was not significantly different (p ≥ 0.05) between the caffeine (1.15 ± 0.08 N·m·kg(-1)) and placebo (1.13 ± 0.10 N·m·kg(-1)) trials. There was, however, a significant effect (p < 0.05) of supplementation on Wmax, with caffeine producing a higher value (1885 ± 303 W) than placebo (1835 ± 290 W). Analysis of the blood lactate data revealed a significant (p < 0.05) torque factor × supplement interaction with values being significantly higher from the sixth sprint (torque factor 1.0 N·m·kg(-1)) onwards following caffeine supplementation. The results of this study confirm previous reports that caffeine supplementation significantly increases blood lactate and Wmax. These findings may explain why the majority of previous studies, which have used fixed-torque factors of around 0.75 N·m·kg(-1) and thereby failing to elicit Wmax, have failed to find an effect of caffeine on sprinting performance.

  19. Equivalent peak resolution: characterization of the extent of separation for two components based on their relative peak overlap.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Martin; Svobodová, Jana; Dubský, Pavel; Riesová, Martina; Vigh, Gyula; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2015-03-01

    Although the classical formula of peak resolution was derived to characterize the extent of separation only for Gaussian peaks of equal areas, it is often used even when the peaks follow non-Gaussian distributions and/or have unequal areas. This practice can result in misleading information about the extent of separation in terms of the severity of peak overlap. We propose here the use of the equivalent peak resolution value, a term based on relative peak overlap, to characterize the extent of separation that had been achieved. The definition of equivalent peak resolution is not constrained either by the form(s) of the concentration distribution function(s) of the peaks (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) or the relative area of the peaks. The equivalent peak resolution value and the classically defined peak resolution value are numerically identical when the separated peaks are Gaussian and have identical areas and SDs. Using our new freeware program, Resolution Analyzer, one can calculate both the classically defined and the equivalent peak resolution values. With the help of this tool, we demonstrate here that the classical peak resolution values mischaracterize the extent of peak overlap even when the peaks are Gaussian but have different areas. We show that under ideal conditions of the separation process, the relative peak overlap value is easily accessible by fitting the overall peak profile as the sum of two Gaussian functions. The applicability of the new approach is demonstrated on real separations.

  20. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  1. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. THE CASE OF EQUAL PEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.; Stevens, A. C.; Rosario, D. J. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: acs0196@mail.utexas.edu

    2012-06-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked narrow lines (DPAGNs) may be caused by kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs, bipolar outflows, or rotating gaseous disks. We examine the class of DPAGNs in which the two narrow-line components have closely similar intensity as being especially likely to involve disks or jets. Two spectroscopic indicators support this likelihood. For DPAGNs from Smith et al., the 'equal-peaked' objects (EPAGNs) have [Ne V]/[O III]ratios lower than for a control sample of non-double-peaked AGNs. This is unexpected for a pair of normal AGNs in a galactic merger, but may be consistent with [O III] emission from a rotating ring with relatively little gas at small radii. Also, [O III]/H{beta} ratios of the redshifted and blueshifted systems in the EPAGN are more similar to each other than in a control sample, suggestive of a single ionizing source and inconsistent with the binary interpretation.

  2. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  3. Vaginal Absorption of Penicillin.

    PubMed

    Rock, J; Barker, R H; Bacon, W B

    1947-01-01

    Except during the last two months of pregnancy, penicillin is easily absorbed from cocoa butter suppositories in the vagina, ordinarily to give therapeutic blood levels for from 4 to 6 hours. Penicillin in the dosage used seems to have a good effect on vaginal infections. In nonpregnant women, during the ovulation phase, considered as including days 14 +/- 2 in the ordinary menstrual cycle of about 28 days, absorption seemed to be somewhat diminished. Higher levels were found in patients who were near the end of their menstrual cycles and in two patients who were menopausal. Patients who were very near term absorbed little or no penicillin, whereas patients 10 days post partum showed excellent absorption.

  4. Photothermal absorption correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Octeau, Vivien; Cognet, Laurent; Duchesne, Laurence; Lasne, David; Schaeffer, Nicolas; Fernig, David G; Lounis, Brahim

    2009-02-24

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a popular technique, complementary to cell imaging for the investigation of dynamic processes in living cells. Based on fluorescence, this single molecule method suffers from artifacts originating from the poor fluorophore photophysics: photobleaching, blinking, and saturation. To circumvent these limitations we present here a new correlation method called photothermal absorption correlation spectroscopy (PhACS) which relies on the absorption properties of tiny nano-objects. PhACS is based on the photothermal heterodyne detection technique and measures akin FCS, the time correlation function of the detected signals. Application of this technique to the precise determination of the hydrodynamic sizes of different functionalized gold nanoparticles are presented, highlighting the potential of this method. PMID:19236070

  5. THE ABSORPTION OF ADRENALIN

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, D. Murray

    1923-01-01

    1. Adrenalin solution given subcutaneously is usually rapidly absorbed, probably by lymphatic channels. 2. The speed of this process may be influenced by the circulation rate. 3. The relative amounts of adrenalin at any moment unabsorbed at the site of inoculation, carried in the circulating fluids, and taken up by the reacting tissues can be calculated from figures extracted from the curve of the blood pressure changes. The relative rates of transference of adrenalin into the blood and from the circulation into the tissues can also be estimated. 4. When absorption takes place rapidly a large quantity of the drug comes into action at once and the maximum occurs early, the curve of blood pressure reaches a considerable height, and subsides quickly. When absorption is slow the apex appears later and does not reach so high a level. 5. The response to adrenalin bears a logarithmic relationship to the dose employed and a method of allowing for this is indicated. PMID:19868816

  6. Peak-flow frequency relations and evaluation of the peak-flow gaging network in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soenksen, Philip J.; Miller, Lisa D.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.; Watton, Jason R.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of peak-flow magnitude and frequency are required for the efficient design of structures that convey flood flows or occupy floodways, such as bridges, culverts, and roads. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Roads, conducted a study to update peak-flow frequency analyses for selected streamflow-gaging stations, develop a new set of peak-flow frequency relations for ungaged streams, and evaluate the peak-flow gaging-station network for Nebraska. Data from stations located in or within about 50 miles of Nebraska were analyzed using guidelines of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B. New generalized skew relations were developed for use in frequency analyses of unregulated streams. Thirty-three drainage-basin characteristics related to morphology, soils, and precipitation were quantified using a geographic information system, related computer programs, and digital spatial data.For unregulated streams, eight sets of regional regression equations relating drainage-basin to peak-flow characteristics were developed for seven regions of the state using a generalized least squares procedure. Two sets of regional peak-flow frequency equations were developed for basins with average soil permeability greater than 4 inches per hour, and six sets of equations were developed for specific geographic areas, usually based on drainage-basin boundaries. Standard errors of estimate for the 100-year frequency equations (1percent probability) ranged from 12.1 to 63.8 percent. For regulated reaches of nine streams, graphs of peak flow for standard frequencies and distance upstream of the mouth were estimated.The regional networks of streamflow-gaging stations on unregulated streams were analyzed to evaluate how additional data might affect the average sampling errors of the newly developed peak-flow equations for the 100-year frequency occurrence. Results indicated that data from new stations, rather than more

  7. Aerosol optical absorption measurements with photoacoustic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kun; Wang, Lei; Liu, Qiang; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong; Gao, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    Many parameters related to radiative forcing in climate research are known only with large uncertainties. And one of the largest uncertainties in global radiative forcing is the contribution from aerosols. Aerosols can scatter or absorb the electromagnetic radiation, thus may have negative or positive effects on the radiative forcing of the atmosphere, respectively [1]. And the magnitude of the effect is directly related to the quantity of light absorbed by aerosols [2,3]. Thus, sensitivity and precision measurement of aerosol optical absorption is crucial for climate research. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the light absorption of aerosols [4]. A PAS based sensor for aerosol optical absorption measurement was developed. A 532 nm semiconductor laser with an effective power of 160 mW was used as a light source of the PAS sensor. The PAS sensor was calibrated by using known concentration NO2. The minimum detectable optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosol was determined to be 1 Mm-1. 24 hours continues measurement of OAC of aerosol in the ambient air was carried out. And a novel three wavelength PAS aerosol OAC sensor is in development for analysis of aerosol wavelength-dependent absorption Angstrom coefficient. Reference [1] U. Lohmann and J. Feichter, Global indirect aerosol effects: a review, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 5, 715-737 (2005) [2] M. Z. Jacobson, Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols, Nature 409, 695-697 (2001) [3] V. Ramanathan and G. Carmichae, Global and regional climate changes due to black carbon, nature geoscience 1, 221-227 (2008) [4] W.P Arnott, H. Moosmuller, C. F. Rogers, T. Jin, and R. Bruch, Photoacoustic spectrometer for measuring light absorption by aerosol: instrument description. Atmos. Environ. 33, 2845-2852 (1999).

  8. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-01

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile.

  9. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-01

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile. PMID:23928555

  10. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  11. Geometrical dependence of spin current absorption into a ferromagnetic nanodot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kohei; Kimura, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    We have investigated the absorption property of the diffusive pure spin current due to a ferromagnetic nanodot in a laterally configured ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic hybrid nanostructure. The spin absorption in a nano-pillar-based lateral-spin-valve structure was confirmed to increase with increasing the lateral dimension of the ferromagnetic dot. However, the absorption efficiency was smaller than that in a conventional lateral spin valve based on nanowire junctions because the large effective cross section of the two dimensional nonmagnetic film reduces the spin absorption selectivity. We also found that the absorption efficiency of the spin current is significantly enhanced by using a thick ferromagnetic nanodot. This can be understood by taking into account the spin absorption through the side surface of the ferromagnetic dot quantitatively.

  12. Silicate Peak Shifts, Spectrometer Peaking Issues and Standard/Specimen Size Discrepancies in EPMA: 3 Bumps in the Road to the Goal of 1% Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournelle, J.

    2006-05-01

    Several years ago a veteran electron microprober complained that his pyroxene, plagioclase and garnet EPMA totals were consistently low -- 98.5-99.2 wt%, as well as low Si values for some of his analyses. He knew his unknowns and had the same standards for 30 years. Eventually we found that the ROM peaking routines which we had uncritically accepted were not yielding optimal peak positions. Further evaluation showed that there were also observable chemical peak shifts for Al and Mg Ka peaks between common silicate and oxide minerals. If a peak position was selected that was actually at the edge of the "peak plateau" (which range from 5-12 sin theta units), there could be an error in the intensity measured on a different phase. If Mg Ka is peaked on forsterite or enstatite, and then Mg measured on a garnet (pyrope), there may be a 1-2 % relative error in the intensity measured relative to the true peak center on the garnet. If Al Ka is peaked on anorthite, there could be a similar error if that peak position is used for measuring Al in pyrope. There are slight peak shifts between the feldspars, with albite and K-feldspars shifted to lower sin theta positions relative to anorthite. Si Ka peaking (on TAP) has also been an issue and whereas Si Ka peak shifts are generally too small to be a problem, incorrect ROM peaking on Si Ka clearly is. We instituted a new final peaking procedure (Probe for Windows) where the peak top (80-90% max) is slowly scanned and the operator manually has control over determining the ultimate peak position; this has resulted in much improved analytical results compared to ROM only peaking. One reason these issues may not have been recognized before is that "slop" in Z (optical) focus yields comparable errors to peak shifts. Recently we found that an error occurs when there is a significant difference in size between a standard and an unknown, due to secondary fluorescence. It is not unusual to analyze tiny phases (e.g., 10 micron grains

  13. Intestinal absorption of magnesium from food and supplements.

    PubMed Central

    Fine, K D; Santa Ana, C A; Porter, J L; Fordtran, J S

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure magnesium absorption over the wide range of intakes to which the intestine may be exposed from food and/or magnesium-containing medications. Net magnesium absorption was measured in normal subjects after they ingested a standard meal supplemented with 0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 mEq of magnesium acetate. Although absorption increased with each increment in intake, fractional magnesium absorption fell progressively (from 65% at the lowest to 11% at the highest intake) so that absorption as a function of intake was curvilinear. This absorption-intake relationship was almost perfectly represented by an equation containing a hyperbolic function plus a linear function. Our results are statistically compatible with a magnesium absorption process that simultaneously uses a mechanism that reaches an absorptive maximum, plus a mechanism that endlessly absorbs a defined fraction (7%) of ingested magnesium. Compared to previous studies of calcium absorption, much less magnesium that calcium was absorbed at intakes above 8 mEq/meal, apparently due to greater restriction of intestinal permeability to magnesium. We also found that magnesium from a high magnesium-containing food source, almonds, was just as bioavailable as from soluble magnesium acetate. In contrast, magnesium absorption from commercially available enteric-coated magnesium chloride was much less than from magnesium acetate, suggesting that enteric coating can impair magnesium bioavailability. PMID:1864954

  14. The application of reduced absorption cross section on the identification of the compounds with similar function-groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fei; Zuo, Jian; Mu, Kai-jun; Zhang, Zhen-wei; Zhang, Liang-liang; Zhang, Lei-wei; Zhang, Cun-lin

    2013-08-01

    Terahertz spectroscopy is a powerful tool for materials investigation. The low frequency vibrations were usually investigated by means of absorption coefficient regardless of the refractive index. It leads to the disregard of some inherent low-frequency vibrational information of the chemical compounds. Moreover, due to the scattering inside the sample, there are some distortions of the absorption features, so that the absorption dependent material identification is not valid enough. Here, a statistical parameter named reduced absorption cross section (RACS) is introduced. This can not only help us investigate the molecular dynamics but also distinguish one chemical compound with another which has similar function-groups. Experiments are carried out on L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine and the different mass ratios of their mixtures as an example of the application of RACS. The results come out that the RACS spectrum of L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine reserve the spectral fingerprint information of absorption spectrum. The log plot of RACSs of the two amino acids show power-law behavior σR(~ν) ~ (ν~α), and there is a linear relation between the wavenumber and the RACS in the double logarithmic plot. The exponents α, at the same time, are the slopes of the RACS curves in the double logarithmic plot. The big differences of the exponents α between the two amino acids and their mixtures can be seen visually from the slopes of the RACS curves. So we can use RACS analytical method to distinguish some complex compounds with similar function-groups and mixtures from another which has similar absorption peaks in THz region.

  15. Highly efficient plasmonic enhancement of graphene absorption at telecommunication wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hua; Cumming, Benjamin P; Gu, Min

    2015-08-01

    A hybrid graphene system consisting of graphene and silica layers coated on a metal film with groove rings is proposed to strongly enhance light absorption in the graphene layer. Our results indicate that the excited localized plasmon resonance in groove rings can effectively improve the graphene absorption from 2.3% to 43.1%, even to a maximum value of 87.0% in five-layer graphene at telecommunication wavelengths. In addition, the absorption peak is strongly dependent on the groove depth and ring radius as well as the number of graphene layers, enabling the flexible selectivity of both the operating spectral position and bandwidth. This favorable enhancement and tunability of graphene absorption could provide a path toward high-performance graphene opto-electronic components, such as photodetectors.

  16. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  17. Harmonic generation at high peak power

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, M.A.; Williams, J.D.; Johnson, B.C.; Eimerl, D.

    1985-12-13

    This report reviews progress made in recent years in frequency conversion of laser radiation. By using a material such as potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), intense, coherent light is made available at wavelengths unavailable from the source laser medium. Tests were performed on an array of KDP crystals at the Nova Facility. The tests revealed unexpected losses due to various non-linear effects. (JDH)

  18. Aerosol Light Absorption and Scattering Assessments and the Impact of City Size on Air Pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paredes-Miranda, Guadalupe

    The general problem of urban pollution and its relation to the city population is examined in this dissertation. A simple model suggests that pollutant concentrations should scale approximately with the square root of city population. This model and its experimental evaluation presented here serve as important guidelines for urban planning and attainment of air quality standards including the limits that air pollution places on city population. The model was evaluated using measurements of air pollution. Optical properties of aerosol pollutants such as light absorption and scattering plus chemical species mass concentrations were measured with a photoacoustic spectrometer, a reciprocal nephelometer, and an aerosol mass spectrometer in Mexico City in the context of the multinational project "Megacity Initiative: Local And Global Research Observations (MILAGRO)" in March 2006. Aerosol light absorption and scattering measurements were also obtained for Reno and Las Vegas, NV USA in December 2008-March 2009 and January-February 2003, respectively. In all three cities, the morning scattering peak occurs a few hours later than the absorption peak due to the formation of secondary photochemically produced aerosols. In particular, for Mexico City we determined the fraction of photochemically generated secondary aerosols to be about 75% of total aerosol mass concentration at its peak near midday. The simple 2-d box model suggests that commonly emitted primary air pollutant (e.g., black carbon) mass concentrations scale approximately as the square root of the urban population. This argument extends to the absorption coefficient, as it is approximately proportional to the black carbon mass concentration. Since urban secondary pollutants form through photochemical reactions involving primary precursors, in linear approximation their mass concentration also should scale with the square root of population. Therefore, the scattering coefficient, a proxy for particulate matter

  19. Assignment of polarization-dependent peaks in carbon K-edge spectra from biogenic and geologic aragonite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Metzler, Rebecca A; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Guo, Jinghua; Abrecht, Mike; Coppersmith, Susan N; Gilbert, P U P A

    2008-10-16

    Many biominerals, including mollusk and echinoderm shells, avian eggshells, modern and fossil bacterial sediments, planktonic coccolithophores, and foraminifera, contain carbonates in the form of biogenic aragonite or calcite. Here we analyze biogenic and geologic aragonite using different kinds of surface- and bulk-sensitive X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the carbon K-edge, as well as high-resolution scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Besides the well-known main pi* and sigma* carbonate peaks, we observed and fully characterized four minor peaks, at energies between the main pi* and sigma* peaks. As expected, the main peaks are similar in geologic and biogenic aragonite, while the minor peaks differ in relative intensity. In this and previous work, the minor peaks appear to be the ones most affected in biomineralization processes, hence the interest in characterizing them. Peak assignment was achieved by correlation of polarization-dependent behavior of the minor peaks with that of the main pi* and sigma* peaks. The present characterization provides the background for future studies of aragonitic biominerals.

  20. Magnetic-dipolar-mode Fano resonances for microwave spectroscopy of high absorption matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisman, G.; Kamenetskii, E. O.; Shavit, R.

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between high absorption matter and microwave radiated energy is a subject of great importance. In particular, this concerns the microwave spectroscopic characterization of biological liquids. The use of effective testing methods to obtain information about physical properties of different liquids on the molecular level is one of the most important problems in biophysics. However, the standard methods based on microwave resonant techniques are not sufficiently suitable for biological liquids because the resonance peak in a resonator with high-loss liquids is so broad that the material parameters cannot be measured correctly. Although molecular vibrations of biomolecules may have microwave frequencies, it is not thought that such resonant coupling is significant due to their low energy compared with thermal energy and the strongly dampening aqueous environment. This paper presents an innovative microwave sensing technique for different types of lossy materials, including biological liquids. The technique is based on the combination of the microwave perturbation method and the Fano resonance effects observed recently in microwave structures with embedded magnetic-dipolar quantum dots. When the frequency of the magnetic dipolar mode (MDM) resonance is not equal to the cavity resonance frequency, one gets Fano transmission intensity. When the MDM resonance frequency is tuned to the cavity resonance frequency, by a bias magnetic field, one observes a Lorentzian line shape. Use of an extremely narrow Lorentzian peak allows exact probing of the resonant frequency of a cavity loaded by a highly lossy material sample. For different kinds of samples, one has different frequencies of Lorentzian peaks. This presents a picture of precise spectroscopic characterization of high absorption matter in microwaves.

  1. Gender differences in peak muscle performance during growth.

    PubMed

    Doré, E; Martin, R; Ratel, S; Duché, P; Bedu, M; Van Praagh, E

    2005-05-01

    Gender-related differences in maximal leg muscle power were examined in 496 females and 426 males aged 8 to 20 years. Cycling peak power (CPP, including the force required to accelerate the flywheel of the cycle ergometer) was measured during three sprints. Optimal velocity (Vopt, velocity at CPP) was also determined. No gender-differences were observed in anthropometric characteristics and cycling performance between 8- and 14-year-old. From age 14, however, males showed a higher CPP than females, but also a higher lean leg volume (LLV, assessed by anthropometry). Allometric relationship between CPP and LLV (CPP = a . LLV ( b)) showed a clear gender-differentiation between 14- and 16-year-old: LLV exponent (b) was 1.05 in males vs. 0.74 in females. From 16 years onwards, analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that the slopes of the CPP-LLV relationship were similar in both genders, but the intercepts differed. In other words, for a similar LLV, males showed greater CPP than females. It was suggested that this sex-related difference was due to total body fat increase, and more specifically lower-limb fat increase during puberty in girls, whilst the boys experienced increased lean body mass. Considering that the same gender-related difference was observed for optimal velocity adjusted for leg length, other factors such as fibre type variability or (and) neuromuscular activation might also be partly responsible for the higher peak muscle performance observed in males. PMID:15795811

  2. Increased peak flow variability in children with asymptomatic hyperresponsiveness.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P G; Mattoli, S; Sears, M R; Dolovich, J; Hargreave, F E

    1995-10-01

    The relevance of increased methacholine airway responsiveness detected in children with no current or past symptoms of asthma is not known. We wished to determine whether the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness in asymptomatic children is also associated with abnormal variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF). In 12 asymptomatic children with methacholine hyperresponsiveness, we examined the diurnal variation of peak expiratory flow (PEF) and response to inhaled bronchodilator. Twelve asthmatic children with a comparable range of methacholine hyperresponsiveness, and 12 normal children without methacholine responsiveness, were used as positive and negative controls. The children were aged 11 (range 9-14) yrs. The mean diurnal variation of PEF in those children with asymptomatic hyperresponsiveness was increased at 9.3%, to a degree comparable to the symptomatic asthmatic children (10.7%), and greater than the normal children (5.7%). Methacholine stimulated airway constriction was associated with symptoms in subjects from each group, indicating that the children were capable of perceiving airway constriction. We conclude that asymptomatic children with methacholine airway hyperresponsiveness have other evidence of mild variable airflow obstruction with increased diurnal PEF variability, and can perceive airflow limitation. The lack of symptoms in the children with airway hyperresponsiveness could be due to an insufficient stimulus to cause symptomatic obstruction, or the absence of eosinophilic airway inflammation, which may be a requirement for the development of symptomatic airway hyperresponsiveness.

  3. Estimating instantaneous peak flow from mean daily flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Krajewski, W. F.

    2015-12-01

    While instantaneous peak flow (IPF) records have historically been necessary for practical applications in flood risk management and hydraulic structure design, mean daily flow (MDF) values are often all that are available. To address this problem, we propose a simple method, which requires only MDF records as its input and uses the rising and falling slopes of daily hydrographs, to estimate IPFs. We applied this method to 144 catchments in Iowa, USA, with drainage areas ranging from about 7 to 220,000 km2. This application involves about 3800 peak flow events originating from different flood generation mechanisms over the period from 1997 to 2014. About 55% of the catchments have prediction errors within ±10%, and 85% of the catchments have predictions errors within ±20%. The method works well for catchments larger than 500 km2, poorly for catchments smaller than 100 km2, and fairly well for catchments in between these sizes. The reduction in the method's effectiveness with decreasing catchment size is due to the fact that the smaller the catchment, the more information is lost when using MDF to characterize the instantaneous flow processes. Our proposed method is simple and promising in terms of estimating IPFs from MDFs for areas where IPF records are unavailable or are insufficient.

  4. Parental smoking, bronchial reactivity and peak flow variability in children

    PubMed Central

    Cook, D.; Strachan, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A systematic quantitative review was conducted of the evidence relating environmental tobacco smoke to bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) during childhood.
METHODS—Twenty nine relevant studies were identified after consideration of 1593 articles selected by electronic search of the Embase and Medline databases using keywords relevant to passive smoking in children. The search was completed in April 1997.
RESULTS—Of 19 studies using challenge tests in children of school age, 10 (5759 children) could be summarised as the odds ratio of being bronchial hyperreactive in children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke compared with those not exposed. The pooled odds ratio for maternal smoking was 1.29 (95% confidence limits 1.10to 1.50) with no evidence of heterogeneity between studies. However, in five further studies of 3531 children providing some evidence, but not odds ratios, none were statistically significant. A further four studies on 5233 children have collected data but are not published. In contrast, all four studies of circadian variation in peak expiratory flow found increased variation in children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.
CONCLUSIONS—A clear effect of exposure to environmental tobacco smoke on BHR in the general population has not been established. While the meta-analysis suggests a small but real increase in BHR in school aged children, it seems likely that this estimate is biased upwards due to publication bias. In contrast, limited evidence suggests greater variation in peak expiratory flow in children of smoking parents.

 PMID:9741375

  5. Turbulence Hazard Metric Based on Peak Accelerations for Jetliner Passengers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Eric C.

    2005-01-01

    Calculations are made of the approximate hazard due to peak normal accelerations of an airplane flying through a simulated vertical wind field associated with a convective frontal system. The calculations are based on a hazard metric developed from a systematic application of a generic math model to 1-cosine discrete gusts of various amplitudes and gust lengths. The math model simulates the three degree-of- freedom longitudinal rigid body motion to vertical gusts and includes (1) fuselage flexibility, (2) the lag in the downwash from the wing to the tail, (3) gradual lift effects, (4) a simplified autopilot, and (5) motion of an unrestrained passenger in the rear cabin. Airplane and passenger response contours are calculated for a matrix of gust amplitudes and gust lengths. The airplane response contours are used to develop an approximate hazard metric of peak normal accelerations as a function of gust amplitude and gust length. The hazard metric is then applied to a two-dimensional simulated vertical wind field of a convective frontal system. The variations of the hazard metric with gust length and airplane heading are demonstrated.

  6. Can You Hear That Peak? Utilization of Auditory and Visual Feedback at Peak Limb Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loria, Tristan; de Grosbois, John; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: At rest, the central nervous system combines and integrates multisensory cues to yield an optimal percept. When engaging in action, the relative weighing of sensory modalities has been shown to be altered. Because the timing of peak velocity is the critical moment in some goal-directed movements (e.g., overarm throwing), the current study…

  7. Peak phosphorus - peak food? The need to close the phosphorus cycle.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The peak in the world production of phosphorus has been predicted to occur in 2033, based on world reserves of rock phosphate (URR) reckoned at around 24,000 million tonnes (Mt), with around 18,000 Mt remaining. This figure was reckoned-up to 71,000 Mt, by the USGS, in 2012, but a production maximum during the present century is still highly probable. There are complex issues over what the demand will be for phosphorus in the future, as measured against a rising population (from 7 billion to over 9 billion in 2050), and a greater per capita demand for fertiliser to grow more grain, in part to feed animals and meet a rising demand for meat by a human species that is not merely more populous but more affluent. As a counterweight to this, we may expect that greater efficiencies in the use of phosphorus - including recycling from farms and of human and animal waste - will reduce the per capita demand for phosphate rock. The unseen game changer is peak oil, since phosphate is mined and recovered using machinery powered by liquid fuels refined from crude oil. Hence, peak oil and peak phosphorus might appear as conjoined twins. There is no unequivocal case that we can afford to ignore the likelihood of a supply-demand gap for phosphorus occurring sometime this century, and it would be perilous to do so.

  8. NOx control buys to peak in `98

    SciTech Connect

    McIlvaine, R.W.

    1995-10-01

    Titles I and IV of the Clean Air Act provide the legislative framework for a huge NOx reduction program now in operation. This reduction will have a substantial effect in reducing ground-level ozone. A new McIlvaine report concludes that US utilities and industrial companies during the next 10 years will spend more than $800 million annually to meet CAA`s NOx-control regulations. Much of that investment will be for low-NOx burners, which minimize NOx formation. Many utilities and industrial boilers can be retrofitted with a new generation of burners; however, this technology achieves less than 50% NOx reduction. Post-combustion technologies, such as selective catalytic reduction and selective noncatalytic reduction, can reduce NOx as much as 90%. Therefore, plants needing greater NOx reduction will use post-combustion technologies, often in combination with low-NOx burners. The peak order year for NOx-control equipment will be 1998, primarily because Title IV of CAA requires utilities to comply by 2000. Many industrial sources also will be ordering equipment in 1998.

  9. Asymmetry parameter of peaked Fano line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meierott, S.; Hotz, T.; Néel, N.; Kröger, J.

    2016-10-01

    The spectroscopic line shape of electronic and vibrational excitations is ubiquitously described by a Fano profile. In the case of nearly symmetric and peaked Fano line shapes, the fit of the conventional Fano function to experimental data leads to difficulties in unambiguously extracting the asymmetry parameter, which may vary over orders of magnitude without degrading the quality of the fit. Moreover, the extracted asymmetry parameter depends on initially guessed values. Using the spectroscopic signature of the single-Co Kondo effect on Au(110) the ambiguity of the extracted asymmetry parameter is traced to the highly symmetric resonance profile combined with the inevitable scattering of experimental data. An improved parameterization of the conventional Fano function is suggested that enables the nonlinear optimization in a reduced parameter space. In addition, the presence of a global minimum in the sum of squared residuals and thus the independence of start parameters may conveniently be identified in a two-dimensional plot. An angular representation of the asymmetry parameter is suggested in order to reliably determine uncertainty margins via linear error propagation.

  10. Time-varying sodium absorption in the Type Ia supernova 2013gh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, R.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Johansson, J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Butler, R. P.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Doran, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Freeland, E.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Lundqvist, P.; Mattila, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P. E.; Petrushevska, T.; Valenti, S.; Vogt, S.; Wozniak, P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. Aims: To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova (SN) evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernovae peak in the ultraviolet. We attempt, therefore, to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. Methods: We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13dge, to search for absorption-line variations. Furthermore, we study interstellar absorption features in relation to the observed photometric colours of the SNe. Results: Both SNe display deep Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features. Furthermore, small but significant variations are detected in a feature of the Na I D profile of SN 2013gh. The variations are consistent with either geometric effects of rapidly moving or patchy gas clouds or photoionisation of Na I gas at R ≈ 1019 cm from the explosion. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that it is necessary to focus on early phases to detect photoionisation effects of gases in the circumstellar medium of SNe Ia. Different absorbers such as Na I and Ca II can be used to probe for matter at different distances from the SNe. The nondetection of variations during early phases makes it possible to put limits on the abundance of the species at those distances. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only

  11. Peak picking and the assessment of separation performance in two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Guiochon, Georges A; Shalliker, R. Andrew

    2010-01-01

    An algorithm was developed for 2DHPLC that automated the process of peak recognition, measuring their retention times, and then subsequently plotting the information in a two-dimensional retention plane. Following the recognition of peaks, the software then performed a series of statistical assessments of the separation performance, measuring for example, correlation between dimensions, peak capacity and the percentage of usage of the separation space. Peak recognition was achieved by interpreting the first and second derivatives of each respective one-dimensional chromatogram to determine the 1D retention times of each solute and then compiling these retention times for each respective fraction 'cut'. Due to the nature of comprehensive 2DHPLC adjacent cut fractions may contain peaks common to more than one cut fraction. The algorithm determined which components were common in adjacent cuts and subsequently calculated the peak maximum profile by interpolating the space between adjacent peaks. This algorithm was applied to the analysis of a two-dimensional separation of an apple flesh extract separated in a first dimension comprising a cyano stationary phase and an aqueous/THF mobile phase as the first dimension and a second dimension comprising C18-Hydro with an aqueous/MeOH mobile phase. A total of 187 peaks were detected.

  12. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  13. Size-dependent absorption properties of CdX (X = S, Se, Te) quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C. C.; Mai, Y.-W.

    2012-05-01

    A unified nanothermodynamic model was developed to study the size effects on first absorption peak energy and molar extinction coefficient of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) based on size-dependent cohesive energy and quantum confinement effect. It is found that: (1) the first absorption peak energy increases as QD size decreases; (2) the molar extinction coefficient decreases with decreasing QD size in strong confinement regime and (3) tunable absorption properties of semiconductor QDs are caused by size-induced cohesive energy variation owing to severe bond dangling. The accuracy of the developed model was verified with experimental data of CdS, CdSe and CdTe QDs.

  14. Inapplicability of small-polaron model for the explanation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide.

    PubMed

    Zeković, Slobodan; Ivić, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of small-polaron model for the interpretation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide has been critically reexamined. It is shown that the energy difference between the normal and anomalous peak, calculated by means of small-polaron theory, displays pronounced temperature dependence which is in drastic contradiction with experiment. It is demonstrated that self-trapped states, which are recently suggested to explain theoretically the experimental absorption spectrum in protein, cannot cause the appearance of the peaks in absorption spectrum for acetanilide. PMID:19811399

  15. Chromatographic peak alignment using derivative dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Bork, Christopher; Ng, Kenneth; Liu, Yinhan; Yee, Alex; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chromatogram overlays are frequently used to monitor inter-batch performance of bioprocess purification steps. However, the objective analysis of chromatograms is difficult due to peak shifts caused by variable phase durations or unexpected process holds. Furthermore, synchronization of batch process data may also be required prior to performing multivariate analysis techniques. Dynamic time warping was originally developed as a method for spoken word recognition, but shows potential in the objective analysis of time variant signals, such as manufacturing data. In this work we will discuss the application of dynamic time warping with a derivative weighting function to align chromatograms to facilitate process monitoring and fault detection. In addition, we will demonstrate the utility of this method as a preprocessing step for multivariate model development. PMID:23292764

  16. Suppression of jet noise peak by velocity profile reshaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, S.; Nishiwaki, H.; Takeda, K.

    1981-07-01

    Proposed here is an efficient noise-abating system having the potential for application to a broad spectrum of turbofan engines. An exhaust system with the core nozzle reshaped into an elliptic exit section from the conventional circular nozzle is recommended. The comparison of the scale-model tests revealed that a 5 dB decrease in peak noise levels was realized with a slight increase of the sound pressure at large emission angles. A laser Doppler velocimeter was used to quantify the high-temperature flow turbulence. With the elliptic core nozzle, the jet flow was more diffused axially and spread radially along the major axis. The noise reduction was attributed to the enhancement of the sound refraction and to the lower sound generation, due to the turbulence suppression as well as the lowered mean density gradients at the noise source.

  17. Robust Majorana Conductance Peaks for a Superconducting Lead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Vinkler-Aviv, Yuval; Glazman, Leonid I.; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-12-01

    Experimental evidence for Majorana bound states largely relies on measurements of the tunneling conductance. While the conductance into a Majorana state is in principle quantized to 2 e2/h , observation of this quantization has been elusive, presumably due to temperature broadening in the normal-metal lead. Here, we propose to use a superconducting lead instead, whose gap strongly suppresses thermal excitations. For a wide range of tunneling strengths and temperatures, a Majorana state is then signaled by symmetric conductance peaks at e V =±Δ of a universal height G =(4 -π )2 e2/h . For a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip, Majorana states appear as spatial conductance plateaus while the conductance varies with the local wave function for trivial Andreev bound states. We discuss effects of nonresonant (bulk) Andreev reflections and quasiparticle poisoning.

  18. Robust Majorana Conductance Peaks for a Superconducting Lead.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Vinkler-Aviv, Yuval; Glazman, Leonid I; von Oppen, Felix

    2015-12-31

    Experimental evidence for Majorana bound states largely relies on measurements of the tunneling conductance. While the conductance into a Majorana state is in principle quantized to 2e^{2}/h, observation of this quantization has been elusive, presumably due to temperature broadening in the normal-metal lead. Here, we propose to use a superconducting lead instead, whose gap strongly suppresses thermal excitations. For a wide range of tunneling strengths and temperatures, a Majorana state is then signaled by symmetric conductance peaks at eV=±Δ of a universal height G=(4-π)2e(2)/h. For a superconducting scanning tunneling microscope tip, Majorana states appear as spatial conductance plateaus while the conductance varies with the local wave function for trivial Andreev bound states. We discuss effects of nonresonant (bulk) Andreev reflections and quasiparticle poisoning. PMID:26765015

  19. Narrow coherence-induced peaks in Doppler-free spectra of thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Tissue, B.M. ); Fearey, B.L. )

    1994-04-01

    We report the observation of narrow peaks in Doppler-free spectra of thorium. The peaks are superimposed upon saturation-broadened line profiles in thorium atomic spectra by use of counterpropagating cw laser beams with resonance ionization mass spectrometry detection. At low laser powers the spectra show a conventional Lamb dip. As the laser power is increased, a narrow peak obscures the dip (for two of four transitions studied). The narrow peak is attributed to coherence effects at high laser powers. To confirm this assignment, we calculated the saturated absorption line shapes by using the theory of Haroche and Hartmann [Phys. Rev. A [bold 6], 1280 (1972)]. The spectral simulations reproduce the narrow peaks and show the same dependence with laser power and transition strength as do the data. There are some quantitative discrepancies, particularly in the overall saturation broadening, but given that there were no adjustable parameters in the calculations, the agreement between theory and experiment is considered quite good. The Einstein [ital A] coefficients used in the calculations were determined from an analysis of the laser-power dependence of the saturation broadening for each transition.

  20. Temperature-dependent excitonic photoluminescence excited by two-photon absorption in perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ke; Xu, Zhongjie; Chen, Runze; Zheng, Xin; Cheng, Xiangai; Jiang, Tian

    2016-08-15

    Recently, lead halide perovskite quantum dots have been reported with potential for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their excellent luminescent properties. Herein excitonic photoluminescence (PL) excited by two-photon absorption in perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots (QDs) has been studied at a broad temperature range, from 80 to 380 K. Two-photon absorption has been investigated and the absorption coefficient is up to 0.085 cm/GW at room temperature. Moreover, the PL spectrum excited by two-photon absorption shows a linear blue-shift (0.32 meV/K) below the temperature of 220 K. However, for higher temperatures, the PL peak approaches a roughly constant value and shows temperature-independent chromaticity up to 380 K. This behavior is distinct from the general red-shift for semiconductors and can be attributed to the result of thermal expansion, electron-phonon interaction and structural phase transition around 360 K. The strong nonlinear absorption and temperature-independent chromaticity of CsPbBr3 QDs observed in temperature range from 220 to 380 K will offer new opportunities in nonlinear photonics, light-harvesting, and light-emitting devices. PMID:27519098

  1. Development of gold induced surface plasmon enhanced CIGS absorption layer on polyimide substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong-Un; Sharma, Rahul; Sim, Jae-Kwan; Baek, Byung Joon; Ahn, Haeng-Kwun; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-09-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) with metal nanoparticles is the promising phenomenon to increase light absorption by trapping light in thin film solar cells. In this study we demonstrate a successful LSPR effect with gold (Au) nanoparticles onto the Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) absorption layer. First, the CIGS absorber layers is fabricated onto the Mo coated polyimide (PI) substrate by using two stage process as DC sputtering of CIG thin film followed by the selenization at 400 °C. Finally, the Au nanoparticles are deposited onto the CIGS layer with increasing particles size from 4-15 nm by using sputter coater for 10-120 s. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirm the formation of CIGS/Au nanocomposite structure with prominent peak shift of CIGS reflections and increasing intensity for Au phase. The CIGS/Au nanocomposite morphologies with Au particle size distribution uniformity and surface coverage is examined under ultra-high resolution field effect scanning electron microscope (UHR-FESEM). A peak at 176 cm-1 in Raman spectra, associated with the “A1” mode of lattice vibration for the attributed to the pure chalcopyrite structure. The secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) showed ∼200 nm depth converge of Au nanoparticles into the CIGS absorption layer. The optical properties as transmittance, reflectance and absorbance of CIGS/Au layers were found to expand in the infrared region and the LSPR effect is the most prominent for Au particles (5-7 nm) deposited for 60 s. The absorption coefficient and band gap measurement also confirms that the LSPR effect for 5-7 nm Au particles with band gap improvement from 1.31 to 1.52 eV for CIGS/Au layer as the defect density decreases due to the deposition of Au nanoparticles onto the CIGS layer. Such LSPR effect in CIGS/Au nanocomposite absorption layer will be a key parameter to further improve performance of the solar cell.

  2. The Nearest GHz Peaked-Spectrum Radio Galaxy, PKS 1718-649

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Jauncey, D. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Tzioumis, A. K.; King, E. A.; Preston, R. A.; Lovell, J. E.; McCulloch, P. M.; Costa, M. E.; Nicolson, G.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we identify PKS 1718-649, at a distance of 56 Mpc (z = 0.014; H(sub o) = 75 km/s/Mpc, q(sub o) = 0), as the nearest GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxy, more than four times closer than any previously known. Extensive observations at radio wavelengths with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Southern Hemisphere VLBI Experiment array, and the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope have allowed us to determine the properties of the radio source: PKS 1718-649 consists of two compact sub-pc-scale components separated by approximately 2 pc, the overall radio polarization is low, and the radio spectrum is peaked near 3 GHz. Order-of-magnitude agreement between the quantitative model for GPS sources of Bicknell et al. and the radio data we present, as well as data at optical wavelengths from the literature, raises the interesting possibility that PKS 1718-649 may be frustrated in its development by the nuclear environment of its host galaxy, NGC 6328. The model of Bicknell et al. suggests free-free absorption as an explanation of the PKS 1718-649 radio spectrum. However, both free-free absorption and synchrotron self-absorption mechanisms are plausible for this source and both may contribute to the overall radio spectrum. PKS 1718-649 provides evidence to strengthen the speculative suggestion that GPS sources arise as a consequence of galaxy merger activity.

  3. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  4. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  5. Surface sensitivity of elastic peak electron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonski, A.

    2016-08-01

    New theoretical model describing the sampling depth of elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) has been proposed. Surface sensitivity of this technique can be generally identified with the maximum depth reached by trajectories of elastically backscattered electrons. A parameter called the penetration depth distribution function (PDDF) has been proposed for this description. Two further parameters are descendant from this definition: the mean penetration depth (MPD) and the information depth (ID). From the proposed theory, relatively simple analytical expressions describing the above parameters can be derived. Although the Monte Carlo simulations can be effectively used to estimate the sampling depth of EPES, this approach may require a considerable amount of computations. In contrast, the analytical model proposed here (AN) is very fast and provides the parameters PDDF, MPD and ID that very well compare with results of MC simulations. As follows from detailed comparisons performed for four elements (Al, Ni, Pd and Au), the AN model practically reproduced complicated emission angle dependences of the MPDs and the IDs, correctly indicating numerous maximum and minimum positions. In the energy range from 200 eV to 5 keV, the averaged percentage differences between MPDs obtained from the MC and the AN models were close to 4%. An important conclusion resulting from the present studies refers to the procedure of determination of the inelastic mean free path (IMFP) from EPES. Frequently, the analyzed sample is deposited as a thin overlayer on a smooth substrate. From an analysis of the presently obtained IDs, is follows that 99% of trajectories in analyzed experimental configurations reaches depth not exceeding 2.39 in units of IMFP. Thus, one can postulate that a safe minimum thickness of an overlayer should be larger than about 3 IMFPs. For example, the minimum thickness of an Al overlayer shoud be about 8 nm at 5000 eV.

  6. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  7. Theoretical study on the structures and optical absorption of Si172 nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Xia, Lin-Hua; Zhao, Li-Zhen; Zang, Qing-Jun; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

    2015-08-01

    The structures and optical properties of silicon nanoclusters (Si NCs) have attracted continuous interest in the last few decades. However, it is a great challenge to determine the structures of Si NCs for accurate property calculation due to the complication and competition of various structural motifs. In this work, a Si172 NC with a size of about 1.8 nm was investigated using a genetic algorithm combined with tight-binding and DFT calculations. We found that a diamond crystalline core with 50 atoms (1.2 nm) was formed in the Si172 NC. It can be expected that at a size of about 172 atoms, a diamond crystalline structure can nucleate from the center of the Si NCs. The optical properties of the pure and hydrogenated Si172 NC structures also have been studied using the TDDFT method. Compared with the pure Si172 NC, the absorption peaks of the hydrogenated Si172 NC are obviously blue-shifted.

  8. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  9. NARROW Na AND K ABSORPTION LINES TOWARD T TAURI STARS: TRACING THE ATOMIC ENVELOPE OF MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pascucci, I.; Simon, M. N.; Edwards, S.; Heyer, M.; Rigliaco, E.; Hillenbrand, L.; Gorti, U.; Hollenbach, D.

    2015-11-20

    We present a detailed analysis of narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines toward nearly 40 T Tauri stars in Taurus with the goal of clarifying their origin. The Na i λ5889.95 line is detected toward all but one source, while the weaker K i λ7698.96 line is detected in about two-thirds of the sample. The similarity in their peak centroids and the significant positive correlation between their equivalent widths demonstrate that these transitions trace the same atomic gas. The absorption lines are present toward both disk and diskless young stellar objects, which excludes cold gas within the circumstellar disk as the absorbing material. A comparison of Na i and CO detections and peak centroids demonstrates that the atomic gas and molecular gas are not co-located, the atomic gas being more extended than the molecular gas. The width of the atomic lines corroborates this finding and points to atomic gas about an order of magnitude warmer than the molecular gas. The distribution of Na i radial velocities shows a clear spatial gradient along the length of the Taurus molecular cloud filaments. This suggests that absorption is associated with the Taurus molecular cloud. Assuming that the gradient is due to cloud rotation, the rotation of the atomic gas is consistent with differential galactic rotation, whereas the rotation of the molecular gas, although with the same rotation axis, is retrograde. Our analysis shows that narrow Na i and K i absorption resonance lines are useful tracers of the atomic envelope of molecular clouds. In line with recent findings from giant molecular clouds, our results demonstrate that the velocity fields of the atomic and molecular gas are misaligned. The angular momentum of a molecular cloud is not simply inherited from the rotating Galactic disk from which it formed but may be redistributed by cloud–cloud interactions.

  10. Thickness Optimization for Petroleum Coke in Microwave Dehydrating Based on the Analysis of Dynamic Absorption Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobiao; Chen, Junruo; Peng, Jinhui; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Weifeng; Guo, Shenghui; Chen, Guo

    2015-07-01

    An analytical approach is proposed to optimize the thickness of petroleum coke for achieving maximum microwave power absorption in microwave heating based on analysis of reflection loss (RL). The microwave RL of the petroleum coke layer was studied over the moisture content range of 1%-5% at 20 °C and the petroleum coke (10% moisture content) in the temperature range of 20 to 100 °C at 2.45 GHz. The results show that RL depends sensitively on the thickness of the petroleum coke and the absorption peak shifts towards a larger thickness as the moisture content of the petroleum coke increases. There exists a matching thickness corresponding to the maximum microwave absorption, the maximum absorbing peak decreases when the thickness of petroleum coke exceeds the matching thickness. We also show that the absorption peak is found to move towards a smaller thickness region with increasing petroleum coke temperature.

  11. Absorption in the visible region of YSZ implanted with Ag ions.

    PubMed

    Saito; Imamura; Kitahara

    2000-12-30

    Ag ions were implanted into YSZ (yttrium-stabilized (cubic) zirconia) single crystals in two different energy regimes: kiloelectron volt and megaelectron volt. Optical absorption spectra were measured in the visible region at each stage in the annealing process of the sample. Depth profiles of Ag for the samples implanted at the energy of 20 keV were measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the samples implanted with Ag at the low energy of 20 keV, one large absorption peak appeared in the wavelength ranging from 470 to 536 nm, depending on the dose of Ag ions. As the sample was heated to 1000 degrees C, the intensity of the absorption peak decreased gradually, but a small, broad peak remains even at the temperature of 1000 degrees C. For the samples implanted with 2.8x10(16) Ag ion cm(-2) at the high energy of 3 MeV, one broad absorption peak was observed at around 470 nm. As the sample was heated sequentially to high temperatures, the peak gradually decreased and almost disappeared at 400 degrees C. When the sample was further heated to even higher temperatures, the absorption peak at 514 nm reappeared at 1000 degrees C and grew with heating time.

  12. FE K EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE XMM-EPIC SPECTRUM OF THE SEYFERT GALAXY IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2001-01-01

    We present a re-analysis of the XMM-Newton long-look of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329a. The Fe K bandpass is dominated by two peaks, consistent with emission from neutral or near-neutral Fe Ka and KP. A relativistic diskline model whereby both peaks are the result of one doubly-peaked diskline profile is found to be a poor description of the data. Models using two relativistic disklines are found to describe the emission profile well. A low-inclination, moderately-relativistic dual-diskline model is possible if the contribution from narrow components, due to distant material, is small or absent. A high-inclination, moderately relativistic profile for each peak is possible if there are roughly equal contributions from both the broad and narrow components. Upper limits on Fe XXV and Fe XXVI emission and absorption at the systemic velocity of IC 4329a are obtained. We also present the results of RXTE monitoring of this source obtained so far; the combined XMM-Newton and RXTE data sets allow us to explore the time-resolved spectral behavior of this source on time scales ranging from hours to 2 years. We find no strong evidence for variability of the Fe Ka emission line on any time scale probed, likely due to the minimal level of continuum variability. We detect a narrow absorption line, at a energy of 7.68 keV in the rest frame of the source; its significance has been confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. This feature is most likely due to absorption from Fe XXVI blueshifted to approximately 0.1c relative to the systemic velocity, making IC 4329a the lowest-redshift AGN known with a high-velocity, highly-ionized outflow component. As is often the case with similar outflows seen in high-luminosity quasars, the estimated mass outflow rate is larger than the inflow accretion rate, signaling that the outflow represents a substantial portion of the total energy budget of the AGN. The outflow could arise from a radiatively-driven disk wind, or it may be in the

  13. Search for absorption edges in superexpansion bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in't Zand, Jean

    2013-09-01

    Our goal is to measure with the LETGS a series of bright type-I X-ray bursts with strong photospheric radius expansion ('superexpansion') to search for absorption edges due to the ashes of nuclear burning. We request a quick TOO, to be triggered by ISS-MAXI and Swift-BAT, with a total exposure time of 100 ks to obtain the detection of about 10 bursts.

  14. Effects of locally resonant modes on underwater sound absorption in viscoelastic materials.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jihong; Zhao, Honggang; Lv, Linmei; Yuan, Bo; Wang, Gang; Wen, Xisen

    2011-09-01

    Recently, by introducing locally resonant scatterers with spherical shape proposed in phononic crystals into design of underwater sound absorption materials, the low-frequency underwater sound absorption phenomenon induced by the localized resonances is observed. To reveal this absorption mechanism, the effect of the locally resonant mode on underwater sound absorption should be studied. In this paper, the finite element method, which is testified efficiently by comparing the calculation results with those of the layer multiple scattering method, is introduced to investigate the dynamic modes and the corresponding sound absorption of localized resonance. The relationship between the resonance modes described with the displacement contours of one unit cell and the corresponding absorption spectra is discussed in detail, which shows that the localized resonance leads to the absorption peak, and the mode conversion from longitudinal to transverse waves at the second absorption peak is more efficient than that at the first one. Finally, to show the modeling capability of FEM and investigate shape effects of locally resonant scatterers on underwater sound absorption, the absorption properties of viscoelastic materials containing locally resonant scatterers with ellipsoidal shape are discussed.

  15. Light absorption properties and absorption budget of Southeast Pacific waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricaud, Annick; Babin, Marcel; Claustre, Hervé; Ras, JoséPhine; TièChe, Fanny

    2010-08-01

    Absorption coefficients of phytoplankton, nonalgal particles (NAPs), and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and their relative contributions to total light absorption, are essential variables for bio-optical and biogeochemical models. However, their actual variations in the open ocean remain poorly documented, particularly for clear waters because of the difficulty in measuring very low absorption coefficients. The Biogeochemistry and Optics South Pacific Experiment (BIOSOPE) cruise investigated a large range of oceanic regimes, from mesotrophic waters around the Marquesas Islands to hyperoligotrophic waters in the subtropical gyre and eutrophic waters in the upwelling area off Chile. The spectral absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAPs were determined using the filter technique, while the CDOM absorption coefficients were measured using a 2 m capillary waveguide. Over the whole transect, the absorption coefficients of both dissolved and particulate components covered approximately two orders of magnitude; in the gyre, they were among the lowest ever reported for open ocean waters. In the oligotrophic and mesotrophic waters, absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAPs were notably lower than those measured in other oceanic areas with similar chlorophyll contents, indicating some deviation from the standard chlorophyll-absorption relationships. The contribution of absorption by NAPs to total particulate absorption showed large vertical and horizontal variations. CDOM absorption coefficients covaried with algal biomass, albeit with a high scatter. The spectral slopes of both NAP and CDOM absorption revealed structured spatial variability in relation with the trophic conditions. The relative contributions of each component to total nonwater absorption were (at a given wavelength) weakly variable over the transect, at least within the euphotic layer.

  16. D-peaks: a visual tool to display ChIP-seq peaks along the genome.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-sequencing is a method of choice to localize the positions of protein binding sites on DNA on a whole genomic scale. The deciphering of the sequencing data produced by this novel technique is challenging and it is achieved by their rigorous interpretation using dedicated tools and adapted visualization programs. Here, we present a bioinformatics tool (D-peaks) that adds several possibilities (including, user-friendliness, high-quality, relative position with respect to the genomic features) to the well-known visualization browsers or databases already existing. D-peaks is directly available through its web interface http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/dpeaks/ as well as a command line tool.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet Spectrum of ARP 102B, the Prototypical Double-peaked Emission-Line AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Jules P.; Eracleous, Michael; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Chen, Kaiyou

    1996-06-01

    UV spectra of the nucleus of the elliptical galaxy Arp 102B were obtained with the HST's Faint Object Spectrograph in order to investigate the UV emission-line counterparts of its unusual double-peaked Balmer lines. Broad Mg II λ2798 is present with nearly the same profile as the Balmer lines (peaks separated by ~12,000 km s^-1^), and a typical Mg II/Hβ ratio of 1. But there is little, if any C III] λ 1909 or C IV λ1550 emission corresponding to the displaced Balmer- line peaks. Most important, there is no double-peaked component detected in Lyα; the Lyα/Hβ ratio is less than 0.12 in the displaced peaks. However, there is an "ordinary," non-displaced broad-line component with FWHM ~3500 km s^-1^ in all of the permitted lines, demonstrating the need to invoke different locations and different physical conditions for double-peaked and single-peaked line components in the same object. The. striking absence of displaced peaks In Lyα probably cannot be explained solely by reddening. Rather, It indicates that high density and large optical depth in Lyα are required to destroy the line photons by collisional de-excitation and possibly by bound-free absorption out of the n = 2 level of hydrogen. These results strongly support the application, at least to Arp 102B, of the accretion- disk model of Dumont & Collin-Souffrin, in which the disk produces only low-ionization lines and a Lyα/Hβ ratio that agrees with our observed upper limit. Also present is an extraordinary system of absorption lines at the systemic redshift of Arp 102B, in which metastable levels of Fe II up to 1.1 eV above the ground state participate in addition to the more common resonance transitions. Absorption from metastable levels of Fe II have been seen previously only in two unusual, low-ionization broad absorption-line QSOs, Q0059 - 2735 and Mrk 231. Temperatures and densities needed to excite these levels are similar to narrow-line region conditions. Why they are seen in absorption in Arp

  18. Automatic quality assessment and peak identification of auditory brainstem responses with fitted parametric peaks.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Joaquin T; de la Torre, Angel; Alvarez, Isaac; Segura, Jose Carlos; Thornton, A Roger D; Sainz, Manuel; Vargas, Jose Luis

    2014-05-01

    The recording of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is used worldwide for hearing screening purposes. In this process, a precise estimation of the most relevant components is essential for an accurate interpretation of these signals. This evaluation is usually carried out subjectively by an audiologist. However, the use of automatic methods for this purpose is being encouraged nowadays in order to reduce human evaluation biases and ensure uniformity among test conditions, patients, and screening personnel. This article describes a new method that performs automatic quality assessment and identification of the peaks, the fitted parametric peaks (FPP). This method is based on the use of synthesized peaks that are adjusted to the ABR response. The FPP is validated, on one hand, by an analysis of amplitudes and latencies measured manually by an audiologist and automatically by the FPP method in ABR signals recorded at different stimulation rates; and on the other hand, contrasting the performance of the FPP method with the automatic evaluation techniques based on the correlation coefficient, FSP, and cross correlation with a predefined template waveform by comparing the automatic evaluations of the quality of these methods with subjective evaluations provided by five experienced evaluators on a set of ABR signals of different quality. The results of this study suggest (a) that the FPP method can be used to provide an accurate parameterization of the peaks in terms of amplitude, latency, and width, and (b) that the FPP remains as the method that best approaches the averaged subjective quality evaluation, as well as provides the best results in terms of sensitivity and specificity in ABR signals validation. The significance of these findings and the clinical value of the FPP method are highlighted on this paper. PMID:24661606

  19. Sensitivity in forward modeled hyperspectral reflectance due to phytoplankton groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Ciro; Bassani, Cristiana; Pinardi, Monica; Giardino, Claudia; Bresciani, Mariano

    2016-04-01

    Phytoplankton is an integral part of the ecosystem, affecting trophic dynamics, nutrient cycling, habitat condition, and fisheries resources. The types of phytoplankton and their concentrations are used to describe the status of water and the processes inside of this. This study investigates bio-optical modeling of phytoplankton functional types (PFT) in terms of pigment composition demonstrating the capability of remote sensing to recognize freshwater phytoplankton. In particular, a sensitivity analysis of simulated hyperspectral water reflectance (with band setting of HICO, APEX, EnMAP, PRISMA and Sentinel-3) of productive eutrophic waters of Mantua lakes (Italy) environment is presented. The bio-optical model adopted for simulating the hyperspectral water reflectance takes into account the reflectance dependency on geometric conditions of light field, on inherent optical properties (backscattering and absorption coefficients) and on concentrations of water quality parameters (WQPs). The model works in the 400-750nm wavelength range, while the model parametrization is based on a comprehensive dataset of WQP concentrations and specific inherent optical properties of the study area, collected in field surveys carried out from May to September of 2011 and 2014. The following phytoplankton groups, with their specific absorption coefficients, a*Φi(λ), were used during the simulation: Chlorophyta, Cyanobacteria with phycocyanin, Cyanobacteria and Cryptophytes with phycoerythrin, Diatoms with carotenoids and mixed phytoplankton. The phytoplankton absorption coefficient aΦ(λ) is modelled by multiplying the weighted sum of the PFTs, Σpia*Φi(λ), with the chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a). To highlight the variability of water reflectance due to variation of phytoplankton pigments, the sensitivity analysis was performed by keeping constant the WQPs (i.e., Chl-a=80mg/l, total suspended matter=12.58g/l and yellow substances=0.27m-1). The sensitivity analysis was

  20. Analysis of ion dynamics and peak shapes for delayed extraction time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, V. M.; Ponciano, C. R.; Fernandez-Lima, F. A.; da Silveira, E. F.

    2004-06-01

    The dependence of time-of-flight (TOF) peak shapes on time-dependent extraction electric fields is studied theoretically. Conditions for time focusing are analyzed both analytically and numerically for double-acceleration-region TOF spectrometers. Expressions for the spectrometer mass resolution and for the critical delay time are deduced. Effects due to a leakage field in the first acceleration region are shown to be relevant under certain conditions. TOF peak shape simulations for the delayed extraction method are performed for emitted ions presenting a Maxwellian initial energy distribution. Calculations are compared to experimental results of Cs+ emission due to CsI laser ablation.

  1. Determination of fixed water in rocks by infrared absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breger, I.A.; Chandler, J.C.

    1969-01-01

    An infrared absorption technique has been developed for the quantitative determination of "fixed water" (H2O+) in rocks. Potassium bromide disks containing 2-mg samples are scanned in the 3-??m spectral region and absorption at 2.96 ??m is determined. Although the exact nature of this peak is not known, other than that it is caused by an interaction between the potassium bromide and hydroxyl groups and water, it can be used for quantitative analysis. Rock samples, other than those containing significant percentages of clay minerals, can be analyzed with a standard deviation of 0.26%.

  2. Absorption properties of alternative chromophores for use in laser tissue soldering applications.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Brian D; Heintzelman, Douglas L; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of using alternative chromophores in laser tissue soldering applications was explored. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green (ICG), and methylene blue (MB) were investigated, as well as three different food colorings: red #40 (RFC), blue #1 (BFC), and green consisting of yellow #5 and blue #1 (GFC). Three experimental studies were conducted: (i) The absorption profiles of the five chromophores, when diluted in deionized water and when bound to protein, were recorded; (ii) the effect of accumulated thermal dosages on the absorption profile of the chromophores was evaluated; and (iii) the stability of the absorption profiles of the chromophore-doped solutions when exposed to ambient light for extended time periods was measured. The peak absorption wavelengths of ICG, MB, RFC, and BFC, were found to be 805 nm, 665 nm, 503 nm, and 630 nm respectively in protein solder. The GFC had two absorption peaks at 426 nm and 630 nm, corresponding to the two dye components comprising this color. The peak absorption wavelength of ICG and MB was dependent on the choice of solvent (deionized water or protein). In contrast, the peak absorption wavelengths of the three chromophores were not dependent on the choice of solvent. ICG and MB showed a significant decrease in absorbance units with increased time and temperature when heated to temperature up to 100 degrees C. A significant decrease in the absorption peak occurred in the ICG and MB samples when exposed to ambient light for a period of 7 days. Negligible change in absorption with accumulated thermal dose up to 100 degrees C or light dose (over a period of 84 days) was observed for any of the three food colorings investigated. PMID:12724860

  3. Absorption properties of alternative chromophores for use in laser tissue soldering applications.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Brian D; Heintzelman, Douglas L; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of using alternative chromophores in laser tissue soldering applications was explored. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green (ICG), and methylene blue (MB) were investigated, as well as three different food colorings: red #40 (RFC), blue #1 (BFC), and green consisting of yellow #5 and blue #1 (GFC). Three experimental studies were conducted: (i) The absorption profiles of the five chromophores, when diluted in deionized water and when bound to protein, were recorded; (ii) the effect of accumulated thermal dosages on the absorption profile of the chromophores was evaluated; and (iii) the stability of the absorption profiles of the chromophore-doped solutions when exposed to ambient light for extended time periods was measured. The peak absorption wavelengths of ICG, MB, RFC, and BFC, were found to be 805 nm, 665 nm, 503 nm, and 630 nm respectively in protein solder. The GFC had two absorption peaks at 426 nm and 630 nm, corresponding to the two dye components comprising this color. The peak absorption wavelength of ICG and MB was dependent on the choice of solvent (deionized water or protein). In contrast, the peak absorption wavelengths of the three chromophores were not dependent on the choice of solvent. ICG and MB showed a significant decrease in absorbance units with increased time and temperature when heated to temperature up to 100 degrees C. A significant decrease in the absorption peak occurred in the ICG and MB samples when exposed to ambient light for a period of 7 days. Negligible change in absorption with accumulated thermal dose up to 100 degrees C or light dose (over a period of 84 days) was observed for any of the three food colorings investigated.

  4. Cyclic responding by pigeons on the peak timing procedure.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick-Steger, K; Miller, S S; Betti, C A; Wasserman, E A

    1996-10-01

    The present experiment examined whether discrimination learning shapes the single-peaked response distributions usually obtained with the peak procedure. Two sources of learning in pigeons were disclosed: learning to respond near the time of reinforcement on fixed interval (FI) trials and learning to withhold responding once the FI duration had elapsed on peak interval (PI) trials. Pigeons also produced a highly unexpected second peak in responding on nonreinforced PI trials at 3 times the FI duration. Follow-up experiments showed that a 1:4 FI:PI duration ratio supported double peaks, but only 1 peak was obtained with a 1:8 FI:PI duration ratio. Finally, 4 peaks could be observed on extra-long PI trials under a 1:4:8 FI:PI:PI ratio procedure. The multiple-peaked response distributions are an unprecedented finding that present a major challenge to any theory of time perception.

  5. CO and H2O vibrational emission toward Orion Peak 1 and Peak 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Alfonso, E.; Wright, C. M.; Cernicharo, J.; Rosenthal, D.; Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2002-05-01

    ISO/SWS observations of Orion Peak 1 and Peak 2 show strong emission in the ro-vibrational lines of CO v=1-0 at 4.45-4.95 μm and of H2O ν2=1-0 at 6.3-7.0 μm. Toward Peak 1 the total flux in both bands is, assuming isotropic emission, ≈2.4 and ≈0.53 Lsun, respectively. This corresponds to ≈14 and ≈3% of the total H2 luminosity in the same beam. Two temperature components are found to contribute to the CO emission from Peak 1/2: a warm component, with TK=200-400 K, and a hot component with Tk~3×103 K. At Peak 2 the CO flux from the warm component is similar to that observed at Peak 1, but the hot component is a factor of ≈2 weaker. The H2O band is ≈25% stronger toward Peak 2, and seems to arise only in the warm component. The P-branch emission of both bands from the warm component is significantly stronger than the R-branch, indicating that the line emission is optically thick. Neither thermal collisions with H2 nor with H I seem capable of explaining the strong emission from the warm component. Although the emission arises in the postshock gas, radiation from the most prominent mid-infrared sources in Orion BN/KL is most likely pumping the excited vibrational states of CO and H2O. CO column densities along the line of sight of N{(CO)}=5-10×1018 cm-2 are required to explain the band shape, the flux, and the P-R-asymmetry, and beam-filling is invoked to reconcile this high N(CO) with the upper limit inferred from the H2 emission. CO is more abundant than H2O by a factor of at least 2. The density of the warm component is estimated from the H2O emission to be ~ 2×107 cm-3. The CO emission from the hot component is neither satisfactorily explained in terms of non-thermal (streaming) collisions, nor by resonant scattering. Vibrational excitation through collisions with H2 for densities of ~3×108 cm-3 or, alternatively, with atomic hydrogen, with a density of at least 107 cm-3, are invoked to explain simultaneously the emission from the hot component

  6. Sport injuries aligned to peak height velocity in talented pubertal soccer players.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, A; Elferink-Gemser, M T; Coelho-e-Silva, M J; Nijboer, J A; Brink, M S; Visscher, C

    2014-04-01

    In young athletes, demands of sports are superimposed on normal growth and maturation. It has been suggested that this causes a temporarily increased vulnerability for injuries. We followed 26 talented soccer players (mean age 11.9±0.84 years) longitudinally for 3 years around their adolescent growth spurt, called Peak Height Velocity, to identify differences in number of traumatic and overuse injuries and days missed due to injuries. Peak Height Velocity was calculated according to the Maturity Offset Protocol. The number of injuries was calculated for each player per year. A repeated measurement analysis showed that athletes had significantly more traumatic injuries in the year of Peak Height Velocity (1.41) than in the year before Peak Height Velocity (0.81). A moderate effect size of 0.42 was found for the difference in number of overuse injuries per player per year before (0.81) and after Peak Height Velocity (1.41), respectively. Finally, a moderate effect size of 0.55 was found for difference between days missed due to injuries before (7.27 days per player per year) and during Peak Height Velocity (15.69 days per player per year). Adolescent growth spurt seems to result in increased vulnerability for traumatic injuries. Afterwards athletes seem to be susceptible to overuse injuries.

  7. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  8. SEISMICITY OF THE LASSEN PEAK AREA, CALIFORNIA: 1981-1983.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Stephen R.; Rojas, Vernonica; Kollmann, Auriel

    1984-01-01

    Over 700 earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of Lassen Peak, California, from February 1981 through December 1983. These earthquakes define a broad, northwest-trending seismic zone that extends from the Sierra Nevada through the Lassen Peak area and either terminates or is offset to the northeast about 20 kilometers northwest of Lassen Peak. Approximately 25% of these earthquakes are associated with the geothermal system south of Lassen Peak. Earthquakes in the geothermal area generally occur at depths shallower than 6 kilometers.

  9. Electromagnetic absorption of semiconductor 2D Majorana nanowires.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Daniel; Osca, Javier; Serra, Llorenç

    2015-04-01

    We calculate the cross section for the electromagnetic absorption of planar 2D Majorana nanowires. The electromagnetic field is described in the dipole approximation. We discuss the signatures on the cross section of a near-zero-energy mode. A low energy peak for transverse polarization, absent in the longitudinal one, reveals the presence of the Majorana-like state. This peak is relatively robust against the thermal smearing of the level occupations. We consider the influence of optical masks hiding parts of the nanowire from the radiation.

  10. Dependence of Aerosol Light Absorption and Single-Scattering Albedo On Ambient Relative Humidity for Sulfate Aerosols with Black Carbon Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, Jens; Russell, Philip B.; Hamill, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric aerosols frequently contain hygroscopic sulfate species and black carbon (soot) inclusions. In this paper we report results of a modeling study to determine the change in aerosol absorption due to increases in ambient relative humidity (RH), for three common sulfate species, assuming that the soot mass fraction is present as a single concentric core within each particle. Because of the lack of detailed knowledge about various input parameters to models describing internally mixed aerosol particle optics, we focus on results that were aimed at determining the maximum effect that particle humidification may have on aerosol light absorption. In the wavelength range from 450 to 750 nm, maximum absorption humidification factors (ratio of wet to 'dry=30% RH' absorption) for single aerosol particles are found to be as large as 1.75 when the RH changes from 30 to 99.5%. Upon lesser humidification from 30 to 80% RH, absorption humidification for single particles is only as much as 1.2, even for the most favorable combination of initial ('dry') soot mass fraction and particle size. Integrated over monomodal lognormal particle size distributions, maximum absorption humidification factors range between 1.07 and 1.15 for humidification from 30 to 80% and between 1.1 and 1.35 for humidification from 30 to 95% RH for all species considered. The largest humidification factors at a wavelength of 450 nm are obtained for 'dry' particle size distributions that peak at a radius of 0.05 microns, while the absorption humidification factors at 700 nm are largest for 'dry' size distributions that are dominated by particles in the radius range of 0.06 to 0.08 microns. Single-scattering albedo estimates at ambient conditions are often based on absorption measurements at low RH (approx. 30%) and the assumption that aerosol absorption does not change upon humidification (i.e., absorption humidification equal to unity). Our modeling study suggests that this assumption alone can

  11. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  12. Reward Value Effects on Timing in the Peak Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effect of motivational variables on timing in the peak procedure. In Experiment 1, rats received a 60-s peak procedure that was coupled with long-term, between-phase changes in reinforcer magnitude. Increases in reinforcer magnitude produced a leftward shift in the peak that persisted for 20 sessions of training. In…

  13. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use.

    PubMed

    Gleick, Peter H; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-06-22

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of "peak oil"--a peaking and then decline in oil production--has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of "peak water": peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak "ecological" water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use.

  14. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use

    PubMed Central

    Gleick, Peter H.; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of “peak oil”—a peaking and then decline in oil production—has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of “peak water”: peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak “ecological” water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use. PMID:20498082

  15. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use.

    PubMed

    Gleick, Peter H; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-06-22

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of "peak oil"--a peaking and then decline in oil production--has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of "peak water": peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak "ecological" water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use. PMID:20498082

  16. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.163 Nursery peak inventory endorsement. Nursery Crop Insurance Peak Inventory Endorsement This endorsement is not continuous and must...

  17. Evaluation of peak power prediction equations in male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Michael J; Lyons, Mark; Nevill, Alan M

    2008-07-01

    This study compared peak power estimated using 4 commonly used regression equations with actual peak power derived from force platform data in a group of adolescent basketball players. Twenty-five elite junior male basketball players (age, 16.5 +/- 0.5 years; mass, 74.2 +/- 11.8 kg; height, 181.8 +/- 8.1 cm) volunteered to participate in the study. Actual peak power was determined using a countermovement vertical jump on a force platform. Estimated peak power was determined using countermovement jump height and body mass. All 4 prediction equations were significantly related to actual peak power (all p < 0.01). Repeated-measures analysis of variance indicated significant differences between actual peak power and estimate peak power from all 4 prediction equations (p < 0.001). Bonferroni post hoc tests indicated that estimated peak power was significantly lower than actual peak power for all 4 prediction equations. Ratio limits of agreement for actual peak power and estimated peak power were 8% for the Harman et al. and Sayers squat jump prediction equations, 12% for the Canavan and Vescovi equation, and 6% for the Sayers countermovement jump equation. In all cases peak power was underestimated.

  18. [Measurement of atomic number of alkali vapor and pressure of buffer gas based on atomic absorption].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui-jie; Quan, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Chen, Yao; Lu, Ji-xi

    2015-02-01

    High sensitivitymagnetic measurementscanbe achieved by utilizing atomic spinmanipulation in the spin-exchange-relaxation-free (SERF) regime, which uses an alkali cell as a sensing element. The atomic number density of the alkali vapor and the pressure of the buffer gasare among the most important parameters of the cell andrequire accurate measurement. A method has been proposed and developedto measure the atomic number density and the pressure based on absorption spectroscopy, by sweeping the absorption line and fittingthe experiment data with a Lorentzian profile to obtainboth parameters. Due to Doppler broadening and pressure broadening, which is mainly dominated by the temperature of the cell and the pressure of buffer gas respectively, this work demonstrates a simulation of the errorbetween the peaks of the Lorentzian profile and the Voigt profile caused by bothfactors. The results indicates that the Doppler broadening contribution is insignificant with an error less than 0.015% at 313-513 K for a 4He density of 2 amg, and an error of 0.1% in the presence of 0.6-5 amg at 393 K. We conclude that the Doppler broadening could be ignored under above conditions, and that the Lorentzianprofile is suitably applied to fit the absorption spectrumobtainingboth parameters simultaneously. In addition we discuss the resolution and the instability due to thelight source, wavelength and the temperature of the cell. We find that the cell temperature, whose uncertainty is two orders of magnitude larger than the instability of the light source and the wavelength, is one of the main factors which contributes to the error.

  19. A linear modulation-based stochastic resonance algorithm applied to the detection of weak chromatographic peaks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Haishan; Xiang, Bingren; Liao, Xuewei; Xie, Shaofei

    2006-12-01

    A simple stochastic resonance algorithm based on linear modulation was developed to amplify and detect weak chromatographic peaks. The output chromatographic peak is often distorted when using the traditional stochastic resonance algorithm due to the presence of high levels of noise. In the new algorithm, a linear modulated double-well potential is introduced to correct for the distortion of the output peak. Method parameter selection is convenient and intuitive for linear modulation. In order to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio for the output signal, the performance of two-layer stochastic resonance was evaluated by comparing it with wavelet-based stochastic resonance. The proposed algorithm was applied to the quantitative analysis of dimethyl sulfide and the determination of chloramphenicol residues in milk, and the good linearity of the method demonstrated that it is an effective tool for detecting weak chromatographic peaks.

  20. Thermally stimulated glow peaks in Ge-doped cultured quartz crystals and their radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Bahadur, Harish

    2007-02-01

    Ge-doped crystalline quartz has been examined for its thermally stimulated luminescence and has been found to exhibit TL-glow peaks at 100, 200, and 310 degree sign C. While the peaks at 100 and 310 degree sign C have already been noticed in conventionally grown quartz, the new peak at 200 degree sign C, observed in the present studies, appears to be due to the presence of Ge in quartz lattice. The radiation dependence of this peak upon irradiation at 300 K by high energy electrons (1.75 MeV) has been presented and the results have been compared and discussed in terms of the hydroxyl defects in natural, cultured, and Ge-doped cultured quartz.

  1. An analysis of Super typhoon Rammasun's(2014) peak intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qinbo; Xu, Yinglong

    2016-04-01

    Super typhoon Rammasun (2014) made landfall over Hainan Island, China, at 0730UTC 18 July 2014. Due to the damage of the anemometers, the Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) and the bouy which by Rammasun passed, failed to obtain its peak wind. Lack of the direct evident, in real-time monitoring, its peak intensities were given by 110kts (.i.e. 60m/s)/910hPa,135kts/922hPa , and 90kts/935hPa based on Dvorak technique , which were made by China Meteorological Administration (CMA),Joint Typhoon Warning Center(JTWC), and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) respectively. However, a minimum pressure of 881.2hPa recorded by a barometer which located at Qixhou island (19.982︒N,111.269︒E) while Rammasun approaching, indicates that its intensity was under estimated. By using observation data such as AWS, satellite, Doppler radar and wind tower near the ground, this study performs a detail evaluation to obtain its actual intensity. At 0521UTC, Qizhou Island station recorded 881.2hPa of the minimum station pressure and 899.2hPa of minimum sea level pressure (MSLP) while the anemometer had been destroyed. These are the lowest records in Chinese history and also are ones of the global lowest pressures obtained directly by barometer. It is evident that Rammasun's eyewall did not pass across Qizhou Island directly, so the actual MSLP should be lower than 899.2hPa. By applying wind-pressure relationship, it is reckoned that the reasonable MSLP and peak wind of Rammasun should be 888hPa and 70-76m/s, which makes Rammasun the strongest typhoon ever made landfall in China's history. In order to intuitively investigate the real intensity of Ramasun, eyewall structures are compared with some historical extreme typhoons (hurricanes) such as Saomai(2006), Haiyan(2013) and Katrina(2005). Satellite images show that the dense overcast convection strength of Rammasun is stronger than those when Saomai and Katrina were in their peak intensities and before landing, but weaker than Haiyan. The

  2. Thulium-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplification system with 2 GW of peak power.

    PubMed

    Gaida, C; Gebhardt, M; Stutzki, F; Jauregui, C; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A

    2016-09-01

    Thulium-doped fibers with ultra large mode-field areas offer new opportunities for the power scaling of mid-IR ultrashort-pulse laser sources. Here, we present a laser system delivering a pulse-peak power of 2 GW and a nearly transform-limited pulse duration of 200 fs in combination with 28.7 W of average power. This performance level has been achieved by optimizing the pulse shape, reducing the overlap with atmospheric absorption lines, and incorporating a climate chamber to reduce the humidity of the atmospheric environment. PMID:27607990

  3. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  4. University buys $530,000 cogeneration system only to shave peak demand

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, L.

    1984-05-14

    The University of Richmond will use a cogeneration system during the four summer months to lower peak demand and save about $125,000. The school expects a four-year payback for its $530,000 investment. Because the school's demand charge of 2.5 cents per kilowatt hour is based on the average peak of the summer months, demand charge will be based on about 1025 kW instead of 3500 kW once the cogeneration system is operating. The system will combine a 725-kW generator and engine in a single unit, with the turbine driven by a gas-fired engine. The system will generate 700,000 kWh and save another 300,000 kWh by recovering waste heat for an absorption chiller. Four competitors bid on the project, which was given to Waukesha Engine Division of Dresser Industries.

  5. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  6. Peak velocity overestimation and linear-array spectral Doppler.

    PubMed

    Eicke, B M; Kremkau, F W; Hinson, H; Tegeler, C H

    1995-04-01

    Ultrasound instruments are used to evaluate blood flow velocities in the human body. Most clinical instruments perform velocity calculations based on the Doppler principle and measure the frequency shift of a reflected ultrasound beam. Doppler-only instruments use single-frequency, single-crystal transducers. Linear- and annular-array multiple-crystal transducers are used for duplex scanning (simultaneous B-mode image and Doppler). Clinical interpretation relies primarily on determination of peak velocities or frequency shifts as identified by the Doppler spectrum. Understanding of the validity of these measurements is important for instruments in clinical use. The present study examined the accuracy with which several ultrasound instruments could estimate velocities based on the identification of the peak of the Doppler spectrum, across a range of different angles of insonation, on a Doppler string phantom. The string was running in a water tank at constant speeds of 50, 100, and 150 cm/sec and also in a sine wave pattern at 100- or 150-cm/sec amplitude. Angles of insonation were 30, 45, 60, and 70 degrees. The single-frequency, single-crystal transducers (PC Dop 842, 2-MHz pulsed-wave, 4-MHz continuous-wave) provided acceptably accurate velocity estimates at all tested velocities independent of the angle of insonation. All duplex Doppler instruments with linear-array transducers (Philips P700, 5.0-MHz; Hewlett-Packard Sonos 1000, 7.5-MHz; ATL Ultramark 9 HDI, 7.5-MHz) exhibited a consistent overestimation of the true flow velocity due to increasing intrinsic spectral broadening with increasing angle of insonation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Peak expiratory flow at increased barometric pressure: comparison of peak flow meters and volumetric spirometer.

    PubMed

    Thomas, P S; Ng, C; Bennett, M

    2000-01-01

    Increasing numbers of patients are receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy as an intensive care treatment, some of whom have pre-existing airway obstruction. Spirometers are the ideal instruments for measuring airway obstruction, but peak flow meters are useful and versatile devices. The behaviour of both types of device was therefore studied in a hyperbaric unit under conditions of increased pressure. It is important to have a non-electrical indicator of airway obstruction, to minimize the fire risk in the hyperoxic environment. The hypothesis was tested that, assuming that dynamic resistance is unchanged, both the Wright's standard and mini-peak flow meters would over-read peak expiratory flow (PEF) under increased pressure when compared with a volumetric spirometer, as the latter is unaffected by air density. It was postulated that a correction factor could be derived so that PEF meters could be used in this setting. Seven normal subjects performed volume-dependent spirometry to derive PEF, and manoeuvres using both standard and mini PEF meters at sea level, under hyperbaric conditions at 303, 253 and 152 kPa (3, 2.5 and 1.5 atmospheres respectively; 1 atmosphere absolute=101.08 kPa), and again at sea level. There was a progressive and significant decline in PEF with increasing pressure as measured by the spirometer (69.46+/-0.8% baseline at 303 kPa compared with 101 kPa), while the PEF meters showed a progressive increase in their readings (an increase of 7.86+/-1.69% at 303 kPa with the mini PEF meter). Using these data points, a correction factor was derived which allows appropriate values to be calculated from the Wright's meter readings under these conditions. PMID:10600666

  8. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  9. Enhanced broadband absorption in gold by plasmonic tapered coaxial holes.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lei; Yang, Liu; Nadzeyka, Achim; Bauerdick, Sven; He, Sailing

    2014-12-29

    Gold absorbers based on plasmonic tapered coaxial holes (PTCHs) are demonstrated theoretically and experimentally. An average absorption of over 0.93 is obtained theoretically in a broad wavelength range from 300 nm to 900 nm without polarization sensitivity due to the structural symmetry. Strong scattering of the incident light by the tapered coaxial holes is the main reason for the high absorption in the short wavelength range below about 550 nm, while gap surface plasmon polaritons propagating along the taper dominate the resonance-induced high absorption in the long wavelength range. Combining two PTCHs with different structural parameters can further enhance the absorption and thus increase the spectral bandwidth, which is verified by a sample fabricated by focused ion beam milling. This design is promising to be extended to other metals to realize effective and efficient light harvesting and absorption.

  10. Effects of compositional variation on absorption spectra of lunar pyroxenes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Bell, P. M.; Mao, H. K.

    1978-01-01

    Polarized absorption spectra of lunar pyroxenes with a range of iron, calcium, magnesium, titanium and chromium contents were measured on polished, oriented single crystals; spectral data on pure synthetic FeSiO3 were also recorded. The bands at 1 and 2 microns were found to vary significantly in position with composition within the pyroxene quadrilateral; wavelengths increased with increasing calcium and iron. In the visible region, a weak band at 640 nm correlates in intensity with Cr2O3, but not with titanium as had been previously suggested. The 505-nm ferrous iron peak is a sharp doublet in most low-calcium pyroxenes but a singlet in augites. A peak at 475 nm and an intense absorption edge below 700 nm correlated with titanium content.

  11. Memory Effect Manifested by a Boson Peak in Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, P.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wen, P.; Wang, W. H.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the correlation between a boson peak and structural relaxation in a typical metallic glass. Consistent with enthalpy recovery, a boson peak shows a memory effect in an aging-and-scan procedure. Single-step isothermal aging produces a monotonic decrease of enthalpy and boson peak intensity; for double-step isothermal aging, both enthalpy and boson peak intensity experience, coincidently, an incipient increase to a maximum and a subsequent decrease toward the equilibrium state. Our results indicate a direct link between slow structural relaxation and fast boson peak dynamics, which presents a profound understanding of the two dynamic behaviors in glass.

  12. Long term NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 concentrations in the Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to concentrations reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time.

  13. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  14. Combining hypoxic methods for peak performance.

    PubMed

    Millet, Gregoire P; Roels, B; Schmitt, L; Woorons, X; Richalet, J P

    2010-01-01

    increases beyond 16 h/day. The minimum daily dose for stimulating erythropoiesis seems to be 12 h/day. For non-haematological changes, the implementation of a much shorter duration of exposure seems possible. Athletes could take advantage of IHT, which seems more beneficial than IHE in performance enhancement. The intensity of hypoxic exercise might play a role on adaptations at the molecular level in skeletal muscle tissue. There is clear evidence that intense exercise at high altitude stimulates to a greater extent muscle adaptations for both aerobic and anaerobic exercises and limits the decrease in power. So although IHT induces no increase in VO(2max) due to the low 'altitude dose', improvement in athletic performance is likely to happen with high-intensity exercise (i.e. above the ventilatory threshold) due to an increase in mitochondrial efficiency and pH/lactate regulation. We propose a new combination of hypoxic method (which we suggest naming Living High-Training Low and High, interspersed; LHTLHi) combining LHTL (five nights at 3000 m and two nights at sea level) with training at sea level except for a few (2.3 per week) IHT sessions of supra-threshold training. This review also provides a rationale on how to combine the different hypoxic methods and suggests advances in both their implementation and their periodization during the yearly training programme of athletes competing in endurance, glycolytic or intermittent sports.

  15. Quasi-static energy absorption of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Jacobsen, AJ; Chen, X

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive modeling and numerical study focusing on the energy quasi-static crushing behavior and energy absorption characteristics of hollow tube microlattice structures. The peak stress and effective plateau stress of the hollow microlattice structures are deduced for different geometrical parameters which gives volume and mass densities of energy absorption, D-v and D-m, scale with the relative density, (rho) over bar, as D-v similar to (rho) over bar (1) (5) and D-m similar to (rho) over bar (0 5), respectively, fitting very well to the experimental results of both 60 degrees inclined and 90 degrees predominately microlattices. Then the strategies for energy absorption enhancement are proposed for the engineering design of microlattice structures. By introducing a gradient in the thickness or radius of the lattice members, the buckle propagation can be modulated resulting in an increase in energy absorption density that can exceed 40%. Liquid filler is another approach to improve energy absorption by strengthening the microtruss via circumference expansion, and the gain may be over 100% in terms of volume density. Insight into the correlations between microlattice architecture and energy absorption performance combined with the high degree of architecture control paves the way for designing high performance microlattice structures for a range of impact and impulse mitigation applications for vehicles and structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression of VO2peak in Children and Youth, with Special Reference to Allometric Scaling.

    PubMed

    Loftin, Mark; Sothern, Melinda; Abe, Takashi; Bonis, Marc

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight research that has focused on examining expressions of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in children and youth, with special reference to allometric scaling. VO2peak is considered the highest VO2 during an increasing workload treadmill or bicycle ergometer test until volitional termination. We have reviewed scholarly works identified from PubMed, One Search, EBSCOhost and Google Scholar that examined VO2peak in absolute units (L·min(-1)), relative units [body mass, fat-free mass (FFM)], and allometric expressions [mass, height, lean body mass (LBM) or LBM of the legs raised to a power function] through July 2015. Often, the objective of measuring VO2peak is to evaluate cardiorespiratory function and fitness level. Since body size (body mass and height) frequently vary greatly in children and youth, expressing VO2peak in dimensionless units is often inappropriate for comparative or explanatory purposes. Consequently, expressing VO2peak in allometric units has gained increased research attention over the past 2 decades. In our review, scaling mass was the most frequent variable employed, with coefficients ranging from approximately 0.30 to over 1.0. The wide variance is probably due to several factors, including mass, height, LBM, sex, age, physical training, and small sample size. In summary, we recommend that since skeletal muscle is paramount for human locomotion, an allometric expression of VO2peak relative to LBM is the best expression of VO2peak in children and youth.

  17. Photophysics of poly(ethylene terephthalate): Ultraviolet absorption and emission

    SciTech Connect

    LaFemina, J.P. ); Arjavalingam, G. )

    1991-01-24

    Polarized and unpolarized emission spectra for poly(ethylene terephthalate) are presented, and a new phosphorescence peak at 564 nm is reported. The spectroscopically parameterized CNDO/S3 model is used to provide a detailed description of the absorption and monomeric emission. Moreover, preliminary computations on an idealized terephthalate dimer indicate that the 368-nm fluorescence and the newly reported phosphorescence emission may be attributable to an associated ground-state dimer.

  18. Absorption spectrum of an atom strongly coupled to a high-temperature reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofman, A. G.

    2005-03-01

    We study the absorption spectrum of a weak probe field near resonant to an atomic transition, the upper level of which is strongly coupled to a third level by the interaction with a Lorentzian bosonic reservoir, such as, e.g., a mode of a high- Q cavity or a local vibration in a solid. The reservoir coupling is approximated by the interaction with a classical complex Gaussian-Markovian random process (control field), which is justified when the reservoir temperature exceeds significantly the mode frequency or when the high- Q cavity is pumped by broadband incoherent radiation. The present theory is applicable also when the control field is chaotic laser light. We assume that the rms control-field Rabi frequency V0 is much greater than the field detuning Δc , which, in turn, is much greater than the material relaxation constants. We reveal and describe analytically all qualitatively different regimes of the spectrum modification and obtain their validity conditions. The analytical results are verified by numerical calculations using the exact continued-fraction solution. The analytical formulas obtained allow one to perform fast computer calculations for arbitrarily small values of the reservoir (control-field) bandwidth ν , in contrast to the known numerical methods, which require sharply increasing computational resources with a decrease of ν . In the most interesting case ν≪V0 , the spectrum consists of two peaks, the nonvanishing bandwidth and material relaxation affecting mainly the dip between the peaks. The results obtained in the static limit (i.e., a very narrow reservoir) are independent of the reservoir band shape. We reveal reservoir-induced transparency (RIT)—i.e., absorption reduction due to the reservoir coupling. Moreover, two unexpected, remarkable features are uncovered in a range of intermediate values of ν and V0 , Γ2∣Δc∣≪V02ν≪∣Δc∣3 ( Γ is the spectral width in the absence of the control field): an extra peak in the dip

  19. 78 FR 53103 - Proposed Establishment of the Eagle Peak Mendocino County Viticultural Area and Realignments of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-28

    ... proposed rule published on June 27, 2013 (78 FR 38618), written comments are now due on or before October..., 2013 (78 FR 38618), the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) requested public comment on the... Peak Mendocino County Viticultural Area and Realignments of the Mendocino and Redwood...

  20. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable␣size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable␣frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  1. Peak Oxygen Uptake during and after Long-duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Alan D., Jr.; Downs, Meghan E.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Knudsen, Poul; Evetts, Simon N.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic capacity (VO2peak) previously has not been measured during or after long-duration spaceflight. PURPOSE: To measure VO2peak and submaximal exercise responses during and after International Space Station (ISS) missions. METHODS: Astronauts (9 M, 5 F: 49 +/- 5 yr, 175 +/- 7 cm, 77.2 +/- 15.1 kg, 40.6 +/- 6.4 mL/kg/min [mean +/-SD]) performed graded peak cycle tests 90 days before spaceflight, 15 d (FD15) after launch and every 30 d thereafter during flight, and 1 (R+1), 10 (R+10), and 30 d (R+30) after landing. Oxygen consumption (VO2) and heart rate (HR) were measured from rest to peak exercise, while cardiac output (Q), stroke volume (SV), and arterial-venous oxygen difference (a-vO2diff) were measured only during rest and submaximal exercise. Data were analyzed using mixed-model linear regression. Body mass contributed significantly to statistical models, and thus results are reported as modeled estimates for an average subject. RESULTS: Early inflight (FD15) VO2peak was 17% lower (95% CI = - 22%, -13%) than preflight. VO2peak increased during spaceflight (0.001 L/min/d, P = 0.02) but did not return to preflight levels. On R+1 VO2peak was 15% (95% CI = -19%, -10%) lower than preflight but recovered to within 2% of preflight by R+30 (95% CI = -6%, +3%). Peak HR was not significantly different from preflight at any time. Inflight submaximal VO2 and a-vO2diff were generally lower than preflight, but the Q vs. VO2 slope was unchanged. In contrast, the SV vs. VO2 slope was lower (P < 0.001), primarily due to elevated SV at rest, and the HR vs. VO2 slope was greater (P < 0.001), largely due to elevated HR during more intense exercise. On R+1 although the relationships between VO2 and Q, SV, and HR were not statistically different than preflight, resting and submaximal exercise SV was lower (P < 0.001), resting and submaximal exercise HR was higher (P < 0.002), and a-vO2diff was unchanged. HR and SV returned to preflight levels by R+30. CONCLUSION: In the average

  2. Absorption of impinging water droplet in porous stones.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Radu, A I; Vontobel, P; Derome, D; Carmeliet, J

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation and numerical analysis of the absorption of water droplets impacting porous stones. The absorption process of an impinging droplet is here fully characterized from spreading to evaporation in terms of absorbed mass during droplet depletion and moisture content distribution in a time-resolved manner for three different natural stones. High-speed imaging and neutron radiography are used to quantify moisture absorption in porous stones of varying moisture properties from deposition until depletion. During impact and spreading, the droplet exhibits a dynamic non-wetting behavior. At maximum spreading, the droplet undergoes pinning, resulting into the contact radius remaining constant until droplet depletion. Absorption undergoes two phases: initially, absorption is hindered due a contact resistance attributed to entrapped air; afterwards, a more perfect capillary contact occurs and absorption goes on until depletion, concurrently with evaporation and further redistribution. A finite-element numerical model for isothermal unsaturated moisture transport in porous media captures the phases of mass absorption in good agreement with the experimental data. Droplet spreading and absorption are highly determined by the impact velocity of the droplet, while moisture content redistribution after depletion is much less dependent on impact conditions.

  3. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light.

  4. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-26

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  5. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the ‘core/shell’ interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon. PMID:22548846

  6. Tunable enhanced optical absorption of graphene using plasmonic perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yijun; Zhu, Jinfeng; Liu, Qing Huo

    2015-01-01

    Enhancement and manipulation of light absorption in graphene is a significant issue for applications of graphene-based optoelectronic devices. In order to achieve this purpose in the visible region, we demonstrate a design of a graphene optical absorber inspired by metal-dielectric-metal metamaterial for perfect absorption of electromagnetic waves. The optical absorbance ratios of single and three atomic layer graphene are enhanced up to 37.5% and 64.8%, respectively. The graphene absorber shows polarization-dependence and tolerates a wide range of incident angles. Furthermore, the peak position and bandwidth of graphene absorption spectra are tunable in a wide wavelength range through a specific structural configuration. These results imply that graphene in combination with plasmonic perfect absorbers have a promising potential for developing advanced nanophotonic devices.

  7. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Han; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng; Tang, Wen-Shu; Li, Da; Ma, Song; Geng, Dianyu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhidong

    2012-05-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the `core/shell' interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon.

  8. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingjing; Wang, Han; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng; Tang, Wen-Shu; Li, Da; Ma, Song; Geng, Dianyu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhidong

    2012-05-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the 'core/shell' interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon.

  9. [Carbohydrate absorption and malabsorption (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Caspary, W F

    1977-06-01

    Starch is digested intraluminally by alpha-amylase to maltose, maltotriose, and alpha-limit dextrins. These products, as well as the disaccharides sucrose and lactose, undergo enzymatic hydrolysis to monosaccharides at the brush border surface. The monosaccharides enter the absorbing cell by specific transport mechanisms ("carriers"). Primary carbohydrate (CH) intolerance is characterized by the congenital or acquired absence of individual brush border enzymes or of monosaccharide "carriers" without morphologic abnormalities of the intestinal villus: lactose, sucrose and trehalose intolerance and glucose-galactose malabsorption (brush border diseases). Secondary CH intolerance arises when surface digestion and absorption are reduced due to structural changes of the intestinal mucosa: e.g., decrease or absence of villi with sprue and reduction of the absorbing surface with intestinal resection. Watery diarrhea is the lead symptom. Many drugs delay or interfere with CH absorption. This action may be viewed either as an unwanted side effect or as a welcome therapeutic principle.

  10. [Using 2-DCOS to identify the molecular spectrum peaks for the isomer in the multi-component mixture gases Fourier transform infrared analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-Xin; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2014-10-01

    The generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared were used to identify hydrocarbon isomers in the mixed gases for absorption spectra resolution enhancement. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of n-butane and iso-butane and the two-dimensional correlation infrared spectrum of concentration perturbation were used for analysis as an example. The all band and the main absorption peak wavelengths of Fourier transform infrared spectrum for single component gas showed that the spectra are similar, and if they were mixed together, absorption peaks overlap and peak is difficult to identify. The synchronous and asynchronous spectrum of two-dimensional correlation spectrum can clearly identify the iso-butane and normal butane and their respective characteristic absorption peak intensity. Iso-butane has strong absorption characteristics spectrum lines at 2,893, 2,954 and 2,893 cm(-1), and n-butane at 2,895 and 2,965 cm(-1). The analysis result in this paper preliminary verified that the two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy can be used for resolution enhancement in Fourier transform infrared spectrum quantitative analysis. PMID:25739197

  11. Gamma-Ray Peak Integration: Accuracy and Precision

    SciTech Connect

    Richard M. Lindstrom

    2000-11-12

    The accuracy of singlet gamma-ray peak areas obtained by a peak analysis program is immaterial. If the same algorithm is used for sample measurement as for calibration and if the peak shapes are similar, then biases in the integration method cancel. Reproducibility is the only important issue. Even the uncertainty of the areas computed by the program is trivial because the true standard uncertainty can be experimentally assessed by repeated measurements of the same source. Reproducible peak integration was important in a recent standard reference material certification task. The primary tool used for spectrum analysis was SUM, a National Institute of Standards and Technology interactive program to sum peaks and subtract a linear background, using the same channels to integrate all 20 spectra. For comparison, this work examines other peak integration programs. Unlike some published comparisons of peak performance in which synthetic spectra were used, this experiment used spectra collected for a real (though exacting) analytical project, analyzed by conventional software used in routine ways. Because both components of the 559- to 564-keV doublet are from {sup 76}As, they were integrated together with SUM. The other programs, however, deconvoluted the peaks. A sensitive test of the fitting algorithm is the ratio of reported peak areas. In almost all the cases, this ratio was much more variable than expected from the reported uncertainties reported by the program. Other comparisons to be reported indicate that peak integration is still an imperfect tool in the analysis of gamma-ray spectra.

  12. Relationships between Electroencephalographic Spectral Peaks Across Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, S. J.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which electroencephalographic spectral peaks are independent, and the relationships between their frequencies have been debated. A novel fitting method was used to determine peak parameters in the range 2–35 Hz from a large sample of eyes-closed spectra, and their interrelationships were investigated. Findings were compared with a mean-field model of thalamocortical activity, which predicts near-harmonic relationships between peaks. The subject set consisted of 1424 healthy subjects from the Brain Resource International Database. Peaks in the theta range occurred on average near half the alpha peak frequency, while peaks in the beta range tended to occur near twice and three times the alpha peak frequency on an individual-subject basis. Moreover, for the majority of subjects, alpha peak frequencies were significantly positively correlated with frequencies of peaks in the theta and low and high beta ranges. Such a harmonic progression agrees semiquantitatively with theoretical predictions from the mean-field model. These findings indicate a common or analogous source for different rhythms, and help to define appropriate individual frequency bands for peak identification. PMID:23483663

  13. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  14. Timing of population peaks of Norway lemming in relation to atmospheric pressure: A hypothesis to explain the spatial synchrony.

    PubMed

    Selås, Vidar

    2016-01-01

    Herbivore cycles are often synchronized over larger areas than what could be explained by dispersal. In Norway, the 3-4 year lemming cycle usually show no more than a one-year time lag between different regions, despite distances of up to 1000 km. If important food plants are forced to reallocate defensive proteins in years with high seed production, spatially synchronized herbivore outbreaks may be due to climate-synchronized peaks in flowering. Because lemming peaks are expected to occur one year after a flowering peak, and the formation of flower buds is induced in the year before flowering, a two-year time lag between flower-inducing climate events and lemming peaks is predicted. At Hardangervidda, South Norway, the probability that a year was a population peak year of lemming during 1920-2014 increased with increasing midsummer atmospheric pressure two years earlier, even when the number of years since the previous peak was accounted for.

  15. Normal and abnormal intestinal absorption by humans

    PubMed Central

    Heizer, William D.

    1979-01-01

    Adults eating a Western diet digest and absorb ingested food containing approximately 100 g fat, 350 g carbohydrate, and 75 g protein daily. Normal fat absorption requires adequate gastric, pancreatic, liver-biliary, mucosal, and lymphatic function. Carbohydrate and protein absorption is much less dependent on liver-biliary and lymphatic function. The intestine has a large reserve capacity for digestion and absorption of nutrients which is due to both excess function and to adaptive changes which increase function in one segment of the digestive-absorptive system when it is decreased or lost in another segment. The large reserve capacity explains why most of the prevalent intestinal diseases seldom cause clinically detectable changes in absorption. However, there are more than 30 less-common human diseases which cause malabsorption of one or more nutrients. Those that cause the malabsorption syndrome, i.e., steatorrhea and weight loss, can be conveniently categorized according to the major deficiency leading to the absorptive defect as follows: insufficient pancreatic enzyme activity, insufficient bile acid, disease of the small intestinal wall, multiple defects, mechanism unknown, and drug-induced malabsorption. A few diseases, most of which are congenital, cause malabsorption of only one or a few related nutrients such as lactose malabsorption in lactase deficiency. Most of the tests currently in use for detecting and diagnosing the cause of malabsorption are relatively insensitive and nonspecific. Chemical analysis of the fat in a three-day stool collection remains the single best test for diagnosing the malabsorption syndrome. However, a breath test using Triolein labeled with either the radioactive or stable isotope of carbon may be an important recent advance. Other breath tests are also currently being investigated for quantitating absorption or malabsorption of various substances including bile acids and various sugars. Studies of the function of the

  16. Study of the absorption coefficient of alpha particles to lower hybrid waves in tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianbing Zhang, Xianmei Yu, Limin Zhao, Xiang

    2014-02-12

    Part of the energy of the Lower Hybrid (LH) waves may be absorbed by the α particles via the so-called perpendicular landau damping mechanism, which depends on various parameters of fusion reactors and the LH waves. In this article, we calculate the absorption coefficient γ{sub α} of LH waves due to α particles. Results show that, the γ{sub α} increases with the parallel refraction index n{sub ∥} while deceases with increasing the frequency of LH waves ω{sub LH} over a wide range. Higher background plasma temperature and toroidal magnetic field will increase the absorption, and there is a peak value of γ{sub α} when n{sub e}≈8×10{sup 19}m{sup −3} for ITER-like scenario. The thermal corrections to the cold plasma dispersion relation will change the damping rate to a certain extent under some specific conditions. We have also evaluated the fraction of LH power absorbed by the alpha particles, η ≈ 0.47% and 4.1% for an LH frequency of 5 GHz and 3.7 GHz respectively for ITER-like scenario. This work gives the effective reference for the choice of parameters of future fusion reactors.

  17. Distinct difference in absorption pattern in pigs of betaine provided as a supplement or present naturally in cereal dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2015-03-18

    The net absorption of betaine and choline was determined for 4 h after the first meal of the day in three experiments with porto-arterial catheterized pigs in which betaine was added as a supplement to a low-betaine diet (n=4 pigs) and compared to the net absorption of betaine and choline from high-fiber breads differing in amount and source of dietary fiber (two experiments, n=6 pigs each). Plasma betaine peaked after 30 min when betaine was fed as a supplement, whereas it peaked after 120-180 min when high-fiber breads were fed. Plasma betaine showed no diet×time interaction after feeding with high-fiber breads, indicating that the absorption kinetic did not differ between fiber sources. The net absorption of choline was not affected by the experimental diets. In conclusion, betaine in cereal sources has to be liberated from the matrix prior to absorption, causing delayed absorption.

  18. Human due diligence.

    PubMed

    Harding, David; Rouse, Ted

    2007-04-01

    Most companies do a thorough job of financial due diligence when they acquire other companies. But all too often, deal makers simply ignore or underestimate the significance of people issues in mergers and acquisitions. The consequences are severe. Most obviously, there's a high degree of talent loss after a deal's announcement. To make matters worse, differences in decision-making styles lead to infighting; integration stalls; and productivity declines. The good news is that human due diligence can help companies avoid these problems. Done early enough, it helps acquirers decide whether to embrace or kill a deal and determine the price they are willing to pay. It also lays the groundwork for smooth integration. When acquirers have done their homework, they can uncover capability gaps, points of friction, and differences in decision making. Even more important, they can make the critical "people" decisions-who stays, who goes, who runs the combined business, what to do with the rank and file-at the time the deal is announced or shortly thereafter. Making such decisions within the first 30 days is critical to the success of a deal. Hostile situations clearly make things more difficult, but companies can and must still do a certain amount of human due diligence to reduce the inevitable fallout from the acquisition process and smooth the integration. This article details the steps involved in conducting human due diligence. The approach is structured around answering five basic questions: Who is the cultural acquirer? What kind of organization do you want? Will the two cultures mesh? Who are the people you most want to retain? And how will rank-and-file employees react to the deal? Unless an acquiring company has answered these questions to its satisfaction, the acquisition it is making will be very likely to end badly.

  19. Vanishing absorption and blueshifted emission in FeLoBAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza; Pirkola, Patrik; Hall, Patrick B.; Galati, Natalee; Rogerson, Jesse; Ameri, Abtin

    2016-07-01

    We study the dramatic decrease in iron absorption strength in the iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar SDSS J084133.15+200525.8. We report on the continued weakening of absorption in the prototype of this class of variable broad absorption line quasar, FBQS J140806.2+305448. We also report a third example of this class, SDSS J123103.70+392903.6; unlike the other two examples, it has undergone an increase in observed continuum brightness (at 3000 Å rest frame) as well as a decrease in iron absorption strength. These changes could be caused by absorber transverse motion or by ionization variability. We note that the Mg II and UV Fe II lines in several FeLoBAL quasars are blueshifted by thousands of km s-1 relative to the H β emission line peak. We suggest that such emission arises in the outflowing winds normally seen only in absorption.

  20. Peak oxygen consumption and lactate threshold in full mask versus mouth mask conditions during incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Dooly, C R; Johnson, A T; Dotson, C O; Vaccaro, P; Soong, P

    1996-01-01

    Respirator masks vary in inhalation and exhalation resistance, and in dead volume. It is believed that these factors may contribute significantly to an early anaerobic threshold in mask wearers during maximal exercise. Very little is known concerning the effect of respirator masks on maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) and the lactate threshold (LT). The purpose of the present study was to assess peak VO2 (VO2peak), LT and the ventilatory threshold (VT) of 14 experienced cyclists performing two maximal cycle exercise protocols while wearing a full respirator mask (FM) (M17 type) and a mouth mask (MM). VO2peak was 10% lower under FM conditions. Peak values for ventilation (VEpeak), respiratory rate (fbpeak) and tidal volume (VTpeak) were all significantly lower under with FM versus MM conditions. Performance time and maximal heart rate (fcpeak) were not different between mask conditions. The LT and VT when expressed in %VO2peak, and the lactate concentration (mmol.l-1) at LT and VT were not significantly different across mask conditions. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated longer inhalation times, decreased Fr values and greater oxygen extraction under FM conditions. Thus, perhaps due to the increased inhalation resistance of the FM condition, subjects were unable to attain their "normal" VO2 despite similar performance times and maximal fc. Furthermore, despite a diminished VO2peak with FM, LT and VT appeared to be the same as with a MM.

  1. System effects in sample self-stacking CZE: single analyte peak splitting of salt-containing samples.

    PubMed

    Malá, Zdena; Gebauer, Petr; Bocek, Petr

    2009-03-01

    In CZE one often gets more peaks than the number of sample components. In practice the additional peaks are often left unexplained or assigned to unidentified impurities or system peaks although cases exist when one analyte forms two or more regular distinct zones. One source of such effects are samples with high salt content that are generally assumed to bring higher sensitivity due to the sample self-stacking mechanism. The subject of this contribution is the theoretical and experimental investigation of the electromigration behavior of salt-containing samples. It is shown that they can exhibit splitting of the analyte zone into mutually independent parts detectable as well-developed distinct peaks. Theory based on velocity diagrams and computer simulations reveals that these effects originate in the transient phase of separation where electromigration dispersion profiles and sharp boundaries are formed and evolve. During this, the sample may induce parallel existence of several transient sharp boundaries (including system boundaries) that are simultaneously capable of stacking an analyte. Their electromigration is convergent and depending on whether they merge before the analyte destacks from them, permanent or transient double or multiple peaks are formed. Presented examples of anionic and cationic systems show good agreement with theory. The appearance of multiple peaks can be very variable, ranging from double or triple peaks to a major peak with a minor peak quite apart. Knowledge of the peak-splitting mechanism allows both to identify its presence in a given BGE and sample and to find effective remedy. PMID:19197903

  2. Effect of UV Absorption on Fabrication of Fiber-Optic Bragg Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ying; Sharma, Anup; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    UV light is used to fabricate fiber-optic gratings also heats up the fiber due to absorption by either the fiber-buffer, fiber-cladding, doped with titania or a thin coating of paint. Significant enhancement in the rate of grating fabrication is observed due to UV light absorption.

  3. Greater deciduous shrub abundance extends tundra peak season and increases modeled net CO2 uptake.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Shannan K; Griffin, Kevin L; Steltzer, Heidi; Gough, Laura; Boelman, Natalie T

    2015-06-01

    Satellite studies of the terrestrial Arctic report increased summer greening and longer overall growing and peak seasons since the 1980s, which increases productivity and the period of carbon uptake. These trends are attributed to increasing air temperatures and reduced snow cover duration in spring and fall. Concurrently, deciduous shrubs are becoming increasingly abundant in tundra landscapes, which may also impact canopy phenology and productivity. Our aim was to determine the influence of greater deciduous shrub abundance on tundra canopy phenology and subsequent impacts on net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) during the growing and peak seasons in the arctic foothills region of Alaska. We compared deciduous shrub-dominated and evergreen/graminoid-dominated community-level canopy phenology throughout the growing season using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). We used a tundra plant-community-specific leaf area index (LAI) model to estimate LAI throughout the green season and a tundra-specific NEE model to estimate the impact of greater deciduous shrub abundance and associated shifts in both leaf area and canopy phenology on tundra carbon flux. We found that deciduous shrub canopies reached the onset of peak greenness 13 days earlier and the onset of senescence 3 days earlier compared to evergreen/graminoid canopies, resulting in a 10-day extension of the peak season. The combined effect of the longer peak season and greater leaf area of deciduous shrub canopies almost tripled the modeled net carbon uptake of deciduous shrub communities compared to evergreen/graminoid communities, while the longer peak season alone resulted in 84% greater carbon uptake in deciduous shrub communities. These results suggest that greater deciduous shrub abundance increases carbon uptake not only due to greater leaf area, but also due to an extension of the period of peak greenness, which extends the period of maximum carbon uptake.

  4. Comparison of the manganese oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II of spinach and Synechococcus sp. with multinuclear manganese model compounds by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    DeRose, V.J.; Mukerji, I.; Latimer, M.J. ); Yachandra, V.K.; Klein, M.P. ); Sauer, K. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1994-06-15

    The evaluation of Mn X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) studies on the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) from photosystem II is described for preparations from both spinach and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. poised in the S[sub 1] and S[sub 2] states. In addition to reproducing previous results suggesting the presence of bis([mu]-oxo)-bridged Mn centers in the OEC, a Fourier transform peak due to scatterers at an average distance of > 3 [angstrom] is detected in both types of preparation. In addition, subtle but reproducible changes are found in the relative amplitudes of the Fourier transform peaks due to mainly O ([approximately]1.8 [angstrom]) and Mn ([approximately] 2.7 [angstrom]) neighbors upon cryogenic advance from the S[sub 1] to the S[sub 2] state. Analysis of the peak due to scatterers at [approximately] 3 [angstrom] favors assignment to (per 4 Mn in the OEC) 1-2 heavy atom (Mn, Ca) scatterers at an average distance of 3.3-3.4 [angstrom]. The EXAFS data of several multinuclear Mn model compounds containing such scattering interactions are analyzed and compared with the data for the OEC. Structural models for the OEC are evaluated on the basis of these results. 40 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Force Irregularity Following Maximal Effort: The After-Peak Reduction.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Barbara M; Mettler, Joni A; Griffin, Lisa; Spirduso, Waneen

    2016-08-01

    Irregularities in force output are present throughout human movement and can impair task performance. We investigated the presence of a large force discontinuity (after-peak reduction, APR) that appeared immediately following peak in maximal effort ramp contractions performed with the thumb adductor and ankle dorsiflexor muscles in 25 young adult participants (76% males, 24% females; M age 24.4 years, SD = 7.1). The after-peak reduction displayed similar parameters in both muscle groups with comparable drops in force during the after-peak reduction minima (thumb adductor: 27.5 ± 7.5% maximal voluntary contraction; ankle dorsiflexor: 25.8 ± 6.2% maximal voluntary contraction). A trend for the presence of fewer after-peak reductions with successive ramp trials was observed, suggesting a learning effect. Further investigation should explore underlying neural mechanisms contributing to the after-peak reduction. PMID:27502241

  6. Intestinal Folate Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Olinger, Edward J.; Bertino, Joseph R.; Binder, Henry J.

    1973-01-01

    These studies were designed to determine whether pteroylmonoglutamic acid (PGA) at physiologic concentrations is transported across the small intestine unaltered or is reduced and methylated to the circulating folate form (5-methyltetrahydrofolate [5-MeFH4]) during absorption. [3H]PGA was incubated in vitro on the mucosal side of rat jejunum. Of the folate transferred to the serosal side, the percent identified as 5-MeFH4 by DEAE-Sephadex chromtography was inversely related to the initial mucosa PGA concentration: at 7, 20, and 2,000 nM, 44%, 34%, and 2%, respectively, was converted to 5-MeFH4. In contrast, less than 4% of the folate transferred across ileal mucosa was 5-MeFH4 when the initial mucosa concentration was 20 nM. Specific activity of dihydrofolate (DHF) reductase, the enzyme responsible for converting PGA to tetrahydrofolic acid, was measured in villus homogenates and was significantly greater in the jejunum than in the ileum. 1,000 nM methotrexate (MTX), a DHF reductase inhibitor, markedly inhibited PGA conversion to 5-MeFH4 by the jejunum. Studies of transmural flux, initial rate of mucosal entry (influx) and mucosal accumulation (uptake) of folate were also performed. Although MTX did not alter the influx of PGA, MTX decreased jejunal mucosal uptake but increased transmural movement. Transmural folate movement across ileal mucosa was greater than across jejunal mucosa although mucosal uptake was greater in the jejunum than in the ileum. These results could explain previous studies which have failed to identify conversion of PGA to 5-MeFH4 when intestinal preparations have been exposed to higher and less physiologic concentrations of PGA. Further, these studies suggest that 5-MeFH4 may be retained by the jejunal mucosa. PMID:4727453

  7. Peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Christina; Lyke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Maslow (1970) defined peak experiences as the most wonderful experiences of a person's life, which may include a sense of awe, well-being, or transcendence. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that psilocybin can produce experiences subjectively rated as uniquely meaningful and significant (Griffiths et al. 2006). It is therefore possible that psilocybin may facilitate or change the nature of peak experiences in users compared to non-users. This study was designed to compare the peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users, to evaluate the frequency of peak experiences while under the influence of psilocybin, and to assess the perceived degree of alteration of consciousness during these experiences. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling from undergraduate classes and at a musical event. Participants were divided into three groups, those who reported a peak experience while under the influence of psilocybin (psilocybin peak experience: PPE), participants who had used psilocybin but reported their peak experiences did not occur while they were under the influence of psilocybin (non-psilocybin peak experience: NPPE), and participants who had never used psilocybin (non-user: NU). A total of 101 participants were asked to think about their peak experiences and complete a measure evaluating the degree of alteration of consciousness during that experience. Results indicated that 47% of psilocybin users reported their peak experience occurred while using psilocybin. In addition, there were significant differences among the three groups on all dimensions of alteration of consciousness. Future research is necessary to identify factors that influence the peak experiences of psilocybin users in naturalistic settings and contribute to the different characteristics of peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users. PMID:23909006

  8. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  9. Peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Christina; Lyke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Maslow (1970) defined peak experiences as the most wonderful experiences of a person's life, which may include a sense of awe, well-being, or transcendence. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that psilocybin can produce experiences subjectively rated as uniquely meaningful and significant (Griffiths et al. 2006). It is therefore possible that psilocybin may facilitate or change the nature of peak experiences in users compared to non-users. This study was designed to compare the peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users, to evaluate the frequency of peak experiences while under the influence of psilocybin, and to assess the perceived degree of alteration of consciousness during these experiences. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling from undergraduate classes and at a musical event. Participants were divided into three groups, those who reported a peak experience while under the influence of psilocybin (psilocybin peak experience: PPE), participants who had used psilocybin but reported their peak experiences did not occur while they were under the influence of psilocybin (non-psilocybin peak experience: NPPE), and participants who had never used psilocybin (non-user: NU). A total of 101 participants were asked to think about their peak experiences and complete a measure evaluating the degree of alteration of consciousness during that experience. Results indicated that 47% of psilocybin users reported their peak experience occurred while using psilocybin. In addition, there were significant differences among the three groups on all dimensions of alteration of consciousness. Future research is necessary to identify factors that influence the peak experiences of psilocybin users in naturalistic settings and contribute to the different characteristics of peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

  10. Combined effect of storm movement and drainage network configuration on flood peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Yongwon; Son, Kwang Ik; Choi, Hyun Il

    2016-04-01

    This presentation reports the combined effect of storm movement and drainage network layout on resulting hydrographs and its implication to flood process and also flood mitigation. First, we investigate, in general terms, the effects of storm movement on the resulting flood peaks, and the underlying process controls. For this purpose, we utilize a broad theoretical framework that uses characteristic time and space scales associated with stationary rainstorms as well as moving rainstorms. For a stationary rainstorm the characteristic timescales that govern the peak response include two intrinsic timescales of a catchment and one extrinsic timescale of a rainstorm. On the other hand, for a moving rainstorm, two additional extrinsic scales are required; the storm travel time and storm size. We show that the relationship between the peak response and the timescales appropriate for a stationary rainstorm can be extended in a straightforward manner to describe the peak response for a moving rainstorm. For moving rainstorms, we show that the augmentation of peak response arises from both effect of overlaying the responses from subcatchments (resonance condition) and effect of increased responses from subcatchments due to increased duration (interdependence), which results in maximum peak response when the moving rainstorm is slower than the channel flow velocity. Second, we show the relation between channel network configurations and hydrograph sensitivity to storm kinematics. For this purpose, Gibbs' model is used to evaluate the network characteristics. The results show that the storm kinematics that produces the maximum peak discharge depends on the network configuration because the resonance condition changes with the network configuration. We show that an "efficient" network layout is more sensitive and results in higher increase in peak response compared to "inefficient" one. These results imply different flood potential risks for river networks depending on network

  11. Multipitched Diffraction Gratings for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the application of metal-coated diffraction gratings possessing multiple simultaneous pitch values for surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. SEIRA increases the magnitude of vibrational signals in infrared measurements by one of several mechanisms, most frequently involving the enhanced electric field associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). While the majority of SEIRA applications to date have employed nanoparticle-based plasmonic systems, recent advances have shown how various metals and structures lead to similar signal enhancement. Recently, diffraction grating couplers have been demonstrated as a highly tunable platform for SEIRA. Indeed, gratings are an experimentally advantageous platform due to the inherently tunable nature of surface plasmon excitation at these surfaces since both the grating pitch and incident angle can be used to modify the spectral location of the plasmon resonance. In this work, we use laser interference lithography (LIL) to fabricate gratings possessing multiple pitch values by subjecting photoresist-coated glass slides to repetitive exposures at varying orientations. After metal coating, these gratings produced multiple, simultaneous plasmon peaks associated with the multipitched surface, as identified by infrared reflectance measurements. These plasmon peaks could then be coupled to vibrational modes in thin films to provide localized enhancement of infrared signals. We demonstrate the flexibility and tunability of this platform for signal enhancement. It is anticipated that, with further refinement, this approach might be used as a general platform for broadband enhancement of infrared spectroscopy. PMID:26458177

  12. Multipitched Diffraction Gratings for Surface Plasmon Resonance-Enhanced Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Petefish, Joseph W; Hillier, Andrew C

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the application of metal-coated diffraction gratings possessing multiple simultaneous pitch values for surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. SEIRA increases the magnitude of vibrational signals in infrared measurements by one of several mechanisms, most frequently involving the enhanced electric field associated with surface plasmon resonance (SPR). While the majority of SEIRA applications to date have employed nanoparticle-based plasmonic systems, recent advances have shown how various metals and structures lead to similar signal enhancement. Recently, diffraction grating couplers have been demonstrated as a highly tunable platform for SEIRA. Indeed, gratings are an experimentally advantageous platform due to the inherently tunable nature of surface plasmon excitation at these surfaces since both the grating pitch and incident angle can be used to modify the spectral location of the plasmon resonance. In this work, we use laser interference lithography (LIL) to fabricate gratings possessing multiple pitch values by subjecting photoresist-coated glass slides to repetitive exposures at varying orientations. After metal coating, these gratings produced multiple, simultaneous plasmon peaks associated with the multipitched surface, as identified by infrared reflectance measurements. These plasmon peaks could then be coupled to vibrational modes in thin films to provide localized enhancement of infrared signals. We demonstrate the flexibility and tunability of this platform for signal enhancement. It is anticipated that, with further refinement, this approach might be used as a general platform for broadband enhancement of infrared spectroscopy.

  13. Emission from water vapor and absorption from other gases at 5-7.5 μm in Spitzer-IRS Spectra Of Protoplanetary Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, B. A.; Forrest, W.; Watson, Dan M.; Kim, K. H.; Richter, I.; Tayrien, C.; D'Alessio, P.; Calvet, N.; Furlan, E.; Green, J.; Pontoppidan, K.

    2014-09-10

    We present spectra of 13 T Tauri stars in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region showing emission in Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph 5-7.5 μm spectra from water vapor and absorption from other gases in these stars' protoplanetary disks. Seven stars' spectra show an emission feature at 6.6 μm due to the ν{sub 2} = 1-0 bending mode of water vapor, with the shape of the spectrum suggesting water vapor temperatures >500 K, though some of these spectra also show indications of an absorption band, likely from another molecule. This water vapor emission contrasts with the absorption from warm water vapor seen in the spectrum of the FU Orionis star V1057 Cyg. The other 6 of the 13 stars have spectra showing a strong absorption band, peaking in strength at 5.6-5.7 μm, which for some is consistent with gaseous formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) and for others is consistent with gaseous formic acid (HCOOH). There are indications that some of these six stars may also have weak water vapor emission. Modeling of these stars' spectra suggests these gases are present in the inner few AU of their host disks, consistent with recent studies of infrared spectra showing gas in protoplanetary disks.

  14. ALPHA ATTENUATION DUE TO DUST LOADING

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, A; Dennis Hadlock, D

    2007-08-09

    Previous studies had been done in order to show the attenuation of alpha particles in filter media. These studies provided an accurate correction for this attenuation, but there had not yet been a study with sufficient results to properly correct for attenuation due to dust loading on the filters. At the Savannah River Site, filter samples are corrected for attenuation due to dust loading at 20%. Depending on the facility the filter comes from and the duration of the sampling period, the proper correction factor may vary. The objective of this study was to determine self-absorption curves for each of three counting instruments. Prior work indicated significant decreases in alpha count rate (as much as 38%) due to dust loading, especially on filters from facilities where sampling takes place over long intervals. The alpha count rate decreased because of a decrease in the energy of the alpha. The study performed resulted in a set of alpha absorption curves for each of three detectors. This study also took into account the affects of the geometry differences in the different counting equipment used.

  15. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Scott

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum and which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all of the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.

  16. Zener Relaxation Peak in an Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng-Cun; Cheng, He-Fa; Gong, Chen-Li; Wei, Jian-Ning; Han, Fu-Sheng

    2002-11-01

    We have studied the temperature spectra of internal friction and relative dynamic modulus of the Fe-(25 wt%)Cr-(5 wt%)Al alloy with different grain sizes. It is found that a peak appears in the internal friction versus temperature plot at about 550°C. The peak is of a stable relaxation and is reversible, which occurs not only during heating but also during cooling. Its activation energy is 2.5 (+/- 0.15) eV in terms of the Arrhenius relation. In addition, the peak is not obvious in specimens with a smaller grain size. It is suggested that the peak originates from Zener relaxation.

  17. Inhibitor of intramembranous absorption in ovine amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F

    2014-02-01

    Intramembranous absorption increases during intra-amniotic infusion of physiological saline solutions. The increase may be due partly to the concomitant elevation in fetal urine production as fetal urine contains a stimulator of intramembranous absorption. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in intramembranous absorption during intra-amniotic infusion is due, in part, to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is present in amniotic fluid. In late-gestation fetal sheep, amniotic fluid volume and the four primary amniotic inflows and outflows were determined over 2-day intervals under three conditions: 1) control conditions when fetal urine entered the amniotic sac, 2) during intra-amniotic infusion of 2 l/day of lactated Ringer solution when urine entered the amniotic sac, and 3) during the same intra-amniotic infusion when fetal urine was continuously replaced with lactated Ringer solution. Amniotic fluid volume, fetal urine production, swallowed volume, and intramembranous absorption rate increased during the infusions independent of fetal urine entry into the amniotic sac or its replacement. Lung liquid secretion rate was unchanged during infusion. Because fetal membrane stretch has been shown not to be involved and because urine replacement did not alter the response, we conclude that the increase in intramembranous absorption that occurs during intra-amniotic infusions is due primarily to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is normally present in amniotic fluid. This result combined with our previous study suggests that a nonrenal inhibitor(s) together with a renal stimulator(s) interact to regulate intramembranous absorption rate and, hence, amniotic fluid volume.

  18. Inhibitor of intramembranous absorption in ovine amniotic fluid

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Cecilia Y.; Anderson, Debra F.

    2013-01-01

    Intramembranous absorption increases during intra-amniotic infusion of physiological saline solutions. The increase may be due partly to the concomitant elevation in fetal urine production as fetal urine contains a stimulator of intramembranous absorption. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in intramembranous absorption during intra-amniotic infusion is due, in part, to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is present in amniotic fluid. In late-gestation fetal sheep, amniotic fluid volume and the four primary amniotic inflows and outflows were determined over 2-day intervals under three conditions: 1) control conditions when fetal urine entered the amniotic sac, 2) during intra-amniotic infusion of 2 l/day of lactated Ringer solution when urine entered the amniotic sac, and 3) during the same intra-amniotic infusion when fetal urine was continuously replaced with lactated Ringer solution. Amniotic fluid volume, fetal urine production, swallowed volume, and intramembranous absorption rate increased during the infusions independent of fetal urine entry into the amniotic sac or its replacement. Lung liquid secretion rate was unchanged during infusion. Because fetal membrane stretch has been shown not to be involved and because urine replacement did not alter the response, we conclude that the increase in intramembranous absorption that occurs during intra-amniotic infusions is due primarily to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is normally present in amniotic fluid. This result combined with our previous study suggests that a nonrenal inhibitor(s) together with a renal stimulator(s) interact to regulate intramembranous absorption rate and, hence, amniotic fluid volume. PMID:24381178

  19. Metrological activity determination of 133Ba by sum-peak absolute method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, R. L.; de Almeida, M. C. M.; Delgado, J. U.; Poledna, R.; Santos, A.; de Veras, E. V.; Rangel, J.; Trindade, O. L.

    2016-07-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation provides gamma sources of radionuclide and standardized in activity with reduced uncertainties. Relative methods require standards to determine the sample activity while the absolute methods, as sum-peak, not. The activity is obtained directly with good accuracy and low uncertainties. 133Ba is used in research laboratories and on calibration of detectors for analysis in different work areas. Classical absolute methods don't calibrate 133Ba due to its complex decay scheme. The sum-peak method using gamma spectrometry with germanium detector standardizes 133Ba samples. Uncertainties lower than 1% to activity results were obtained.

  20. Temperature and pH effects on myoglobin optical absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielski, Wayne A.; Arakaki, Lorilee S. L.; Schenkman, Kenneth A.

    2005-03-01

    Myoglobin is an important intracellular oxygen transport molecule in muscle. Oxygen binding to myoglobin can be determined spectroscopically due to differences in absorption of oxymyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin. Myoglobin oxygenation can be used as a measure of intracellular oxygen tension in muscle. We sought to determine the effects of differences in temperature and pH on myoglobin absorption spectra in the near-infrared spectral region. Transmission spectra were taken of pure solutions of oxymyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin at 10°, 20°, 30°, and 40°C at pH values of 6.0, 7.0, and 8.0 (n=4). In second derivative spectra at 40°C, the deoxymyoglobin peak near 760 nm was shifted by 0.9-1.2 nm toward longer wavelengths relative to 10°C at constant pH. Differences in pH did not result in statistically significant shifts in this peak at constant temperature. Estimations of myoglobin saturation from myoglobin spectra with intermediate saturations were obtained by least squares (LS) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses. Both algorithms estimate myoglobin saturation with small root mean square errors (<1e-6) when component spectra and calibration set spectra are at the same temperature as test spectra (n=100). However, when spectra at 20°C or 40°C were used as component spectra in LS with test spectra at 30°C (all at pH 7.0), errors were 0.8% and 1.4%, respectively. PLS analysis of 30°C test spectra using 20°C or 40°C calibration set spectra yielded errors of 1.6% and 1.5%, respectively. When the PLS analysis is endpoint corrected, these errors become vanishingly small. These results demonstrate that peak shifts due to temperature are potential sources of error if calibration and test spectra differ by 10°C. These errors can be minimized by appropriate spectral analytic methods.