Science.gov

Sample records for absorption peak energy

  1. Microwave peak absorption frequency of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangze; Chen, Mingdong

    2008-09-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction is a new effective method which has practical applications in many fields. Microwave heating is one of its physical mechanisms, and it also has the characteristic of selectivity. When the applied microwave frequency equals a certain absorption frequency of the material (or specific component), the material will intensively absorb microwave energy. This is also known as resonant absorption, and the frequency is called the peak absorption frequency which depends on the physical structure of the material. In this work, dynamic hydrogen bond energy was included in molecular activation energy; with the liquid cell model, the expression of interaction energy between dipolar molecules was derived. The rotational relaxation time was gotten from the Eyring viscosity formula. Then based on the relationship between dielectric dissipation coefficient and relaxation time, the expression of microwave peak absorption frequency as a function of the material physical structure, rotational inertia and electrical dipole moment of molecules was established. These theoretical formulas were applied to water and benzene, and the calculated results agree fairly well with the experimental data. This work can not only deepen the study of the interaction between microwave and material, but also provide a possible guide for the experiment of microwave-assisted extraction.

  2. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  3. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  4. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  5. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  6. Peak, multi-peak and broadband absorption in graphene-based one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloua, R.; Kebbab, Z.; Chiker, F.; Khadraoui, M.; Sahraoui, K.; Bouzidi, A.; Medles, M.; Mathieu, C.; Benramdane, N.

    2014-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of enhancing light absorption in graphene-based one dimensional photonic crystal. We demonstrate that it is possible to achieve total light absorption at technologically important wavelengths using one-dimensional graphene-based photonic crystals. By means of the transfer matrix method, we investigate the effect of refractive indices and layer numbers on the optical response of the structure. We found that it is possible to achieve one peak, multi-peak or broadband, and complete optical absorption. As a result, the proposed photonic structures enable myriad potential applications such as photodetection, shielding and optical sensing.

  7. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  8. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  9. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  10. Spectral calibration for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer based on absorption peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, YaSheng; Chen, Yan; Liao, Ningfang; Lyu, Hang; He, Shufang; Wan, Lifang

    2015-08-01

    A new calibration method for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer is presented. Two kinds of common materials as Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films which have special absorption peaks in the infrared band were used in the calibration experiment. As the wavelengths at the sharp absorption peaks of the films are known, an infrared imaging spectrometer can be calibrated on spectra with two or three peaks. With high precision and stability, this method simplifies the calibration work. It is especially appropriate for the measuring condition with a lack of calibration equipment or with inconvenience to calibrate the multiple light sources outdoors.

  11. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  12. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-21

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications. PMID:27143336

  13. Twin-peaks absorption spectra of excess electron in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Kondoh, Takafumi; Yoshida, Yoichi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    The solvated electron in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been the subject of several investigations and several reports exist on its nature and absorption spectrum. These studies concluded that the solvated electron exhibits an absorption spectrum peaking in the 1000-1400 nm region; a second absorption band peaking in the UV region has been assigned to the hole or dication radicals simultaneously formed in the system. Here we report on the fate of the excess electron in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, P14+/NTf2- using nanosecond pulse radiolysis. Scavenging experiments allowed us to record and disentangle the complex spectrum measured in P14+/NTf2-. We identified a bi-component absorption spectrum, due to the solvated electron, the absorption maxima located at 1080 nm and around 300 nm, as predicted by previous ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations for the dry excess electron. We also measured the spectra using different ionic liquids and confirmed the same feature of two absorption peaks. The present results have important implications for the characterization of solvated electrons in ionic liquids and better understanding of their structure and reactivity.

  14. Energy absorption by polymer crazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, S. S.; Zhang, Z. D.; Chern, S. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    During the past thirty years, a tremendous amount of research was done on the development of crazing in polymers. The phenomenon of crazing was recognized as an unusual deformation behavior associated with a process of molecular orientation in a solid to resist failure. The craze absorbs a fairly large amount of energy during the crazing process. When a craze does occur the surrounding bulk material is usually stretched to several hundred percent of its original dimension and creates a new phase. The total energy absorbed by a craze during the crazing process in creep was calculated analytically with the help of some experimental measurements. A comparison of the energy absorption by the new phase and that by the original bulk uncrazed medium is made.

  15. Fluid absorption solar energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A conventional solar dynamic system transmits solar energy to the flowing fluid of a thermodynamic cycle through structures which contain the gas and thermal energy storage material. Such a heat transfer mechanism dictates that the structure operate at a higher temperature than the fluid. This investigation reports on a fluid absorption receiver where only a part of the solar energy is transmitted to the structure. The other part is absorbed directly by the fluid. By proportioning these two heat transfer paths the energy to the structure can preheat the fluid, while the energy absorbed directly by the fluid raises the fluid to its final working temperature. The surface temperatures need not exceed the output temperature of the fluid. This makes the output temperature of the gas the maximum temperature in the system. The gas can have local maximum temperatures higher than the output working temperature. However local high temperatures are quickly equilibrated, and since the gas does not emit radiation, local high temperatures do not result in a radiative heat loss. Thermal radiation, thermal conductivity, and heat exchange with the gas all help equilibrate the surface temperature.

  16. Off-peak electric energy for poultry feed processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tyson, E.J.

    1987-01-01

    Off-peak electric energy can be used for poultry feed processing, achieving substantial reduction in electric energy cost. In addition, high efficiency equipment and conservation measures add to energy cost savings. Careful planning and evaluation of time-of-use rates can maximize the savings for each type of enterprise.

  17. Identification of B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure peaks of boron nitride thin films prepared by sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Masahito; Miyamoto, Kazuyoshi; Mitamura, Tohru; Mochiji, Kozo

    2010-09-15

    Four {pi}{sup *} resonance peaks were observed in the B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of boron nitride thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering. In the past, these peaks have been explained as the K-absorption of boron atoms, which are present in environment containing nitrogen vacancies, the number of which is 1-3 corresponding to the three peaks at higher photon energy. However, the authors found that there was a strong correlation between the intensities of these three peaks and that of O-K absorption after wide range scanning and simultaneous measurement of nitrogen and oxygen K-absorptions of the BN films. Therefore, the authors conclude that these three peaks at the higher energy side correspond to boron atoms bound to one-to-three oxygen atoms instead of three nitrogen atoms surrounding the boron atom in the h-BN structure. The result of the first-principles calculation with a simple cluster model supported the validity of this explanation.

  18. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  19. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-05-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed.

  20. Quasi-static energy absorption of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Jacobsen, AJ; Chen, X

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive modeling and numerical study focusing on the energy quasi-static crushing behavior and energy absorption characteristics of hollow tube microlattice structures. The peak stress and effective plateau stress of the hollow microlattice structures are deduced for different geometrical parameters which gives volume and mass densities of energy absorption, D-v and D-m, scale with the relative density, (rho) over bar, as D-v similar to (rho) over bar (1) (5) and D-m similar to (rho) over bar (0 5), respectively, fitting very well to the experimental results of both 60 degrees inclined and 90 degrees predominately microlattices. Then the strategies for energy absorption enhancement are proposed for the engineering design of microlattice structures. By introducing a gradient in the thickness or radius of the lattice members, the buckle propagation can be modulated resulting in an increase in energy absorption density that can exceed 40%. Liquid filler is another approach to improve energy absorption by strengthening the microtruss via circumference expansion, and the gain may be over 100% in terms of volume density. Insight into the correlations between microlattice architecture and energy absorption performance combined with the high degree of architecture control paves the way for designing high performance microlattice structures for a range of impact and impulse mitigation applications for vehicles and structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Asymmetric and symmetric absorption peaks observed in infrared spectra of CO2 adsorbed on TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Infrared spectra of CO2 physisorbed on titania nanotubes (TiNTs), predominantly in the anatase polymorph, were measured at 81 K. Asymmetric and symmetric absorption peaks due to the antisymmetric stretch vibration (ν3) of CO2 were observed at 2340 cm-1 and 2350 cm-1, respectively. On the basis of the exposure- and time-dependence of the spectrum, the 2340 cm-1 peak was attributed to CO2 at the defective sites related to subsurface O vacancies (Vos) while the 2350 cm-1 peak was assigned to that at the fivefold coordinated Ti4+ sites. It was found that the generalized Fano line shape was well fitted to the 2340 cm-1 peak. We also observed an absorption peak at 2372 cm-1, which was attributed to the combination band of ν3 and the external mode of CO2 at Ti4+.

  2. Peak Oil and Energy Independence: Myth and Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, James W.; Hansen, Jim

    2013-07-01

    Despite the recent uptick in production of natural gas and liquid fuels in the United States, increasing energy resource scarcity and reliance on unconventional fossil fuel sources will make energy independence for the nation very unlikely. Rather, geologists, economists, environmentalists, and resource managers are looking with interest at when the use of fossil fuels is expected to peak—will that occurrence be driven by the market or by supply? What level will emissions reach before this peak is reached?

  3. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  4. Molten salt thermal energy storage for utility peaking loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrara, A.; Haslett, R.; Joyce, J.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers the use of thermal energy storage (TES) in molten salts to increase the capacity of power plants. Five existing fossil and nuclear electric utility plants were selected as representative of current technology. A review of system load diagrams indicated that TES to meet loads over 95% of peak was a reasonable goal. Alternate TES heat exchanger locations were evaluated, showing that the stored energy should be used either for feedwater heating or to generate steam for an auxiliary power cycle. Specific salts for each concept are recommended. Design layouts were prepared for one plant, and it was shown that a TES tube/shell heat exchanger system could provide about 7% peaking capability at lower cost than adding steam generation capacity. Promising alternate heat exchanger concepts were also identified.

  5. Absorption Peaks: α, β, γ and Their Covariance with Age and Hemoglobin in Human Blood Samples Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Domínguez, J. L.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, F. A.; Martínez-Ortiz, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.

    2012-11-01

    This study reports the absorption peaks α, β, γ in the Soret band of photoacoustic (PA) signals and their covariance with age and hemoglobin in human blood samples through PA spectroscopy. Samples were taken randomly from a masculine population grouped in three categories according to age: infants, young adults, and senior adults. Samples were prepared with two drops of blood from a 0.5 mL insulin syringe with a needle gauge 31G over 5 mm circles of filter paper. It was observed that the PA signal, the amplitude as a function of the wavelength, has a behavior as that reported for human blood for the three absorption peaks α, β, γ. In particular, the ratio γ/ β is due to electronic transitions associated with charge-transfer interactions of iron orbitals with the ligand states. Through an evaluation of optical absorption peaks in blood samples and their covariance with age and hemoglobin concentration, a relationship was found for the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with such parameters. Specifically, a negative covariance in the Soret band of the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with respect to both age and hemoglobin was found. This showed a tendency in their behavior. Further experiments of different populations may corroborate these conclusions.

  6. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  7. High peak power diode stacks for high energy lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negoita, Viorel C.; Vethake, Thilo; Jiang, John; Roff, Robert; Shih, Ming; Duck, Richard; Bauer, Marc; Mite, Roberto; Boucke, Konstantin; Treusch, Georg

    2015-02-01

    High energy solid state lasers are being developed for fusion experiments and other research applications where high energy per pulse is required but the repetition rate is rather low, around 10Hz. We report our results on high peak power diode laser stacks used as optical pumps for these lasers. The stacks are based on 10 mm bars with 4 mm cavity length and 55% fill factor, with peak power exceeding 500 W per bar. These bars are stacked and mounted on a cooler which provides backside cooling and electrical insulation. Currently we mount 25 bars per cooler for a nominal peak power of 12.5 kW, but in principle the mounting scheme can be scaled to a different number of devices depending on the application. Pretesting of these bars before soldering on the cooler enables us to select devices with similar wavelength and thus we maintain tight control of the spectral width (FWHM less than 6 nm). Fine adjustments of the centroid wavelength can be done by means of temperature of the cooling fluid or bias current. The available wavelength range spans from 880 nm to 1000 nm, and the wavelength of the entire assembly of stacks can be controlled to within 0.5 nm of the target value, which makes these stacks suitable for pumping a variety of gain media. The devices are fast axis collimated, with over 95% power being collimated in 6 mrad (full angle). The slow axis divergence is 9° (full angle) for 95% power content.

  8. Using energy peaks to measure new particle masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin

    2014-11-01

    We discussed in arXiv:1209.0772 that the laboratory frame distribution of the energy of a massless particle from a two-body decay at a hadron collider has a peak whose location is identical to the value of this daughter's (fixed) energy in the rest frame of the corresponding mother particle. For that result to hold we assumed that the mother is unpolarized and has a generic boost distribution in the laboratory frame. In this work we discuss how this observation can be applied for determination of masses of new particles, with out requiring a full reconstruction of their decay chains or information about the rest of the event. We focus on a two-step cascade decay of a massive particle that has one invisible particle in the final state: C → Bb → Aab, where C, B and A are new particles of which A is invisible and a, b are visible particles. Combining the measurements of the peaks of energy distributions of a and b with that of the edge in their invariant mass distribution, we demonstrate that it is in principle possible to determine separately all three masses of the new particles, in particular, without using any measurement of missing transverse momentum. Furthermore, we show how the use of the peaks in an inclusive energy distribution is generically less affected (as compared to other mass measurement strategies) by combinatorial issues. For some simplified, yet interesting, scenarios we find that these combinatorial issues are absent altogether. As an example of this general strategy, we study SUSY models where gluino decays to an invisible lightest neutralino via an on-shell bottom squark. Taking into account the dominant backgrounds, we show how the mass of the bottom squark, the gluino and (for some class of spectra) that of the neutralino can be determined using this technique.

  9. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  10. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  11. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ˜ 0.01 up to ˜ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the "intensity" is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i - Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ˜ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  12. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  13. Determining neutrino absorption spectra at ultra-high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, O; Van Vliet, A R E-mail: A.R.van.Vliet@student.rug.nl

    2008-06-15

    A very efficient method for measuring the flux of ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrinos is through the detection of radio waves which are emitted by the particle shower in the lunar regolith. The highest acceptance is reached for radio waves in the frequency band of 100-200 MHz which can be measured with modern radio telescopes. In this work we investigate the sensitivity of this detection method to structures in the UHE neutrino spectrum caused by their absorption on the low energy relic anti-neutrino background through the Z boson resonance. The position of the absorption peak is sensitive to the neutrino mass and the redshift of the source. A new generation of low frequency digital radio telescopes will provide excellent detection capabilities for measuring these radio pulses, thus making our consideration here very timely.

  14. Energy Absorption Structure of Laser Supported Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Hatai, Keigo; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-01

    In Repetitive Pulsed (RP) laser propulsion, when the high energy laser beam is focused in the thruster, Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave is generated. This LSD wave converts the laser energy to the enthalpy of the blast wave, which will then apply impulse to the wall of the thruster. Therefore, the energy absorption structure and sustaining condition of LSD wave are important to be understood, which was still not clear though some visualized experiments have been conducted by Ushio et al. before. In this paper, 2-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometry is brought to investigate the electron density distribution of LSD area. At the same time, the temperature of the laser induced plasma is measured by an emission spectroscopy experiment, and calculated based on the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. The results show that in LSD, the electron density has a peak (as high as 2×1024[m-3]) behind the shock wave. The irradiated laser can be entirely absorbed before reaching the position of this peak. As a result, a new peak is always generating in front of the old one and this propagating has the same velocity as that of the blast wave. In this way, high heating ratio is sustained right after the shock front. However, as the laser pulse energy becomes lower, the propagating peak cannot catch up with the blast wave anymore, which leads to a termination of the LSD wave. From this study, it is found that for sustaining the LSD wave, a sufficiently thin laser absorption layer is necessary.

  15. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  16. Tiny peaks vs mega backgrounds: a general spectroscopic method with applications in resonant Raman scattering and atmospheric absorptions.

    PubMed

    Auguié, Baptiste; Reigue, Antoine; Le Ru, Eric C; Etchegoin, Pablo G

    2012-09-18

    A simple method using standard spectrometers with charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors is described to routinely measure background-corrected spectra in situations where the signal is composed of weak spectral features (such as Raman peaks or absorption lines) engulfed in a much stronger (by as much as ∼10(5)) broad background. The principle of the method is to subtract the dominant fixed-structure noise and obtain a shot-noise limited spectrum. The final noise level can therefore be reduced as desired by sufficient integration time. The method requires multiple shifts of the diffraction gratings to extract the pixel-dependent noise structure, which is then used as a flat-field correction. An original peak-retrieval procedure is proposed, demonstrating accurate determination of peak lineshapes and linewidths and robustness on practical examples where conventional methods would not be applicable. Examples are discussed to illustrate the potential of the technique to perform routine resonant Raman measurements of fluorescent dyes with high quantum yield, using conventional Raman systems. The method can equally be applied to other situations where small features are masked by a broad overwhelming background. An explicit example is given with the measurement of weak absorption lines in atmospheric gases. PMID:22894881

  17. Using energy peaks to count dark matter particles in decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Franceschini, Roberto; Kim, Doojin; Wardlow, Kyle

    2013-06-01

    We study the determination of the symmetry that stabilizes a dark matter (DM) candidate produced at colliders. Our question is motivated per se, and by several alternative symmetries that appear in models that provide a DM particle. To this end, we devise a strategy to determine whether a heavy mother particle decays into one visible massless particle and one or two DM particles. The counting of DM particles in these decays is relevant to distinguish the minimal choice of Z2 from a Z3 stabilization symmetry, under which the heavy particle and the DM are charged and the visible particle is not. Our method is novel in that it chiefly uses the peak of the energy spectrum of the visible particle and only secondarily uses the MT2 endpoint of events in which the heavy mother particles are pair-produced. We present new theoretical results concerning the energy distribution of the decay products of a three-body decay, which are crucial for our method. To demonstrate the feasibility of our method in investigating the stabilization symmetry, we apply it in distinguishing the decay of a bottom quark partner into a b quark and one or two DM particles. The method can be applied generally to distinguish two- and three-body decays, irrespective of DM.

  18. Optical intraday variability studies of 10 low energy peaked blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Bindu; Gupta, Alok C.; Joshi, U. C.; Ganesh, S.; Wiita, Paul J.

    2011-05-01

    We have carried out optical (R band) intraday variability (IDV) monitoring of a sample of 10 bright low energy peaked blazars (LBLs). 40 photometric observations, of an average of ˜4 h each, were made between 2008 September and 2009 June using two telescopes in India. Measurements with good signal-to-noise ratios were typically obtained within 1-3 min, allowing the detection of weak, fast variations using N-star differential photometry. We employed both structure function and discrete correlation function analysis methods to estimate any dominant time-scales of variability and found that in most of the cases any such time-scales were longer than the duration of the observation. The calculated duty cycle of IDV in LBLs during our observing run is ˜52 per cent, which is low compared to many earlier studies; however, the relatively short periods for which each source was observed can probably explain this difference. We briefly discuss possible emission mechanisms for the observed variability.

  19. Experimental phasing using zinc and sulfur anomalous signals measured at the zinc absorption peak.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Min-Kyu; Ji, Chang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Won; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2013-10-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal required for bacterial growth and survival. Excess free iron can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species that can cause severe damage to cellular functions. Cells have developed iron-sensing regulators to maintain iron homeostasis at the transcription level. The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is an iron-responsive regulator that controls the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis, bacterial virulence, stress resistance, and redox metabolism. Here, we report the expression, purification, crystallization, and phasing of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis Fur (BsFur) in the absence of regulatory metal ions. Crystals were obtained by microbatch crystallization method at 295 K and diffraction data at a resolution of 2.6 Å was collected at the zinc peak wavelength (λ=1.2823 Å). Experimental phasing identified the positions of one zinc atom and four sulfur atoms of cysteine residues coordinating the zinc atom, indicating that the data contained a meaningful anomalous scattering originating from the ordered zinc-coordinating sulfur atoms, in spite of the small anomalous signals of sulfur atoms at the examined wavelength. PMID:24173644

  20. Glass Composition-Dependent Silicate Absorption Peaks in FTIR Spectroscopy: Implications for Measuring Sample Thickness and Molecular H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Nichols, A. R.; Schipper, C. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is often used to measure the H2O and CO2 contents of volcanic glasses. A key advantage of FTIR over other analytical techniques is that it can reveal not only total H2O concentration but also H2O speciation, i.e. how much H2O is present as molecular H2O (H2Om) and how much as hydroxyl groups (OH) bound to the silicate network. This H2O speciation data can be used to investigate cooling rate and glass transition temperature of volcanic glasses, and to interpret H2O contents of pyroclasts affected by partial bubble resorption during cooling or secondary hydration after deposition. FTIR in transmitted light requires sample wafers polished on both sides of known thickness. Thickness is commonly measured using a micrometer but this may damage fragile samples and in samples with non-uniform thickness, e.g. vesicular samples, it is difficult to position at the exact location of FTIR analysis. Furthermore, in FTIR images or maps of such samples it is impractical to determine the thickness across the whole of the analysed area, resulting either in only a selection of the collected data being processed quantitatively and the rest being unused, or results being presented in terms of absorbance, which does not account for variations in thickness.It is known that FTIR spectra contain absorption peaks related to the glass aluminosilicate network at wavenumbers of ~2000, ~1830 and ~1600 cm-1 [1]. These have been shown to be proportional to sample thickness at the analysis location for one obsidian composition with up to 0.66 wt% H2O [2]. We test whether this calibration can be applied more widely by analysing a range of synthetic and natural glasses (andesitic to rhyolitic) to examine how the position and relative intensities of the different silicate absorption peaks vary with composition and H2O content. Our data show that even minor differences in composition necessitate a unique calibration. Furthermore, importantly we show how

  1. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  2. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  3. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  4. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  5. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  6. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  7. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  8. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  9. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  10. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  11. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  12. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  13. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  14. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be...

  15. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted...

  16. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  17. 75 FR 15456 - Notice of Availability for the Signal Peak Energy, LLC, Federal Coal Lease Application...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Availability for the Signal Peak Energy, LLC, Federal Coal Lease... management regulations, the Signal Peak Energy Coal Lease by Application Environmental Assessment (EA) is... Market Value (FMV), and Maximum Economic Recovery (MER) of the coal resources for Signal Peak...

  18. Simulation of energy absorption spectrum in NaI crystal detector for multiple gamma energy using Monte Carlo method

    SciTech Connect

    Wirawan, Rahadi; Waris, Abdul; Djamal, Mitra; Handayani, Gunawan

    2015-04-16

    The spectrum of gamma energy absorption in the NaI crystal (scintillation detector) is the interaction result of gamma photon with NaI crystal, and it’s associated with the photon gamma energy incoming to the detector. Through a simulation approach, we can perform an early observation of gamma energy absorption spectrum in a scintillator crystal detector (NaI) before the experiment conducted. In this paper, we present a simulation model result of gamma energy absorption spectrum for energy 100-700 keV (i.e. 297 keV, 400 keV and 662 keV). This simulation developed based on the concept of photon beam point source distribution and photon cross section interaction with the Monte Carlo method. Our computational code has been successfully predicting the multiple energy peaks absorption spectrum, which derived from multiple photon energy sources.

  19. On the Evolution of and High-Energy Emission from GHz-Peaked-Spectrum Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Stawarz, L.; Ostorero, L.; Begelman, M.C.; Moderski, R.; Kataoka, J.; Wagner, S.

    2007-12-18

    Here we discuss evolution and broad-band emission of compact (< kpc) lobes in young radio sources. We propose a simple dynamical description for these objects, consisting of a relativistic jet propagating into a uniform gaseous medium in the central parts of an elliptical host. In the framework of the proposed model, we follow the evolution of ultrarelativistic electrons injected from a terminal hotspot of a jet to expanding lobes, taking into account their adiabatic energy losses as well as radiative cooling. This allows us to discuss the broad-band lobe emission of young radio sources. In particular, we argue that the observed spectral turnover in the radio synchrotron spectra of these objects cannot originate from the synchrotron self-absorption process but is most likely due to free-free absorption effects connected with neutral clouds of interstellar medium engulfed by the expanding lobes and photoionized by active centers. We also find a relatively strong and complex high-energy emission component produced by inverse-Compton up-scattering of various surrounding photon fields by the lobes electrons. We argue that such high energy radiation is strong enough to account for several observed properties of GHz-peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio galaxies at UV and X-ray frequencies. In addition, this emission is expected to extend up to GeV (or possibly even TeV) photon energies and can thus be probed by several modern {gamma}-ray instruments. In particular, we suggest that GPS radio galaxies should constitute a relatively numerous class of extragalactic sources detected by GLAST.

  20. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  1. ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi; Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2013-02-20

    The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

  2. Mechanical Energy Absorption of Pectin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zsivanovits, G.

    2007-04-01

    Pectin film samples were prepared from HM, LM and amidated pectins produced by CP Kelco and Danisco, with acidic and enzymatic de-esterification and amidation. The swelling of samples were indicated by hydration before the experiments for 24 h by PEG20000 solution, on known osmotic pressure, with Ca, Mg and K ions with different concentrations. Mechanical tests were followed by Stable Micro Systems penetrometer, with stress-relaxation method, in elastic deformation section. Results show, that the energy absorption depends on the pectin type, on the hydration and the ion concentration. Based on this type experiments it is possible to choose the best pectin type for different uses - as a packaging material in different occasions, or modeling pectin changes during physiological changing in the cell-wall etc.

  3. Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate improves calcium absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during peak production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Zhao, J P; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Zhang, Q; Lin, H

    2015-01-01

    The advantage of supplemental sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on eggshell quality in laying hens changes with age. Besides increasing calcium (Ca) secretion in the eggshell gland, it may improve Ca absorption in the intestine or kidney. Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384), 25 weeks of age, were allocated to two treatment groups in two experiments, each of which included 4 replicates of 24 hens. Hens were fed a basal diet (control) or the basal diet containing 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg for 50 or 20 weeks in Experiment 1 or 2, respectively. A 24-h continuous lighting regimen was used to allow hens to consume the dietary supplements during the period of active eggshell formation. In Experiment 1, particularly from 25 to 50 weeks of age, and in Experiment 2, NaHCO3 supplementation favoured hen-d egg production at the expense of lower egg weight. The increased eggshell thickness should have nothing to do with the additional eggshell formation, because of the unchanged egg mass and daily eggshell calcification. At 35 weeks of age in both experiments, NaHCO3 supplementation increased duodenal expression of calbindin-d28k (CaBP-D28k) protein, contributing to higher Ca retention and balance. From 50 to 75 weeks of age in Experiment 1, the hens had little response to NaHCO3 supplementation and showed a negative trend on eggshell thickness and strength. It is concluded that dietary supplementation with 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg improves Ca absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during the peak but not late production period, with the introduction of continuous lighting. PMID:26569471

  4. Dependence on neutron energy of neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, David F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, Trevor J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 KeV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si((mu) -, nv), and 209Bi((pi) -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for any dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no dependence of these peak shapes on the neutron energy spectra has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies we found similar results to ours except for monoenergetic neutron irradiations from 1 to 8 MeV.

  5. An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend therefore on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features within the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The developed method and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which implies direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by successive crystallization. Application of the method to

  6. Technical Note: An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak-height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend, therefore, on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features in the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak-height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The method developed and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which confirms direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by both direct nucleation and successive crystallization. Application of

  7. Energy and peak power saved by passively cooled residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, G.; Loxsom, F.; Doderer, E.; Vieira, R.; Fleischhacker, P.

    1983-11-01

    The energy displacement potential of roof pond cooling in humid climates is sensitive to the type of dehumidification equipment employed and the humidity levels allowed. The simulated energy requirements of roof pond residences assisted by two high efficiency dehumidifier options are described. One dehumidifier was a vapor compression air conditioner with sensible cooling recovery by an air-to-air heat exchanger (improved mechanical dehumidification or IMD). The second option was a solar regenerated desiccant dehumidifier (SRDD). An IMD assisted roof pond house had energy savings of 30 to 65% in humid climates compared to the conventional house; an SRDD assisted roof pond house had energy savings of 70 to 75% in humid climates.

  8. Energy conservation in regenerated chemical absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Energy savings from split-flow design modifications or the installation of absorber intercoolers are quantified for solvent-based separation processes. Absorber-stripper systems that use aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) or diethanolamine (DEA) to remove CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/S from natural gas streams are modeled. Use of split flow in regenerated chemical absorption processes with isothermal columns resulted in energy savings of over 50% for systems with large solute-recovery fractions. The energy savings are a linear function of the logarithm of percent unrecovered solute. Optimal values are found for the flow rate and withdrawal point of the split-flow stream. The optimal design and operating conditions for CO/sub 2/ systems with adiabatic columns are determined by the stripper column; the stripper exhibits a steam-consumption minimum with respect to the total solvent flow rate and the composition of the lean-solvent stream. In contrast, optimal conditions for H/sub 2/S systems are set by the absorber. These absorber-limited systems exhibit a steam consumption minimum for the lowest solvent flow which can achieve the specified solute recovery in the absorber. Absorber intercoolers conserve energy by reducing the solvent flow rate required for a specified solute recovery. The optimal intercooler location is near an acid-gas-to-amine ratio halfway between the same ratios for the lean and rich solvent streams. The intercooler location is near an acid-gas-to-amine ratio halfway between the same ratios for the lean and rich solvent streams. The intercooler is optically sized by equating the absorber-solvent-feed temperature, the absorber-intercooler process-outlet temperature, and the cooling-water effluent temperature.

  9. Energy Absorption in a Shear-Thickening Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeshejani, Seyed Hossein Amiri; Sabet, Seyed Ali Reza; Zeynali, Mohammad Ebrahim; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates energy absorption in a shear-thickening fluid (STF) containing nano-size fumed silica as a suspending material. Fumed silica particles in 20, 30, and 40 wt.% were used in polyethylene glycol and ethylene glycol. Three areas were studied, namely: energy absorption of STF pre-impregnated aramid fabric, neat STF under high-velocity impact, and flexible foam soaked in STF under low-velocity drop weight impact. Results showed moderate energy absorption in STF pre-impregnated aramid fabric compared to dry fabric. High-velocity impact tests also revealed higher fabric weave density, and multi-layered target plays vital role in optimum performance of SFT impregnated targets. High-velocity impact tests on the neat STF showed good energy absorption at velocities near STF critical shear rate. Low-velocity drop weight impact test on flexible foam soaked in STF also indicated significant energy absorption.

  10. Energy Absorption in a Shear-Thickening Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afeshejani, Seyed Hossein Amiri; Sabet, Seyed Ali Reza; Zeynali, Mohammad Ebrahim; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates energy absorption in a shear-thickening fluid (STF) containing nano-size fumed silica as a suspending material. Fumed silica particles in 20, 30, and 40 wt.% were used in polyethylene glycol and ethylene glycol. Three areas were studied, namely: energy absorption of STF pre-impregnated aramid fabric, neat STF under high-velocity impact, and flexible foam soaked in STF under low-velocity drop weight impact. Results showed moderate energy absorption in STF pre-impregnated aramid fabric compared to dry fabric. High-velocity impact tests also revealed higher fabric weave density, and multi-layered target plays vital role in optimum performance of SFT impregnated targets. High-velocity impact tests on the neat STF showed good energy absorption at velocities near STF critical shear rate. Low-velocity drop weight impact test on flexible foam soaked in STF also indicated significant energy absorption.

  11. Absorption Of Crushing Energy In Square Composite Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of crash-energy-absorbing capabilities of square-cross-section tubes of two matrix/fiber composite materials. Both graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy tubes crushed in progressive and stable manner. Ratio between width of cross section and thickness of wall determined to affect energy-absorption significantly. As ratio decreases, energy-absorption capability increases non-linearly. Useful in building energy-absorbing composite structures.

  12. Design for Manufacturing for Energy Absorption Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Del Prete, A.; Primo, T.; Papadia, G.; Manisi, B.

    2011-05-04

    In the typical scenario of a helicopter crash, impact with the ground is preceded by a substantially vertical drop, with the result that a seated occupant of a helicopter experiences high spinal loads and pelvic deceleration during such crash due to the sudden arresting of vertical downward motion. It has long been recognized that spinal injuries to occupants of helicopters in such crash scenario can be minimized by seat arrangements which limit the deceleration to which the seated occupant is subjected, relative to the helicopter, to a predetermined maximum, by allowing downward movement of the seated occupant relative to the helicopter, at the time of impact with the ground, under a restraining force which, over a limited range of such movement, is limited to a predetermined maximum. In practice, significant benefits, in the way of reduced injuries and reduced seriousness of injuries, can be afforded in this way in such crash situations even where the extent of such controlled vertical movement permitted by the crashworthy seat arrangement is quite limited. Important increase of accident safety is reached with the installation of crashworthy shock absorbers on the main landing gear, but this solution is mostly feasible on military helicopters with long fixed landing gear. Seats can then give high contribution to survivability. Commonly, an energy absorber is a constant load device, if one excludes an initial elastic part of the load-stroke curve. On helicopter seats, this behavior is obtained by plastic deformation of a metal component or scraping of material. In the present work the authors have studied three absorption systems, which differ in relation to their shape, their working conditions and their constructive materials. All the combinations have been analyzed for applications in VIP helicopter seats.

  13. Design for Manufacturing for Energy Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Prete, A.; Primo, T.; Papadia, G.; Manisi, B.

    2011-05-01

    In the typical scenario of a helicopter crash, impact with the ground is preceded by a substantially vertical drop, with the result that a seated occupant of a helicopter experiences high spinal loads and pelvic deceleration during such crash due to the sudden arresting of vertical downward motion. It has long been recognized that spinal injuries to occupants of helicopters in such crash scenario can be minimized by seat arrangements which limit the deceleration to which the seated occupant is subjected, relative to the helicopter, to a predetermined maximum, by allowing downward movement of the seated occupant relative to the helicopter, at the time of impact with the ground, under a restraining force which, over a limited range of such movement, is limited to a predetermined maximum. In practice, significant benefits, in the way of reduced injuries and reduced seriousness of injuries, can be afforded in this way in such crash situations even where the extent of such controlled vertical movement permitted by the crashworthy seat arrangement is quite limited. Important increase of accident safety is reached with the installation of crashworthy shock absorbers on the main landing gear, but this solution is mostly feasible on military helicopters with long fixed landing gear. Seats can then give high contribution to survivability. Commonly, an energy absorber is a constant load device, if one excludes an initial elastic part of the load-stroke curve. On helicopter seats, this behavior is obtained by plastic deformation of a metal component or scraping of material. In the present work the authors have studied three absorption systems, which differ in relation to their shape, their working conditions and their constructive materials. All the combinations have been analyzed for applications in VIP helicopter seats.

  14. Seasonal Solar Thermal Absorption Energy Storage Development.

    PubMed

    Daguenet-Frick, Xavier; Gantenbein, Paul; Rommel, Mathias; Fumey, Benjamin; Weber, Robert; Gooneseker, Kanishka; Williamson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a thermochemical seasonal storage with emphasis on the development of a reaction zone for an absorption/desorption unit. The heat and mass exchanges are modelled and the design of a suitable reaction zone is explained. A tube bundle concept is retained for the heat and mass exchangers and the units are manufactured and commissioned. Furthermore, experimental results of both absorption and desorption processes are presented and the exchanged power is compared to the results of the simulations. PMID:26842331

  15. United States Department of Energy large commercial absorption chiller development program

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.; Zaltash, A.

    1998-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas cooling industry to improve energy efficiency and US competitiveness by using advanced absorption technologies that eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Absorption cooling uses natural gas as the heat source, which produces much lower NO{sub x} emissions than oil- or coal-generated electricity. Gas-fired chillers also have the advantage of helping reduce peak electrical usage during summer months. To assist industry in developing advanced absorption cooling technologies, DOE sponsors the Large Commercial Chiller Development Program. The goal of the program is to improve chiller cooling efficiency by 30--50% compared with the best currently available absorption systems.

  16. Energy absorption in composite materials for crashworthy structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Crash energy-absorption processes in composite materials have been studied as part of a research program aimed at the development of energy absorbing subfloor beams for crashworthy military helicopters. Based on extensive tests on glass/epoxy, graphite/epoxy, and Kevlar/epoxy composites, it is shown that the energy-absorption characteristics and crushing modes of composite beams are similar to those exhibited by tubular specimens of similar material and architecture. The crushing mechanisms have been determined and related to the mechanical properties of the constituent materials and specimen architecture. A simple and accurate method for predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite beams has been developed.

  17. A framework for understanding and generating integrated solutions for residential peak energy demand.

    PubMed

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  18. A Framework for Understanding and Generating Integrated Solutions for Residential Peak Energy Demand

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Laurie; Vine, Desley; Ledwich, Gerard; Bell, John; Mengersen, Kerrie; Morris, Peter; Lewis, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Supplying peak energy demand in a cost effective, reliable manner is a critical focus for utilities internationally. Successfully addressing peak energy concerns requires understanding of all the factors that affect electricity demand especially at peak times. This paper is based on past attempts of proposing models designed to aid our understanding of the influences on residential peak energy demand in a systematic and comprehensive way. Our model has been developed through a group model building process as a systems framework of the problem situation to model the complexity within and between systems and indicate how changes in one element might flow on to others. It is comprised of themes (social, technical and change management options) networked together in a way that captures their influence and association with each other and also their influence, association and impact on appliance usage and residential peak energy demand. The real value of the model is in creating awareness, understanding and insight into the complexity of residential peak energy demand and in working with this complexity to identify and integrate the social, technical and change management option themes and their impact on appliance usage and residential energy demand at peak times. PMID:25807384

  19. Supporting Structure of the LSD Wave in an Energy Absorption Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Akihiro; Hatai, Keigo; Cho, Shinatora; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2008-04-01

    In Repetitively Pulsed (RP) Laser Propulsion, laser energy irradiated to a vehicle is converted to blast wave enthalpy during the Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) regime. Based on the measured post-LSD electron number density profiles by two-wavelength Mach Zehnder interferometer in a line-focusing optics, electron temperature and absorption coefficient were estimated assuming Local Thermal Equilibrium. A 10J/pulse CO2 laser was used. As a result, laser absorption was found completed in the layer between the shock wave and the electron density peak. Although the LSD-termination timing was not clear from the shock-front/ionization-front separation in the shadowgraph images, there observed drastic changes in the absorption layer thickness from 0.2 mm to 0.5 mm and in the peak heating rate from 12-17×1013 kW/m3 to 5×1013 kW/m3 at the termination.

  20. The {ital b} Distribution and the Velocity Structure of Absorption Peaks in the Ly{alpha} Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, L.

    1999-06-01

    A theory is developed that relates the observed {ital b} parameter of a Ly{alpha} absorption line to the velocity curvature of the corresponding peak in the optical depth fluctuation. Its relation to the traditional interpretation of {ital b} as the thermal broadening width is discussed. It is demonstrated that, independent of the details of the cosmological model, the differential {ital b} distribution has a high-{ital b} asymptote of dN/db{proportional_to}b{sup {minus}m}, where m{ge}5, when we make the reasonable assumption that low-curvature fluctuations are statistically favored over high-curvature ones. There in general always exist lines much broader than the thermal width. We develop a linear perturbative analysis of the optical depth fluctuation, which yields a single-parameter prediction for the full {ital b} distribution. In addition to exhibiting the high-velocity tail, it qualitatively explains the observed sharp low-{ital b} cutoff{emdash}a simple reflection of the fact that high-curvature fluctuations are relatively rare. Although the existence of the high-{ital b} asymptote, which is independent of the validity of the linear expansion, is consistent with the observed {ital b} distribution, a detailed comparison of the linear prediction with six observational data sets indicates that higher order corrections are not negligible. The perturbative analysis nonetheless offers valuable insights into the dependence of the {ital b} distribution on cosmological parameters such as {Omega} and the power spectrum. A key parameter is the effective smoothing scale of the optical depth fluctuation, which is in turn determined by three scales: the thermal broadening width, the baryon smoothing scale (approximately the Jeans scale), and the observation/simulation resolution. The first two are determined by reionization history, but are comparable in general, whereas the third varies by about an order of magnitude in current hydrodynamic simulations. Studies with non

  1. Energy absorption studied to reduce aircraft crash forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The NASA/FAA aircraft safety reseach programs for general aviation aircraft are discussed. Energy absorption of aircraft subflooring and redesign of interior flooring are being studied. The testing of energy absorbing configurations is described. The three NASA advanced concepts performed at neary the maximum possible amount of energy absorption, and one of two minimum modifications concepts performed well. Planned full scale tests are described. Airplane seat concepts are being considered.

  2. Measurements of Ion Stopping Around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies around the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te ) and electron number density (ne ) in the range of 0.5-4.0 keV and 3 ×1022 to 3 ×1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne . The importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  3. FREQUENCY-DEPENDENT ABSORPTION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC ENERGY IN BIOLOGICAL TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The frequency-dependent absorption of electromagnetic energy in biological tissue is illustrated by use of the Debye equations, model calculations for different irradiation conditions, and measured electrical properties (conductivity and permittivity) of different tissues. Four s...

  4. Characterization of hydrophobic nanoporous particle liquids for energy absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yi; Liu, Yingtao

    2016-04-01

    Recently, the development of hydrophobic nanoporous technologies has drawn increased attention, especially for the applications of energy absorption and impact protection. Although significant amount of research has been conducted to synthesis and characterize materials to protect structures from impact damage, the tradition methods focused on converting kinetic energy to other forms, such as heat and cell buckling. Due to their high energy absorption efficiency, hydrophobic nanoporous particle liquids (NPLs) are one of the most attractive impact mitigation materials. During impact, such particles directly trap liquid molecules inside the non-wetting surface of nanopores in the particles. The captured impact energy is simply stored temporarily and isolated from the original energy transmission path. In this paper we will investigate the energy absorption efficiency of combinations of silica nanoporous particles and with multiple liquids. Inorganic particles, such as nanoporous silica, are characterized using scanning electron microscopy. Small molecule promoters, such as methanol and ethanol, are introduced to the prepared NPLs. Their effects on the energy absorption efficiency are studied in this paper. NPLs are prepared by dispersing the studied materials in deionized water. Energy absorption efficiency of these liquids are experimentally characterized using an Instron mechanical testing frame and in-house develop stainless steel hydraulic cylinder system.

  5. A torque controlled high speed flywheel energy storage system for peak power transfer in electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Schaible, U.; Szabados, B.

    1994-12-31

    This paper provides a design outline and implementation procedure for a flywheel energy storage system using a high speed interior permanent magnet synchronous machine, torque-controlled through the use of a vector control algorithm. The proposed flywheel energy storage system can be used to meet the peak energy requirements of an electric vehicle during both acceleration and regenerative braking. By supplying the peak energy requirements from a secondary source, the life cycle of the electric vehicle`s batteries may be extended considerably. A torque control algorithm is presented and preliminary implementation through a commercially available microcontroller is described. Preliminary testing of the proposed system has been very promising and has proven that bidirectional peak power transfer can be rapidly accomplished. 4 refs.

  6. Radiant energy absorption studies for laser propulsion. [gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Wu, P. K. S.; Pirri, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the energy absorption mechanisms and fluid dynamic considerations for efficient conversion of high power laser radiation into a high velocity flow is presented. The objectives of the study are: (1) to determine the most effective absorption mechanisms for converting laser radiation into translational energy, and (2) to examine the requirements for transfer of the absorbed energy into a steady flow which is stable to disturbances in the absorption zone. A review of inverse Bremsstrahlung, molecular and particulate absorption mechanisms is considered and the steady flow and stability considerations for conversion of the laser power to a high velocity flow in a nozzle configuration is calculated. A quasi-one-dimensional flow through a nozzle was formulated under the assumptions of perfect gas.

  7. Effect of shading devices on building energy use and peak demand in Minnesota. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Hunn, B.D.; Jones, J.W.; Grasso, M.M.; Hitzfelder, D.D.

    1990-12-01

    The report presents the results of an analytical study of the effect of shading devices on annual heating, cooling, and total energy use, on peak electric demand, and on energy cost savings in single-family residences, a small office, a school, and a high-rise office in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Using an hour-by-hour building energy analysis model, savings were simulated for interior and exterior shading devices. Energy cost savings were calculated using Northern States Power (NSP) Company utility rates; however, no analysis of the costs of installing and operating these devices was made. Results are presented in terms of annual energy cost savings and peak electric demand reductions, with each shading device in place, as compared to baseline reference cases for three prototypical residences and a prototypical small office, elementary school, and high-rise office building. The devices are ranked in terms of energy cost savings, as well as peak demand reduction. While the best-performing devices have annual cooling energy savings ranging up to over 30%, the annual energy cost savings (at NSP utility rates in effect in 1989) range up to only 4% for the residences and 10% for the office buildings, but less than 1% for the school. Summer peak electric demand reductions are more significant: up to 20% for the residences, 12% for the offices, and 3% for the school.

  8. Comprehensive study of the surface peak in charge-integrated low-energy ion scattering spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Draxler, M.; Gruber, R.; Bauer, P.; Beikler, R.; Taglauer, E.; Schmid, K.; Ermolov, S. N.

    2003-08-01

    Low-energy ion scattering is very surface sensitive if scattered ions are analyzed. By time-of-flight (TOF) techniques, the neutral and the charge-integrated spectra (ions plus neutrals) are obtained, which yield information about deeper layers. It is well known that charge integrated spectra may exhibit a surface peak which is more pronounced for heavier projectiles, e.g., Ne ions. Aiming at a more profound physical understanding of this surface peak, we performed TOF experiments and computer simulations for H, He, and Ne projectiles scattered from a polycrystalline copper target. Measurements were done in the range of 1-9 keV for a scattering angle of 129 degree sign under UHV conditions. The simulations were performed using the MARLOWE code for the given experimental parameters and a polycrystalline target. In the experiments, a pronounced surface peak was observed at low energies, which fades away at higher energies. This peak is quantitatively reproduced by the simulation. Several atomic layers may contribute to the surface peak, depending on the energy. Analyzing the contributions of the individual outermost atomic layers, one finds that the binary collisions of the projectiles with atoms in the first and the second layer yield a narrow energy distribution, while the contribution from the deeper layers is dominated by multiple scattering and therefore exhibits a very broad energy spectrum. It is shown that the appearance of a more or less pronounced surface peak is due to the relative contributions of single scattering and multiple scattering and thus depends on the projectile energy and mass.

  9. Scattering with absorptive interaction: Energy-dependent potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.

    1983-05-01

    The energy dependence and analytic structure of the effective interaction for elastic scattering of composite particles are investigated using Feshbach's projection technique. A generalized Levinson theorem is established for complex, nonlocal, and energy-dependent interactions. The analytical results are illustrated by means of Argand diagrams for a solvable model and the effect of energy averaging is discussed. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for absorptive, energy-dependent potentials, Levinson theorem.

  10. Terahertz absorption spectra and potential energy distribution of liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zezhang; Jiang, Yurong; Jiang, Lulu; Ma, Heng

    2016-01-15

    In this work, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of a set of nematic liquid crystals were studied using the density functional theories (DFT). An accurate assignment of the vibrational modes corresponding to absorption frequencies were performed using potential energy distribution (PED) in a frequency range of 0-3 THz. The impacts of different core structures on THz absorption spectra were discussed. The results indicate that scope of application must be considered in the LC-based THz device designing. This proposed work may give a useful suggestion on the design of novel liquid crystal material in THz wave. PMID:26476072

  11. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  12. Energy absorption characteristics of nano-composite conical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Sachse, S.; Njuguna, J.

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of polyamide 6 composite structures is studied in details in the present paper. The axial dynamic and quasi-static collapse of conical structures was conducted using a high energy drop tower, as well as Instron 5500R electro-mechanical testing machine. The impact event was recorded using a high-speed camera and the fracture surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained results indicate an important influence of filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of the polymer composites. A significant increase in specific energy absorption (SEA) is observed in polyamide 6 (PA6) reinforced with nano-silica particles (SiO2) and glass-spheres (GS), whereas addition of montmorillonite (MMT) did not change the SEA parameter.

  13. Dynamic energy absorption characteristics of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Chen, X

    2014-10-01

    Hollow microlattice structures are promising candidates for advanced energy absorption and their characteristics under dynamic crushing are explored. The energy absorption can be significantly enhanced by inertial stabilization, shock wave effect and strain rate hardening effect. In this paper we combine theoretical analysis and comprehensive finite element method simulation to decouple the three effects, and then obtain a simple model to predict the overall dynamic effects of hollow microlattice structures. Inertial stabilization originates from the suppression of sudden crushing of the microlattice and its contribution scales with the crushing speed, v. Shock wave effect comes from the discontinuity across the plastic shock wave front during dynamic loading and its contribution scales with e. The strain rate effect increases the effective yield strength upon dynamic deformation and increases the energy absorption density. A mechanism map is established that illustrates the dominance of these three dynamic effects at a range of crushing speeds. Compared with quasi-static loading, the energy absorption capacity a dynamic loading of 250 m/s can be enhanced by an order of magnitude. The study may shed useful insight on designing and optimizing the energy absorption performance of hollow microlattice structures under various dynamic loads. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Heat exchange model in absorption chamber of water-direct-absorption-typed laser energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Wei, Ji; Qun Sun, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hu, XiaoYang; Zhou, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between laser and water flow is very complicated in the absorption chamber of a high energy laser (HEL) energy meter which directly uses water as an absorbing medium. Therefore, the heat exchange model cannot be studied through traditional methods, but it is the most important factor to improve heat exchange efficiency in the absorption chamber. After the exchanges of heat and mass were deeply analyzed, experimental study and numerical fitting were brought out. The original testing data of laser power and water flow temperature at one moment were utilized to calculate those at the next moment, and then the calculated temperature curve was compared with the measured one. If the two curves matched well, the corresponding coefficient was obtained. Meanwhile, numerous experiments were performed to study the effects of laser power, duration, focal spot scale, and water flow rate on heat exchange coefficient. In addition, the relationship between water phase change and heat exchange was analyzed. The heat exchange coefficient was increased by optimizing the construction of the absorption chamber or increasing water flow rate. The results provide the reference for design of water-direct-absorption-typed HEL energy meters, as well as for analysis of the interaction between other similar lasers and water flow.

  15. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

  16. Measurements of ion stopping around the Bragg peak in high-energy-density plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Frenje, J. A.; Grabowski, P. E.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-09

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies about the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (Te) and electron number density (ne) in the range of 0.5 – 4.0 keV and 3 × 1022 – 3 × 1023 cm-3 have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with Te with ne. As a result, the importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modelingmore » of High-Energy-Density Plasmas.« less

  17. Measurements of Ion Stopping Around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Frenje, J A; Grabowski, P E; Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Zylstra, A B; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Yu; Sangster, T C

    2015-11-13

    For the first time, quantitative measurements of ion stopping at energies around the Bragg peak (or peak ion stopping, which occurs at an ion velocity comparable to the average thermal electron velocity), and its dependence on electron temperature (T(e)) and electron number density (n(e)) in the range of 0.5-4.0 keV and 3×10(22) to 3×10(23) cm(-3) have been conducted, respectively. It is experimentally demonstrated that the position and amplitude of the Bragg peak varies strongly with T(e) with n(e). The importance of including quantum diffraction is also demonstrated in the stopping-power modeling of high-energy-density plasmas. PMID:26613448

  18. Dosimetric response of radiochromic films to protons of low energies in the Bragg peak region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M. C.; Schardt, D.; Espino, J. M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Quesada, J. M.; Lallena, A. M.; Miras, H.; Guirado, D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the major advantages of proton or ion beams, applied in cancer treatment, is their excellent depth-dose profile exhibiting a low dose in the entrance channel and a distinct dose maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range in tissue. In the region of the Bragg peak, where the protons or ions are almost stopped, experimental studies with low-energy particle beams and thin biological samples may contribute valuable information on the biological effectiveness in the stopping region. Such experiments, however, require beam optimization and special dosimetry techniques for determining the absolute dose and dose homogeneity for very thin biological samples. At the National Centre of Accelerators in Seville, one of the beam lines at the 3 MV Tandem Accelerator was equipped with a scattering device, a special parallel-plate ionization chamber with very thin electrode foils and target holders for cell cultures. In this work, we present the calibration in absolute dose of EBT3 films [Gafchromic radiotherapy films, http://www.ashland.com/products/gafchromic-radiotherapy-films] for proton energies in the region of the Bragg peak, where the linear energy transfer increases and becomes more significant for radiobiology studies, as well as the response of the EBT3 films for different proton energy values. To irradiate the films in the Bragg peak region, the energy of the beam was degraded passively, by interposing Mylar foils of variable thickness to place the Bragg peak inside the active layer of the film. The results obtained for the beam degraded in Mylar foils are compared with the dose calculated by means of the measurement of the beam fluence with an ionization chamber and the energy loss predicted by srim2008 code.

  19. Using Plasmon Peaks in Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy to Determine the Physical and Mechanical Properties of Nanoscale Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, James M.

    2013-05-09

    In this program, we developed new theoretical and experimental insights into understanding the relationships among fundamental universality and scaling phenomena, the solid-state physical and mechanical properties of materials, and the volume plasmon energy as measured by electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). Particular achievements in these areas are summarized as follows: (i) Using a previously proposed physical model based on the universal binding-energy relation (UBER), we established close phenomenological connections regarding the influence of the valence electrons in materials on the longitudinal plasma oscillations (plasmons) and various solid-state properties such as the optical constants (including absorption and dispersion), elastic constants, cohesive energy, etc. (ii) We found that carbon materials, e.g., diamond, graphite, diamond-like carbons, hydrogenated and amorphous carbon films, exhibit strong correlations in density vs. Ep (or maximum of the volume plasmon peak) and density vs. hardness, both from available experimental data and ab initio DFT calculations. This allowed us to derive a three-dimensional relationship between hardness and the plasmon energy, that can be used to determine experimentally both hardness and density of carbon materials based on measurements of the plasmon peak position. (iii) As major experimental accomplishments, we demonstrated the possibility of in-situ monitoring of changes in the physical properties of materials with conditions, e.g., temperature, and we also applied a new plasmon ratio-imaging technique to map multiple physical properties of materials, such as the elastic moduli, cohesive energy and bonding electron density, with a sub-nanometer lateral resolution. This presents new capability for understanding material behavior. (iv) Lastly, we demonstrated a new physical phenomenon - electron-beam trapping, or electron tweezers - of a solid metal nanoparticle inside a liquid metal. This phenomenon is

  20. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  1. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below. PMID:25150556

  2. Vertical transition energies vs. absorption maxima: illustration with the UV absorption spectrum of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Lasorne, Benjamin; Jornet-Somoza, Joaquim; Meyer, Hans-Dieter; Lauvergnat, David; Robb, Michael A; Gatti, Fabien

    2014-02-01

    We revisit the validity of making a direct comparison between measured absorption maxima and computed vertical transition energies within 0.1 eV to calibrate an excited-state level of theory. This is illustrated on the UV absorption spectrum of ethylene for which the usual experimental values of 7.66 eV (V←N) and 7.11 eV (R(3s)←N) cannot be compared directly to the results of electronic structure calculations for two very different reasons. After validation of our level of theory against experimental data, a new experimental reference of 7.28 eV is suggested for benchmarking the Rydberg state, and the often-cited average transition energy (7.80 eV) is confirmed as a safer estimate for the valence state. PMID:23711543

  3. Push-pull converter with energy saving circuit for protecting switching transistors from peak power stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    In a push-pull converter, switching transistors are protected from peak power stresses by a separate snubber circuit in parallel with each comprising a capacitor and an inductor in series, and a diode in parallel with the inductor. The diode is connected to conduct current of the same polarity as the base-emitter juction of the transistor so that energy stored in the capacitor while the transistor is switched off, to protect it against peak power stress, discharges through the inductor when the transistor is turned on, and after the capacitor is discharges through the diode. To return this energy to the power supply, or to utilize this energy in some external circuit, the inductor may be replaced by a transformer having its secondary winding connected to the power supply or to the external circuit.

  4. On the anticorrelation of the electric field and peak electron energy within an auroral arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallinckrodt, A. J.; Carlson, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with an example of a strongly anticorrelated electric field and particle precipitation, taking into account an application of an extended version of the model of Evans et al. (1977) to the data. A striking feature of the data reported is the high degree of anticorrelation between electric field strength and peak precipitating electron energy. A simple model consisting of a constant current traversing a region in which the conductivities increase in proportion to ionospheric energy deposition provides a qualitative explanation of the observations. However, when the effects of neutral winds, ionization transport, Hall currents, and arc motion, and the nonlinearity of the relationship between peak precipitating electron energy and equilibrium are considered, the conclusions become less clear.

  5. Design method of planar vibration system for specified ratio of energy peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun Woo; Lee, Sungon; Choi, Yong Je

    2015-05-01

    The magnitudes of the resonant peaks should be considered in the design stage of any bandwidth-relevant applications to widen the working bandwidth. This paper presents a new design method for a planar vibration system that satisfies any desired ratio of peak magnitudes at target resonant frequencies. An important geometric property of a modal triangle formed from three vibration centers representing vibration modes is found. Utilizing the property, the analytical expressions for the vibration energy generated by external forces are derived in terms of the geometrical data of vibration centers. When any desired ratio of peak magnitudes is specified, the locations of the vibration centers are found from their analytical relations. The corresponding stiffness matrix can be determined and realized accordingly. The systematic design methods for direct- and base-excitation systems are developed, and one numerical example is presented to illustrate the proposed design method.

  6. Analytical design of a superconducting magnetic energy storage for pulsed power peak

    SciTech Connect

    Netter, D.; Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.; Caron, J.P.; Sargos, F.M.

    1996-09-01

    A Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage can be used to produce very high pulsed power peak. A superconducting coil is magnetically coupled with another coil linked to the load. During the storage phase, the current is constant. In order to transfer the energy to the load, the authors cause the quench of the superconducting coil. It is very important to know the efficiency of the transfer and how much energy is discharged in the Helium vessel. In this paper, they propose an analytical method which enables to calculate very quickly the electrical parameters of such a device.

  7. GRB110721A: AN EXTREME PEAK ENERGY AND SIGNATURES OF THE PHOTOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Caliandro, G. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; D'Ammando, F.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S. E-mail: moretti@particle.kth.se E-mail: josefin.larsson@astro.su.se; and others

    2012-10-01

    GRB110721A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope using its two instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The burst consisted of one major emission episode which lasted for {approx}24.5 s (in the GBM) and had a peak flux of (5.7 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The time-resolved emission spectrum is best modeled with a combination of a Band function and a blackbody spectrum. The peak energy of the Band component was initially 15 {+-} 2 MeV, which is the highest value ever detected in a GRB. This measurement was made possible by combining GBM/BGO data with LAT Low Energy events to achieve continuous 10-100 MeV coverage. The peak energy later decreased as a power law in time with an index of -1.89 {+-} 0.10. The temperature of the blackbody component also decreased, starting from {approx}80 keV, and the decay showed a significant break after {approx}2 s. The spectrum provides strong constraints on the standard synchrotron model, indicating that alternative mechanisms may give rise to the emission at these energies.

  8. GRB110721A: An Extreme Peak Energy and Signatures of the Photosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Fishman, G.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    GRB110721A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope using its two instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The burst consisted of one major emission episode which lasted for approximately 24.5 s (in the GBM) and had a peak flux of (5.7 +/- 0.2) 10(exp -5) erg s(exp -1) cm(exp -2). The time-resolved emission spectrum is best modeled with a combination of a Band function and a blackbody spectrum. The peak energy of the Band component was initially 15 +/- 2 MeV, which is the highest value ever detected in a GRB. This measurement was made possible by combining GBM/BGO data with LAT Low Energy events to achieve continuous 10-100 MeV coverage. The peak energy later decreased as a power law in time with an index of -1.89 +/- 0.10. The temperature of the blackbody component also decreased, starting from approximately 80 keV, and the decay showed a significant break after approximately 2s. The spectrum provides strong constraints on the standard synchrotron model, indicating that alternative mechanisms may give rise to the emission at these energies.

  9. Hydrogen bonding between acetate-based ionic liquids and water: Three types of IR absorption peaks and NMR chemical shifts change upon dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yuwei; Mu, Tiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonding interaction between acetate-based ionic liquids (AcIL) and water was investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) and 1H NMR. Interestingly, the relative change of chemical shift δ of 1H NMR upon dilution could be divided into three regions. All the H show an upfield shift in Regions 1 and 2 while a different tendency in Region 3 (upfield, no, and downfield shift classified as Types 1, 2, 3, respectively). For ATR-IR, the red, no, or blue shift of νOD (IR absorption peak of OD in D2O) and ν± (IR absorption peak of AcILs) also have three types, respectively. Two-Times Explosion Mechanism (TTEM) was proposed to interpret the dynamic processes of AcILs upon dilution macroscopically, meanwhile an Inferior Spring Model (ISM) was proposed to help to understand the TTEM microscopically, All those indicate that AcILs present the state of network, sub-network, cluster, sub-cluster, ion pairs and sub-ion pairs in sequence upon dilution by water and the elongation of hydrogen bonding between AcILs-water, between cation-anion of AcILs is plastic deformation rather than elastic deformation.

  10. Peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement with the superconducting flywheel energy storage in electric railway system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hansang; Jung, Seungmin; Cho, Yoonsung; Yoon, Donghee; Jang, Gilsoo

    2013-11-01

    This paper proposes an application of the 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems to reduce the peak power of the electric railway system. The electric railway systems have high-power characteristics and large amount of regenerative energy during vehicles’ braking. The high-power characteristic makes operating cost high as the system should guarantee the secure capacity of electrical equipment and the low utilization rate of regenerative energy limits the significant energy efficiency improvement. In this paper, it had been proved that the peak power reduction and energy efficiency improvement can be achieved by using 100 kWh superconducting flywheel energy storage systems with the optimally controlled charging or discharging operations. Also, economic benefits had been assessed.

  11. Cosmology constraints from shear peak statistics in Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, T.; Kirk, D.; Friedrich, O.; Amara, A.; Refregier, A.; Marian, L.; Dietrich, J. P.; Suchyta, E.; Aleksić, J.; Bacon, D.; Becker, M. R.; Bonnett, C.; Bridle, S. L.; Chang, C.; Eifler, T. F.; Hartley, W. G.; Huff, E. M.; Krause, E.; MacCrann, N.; Melchior, P.; Nicola, A.; Samuroff, S.; Sheldon, E.; Troxel, M. A.; Weller, J.; Zuntz, J.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Crocce, M.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Evrard, A. E.; Neto, A. Fausti; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; Jain, B.; James, D. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Martini, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Smith, I. Sevilla-Noarbe R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Vikram, V.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.; DES Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Shear peak statistics has gained a lot of attention recently as a practical alternative to the two point statistics for constraining cosmological parameters. We perform a shear peak statistics analysis of the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification (SV) data, using weak gravitational lensing measurements from a 139 deg2 field. We measure the abundance of peaks identified in aperture mass maps, as a function of their signal-to-noise ratio, in the signal-to-noise range 0peak counts as a function of cosmological parameters we use a suite of N-body simulations spanning 158 models with varying Ωm and σ8, fixing w = -1, Ωb = 0.04, h = 0.7 and ns = 1, to which we have applied the DES SV mask and redshift distribution. In our fiducial analysis we measure σ8(Ωm/0.3)0.6 = 0.77 ± 0.07, after marginalising over the shear multiplicative bias and the error on the mean redshift of the galaxy sample. We introduce models of intrinsic alignments, blending, and source contamination by cluster members. These models indicate that peaks with mathcal {S} / mathcal {N}>4 would require significant corrections, which is why we do not include them in our analysis. We compare our results to the cosmological constraints from the two point analysis on the SV field and find them to be in good agreement in both the central value and its uncertainty. We discuss prospects for future peak statistics analysis with upcoming DES data.

  12. Design and analysis of vibration energy harvesters based on peak response statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Friswell, M. I.; Litak, G.; Haddad Khodaparast, H.

    2016-06-01

    Energy harvesting using cantilever piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters excited by Gaussian broadband random base excitation is considered. The optimal design and analysis of energy harvesters under random excitation is normally performed using the mean and standard deviation of a response quantity of interest, such as the voltage. An alternative approach based on the statistics of the peak voltage is developed in this paper. Three extreme response characteristics, namely (a) level crossing, (b) response peaks above certain level, and (c) fractional time spend above a certain level, have been employed. Two cases, namely the harvesting circuit with and without an inductor, have been considered. Exact closed-form expressions have been derived for number of level crossings, statistics of response peaks and fractional time spend above a certain level for the output voltage. It is shown that these quantities can be related to the standard deviation of the voltage and its derivative with respect to time. Direct numerical simulation has been used to validate the analytical expressions. Based on the analytical results, closed-form expressions for optimal system parameters have been proposed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the applicability of the analytical results.

  13. Measurements of Ion Stopping around the Bragg Peak in High-Energy-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenje, Johan

    2015-11-01

    Over the last few decades, ion stopping in weakly- to strongly-coupled High-Energy-Density (HED) plasmas has been subject to extensive analytical and numerical studies, but only a limited set of experimental data exists to check the validity of these theories. Most of these experiments also did not probe the detailed characteristics of the Bragg peak (peak ion stopping) where the ion velocity is similar to the average thermal electron velocity. To the best of our knowledge, only one exploratory attempt to do this was conducted by Hicks et al., who were able to describe qualitatively the behavior of the Bragg peak for one plasma condition. The work described in this presentation makes significant advances over previous experimental efforts by quantitatively assessing the characteristics of the ion stopping, ranging from low-velocity stopping, through the Bragg peak, to high-velocity stopping for different HED plasma conditions. This was achieved by measuring the energy loss of DD-tritons, D3He-alphas, DD-protons and D3He-protons, with distinctly different velocities, and the results indicate that the stopping power varies strongly with Te and ne. This effort represents the first experimental test of state-of-art plasma-stopping-power theories around the Bragg peak, which is an important first step in our efforts of getting a fundamental understanding of DT-alpha stopping in HED plasmas, a prerequisite for understanding ignition margins in various implosion designs with varying hot spot areal density at the National Ignition Facility. The work described here was performed in part at the LLE National Laser User's Facility (NLUF), and was supported in part by US DOE (Grant No. DE-FG03- 03SF22691), LLNL (subcontract Grant No. B504974) and LLE (subcontract Grant No. 412160-001G).

  14. Depth-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detection of energy-loss Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Soejima, Narumasa; Iwasaki, Shiro; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Murai, Takaaki; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2015-11-01

    A unique X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) method is proposed for depth profiling of chemical states in material surfaces. Partial electron yield mode detecting energy-loss Auger electrons, called the inelastic electron yield (IEY) mode, enables a variation in the probe depth. As an example, Si K-edge XAS spectra for a well-defined multilayer sample (Si3N4/SiO2/Si) have been investigated using this method at various kinetic energies. We found that the peaks assigned to the layers from the top layer to the substrate appeared in the spectra in the order of increasing energy loss relative to the Auger electrons. Thus, the probe depth can be changed by the selection of the kinetic energy of the energy loss electrons in IEY-XAS.

  15. X-ray Emission of Low-Energy-Peaked BL Lacertae Objects

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Jill M.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2009-12-18

    Presented here is an analysis of X-ray observations of the following seven low-energy-peaked BL Lacertae objects: BL Lacertae, S5 0716+71, W Comae, 3C 66A, S4 0954+65, OJ 287, and AO 0235+16. The spectral data for these objects were taken from observations by the XMM-Newton and/or Chandra X-ray observatories. These objects are being analyzed in an effort to reanalyze all XMM-Newton and Chandra data of low-energy BL Lacs, similar to the efforts of Perlman et al.[4] for high energy BL Lacs. The objects were studied in an effort to understand the nature of the X-ray and multi-waveband emissions in these objects, study the shape of the spectra, and compare the observations of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs to previous observations of these objects and also to observations of high-energy-peaked BL Lacs. Light curves and spectra were analyzed to look for evidence of spectral variability in the objects and as a comparison to previous research on these objects. Most data shows both synchrotron and Inverse-Compton emission, though only little correlation was seen between the emission strength and the spectral slope. Our data is generally well-fitted to a broken power law model with distinct bimodality seen in the first spectral index (six observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}0.4 and four observations with {Gamma}{sub 1{approx}}3.0), a break in energy between 0.6 and 1.4 keV, and a second spectral index {Gamma}{sub 2{approx}}2.0. None of the observations showed spectral lines, which is consistent with past results. For S5 0716+71 the XMM-Newton X-ray and optical data, along with radio data obtained from the University of Michigan Radio Astronomy Observatory (UMRAO), a spectral energy distribution was created and peak frequencies were estimated.

  16. Energy peak: Back to the Galactic Center GeV gamma-ray excess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong-Chul

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel mechanism enabling us to have a continuum bump as a signature of gamma-ray excess in indirect detection experiments of dark matter (DM), postulating a generic dark sector having (at least) two DM candidates. With the assumption of non-zero mass gap between the two DM candidates, the heavier one directly communicates to the partner of the lighter one. Such a partner then decays into a lighter DM particle along with an "axion-like" particle (ALP) or dark "pion", which subsequently decays into a pair of photons, via a more-than-one step cascade decay process. Since the cascade is initiated by the dark partner obtaining a non-trivial fixed boost factor, a continuum γ-ray energy spectrum naturally arises even with a particle directly decaying into two photons. We apply the main idea to the energy spectrum of the GeV γ-rays from around the Galactic Center (GC), and find that the relevant observational data is well-reproduced by the theory expectation predicted by the proposed mechanism. Remarkably, the relevant energy spectrum has a robust peak at half the mass of the ALP or dark pion, as opposed to popular DM models directly annihilating to Standard Model particles where physical interpretations of the energy peak are not manifest. Our data analysis reports substantially improved fits, compared to those annihilating DM models, and ∼ 900 MeV mass of the ALP or dark pion.

  17. Supporting Structure of the LSD Wave in an Energy Absorption Perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Akihiro; Hatai, Keigo; Cho, Shinatora; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Komurasaki, Kimiya

    2008-04-28

    In Repetitively Pulsed (RP) Laser Propulsion, laser energy irradiated to a vehicle is converted to blast wave enthalpy during the Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) regime. Based on the measured post-LSD electron number density profiles by two-wavelength Mach Zehnder interferometer in a line-focusing optics, electron temperature and absorption coefficient were estimated assuming Local Thermal Equilibrium. A 10J/pulse CO{sub 2} laser was used. As a result, laser absorption was found completed in the layer between the shock wave and the electron density peak. Although the LSD-termination timing was not clear from the shock-front/ionization-front separation in the shadowgraph images, there observed drastic changes in the absorption layer thickness from 0.2 mm to 0.5 mm and in the peak heating rate from 12-17x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} to 5x10{sup 13} kW/m{sup 3} at the termination.

  18. Prediction of the energy-absorption capability of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1992-01-01

    A method of predicting the crack-related energy-absorption capability of composite tubes is presented. The method is based upon a phenomenological model of the crushing process exhibited by continuous-fiber-reinforced tubes. A finite element method is used to model the crushing process. The analysis is compared with experiments on Kevlar-epoxy and graphite-epoxy tubes. Reasonable agreement is obtained between the analysis and experiment.

  19. Impacts of Climate Change on Energy Consumption and Peak Demand in Buildings: A Detailed Regional Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Dirks, James A.; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Hathaway, John E.; Skorski, Daniel C.; Scott, Michael J.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results of numerous commercial and residential building simulations, with the purpose of examining the impact of climate change on peak and annual building energy consumption over the portion of the Eastern Interconnection (EIC) located in the United States. The climate change scenario considered (IPCC A2 scenario as downscaled from the CASCaDE data set) has changes in mean climate characteristics as well as changes in the frequency and duration of intense weather events. This investigation examines building energy demand for three annual periods representative of climate trends in the CASCaDE data set at the beginning, middle, and end of the century--2004, 2052, and 2089. Simulations were performed using the Building ENergy Demand (BEND) model which is a detailed simulation platform built around EnergyPlus. BEND was developed in collaboration with the Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA), a modeling framework designed to simulate the complex interactions among climate, energy, water, and land at decision-relevant spatial scales. Over 26,000 building configurations of different types, sizes, vintages, and, characteristics which represent the population of buildings within the EIC, are modeled across the 3 EIC time zones using the future climate from 100 locations within the target region, resulting in nearly 180,000 spatially relevant simulated demand profiles for each of the 3 years. In this study, the building stock characteristics are held constant based on the 2005 building stock in order to isolate and present results that highlight the impact of the climate signal on commercial and residential energy demand. Results of this analysis compare well with other analyses at their finest level of specificity. This approach, however, provides a heretofore unprecedented level of specificity across multiple spectrums including spatial, temporal, and building characteristics. This capability enables the ability to

  20. Mechanical properties and energy absorption characteristics of a polyurethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Neuschwanger, C.L.; Henderson, C.; Skala, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    Tension, compression and impact properties of a polyurethane encapsulant foam have been measured as a function of foam density. Significant differences in the behavior of the foam were observed depending on the mode of testing. Over the range of densities examined, both the modulus and the elastic collapse stress of the foam exhibited power-law dependencies with respect to density. The power-law relationship for the modulus was the same for both tension and compression testing and is explained in terms of the elastic compliance of the cellular structure of the foam using a simple geometric model. Euler buckling is used to rationalize the density dependence of the collapse stress. Neither tension nor compression testing yielded realistic measurements of energy absorption (toughness). In the former case, the energy absorption characteristics of the foam were severely limited due to the inherent lack of tensile ductility. In the latter case, the absence of a failure mechanism led to arbitrary measures of energy absorption that were not indicative of true material properties. Only impact testing revealed an intrinsic limitation in the toughness characteristics of the material with respect to foam density. The results suggest that dynamic testing should be used when assessing the shock mitigating qualities of a foam.

  1. Wavelength and energy dependent absorption of unconventional fuel mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, N.; Saleem, Z.; Mirza, A. A.

    2005-11-01

    Economic considerations of laser induced ignition over the normal electrical ignition of direct injected Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) engines has motivated automobile industry to go for extensive research on basic characteristics of leaner unconventional fuel mixtures to evaluate practical possibility of switching over to the emerging technologies. This paper briefly reviews the ongoing research activities on minimum ignition energy and power requirements of natural gas fuels and reports results of present laser air/CNG mixture absorption coefficient study. This study was arranged to determine the thermo-optical characteristics of high air/fuel ratio mixtures using laser techniques. We measured the absorption coefficient using four lasers of multiple wavelengths over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. The absorption coefficient of mixture was found to vary significantly over change of mixture temperature and probe laser wavelengths. The absorption coefficients of air/CNG mixtures were measured using 20 watts CW/pulsed CO2 laser at 10.6μm, Pulsed Nd:Yag laser at 1.06μm, 532 nm (2nd harmonic) and 4 mW CW HeNe laser at 645 nm and 580 nm for temperatures varying from 290 to 1000K using optical transmission loss technique.

  2. High Energy Absorption Top Nozzle For A Nuclaer Fuel Assembly

    DOEpatents

    Sparrow, James A.; Aleshin, Yuriy; Slyeptsov, Aleksey

    2004-05-18

    A high energy absorption top nozzle for a nuclear fuel assembly that employs an elongated upper tubular housing and an elongated lower tubular housing slidable within the upper tubular housing. The upper and lower housings are biased away from each other by a plurality of longitudinally extending springs that are restrained by a longitudinally moveable piston whose upward travel is limited within the upper housing. The energy imparted to the nozzle by a control rod scram is mostly absorbed by the springs and the hydraulic affect of the piston within the nozzle.

  3. Search for two-{gamma} sum-energy peaks in the decay out of superdeformed bands

    SciTech Connect

    Blumenthal, D.; Khoo, T.L.; Lauritsen, T.

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays decaying out of the superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 192}Hg has a quasicontinuous distribution. Whereas methods to construct level schemes from discrete lines in coincidence spectra are well established, new techniques must still be developed to extract information from coincidences involving quasicontinuous {gamma}rays. From an experiment using Eurogam, we obtained impressively clean 1- and 2-dimensional {gamma} spectra from pairwise or single gates, respectively, on the transitions of the SD band in {sup 192}Hg. We investigated methods to exploit the 2-dimensional quasicontinuum spectra coincident with the SD band to determine the excitation energy of the SD band above the normal yrast line. No strong peaks were observed in the 2-{gamma} sum spectra; only candidates of peaks at a 2-3 {sigma} level were found. This suggests that 2-{gamma} decay is not the dominant decay branch out of SD bands, consistent with the observed multiplicity of 3.2. We shall next search for peaks in sum-spectra of 3 {gamma}s.

  4. Low frequency noise peak near magnon emission energy in magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Liang; Xiang, Li; Guo, Huiqiang; Wei, Jian; Li, D. L.; Yuan, Z. H.; Feng, J. F. Han, X. F.; Coey, J. M. D.

    2014-12-15

    We report on the low frequency (LF) noise measurements in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) below 4 K and at low bias, where the transport is strongly affected by scattering with magnons emitted by hot tunnelling electrons, as thermal activation of magnons from the environment is suppressed. For both CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB and CoFeB/AlO{sub x}/CoFeB MTJs, enhanced LF noise is observed at bias voltage around magnon emission energy, forming a peak in the bias dependence of noise power spectra density, independent of magnetic configurations. The noise peak is much higher and broader for unannealed AlO{sub x}-based MTJ, and besides Lorentzian shape noise spectra in the frequency domain, random telegraph noise (RTN) is visible in the time traces. During repeated measurements the noise peak reduces and the RTN becomes difficult to resolve, suggesting defects being annealed. The Lorentzian shape noise spectra can be fitted with bias-dependent activation of RTN, with the attempt frequency in the MHz range, consistent with magnon dynamics. These findings suggest magnon-assisted activation of defects as the origin of the enhanced LF noise.

  5. High-speed Light Peak optical link for high energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, F. X.; Chiang, F.; Deng, B.; Hou, J.; Hou, S.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Teng, P. K.; Wang, C. H.; Xu, T.; Ye, J.

    2014-11-01

    Optical links provide high speed data transmission with low mass fibers favorable for applications in high energy experiments. We report investigation of a compact Light Peak optical engine designed for data transmission at 4.8 Gbps. The module is assembled with bare die VCSEL, PIN diodes and a control IC aligned within a prism receptacle for light coupling to fiber ferrule. Radiation damage in the receptacle was examined with 60Co gamma ray. Radiation induced single event effects in the optical engine were studied with protons, neutrons and X-ray tests.

  6. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples.

    PubMed

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-05-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with (137)Cs and (60)Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of (137)Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  7. Energy Absorption in Chopped Carbon Fiber Compression Molded Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Starbuck, J.M.

    2001-07-20

    In passenger vehicles the ability to absorb energy due to impact and be survivable for the occupant is called the ''crashworthiness'' of the structure. To identify and quantify the energy absorbing mechanisms in candidate automotive composite materials, test methodologies were developed for conducting progressive crush tests on composite plate specimens. The test method development and experimental set-up focused on isolating the damage modes associated with the frond formation that occurs in dynamic testing of composite tubes. Quasi-static progressive crush tests were performed on composite plates manufactured from chopped carbon fiber with an epoxy resin system using compression molding techniques. The carbon fiber was Toray T700 and the epoxy resin was YLA RS-35. The effect of various material and test parameters on energy absorption was evaluated by varying the following parameters during testing: fiber volume fraction, fiber length, fiber tow size, specimen width, profile radius, and profile constraint condition. It was demonstrated during testing that the use of a roller constraint directed the crushing process and the load deflection curves were similar to progressive crushing of tubes. Of all the parameters evaluated, the fiber length appeared to be the most critical material parameter, with shorter fibers having a higher specific energy absorption than longer fibers. The combination of material parameters that yielded the highest energy absorbing material was identified.

  8. Ultra high energy neutrinos: absorption, thermal effects and signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Sabancilar, Eray; Yang, Lili E-mail: Eray.Sabancilar@asu.edu

    2013-08-01

    We study absorption of ultra high energy neutrinos by the cosmic neutrino background, with full inclusion of the effect of the thermal distribution of the background on the resonant annihilation channel. For a hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum (with at least one neutrino with mass below ∼ 10{sup −2} eV), thermal effects are important for ultra high energy neutrino sources at z∼>16. The neutrino transmission probability shows no more than two separate suppression dips since the two lightest mass eigenstates contribute as a single species when thermal effects are included. Results are applied to a number of models of ultra high energy neutrino emission. Suppression effects are strong for sources that extend beyond z ∼ 10, which can be realized for certain top down scenarios, such as superheavy dark matter decays, cosmic strings and cosmic necklaces. For these, a broad suppression valley should affect the neutrino spectrum at least in the energy interval 10{sup 12}−10{sup 13} GeV — which therefore is disfavored for ultra high energy neutrino searches — with only a mild dependence on the neutrino mass spectrum and hierarchy. The observation of absorption effects would indicate a population of sources beyond z ∼ 10, and favor top-down mechanisms; it would also be an interesting probe of the physics of the relic neutrino background in the unexplored redshift interval z ∼ 10–100.

  9. Determining photon energy absorption parameters for different soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Kucuk, Nil; Tumsavas, Zeynal; Cakir, Merve

    2013-01-01

    The mass attenuation coefficients (μs) for five different soil samples were measured at 661.6, 1173.2 and 1332.5 keV photon energies. The soil samples were separately irradiated with 137Cs and 60Co (370 kBq) radioactive point gamma sources. The measurements were made by performing transmission experiments with a 2″ × 2″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, which had an energy resolution of 7% at 0.662 MeV for the gamma-rays from the decay of 137Cs. The effective atomic numbers (Zeff) and the effective electron densities (Neff) were determined experimentally and theoretically using the obtained μs values for the soil samples. Furthermore, the Zeff and Neff values of the soil samples were computed for the total photon interaction cross-sections using theoretical data over a wide energy region ranging from 1 keV to 15 MeV. The experimental values of the soils were found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values. Sandy loam and sandy clay loam soils demonstrated poor photon energy absorption characteristics. However, clay loam and clay soils had good photon energy absorption characteristics. PMID:23179375

  10. Energy absorption in cold inhomogeneous plasmas - The Herlofson paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, F. W.; Harker, K. J.

    1972-01-01

    Confirmation of Barston's (1964) conclusions regarding the underlying mechanism of the Herlofson paradox by examining in detail several analytically tractable cases of delta-function and sinusoidal excitation. The effects of collisions and nonzero electron temperature in determining the steady state fields and dissipation are considered. Energy absorption without dissipation in plasmas is shown to be analogous to that occurring after application of a signal to a network of lossless resonant circuits. This analogy is pursued and is extended to cover Landau damping in a warm homogeneous plasma in which the resonating elements are the electron streams making up the velocity distribution. Some of the practical consequences of resonant absorption are discussed, together with a number of paradoxical plasma phenomena which can also be elucidated by considering a superposition of normal modes rather than a single Fourier component.

  11. Charge-state dependence of binary-encounter-electron cross sections and peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidmi, H. I.; Richard, P.; Sanders, J. M.; Schöne, H.; Giese, J. P.; Lee, D. H.; Zouros, T. J. M.; Varghese, S. L.

    1993-12-01

    The charge-state dependence of the binary-encounter-electron (BEE) double-differential cross section (DDCS) at 0° with respect to the beam direction resulting from collisions of 1 MeV/amu H+, Cq+, Nq+, Oq+, Fq+, Siq+, and Clq+, and 0.5 MeV/amu Cuq+ with H2 is reported. The data show an enhancement in the BEE DDCS as the charge state of the projectile is decreased, in agreement with the data reported by Richard et al. [J. Phys. B 23, L213 (1990)]. The DDCS enhancement ratios observed for the three-electron isoelectronic sequence C3+:C6+, N4+:N7+, O5+:O8+, and F6+:F9+ are about 1.35, whereas a DDCS enhancement of 3.5 was observed for Cu4+. The BEE enhancement with increasing electrons on the projectile has been shown by several authors to be due to the non-Coulomb static potential of the projectile and additionally to the e-e exchange interaction. An impulse-approximation (IA) model fits the shape of the BEE DDCS and predicts a Z2p dependence for the bare-ion cross sections. The IA also predicts a binary peak energy that is independent of q and Zp and below the classical value of 4t, where t is the energy of electrons traveling with the projectile velocity. We observed a BEE energy shift ΔE (ΔE=4t-Epeak, where Epeak is the measured energy at the peak of the binary encounter electrons) that is approximately independent of q for the low-Zp ions, whereas the measured ΔE values for Si, Cl, and Cu were found to be q dependent.

  12. Energy analysis of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.

    1996-09-01

    Absorption refrigeration systems (ARSs) are run on heat-operated cycles. In these systems a secondary fluid (i.e., absorbent) is used to absorb the primary fluid (i.e., refrigerant) vaporized in the evaporator. ARSs for industrial and domestic applications have been attracting increasing interest throughout the world. A simple energy analysis technique for ammonia-water refrigeration systems is presented and verified with actual experimental data taken from the literature. Comparison was made in terms of the coefficient of performance, and very good agreement was found.

  13. Studies on mass energy-absorption coefficients and effective atomic energy-absorption cross sections for carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladhaf, Bibifatima M.; Pawar, Pravina P.

    2015-04-01

    We measured here the mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) of carbohydrates, Esculine (C15H16O9), Sucrose (C12H22O11), Sorbitol (C6H14O6), D-Galactose (C6H12O6), Inositol (C6H12O6), D-Xylose (C5H10O5) covering the energy range from 122 keV up to 1330 keV photon energies by using gamma ray transmission method in a narrow beam good geometry set-up. The gamma-rays were detected using NaI(Tl) scintillation detection system with a resolution of 8.2% at 662 keV. The attenuation coefficient data were then used to obtain the total attenuation cross-section (σtot), molar extinction coefficients (ε), mass-energy absorption coefficients (μen/ρ) and effective (average) atomic energy-absorption cross section (σa,en) of the compounds. These values are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical values calculated based on XCOM data.

  14. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    PubMed Central

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  15. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-05-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates–sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity–have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics.

  16. High-energy side-peak emission of exciton-polariton condensates in high density regime.

    PubMed

    Horikiri, Tomoyuki; Yamaguchi, Makoto; Kamide, Kenji; Matsuo, Yasuhiro; Byrnes, Tim; Ishida, Natsuko; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Shikano, Yutaka; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Forchel, Alfred; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    In a standard semiconductor laser, electrons and holes recombine via stimulated emission to emit coherent light, in a process that is far from thermal equilibrium. Exciton-polariton condensates-sharing the same basic device structure as a semiconductor laser, consisting of quantum wells coupled to a microcavity-have been investigated primarily at densities far below the Mott density for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation. At high densities approaching the Mott density, exciton-polariton condensates are generally thought to revert to a standard semiconductor laser, with the loss of strong coupling. Here, we report the observation of a photoluminescence sideband at high densities that cannot be accounted for by conventional semiconductor lasing. This also differs from an upper-polariton peak by the observation of the excitation power dependence in the peak-energy separation. Our interpretation as a persistent coherent electron-hole-photon coupling captures several features of this sideband, although a complete understanding of the experimental data is lacking. A full understanding of the observations should lead to a development in non-equilibrium many-body physics. PMID:27193700

  17. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  18. Energy-absorption capability and scalability of square cross section composite tube specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1989-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy square cross section tubes to study the influence of specimen geometry on the energy-absorption capability and scalability of composite materials. The tube inside width-to-wall thickness (W/t) ratio was determined to significantly affect the energy-absorption capability of composite materials. As W/t ratio decreases, the energy-absorption capability increases nonlinearly. The energy-absorption capability of Kevlar epoxy tubes was found to be geometrically scalable, but the energy-absorption capability of graphite/epoxy tubes was not geometrically scalable.

  19. Exciton-Like Behavior in Low-Energy Absorption Spectra of Simple Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, Mira Hemendraray

    The valence excitation (ns('2) (--->) nsnp) spectra of Mg, Zn, and Ca impurities at various concentrations in Li have been measured. Polarization modulation ellipsometry was used to determine the impurity-induced changes in real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function simultaneously, together with the differential reflectivity, in the energy range 1.5 - 4.5 eV. The most important result at sufficiently dilute alloy compositions, is that the system investigated display a distinct absorption peak above the Drude background. The height of this peak varies linearly with impurity content. The impurity-specific character of these spectral features points to exciton-like behavior at low-energy, arising from atomic-like excitations in which the electron and the hole linger together at the impurity site. Existing theories of alloy spectra do not explain these effects, because they do not include the Coulomb correlations between the interacting quasiparticles created in the optical event, or the way in which the interacting pair is confined to the impurity site by the mutual field. A remarkable added result of this research is that the exciton-like behavior can be followed with increasing impurity content, all the way to the pure Mg response, when it becomes the interband transition. This has led Kunz and Flynn to reformulate the theory of optical absorption including excited state interactions; and to apply the theory to the spectrum of pure Mg. The Coulomb interaction causes striking effects which are in generally good agreement with experiment. Zn-Li alloys behave differently. At an alloy composition for which Zn-Zn interactions become prevalent, the local, impurity-specific character of the spectrum disappears, leaving only a featureless Drude-like absorption. These results have provoked cluster calculations by Boisvert and Kunz, which predict the spectral shifts, and exhibit qualitatively similar persistence for Mg-Li, and broadening for Zn-Li.

  20. Unification of the low-energy excitation peaks in the heat capacity that appears in clathrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jiazhen; Akagi, Kazuto; Xu, Jingtao; Shimotani, Hidekazu; Huynh, Khuong K.; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2016-03-01

    We report that anomalous low-energy excitation (ALE) peaks in the heat capacity emerging from single-crystal cage materials can be successfully rationalized in terms of a single unified exponential line for a variety of type-I clathrates by employing a parameter associated with the freedom of space and the modified radii of guest atoms estimated by band calculations. The origin of these low-energy excitations is interpreted in the framework of quasiharmonic van der Waals type guest-host interactions based on a unified picture with the help of first-principles calculations. It is shown that the influence of guest-host ionic and covalent bonding interactions on the phonon anharmonicity, which have so far been considered to play an important role, are not significant as long as high symmetry of the cage structure is preserved. The dominant van der Waals interactions explain the soft vibrational modes of the rattling, which suppress phonon transport and lead to the concept of "phonon-glass electron-crystal" (PGEC) for thermoelectric applications. A few exceptions existing in type-I clathrates, as indicated by deviations from the unified line, suggest that a quasiharmonic potential can become more asymmetric via lower symmetry of the cage structure, towards glasslike disordered states at even lower temperatures. Although the origin of the boson peaks appearing in disordered materials is still under debate due to incomplete information on the real structure, the understanding provided by the present paper for crystalline cage materials may provide information partly applicable to other disordered systems.

  1. Novel impact-based peak-energy locking piezoelectric generators for munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Murray, R.; Pereira, C.; Nguyen, H.-L.

    2007-04-01

    Presented here is an innovative class of piezoelectric-based generators for application in gun-fired munitions and other similar devices. The generators are designed to produce electrical energy as a result of the firing acceleration with enough output to power certain on-board electronic circuitry, such as lowpower fuzing. In this class of piezoelectric-based generators, a novel mechanism is provided with which the strain applied to the piezoelectric stack can be maintained at its in-firing peak value throughout the flight of the projectile. As a result, the generated charge can be harvested efficiently during a significantly longer period of time. In addition, in some munitions applications this can totally eliminate the need for storing the generated electrical energy in another storage medium. This class of impact-based piezoelectric generator devices is intrinsically robust in design which makes it suitable for high-G applications. Also, since the present devices produce energy due to the firing acceleration, a high degree of safety is guaranteed because the electronics are not powered until the projectile is fired. A basic proof-of-concept design and a deployable prototype concept are presented which will demonstrate the scalability of the present devices as well as their survivability in high-G environments.

  2. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2012-04-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  3. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2011-11-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  4. GRPANL: a program for fitting complex peak groupings for gamma and x-ray energies and intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnink, R.; Ruhter, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    GRPANL is a general-purpose peak-fitting program that calculates gamma-ray and x-ray energies and intensities from a given spectral region. The program requires that the user supply input information such as the first and last channels of the region, the channels to be used as pre- and post-region background, the system gain and zero-intercept, and a list of approximate energy values at which peaks occur in the region. Because the peak position and peak-shape parameters enter nonlinearly into the peak-fitting algorithm, an iterative least-square procedure is used in the fitting process. The program iterates until either all convergence criteria are met or ten iterations have elapsed. The code described here allows for twenty free parameters and a region as large as 240 data channels. This code runs on an LSI-11 computer with 32K memory and disk-storage capability.

  5. Reaching the peak of the quasar spectral energy distribution - I. Observations and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collinson, James S.; Ward, Martin J.; Done, Chris; Landt, Hermine; Elvis, Martin; McDowell, Jonathan C.

    2015-05-01

    We perform a spectral analysis of a sample of 11 medium redshift (1.5 ≲ z ≲ 2.2) quasars. Our sample all have optical spectra from the SDSS, infrared spectra from GNIRS and TripleSpec, and X-ray spectra from XMM-Newton. We first analyse the Balmer broad emission line profiles which are shifted into the IR spectra to constrain black hole masses. Then we fit an energy-conserving, three component accretion model of the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) to our multiwavelength data. 5 out of the 11 quasars show evidence of an SED peak, allowing us to constrain their bolometric luminosity from these models and estimate their mass accretion rates. Based on our limited sample, we suggest that estimating bolometric luminosities from L_{5100 A} and L2-10 keV may be unreliable, as has been also noted for a low-redshift, X-ray selected active galactic nucleus sample.

  6. Short-term flux and colour variations in low-energy peaked blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Bindu; Gupta, Alok C.; Strigachev, A.; Bachev, R.; Wiita, Paul J.; Semkov, E.; Ovcharov, E.; Mihov, B.; Boeva, S.; Peneva, S.; Spassov, B.; Tsvetkova, S.; Stoyanov, K.; Valcheva, A.

    2010-06-01

    We have measured multiband optical flux and colour variations for a sample of 12 low-energy peaked blazars (LBLs) on short, day-to-month, time-scales. Our sample contains six BL Lacertae objects (BL Lacs) and six flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). These photometric observations, made during 2008 September to 2009 June, used five optical telescopes, one in India and four in Bulgaria. We detected short-term flux variations in 11 of these blazars and colour variability in eight of them. Our data indicate that six blazars (3C 66A, AO 0235+164, S50716+714, PKS 0735+178, OJ 287 and 3C 454.3) were observed in pre- or post-outburst states, five (PKS 0420-014, 4C 29.45, 3C 279, PKS 1510-089 and BL Lac) were in a low state, while one (3C 273) was in an essentially steady state. The duty cycles for flux and colour variations on short time-scales in these LBLs are ~92 and ~33 per cent, respectively. The colour versus magnitude correlations seen here support the hypothesis that BL Lac objects tend to become bluer with increase in brightness; however, FSRQs may show the opposite trend, and there are exceptions to these trends in both categories of blazar. We briefly discuss emission models for active galactic nuclei that might explain our results.

  7. Test of the peak energy- luminosity correlations of GRBs for their application in cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Disha

    In a few dozen seconds gamma ray bursts (GRBs) emit upto 10 (54) ergs in terms of an equivalent isotropical radiated energy "E _{iso}", so they can be observed with redshifts almost upto 10. Thus, these phenomena appear to be very promising tools to shed light on the expansion rate and the history of the universe. Here we review the use of the E _{p,i} - E _{iso} correlation of GRBs to measure the cosmological density parameter Omega _{M}. We show that the present data set of gamma ray bursts, coupled with the assumption that we live in a flat universe, can provide independent evidence, from other probes, that Omega _{M} ˜ 0.3. As the first step, we consider verifying the correltion depending on several considerable criteria (e.g. E _{p,i} - E _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{iso}, E _{p,i} - L _{peak}, etc.). The results of the comparisons will lead us to verify the reliability of the correlations for cosmographical purpose. This will eventually be utilized to constrain GRBs as standard candles for studying cosmology.

  8. MULTICHANNEL ENERGY AND TIMING MEASUREMENTS WITH THE PEAK DETECTOR/DERANDOMIZER ASIC.

    SciTech Connect

    O'CONNOR,P.; DE GERONIMO,G.; GROSHOLZ,J.; KANDASAMY,A.; JUNNARKAR,S.; FRIED,J.

    2004-10-16

    The Peak Detector/Derandomizer ASIC (PDD) provides threshold discrimination, peak detection, time-to-amplitude conversion, analog memory, sparsification, and multiplexing for 32 channels of analog pulse data. In this work the spectroscopic capabilities of the chip (high resolution and high rate) are demonstrated along with correlated measurements of pulse risetime. Imaging and coincidence detection using the PDD chip will also be illustrated.

  9. Thermal energy storage for space cooling. Technology for reducing on-peak electricity demand and cost

    SciTech Connect

    2000-12-01

    Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off-peak hours when electricity rates are lower. In addition, some system configurations may result in lower first costs and/or lower operating costs. Cool storage systems of one type or another could potentially be cost-effectively applied in most buildings with a space cooling system. A survey of approximately 25 manufacturers providing cool storage systems or components identified several thousand current installations, but less than 1% of these were at Federal facilities. With the Federal sector representing nearly 4% of commercial building floor space and 5% of commercial building energy use, Federal utilization would appear to be lagging. Although current applications are relatively few, the estimated potential annual savings from using cool storage in the Federal sector is $50 million. There are many different types of cool storage systems representing different combinations of storage media, charging mechanisms, and discharging mechanisms. The basic media options are water, ice, and eutectic salts. Ice systems can be further broken down into ice harvesting, ice-on-coil, ice slurry, and encapsulated ice options. Ice-on-coil systems may be internal melt or external melt and may be charged and discharged with refrigerant or a single-phase coolant (typically a water/glycol mixture). Independent of the technology choice, cool storage systems can be designed to provide full storage or partial storage, with load-leveling and demand-limiting options for partial storage. Finally, storage systems can be operated on a chiller-priority or storage priority basis whenever the cooling load is less than the design conditions. The first section describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. The next three sections define the savings potential in the

  10. Robust gain-scheduling energy-to-peak control of vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xinjie; Wang, Junmin

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the vehicle lateral dynamics stabilisation problem to enhance vehicle handling by considering time-varying longitudinal velocity. The longitudinal velocity is described by a polytope with finite vertices and a novel technique is proposed to reduce the number of vertices. Since the tyre dynamics is nonlinear, the cornering stiffness is represented via the norm-bounded uncertainty. Concerning the time-varying velocity and the nonlinear tyre model, a linear parameter-varying vehicle model is obtained. As the velocity and the states are measurable, a gain-scheduling state-feedback controller is introduced. In the lateral control, the sideslip angle is required to be as small as possible and the yaw rate is constrained to a certain level. Thus, the control objective is to minimise the sideslip angle while the yaw rate is under a prescribed level or constrain both the sideslip angle and the yaw rate to prescribed levels. To consider the transient response of the closed-loop system, the ?-stability is also employed in the energy-to-peak control. The optimal controller can be obtained by solving a set of linear matrix inequalities. A nonlinear vehicle model is utilised to illustrate the design procedure and the effectiveness of the proposed design method. Finally, simulations and comparisons are carried out to show the significant advantage of the designed controller. Compared to the open-loop system, the closed-loop system with the designed controller can achieve much smaller sideslip angle and the yaw rate is closer to the desired yaw rate from a reference model. Therefore, the vehicle safety and the handling are both improved in our simulation cases.

  11. Tube bundle system studies at Signal Peak Energy Bull Mountains #1 Mine

    PubMed Central

    Zipf, R.K.; Ochsner, R.; Krog, R.; Marchewka, W.; Valente, M.; Jensen, R.

    2015-01-01

    A tube bundle system (TBS) is a mechanical system for continuously drawing gas samples through tubes from multiple monitoring points located in an underground coal mine for analysis and display on the surface. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), in collaboration with Signal Peak Energy (SPE), LLC, Bull Mountains No. 1 Mine, operated a TBS during mining of two bleederless, longwall panels. This paper describes the gas analysis data and its interpretation. As verified by the TBS, coal at the SPE mine tends to oxidize slowly. It was known that a reservoir of low-oxygen concentration atmosphere developed about 610 m (2,000 ft) behind the longwall face. A bleederless ventilation system facilitates formation of an inert atmosphere in this longwall gob and decreases the likelihood of spontaneous combustion. Connections of the mine atmosphere to the surface through subsidence cracks could allow airflow into the longwall gob, revive coal oxidation and increase spontaneous combustion risk. The atmospheric composition of the sealed areas was homogeneous, except in the immediate vicinity of suspected ingassing points. The TBS verified that gases within the partially sealed, bleederless longwall gob expanded into the longwall tailgate area when barometric pressure decreased. The concentration of carbon dioxide in the back return airflow at the longwall tailgate was observed to increase by a factor of three and possibly up to 10 times the typical background concentration of 0.5 to 1.0%, depending on the size of the longwall gob and the magnitude of barometric pressure decrease. TBS have the inherent disadvantage of slow response time due to travel time of the gas samples and sequential gas analyses. A TBS or similar continuous monitoring system could be beneficial in detecting and providing warning of potentially hazardous gas concentrations, if the slow response time of the system is always understood. PMID:26306075

  12. Cellular Energy Depletion Resets Whole-Body Energy by Promoting Coactivator Mediated Dietary Fuel Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Atul R.; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Saha, Pradip; Louet, Jean-Francois; Salazar, Christina; Song, Junghun; Jeong, Jaewook; Finegold, Milton; Viollet, Benoit; DeMayo, Franco; Chan, Lawrence; Moore, David D.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary All organisms have devised strategies to counteract energy depletion in order to promote fitness for survival. We show here that cellular energy depletion puts into play a surprising strategy that leads to absorption of exogenous fuel for energy repletion. We found that the energy depletion sensing kinase AMPK, binds, phosphorylates, and activates the transcriptional coactivator SRC-2, which in a liver-specific manner, promotes absorption of dietary fat from the gut. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of SRC-2 results in intestinal fat malabsorption and attenuated entry of fat into the blood stream. This defect can be attributed to AMPK and SRC-2 mediated transcriptional regulation of hepatic bile-acid secretion into the gut, as it can be completely rescued by replenishing intestinal BA, or by genetically restoring the levels of hepatic Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP). Our results position the hepatic AMPK-SRC-2 axis as an energy rheostat which upon cellular energy depletion resets whole-body energy by promoting absorption of dietary fuel. PMID:21195347

  13. Validation Methodology to Allow Simulated Peak Reduction and Energy Performance Analysis of Residential Building Envelope with Phase Change Materials: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Christensen, C.; Bianchi, M.

    2012-08-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) represent a potential technology to reduce peak loads and HVAC energy consumption in residential buildings. This paper summarizes NREL efforts to obtain accurate energy simulations when PCMs are modeled in residential buildings: the overall methodology to verify and validate Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) and PCM algorithms in EnergyPlus is presented in this study. It also shows preliminary results of three residential building enclosure technologies containing PCM: PCM-enhanced insulation, PCM impregnated drywall and thin PCM layers. The results are compared based on predicted peak reduction and energy savings using two algorithms in EnergyPlus: the PCM and Conduction Finite Difference (CondFD) algorithms.

  14. Optimization of absorption air-conditioning for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    Improved performance of solar cooling systems using the lithium bromide water absorption cycle is investigated. Included are computer simulations of a solar-cooled house, analyses and measurements of heat transfer rates in absorption system components, and design and fabrication of various system components. A survey of solar collector convection suppression methods is presented.

  15. Impact energy absorption of sandwich plates with crushable core

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzbicki, T.; Fatt, M.H.; Alvarez, A.L.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to derive a closed-form solution for deformations, resisting forces, and energy absorption of a metal honeycomb with face plating subjected to localize static and dynamic loads. Two load cases are considered: a quasi-static indentation by a circular punch and dynamic impact by a cylindrical projectile with a velocity in the range of 20 {divided_by} 40 m/sec. The present analysis is building-up on the earlier solution obtained by one of the authors in which the crash resistance of a bare honeycomb was predicted from a known geometry of the cell and material properties. The face plating increases crush resistance of the honeycomb by spreading deformation outside the loading area and invoking considerable membrane action in the plate. Each of the above contributions is quantified and is shown that the resisting force and the radial extent of deformation are increasing functions of punch displacement. The present analytical predictions are compared with measurements taken on seven impact tests on sandwich plates, reported by Goldsmith and Sackman. A correlation of final plate deflections under the projectile was very good for lower impact velocities (less that 6.3% error) and good for higher impact velocities (between 2.08% and 8.9% error). This exceeds the accuracy of a purely numerical solution presented. Three mechanisms limiting the energy absorbed by a sandwich plate are identified: densification of the honeycomb, punch-through shear of the facing plates, and reaching deformation of the outer boundary of the sandwich plate. The present theory provides the necessary background information for optimum designing of sandwich plates against impact loads.

  16. Dynamical behavior and peak power reduction in a pair of energy storage oscillators coupled by delayed power price

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukunaga, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Tomoaki; Ito, Akira; Sugitani, Yoshiki; Konishi, Keiji; Hara, Naoyuki

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigates dynamics of a management system for controlling a pair of energy storages. The system involves the following two characteristics: each storage behaves in a manner that reduces the number of charge noncharge cycles and begins to be charged when the price of power is lower than a particular price threshold. The price is proportional to the past total power flow from a power grid to all storages. A peak of the total power flow occurs when these storages are charged simultaneously. From the viewpoint of nonlinear dynamics, the energy storages can be considered as relaxation oscillators coupled by a delay connection. Our analytical results suggest that the peak can be reduced by inducing an antiphase synchronization in coupled oscillators. We confirm these analytical results through numerical simulations. In addition, we numerically investigate the dynamical behavior in 10 storages and find that time delay in the connection is important in reducing the peak.

  17. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-05-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,i-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,i-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,i ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,i are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,i. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  18. Correlation between peak energy and Fourier power density spectrum slope in gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Amati, L.; Frontera, F.; Margutti, R.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The origin of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission still defies explanation, in spite of recent progress made, for example, on the occasional presence of a thermal component in the spectrum along with the ubiquitous non-thermal component that is modelled with a Band function. The combination of finite duration and aperiodic modulations make GRBs hard to characterise temporally. Although correlations between GRB luminosity and spectral hardness on one side and time variability on the other side have long been known, the loose and often arbitrary definition of the latter makes the interpretation uncertain. Aims: We characterise the temporal variability in an objective way and search for a connection with rest-frame spectral properties for a number of well-observed GRBs. Methods: We studied the individual power density spectra (PDS) of 123 long GRBs with measured redshift, rest-frame peak energy Ep,i of the time-averaged ν Fν spectrum, and well-constrained PDS slope α detected with Swift, Fermi and past spacecraft. The PDS were modelled with a power law either with or without a break adopting a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo technique. Results: We find a highly significant Ep,i-α anti-correlation. The null hypothesis probability is ~10-9. Conclusions: In the framework of the internal shock synchrotron model, the Ep,i-α anti-correlation can hardly be reconciled with the predicted Ep,i ∝ Γ-2, unless either variable microphysical parameters of the shocks or continual electron acceleration are assumed. Alternatively, in the context of models based on magnetic reconnection, the PDS slope and Ep,i are linked to the ejecta magnetisation at the dissipation site, so that more magnetised outflows would produce more variable GRB light curves at short timescales (≲1 s), shallower PDS, and higher values of Ep,i. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  19. 3D printed elastic honeycombs with graded density for tailorable energy absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Simon R. G.; Farrow, Ian R.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the development and experimental analysis of hyperelastic honeycombs with graded densities, for the purpose of energy absorption. Hexagonal arrays are manufactured from thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) via fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printing and the density graded by varying cell wall thickness though the structures. Manufactured samples are subject to static compression tests and their energy absorbing potential analysed via the formation of energy absorption diagrams. It is shown that by grading the density through the structure, the energy absorption profile of these structures can be manipulated such that a wide range of compression energies can be efficiently absorbed.

  20. Photon interference effect in x-ray absorption spectra over a wide energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishino, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Suzuki, M.; Kawamura, N.; Kappen, P.; Korecki, P.; Haack, N.; Materlik, G.

    2002-09-01

    We consider fundamental structures in x-ray absorption spectra over a wide energy range. We formulate the elastic scattering in addition to the photoelectric absorption in recently reported photon interference x-ray absorption fine structure (πXAFS). The simulations show excellent agreement with experimental x-ray absorption spectra for platinum and tungsten powders far above and below the L absorption edges. πXAFS can be as big as in the order of 10% of XAFS, and cannot be easily neglected in detailed analysis of XAFS and related phenomena.

  1. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  2. Double-peak structures in transmission of H2+ ions through conical multicapillaries in a polymer: Projectile-energy dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, S. D.; Wang, Y. Y.; Zhao, Y. T.; Zhou, X. M.; Cheng, R.; Lei, Y.; Sun, Y. B.; Ren, J. R.; Duan, J. L.; Liu, J.; Xu, H. S.; Xiao, G. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission experiments of 7 -200 keV H2+ ions through conical multicapillaries with inlet or outlet diameters of 4/2 μ m and a length of 30 μ m etched in a PC polymer are reported. The yield of the transmitted particles as a function of the capillary tilt angle was measured. The results show that for 200 keV H2+ ions the guiding effect disappears but a focusing effect is obtained with a density enhancement factor of 3.5. For 7 -50 keV H2+ ions their transmitted particle curves exhibit a pair of shoulder peaks on the left- and right-hand side of the center angle 0∘. As the ion energy increases, the shoulder-peak structure is found to vanish leaving one peak at 0∘.

  3. Temporalization of peak electric generation particulate matter emissions during high energy demand days.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Caroline M; Moeller, Michael D; Felder, Frank A; Baker, Kirk R; Rodgers, Mark; Carlton, Annmarie G

    2015-04-01

    Underprediction of peak ambient pollution by air quality models hinders development of effective strategies to protect health and welfare. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's community multiscale air quality (CMAQ) model routinely underpredicts peak ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations. Temporal misallocation of electricity sector emissions contributes to this modeling deficiency. Hourly emissions are created for CMAQ by use of temporal profiles applied to annual emission totals unless a source is matched to a continuous emissions monitor (CEM) in the National Emissions Inventory (NEI). More than 53% of CEMs in the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland (PJM) electricity market and 45% nationally are unmatched in the 2008 NEI. For July 2006, a United States heat wave with high electricity demand, peak electric sector emissions, and elevated ambient PM2.5 mass, we match hourly emissions for 267 CEM/NEI pairs in PJM (approximately 49% and 12% of unmatched CEMs in PJM and nationwide) using state permits, electricity dispatch modeling and CEMs. Hourly emissions for individual facilities can differ up to 154% during the simulation when measurement data is used rather than default temporalization values. Maximum CMAQ PM2.5 mass, sulfate, and elemental carbon predictions increase up to 83%, 103%, and 310%, at the surface and 51%, 75%, and 38% aloft (800 mb), respectively. PMID:25705922

  4. Electron density compression and oscillating effects on laser energy absorption in overdense plasma targets.

    PubMed

    Ge, Z Y; Zhuo, H B; Yu, W; Yang, X H; Yu, T P; Li, X H; Zou, D B; Ma, Y Y; Yin, Y; Shao, F Q; Peng, X J

    2014-03-01

    An analytical model for energy absorption during the interaction of an ultrashort, ultraintense laser with an overdense plasma is proposed. Both the compression effect of the electron density profile and the oscillation of the electron plasma surface are self-consistently included, which exhibit significant influences on the laser energy absorption. Based on our model, the general scaling law of the compression effect depending on laser strength and initial density is derived, and the temporal variation of the laser absorption due to the boundary oscillating effect is presented. It is found that due to the oscillation of the electron plasma surface, the laser absorption rate will vibrate periodically at ω or 2ω frequency for the p-polarized and s-polarized laser, respectively. The effect of plasma collision on the laser absorption has also been investigated, which shows a considerable rise in absorption with increasing electron-ion collision frequency for both polarizations. PMID:24730955

  5. The energy of the vacuum related to the theory of energy absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilov, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    The primary objective in this article is to investigate a new source of renewable energy, the existence of the vacuum in five environments, and the possibility of absorption of the explosion. The study has also addressed the development of new principles in the motor industry, protection against explosions, new principles of mineral processing and new types of explosives. Also, this study may offer some insight into new approaches in solving problems in thermodynamics, the development of gravity waves, the basis of renewable energy source, and the mechanism of the emergence of gravitational waves.

  6. Energy absorption capability and crashworthiness of composite material structures: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Carruthers, J.J.; Kettle, A.P.; Robinson, A.M.

    1998-10-01

    The controlled brittle failure of thermosetting fiber-reinforced polymer composites can provide a very efficient energy absorption mechanism. Consequently, the use of these materials in crashworthy vehicle designs has been the subject of considerable interest. In this respect, their more widespread application has been limited by the complexity of their collapse behavior. This article reviews the current level of understanding i this field, including the correlations between failure mode and energy absorption, the principal material, geometric, and physical parameters relevant to crashworthy design and methods of predicting the energy absorption capability of polymer composites. Areas which require further investigation are identified. This review article contains 70 references.

  7. Energy and Exergy Analysis of Vapour Absorption Refrigeration Cycle—A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanabar, Bhaveshkumar Kantilal; Ramani, Bharatkumar Maganbhai

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, an energy crisis and the energy consumption have become global problems which restrict the sustainable growth. In these scenarios the scientific energy recovery and the utilization of various kinds of waste heat become very important. The waste heat can be utilized in many ways and one of the best practices is to use it for vapour absorption refrigeration system. To ensure efficient working of absorption cycle and utilization of optimum heat, exergy is the best tool for analysis. This paper provides the comprehensive picture of research and development of absorption refrigeration technology, practical and theoretical analysis with different arrangements of the cycle.

  8. Energy and Exergy Analysis of Vapour Absorption Refrigeration Cycle—A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanabar, Bhaveshkumar Kantilal; Ramani, Bharatkumar Maganbhai

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, an energy crisis and the energy consumption have become global problems which restrict the sustainable growth. In these scenarios the scientific energy recovery and the utilization of various kinds of waste heat become very important. The waste heat can be utilized in many ways and one of the best practices is to use it for vapour absorption refrigeration system. To ensure efficient working of absorption cycle and utilization of optimum heat, exergy is the best tool for analysis. This paper provides the comprehensive picture of research and development of absorption refrigeration technology, practical and theoretical analysis with different arrangements of the cycle.

  9. Low-Energy Peak Structure in Strong-Field Ionization by Mid-Infrared Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemell, C.; Dimitriou, K. I.; Arbó, D. G.; Tong, X.-M.; Kartashov, D.; Burgdörfer, J.; Gräfe, S.

    2013-03-01

    Using a quasiclassical approach, we demonstrate that the formation of the low-energy structure in above-threshold ionization spectra by intense, midinfrared laser pulses originates from a two-dimensional focusing of the strong-field dynamics in the energy-angular-momentum plane. We show that the low-energy structure is very sensitive to the carrier-envelope phase of the laser field.

  10. Computation of full energy peak efficiency for nuclear power plant radioactive plume using remote scintillation gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Grozdov, D S; Kolotov, V P; Lavrukhin, Yu E

    2016-04-01

    A method of full energy peak efficiency estimation in the space around scintillation detector, including the presence of a collimator, has been developed. It is based on a mathematical convolution of the experimental results with the following data extrapolation. The efficiency data showed the average uncertainty less than 10%. Software to calculate integral efficiency for nuclear power plant plume was elaborated. The paper also provides results of nuclear power plant plume height estimation by analysis of the spectral data. PMID:26774388

  11. Experiment to Determine the Absorption Coefficient of Gamma Rays as a Function of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouseph, P. J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Simpler than x-ray diffractometer experiments, the experiment described illustrates certain concepts regarding the interaction of electromagnetic rays with matter such as the exponential decrease in the intensity with absorber thickness, variation of the coefficient of absorption with energy, and the effect of the K-absorption edge on the…

  12. Molecular dynamics study of a CNT-buckyball-enabled energy absorption system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Heng; Zhang, Liuyang; Becton, Matthew; Nie, Hong; Chen, Jinbao; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-07-14

    An energy absorption system (EAS) composed of a carbon nanotube (CNT) with nested buckyballs is put forward for energy dissipation during impact owing to the outstanding mechanical properties of both CNTs and buckyballs. Here we implement a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the energy absorption capabilities of several different EASs based on a variety of design parameters. For example, the effects of impact energy, the number of nested buckyballs, and of the size of the buckyballs are analyzed to optimize the energy absorption capability of the EASs by tuning the relevant design parameters. Simulation results indicate that the energy absorption capability of the EAS is closely associated with the deformation characteristics of the confined buckyballs. A low impact energy leads to recoverable deformation of the buckyballs and the dissipated energy is mainly converted to thermal energy. However, a high impact energy yields non-recoverable deformation of buckyballs and thus the energy dissipation is dominated by the strain energy of the EAS. The simulation results also reveal that there exists an optimal value of the number of buckyballs for an EAS under a certain impact energy. Larger buckyballs are able to deform to a larger degree yet also need less impact energy to induce plastic deformation, therefore performing with a better overall energy absorption ability. Overall, the EAS in this study shows a remarkably high energy absorption density of 2 kJ g(-1), it is a promising candidate for mitigating impact energy and sheds light on the research of buckyball-filled CNTs for other applications. PMID:26074446

  13. How does the plasmonic enhancement of molecular absorption depend on the energy gap between molecular excitation and plasmon modes: a mixed TDDFT/FDTD investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Li, Guang; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-07-14

    A real-time time-dependent density functional theory coupled with the classical electrodynamics finite difference time domain technique is employed to systematically investigate the optical properties of hybrid systems composed of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and organic adsorbates. The results demonstrate that the molecular absorption spectra throughout the whole energy range can be enhanced by the surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs; however, the absorption enhancement ratio (AER) for each absorption band differs significantly from the others, leading to the quite different spectral profiles of the hybrid complexes in contrast to those of isolated molecules or sole NPs. Detailed investigations reveal that the AER is sensitive to the energy gap between the molecular excitation and plasmon modes. As anticipated, two separate absorption bands, corresponding to the isolated molecules and sole NPs, have been observed at a large energy gap. When the energy gap approaches zero, the molecular excitation strongly couples with the plasmon mode to form the hybrid exciton band, which possesses the significantly enhanced absorption intensity, a red-shifted peak position, a surprising strongly asymmetric shape of the absorption band, and the nonlinear Fano effect. Furthermore, the dependence of surface localized fields and the scattering response functions (SRFs) on the geometrical parameters of NPs, the NP-molecule separation distance, and the external-field polarizations has also been depicted. PMID:26058430

  14. The long-term Swift observations of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae source 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Kapanadze, S.; Mdzinarishvili, T.; Kharshiladze, G.

    2016-03-01

    We present the results based on the monitoring of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae object 1ES 1959+650 by the Swift satellite during 2005-2014. Our timing study shows that the source was highly variable on longer (weeks-to-months) time-scales with the 0.3-10 keV fluxes ranging by a factor of 8. It sometimes showed a significant intra-day variability in the course of ˜1 ks, detected mainly in the epochs of higher brightness states. The flux variability exhibited an erratic character and no signatures of periodic variations are revealed. The X-ray spectra were mainly curved with broad ranges of photon index, curvature parameter, hardness ratio, synchrotron spectral energy distribution (SED) peak location which exhibited a significant variability with the flux at different time-scales. Our study of multi-wavelength cross-correlations shows that the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton scenario was not always valid for 1ES 1959+650. The X-ray flares were sometimes not accompanied with an increasing activity in the γ-ray or lower-energy parts of the spectrum and vice versa. Similar to the prominent `orphan' TeV event in 2002, significant flares in the high-energy and very high energy bands in 2009 May and 2012 May were not accompanied by those in the synchrotron part of the spectrum. Similar to other TeV-detected high-energy peaked BLLs, the stochastic acceleration of the electrons from the magnetic turbulence close to the shock front may be more important for our target compared to other scenarios since it showed mainly broader synchrotron SEDs during the X-ray flares expected when the stochastic mechanism is more efficient.

  15. The absorption process for heating, cooling and energy storage - An historical survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjurstrom, H.; Raldow, W.

    1981-03-01

    A historical overview of the absorption process is given and a wide range of applications, from household refrigerators and air conditioners to topping processes in power plants, are surveyed in historical perspective. The production of mechanical energy and open systems are also included. The current development of the absorption process is sketched out and special attention is given to the aspects of thermal energy storage.

  16. Quark-novae Occurring in Massive Binaries : A Universal Energy Source in Superluminous Supernovae with Double-peaked Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyed, Rachid; Leahy, Denis; Koning, Nico

    2016-02-01

    A quark-nova (QN; the sudden transition from a neutron star into a quark star), which occurs in the second common envelope (CE) phase of a massive binary, gives excellent fits to superluminous, hydrogen-poor, supernovae (SLSNe) with double-peaked light curves, including DES13S2cmm, SN 2006oz, and LSQ14bdq (http://www.quarknova.ca/LCGallery.html). In our model, the H envelope of the less massive companion is ejected during the first CE phase, while the QN occurs deep inside the second, He-rich, CE phase after the CE has expanded in size to a radius of a few tens to a few thousands of solar radii; this yields the first peak in our model. The ensuing merging of the quark star with the CO core leads to black hole formation and accretion, explaining the second long-lasting peak. We study a sample of eight SLSNe Ic with double-humped light curves. Our model provides good fits to all of these, with a universal explosive energy of 2 × 1052 erg (which is the kinetic energy of the QN ejecta) for the first hump. The late-time emissions seen in iPTF13ehe and LSQ14bdq are fit with a shock interaction between the outgoing He-rich (i.e., second) CE and the previously ejected H-rich (i.e., first) CE.

  17. Model of yield response of corn to plant population and absorption of solar energy.

    PubMed

    Overman, Allen R; Scholtz, Richard V

    2011-01-01

    Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha(-1) and g plant(-1)) on plant population (plants m(-2)). Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L.) grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Y(m) (Mg ha(-1)) for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m(2) plant(-1)) for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, x(c) = 1/c (plants m(-2)). The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of x(c) were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species. PMID:21297960

  18. Model of Yield Response of Corn to Plant Population and Absorption of Solar Energy

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Allen R.; Scholtz, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha−1 and g plant−1) on plant population (plants m−2). Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L.) grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Ym (Mg ha−1) for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m2 plant−1) for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, xc = 1/c (plants m−2). The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of xc were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species. PMID:21297960

  19. Plasmid DNA damage by heavy ions at spread-out Bragg peak energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H. M.; van Goethem, M. J.; van der Graaf, E. R.; Brandenburg, S.; Hoekstra, R.; Schlathölter, T.

    2010-10-01

    Interaction of ionizing radiation with plasmid DNA can lead to formation of single strand breaks, double strand breaks and clustered lesions. We have investigated the response of the synthetic plasmid pBR322 in aqueous solution upon irradiation with 12C ions under spread-out Bragg peak conditions (densely ionizing) and with 137Cs γ-photons (sparsely ionizing) as a function of dose. To evaluate the relevance of indirect effects, i.e. influences of diffusion limited radical induced DNA damage triggered by water radiolysis, the experiments were performed at various concentrations of the radical scavenger mannitol. Agarose gel electrophoresis was employed to quantify the DNA damage. At low scavenger concentration for a given dose DNA damage is higher for γ-photons than for 12C. For the latter, the microscopic dose distribution is inhomogeneous, with very high dose deposited along the few tracks through the solution. This is in agreement with the concept that scavengers efficiently reduce damage for γ-photons, implying that the underlying damage mechanism is single strand break induction by OH radicals. For 12C induced damage, the fraction of SSB and DSB that is unaffected by radical scavengers and thus due to direct effect is quantified.

  20. Lower Extremity Energy Absorption and Biomechanics During Landing, Part II: Frontal-Plane Energy Analyses and Interplanar Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Norcross, Marc F.; Lewek, Michael D.; Padua, Darin A.; Shultz, Sandra J.; Weinhold, Paul S.; Blackburn, J. Troy

    2013-01-01

    Context: Greater sagittal-plane energy absorption (EA) during the initial impact phase (INI) of landing is consistent with sagittal-plane biomechanics that likely increase anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) loading, but it does not appear to influence frontal-plane biomechanics. We do not know whether frontal-plane INI EA is related to high-risk frontal-plane biomechanics. Objective: To compare biomechanics among INI EA groups, determine if women are represented more in the high group, and evaluate interplanar INI EA relationships. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Setting: Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Participants included 82 (41 men, 41 women; age = 21.0 ± 2.4 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.10 m, mass = 70.3 ± 16.1 kg) healthy, physically active volunteers. Intervention(s): We assessed landing biomechanics with an electromagnetic motion-capture system and force plate. Main Outcome Measure(s): We calculated frontal- and sagittal-plane total, hip, knee, and ankle INI EA. Total frontal-plane INI EA was used to create high, moderate, and low tertiles. Frontal-plane knee and hip kinematics, peak vertical and posterior ground reaction forces, and peak internal knee-varus moment (pKVM) were identified and compared across groups using 1-way analyses of variance. We used a χ2 analysis to evaluate male and female allocation to INI EA groups. We used simple, bivariate Pearson product moment correlations to assess interplanar INI EA relationships. Results: The high–INI EA group exhibited greater knee valgus at ground contact, hip adduction at pKVM, and peak hip adduction than the low–INI EA group (P < .05) and greater peak knee valgus, pKVM, and knee valgus at pKVM than the moderate– (P < .05) and low– (P < .05) INI EA groups. Women were more likely than men to be in the high–INI EA group (χ2 = 4.909, P = .03). Sagittal-plane knee and frontal-plane hip INI EA (r = 0.301, P = .006) and sagittal-plane and frontal-plane ankle INI EA were

  1. Energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter revisited: A step-by-step illustrated approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Rahman, W.; Podgorsak, E. B.

    2010-05-01

    A clear understanding of energy transfer and energy absorption in photon interactions with matter is essential for the understanding of radiation dosimetry and development of new dosimetry techniques. The concepts behind the two quantities have been enunciated many years ago and described in many scientific papers, review articles, and textbooks. Data dealing with energy transfer and energy absorption as well as the associated mass energy transfer coefficient and the mass energy absorption coefficient are readily available in web-based tabular forms. However, tables, even when available in detailed and easy to access form, do not lend themselves to serve as visual aid to promote better understanding of the dosimetric quantities related to energy transfer and energy absorption as well as their relationship to the photon energy and absorber atomic number. This paper uses graphs and illustrations, in addition to well-known mathematical relationships, to guide the reader in a systematic manner through the various stages involved in the derivation of energy absorbed in medium and its associated quantity, the mass energy absorption coefficient, from the mass attenuation coefficient.

  2. Coolerado Cooler Helps to Save Cooling Energy and Dollars: New Cooling Technology Targets Peak Load Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Robichaud, R.

    2007-06-01

    This document is about a new evaporative cooling technology that can deliver cooler supply air temperatures than either direct or indirect evaporative cooling systems, without increasing humidity. The Coolerado Cooler technology can help Federal agencies reach the energy-use reduction goals of EPAct 2005, particularly in the western United States.

  3. Relationship between mechanical-property and energy-absorption trends for composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    U.S. Army helicopters are designed to dissipate prescribed levels of crash impact kinetic energy without compromising the integrity of the fuselage. Because of the complexity of the energy-absorption process it is imperative for designers of energy-absorbing structures to develop an in-depth understanding of how and why composite structures absorb energy. A description of the crushing modes and mechanisms of energy absorption for composite tubes and beams is presented. Three primary crushing modes of composite structures including transverse shearing, lamina bending, and local buckling are described. The experimental data presented show that fiber and matrix mechanical properties and laminate stiffness and strength mechanical properties cannot reliably predict the energy-absorption response of composite tubes.

  4. NREL's Energy-Saving Technology for Air Conditioning Cuts Peak Power Loads Without Using Harmful Refrigerants (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    This fact sheet describes how the DEVAP air conditioner was invented, explains how the technology works, and why it won an R&D 100 Award. Desiccant-enhanced evaporative (DEVAP) air-conditioning will provide superior comfort for commercial buildings in any climate at a small fraction of the electricity costs of conventional air-conditioning equipment, releasing far less carbon dioxide and cutting costly peak electrical demand by an estimated 80%. Air conditioning currently consumes about 15% of the electricity generated in the United States and is a major contributor to peak electrical demand on hot summer days, which can lead to escalating power costs, brownouts, and rolling blackouts. DEVAP employs an innovative combination of air-cooling technologies to reduce energy use by up to 81%. DEVAP also shifts most of the energy needs to thermal energy sources, reducing annual electricity use by up to 90%. In doing so, DEVAP is estimated to cut peak electrical demand by nearly 80% in all climates. Widespread use of this cooling cycle would dramatically cut peak electrical loads throughout the country, saving billions of dollars in investments and operating costs for our nation's electrical utilities. Water is already used as a refrigerant in evaporative coolers, a common and widely used energy-saving technology for arid regions. The technology cools incoming hot, dry air by evaporating water into it. The energy absorbed by the water as it evaporates, known as the latent heat of vaporization, cools the air while humidifying it. However, evaporative coolers only function when the air is dry, and they deliver humid air that can lower the comfort level for building occupants. And even many dry climates like Phoenix, Arizona, have a humid season when evaporative cooling won't work well. DEVAP extends the applicability of evaporative cooling by first using a liquid desiccant-a water-absorbing material-to dry the air. The dry air is then passed to an indirect evaporative

  5. Variable energy, high peak power, passive Q-switching diode end-pumped Yb:LuAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaskow, M.; Sulc, J.; Jabczynski, J. K.; Jelinkova, H.

    2014-12-01

    A new method to control the pulse energy in a passively Q-switched laser was proposed and experimentally verified for a diode-end-pumped Yb:LuAG laser. By changing the pumping area parameters it was possible to demonstrate generation of a wide range of output energies with a single laser configuration consisting of a gain medium, passive Q-switch and out-coupling mirror. The range of available energies 0.15-0.51 mJ with maximum peak power of 113 kW in simple Q-switching regime by means of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber and a Yb:LuAG gain medium pumped by a 20 W laser diode emitting at 968 nm was demonstrated.

  6. Examination of food waste co-digestion to manage the peak in energy demand at wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Lensch, D; Schaum, C; Cornel, P

    2016-01-01

    Many digesters in Germany are not operated at full capacity; this offers the opportunity for co-digestion. Within this research the potentials and limits of a flexible and adapted sludge treatment are examined with a focus on the digestion process with added food waste as co-substrate. In parallel, energy data from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) are analysed and lab-scale semi-continuous and batch digestion tests are conducted. Within the digestion tests, the ratio of sewage sludge to co-substrate was varied. The final methane yields show the high potential of food waste: the higher the amount of food waste the higher the final yield. However, the conversion rates directly after charging demonstrate better results by charging 10% food waste instead of 20%. Finally, these results are merged with the energy data from the WWTP. As an illustration, the load required to cover base loads as well as peak loads for typical daily variations of the plant's energy demand are calculated. It was found that 735 m³ raw sludge and 73 m³ of a mixture of raw sludge and food waste is required to cover 100% of the base load and 95% of the peak load. PMID:26877042

  7. On the Energy Shift between Near-Field and Far-Field Peak Intensities in Localized Plasmon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, Jorge; Nordlander, Peter

    2011-03-09

    The localized plasmons of metallic nanoparticles and nanostructures are known to display an interesting and apparently universal phenomenon: upon optical excitation, the maximum near-field enhancements occur at lower energies than the maximum of the corresponding far-field spectrum. Here we present an explanation for this behavior, showing that it results directly from the physics of a driven and damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the magnitude of the shift between the near- and far-field peak intensities depends directly on the total damping of the system, whether it is intrinsic damping within the metal of the nanoparticle or radiative damping of the localized plasmon.

  8. Bio-Inspired Photon Absorption and Energy Transfer for Next Generation Photovoltaic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magsi, Komal

    Nature's solar energy harvesting system, photosynthesis, serves as a model for photon absorption, spectra broadening, and energy transfer. Photosynthesis harvests light far differently than photovoltaic cells. These differences offer both engineering opportunity and scientific challenges since not all of the natural photon absorption mechanisms have been understood. In return, solar cells can be a very sensitive probe for the absorption characteristics of molecules capable of transferring charge to a conductive interface. The objective of this scientific work is the advancement of next generation photovoltaics through the development and application of natural photo-energy transfer processes. Two scientific methods were used in the development and application of enhancing photon absorption and transfer. First, a detailed analysis of photovoltaic front surface fluorescent spectral modification and light scattering by hetero-structure was conducted. Phosphor based spectral down-conversion is a well-known laser technology. The theoretical calculations presented here indicate that parasitic losses and light scattering within the spectral range are large enough to offset any expected gains. The second approach for enhancing photon absorption is based on bio-inspired mechanisms. Key to the utilization of these natural processes is the development of a detailed scientific understanding and the application of these processes to cost effective systems and devices. In this work both aspects are investigated. Dye type solar cells were prepared and tested as a function of Chlorophyll (or Sodium-Copper Chlorophyllin) and accessory dyes. Forster has shown that the fluorescence ratio of Chlorophyll is modified and broadened by separate photon absorption (sensitized absorption) through interaction with nearby accessory pigments. This work used the dye type solar cell as a diagnostic tool by which to investigate photon absorption and photon energy transfer. These experiments shed

  9. Calculation tool for transported geothermal energy using two-step absorption process

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyle Gluesenkamp

    2016-02-01

    This spreadsheet allows the user to calculate parameters relevant to techno-economic performance of a two-step absorption process to transport low temperature geothermal heat some distance (1-20 miles) for use in building air conditioning. The parameters included are (1) energy density of aqueous LiBr and LiCl solutions, (2) transportation cost of trucking solution, and (3) equipment cost for the required chillers and cooling towers in the two-step absorption approach. More information is available in the included public report: "A Technical and Economic Analysis of an Innovative Two-Step Absorption System for Utilizing Low-Temperature Geothermal Resources to Condition Commercial Buildings"

  10. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  11. Effective Atomic Numbers of Lanthanides with Gamma Radiation for Photon Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption, ZPEA,eff have been calculated for photon from 1 keV to 20 MeV for selected oxides of lanthanides, such as Lanthanum oxide, Cerium oxide, Samarium oxide, Europium oxide, Dysprosium oxide, Thulium oxide, Ytterbium oxide. The ZPEA,eff values then compared with ZPI,eff for photon interaction. The ZPEA,eff values have been found to change with energy and composition of selected lanthanides. Oxides of lanthanides are considered as better shielding materials to the exposure of gamma radiation. The values of effective atomic number for photon energy absorption help in the calculation of absorbed dose.

  12. Energy-dependent parameterization of heavy-ion absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Wilson, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    An energy-dependent parameterization of the total absorption (reaction) cross sections for heavy ion (Z equal to or greater than 2) collisions at energies above 25 MeV per nucleon is presented. The formula will be especially useful in heavy-ion transport applications.

  13. Ratio of germanium detector peak efficiencies at photon energies of 4.4 and 11.7 MeV: Experiment versus simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carson, Spencer; Iliadis, Christian; Cesaratto, John; Champagne, Art; Downen, Lori; Ivanovic, Marija; Kelley, John; Longland, Richard; Newton, Joseph R.; Rusev, Gencho; Tonchev, Anton P.

    2010-06-01

    Full-energy peak efficiencies of germanium detectors are frequently investigated at γ-ray energies below 4 MeV using calibrated radioactive sources, while very accurate peak efficiencies for higher photon energies are essentially non-existent. Peak efficiencies in the energy range of Eγ=4-12 MeV are crucial for a number of applications, including nuclear astrophysics measurements of fusion reactions and resonance fluorescence experiments. We report on a novel method, using the 163 keV resonance in the B11(p,γ)C12 reaction, of measuring accurately the ratio of full-energy peak efficiencies at 4.44 and 11.66 MeV. We derive this ratio for three different detector-target distances (3, 12 and 26 cm) directly from measured peak intensities and demonstrate that corrections are small ( γ-ray branching ratios, angular correlations, coincidence summing). Our measured full-energy peak efficiency ratios have a precision of 1.4-1.6%. Another important goal of our study was to determine to what precision full-energy peak efficiencies at high γ-ray energies can be predicted using the simulation codes Geant3 and Geant4. We imaged our detector using computed tomography and radiographs in order to extract reliable detector crystal dimensions. Based on these results, extensive computer simulations are performed. We find that the simulation results agree with the measured peak efficiency ratios within an uncertainty of 1.6% for Geant4 and 2.6% for Geant3. Our results are useful for assigning uncertainties when peak efficiencies are extrapolated from low energy data to high energies based on simulations only.

  14. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  15. Crashworthiness of Aluminium Tubes; Part 2: Improvement of Hydroforming Operation to Increase Absorption Energy

    SciTech Connect

    D'Amours, Guillaume; Rahem, Ahmed; Mayer, Robert; Williams, Bruce; Worswick, Michael

    2007-05-17

    The motivation to reduce overall vehicle weight within the automotive sector drives the substitution of lightweight materials such as aluminium alloys for structural components. Such a substitution requires a significant amount of development to manufacture structurally parts such that the energy absorption characteristics are not sacrificed in the event of crash. The effects of the manufacturing processes on the crash performance of automotive structural components must be better understood to ensure improved crashworthiness. This paper presents results of an experimental and numerical investigation of the crash response and energy absorption properties of impacted hydroformed aluminium alloy tubes. Crash experiments on hydroformed tubes were performed using a deceleration sled test at the General Motors Technical Center. Results from axial crush testing showed that an important parameter that influences the energy absorption characteristics during crash was the thickness reduction caused by circumferential expansion of the tube during hydroforming. It was found that that the energy absorption decreased as the corner radius decreased, which results because of increased thinning. Sensitivity studies of end feeding parameters, such as end feed level and profile, were carried out to evaluate their impact on the energy absorption of the aluminium tubes.

  16. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability of composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    The energy-absorption capability as a function of crushing speed was determined for Thornel 300-Fiberite 934 (Gr-E) and Kevlar-49-Fiberite 934 (K-E) composite material. Circular cross section tube specimens were crushed at speeds ranging from 0.01 to 12 m/sec. Ply orientations of the tube specimens were (0/ +/- theta)2 and (+/- theta)2 where theta = 15, 45, and 75 deg. Based upon the results of these tests, the energy-absorption capability of Gr-E and K-E was determined to be a function of crushing speed. The magnitude of the effects of crushing speed on energy-absorption capability was determined to be a function of the mechanisms that control the crushing process. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability is related to whether the mechanical response of the crushing mechanism that controls the crushing process is a function of strain rate. Energy-absorption capability of Gr-E and K-E tubes ranged between 0 and 35 percent and 20 and 45 percent, respectively, depending upon ply orientation.

  17. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  18. Crashworthiness of Aluminium Tubes; Part 2: Improvement of Hydroforming Operation to Increase Absorption Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amours, Guillaume; Rahem, Ahmed; Mayer, Robert; Williams, Bruce; Worswick, Michael

    2007-05-01

    The motivation to reduce overall vehicle weight within the automotive sector drives the substitution of lightweight materials such as aluminium alloys for structural components. Such a substitution requires a significant amount of development to manufacture structurally parts such that the energy absorption characteristics are not sacrificed in the event of crash. The effects of the manufacturing processes on the crash performance of automotive structural components must be better understood to ensure improved crashworthiness. This paper presents results of an experimental and numerical investigation of the crash response and energy absorption properties of impacted hydroformed aluminium alloy tubes. Crash experiments on hydroformed tubes were performed using a deceleration sled test at the General Motors Technical Center. Results from axial crush testing showed that an important parameter that influences the energy absorption characteristics during crash was the thickness reduction caused by circumferential expansion of the tube during hydroforming. It was found that that the energy absorption decreased as the corner radius decreased, which results because of increased thinning. Sensitivity studies of end feeding parameters, such as end feed level and profile, were carried out to evaluate their impact on the energy absorption of the aluminium tubes.

  19. Compression Behavior and Energy Absorption of Aluminum Alloy AA6061 Tubes with Multiple Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simhachalam, Bade; Lakshmana Rao, C.; Srinivas, Krishna

    2014-05-01

    In this article, compression behavior and energy absorption of aluminum alloy AA6061 tubes are investigated both experimentally and numerically. Static and dynamic simulations are done using LS-Dyna Software for AA6061 tubes. True stress-plastic strain curves from the tensile test are used in the static and dynamic simulations of AA6061 tubes. The energy absorption values between experimental compression results and numeral simulation are found to be in good agreement. Dynamic simulations are done with drop velocity of up to 10 m/s to understand the inertia effects on energy absorption. The deformed modes from the numerical simulation are compared between tubes with and without holes in static and dynamic conditions.

  20. Load-limiting landing gear footpad energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Chris; Tsai, Ted

    1994-01-01

    As a precursor to future manned missions to the moon, an inexpensive, unmanned vehicle that could carry small, scientific payloads to the lunar surface was studied by NASA. The vehicle, called the Common Lunar Lander, required extremely optimized structural systems to increase the potential payload mass. A lightweight energy-absorbing system (LAGFEAS), which also acts as a landing load-limiter was designed to help achieve this optimized structure. Since the versatile and easily tailored system is a load-limiter, it allowed for the structure to be designed independently of the ever-changing landing energy predictions. This paper describes the LAGFEAS system and preliminary verification testing performed at NASA's Johnson Space Center for the Common Lunar Lander program.

  1. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within ±3° relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures. PMID:19655966

  2. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2009-07-31

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  3. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenu, Luigi; Forni, Daniele; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) was finally evaluated.

  4. Coupling continuous damage and debris fragmentation for energy absorption prediction by cfrp structures during crushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, Christine; Lachaud, Frédéric; Limido, Jérome; Lacome, Jean-Luc; Bisson, Antoine; Charlotte, Miguel

    2015-05-01

    Energy absorption during crushing is evaluated using a thermodynamic based continuum damage model inspired from the Matzenmiller-Lubliner-Taylors model. It was found that for crash-worthiness applications, it is necessary to couple the progressive ruin of the material to a representation of the matter openings and debris generation. Element kill technique (erosion) and/or cohesive elements are efficient but not predictive. A technique switching finite elements into discrete particles at rupture is used to create debris and accumulated mater during the crushing of the structure. Switching criteria are evaluated using the contribution of the different ruin modes in the damage evolution, energy absorption, and reaction force generation.

  5. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong vs band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  6. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong n8 band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  7. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-03-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  8. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W.; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  9. Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

    2006-08-01

    An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

  10. Peak Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the benefits of high-performance schools, which enhance the learning environment for students while saving energy, resources, and money. Describes initiatives of the Collaborative for High Performance Schools and the high-performance design of Carleton College in Minnesota. (EV)

  11. Energy-absorption capability of composite tubes and beams. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.; Jones, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    In this study the objective was to develop a method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of composite subfloor beam structures. Before it is possible to develop such an analysis capability, an in-depth understanding of the crushing process of composite materials must be achieved. Many variables affect the crushing process of composite structures, such as the constituent materials' mechanical properties, specimen geometry, and crushing speed. A comprehensive experimental evaluation of tube specimens was conducted to develop insight into how composite structural elements crush and what are the controlling mechanisms. In this study the four characteristic crushing modes, transverse shearing, brittle fracturing, lamina bending, and local buckling were identified and the mechanisms that control the crushing process defined. An in-depth understanding was developed of how material properties affect energy-absorption capability. For example, an increase in fiber and matrix stiffness and failure strain can, depending upon the configuration of the tube, increase energy-absorption capability. An analysis to predict the energy-absorption capability of composite tube specimens was developed and verified. Good agreement between experiment and prediction was obtained.

  12. Estimation of neutron energy for first resonance from absorption cross section for thermal neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogart, Donald

    1951-01-01

    Examination of published data for some 52 isotopes indicates that the neutron energy for which the first resonance occurs is related to the magnitude of the thermal absorption cross section. The empirical relation obtained is in qualitative agreement with the results of a simplified version of the resonance theory of the nucleus of Breit-Wigner.

  13. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  14. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Absorption of Solar Energy in the Atmosphere: Discrepancy Between Model and Observations

    PubMed

    Arking

    1996-08-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model, which assimilates data from daily observations of temperature, humidity, wind, and sea-level air pressure, was compared with a set of observations that combines satellite and ground-based measurements of solar flux. The comparison reveals that the model underestimates by 25 to 30 watts per square meter the amount of solar energy absorbed by Earth's atmosphere. Contrary to some recent reports, clouds have little or no overall effect on atmospheric absorption, a consistent feature of both the observations and the model. Of several variables considered, water vapor appears to be the dominant influence on atmospheric absorption. PMID:8670414

  16. Energy absorption ability of buckyball C720 at low impact speed: a numerical study based on molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic impact response of giant buckyball C720 is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. The non-recoverable deformation of C720 makes it an ideal candidate for high-performance energy absorption. Firstly, mechanical behaviors under dynamic impact and low-speed crushing are simulated and modeled, which clarifies the buckling-related energy absorption mechanism. One-dimensional C720 arrays (both vertical and horizontal alignments) are studied at various impact speeds, which show that the energy absorption ability is dominated by the impact energy per buckyball and less sensitive to the number and arrangement direction of buckyballs. Three-dimensional stacking of buckyballs in simple cubic, body-centered cubic, hexagonal, and face-centered cubic forms are investigated. Stacking form with higher occupation density yields higher energy absorption. The present study may shed lights on employing C720 assembly as an advanced energy absorption system against low-speed impacts. PMID:23360618

  17. Study and Development of near-Infrared Reflective and Absorptive Materials for Energy Saving Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yu Xing

    Near-Infrared (NIR) materials find applications in the field of energy saving. Both NIR reflective and absorptive materials can be used as energy saving materials with different working principles. The reflective materials can reflect the NIR light preventing it from being transmitted. Silver thin films are the best option as reflective films based on its reflectivity and cost. On the other hand, NIR absorptive materials can effectively convert the absorbed NIR light from sunlight to heat or electric energy. The first part of this research explored methods of preparing silver thin films that could be processed at low cost. The second part involved the design, synthesis and characterization of nickel coordination polymers as NIR absorptive materials. In part 1, different solution based methods of preparing silver thin films were studied. A silver nanoparticles solution was used to make thin film by a spray-pyrolysis process. Another method involved the surface activation with a fluoro-compound or silver nanoparticles followed by electroless silver plating on different substrates. Both methods could be processed at low cost. The obtained silver films showed NIR reflection of 50˜90% with transmission of 15-28% in the visible region. In part 2, two Nickel coordination polymers were explored. Tetraamino compounds were used as bridging ligands to increase the scope of electronic delocalization and metal-ligand orbital overlap which would reduce the energy gap to the NIR region. As a result, both polymers showed broad NIR absorption with maximum of 835 and 880 nm, respectively. In addition, the polymer showed NIR halochromism. This ground study pointed out both Ni coordination polymers as NIR absorptive materials with NIR halochromism.

  18. Universality of high-energy absorption cross sections for black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Decanini, Yves; Esposito-Farese, Gilles; Folacci, Antoine

    2011-02-15

    We consider the absorption problem for a massless scalar field propagating in static and spherically symmetric black holes of arbitrary dimension endowed with a photon sphere. For this wide class of black holes, we show that the fluctuations of the high-energy absorption cross section are totally and very simply described from the properties (dispersion relation and damping) of the waves trapped near the photon sphere and therefore, in the eikonal regime, from the characteristics (orbital period and Lyapunov exponent) of the null unstable geodesics lying on the photon sphere. This is achieved by using Regge pole techniques. They permit us to make an elegant and powerful resummation of the absorption cross section and to extract then all the physical information encoded in the sum over the partial wave contributions. Our analysis induces moreover some consequences concerning Hawking radiation which we briefly report.

  19. Energy absorption buildup factors of human organs and tissues at energies and penetration depths relevant for radiotherapy and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Manohara, S R; Hanagodimath, S M; Gerward, L

    2011-01-01

    Energy absorption geometric progression (GP) fitting parameters and the corresponding buildup factors have been computed for human organs and tissues, such as adipose tissue, blood (whole), cortical bone, brain (grey/white matter), breast tissue, eye lens, lung tissue, skeletal muscle, ovary, testis, soft tissue, and soft tissue (4-component), for the photon energy range 0.015-15 MeV and for penetration depths up to 40 mfp (mean free path). The chemical composition of human organs and tissues is seen to influence the energy absorption buildup factors. It is also found that the buildup factor of human organs and tissues changes significantly with the change of incident photon energy and effective atomic number, Z(eff). These changes are due to the dominance of different photon interaction processes in different energy regions and different chemical compositions of human organs and tissues. With the proper knowledge of buildup factors of human organs and tissues, energy absorption in the human body can be carefully controlled. The present results will help in estimating safe dose levels for radiotherapy patients and also useful in diagnostics and dosimetry. The tissue-equivalent materials for skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, cortical bone, and lung tissue are also discussed. It is observed that water and MS20 are good tissue equivalent materials for skeletal muscle in the extended energy range. PMID:22089011

  20. Investigation of human teeth with respect to the photon interaction, energy absorption and buildup factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Topcuoglu, Sinan

    2011-05-01

    The effective atomic numbers and electron densities of human teeth have been calculated for total photon interaction (Z, Ne) and photon energy absorption (Z, Z Ne) in the energy region 1 keV-20 MeV. Besides, the energy absorption (EABF) and exposure (EBF) buildup factors have been calculated for these samples by using the geometric progression fitting approximation in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV up to 40 mfp (mean free path). Wherever possible the results were compared with experiment. Effective atomic numbers ( Z) of human teeth were calculated using different methods. Discrepancies were noted in Z between the direct and interpolation methods in the low and high energy regions where absorption processes dominate while good agreement was observed in intermediate energy region where Compton scattering dominates. Significant variations up to 22% were observed between Z and Z in the energy region 30-150 keV which is the used energy range in dental cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) X-ray machines. The Zeff values of human teeth were found to relatively vary within 1% if different laser treatments are applied. In this variation, the Er:YAG laser treated samples were found to be less effected than Nd:YAG laser treated ones when compared with control group. Relative differences between EABF and EBF were found to be significantly high in the energy region 60 keV-1 MeV even though they have similar variations with respect to the different parameters viz. photon energy, penetration depth.

  1. Integration of Semiconducting Sulfides for Full-Spectrum Solar Energy Absorption and Efficient Charge Separation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Tao-Tao; Liu, Yan; Li, Yi; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Liang; Jiang, Jun; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2016-05-23

    The full harvest of solar energy by semiconductors requires a material that simultaneously absorbs across the whole solar spectrum and collects photogenerated electrons and holes separately. The stepwise integration of three semiconducting sulfides, namely ZnS, CdS, and Cu2-x S, into a single nanocrystal, led to a unique ternary multi-node sheath ZnS-CdS-Cu2-x S heteronanorod for full-spectrum solar energy absorption. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nonstoichiometric copper sulfide nanostructures enables effective NIR absorption. More significantly, the construction of pn heterojunctions between Cu2-x S and CdS leads to staggered gaps, as confirmed by first-principles simulations. This band alignment causes effective electron-hole separation in the ternary system and hence enables efficient solar energy conversion. PMID:27062543

  2. DETECTION OF INTRA-DAY VARIABILITY TIMESCALES OF FOUR HIGH-ENERGY PEAKED BLAZARS WITH XMM-NEWTON

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Haritma; Gupta, Alok C.; Lachowicz, Pawel; Wiita, Paul J. E-mail: acgupta30@gmail.co E-mail: wiita@chara.gsu.ed

    2010-07-20

    We selected a sample of 24 XMM-Newton light curves (LCs) of four high energy peaked blazars, PKS 0548 - 322, ON 231, 1ES 1426+428, and PKS 2155 - 304. These data comprise continuous LCs of 7.67-18.97 hr in length. We searched for possible quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) and intra-day variability (IDV) timescales in the LCs of these blazars. We found a likely QPO in one LC of PKS 2155 - 304 which was reported elsewhere. In the remaining 23 LCs we found hints of possible weak QPOs in one LC of each ON 231 and PKS 2155 - 304, but neither is statistically significant. We found IDV timescales that ranged from 15.7 to 46.8 ks in eight LCs. In 13 LCs any variability timescales were longer than the length of the data. Assuming that the possible weak QPO periods in the blazars PKS 2155 - 304 and ON 231 are real and are associated with the innermost portions of their accretion disk, we can estimate that their central black hole masses exceed 1.2 x 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}. Emission models for radio-loud active galactic nuclei that could explain our results are briefly discussed.

  3. An energy and intensity monitor for X-ray absorption near-edge structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jonge, Martin D.; Paterson, David; McNulty, Ian; Rau, Christoph; Brandes, Jay A.; Ingall, Ellery

    2010-07-01

    An in-line X-ray beam energy and intensity monitor has been developed for use in focussed X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) measurements. The monitor uses only the X-ray intensity that would otherwise bypass our zone-plate focussing optic and relies on a measurement of photoemission current. The monitor is inexpensive, easy to align, and provides valuable feedback about the X-ray energy. Operation of the monitor is demonstrated for measurements of phosphorus XANES. The precision of the energy determination is around 0.5 eV.

  4. Structural Analysis of Shipping Casks, Vol. 9. Energy Absorption Capabilities of Plastically Deformed Struts Under Specified Impact Loading Conditions (Thesis)

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, F.C.

    2001-02-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the energy absorption characteristics of plastically deformed inclined struts under impact loading. This information is needed to provide a usable method by which designers and analysts of shipping casks for radioactive or fissile materials can determine the energy absorption capabilities of external longitudinal fins on cylindrical casks under specified impact conditions. A survey of technical literature related to experimental determination of the dynamic plastic behavior of struts revealed no information directly applicable to the immediate problem, especially in the impact velocity ranges desired, and an experimental program was conducted to obtain the needed data. Mild-steel struts with rectangular cross sections were impacted by free-falling weights dropped from known heights. These struts or fin specimens were inclined at five different angles to simulate different angles of impact that fins on a shipping cask could experience under certain accident conditions. The resisting force of the deforming strut was measured and recorded as a function of time by using load cells instrumented with resistance strain gage bridges, signal conditioning equipment, an oscilloscope, and a Polaroid camera. The acceleration of the impacting weight was measured and recorded as a function of time during the latter portion of the testing program by using an accelerometer attached to the drop hammer, appropriate signal conditioning equipment, the oscilloscope, and the camera. A digital computer program was prepared to numerically integrate the force-time and acceleration-time data recorded during the tests to obtain deformation-time data. The force-displacement relationships were then integrated to obtain values of absorbed energy with respect to deformation or time. The results for various fin specimen geometries and impact angles are presented graphically, and these curves may be used to compute the energy absorption capacity of

  5. An experimental investigation of energy absorption in TRIP steel under impact three-point bending deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is nowadays in widespread use in the automobile industry because of their favorable mechanical properties such as high strength, excellent formability and toughness because of strain-induced martensitic transformation. Moreover, when TRIP steel is applied to the components of the vehicles, it is expected that huge amount of kinetic energy will be absorbed into both plastic deformation and martensitic transformation during the collision. Basically, bending deformation due to buckling is one of the major crash deformation modes of automobile structures. Thus, an investigation of energy absorption during bending deformation at high impact velocity for TRIP steel is indispensable. Although TRIP steel have particularly attracted the recent interest of the scientific community, just few studies can be found on the energy absorption characteristic of TRIP steel, especially at impact loading condition. In present study, experimental investigations of bending deformation behaviors of TRIP steel are conducted in the three-point bending tests for both smooth and pre-cracked specimen. Then, energy absorption characteristic during plastic deformation and fracture process at high impact velocity in TRIP steel will be discussed.

  6. Strain Rate Effects on the Energy Absorption of Rapidly Manufactured Composite Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brighton, Aaron M; Forrest, Mark; Starbuck, J Michael; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Fox, Bronwyn

    2009-01-01

    Quasi-static and intermediate rate axial crush tests were conducted on tubular specimens of Carbon/Epoxy (Toray T700/G83C) and Glass/Polypropylene (Twintex). The quasi-static tests were conducted at 10 mm/min (1.67x10-4 m/s); five different crush initiators were used. Tests at intermediate rates were performed at speeds of 0.25 m/s, 0.5 m/s, 0.75 m/s 1m/s, 2 m/s and 4 m/s. Quasi-static tests of tubular specimens showed high specific energy absorption (SEA) values with 86 kJ/kg for Carbon/Epoxy specimens. The specific energy absorption of the Glass/Polypropylene specimens was measured to be 29 kJ/kg. Results from the intermediate test rates showed that while a decrease in specific energy absorbed was observed as speeds increased, values did not fall below 55kj/kg for carbon specimens or 35 kJ/kg for the Glass/Polypropylene specimens. When compared with steel and aluminium, specific energy absorption values of 15 kJ/kg and 30 kJ/kg respectively, the benefits of using composite materials in crash structures are apparent.

  7. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  8. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  9. Electromagnetic energy, absorption, and Casimir forces: Uniform dielectric media in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Rosa, F. S. S.; Dalvit, D. A. R.; Milonni, P. W.

    2010-03-15

    The derivation of Casimir forces between dielectrics can be simplified by ignoring absorption, calculating energy changes due to displacements of the dielectrics, and only then admitting absorption by allowing permittivities to be complex. As a first step toward a better understanding of this situation we consider in this article the model of a dielectric as a collection of oscillators, each of which is coupled to a reservoir giving rise to damping and Langevin forces on the oscillators and a noise polarization acting as a source of a fluctuating electromagnetic field in the dielectric. The model leads naturally to expressions for the quantized electric and magnetic fields that are consistent with those obtained in approaches that diagonalize the coupled system of oscillators for the dielectric medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field. It also results in a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the noise polarization and the imaginary part of the permittivity; comparison with the Rytov fluctuation-dissipation relation employed in the well-known Lifshitz theory for the van der Waals (or Casimir) force shows that the Lifshitz theory is actually a classical stochastic electrodynamical theory. The approximate classical expression for the energy density in a band of frequencies at which absorption in a dielectric is negligible is shown to be exact as a spectral thermal equilibrium expectation value in quantum electrodynamic theory. Our main result is the derivation of an expression for the QED energy density of a uniform dispersive, absorbing media in thermal equilibrium. The spectral density of the energy is found to have the same form with or without absorption. We also show how the fluctuation-dissipation theorem ensures a detailed balance of energy exchange between the (absorbing) medium, the reservoir, and the electromagnetic field in thermal equilibrium.

  10. Experimental development and control of magnetorheological damper towards smart energy absorption of composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Shen Hin; Prusty, B. Gangadhara; Lee, Ann; Yeoh, Guan Heng

    2013-08-01

    Experimental investigation and efficient control of magnetorheological (MR) damper towards smart energy absorption of composite structures are presented in this paper. The evaluation of an existing MR damper based on the damping force presented in our earlier work is limited by the experiment configuration setup. Using two arms configuration, an experimental test rig is designed to overcome this limitation and enabled the MR damper to be investigated throughout its full velocity range capability. A controller is then developed based on the MR damper investigation to provide automated variable control of induced current with a set crushing force and available data of composite tube crushing force. The controller is assessed numerically and shows that MR damper is controlled to provide consistent crushing force despite oscillation from the composite tube crushing force. This, thus, shows promise of MR damper integration towards smart energy absorption of composite structures.

  11. A review of infrared laser energy absorption and subsequent healing in the cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Latica L.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Neal, Thomas A.

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to compile information on the optical and healing properties of the cornea when exposed to infrared lasers. Our long-term goal is to optimize the treatment parameters for corneal injuries after exposure to infrared laser systems. The majority of the information currently available in the literature focuses on corneal healing after therapeutic vision correction surgery with LASIK or PRK. Only a limited amount of information is available on corneal healing after injury with an infrared laser system. In this review we will speculate on infrared photon energy absorption in corneal injury and healing to include the role of the tear layer. The aim of this review is to gain a better understanding of infrared energy absorption in the cornea and how it might impact healing.

  12. Determination of RW3-to-water mass-energy absorption coefficient ratio for absolute dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Seet, Katrina Y T; Hanlon, Peta M; Charles, Paul H

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of absorbed dose to water in a solid-phantom may require a conversion factor because it may not be radiologically equivalent to water. One phantom developed for the use of dosimetry is a solid water, RW3 white-polystyrene material by IBA. This has a lower mass-energy absorption coefficient than water due to high bremsstrahlung yield, which affects the accuracy of absolute dosimetry measurements. In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of mass-energy absorption coefficient ratios, relative to water, from measurements in plastic water and RW3 with an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator (6 and 10 MV photon beams) as well as Monte Carlo modeling in BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc. From this, the solid-phantom-to-water correction factor was determined for plastic water and RW3. PMID:21960410

  13. Efficient energy absorption of intense ps-laser pulse into nanowire target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habara, H.; Honda, S.; Katayama, M.; Sakagami, H.; Nagai, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between ultra-intense laser light and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes is investigated to demonstrate efficient laser-energy absorption in the ps laser-pulse regime. Results indicate a clear enhancement of the energy conversion from laser to energetic electrons and a simultaneously small plasma expansion on the surface of the target. A two-dimensional plasma particle calculation exhibits a high absorption through laser propagation deep into the nanotube array, even for a dense array whose structure is much smaller than the laser wavelength. The propagation leads to the radial expansion of plasma perpendicular to the nanotubes rather than to the front side. These features may contribute to fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion and laser particle acceleration, both of which require high current and small surface plasma simultaneously.

  14. Solar energy absorption characteristics and the effects of heat on the optical properties of several coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The solar energy absorption characteristics of several high temperature coatings were determined and effects of heat on these coatings were evaluated. Included in the investigation were an electroplated alloy of black chrome and vanadium, electroplated black chrome, and chemically colored 316 stainless steel. Each of the coatings possessed good selective solar energy absorption properties at laboratory ambient temperature. Measured at a temperature of 700 K (800 F), the emittances of black chrome, black chrome vanadium, and colored stainless steel were 0.11, 0.61, and 0.15, respectively. Black chrome and black chrome vanadium did not degrade optically in the presence of high heat (811 K (1000 F)). Chemically colored stainless steel showed slight optical degradation when exposed to moderately high heat (616 K (650 F)0, but showed more severe degradation at exposure temperatures beyond this level. Each of the coatings showed good corrosion resistance to a salt spray environment.

  15. Nonlinear ionization mechanism dependence of energy absorption in diamond under femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Li Xin; Wang Feng; Yuan Yanping; Lu Yongfeng

    2013-04-14

    We present first-principles calculations for nonlinear photoionization of diamond induced by the intense femtosecond laser field. A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional theory with the adiabatic local-density approximation is applied to describe the laser-material interactions in the Kohn-Sham formalism with the self-interaction correction. For a certain laser wavelength, the intensity dependence of energy absorption on multiphoton and/or tunnel ionization mechanisms is investigated, where laser intensity regions vary from 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the effect of laser wavelength on energy absorption at certain ionization mechanism is discussed when the Keldysh parameter is fixed. Theoretical results show that: (1) at the fixed laser wavelength, the relationship between the energy absorption and laser intensity shows a good fit of E = c{sub M}I{sup N} (N is the number of photons absorbed to free from the valence band) when multiphoton ionization dominates; (2) while when tunnel ionization becomes significant, the relationship coincides with the expression of E = c{sub T}I{sup n} (n < N).

  16. Assessment of the efficiency of hydrogen cycles on the basis of off-peak electric energy produced at a nuclear power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminov, R. Z.; Bairamov, A. N.; Shatskova, O. V.

    2009-11-01

    The main factors influencing the efficiency of using off-peak electric energy to run hydrogen cycles at a nuclear power station are considered. Indicators characterizing the efficiency of using a hydrogen cycle at a nuclear power station during its operation with superheating live steam in a steam-hydrogen mode are presented. A comparison between the steam-turbine hydrogen cycle and a pumped-storage hydraulic power station in the efficiency of generating peak electric energy (power) and capital investments is given.

  17. Optical absorption enhancement of CdTe nanostructures by low-energy nitrogen ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarnejad, E.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S.; Hantehzadeh, M. R.; Asl Soleimani, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the fabrication of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanostructures by means of RF magnetron sputtering followed by low-energy ion implantation and post-thermal treatment. We have thoroughly studied the structural, optical, and morphological properties of these nanostructures. The effects of nitrogen ion bombardment on the structural parameters of CdTe nanostructures such as crystal size, microstrain, and dislocation density have been examined. From x-ray diffractometer (XRD) analysis it could be deduced that N+ ion fluence and annealing treatment helps to form (3 0 0) orientation in the crystalline structure of cadmium-telluride films. Fluctuations in optical properties like the optical band gap and absorption coefficient as a function of N+ ion fluences have been observed. The annealing of the sample irradiated by a dose of 1018 ions cm-2 has led to great enhancement in the optical absorption over a wide range of wavelengths with a thickness of 250 nm. The enhanced absorption is significantly higher than the observed value in the original CdTe layer with a thickness of 3 μm. Surface properties such as structure, grain size and roughness are noticeably affected by varying the nitrogen fluences. It is speculated that nitrogen bombardment and post-annealing treatment results in a smaller optical band gap, which in turn leads to higher absorption. Nitrogen bombardment is found to be a promising method to increase efficiency of thin film solar cells.

  18. Self operating absorption cooling system using solar energy: Small power experimental plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velluet, P.; Dehausse, R.

    This study deals with a solar system for refrigeration specially designed for remote areas conditions. So, it must be very simple and reliable, and in addition it must be also mechanically self-operating. The thermodynamic cycle used is an ammonia-water absorption one. It consumes only thermal energy, which is easily and cheaply converted directly from solar radiation. In order to make a self-operating system, an engine is located between the boiler (at high pressure) and the absorber (at low pressure). It expands ammonia vapor and produces mechanical energy to run the solution pump.

  19. Decay heat and anti-neutrino energy spectra in fission fragments from total absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rykaczewski, Krzysztof

    2015-10-01

    Decay studies of over forty 238U fission products have been studied using ORNL's Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer. The results are showing increased decay heat values, by 10% to 50%, and the energy spectra of anti-neutrinos shifted towards lower energies. The latter effect is resulting in a reduced number of anti-neutrinos interacting with matter, often by tens of percent per fission product. The results for several studied nuclei will be presented and their impact on decay heat pattern in power reactors and reactor anti-neutrino physics will be discussed.

  20. Photon interaction and energy absorption in glass: A transparent gamma ray shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, L.

    2009-09-01

    The effective atomic number, Zeff, the effective electron density, Ne,eff, and the energy dependence, ED, have been calculated at photon energies from 1 keV to 1 GeV for CaO-SrO-B 2O 3, PbO-B 2O 3, Bi 2O 3-B 2O 3, and PbO-Bi 2O 3-B 2O 3 glasses with potential applications as gamma ray shielding materials. For medium- Z glasses, Zeff is about constant and equal to the mean atomic number in a wide energy range, typically 0.3 < E < 4 MeV, where Compton scattering is the main photon interaction process. In contrast, for high- Z glasses there is no energy region where Compton scattering is truly dominating. Heavy-metal oxide glasses containing PbO and/or Bi 2O 3 are promising gamma ray shielding materials due to their high effective atomic number and strong absorption of gamma rays. They compare well with concrete and other standard shielding materials and have the additional advantage of being transparent to visible light. The single-valued effective atomic number calculated by XMuDat is approximately valid at low energies where photoelectric absorption is dominating.

  1. Multi-coil approach to reduce electromagnetic energy absorption for wirelessly powered implants.

    PubMed

    RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Near-field inductive coupling is a commonly used technique for wireless power transfer (WPT) in biomedical implants. Owing to the close proximity of the implant coil(s) with the tissue ( ∼1 mm) and high current ( ∼100-300 mA) in the magnetic coil(s), a significant induced electric field can be generated for the operating frequency (1-20 MHz). In this Letter, a multi-coil-based WPT technique is proposed to selectively control the currents in the external and implant coils to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). A three-coil WPT system, that can achieve 26% reduction in peak 1-g SAR and 15% reduction in peak 10-g SAR, as compared to a two-coil WPT system with the same dimensions, is implemented and used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. To achieve the seamless design for the external and implant electronics, the multi-coil system achieves the same voltage gain and bandwidth as the two-coil design with 46% improvement in the power transfer efficiency. PMID:26609371

  2. Multi-coil approach to reduce electromagnetic energy absorption for wirelessly powered implants

    PubMed Central

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Near-field inductive coupling is a commonly used technique for wireless power transfer (WPT) in biomedical implants. Owing to the close proximity of the implant coil(s) with the tissue ( ∼1 mm) and high current ( ∼100–300 mA) in the magnetic coil(s), a significant induced electric field can be generated for the operating frequency (1–20 MHz). In this Letter, a multi-coil-based WPT technique is proposed to selectively control the currents in the external and implant coils to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). A three-coil WPT system, that can achieve 26% reduction in peak 1-g SAR and 15% reduction in peak 10-g SAR, as compared to a two-coil WPT system with the same dimensions, is implemented and used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. To achieve the seamless design for the external and implant electronics, the multi-coil system achieves the same voltage gain and bandwidth as the two-coil design with 46% improvement in the power transfer efficiency.

  3. Solar absorption characteristics of several coatings and surface finishes. [for solar energy collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    Solar absorption characteristics are established for several films potentially favorable for use as receiving surfaces in solar energy collectors. Included in the investigation were chemically produced black films, black electrodeposits, and anodized coatings. It was found that black nickel exhibited the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the coatings studied. A serious drawback to black nickel was its high susceptibility to degradation in the presence of high moisture environments. Electroplated black chrome generally exhibited high solar absorptivities, but the emissivity varied considerably and was also relatively high under some conditions. The black chrome had the greatest moisture resistance of any of the coatings tested. Black oxide coatings on copper and steel substrates showed the best combination of selective optical properties of any of the chemical conversion films studied.

  4. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  5. High-Energy X-ray Absorption Diagnostics as an Experimental Combustion Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunnmon, Jared; Sobhani, Sadaf; Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    X-ray diagnostics such as X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) have recently been utilized for measurement of scalar concentration fields in gas-phase flow phenomena. In this study, we apply high-energy X-ray absorption techniques to visualize a laboratory-scale flame via fluoroscopic measurements by using krypton as a radiodense tracer media. Advantages of X-ray absorption diagnostics in a combustion context, including application to optically inaccessible environments and lack of ambient photon interference, are demonstrated. Analysis methods and metrics for extracting physical insights from these data are presented. The accuracy of the diagnostic is assessed via comparison to known results from canonical flame configurations, and the potential for further applications is discussed. Support from the NDSEG fellowship, Bosch, and NASA are gratefully acknolwedged.

  6. The A-Dependence of Pion Absorption in the Energy Region of the DELTA(1232) Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowntree, David Cedric

    1995-01-01

    The absorption of pi^+ at 118, 162, and 239 MeV on ^3He, ^4He, N, and Ar has been studied using the Large Acceptance Detector System (LADS) at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland. LADS has a solid angle coverage of over 98% of 4pi steradians and an energy threshold of less than 20 MeV for protons, making it an almost ideal detector for studying multi-nucleon final states following pion absorption. The total absorption cross sections at the three energies are, in millibarns: ^3He - 24.8 +/- 2.1, 24.2 +/- 3.1, and 8.1 +/- 2.7; ^4He - 49.5 +/- 3.1, 48.0 +/- 3.8, and 21.9 +/- 4.1; N - 181.6 +/- 9.9, 163.4 +/- 10.5, and 107.0 +/- 9.9; Ar - 393.2 +/- 20.6, 366.1 +/- 21.8, and 281.8 +/- 21.1. With the exception of ^3 He, these are the most accurate measurements reported to date. In addition, the breakup into channels with different numbers of energetic final state nucleons has been determined. The average number of nucleons participating in the absorption reaction has been found to increase more slowly with A than previously reported. Differential spectra show clear signatures of small contributions from initial state interactions, and indicate the presence of at least some final state interactions. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  7. High energy neutrino absorption and its effects on stars in close X-ray binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaisser, T. K.; Stecker, F. W.

    1986-01-01

    The physics and astrophysics of high energy neutrino production and interactions in close X-ray binary systems are studied. These studies were stimulated by recent observations of ultrahigh energy gamma-rays and possibly other ultrahigh energy particles coming from the directions of Cygnus X-3 and other binary systems and possessing the periodicity characteristics of these systems. Systems in which a compact object, such as a neutron star, is a strong source of high energy particles which, in turn, produce photons, neutronos and other secondary particles by interactions in the atmosphere of the companion star were considered. The highest energy neutrinos are absorbed deep in the companion and the associated energy deposition may be large enough to effect its structure or lead to its ultimate disruption. This neutrino heating was evaluated, starting with a detailed numerical calculation of the hadronic cascade induced in the atmosphere of the companion star. For some theoretical models, the resulting energy deposition from neutrino absorption may be so great as to disrupt the companion star over an astronomically small timescale of the order of 10,000 years. Even if the energy deposition is smaller, it may still be high enough to alter the system substantially, perhaps leading to quenching of high energy signals from the source. Given the cosmic ray luminosities required to produce the observed gamma rays from cygnus X-3 and LMX X-4, such a situation may occur in these sources.

  8. X-class Solar Flare Energy Partition into Radiative, Non-Thermal Acceleration of Electrons and Peak Thermal Plasma Components - Methodology and Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Chamberlin, Phillip; Dennis, Brian R.; Hock, Rachel

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares are among the most energetic processes in the solar system. X-class flares are the largest and can convert up to 1033 ergs of magnetic energy into the acceleration of charged particles and the heating of plasma. They are often accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). We discuss the methodology and results of the energy partition into three main components: (1) radiative energy, (2) non-thermal acceleration of electrons, and (3) the peak thermal energy content, for a subset of the largest eruptive events from Solar Cycle 23, as derived from satellite observations and empirical models. The bolometric energy content is on the order of 1031 - 1032 ergs and is extracted from Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) onboard the SOlar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). The Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) contribution of the total radiative output is obtained by implementing the Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM). Furthermore, we partition the radiative release into impulsive and gradual phases. X-ray spectra from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) are used to deduce the energy in the non-thermal accelerated electrons, generally found to be 1031 -1032 ergs, and the peak thermal energy content of around 1030 - 1031 ergs. Aside from the CME kinetic energy, these three components contain a substantial amount of the initial available magnetic energy.

  9. A Fresh Look at Weather Impact on Peak Electricity Demand and Energy Use of Buildings Using 30-Year Actual Weather Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Tianzhen; Chang, Wen-Kuei; Lin, Hung-Wen

    2013-05-01

    Buildings consume more than one third of the world?s total primary energy. Weather plays a unique and significant role as it directly affects the thermal loads and thus energy performance of buildings. The traditional simulated energy performance using Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) weather data represents the building performance for a typical year, but not necessarily the average or typical long-term performance as buildings with different energy systems and designs respond differently to weather changes. Furthermore, the single-year TMY simulations do not provide a range of results that capture yearly variations due to changing weather, which is important for building energy management, and for performing risk assessments of energy efficiency investments. This paper employs large-scale building simulation (a total of 3162 runs) to study the weather impact on peak electricity demand and energy use with the 30-year (1980 to 2009) Actual Meteorological Year (AMY) weather data for three types of office buildings at two design efficiency levels, across all 17 ASHRAE climate zones. The simulated results using the AMY data are compared to those from the TMY3 data to determine and analyze the differences. Besides further demonstration, as done by other studies, that actual weather has a significant impact on both the peak electricity demand and energy use of buildings, the main findings from the current study include: 1) annual weather variation has a greater impact on the peak electricity demand than it does on energy use in buildings; 2) the simulated energy use using the TMY3 weather data is not necessarily representative of the average energy use over a long period, and the TMY3 results can be significantly higher or lower than those from the AMY data; 3) the weather impact is greater for buildings in colder climates than warmer climates; 4) the weather impact on the medium-sized office building was the greatest, followed by the large office and then the small

  10. Absorption spectra of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots at high photon energies: Experiment and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Amlan; Ghosh, Sandip

    2014-11-01

    Absorption spectra of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dot (QD) ensembles, with average core diameters ranging from 2.6 nm to 7.2 nm have been obtained using both transmission and photoluminescence excitation measurements. In agreement with previous reports, the absorption coefficient at energies ≃1 eV above the effective bandgap increases monotonically as in bulk solids. A simple effective-mass spherical core-shell potential model cannot explain the relatively high absorption at higher energies. The calculated electron and hole radial envelope wavefunctions show asymmetry due to the core-shell structure. It leads to normally symmetry-disallowed transitions acquiring a weak oscillator strength, with their number and strength increasing with energy. A phenomenological model that invokes normally disallowed transitions in general is shown to reproduce the absorption spectrum at higher energies quite well. The oscillator strength scaling factor for such transitions increases with decrease in QD size, consistent with expectations.

  11. High energy, low repetition rate, photonic crystal fiber generated supercontinuum for nanosecond to millisecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Julie L. H.; Rohde, Charles A.; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Cather Simpson, M.

    2013-05-01

    High energy density per pulse (-15 dBm nm-1) supercontinuum (SC) source has been developed as a probe for transient absorption (TrA) spectroscopy of systems with lifetimes from nanoseconds to a few milliseconds. We have generated a 600-1600 nm, broadband SC by pumping a 15 m photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with relatively high power, 7 ns, 1064 nm pulses. The SC generated at peak pump power of 7.1 kW was randomly polarized and maintained a stable output (6.5% rms average power; 9.1% rms shot-to-shot power). Co-pumping with both 1064 and 532 nm light extended the wavelength range of the SC by about 20%, to 500-1700 nm. Power conversion efficiency and spectral flatness were improved as well. In the visible range, the single-pump SC shows a flatness of 5 dB while the dual-pump SC exhibits 3 dB. In the NIR (1100-1600 nm), the flatness in single- and dual-pump configurations were 3 and 2 dB, respectively. Optically induced fiber breakdown was characterized.

  12. The electronic absorption edge of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, O.C.; Mitra-Kirtley, S.; Zhu, Yifu

    1992-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of more than 20 crude oils and asphaltenes are examined. The spectral location of the electronic absorption edge varies over a wide range, from the near-infrared for heavy oils and asphaltenes to the near-UV for gas condensates. The functional form of the electronic absorption edge for all crude oils (measured) is characteristic of the {open_quotes}Urbach tail,{close_quotes} a phenomenology which describes electronic absorption edges in wide-ranging materials. The crude oils all show similar Urbach widths, which are significantly larger than those generally found for various materials but are similar to those previously reported for asphaltenes. Monotonically increasing absorption at higher photon energy continues for all crude oils until the spectral region is reached where single-ring aromatics dominate absorption. However, the rate of increasing absorption at higher energies moderates, thereby deviating from the Urbach behavior. Fluorescence emission spectra exhibit small red shifts from the excitation wavelength and small fluorescence peak widths in the Urbach regions of different crude oils, but show large red shifts and large peak widths in spectral regions which deviate from the Urbach behavior. This observation implies that the Urbach spectral region is dominated by lowest-energy electronic absorption of corresponding chromophores. Thus, the Urbach tail gives a direct measure of the population distribution of chromophores in crude oils. Implied population distributions are consistent with thermally activated growth of large chromophores from small ones. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Crash energy absorption of two-segment crash box with holes under frontal load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choiron, Moch. Agus; Sudjito, Hidayati, Nafisah Arina

    2016-03-01

    Crash box is one of the passive safety components which designed as an impact energy absorber during collision. Crash box designs have been developed in order to obtain the optimum crashworthiness performance. Circular cross section was first investigated with one segment design, it rather influenced by its length which is being sensitive to the buckling occurrence. In this study, the two-segment crash box design with additional holes is investigated and deformation behavior and crash energy absorption are observed. The crash box modelling is performed by finite element analysis. The crash test components were impactor, crash box, and fixed rigid base. Impactor and the fixed base material are modelled as a rigid, and crash box material as bilinear isotropic hardening. Crash box length of 100 mm and frontal crash velocity of 16 km/jam are selected. Crash box material of Aluminum Alloy is used. Based on simulation results, it can be shown that holes configuration with 2 holes and ¾ length locations have the largest crash energy absorption. This condition associated with deformation pattern, this crash box model produces axisymmetric mode than other models.

  14. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  15. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  16. Extension to Low Energies (<7keV) of High Pressure X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Itie, J.-P.; Flank, A.-M.; Lagarde, P.; Idir, M.; Polian, A.; Couzinet, B.

    2007-01-19

    High pressure x-ray absorption has been performed down to 3.6 keV, thanks to the new LUCIA beamline (SLS, PSI) and to the use of perforated diamonds or Be gasket. Various experimental geometries are proposed, depending on the energy of the edge and on the concentration of the studied element. A few examples will be presented: BaTiO3 at the titanium K edge, Zn0.95 Mn0.05O at the manganese K edge, KCl at the potassium K edge.

  17. Theoretical Modeling of Low Energy Electronic Absorption Bands in Reduced Cobaloximes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task. PMID:25113847

  18. 5kW High peak power, 0.2 mJ high pulse energy, linearly-polarized pulsed laser from a single all-fiber oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Huang, Long; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu

    2015-12-01

    We report a high peak power ytterbium-doped fiber laser that emitted linearly-polarized laser at 1064 nm. An intracavity polarization-maintaining (PM) acousto-optic modulator (AOM) was used as a Q-switch to generate pulsed laser output. The whole system was constructed with all-fiber structure. The power of the polarized laser reached 4.21 W and a polarization purity of greater than 97.6% under the repetition rate of 20 kHz. The pulse width was 37 ns, which implied a 5 kW peak power and 0.2 mJ pulse energy. It is the highest peak power output from a linearly-polarized, Q-switched fiber laser oscillator to the best of our knowledge.

  19. An experimental-finite element analysis on the kinetic energy absorption capacity of polyvinyl alcohol sponge.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-06-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) sponge is in widespread use for biomedical and tissue engineering applications owing to its biocompatibility, availability, relative cheapness, and excellent mechanical properties. This study reports a novel concept of design in energy absorbing materials which consist in the use of PVA sponge as an alternative reinforcement material to enhance the energy loss of impact loads. An experimental study is carried out to measure the mechanical properties of the PVA sponge under uniaxial loading. The kinetic energy absorption capacity of the PVA sponge is computed by a hexahedral finite element (FE) model of the steel ball and bullet through the LS-DYNA code under impact load at three different thicknesses (5, 10, 15mm). The results show that a higher sponge thickness invokes a higher energy loss of the steel ball and bullet. The highest energy loss of the steel ball and bullet is observed for the thickest sponge with 160 and 35J, respectively. The most common type of traumatic brain injury in which the head subject to impact load causes the brain to move within the skull and consequently brain hemorrhaging. These results suggest the application of the PVA sponge as a great kinetic energy absorber material compared to commonly used expanded polystyrene foams (EPS) to absorb most of the impact energy and reduces the transmitted load. The results might have implications not only for understanding of the mechanical properties of PVA sponge but also for use as an alternative reinforcement material in helmet and packaging material design. PMID:24863223

  20. Electromagnetic radiation energy arrangement. [coatings for solar energy absorption and infrared reflection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipkis, R. R.; Vehrencamp, J. E. (Inventor)

    1965-01-01

    A solar energy collector and infrared energy reflector is described which comprises a vacuum deposited layer of aluminum of approximately 200 to 400 Angstroms thick on one side of a substrate. An adherent layer of titanium with a thickness of between 800 and 1000 Angstroms is vacuum deposited on the aluminum substrate and is substantially opaque to solar energy and substantially transparent to infrared energy.

  1. Mass energy-absorption coefficients and average atomic energy-absorption cross-sections for amino acids in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    More, Chaitali V.; Lokhande, Rajkumar M.; Pawar, Pravina. P.

    2016-05-01

    Mass attenuation coefficients of amino acids such as n-acetyl-l-tryptophan, n-acetyl-l-tyrosine and d-tryptophan were measured in the energy range 0.122-1.330 MeV. NaI (Tl) scintillation detection system was used to detect gamma rays with a resolution of 8.2% at 0.662 MeV. The measured attenuation coefficient values were then used to determine the mass energy-absorption coefficients (σa,en) and average atomic energy-absorption cross sections (μen/ρ) of the amino acids. Theoretical values were calculated based on XCOM data. Theoretical and experimental values are found to be in good agreement.

  2. MW peak-power, mJ pulse energy, multi-kHz repetition rate pulses from Yb-doped fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Teodoro, Fabio; Brooks, Christopher D.

    2006-02-01

    We report on pulsed fiber-based sources generating high peak and average powers in beams of excellent spectral/spatial quality. In the first setup, a ~10-kHz pulse repetition rate (PRR), 1ns-pulse, Q-switched microlaser seeded a dual-stage amplifier featuring a 40-μm-core Yb-doped photonic-crystal fiber (PCF) as the power amplifier. From this amplifier, we obtained diffraction-limited (M2 = 1.05), ~1ns pulses of 1.1mJ energy, ~1.1MW peak power, ~10.2W average-power, spectral linewidth ~9GHz, negligible nonlinearities, and slope efficiency >73%. In the second setup, we replaced the seed source with a shorter-pulse (<500ps) microchip laser of PRR ~13.4 kHz and obtained diffraction-limited (M2=1.05), ~450ps pulses of energy >0.7mJ, peak power in excess of 1.5 MW, average power ~9.5W, spectral linewidth <35 GHz. To show further power scaling, these pulses were amplified in a 140-μmcore Yb-doped fiber, which yielded multimode (M2 ~ 9), 2.2mJ-energy, 30-W average-power pulses of peak power in excess of 4.5MW, the highest ever obtained in a fiber source, to our knowledge. In the third setup, an Yb-doped, 70μmcore, intrinsically single-mode photonic-crystal rod was used to generate diffraction-limited (M2 ~ 1.1), ~10kHz PRR, ~1ns pulses of 2.05mJ energy, >2 MW peak-power (the highest ever reported in a diffraction-limited fiber source), ~20W average-power, ~13 GHz spectral linewidth, and spectral signal-to-noise ratio >50 dB. Finally, a single polarization large-core Yb-doped PCF was used to demonstrate high-peak-power harmonic generation. We obtained ~1ns pulses of peak powers >410 kW in the green (531nm) and >190kW in the UV (265.5 nm).

  3. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liseykina, T.; Mulser, P.; Murakami, M.

    2015-03-15

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague term “vacuum heating.” The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.3−1.2)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2} in the plasma target with the electron density of n{sub e}λ{sup 2}∼10{sup 23}cm{sup −3}μm{sup 2}, the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain Iλ{sup 2}≅(10{sup 18}−10{sup 20}) Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}, a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.14−3.5)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}

  4. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T.; Mulser, P.; Murakami, M.

    2015-03-01

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague term "vacuum heating." The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at I λ 2 ≅ ( 0.3 - 1.2 ) × 10 21 Wcm - 2 μ m 2 in the plasma target with the electron density of n e λ 2 ˜ 10 23 cm - 3 μ m 2 , the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain I λ 2 ≅ ( 10 18 - 10 20 ) Wcm - 2 μ m 2 , a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range I λ 2 ≅ ( 0.14 - 3.5 ) × 10 21 Wcm - 2 μ m 2 , and again a distinct power increase beyond I = 3.5 × 10 21 Wcm

  5. Laser-driven hard-x-ray generation based on ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of Ni compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Fang; Carter, Josh D.; Ng, Vicky; Guo Ting

    2005-02-01

    Three Ni compounds were studied by ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy using a laser-driven electron x-ray source with a tungsten target. The measured K edges of these Ni compounds using this self-referencing method were made identical to those measured with synchrotron x-ray sources. This enabled us to determine the absolute peak positions of tungsten L{alpha}{sub 1} and L{alpha}{sub 2} emitted from this source to be within 1 eV of those from the neutral tungsten atoms, which strongly suggested that the x rays were emitted from high energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target. This is the best evidence to date that directly supports the cold atom x-ray generation theory.

  6. IR multiphoton absorption of SF6 in flow with Ar at moderate energy fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarov, G. N.; Ronander, E.; van Heerden, S. P.; Gouws, M.; van der Merwe, K.

    1997-10-01

    IR multiple photon absorption (MPA) of SF6 in flow with Ar (SF6: Ar=1:100) in conditions of a large vibrational/rotational temperature difference (TV𪒮 K, TR䏐 K) was studied at moderate energy fluences from ۂ.1 to 𪐬 mJ/cm2, which are of interest for isotope selective two-step dissociation of molecules. A 50 cm Laval-type slit nozzle for the flow cooling, and a TEA CO2-laser for excitation of molecules were used in the experiments. The laser energy fluence dependences of the SF6 MPA were studied for several CO2-laser lines which are in a good resonance with the linear absorption spectrum of the Ƚ vibration of SF6 at low temperature. The effect of the laser pulse duration (intensity) on MPA of flow cooled SF6 with Ar was also studied. The results are compared with those obtained in earlier studies.

  7. Automatic Peak Identification in Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDS) Microanalysis: Can You Always Trust the Results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newbury, D.

    2006-05-01

    The degree of sophistication of computer-aided scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDS) microanalysis has advanced to the point where it is possible with a single command to automatically perform sequential qualitative analysis (peak identification) and quantitative analysis and then create a report of analysis with full statistical support. Often the actual algorithms employed in commercial software for each stage of the analysis are not provided or tested in sufficient detail nor are any inherent limitations in applying such "black box" software described to enable the analyst to estimate the performance. The identification of the elements responsible for the characteristic peaks in the EDS spectrum is obviously the first critical step in performing a robust analysis. Can the software be trusted to always deliver the correct elemental identification for the easiest possible case: peaks with high intensity and high peak-to-background that arise from major constituents (i.e., concentration, C above 0.1 mass fraction = 10 weight percent) and which do not suffer peak interference from another constituent? Unfortunately, testing of automatic peak identification procedures in a series of commercial systems has revealed that serious mistakes occur approximately 3 to 5 percent of the time for this easiest case [1]. Moreover, these mistakes are not random but occur systematically for certain elements. The situation is even worse when minor (C from 0.01 to 0.1) and trace (C less than 0.01) constituents are of interest or when analysis is performed under "low voltage" conditions (beam energy 5 keV or less). The prudent analyst will always use manual peak identification procedures to provide confirmation of automatic peak identification results before proceeding to quantitative analysis [2]. [1] Newbury, D., Microscopy and Microanalysis, 11 (2005) 545. [2] Goldstein, J., Newbury, D., Joy, D., Lyman, C., Echlin, P., Lifshin, E., Sawyer, L

  8. The effects of crushing speed on the energy-absorption capability of composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    The energy-absorption capability as a function of crushing speed was determined for Thornel 300/Fiberite 934 (Gr/E) and Kevlar-49/Fiberite 934 (K/E) composite material. Circular cross section tube specimens were crushed at quasi-static, 6 m/sec, and 12 m/sec speeds. Ply orientations of the tube specimens were (0/+ or - theta) sub 2 and (+ or - theta) sub 3 where theta=15, 45, and 75 degress. Based on the results of these tests the energy-absortion capability of Gr/E and K/E was determined to be a function of crushing speed. The crushing modes based on exterior appearance of the crushed tubes were unchanged for either material. However, the interlaminar crushing behavior changed with crushing speed.

  9. Vibration energy absorption in the whole-body system of a tractor operator.

    PubMed

    Szczepaniak, Jan; Tanaś, Wojciech; Kromulski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Many people are exposed to whole-body vibration (WBV) in their occupational lives, especially drivers of vehicles such as tractor and trucks. The main categories of effects from WBV are perception degraded comfort interference with activities-impaired health and occurrence of motion sickness. Absorbed power is defined as the power dissipated in a mechanical system as a result of an applied force. The vibration-induced injuries or disorders in a substructure of the human system are primarily associated with the vibration power absorption distributed in that substructure. The vibration power absorbed by the exposed body is a measure that combines both the vibration hazard and the biodynamic response of the body. The article presents measurement method for determining vibration power dissipated in the human whole body system called Vibration Energy Absorption (VEA). The vibration power is calculated from the real part of the force-velocity cross-spectrum. The absorbed power in the frequency domain can be obtained from the cross-spectrum of the force and velocity. In the context of the vibration energy transferred to a seated human body, the real component reflects the energy dissipated in the biological structure per unit of time, whereas the imaginary component reflects the energy stored/released by the system. The seated human is modeled as a series/parallel 4-DOF dynamic models. After introduction of the excitation, the response in particular segments of the model can be analyzed. As an example, the vibration power dissipated in an operator has been determined as a function of the agricultural combination operating speed 1.39 - 4.16 ms(-1). PMID:24959797

  10. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  11. Integrated energy, economic, and environmental assessment for the optimal solar absorption cooling and heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Yin

    Buildings in the United States are responsible for 41% of the primary energy use and 30% of carbon dioxide emissions. Due to mounting concerns about climate change and resource depletion, meeting building heating and cooling demand with renewable energy has attracted increasing attention in the energy system design of green buildings. One of these approaches, the solar absorption cooling and heating (SACH) technology can be a key solution to addressing the energy and environmental challenges. SACH system is an integration of solar thermal heating system and solar thermal driven absorption cooling system. So far, SACH systems still remain at the demonstration and testing stage due to not only its high cost but also complicated system characteristics. This research aims to develop a methodology to evaluate the life cycle energy, economic and environmental performance of SACH systems by high-fidelity simulations validated by experimental data. The developed methodology can be used to assist the system design. In order to achieve this goal, the study includes four objectives as follows: * Objective 1: Develop the evaluation model for the SACH system. The model includes three aspects: energy, economy, and environment from a life cycle point of view. * Objective 2: Validate the energy system model by solar experiments performance data. * Objective 3: Develop a fast and effective multi-objective optimization methodology to find the optimal system configuration which achieves the maximum system benefits on energy, economy and environment. Statistic techniques are explored to reveal the relations between the system key parameters and the three evaluation targets. The Pareto front is generated by solving this multi-objective optimization problem. * Objective 4: Apply the developed assessment methodology to different building types and locations. Furthermore, this study considered the influence of the input uncertainties on the overall system performance. The sensitivity

  12. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  13. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  14. Analytic model of energy-absorption response functions in compound X-ray detector materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    The absorbed energy distribution (AED) in X-ray imaging detectors is an important factor that affects both energy resolution and image quality through the Swank factor and detective quantum efficiency. In the diagnostic energy range (20-140 keV), escape of characteristic photons following photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter photons are primary sources of absorbed-energy dispersion in X-ray detectors. In this paper, we describe the development of an analytic model of the AED in compound X-ray detector materials, based on the cascaded-systems approach, that includes the effects of escape and reabsorption of characteristic and Compton-scatter photons. We derive analytic expressions for both semi-infinite slab and pixel geometries and validate our approach by Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic model provides the energy-dependent X-ray response function of arbitrary compound materials without time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. We believe this model will be useful for correcting spectral distortion artifacts commonly observed in photon-counting applications and optimal design and development of novel X-ray detectors. PMID:23744671

  15. Assessing the Effect of Tree Canopy Stocking on Home Energy Use Savings during Peak Cooling Months in West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzo, Jared

    This study estimated the direct energy savings for homes as well as identified specific site differences using actual electric usage for homes. Four sites, ranging between thirty and forty houses per site, were selected at various canopy cover levels (15, 25, 39, and 54 percent). Tree characteristics were measured for each house at the parcel level. This included tree height, height to live crown, species, crown width, distance from house, tree direction, and percent shrub surrounding the house. Energy use for cooling months (June-September) was obtained for sample homes from Allegheny Power. Data indicate a declining energy use with increasing canopy cover per home. Sample comparisons within and across sites yielded no statistically significant differences between sites. Stepwise regression analysis was used to identify important variables contributing to energy use in homes, and energy use savings were predicted at increasing levels of canopy cover. Significant factors affecting the results were sample size, occupant behavior, site homogeneity, missing variables, and seasonal variation.

  16. Measurement of the D-D fusion neutron energy spectrum and variation of the peak width with plasma ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. A.; Chen, S. H.; Gwinn, D.; Parker, R. R.

    1983-11-01

    We report a set of neutron spectrum measurements made at the Alcator-C tokamak under Ohmic-heating conditions. It has been found that the width of the D-D fusion neutron peak increases with the plasma ion temperature consistent with the theoretical prediction. In particular, the neutron spectra resulting from the sum of many plasma discharges with ion temperatures of 780 and 1050 eV have been obtained. The width for the 780-eV case is 64+ 9-11 keV and that of the 1050-eV case, 81+10-14 keV (full width at half maximum), corresponding to ion temperatures of 740 and 1190 eV, respectively.

  17. CT dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene cylinders with diameters from 6 to 55 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: ICRU Report No. 87 Committee and AAPM Task Group 200 designed a three-sectional polyethylene phantom of 30 cm in diameter and 60 cm in length for evaluating the midpoint dose D{sub L}(0) and its rise-to-the-equilibrium curve H(L) = D{sub L}(0)/D{sub eq} from computed tomography (CT) scanning, where D{sub eq} is the equilibrium dose. To aid the use of the phantom in radiation dose assessment and to gain an understanding of dose equilibration and energy absorption in polyethylene, the authors evaluated the short (20 cm) to long (60 cm) phantom dose ratio with a polyethylene diameter of 30 cm, assessed H(L) in polyethylene cylinders of 6–55 cm in diameters, and examined energy absorption in these cylinders. Methods: A GEANT4-based Monte Carlo program was used to simulate the single axial scans of polyethylene cylinders (diameters 6–55 cm and length 90 cm, as well as diameter 30 cm and lengths 20 and 60 cm) on a clinical CT scanner (Somatom Definition dual source CT, Siemens Healthcare). Axial dose distributions were computed on the phantom central and peripheral axes. An average dose over the central 23 or 100 mm region was evaluated for modeling dose measurement using a 0.6 cm{sup 3} thimble chamber or a 10 cm long pencil ion chamber, respectively. The short (20 cm) to long (90 cm) phantom dose ratios were calculated for the 30 cm diameter polyethylene phantoms scanned at four tube voltages (80–140 kV) and a range of beam apertures (1–25 cm). H(L) was evaluated using the dose integrals computed with the 90 cm long phantoms. The resultant H(L) data were subsequently used to compute the fraction of the total energy absorbed inside or outside the scan range (E{sub in}/E or E{sub out}/E) on the phantom central and peripheral axes, where E = LD{sub eq} was the total energy absorbed along the z axis. Results: The midpoint dose in the 60 cm long polyethylene phantom was equal to that in the 90 cm long polyethylene phantom. The short-to-long phantom dose

  18. Cost benefit analysis and energy savings of using compression and absorption chillers for air conditioners in hot and humid climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekarchian, M.; Moghavvemi, M.; Motasemi, F.; Mahlia, T. M. I.

    2012-06-01

    The electricity consumption growth has increased steadily in the recent decade which is a great concern for the environment. Increasing the number of high-rise air-conditioned buildings and the rapid use of electrical appliances in residential and commercial sectors are two important factors for high electricity consumption. This paper investigates the annual energy required for cooling per unit area and the total energy cost per unit area for each type of air conditioning systems in hot and humid climates. The effects of changing the coefficient of performance (COP) of absorption chillers on cost saving was also investigated in this study. The results showed that using absorption chillers for cooling will increase the amount of energy consumption per unit area; however the energy cost per unit area will decrease. In addition this research indicates that for each 0.1 increment in COP of absorption chillers, there is about 500 USD/m2 saved cost.

  19. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  20. The energy spectrum and the optical absorption spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene within the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Silant’ev, A. V.

    2015-10-15

    Anticommutator Green’s functions and the energy spectrum of C{sub 60} fullerene are calculated in the approximation of static fluctuations within the Hubbard model. On the basis of this spectrum, an interpretation is proposed for the experimentally observed optical absorption bands of C{sub 60} fullerene. The parameters of C{sub 60} fullerene that characterize it within the Hubbard model are calculated by the optical absorption spectrum.

  1. High Shear Deformation to Produce High Strength and Energy Absorption in Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Vineet V.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Li, Dongsheng; Garmestani, Hamid; Nyberg, Eric A.; Lavender, Curt A.

    2014-02-01

    Magnesium alloys have the potential to reduce the mass of transportation systems however to fully realize the benefits it must be usable in more applications including those that require higher strength and ductility. It has been known that fine grain size in Mg alloys leads to high strength and ductility. However, the challenge is how to achieve this optimal microstructure in a cost effective way. This work has shown that by using optimized high shear deformation and second phase particles of Mg2Si and MgxZnZry the energy absorption of the extrusions can exceed that of AA6061. The extrusion process under development described in this presentation appears to be scalable and cost effective. In addition to process development a novel modeling approach to understand the roles of strain and state-of-strain on particle fracture and grain size control has been developed

  2. Prethermalization and exponentially slow energy absorption in periodically driven many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abanin, Dmitry; Ho, Wen Wei; de Roeck, Wojciech; Huveneers, Francois

    We establish some general dynamical properties of lattice many-body systems that are subject to a high-frequency periodic driving. We prove that such systems have a quasi-conserved extensive quantity H*, which plays the role of an effective static Hamiltonian. The dynamics of the system (e.g., evolution of any local observable) is well-approximated by the evolution with the Hamiltonian H* up to time τ*, which is exponentially long in the driving frequency. We further show that the energy absorption rate is exponentially small in the driving frequency. In cases where H* is ergodic, the driven system prethermalizes to a thermal state described by H* at intermediate times t <τ* , eventually heating up to an infinite-temperature state at times t ~τ* . Our results indicate that rapidly driven many-body systems generically exhibit prethermalization and very slow heating. We briefly discuss implications for cold atoms experiments which realize topological states by periodic driving.

  3. Optical absorption and energy-loss spectra of aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Vidal, F. J.; Pitarke, J. M.

    2001-07-01

    Optical-absorption cross-sections and energy-loss spectra of aligned multishell carbon nanotubes are investigated, on the basis of photonic band-structure calculations. A local graphite-like dielectric tensor is assigned to every point of the tubules, and the effective transverse dielectric function of the composite is computed by solving Maxwell's equations in media with tensor-like dielectric functions. A Maxwell-Garnett-like approach appropriate to the case of infinitely long anisotropic tubules is also developed. Our full calculations indicate that the experimentally measured macroscopic dielectric function of carbon nanotube materials is the result of a strong electromagnetic coupling between the tubes. An analysis of the electric-field pattern associated with this coupling is presented, showing that in the close-packed regime the incident radiation excites a very localized tangential surface plasmon.

  4. Cellulose nanocomposite biopolymer foam--hierarchical structure effects on energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Svagan, Anna J; Berglund, Lars A; Jensen, Poul

    2011-05-01

    Starch is an attractive biofoam candidate as replacement of expanded polystyrene (EPS) in packaging materials. The main technical problems with starch foam include its hygroscopic nature, sensitivity of its mechanical properties to moisture content, and much lower energy absorption than EPS. In the present study, a starch-based biofoam is for the first time able to reach comparable mechanical properties (E = 32 MPa, compressive yield strength, 630 kPa) to EPS at 50% relative humidity and similar relative density. The reason is the nanocomposite concept in the form of a cellulose nanofiber network reinforcing the hygroscopic amylopectin starch matrix in the cell wall. The biofoams are prepared by the freezing/freeze-drying technique and subjected to compressive loading. Cell structure is characterized by FE-SEM of cross sections. Mechanical properties are related to cell structure and cell wall nanocomposite composition. Hierarchically structured biofoams are demonstrated to be interesting materials with potential for strongly improved mechanical properties. PMID:21520887

  5. Using Hydrated Salt Phase Change Materials for Residential Air Conditioning Peak Demand Reduction and Energy Conservation in Coastal and Transitional Climates in the State of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung Ok

    The recent rapid economic and population growth in the State of California have led to a significant increase in air conditioning use, especially in areas of the State with coastal and transitional climates. This fact makes that the electric peak demand be dominated by air conditioning use of residential buildings in the summer time. This extra peak demand caused by the use of air conditioning equipment lasts only a few days out of the year. As a result, unavoidable power outages have occurred when electric supply could not keep up with such electric demand. This thesis proposed a possible solution to this problem by using building thermal mass via phase change materials to reduce peak air conditioning demand loads. This proposed solution was tested via a new wall called Phase Change Frame Wall (PCFW). The PCFW is a typical residential frame wall in which Phase Change Materials (PCMs) were integrated to add thermal mass. The thermal performance of the PCFWs was first evaluated, experimentally, in two test houses, built for this purpose, located in Lawrence, KS and then via computer simulations of residential buildings located in coastal and transitional climates in California. In this thesis, a hydrated salt PCM was used, which was added in concentrations of 10% and 20% by weight of the interior sheathing of the walls. Based on the experimental results, under Lawrence, KS weather, the PCFWs at 10% and 20% of PCM concentrations reduced the peak heat transfer rates by 27.0% and 27.3%, on average, of all four walls, respectively. Simulated results using California climate data indicated that PCFWs would reduce peak heat transfer rates by 8% and 19% at 10% PCM concentration and 12.2% and 27% at 20% PCM concentration for the coastal and transitional climates, respectively. Furthermore, the PCFWs, at 10% PCM concentration, would reduce the space cooling load and the annual energy consumption by 10.4% and 7.2%, on average in both climates, respectively.

  6. Experimental investigation of the multiple scatter peak of gamma rays in portland cement in the energy range 279-1332 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Tejbir; Singh, Parjit S.

    2011-12-01

    The pulse height spectra for different thicknesses of portland cement in the reflected geometry has been recorded with the help of a NaI(Tl) scintillator detector and 2 K MCA card using different gamma-ray sources such as Hg203 (279 keV), Cs137 (662 keV) and Co60 (1173 and 1332 keV). It has been observed that the multiple scatter peak for portland cement appears at 110 (±7) keV in all the spectra irrespective of different incident photon energies in the range 279-1332 keV from different gamma-ray sources. Further, the variation in the intensity of the multiple scatter peak with the thickness of portland cement in the backward semi-cylinders has been investigated.

  7. Absorption of solar radiation by alkali vapors. [for efficient high temperature energy converters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattick, A. T.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical study of the direct absorption of solar radiation by the working fluid of high temperature, high efficiency energy converters has been carried out. Alkali vapors and potassium vapor in particular were found to be very effective solar absorbers and suitable thermodynamically for practical high temperature cycles. Energy loss via reradiation from a solar boiler was shown to reduce the overall efficiency of radiation-heated energy converters, although a simple model of radiation transfer in a potassium vapor solar boiler revealed that self-trapping of the reradiation may reduce this loss considerably. A study was also made of the requirements for a radiation boiler window. It was found that for sapphire, one of the best solar transmitting materials, the severe environment in conjunction with high radiation densities will require some form of window protection. An aerodynamic shield is particularly advantageous in this capacity, separating the window from the absorbing vapor to prevent condensation and window corrosion and to reduce the radiation density at the window.

  8. Shape of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of condensed phases and transition energies.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Miguel; Paredes, Rodrigo

    2014-11-13

    General integral expressions for the temperature-dependent profile of the spectral lines of photon absorption and emission by atomic or molecular species in a condensed environment are derived with no other hypothesis than: (a) The acoustic vibrational modes of the condensed host medium constitute the thermodynamic energy reservoir at a given constant temperature, and local electronic transitions modifying the equilibrium configuration of the surroundings are multiphonon events, regardless of the magnitude of the transition energy. (b) Electron-phonon coupling is linear in the variations of the bond length. The purpose is to develop a theoretical tool for the analysis of the spectra, allowing us to grasp highly accurate information from fitting the theoretical line shape function to experiment, including those spectra displaying wide features. The method is illustrated by applying it to two dyes, Lucifer Yellow CH and Coumarin 1, which display fluorescence maxima of 0.41 and 0.51 eV fwhm. Fitting the theoretical curves to the spectra indicates that the neat excitation energies are 2.58 eV ± 2.5% and 3.00 eV ± 2.0%, respectively. PMID:25321927

  9. Local Absorption of High-energy Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, R.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2010-09-01

    High-energy photons emitted from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are subject to pair-production interactions with lower energy photons, leading to an effective optical depth. In this paper, we estimate the opacity resulting from photon fields located at various distances from long GRB sites: those of the binary companion to the massive stellar progenitor, the star-forming molecular cloud containing the GRB, and the total photon field of the host galaxy. The first two photon fields are found to be transparent for most reasonable sets of assumptions about these systems. In the case of galactic radiation fields, we have performed several numerical simulations to calculate the expected opacities for two different line-of-sight geometries through the host galaxy and include a full accounting of the infrared radiation produced by the absorption and re-radiation of starlight by dust. The optical depth for GeV gamma rays due to direct starlight is less than unity for all host galaxies. At higher energies, >10 TeV, a spectral cutoff can occur due to the rapidly increasing number of mid- to far-IR intragalactic photons re-radiated by dust. Photons in the extragalactic background light therefore remain the only relevant source of photon-photon opacity for ongoing GRB observations with Fermi-LAT and potential future detections with ground-based gamma-ray telescopes.

  10. Solar energy absorption by vertical cylindrical-tube absorbers in sunspace enclosures

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, M.E.; Van Migom, M.

    1983-11-01

    Absorption of radiant solar energy in a building sunspace with a south-facing window and a row of opaque vertical cylindrical-tube solar absorbers is considered. A two-dimensional model is formulated for a horizontal, planar enclosure in which a typical cylindrical absorber tube is subdivided into a number of uniform surface elements and the window and sunspace surfaces are each represented as single elements. Matrix expressions are derived for the radiosity, irradiance, and absorbed solar energy at each surface, considering the transmission of beam and diffuse radiant energy by the window and assuming that all interior surfaces reflect diffusely. The matrix expressions are evaluated for incident solar flux conditions for a south vertical surface on a clear winter day and the results are presented as dimensionless ratios of absorbed-to-incident solar flux as a function of the tube spacing ratio L/R. Hourly values of the spatial distribution of absorbed solar flux are presented for the cylindrical-tube. Space and time averaged values of absorbed solar flux are also presented for the cylinder, the window and the room. The potential application of these results for thermal modeling in passive solar applications is discussed.

  11. Parametric study of a variable-magnetic-field-based energy-selection system for generating a spread-out Bragg peak with a laser-accelerated proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dae-Hyun; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kang, Young Nam; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Pae, Ki-Hong; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based proton beam acceleration, which produces broad energy spectra, is unsuitable for direct clinical use. Thus, employing an energy selection system is necessary. The purpose of the present study was to investigate a method whereby a variable magnetic field could be employed with an energy selection system to generate a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). For energy selection, particle transport and dosimetric property measurements, the Geant4 toolkit was implemented. The energy spectrum of the laser-accelerated proton beam was acquired using a particle-in-cell simulation. The hole size and the position of the energy selection collimator were varied in order to determine the effects of those parameters on the dosimetric properties. To generate an SOBP, we changed the magnetic field in the energy selection system for each beam weighting factor during beam irradiation. The overall results of this study suggest that the use of an energy selection system with a variable magnetic field can effectively generate an SOBP suitable for proton radiation therapy applications.

  12. A method for establishing absolute full-energy peak efficiency and its confidence interval for HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizwan, U.; Chester, A.; Domingo, T.; Starosta, K.; Williams, J.; Voss, P.

    2015-12-01

    A method is proposed for establishing the absolute efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector including the confidence interval in the energy range of 79.6-3451.2 keV. The calibrations were accomplished with the 133Ba, 60Co, 56Co and 152Eu point-like radioactive sources with only the 60Co source being activity calibrated to an accuracy of 2% at the 90% confidence level. All data sets measured from activity calibrated and uncalibrated sources were fit simultaneously using the linearized least squares method. The proposed fit function accounts for scaling of the data taken with activity uncalibrated sources to the data taken with the high accuracy activity calibrated source. The confidence interval for the fit was found analytically using the covariance matrix. Accuracy of the fit was below 3.5% at the 90% confidence level in the 79.6-3451.2 keV energy range.

  13. Mass-energy absorption coefficient and backscatter factor ratios for kilovoltage x-ray beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.-M.; Seuntjens, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    For low-energy (up to 150 kV) x-rays, the ratio of mass-energy absorption coefficients for water to air, , and the backscatter factor B are used in the conversion of air kerma, measured free-in-air, to water kerma on the surface of a water phantom. For clinical radiotherapy, similar conversion factors are needed for the determination of the absorbed dose to biological tissues on (or near) the surface of a human body. We have computed the ratios and B factor ratios for different biological tissues including muscle, soft tissue, lung, skin and bone relative to water. The ratios were obtained by integrating the respective mass-energy absorption coefficients over the in-air primary photon spectra. We have also calculated the ratios at different depths in a water phantom in order to convert the measured in-phantom water kerma to the absorbed dose to various biological tissues. The EGS4/DOSIMETER Monte Carlo code system has been used for the simulation of the energy fluence at different depths in a water phantom irradiated by a kilovoltage x-ray beam of variable beam quality (HVL: 0.1 mm Al-5 mm Cu), field size and source-surface distance (SSD). The same code was also used in the calculation of the B factor ratios, soft tissue to water and bone to water. The results show that the B factor for bone differs from the B factor for water by up to 20% for a 100 kV beam (HVL: 2.65 mm Al) with a 100 field. On the other hand, the difference in the B factor between water and soft tissue is insignificant (well within 1% generally). This means that the B factors for water may be directly used to

  14. Longitudinal dose distribution and energy absorption in PMMA and water cylinders undergoing CT scans

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xinhua; Zhang, Da; Liu, Bob

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The knowledge of longitudinal dose distribution provides the most direct view of the accumulated dose in computed tomography (CT) scanning. The purpose of this work was to perform a comprehensive study of dose distribution width and energy absorption with a wide range of subject sizes and beam irradiated lengths. Methods: Cumulative dose distribution along the z-axis was calculated based on the previously published CT dose equilibration data by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 40, 031903 (10pp.) (2013)] and a mechanism for computing dose on axial lines by Li, Zhang, and Liu [Med. Phys. 39, 5347–5352 (2012)]. Full width at half maximum (FWHM), full width at tenth maximum (FWTM), the total energy (E) absorbed in a small cylinder of unit mass per centimeter square about the central or peripheral axis, and the energy (E{sub in}) absorbed inside irradiated length (L) were subsequently extracted from the dose distribution. Results: Extensive results of FWHM, FWTM, and E{sub in}/E were presented on the central and peripheral axes of infinitely long PMMA (diameters 6–50 cm) and water (diameters 6–55 cm) cylinders with L < 100 cm. FWHM was greater than the primary beam width only on the central axes of large phantoms and also with L ranging from a few centimeter to about 33 cm. FWTM generally increased with phantom diameter, and could be up to 32 cm longer than irradiated length, depending on L, phantom diameter and axis, but was insensitive to phantom material (PMMA or water). E{sub in}/E increased with L and asymptotically approached unity for large L. As phantom diameter increased, E{sub in}/E generally decreased, but asymptotically approached constant levels on the peripheral axes of large phantoms. A heuristic explanation of dose distribution width results was presented. Conclusions: This study enables the reader to gain a comprehensive view of dose distribution width and energy absorption and provides useful data for estimating doses to organs inside or

  15. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  16. Noontime Latitudinal Behavior of the Ionospheric Peak Parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the Variation of Solar Energy Input for the American Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabassa-Miranda, E.; Garnett Marques Brum, C.

    2013-12-01

    We are presenting a statistical study of the behavior of the noontime F2 peak parameters (foF2 and hmF2) to the variation of solar energy input based on digisonde data and EUV-UV solar emissions registered by SOHO satellite for geomagnetic quiet-to-normal condition. For this, we selected digisonde data from fourteen different stations spread along the American sector (ten of them located above and four below the equator). These registers were collected from 2000 to 2012 and encompass the last unusual super minimum period.

  17. Fermi LAT detection of increasing GeV gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, has observed increasing gamma-ray emission from a source positionally consistent with the very-high energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (also known as TXS 1959+650 and 3FGL J2000.0+6509, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  18. Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS detection of increasing gamma-ray activity from the high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buson, S.; Magill, J. D.; Dorner, D.; Biland, A.; Mirzoyan, R.; Mukherjee, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fermi-LAT, FACT, MAGIC and VERITAS collaborations report the detection of enhanced gamma-ray activity from a source positionally consistent with the very-high-energy peaked BL Lac object 1ES 1959+650 (a.k.a 3FGL J2000.0+6509, in the 3rd LAT source catalog, 3FGL, Acero et al. 2015, ApJS 218, 23) with radio coordinates (J2000) R.A.: 299.999384 deg, Dec.: 65.148514 deg (Beasley et al. 2002, ApJS, 141, 13). This source has a redshift z=0.047 (Schachter et al. 1993, ApJ, 412, 541).

  19. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of carbon and silicon nanostructures for energy applications.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jun; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xuhui; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2014-12-10

    Carbon and silicon materials are two of the most important materials involved in the history of the science and technology development. In the last two decades, C and Si nanoscale materials, e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene, and silicon nanowires, and quantum dots, have also emerged as the most interesting nanomaterials in nanoscience and nanotechnology for their myriad promising applications such as for electronics, sensors, biotechnology, etc. In particular, carbon and silicon nanostructures are being utilized in energy-related applications such as catalysis, batteries, solar cells, etc., with significant advances. Understanding of the nature of surface and electronic structures of nanostructures plays a key role in the development and improvement of energy conversion and storage nanosystems. Synchrotron soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and related techniques, such as X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), show unique capability in revealing the surface and electronic structures of C and Si nanomaterials. In this review, XAS is demonstrated as a powerful technique for probing chemical bonding, the electronic structure, and the surface chemistry of carbon and silicon nanomaterials, which can greatly enhance the fundamental understanding and also applicability of these nanomaterials in energy applications. The focus is on the unique advantages of XAS as a complementary tool to conventional microscopy and spectroscopy for effectively providing chemical and structural information about carbon and silicon nanostructures. The employment of XAS for in situ, real-time study of property evolution of C and Si nanostructures to elucidate the mechanisms in energy conversion or storage processes is also discussed. PMID:25204894

  20. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-01

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader π* and σ* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) — (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the π* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the "pre-peak", in the subtracted spectra and the π*/σ* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore, it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the π*/σ* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.

  1. Study of electron transition energies between anions and cations in spinel ferrites using differential UV-vis absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. C.; Wu, L. Q.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    It is very important to determine electron transition energies (Etr) between anions and different cations in order to understand the electrical transport and magnetic properties of a material. Many authors have analyzed UV-vis absorption spectra using the curve (αhν)2 vs E, where α is the absorption coefficient and E(=hν) is the photon energy. Such an approach can give only two band gap energies for spinel ferrites. In this paper, using differential UV-vis absorption spectra, dα/dE vs E, we have obtained electron transition energies (Etr) between the anions and cations, Fe2+ and Fe3+ at the (A) and [B] sites and Ni2+ at the [B] sites for the (A)[B]2O4 spinel ferrite samples CoxNi0.7-xFe2.3O4 (0.0≤x≤0.3), CrxNi0.7Fe2.3-xO4 (0.0≤x≤0.3) and Fe3O4. We suggest that the differential UV-vis absorption spectra should be accepted as a general analysis method for determining electron transition energies between anions and cations.

  2. Characterizing the spatio-temporal and energy-dependent response of riometer absorption to particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Makarevich, Roman; Spanswick, Emma; Donovan, Eric; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    Energetic electrons in the 10's of keV range precipitate to the upper D- and lower E-region ionosphere, and are responsible for enhanced ionization. The same particles are important in the inner magnetosphere, as they provide a source of energy for waves, and thus relate to relativistic electron enhancements in Earth's radiation belts.In situ observations of plasma populations and waves are usually limited to a single point, which complicates temporal and spatial analysis. Also, the lifespan of satellite missions is often limited to several years which does not allow one to infer long-term climatology of particle precipitation, important for affecting ionospheric conditions at high latitudes. Multi-point remote sensing of the ionospheric plasma conditions can provide a global view of both ionospheric and magnetospheric conditions, and the coupling between magnetospheric and ionospheric phenomena can be examined on time-scales that allow comprehensive statistical analysis. In this study we utilize multi-point riometer measurements in conjunction with in situ satellite data, and physics-based modeling to investigate the spatio-temporal and energy-dependent response of riometer absorption. Quantifying this relationship may be a key to future advancements in our understanding of the complex D-region ionosphere, and may lead to enhanced specification of auroral precipitation both during individual events and over climatological time-scales.

  3. Alternating magnetic field energy absorption in the dispersion of iron oxide nanoparticles in a viscous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolkova, Ilona S.; Kazantseva, Natalia E.; Babayan, Vladimir; Smolka, Petr; Parmar, Harshida; Vilcakova, Jarmila; Schneeweiss, Oldrich; Pizurova, Nadezda

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by a coprecipitation method in a controlled growth process leading to the formation of uniform highly crystalline nanoparticles with average size of 13 nm, which corresponds to the superparamagnetic state. Nanoparticles obtained are a mixture of single-phase nanoparticles of magnetite and maghemite as well as nanoparticles of non-stoichiometric magnetite. The subsequent annealing of nanoparticles at 300 °C in air during 6 h leads to the full transformation to maghemite. It results in reduced value of the saturation magnetization (from 56 emu g-1 to 48 emu g-1) but does not affect the heating ability of nanoparticles. A 2-7 wt% dispersion of as-prepared and annealed nanoparticles in glycerol provides high heating rate in alternating magnetic fields allowed for application in magnetic hyperthermia; however the value of specific loss power does not exceed 30 W g-1. This feature of heat output is explained by the combined effect of magnetic interparticle interactions and the properties of the carrier medium. Nanoparticles coalesce during the synthesis and form aggregates showing ferromagnetic-like behavior with magnetization hysteresis, distinct sextets on Mössbauer spectrum, blocking temperature well about room temperature, which accounts for the higher energy barrier for magnetization reversal. At the same time, low specific heat capacity of glycerol intensifies heat transfer in the magnetic dispersion. However, high viscosity of glycerol limits the specific loss power value, since predominantly the Neel relaxation accounts for the absorption of AC magnetic field energy.

  4. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  5. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  6. Energy-to-peak state estimation for Markov jump RNNs with time-varying delays via nonsynchronous filter with nonstationary mode transitions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Zhu, Yanzheng; Zheng, Wei Xing

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the problem of energy-to-peak state estimation for a class of discrete-time Markov jump recurrent neural networks (RNNs) with randomly occurring nonlinearities (RONs) and time-varying delays is investigated. A practical phenomenon of nonsynchronous jumps between RNNs modes and desired mode-dependent filters is considered, and a nonstationary mode transition among the filters is used to model the nonsynchronous jumps to different degrees that are also mode dependent. The RONs are used to model a class of sector-like nonlinearities that occur in a probabilistic way according to a Bernoulli sequence. The time-varying delays are supposed to be mode dependent and unknown, but with known lower and upper bounds a priori. Sufficient conditions on the existence of the nonsynchronous filters are obtained such that the filtering error system is stochastically stable and achieves a prescribed energy-to-peak performance index. Further to the recent study on the class of nonsynchronous estimation problem, a monotonicity is observed in obtaining filtering performance index, while changing the degree of nonsynchronous jumps. A numerical example is presented to verify the theoretical findings. PMID:25576580

  7. The X-ray behaviour of the high-energy peaked BL Lacertae source PKS 2155-304 in the 0.3-10 keV band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapanadze, B.; Romano, P.; Vercellone, S.; Kapanadze, S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the results of our monitoring of the high-energy peaked BL Lac object PKS 2155-304 by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) during 2005-2012. Our timing study shows that the source was highly variable both on longer (weeks-to-months) and intra-day time-scales, up to a factor of 7 in flux, and 30 per cent in fractional variability amplitudes, with no periodic variations. The X-ray spectra are mainly curved with broad ranges of photon index, curvature parameter, and hardness ratio which exhibit significant variability with the flux on different time-scales. Our study of multi-wavelength cross-correlations has revealed that the one-zone SSC scenario seems to be valid for the most optical-to-gamma-ray flares observed during 2006-2012. An `orphan' X-ray flare with no counterpart in other spectral bands suggests the existence of different electron populations. Based on the absence of a correlation between photon index and curvature parameter (expected from the energy-dependent acceleration probability scenario), the observed distribution of curvature parameter from the XRT spectra peaking at b = 0.37, and the observed anti-correlation between the curvature parameter and the 0.3-10 keV flux (i.e. lower curvatures in flaring states), we conclude that the most likely mechanism responsible for producing X-ray emission during the flares is the stochastic acceleration of the electrons.

  8. Stochastic shock response spectrum decomposition method based on probabilistic definitions of temporal peak acceleration, spectral energy, and phase lag distributions of mechanical impact pyrotechnic shock test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, James Ho-Jin; Duran, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Most of the times pyrotechnic shock design and test requirements for space systems are provided in Shock Response Spectrum (SRS) without the input time history. Since the SRS does not describe the input or the environment, a decomposition method is used to obtain the source time history. The main objective of this paper is to develop a decomposition method producing input time histories that can satisfy the SRS requirement based on the pyrotechnic shock test data measured from a mechanical impact test apparatus. At the heart of this decomposition method is the statistical representation of the pyrotechnic shock test data measured from the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL) designed Universal Pyrotechnic Shock Simulator (UPSS). Each pyrotechnic shock test data measured at the interface of a test unit has been analyzed to produce the temporal peak acceleration, Root Mean Square (RMS) acceleration, and the phase lag at each band center frequency. Maximum SRS of each filtered time history has been calculated to produce a relationship between the input and the response. Two new definitions are proposed as a result. The Peak Ratio (PR) is defined as the ratio between the maximum SRS and the temporal peak acceleration at each band center frequency. The ratio between the maximum SRS and the RMS acceleration is defined as the Energy Ratio (ER) at each band center frequency. Phase lag is estimated based on the time delay between the temporal peak acceleration at each band center frequency and the peak acceleration at the lowest band center frequency. This stochastic process has been applied to more than one hundred pyrotechnic shock test data to produce probabilistic definitions of the PR, ER, and the phase lag. The SRS is decomposed at each band center frequency using damped sinusoids with the PR and the decays obtained by matching the ER of the damped sinusoids to the ER of the test data. The final step in this stochastic SRS decomposition process is the Monte Carlo (MC

  9. Excitation energy dependence of excited states dynamics in all- trans-carotenes determined by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2005-06-01

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics in β-carotene and lycopene has been investigated by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies using tunable excitation pulses. The transient signals induced by the photoexcitation with larger excess energy have broader bands and longer lifetimes both in the 11Bu+and21Ag- excited states. The excess vibrational energy remains longer than several picoseconds and slows the relaxation kinetics in carotenoids.

  10. Effects of supplemental chromium propionate and rumen-protected amino acids on productivity, diet digestibility, and energy balance of peak-lactation dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Rodriguez, C F; Yuan, K; Titgemeyer, E C; Mamedova, L K; Griswold, K E; Bradford, B J

    2014-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) feeding in early lactation increased milk production in some studies, but responses to dietary Cr during peak lactation have not been evaluated. Furthermore, interactions of essential amino acids (AA) and Cr have not been explored. Our objective was to evaluate responses to CrPr (KemTRACE chromium propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries Inc., Des Moines, IA) and rumen-protected Lys (LysiPEARL, Kemin Industries Inc.) and Met (MetiPEARL, Kemin Industries Inc.) and their interaction in peak-lactation cows. Forty-eight individually fed Holstein cows (21 primiparous, 27 multiparous, 38 ± 15 d in milk) were stratified by calving date in 12 blocks and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments within block. Treatments were control, CrPr (8 mg/d of Cr), RPLM (10 g/d of Lys and 5 g/d of Met, intestinally available), or CrPr plus RPLM. Treatments were premixed with ground corn and top-dressed at 200 g/d for 35 d. Diets consisted of corn silage, alfalfa hay, and concentrates, providing approximately 17% crude protein, 31% neutral detergent fiber, and 40% nonfiber carbohydrates. Dry matter intake (DMI) significantly increased with the inclusion of CrPr (22.2 vs. 20.8 ± 0.67 kg/d), and energy-corrected milk (ECM) yield tended to increase. In addition, CrPr increased milk protein yield and tended to increase DMI in primiparous cows but not in multiparous cows. A CrPr×week interaction was detected for milk lactose content, which was increased by CrPr during wk 1 only (4.99 vs. 4.88 ± 0.036%). As a proportion of plasma AA, lysine increased and methionine tended to increase in response to RPLM, but the inclusion of RPLM decreased N efficiency (milk protein N:N intake). Digestible energy intake, gross energy digestibility, and energy balance were not affected by treatments. We observed no treatment effects on feed efficiency or changes in body weight or body condition score. In summary, feeding CrPr increased DMI and tended to increase ECM in cows fed for 5 wk near peak

  11. Assessment of specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the head from a TETRA handset.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, Peter; Khalid, Mohammed; Mann, Simon

    2003-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) from a representative TETRA handset have been performed in an anatomically realistic model of the head. TETRA (Terrestrial Trunked Radio) is a modern digital private mobile radio system designed to meet the requirements of professional users, such as the police and fire brigade. The current frequency allocations in the UK are 380-385 MHz and 390-395 MHz for the public sector network. A comprehensive set of calculations of SAR in the head was performed for positions of the handset in front of the face and at both sides of the head. The representative TETRA handset considered. operating at 1 W in normal use, will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a monopole antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a helical antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with the ICNIRP occupational exposure restriction but will be over the public exposure restriction by up to approximately 50% if kept in the position of maximum SAR for 6 min continuously. PMID:14703166

  12. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  13. Absorption dips at low X-ray energies in Cygnus X-1. [observed with Copernicus satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murdin, P. G.

    1976-01-01

    Absorbing material in Cygnus X-1 jitters near the line joining the two stars, out of the orbital plane is described. Three looks with the Copernicus satellite at Cygnus X-1 have produced four examples of absorption dips (decreases in the 2 to 7 keV flux from Cygnus X-1 with an increase of spectral hardness consistent with photoelectric absorption).

  14. Failure of Energy Transfer between Identical Aromatic Molecules on Excitation at the Long Wave Edge of the Absorption Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Gregorio; Shinitzky, Meir

    1970-01-01

    Electronic energy transfer among identical molecules has been followed by the depolarization of the fluorescence in concentrated solutions as well as in dimers, polymers, and micelle systems. In the many aromatic fluorophores examined, unlike a few nonaromatic ones, transfer is much decreased or altogether undetectable on excitation at the red edge of the absorption spectrum. The phenomenon is not due to the transfer taking place during a small fraction of the total fluorescence lifetime, nor is it explainable by a decrease in overlap of absorption and emission upon edge excitation. PMID:16591825

  15. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Liu, Guanghui; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Xianyi

    2015-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells are theoretically investigated within analytical wave functions and numerical quantized energy levels. Our results show that the inner radius, the outer radius and the cut-off angle of spherical dome shells have great influences on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the total optical absorption coefficients. It is found that with the increase of the inner radius and the outer radius, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients exhibit a blueshift and a redshift, respectively. However, with the increase of the cut-off angle, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients do not shift. Besides, the resonant peaks of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients climb up and then decrease with increasing the cut-off angle. The influences of the incident optical intensity on the total optical absorption coefficients are studied. It is found that the bleaching effect occurs at higher incident optical intensity.

  16. Cyanine dyes with high absorption cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer primers

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Su-Chung; Ju, Jingyue; Mathies, R.A.; Glazer, A.N.

    1996-12-01

    Energy transfer (ET) fluorescent primers are significantly superior to single dye-labeled primers for DNA sequencing and multiplex genetic analyses. We describe here ET primers in which a donor chromophore with a large absorption cross section but a low fluorescence quantum yield is exploited to increase the Stokes-shifted fluorescence emission of acceptor dyes. The new ET primers have 3-({var_epsilon}-carboxy-pentyl)-3{prime}-ethyl-5,5{prime}-dimethyloxacarbocyanine (CYA; {var_epsilon}{sub M}{sup 488 nm} 142,000 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}) at the 5{prime}-end as a common energy donor, and fluorescein or rhodamine derivatives (FAM, R6G, TAMRA, and ROX), attached to a modified thymidine 10 bases away within the primer sequence, as acceptors. With 488-nm excitation, the fluorescence emission intensity of these four ET primers is 1.4- to 24-fold stronger than that of the corresponding primers labeled only with the single acceptor dye. When compared with the corresponding ET primers with a fluorescein derivative (FAM; {var_epsilon}{sub M}{sup 488 nm} 60,000 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}) as donor, the fluorescence emissions of primers with CYA as donor and FAM, R6G, TAMRA, and ROX as acceptors are respectively 0.8-, 1.0-, 1.7-, and 1.7-fold as intense. The low fluorescence quantum yield of the CYA donor resulted in distinct fluorescence signals for the DNA-sequencing fragments with much lower crosstalk between the four detection channels than that seen with ET primers based on a FAM donor. With single-stranded M13mp18 DNA as the template, the CYA ET primers provided DNA sequences on a four-color capillary sequencer with 100% accuracy in the first 500 bases. 15 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  18. Broadband absorption enhancement in organic solar cells with an antenna layer through surface-plasmon mediated energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yu; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qi-Dai; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrated a strategy to realize broadband enhanced absorption in the top-incident inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) by employing an external antenna layer on top of the periodic corrugated metallic anode. Surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are excited on the opposite interfaces of the periodic corrugated metallic anode, which mediate the energy transfer from the antenna layer to the active layer through the anode. The absorption of the OSCs is significantly broadened and enhanced by tuning the SPP resonance to coincide with both the emission of the antenna and the absorption of the active material. The power conversion efficiency exhibits an enhancement of 16% compared to that of the OSCs without the antenna layer.

  19. Chemical Analysis of Reaction Rims on Olivine Crystals in Natural Samples of Black Dacite Using Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, Lassen Peak, CA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Lassen Volcanic Center is the southernmost volcanic region in the Cascade volcanic arc formed by the Cascadia Subduction Zone. Lassen Peak last erupted in 1915 in an arc related event producing a black dacite material containing xenocrystic olivine grains with apparent orthopyroxene reaction rims. The reaction rims on these olivine grains are believed to have formed by reactions that ensued from a mixing/mingling event that occurred prior to eruption between the admixed mafic andesitic magma and a silicic dacite host material. Natural samples of the 1915 black dacite from Lassen Peak, CA were prepared into 15 polished thin sections and carbon coated for analysis using a FEI Quanta 250 Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to identify and measure mineral textures and disequilibrium reaction rims. Observed mineralogical textures related to magma mixing include biotite and amphibole grains with apparent dehydration/breakdown rims, pyroxene-rimmed quartz grains, high concentration of microlites in glass matrix, and pyroxene/amphibole reaction rims on olivine grains. Olivine dissolution is evidenced as increased iron concentration toward convolute edges of olivine grains as observed by Backscatter Electron (BSE) imagery and elemental mapping using NSS spectral imaging software. In an attempt to quantify the area of reaction rim growth on olivine grains within these samples, high-resolution BSE images of 30 different olivine grains were collected along with Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of different phases. Olivine cores and rims were extracted from BSE images using Photoshop and saved as separate image files. ImageJ software was used to calculate the area (μm2) of the core and rim of these grains. Average pyroxene reaction rim width for 30 grains was determined to be 11.68+/-1.65 μm. Rim widths of all 30 grains were averaged together to produce an overall average rim width for the Lassen Peak black dacite. By quantifying the reaction rims on olivine grains

  20. On the uncertainties of photon mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreo, Pedro; Burns, David T.; Salvat, Francesc

    2012-04-01

    A systematic analysis of the available data has been carried out for mass energy-absorption coefficients and their ratios for air, graphite and water for photon energies between 1 keV and 2 MeV, using representative kilovoltage x-ray spectra for mammography and diagnostic radiology below 100 kV, and for 192Ir and 60Co gamma-ray spectra. The aim of this work was to establish ‘an envelope of uncertainty’ based on the spread of the available data. Type A uncertainties were determined from the results of Monte Carlo (MC) calculations with the PENELOPE and EGSnrc systems, yielding mean values for µen/ρ with a given statistical standard uncertainty. Type B estimates were based on two groupings. The first grouping consisted of MC calculations based on a similar implementation but using different data and/or approximations. The second grouping was formed by various datasets, obtained by different authors or methods using the same or different basic data, and with different implementations (analytical, MC-based, or a combination of the two); these datasets were the compilations of NIST, Hubbell, Johns-Cunningham, Attix and Higgins, plus MC calculations with PENELOPE and EGSnrc. The combined standard uncertainty, uc, for the µen/ρ values for the mammography x-ray spectra is 2.5%, decreasing gradually to 1.6% for kilovoltage x-ray spectra up to 100 kV. For 60Co and 192Ir, uc is approximately 0.1%. The Type B uncertainty analysis for the ratios of µen/ρ values includes four methods of analysis and concludes that for the present data the assumption that the data interval represents 95% confidence limits is a good compromise. For the mammography x-ray spectra, the combined standard uncertainties of (µen/ρ)graphite,air and (µen/ρ)graphite,water are 1.5%, and 0.5% for (µen/ρ)water,air, decreasing gradually down to uc = 0.1% for the three µen/ρ ratios for the gamma-ray spectra. The present estimates are shown to coincide well with those of Hubbell (1977 Rad. Res

  1. Monitoring peak power and cooling energy savings of shade trees and white surfaces in the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) service area: Project design and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Bretz, S.; Hanford, J.; Rosenfeld, A.; Sailor, D.; Taha, H.; Bos, W.

    1992-12-01

    Urban areas in warm climates create summer heat islands of daily average intensity of 3--5{degrees}C, adding to discomfort and increasing air-conditioning loads. Two important factors contributing to urban heat islands are reductions in albedo (lower overall city reflectance) and loss of vegetation (less evapotranspiration). Reducing summer heat islands by planting vegetation (shade trees) and increasing surface albedos, saves cooling energy, allows down-sizing of air conditioners, lowers air-conditioning peak demand, and reduces the emission of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from electric power plants. The focus of this multi-year project, jointly sponsored by SMUD and the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE), was to measure the direct cooling effects of trees and white surfaces (mainly roofs) in a few buildings in Sacramento. The first-year project was to design the experiment and obtain base case data. We also obtained limited post retrofit data for some sites. This report provides an overview of the project activities during the first year at six sites. The measurement period for some of the sites was limited to September and October, which are transitional cooling months in Sacramento and hence the interpretation of results only apply to this period. In one house, recoating the dark roof with a high-albedo coating rendered air conditioning unnecessary for the month of September (possible savings of up to 10 kWh per day and 2 kW of non-coincidental peak power). Savings of 50% relative to an identical base case bungalow were achieved when a school bungalow`s roof and southeast wall were coated with a high-albedo coating during the same period. Our measured data for the vegetation sites do not indicate conclusive results because shade trees were small and the cooling period was almost over. We need to collect more data over a longer cooling season in order to demonstrate savings conclusively.

  2. Investigation of a Peak-Like Feature Observed in the Triton Energy Spectra from the 152,154 Sm(p,t) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humby, P.; Wilson, E.; Beausang, C. W.; Simon, A.; Gell, K.; Tarlow, T.; Vyas, G.; Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Koglin, J.; Ota, S.; Allmond, J. M.; McCleskey, M.; McCleskey, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Chyzh, R.; Dag, M.

    2015-04-01

    Isotopically enriched 152,154 Sm targets were bombarded with 25 MeV protons from the K-150 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University. The outgoing charged particles and γ rays were detected using the STARLiTeR array, which consists of a highly segmented ΔE-E silicon telescope and six BGO shielded HPGe clover detectors. A peak-like feature was observed in the triton energy spectra from the 152,154 Sm(p,t) reactions at excitation energies of approximately 3 MeV for the 152 Sm(p,t) reaction and 2.2 MeV for the 154 Sm(p,t) reaction. Discrete states with cross sections as large as approximately 9% of the ground state cross section were identified in this feature using particle- γ and particle- γ- γ coincidences. The range of spins populated appears to be unusually large. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy No. DE-FG02-05ER41379, DE-FG52-09NA29467 and DE-NA0001801, the National Science Foundation under PHY-130581, and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Using aeroelastic structures with nonlinear switching electronics to increase potential energy yield in airflow: investigating analog control circuitry for automated peak detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalca, Alexander G.; Drosinos, Jonathan G.; Grayson, Malika; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2015-03-01

    Bending piezoelectric transducers have the ability to harvest energy from aeroelastic vibrations induced by the ambient airflow. Such harvesters can have useful applications in the operation of low power devices, and their relatively small size makes them ideal for use in urban environments over civil infrastructure. One of the areas of focus regarding piezoelectric energy harvesting is the circuit topology used to store the harvested power. This study aims to further investigate the increase in potential energy yield from the piezoelectric harvester by optimizing the circuitry connecting the piezoelectric transducer and the power storage interface. When compared to an optimal resistive load case, it has been shown that certain circuit topologies, specifically synchronized switching and discharging to a storage capacitor through an inductor (SSDCI), can increase the charging power by as much as 400% if the circuit is completely lossless. This paper proposes a strategy for making a self-sufficient SSDCI circuit capable of peak detection for the synchronized switching using analog components. Using circuit simulation software, the performance of this proposed self-sufficient circuit is compared to an ideal case, and the effectiveness of the self-sufficient circuit strategy is discussed based on these simulation results. Further investigation of a physical working model of the new circuit proposal will be developed and experimental results of the circuit's performance obtained and compared to the estimated performance from the model.

  4. Simulations about self-absorption of tritium in titanium tritide and the energy deposition in a silicon Schottky barrier diode.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Yebing; Hu, Rui; Yang, Yuqing; Wang, Guanquan; Zhong, Zhengkun; Luo, Shunzhong

    2012-11-01

    Simulations on the self-absorption of tritium electrons in titanium tritide films and the energy deposition in a silicon Schottky barrier diode are carried out using the Geant4 radiation transport toolkit. Energy consumed in each part of the Schottky radiovoltaic battery is simulated to give a clue about how to make the battery work better. The power and energy-conversion efficiency of the tritium silicon Schottky radiovoltaic battery in an optimized design are simulated. Good consistency with experiments is obtained. PMID:22935439

  5. The Impacts of Different Expansion Modes on Performance of Small Solar Energy Firms: Perspectives of Absorptive Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsing Hung; Shen, Tao; Xu, Xin-long; Ma, Chao

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of firm's expansion by differentiated products and diversified products are quite different. However, the study employing absorptive capacity to examine the impacts of different modes of expansion on performance of small solar energy firms has never been discussed before. Then, a conceptual model to analyze the tension between strategies and corporate performance is proposed to filling the vacancy. After practical investigation, the results show that stronger organizational institutions help small solar energy firms expanded by differentiated products increase consistency between strategies and corporate performance; oppositely, stronger working attitudes with weak management controls help small solar energy firms expanded by diversified products reduce variance between strategies and corporate performance. PMID:24453837

  6. On collisional energy transfer in recombination and dissociation reactions: A Wiener-Hopf problem and the effect of a near elastic peak.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhaoyan; Marcus, R A

    2008-12-01

    The effect of the large impact parameter near-elastic peak of collisional energy transfer for unimolecular dissociation/bimolecular recombination reactions is studied. To this end, the conventional single exponential model, a biexponential model that fits the literature classical trajectory data better, a model with a singularity at zero energy transfer, and the most realistic model, a model with a near-singularity, are fitted to the trajectory data in the literature. The typical effect of the energy transfer on the recombination rate constant is maximal at low pressures and this region is the one studied here. The distribution function for the limiting dissociation rate constant k(0) at low pressures is shown to obey a Wiener-Hopf integral equation and is solved analytically for the first two models and perturbatively for the other two. For the single exponential model, this method yields the trial solution of Troe. The results are applied to the dissociation of O(3) in the presence of argon, for which classical mechanical trajectory data are available. The k(0)'s for various models are calculated and compared, the value for the near-singularity model being about ten times larger than that for the first two models. This trend reflects the contribution to the cross section from collisions with larger impact parameter. In the present study of the near-singularity model, it is found that k(0) is not sensitive to reasonable values for the lower bound. Energy transfer values DeltaE's are also calculated and compared and can be similarly understood. However, unlike the k(0) values, they are sensitive to the lower bound, and so any comparison of a classical trajectory analysis for DeltaE's with the kinetic experimental data needs particular care. PMID:19063543

  7. Energy absorption of free rare gas clusters irradiated by intense VUV pulses of a free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, J.; Wabnitz, H.; Laarmann, T.; Gürtler, P.; Laasch, W.; Swiderski, A.; Möller, Th.; de Castro, A. R. B.

    2003-07-01

    As one of the first experiments at the free electron laser of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) the Coulomb explosion of Xenon clusters irradiated with high intensity pulses at a wavelength of 98 nm has been observed. Classical trajectory calculations have been performed in order to illuminate the energy absorption process. Comparison with typical parameters in the infrared regime shows that above barrier ionization is suppressed due to the fast oscillating field and thermionic ionization prevails.

  8. Solar investigation at Terskol Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlov-Vasiljev, K. A.; Vasiljeva, I. E.

    2003-04-01

    During 1980--1990 regular observations of the solar disk spectrum and active solar structures were carried out with SEF-1 and ATsU-26 telescopes at Terskol Peak in the framework of the program ``Energy distribution in the solar spectrum in absolute energy units''. In order to refine the fine structure of telluric lines, observations with ATsU-26 telescope were carried out in parallel. This telescope was also used for the investigation of the solar active structures. In this paper the observational technique is described. The obtained results and energy distribution in the solar disk center in absolute energy units are presented.

  9. Effect of particle size on activation energy and peak temperature of the thermoluminescence glow curve of undoped ZnS nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chandra, B P; Chandrakar, Raju Kumar; Chandra, V K; Baghel, R N

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports the effect of particle size on the thermoluminescence (TL) of undoped ZnS nanoparticles. ZnS nanoparticles were prepared using a chemical precipitation method in which mercaptoethanol was used as the capping agent. The nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission gun-scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. When the concentrations of mercaptoethanol used are 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.025, 0.040 and 0.060 M, the sizes of the nanoparticles are 2.86, 2.81, 2.69, 2.40, 2.10, 1.90 and 1.80 nm, respectively. Initially, the TL intensity of UV-irradiated ZnS nanoparticles increases with temperature, attains a peak value Im for a particular temperature Tm, and then decreases with further increases in temperature. The values of both Im and Tm increase with decreasing nanoparticle size. Whereas the activation energy decreases slightly with decreasing nanoparticle size, the frequency factor decreases significantly as the nanoparticle size is reduced. The order of kinetics for the TL glow curve of ZnS nanoparticles is 2. Expressions are derived for the dependence of activation energy (Ea) and Tm on nanoparticle size, and good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical results. PMID:26332287

  10. Energy absorption, lean body mass, and total body fat changes during 5 weeks of continuous bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krebs, Jean M.; Evans, Harlan; Kuo, Mike C.; Schneider, Victor S.; Leblanc, Adrian D.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the body composition changes due to inactivity was examined together with the question of whether these changes are secondary to changes in energy absorption. Volunteers were 15 healthy males who lived on a metabolic research ward under close staff supervision for 11 weeks. Subjects were ambulatory during the first six weeks and remained in continuous bed rest for the last five weeks of the study. Six male volunteers (age 24-61 years) were selected for body composition measurements. Nine different male volunteers (age 21-50 years) were selected for energy absorption measurements. The volunteers were fed weighed conventional foods on a constant 7-d rotation menu. The average daily caloric content was 2,592 kcal. Comparing the five weeks of continuous bed rest with the previous six weeks of ambulation, it was observed that there was no change in energy absorption or total body weight during bed rest, but a significant decrease in lean body mass and a significant increase in total body fat (p less than 0.05).

  11. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  12. Core-hole effects on theoretical electron-energy-loss near-edge structure and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of MgO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Tanaka, Isao; Yoshiya, Masato; Oba, Fumiyasu; Ogasawara, Kazuyoshi; Adachi, Hirohiko

    2000-01-01

    First-principles molecular orbital calculations using model clusters are made in order to reproduce and interpret experimental electron-energy-loss near-edge structure and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure of MgO at Mg K, L2,3 and O K edges. Ground-state calculations using a model cluster composed of 125 atoms and by a band-structure method are in good agreement, but they do not reproduce the experimental spectra satisfactory. They are well reproduced only by the cluster calculations for the Slater transition state, where a half-electron is removed from a core orbital and placed into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The core-hole effect is therefore essential for theoretical reproduction of the spectral shapes. A large supercell is required to reproduce the experimental spectra when one uses a band-structure method. The origin of peaks appearing in the experimental spectra is interpreted in terms of orbital interactions using overlap-population diagrams. Some features of the spectra at different edges are pointed out to have common origins. Experimental spectra are aligned accordingly. The transition energies and qualitative features of experimental spectra are found to be reproduced even using a smaller cluster composed of 27 atoms, although some of fine structure is missing.

  13. LiCl dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, S.M.

    1980-06-03

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system. 4 figs.

  14. An improved absorption generator for solar-thermal powered heat pumps. Part 2: Energy and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.

    1997-12-31

    Solar heated absorption chiller installations have been very expensive for their rating. To enhance collector thermal efficiency the liquid flowing within the collectors must be kept as cool as possible. However, there is also a need to operate the absorption reported earlier. The compromise usually results in poor collector efficiency as well as a relatively poor specific chiller effect. The proposed vortex generator permits a heat pump to operate efficiently with relatively low temperature solar heated fluid (70--80 C). As a result, the collectors are cooler and more efficient. As noted in Part 1, the specific heat pumping capacity is about 27% greater than conventional systems operating at the same reduced generator temperatures. Therefore, a smaller, less expensive chiller is required. The reduced investment in solar arrays and absorption chillers is estimated along with a range of paybacks.

  15. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOEpatents

    Ko, Suk M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  16. Efficient Vacuum-Deposited Ternary Organic Solar Cells with Broad Absorption, Energy Transfer, and Enhanced Hole Mobility.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyun-Sub; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Jihun; Wang, Chun-Kai; Sim, Bomi; Lin, Francis; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Seo, Yongsok; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-01-20

    The use of multiple donors in an active layer is an effective way to boost the efficiency of organic solar cells by broadening their absorption window. Here, we report an efficient vacuum-deposited ternary organic photovoltaic (OPV) using two donors, 2-((2-(5-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophen-2-yl)thiazol-5-yl)methylene)malononitrile (DTTz) for visible absorption and 2-((7-(5-(dip-tolylamino)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c]-[1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)methylene)malononitrile (DTDCTB) for near-infrared absorption, codeposited with C70 in the ternary layer. The ternary device achieved a power conversion efficiency of 8.02%, which is 23% higher than that of binary OPVs. This enhancement is the result of incorporating two donors with complementary absorption covering wavelengths of 350 to 900 nm with higher hole mobility in the ternary layer than that of binary layers consisting of one donor and C70, combined with energy transfer from the donor with lower hole mobility (DTTz) to that with higher mobility (DTDCTB). This structure fulfills all the requirements for efficient ternary OPVs. PMID:26714649

  17. Attosecond transient absorption of argon atoms in the vacuum ultraviolet region: line energy shifts versus coherent population transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Using attosecond transient absorption, the dipole response of an argon atom in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region is studied when an external electromagnetic field is present. An isolated attosecond VUV pulse populates Rydberg states lying 15 eV above the argon ground state. A synchronized few-cycle near infrared (NIR) pulse modifies the oscillating dipoles of argon impulsively, leading to alterations in the VUV absorption spectra. As the NIR pulse is delayed with respect to the VUV pulse, multiple features in the absorption profile emerge simultaneously including line broadening, sideband structure, sub-cycle fast modulations, and 5-10 fs slow modulations. These features indicate the coexistence of two general processes of the light-matter interaction: the energy shift of individual atomic levels and coherent population transfer between atomic eigenstates, revealing coherent superpositions. An intuitive formula is derived to treat both effects in a unifying framework, allowing one to identify and quantify the two processes in a single absorption spectrogram.

  18. Analysis of some lunar soil and rocks samples in terms of photon interaction and photon energy absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Khayatt, A. M.; Al-Rajhi, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Understanding the space radiation environment is critical to future manned lunar missions, and this includes photons. In this paper, the attenuation properties of gamma rays in 20 lunar soil and rocks, found at landing site during the Apollo 17, are investigated. Effective atomic numbers Zeff for photon interaction and photon energy absorption for a wide range of photon energies are determined. The results indicate that within the wide compositional range of the Apollo 17 samples, three categories, each one have broadly similar attenuation properties. As well as the results showed that the Zeff has been successfully characterize and correlate the different soil samples with mixing of prevalent local rocks.

  19. Enhancing energy absorption in quantum dot solar cells via periodic light-trapping microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher Wayne; Fu, Yulan; Lopez, Rene

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells prove to be promising devices for optoelectronic applications due to their tunable absorption range, deep infrared absorption capabilities, and straightforward processability. However, there remains a need to further enhance their device performance—particularly when one has to adhere to strict physical limitations on their physical structure. Here we present a three-dimensional numerical model of CQD solar cells in COMSOL Multiphysics based on the finite element method. With this model we have simulated the optical characteristics of several CQD solar cells across varying photonic structures and physical parameters to investigate how distinct photonic structures may enhance the light absorption and current output of CQD solar cells using identical physical parameters. Of the many cells simulated, one notable model increased the predicted current in the active layer PbS by 69.33% as compared to a flat solar cell with identical physical parameters, and produced a current of 24.18 mA cm‑2 by implementing a cross-shaped photonic structure built on top of a flat substrate of glass and ITO. This cross-shaped model serves as a key example of how unique photonic structures can be implemented to further enhance light absorption.

  20. Direction dependence of the magneto-optical absorption in nanowires with Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    We study the directional dependence of the absorption spectrum of ballistic nanowires in the presence of gate-controlled Rashba spin-orbit interaction and an in-plane magnetic field. In the weak Rashba regime, our analytical and numerical results show that the absorption peaks associated with the first and third intersubband transitions exhibit frequency shifts and strong amplitude modulations as the direction of the magnetic field changes. If the field is parallel to the nanowire axis, these peaks disappear and the resonance frequencies of the whole absorption spectrum are given merely in terms of the Zeeman splitting and the energy scale characterizing the confinement potential. The second transition has an absorption peak that suffers an opposite frequency shift with amplitude that is largely direction independent. The amplitude modulation and frequency shift of the absorption spectrum is periodic in the angle that the magnetic field makes with the nanowire axis.

  1. Triplet exciton energy transfer in polyfluorene doped with heavy metal complexes studied using photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, H. H.; Meng, H. F.; Horng, S. F.; Lee, W. S.; Yang, J. M.; Liu, C. C.; Shy, J. T.; Chen, F. C.; Hsu, C. S.

    2006-12-01

    Modulated photoinduced absorption and photoluminescence are used to study triplet-to-triplet Dexter energy transfer in Ir-complexes/polyfluorene blend systems. There is no Dexter energy transfer for red iridium (III)bis[2-(9,9-dibutylfluorenyl)-1-isoquinoline(acetylacetonate)] (DFIr) and red iridium (III) bis([2-(2-benzo-thienyl)pyridinatoN,C3] acetyl-acetonate) (BtpIr) dopants. Although green iridium(III)tris[2-(4-tolyl)pyridinato-N,C2] [Ir(mppy)3] has no triplet confinement in polyfluorene host, it has clear evidence for Dexter energy transfer. Aggregation and dopant lifetime are shown to significantly affect the energy transfer. The presence of Dexter transfer implies the possibility to harvest triplet excitons of polyfluorene in polymer light-emitting diodes even without carrier trapping and triplet exciton confinement.

  2. Soliton Formation and Superluminality Effect due to Nonlinear Absorption of Femtosecond Laser Pulse Energy by the Medium Containing Nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate a femtosecond pulse propagation in a medium, containing nanorods, with taking into account the dependence of multi-photon absorption from the aspect ratio of nanorods. Nanorods melting due to the laser energy absorption leads to the non-stationary interaction of laser pulse with the medium and time-dependent nanorod aspect ratio changing. Under certain conditions, we found out the soliton-like mode of a laser pulse propagation and the superluminality effect: acceleration of light (fast light) in comparison with light propagation in a linear medium. We discuss a physical mechanism of superluminality effect for considering laser pulse propagation. Using spatio-temporal analogy, one can see the similarity between the pulse centre evolution along longitudinal coordinate and the beam centre evolution under the infrared optical radiation propagation in a cloud, or fog, which moves across the beam, with taking into account its thermal blooming.

  3. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  4. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  5. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    SciTech Connect

    Hasan, Mohammad; Ghatak, Ananya; Mandal, Bhabani Prasad

    2014-05-15

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  6. Influence of resin system on the energy absorption capability and morphological properties of plain woven kenaf composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, S. D.; Leman, Z.; Sultan, M. T. H.; Ishak, M. R.; Cardona, F.

    2015-12-01

    Due to both environmental and technical advantages, natural fibers are being used as reinforcement of polymeric composite in many industries. The flexibility of the most natural fibers is one of the important technical characteristic which allows them to resist impact forces. An investigation was carried out to compare the energy absorption capability of kenaf/PVB film and kenaf/epoxy composites. The hot and cold press techniques were used to fabricate the specimens with 35% kenaf fibre weight fraction. The charpy impact test was performed on forty notched specimens using a pendulum impact tester with different hammer energy. The results showed that the kenaf/PVB film composite has the highest energy absorption, strength and toughness compared with the epoxy composite. At high energy levels, the impact strength and toughness of the kenaf/PVB film was six times of kenaf/epoxy composite. In addition, the scanning electron microscopy was assessed to demonstrate the different failure in fracture surfaces. It was found that the kenaf/PVB film composite failed by fibre fracture while kenaf/epoxy composite failed by a combination of fibre pull-out and fibre fracture as well as crack propagations through the matrix.

  7. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Moix, Jeremy M.; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters.

  8. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  9. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. III. Exact stochastic path integral evaluation.

    PubMed

    Moix, Jeremy M; Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-01

    A numerically exact path integral treatment of the absorption and emission spectra of open quantum systems is presented that requires only the straightforward solution of a stochastic differential equation. The approach converges rapidly enabling the calculation of spectra of large excitonic systems across the complete range of system parameters and for arbitrary bath spectral densities. With the numerically exact absorption and emission operators, one can also immediately compute energy transfer rates using the multi-chromophoric Förster resonant energy transfer formalism. Benchmark calculations on the emission spectra of two level systems are presented demonstrating the efficacy of the stochastic approach. This is followed by calculations of the energy transfer rates between two weakly coupled dimer systems as a function of temperature and system-bath coupling strength. It is shown that the recently developed hybrid cumulant expansion (see Paper II) is the only perturbative method capable of generating uniformly reliable energy transfer rates and emission spectra across a broad range of system parameters. PMID:25747062

  10. a Search for Peak Structures in the Positron-Electron Sum-Energy Spectra for the URANIUM-238 + TANTALUM-181 System at 6.3, 6.1, and 5.95 Mev/u.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, P. A. Aloy

    1995-01-01

    The discovery of unexpected sharp peak structures in the positron energy spectra, and also in the positron -electron sum energy spectra, in the heavy-ion collision experiments carried out at GSI, Germany has initiated a great amount of experimental and theoretical interest. There is no fully consistent explanation for the origin of these peaks. APEX--the ATLAS Positron experiment--has been designed to gain insight into this puzzling positron-line phenomenon. With the data from the APEX spectrometer a search for peak structures in the positron-electron sum energy spectra was carried out for the ^{238}U+ ^{181}Ta system at 6.3, 6.1 and 5.95 MeV/u. The possibility of revealing the previously reported peak structures in positron-electron sum-energy spectra by applying cuts on the distance of closest approach, the difference-energy between positron and electron, the positron-electron opening angle, and the positron emission angle relative to the beam direction was investigated. No statistically significant peaks were observed in the APEX data.

  11. Investigation of Absorption Cooling Application Powered by Solar Energy in the South Coast Region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, O.; Aksoy, M. H.; Ozgoren, M.; Solmaz, O.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, an absorption system using ammonia-water (NH3-H2O) solution has been theoretically examined in order to meet the cooling need of a detached building having 150 m2 floor area for Antalya, Mersin and Mugla provinces in Turkey. Hourly dynamic cooling load capacities of the building were determined by using Radiant Time Series (RTS) method in the chosen cities. For the analysis, hourly average meteorological data such as atmospheric air temperature and solar radiation belonging to the years 1998-2008 are used for performance prediction of the proposed system. Thermodynamic relations for each component of absorption cooling system is explained and coefficients of performance of the system are calculated. The maximum daily total radiation data were calculated as 7173 W/m2day on July 15, 7277 W/m2 day on July 19 and 7231 W/m2day on July 19 for Mersin, Antalya and Mugla, respectively on the 23° toward to south oriented panels from horizontal surface. The generator operating temperatures are considered between 90-130°C and the best result for 110°C is found the optimum degree for maximum coefficient of performance (COP) values at the highest solar radiation occurred time during the considered days for each province. The COP values varies between 0.521 and 0.530 for the provinces. In addition, absorber and condenser capacities and thermal efficiency for the absorption cooling system were calculated. The necessary evacuated tube collector area for the different provinces were found in the range of 45 m2 to 47 m2. It is shown that although the initial investment cost is higher for the proposed absorption cooling system, it is economically feasible because of its lower annual operation costs and can successfully be operated for the considered provinces.

  12. Role of the muscle belly and tendon of soleus, gastrocnemius, and plantaris in mechanical energy absorption and generation during cat locomotion.

    PubMed

    Prilutsky, B I; Herzog, W; Leonard, T R; Allinger, T L

    1996-04-01

    negative and peak positive velocities as well as peak powers of the muscle-tendon complexes of SO, GA, and PL were typically higher than those of the muscle bellies. Positive work done by the muscle-tendon complexes exceeded the positive work done by the muscle bellies. GA and PL tendons stored more mechanical energy than the SO tendon. The contributions of the elastic energy stored in the tendons to the positive work done by the muscle-tendon complexes decreased with increasing speeds of locomotion for two of the three cats studied and did not change for the third one. These contributions equaled 50-21%, 30-14%, and 25-18% for the three cats, respectively. The results of this study suggest that energy absorption and release by the tendons of cat SO, GA, and PL make up a substantial part of the total energy absorbed and generated by the corresponding muscle-tendon complexes. PMID:8964771

  13. Enhanced Solar Energy Absorption by Internally-mixed Black Carbon in Snow Grains

    SciTech Connect

    Flanner, M. G.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhou, Cheng; Penner, Joyce E.; Jiao, C.

    2012-05-30

    Here we explore light absorption by snowpack containing black carbon (BC) particles residing within ice grains. Basic considerations of particle volumes and BC/snow mass concentrations show that there are generally 0:05-109 BC particles for each ice grain. This suggests that internal BC is likely distributed as multiple inclusions within ice grains, and thus the dynamic effective medium approximation (DEMA) (Chylek and Srivastava, 1983) is a more appropriate optical representation for BC/ice composites than coated-sphere or standard mixing approximations. DEMA calculations show that the 460 nm absorption cross-section of BC/ice composites, normalized to the mass of BC, is typically enhanced by factors of 1.8-2.1 relative to interstitial BC. BC effective radius is the dominant cause of variation in this enhancement, compared with ice grain size and BC volume fraction. We apply two atmospheric aerosol models that simulate interstitial and within-hydrometeor BC lifecycles. Although only {approx}2% of the atmospheric BC burden is cloud-borne, 71-83% of the BC deposited to global snow and sea-ice surfaces occurs within hydrometeors. Key processes responsible for within-snow BC deposition are development of hydrophilic coatings on BC, activation of liquid droplets, and subsequent snow formation through riming or ice nucleation by other species and aggregation/accretion of ice particles. Applying deposition fields from these aerosol models in offline snow and sea-ice simulations, we calculate that 32-73% of BC in global surface snow resides within ice grains. This fraction is smaller than the within-hydrometeor deposition fraction because meltwater flux preferentially removes internal BC, while sublimation and freezing within snowpack expose internal BC. Incorporating the DEMA into a global climate model, we simulate increases in BC/snow radiative forcing of 43-86%, relative to scenarios that apply external optical properties to all BC. We show that snow metamorphism

  14. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  15. Energy transfer among CP29 chlorophylls: calculated Förster rates and experimental transient absorption at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Cinque, G; Croce, R; Holzwarth, A; Bassi, R

    2000-10-01

    The energy transfer rates between chlorophylls in the light harvesting complex CP29 of higher plants at room temperature were calculated ab initio according to the Förster mechanism (Förster T. 1948, Ann. Physik. 2:55-67). Recently, the transition moment orientation of CP29 chlorophylls was determined by differential linear dichroism and absorption spectroscopy of wild-type versus mutant proteins in which single chromophores were missing (Simonetto R., Crimi M., Sandonà D., Croce R., Cinque G., Breton J., and Bassi R. 1999. Biochemistry. 38:12974-12983). In this way the Q(y) transition energy and chlorophyll a/b affinity of each binding site was obtained and their characteristics supported by reconstruction of steady-state linear dichroism and absorption spectra at room temperature. In this study, the spectral form of individual chlorophyll a and b ligands within the protein environment was experimentally determined, and their extinction coefficients were also used to evaluate the absolute overlap integral between donors and acceptors employing the Stepanov relation for both the emission spectrum and the Stokes shift. This information was used to calculate the time-dependent excitation redistribution among CP29 chlorophylls on solving numerically the Pauli master equation of the complex: transient absorption measurements in the (sub)picosecond time scale were simulated and compared to pump-and-probe experimental data in the Q(y) region on the native CP29 at room temperature upon selective excitation of chlorophylls b at 640 or 650 nm. The kinetic model indicates a bidirectional excitation transfer over all CP29 chlorophylls a species, which is particularly rapid between the pure sites A1-A2 and A4-A5. Chlorophylls b in mixed sites act mostly as energy donors for chlorophylls a, whereas site B5 shows high and bidirectional coupling independent of the pigment hosted. PMID:11023879

  16. SYNCHROTRON POLARIZATION AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION SPECTRA FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION WITH FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S. E-mail: souichaoui@usthb.dz

    2011-12-10

    We have derived asymptotic forms for the degree of polarization of the optically thin synchrotron and for synchrotron self-absorption (SSA) spectra assuming a power-law particle distribution of the form N({gamma}) {approx} {gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1} < {gamma} < {gamma}{sub 2}, especially for a finite high-energy limit, {gamma}{sub 2}, in the case of an arbitrary pitch angle. The new results inferred concern more especially the high-frequency range x >> {eta}{sup 2} with parameter {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1}. The calculated SSA spectra concern instantaneous photon emission where cooling effects are not considered. They have been obtained by also ignoring likely effects such as Comptonization, pair creation and annihilation, as well as magnetic photon splitting. To that aim, in addition to the two usual absorption frequencies, a third possible one has been derived and expressed in terms of the Lambert W function based on the analytical asymptotic form of the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, for the high-frequency range {nu} >> {nu}{sub 2} (with {nu}{sub 2} the synchrotron frequency corresponding to {gamma}{sub 2}). We have shown that the latter frequency may not have realistic applications in astrophysics, except in the case of an adequate set of parameters allowing one to neglect Comptonization effects. More detailed calculations and discussions are presented.

  17. [New methodic approach to hygienic evaluation of electromagnetic energy absorption in near-field zone of irradiation source].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Yu; Bogachova, E V; Belaya, O V

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, essential objective of hygienic evaluation of electromagnetic energy absorption of mobile radio-frequency devices is specification of new approach with consideration of russian and international regulation principles. This approach enables to ealuate correctly users' actual exposure conditions and consider energy absorption by human in near-field zone of the irradiation source. The work is aimed to study applicability of hypothesis on possible relations between magnetic part of electromagnetic field and specific absorbed capacity. This hypothesis is considered a basis for designing a new methodic approach to hygienic evaluation of individual mobile communication devices in near-field zone of the source. Analysis of the data obtained demonstrates that visible difference between suggested and classic methods decreases with higher frequency. Every studied source in its near-field zone can be characterized by optimal conditions for the suggested method usage with error less than 2 dB. The study results on relations between decreasing electromagnetic energy and specific absorbed capacity value make possible further improvement of methods controlling electromagnetic field levels in assessment of personal mobile radio communication devices. PMID:26470479

  18. Birge-Sponer Estimation of the C-H Bond Dissociation Energy in Chloroform Using Infrared, Near-Infrared, and Visible Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myrick, M. L.; Greer, A. E.; Nieuwland, A. A.; Priore, R. J.; Scaffidi, J.; Andreatta, Danielle; Colavita, Paula

    2008-01-01

    The fundamental and overtone vibrational absorption spectroscopy of the C-H unit in CHCl[subscript 3] is measured for transitions from the v = 0 energy level to v = 1 through v = 5 energy levels. The energies of the transitions exhibit a linearly-decreasing spacing between adjacent vibrational levels as the vibrational quantum number increases.…

  19. Absorption of a single 500 fs laser pulse at the surface of fused silica: Energy balance and ablation efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Varkentina, N.; Sanner, N.; Lebugle, M.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.

    2013-11-07

    Ablation of fused silica by a single femtosecond laser pulse of 500 fs pulse duration is investigated from the perspective of efficiency of incident photons to remove matter. We measure the reflected and transmitted fractions of the incident pulse energy as a function of fluence, allowing us to recover the evolution of absorption at the material surface. At the ablation threshold fluence, 25% of incident energy is absorbed. At high fluences, this ratio saturates around 70% due to the appearance of a self-triggered plasma mirror (or shielding) effect. By using the energy balance retrieved experimentally and measurements of the ablated volume, we show that the amount of absorbed energy is far above the bonding energy of fused silica at rest and also above the energy barrier to ablate the material under non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions. Our results emphasize the crucial role of transient plasma properties during the laser pulse and suggest that the major part of the absorbed energy has been used to heat the plasma formed at the surface of the material. A fluence range yielding an efficient and high quality ablation is also defined, which makes the results relevant for femtosecond micromachining processes.

  20. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  1. Sound Absorption in Molecular Gas Mixtures: Master Equation for Rotational and Vibrational Excitation, Relaxation, and Energy Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Laboratory sound absorption measurements provide much of what we know about the vibrational kinetics of air mixtures, forming the core basis for retrieving the altitude profile of water in the mesosphere from infrared emissions between 6.3 and 6.9 μm. Here we show that sound-absorption and laser-excitation experiments follow exactly the same kinetics, reflect the same underlying reaction rates, and can be vulnerable to similar ambiguities. This has not been obvious because the literature lacks a consistent prescription for calculating the sound absorption frequency spectrum from the reaction rate coefficients. We have developed the first general theoretical formalism for calculating the absolute magnitude of sound absorption per-unit-length, versus sound frequency, for any number of collisional excitation, relaxation, and energy transfer processes, for any mixture of atomic and molecular gases. This new formalism, and the computer code that implements it, provide the first systematic means for inferring collisional rate coefficients from sound absorption measurements in which more than one rotational or vibrational mode is active, such as N2/O2/H2O/CO2 gas mixtures in the laboratory and the atmosphere. When a sound wave travels through a gas, the alternating compression and expansion cycles heat and cool the gas. If the acoustic frequency roughly matches the rate of vibrational relaxation, then the effective vibrational temperature lags behind the translational temperature and the energy in the sound wave is attenuated. The measured frequency of maximum absorption is proportional to the vibrational relaxation rate. In the simplest laser-based experiment, we excite a single molecular level and record its exponential time decay, with the vibrational relaxation rate being proportional to the decay frequency. In both experiments we derive the relaxation rate coefficient from the linear graph versus gas pressure. The technical problem is that any mixture of molecular

  2. Hale Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the mountains that make up the central peak region of Hale Crater, located near 35.8oS, 36.5oW. Dark, smooth-surfaced sand dunes are seen to be climbing up the mountainous slopes. The central peak of a crater consists of rock brought up during the impact from below the crater floor. This autumn image is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  3. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  4. A microscopic description of absorption in high-energy string-brane collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Di Vecchia, Paolo; Russo, Rodolfo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2016-03-01

    We study the collision of a highly energetic light closed string off a stack of D p-branes at (sub)string-scale impact parameters and in a regime justifying a perturbative treatment. Unlike at larger impact parameters — where elastic scattering and/or tidal excitations dominate — here absorption of the closed string by the brane system, with the associated excitation of open strings living on it, becomes important. As a first step, we study this phenomenon at the disk level, in which the energetic closed string turns into a single heavy open string at rest whose particularly simple properties are described.

  5. Method for making an aluminum or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A panel is described for selectively absorbing solar energy comprising an aluminum substrate. A zinc layer was covered by a layer of nickel and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a nickel layer. A layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate was included. A method for making these panels is disclosed.

  6. THE STELLAR CONTRIBUTION TO THE EXTRAGALACTIC BACKGROUND LIGHT AND ABSORPTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Razzaque, Soebur; Finke, Justin D.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2009-05-20

    TeV {gamma}-rays from distant astrophysical sources are attenuated due to electron-positron pair creation by interacting with ultraviolet/optical to infrared photons which fill the universe and are collectively known as the extragalactic background light (EBL). We model the {approx}0.1-10 eV starlight component of the EBL derived from expressions for the stellar initial mass function (IMF), star formation history of the universe, and wavelength-dependent absorption of a large sample of galaxies in the local universe. These models are simultaneously fitted to the EBL data as well as to the data on the stellar luminosity density in our local universe. We find that the models with modified Salpeter A IMF together with Cole et al. or Hopkins and Beacom star formation history best represent available data. Since no dust emission is included, our calculated EBL models can be interpreted as the lower limits in the {approx}0.1-1 eV range. We present simple analytic fits to the best-fit EBL model evolving with redshift. We then proceed to calculate {gamma}-ray opacities and absorption of {approx}10-300 GeV {gamma}-rays coming from different redshifts. We discuss implications of our results for the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and ground-based Air Cherenkov Telescopes.

  7. Estimation of effective atomic numbers of some solutions for photon energy absorption in the energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV: An alternative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat

    2011-12-01

    The effective atomic numbers (ZPEAeff), which are used to describe the composite materials in terms of equivalent elements, have been estimated in some solutions for photon energy absorption in the energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV. Since the mass energy absorption (μen/ρ) and mass attenuation coefficients (μ/ρ) remain more or less the same for any given material in the photon energy region 0.2-1.5 MeV where Compton scattering is the main dominant photon interaction process, semi-empirical relations including both μen/ρ and μ/ρ have been constituted as a function of energy. These parameters were then used to obtain ZPEAeff with the help of a Z-wise interpolation procedure. The results were compared with the experimental as well as other theoretical estimations wherever possible. Consequently, the present method is found to be readily applicable to the given solutions in order to estimate accurate values of ZPEAeff for which it is not possible to directly obtain experimentally using the conventional gamma spectrometry system.

  8. Photodissociation of water in the first absorption band: A prototype for dissociation on a repulsive potential energy surface

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, V.; Staemmler, V.; Vander Wal, R.L.; Crim, F.F.

    1992-04-16

    The photodissociation of water in the first absorption band, H{sub 2}O(X) + {Dirac_h}{omega} {yields} H{sub 2}O(A{sup 1}B{sub 1}) {yields} H({sup 2}S) + OH({sup 2}II), is a prototype of fast and direct bond rupture in an excited electronic state. It has been investigated from several perspectives-absorption spectrum, final state distributions of the products, dissociation of vibrationally excited states, isotope effects, and emission spectroscopy. The availability of a calculated potential energy surface for the A state, including all three internal degrees of freedom, allows comparison of all experimental data with the results of rigorous quantum mechanical calculations without any fitting parameters or simplifying model assumptions. As the result of the confluence of ab initio electronic structure theory, dynamical theory, and experiment, water is probably the best studied and best understood polyatomic photodissociation system. In this article we review the joint experimental and theoretical advances which make water a unique system for studying molecular dynamics in excited electronic states. We focus our attention especially on the interrelation between the various perspectives and the correlation with the characteristic features of the upper-state potential energy surface. 80 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Spherically shaped micron-size particle-reinforced PMMA and PC composites for improving energy absorption capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-ick; Kang, Eung-Chun; Jang, Jae-Soon; Suhr, Jonghwan

    2011-04-01

    The focus of this study was to experimentally investigate spherically shaped micron-size particles reinforced polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC) polymer composites for improving energy absorbing capabilities such as toughness and low-velocity impact resistance. In this study, a solution mixing method was developed to fabricate both PMMA and PC polymer composites with spherically shaped micron-size polyamide- nylon 6 (PA6) particles inclusions. The morphology of the fracture surfaces of polymer composites was examined by using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Strain-rate dependent response of both PMMA and PC polymer composites was investigated by characterizing tensile and flexural properties. Low-velocity penetration testing was performed for both polymer composites and the key results observed for energy absorption capabilities are discussed in this study.

  10. The excitation energy transfer in the trimeric fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein from Cyclotella meneghiniana analyzed by polarized transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gildenhoff, Nina; Herz, Julia; Gundermann, Kathi; Büchel, Claudia; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2010-07-01

    Polarized transient absorption spectroscopy has been applied to study the carotenoid to chlorophyll excitation energy transfer in the trimeric fucoxanthin-chlorophyll protein FCPa of the centric diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. We examined the transfer pathways after excitation in the main carotenoid band (S 0 → S 2 transition) with two excitation wavelengths that address either red fucoxanthins only or blue fucoxanthins and the xanthophyll cycle pigments. We were able to identify different transition dipole moments for the S 1 and the ICT state, which are assumed to be a single coupled state that transfers excitation energy to chlorophyll a. Furthermore we obtained different transition dipole moments for the first excited state S 1 of fucoxanthin depending on the excitation wavelength.

  11. An energy supply network of nutrient absorption coordinated by calcium and T1R taste receptors in rat small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Oliver J; Lister, Norma; Morgan, Emma; Shepherd, Emma; Affleck, Julie; Helliwell, Philip; Bronk, John R; Kellett, George L; Meredith, David; Boyd, Richard; Pieri, Myrtani; Bailey, Pat D; Pettcrew, Rachel; Foley, David

    2009-01-01

    T1R taste receptors are present throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Glucose absorption comprises active absorption via SGLT1 and facilitated absorption via GLUT2 in the apical membrane. Trafficking of apical GLUT2 is rapidly up-regulated by glucose and artificial sweeteners, which act through T1R2 + T1R3/α-gustducin to activate PLC β2 and PKC βII. We therefore investigated whether non-sugar nutrients are regulated by taste receptors using perfused rat jejunum in vivo. Under different conditions, we observed a Ca2+-dependent reciprocal relationship between the H+/oligopeptide transporter PepT1 and apical GLUT2, reflecting the fact that trafficking of PepT1 and GLUT2 to the apical membrane is inhibited and activated by PKC βII, respectively. Addition of l-glutamate or sucralose to a perfusate containing low glucose (20 mm) each activated PKC βII and decreased apical PepT1 levels and absorption of the hydrolysis-resistant dipeptide l-Phe(ΨS)-l-Ala (1 mm), while increasing apical GLUT2 and glucose absorption within minutes. Switching perfusion from mannitol to glucose (75 mm) exerted similar effects. l-Glutamate induced rapid GPCR internalization of T1R1, T1R3 and transducin, whereas sucralose internalized T1R2, T1R3 and α-gustducin. We conclude that l-glutamate acts via amino acid and glucose via sweet taste receptors to coordinate regulation of PepT1 and apical GLUT2 reciprocally through a common enterocytic pool of PKC βII. These data suggest the existence of a wider Ca2+ and taste receptor-coordinated transport network incorporating other nutrients and/or other stimuli capable of activating PKC βII and additional transporters, such as the aspartate/glutamate transporter, EAAC1, whose level was doubled by l-glutamate. The network may control energy supply. PMID:19001049

  12. Aluminium or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method for making panels which selectively absorb solar energy is disclosed. The panels are comprised of an aluminum substrate, a layer of zinc thereon, a layer of nickel over the zinc layer and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a layer of nickel thereon and a layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate.

  13. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  14. Control of enhanced optical absorption in {mu}c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of grain size on the enhanced optical absorption of {micro}c-Si has been investigated using films of various grain sizes prepared by solid phase crystallization. The authors show that they can control this grain size and therefore the degree of absorption changes. For grain sizes below a threshold range significant absorption enhancement can be seen in the photon energy range of 1 to {approximately}3 eV and the absorption characteristics of these films show that the dominant mode of optical transitions is indirect. A correlation between first order Raman peak broadening and enhanced absorption was found suggesting both effects are related to confinement. A simple model was developed to see how confinement in the crystallites could influence indirect optical transitions.

  15. Optical absorption spectra and energy levels of Er3+ ions in glassy lithium tetraborate matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilyuk, P. S.; Popovich, K. P.; Puga, P. P.; Gomonai, A. I.; Primak, N. V.; Krasilinets, V. N.; Turok, I. I.; Puga, G. D.; Rizak, V. M.

    2014-11-01

    The optical absorption spectra of Er:Li2B4O7 glasses are studied in the range 200-800 nm. The lines corresponding to the direct f-f parity-forbidden intraconfigurational transitions from the ground 4 I 15/2 state to the levels of the excited 4 F 9/2, 4 S 3/2, 2 H 9/2, 2 H 11/2, 4 F 7/2, 4 F 5/2, 4 F 3/2, 2 H 9/2, 4 G 11/2, 4 D 3/2, 4 D 1/2, and 2 D 3/2 states are found.

  16. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  17. Peak of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    In three studies, we explore the existence of an evolved sensitivity to the peak as consistent with the evolutionary origins of many of our basic preferences. Activating the evolved motive of mating activates related adaptive mechanisms, including a general sensitivity to cues of growth and decay associated with determining mate value in human courtship. We establish that priming the mating goal also activates as well an evaluative bias that influences how people evaluate cues of growth. Specifically, living kinds that are immature or past their prime are devalued, whereas living kinds at their peak become increasingly valued. Study 1 establishes this goal-driven effect for human stimuli indirectly related to the mating goal. Studies 2 and 3 establish that the evaluative bias produced by the active mating goal extends to living kinds but not artifacts. PMID:18578847

  18. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  19. Novel shortcut estimation method for regeneration energy of amine solvents in an absorption-based carbon capture process.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huiyong; Hwang, Sung June; Lee, Kwang Soon

    2015-02-01

    Among various CO2 capture processes, the aqueous amine-based absorption process is considered the most promising for near-term deployment. However, the performance evaluation of newly developed solvents still requires complex and time-consuming procedures, such as pilot plant tests or the development of a rigorous simulator. Absence of accurate and simple calculation methods for the energy performance at an early stage of process development has lengthened and increased expense of the development of economically feasible CO2 capture processes. In this paper, a novel but simple method to reliably calculate the regeneration energy in a standard amine-based carbon capture process is proposed. Careful examination of stripper behaviors and exploitation of energy balance equations around the stripper allowed for calculation of the regeneration energy using only vapor-liquid equilibrium and caloric data. Reliability of the proposed method was confirmed by comparing to rigorous simulations for two well-known solvents, monoethanolamine (MEA) and piperazine (PZ). The proposed method can predict the regeneration energy at various operating conditions with greater simplicity, greater speed, and higher accuracy than those proposed in previous studies. This enables faster and more precise screening of various solvents and faster optimization of process variables and can eventually accelerate the development of economically deployable CO2 capture processes. PMID:25602643

  20. Towards elucidating the energy of the first excited singlet state of xanthophyll cycle pigments by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gruszecki, W I; Stiel, H; Niedzwiedzki, D; Beck, M; Milanowska, J; Lokstein, H; Leupold, D

    2005-06-01

    The first excited singlet state (S(1)) of carotenoids (also termed 2A(g)(-)) plays a key role in photosynthetic excitation energy transfer due to its close proximity to the S(1) (Q(y)) level of chlorophylls. The determination of carotenoid 2A(g)(-) energies by optical techniques is difficult; transitions from the ground state (S(0), 1A(g)(-)) to the 2A(g)(-) state are forbidden ("optically dark") due to parity (g <-- //--> g) as well as pseudo-parity selection rules (- <-- //--> -). Of particular interest are S(1) energies of the so-called xanthophyll-cycle pigments (violaxanthin, antheraxanthin and zeaxanthin) due to their involvement in photoprotection in plants. Previous determinations of S(1) energies of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin by different spectroscopic techniques vary considerably. Here we present an alternative approach towards elucidation of the optically dark states of xanthophylls by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). The indication of at least one pi* energy level (about 0.5 eV below the lowest 1B(u)(+) vibronic sublevel) has been found for zeaxanthin. Present limitations and future improvements of NEXAFS to study optically dark states of carotenoids are discussed. NEXAFS combined with simultaneous optical pumping will further aid the investigation of these otherwise hardly accessible states. PMID:15949988

  1. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  2. Universality, maximum radiation, and absorption in high-energy collisions of black holes with spin.

    PubMed

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Pretorius, Frans

    2013-07-26

    We explore the impact of black hole spins on the dynamics of high-energy black hole collisions. We report results from numerical simulations with γ factors up to 2.49 and dimensionless spin parameter χ=+0.85, +0.6, 0, -0.6, -0.85. We find that the scattering threshold becomes independent of spin at large center-of-mass energies, confirming previous conjectures that structure does not matter in ultrarelativistic collisions. It has further been argued that in this limit all of the kinetic energy of the system may be radiated by fine tuning the impact parameter to threshold. On the contrary, we find that only about 60% of the kinetic energy is radiated for γ=2.49. By monitoring apparent horizons before and after scattering events we show that the "missing energy" is absorbed by the individual black holes in the encounter, and moreover the individual black-hole spins change significantly. We support this conclusion with perturbative calculations. An extrapolation of our results to the limit γ→∞ suggests that about half of the center-of-mass energy of the system can be emitted in gravitational radiation, while the rest must be converted into rest-mass and spin energy. PMID:23931346

  3. A state-space analysis of mechanical energy generation, absorption, and transfer during pedaling.

    PubMed

    Fregly, B J; Zajac, F E

    1996-01-01

    Seated ergometer pedaling is a motor task ideal for studying basic mechanisms of human bipedal coordination because, in contrast to standing and walking, fewer degrees of freedom are being controlled and upright balance is not a factor. As a step toward understanding how individual muscles coordinate pedaling, we investigated how individual net muscle joint torques and non-muscular (e.g. centripetal, coriolis, and gravity) forces of the lower limbs generate, absorb, and transfer mechanical energy in order to propel the crank and recover the limb. This was accomplished using a mechanical power analysis derived entirely from the closed-form state-space dynamical equations of a two-legged pedaling model that accounted for both the limb segmental and crank load dynamics. Based on a pedaling simulation that reproduced experimental kinematic and kinetic trajectories, we found that the net ankle and hip extensor joint torques function 'synergistically' to deliver energy to the crank during the downstroke. The net hip extensor joint torque generates energy to the limb, while the net ankle extensor joint torque transfers this energy from the limb to the crank. In contrast, net knee extensor and flexor joint torques function 'independently' by generating energy to the crank through the top and bottom of the stroke, respectively. The net ankle joint torque transfers and the net knee joint torque generates energy to the crank by contributing to the driving component of the pedal reaction force. During the upstroke, net ankle extensor joint torque transfers energy from the crank to the limb to restore the potential energy of the limb. In both halves of the crank cycle, gravity forces augment the crank-limb energy transfer performed by the net ankle extensor joint torque. PMID:8839020

  4. Investigating ligand-receptor interactions at bilayer surface using electronic absorption spectroscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Navneet; Li, Xuelian; Kohli, Punit

    2012-01-01

    We investigate interactions between receptors and ligands at bilayer surface of polydiacetylene (PDA) liposomal nanoparticles using changes in electronic absorption spectroscopy and Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). We study the effect of mode of linkage (covalent versus non-covalent) between the receptor and liposome bilayer. We also examine the effect of size dependent interactions between liposome and analyte through electronic absorption and FRET responses. Glucose (receptor) molecules were either covalently or non-covalently attached at the bilayer of nanoparticles, and they provided selectivity for molecular interactions between glucose and glycoprotein ligands of E. coli. The receptor-ligand interactions between glucose and ligand on E. Coli surface induced stress on conjugated PDA chain which resulted in changes (blue to red) in the absorption spectrum of PDA. The changes in electronic absorbance also led to changes in FRET efficiency between conjugated PDA chains (acceptor) and fluorophores (Sulphorhodamine-101) (donor) attached to the bilayer surface. Interestingly, we did not find significant differences in UV-Vis and FRET responses for covalently- and non-covalently-bound glucose to liposomes following their interactions with E. Coli. We attributed these results to close proximity of glucose receptor molecules to the liposome bilayer surface such that induced stress were similar in both the cases. We also found that PDA emission from direct excitation mechanism was ~ 2 - 10 times larger than that of FRET based response. These differences in emission signals were attributed to three major reasons: non-specific interactions between E. Coli and liposomes; size differences between analyte and liposomes; and a much higher PDA concentration with respect to sulpho-rhodamine (SR-101). We have proposed a model to explain our experimental observations. Our fundamental studies reported here will help in enhancing our knowledge regarding interactions

  5. The effects of wheelchair-seating stiffness and energy absorption on occupant frontal impact kinematics and submarining risk using computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Bertocci, Gina; Souza, Aaron L; Szobota, Stephanie

    2003-01-01

    Many wheelchair users must travel in motor vehicles while seated in their wheelchairs. The safety features of seat assemblies are key to motor vehicle occupant crash protection. Seating system properties such as strength, stiffness, and energy absorbance have been shown to have significant influence on risk of submarining. This study investigated the effects of wheelchair seat stiffness and energy absorption properties on occupant risk of submarining during a frontal motor vehicle 20 g/30 mph impact using a validated computer crash simulation model. The results indicate that wheelchair-seating stiffness and energy absorption characteristics influence occupant kinematics associated with the risk of submarining. Softer seat surfaces and relatively high energy absorption/permanent deformation were found to produce pelvis excursion trajectories associated with increased submarining risk. Findings also suggest that the current American National Standards Institute/Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology Society of North America (ANSI/RESNA) WC-19 seating integrity may not adequately assess submarining risk. PMID:15077638

  6. Solar powered absorption cycle heat pump using phase change materials for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Solar powered heating and cooling system with possible application to residential homes is described. Operating principles of system are defined and illustration of typical energy storage and exchange system is provided.

  7. IR absorption and Raman spectra of single crystals of stable germanium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavva, V. A.; Kotereva, T. V.; Lipskiy, V. A.; Nezhdanov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The Raman and IR absorption spectra of single crystals of germanium isotopes 72Ge, 73Ge, 74Ge, and 76Ge in the region of phonon absorption and interband electronic transitions are studied at room temperature. The dependence of the Raman peak position on the atomic mass has the form ν ~ M -1/2. The shifts of the phonon absorption peaks of individual isotopes with respect to germanium of natural isotopic composition natGe are determined. With increasing average atomic mass of germanium, these peaks shift to longer wavelengths. In the region of interband electronic transitions, the intrinsic absorption edge of 76Ge is observed to shift by 1 meV to higher energies with respect to Ge of natural isotopic composition. For isotopes with atomic masses close to that of natural germanium (72Ge,73Ge, 74Ge), we found no significant difference in the band gap width at room temperature.

  8. Observation of ultrahigh-energy electrons by resonance absorption of high-power microwaves in a pulsed plasma.

    PubMed

    Rajyaguru, C; Fuji, T; Ito, H; Yugami, N; Nishida, Y

    2001-07-01

    The interaction of high power microwave with collisionless unmagnetized plasma is studied. Investigation on the generation of superthermal electrons near the critical layer, by the resonance absorption phenomenon, is extended to very high microwave power levels (eta=E(2)(0)/4 pi n(e)kT(e) approximately 0.3). Here E0, n(e), and T(e) are the vacuum electric field, electron density, and electron temperature, respectively. Successive generation of electron bunches having maximum energy of about 2 keV, due to nonlinear wave breaking, is observed. The electron energy epsilon scales as a function of the incident microwave power P, according to epsilon proportional to P0.5 up to 250 kW. The two-dimensional spatial distribution of high energy electrons reveals that they are generated near the critical layer. However, the lower energy component is again produced in the subcritical density region indicating the possibility of other electron heating mechanisms. PMID:11461406

  9. Time-dependent absorption of very high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic center by pair-production

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, Attila; Horns, Dieter; Ripken, Joachim; Gillessen, Stefan; Eldik, Christopher van

    2008-12-24

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays have been detected from the direction of the Galactic center. The H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes have located this {gamma}-ray source with a preliminary position uncertainty of 8.5'' per axis (6'' statistic+6'' sytematic per axis). Within the uncertainty region several possible counterpart candidates exist: the Super Massive Black Hole Sgr A*, the Pulsar Wind Nebula candidate G359.95-0.04, the Low Mass X-Ray Binary-system J174540.0-290031, the stellar cluster IRS 13, as well as self-annihilating dark matter. It is experimentally very challenging to further improve the positional accuracy in this energy range and therefore, it may not be possible to clearly associate one of the counterpart candidates with the VHE-source. Here, we present a new method to investigate a possible link of the VHE-source with the near environment of Sgr A*(within approximately 1000 Schwarzschild radii). This method uses the time- and energy-dependent effect of absorption of VHE {gamma}-rays by pair-production (in the following named pair-eclipse) with low-energy photons of stars closely orbiting the SMBH Sgr A*.

  10. Modeling the performance of small capacity lithium bromide-water absorption chiller operated by solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Saman, N.F.; Sa`id, W.A.D.K.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis of the performance of a solar operated small capacity (two-ton) Lithium Bromide-Water (LiBr-H{sub 2}O) absorption system is conducted. The analysis is based on the first law of thermodynamics with lithium bromide as the absorbent and water as the refrigerant. The effect of various parameters affecting the machine coefficient of performance under various operating conditions is reported. Coefficient of performance of up to 0.8 can be obtained using flat plate solar collectors with generator temperatures in the range of 80--95 C (176--203 F). Liquid heat exchangers with effectiveness based on an NTU of the order of one would be a good design choice. The chiller can save approximately 3,456 kWh/yr per a two-ton unit, and it will reduce emissions by 19 lb of NO{sub x}, 5,870 lb of CO{sub 2}, and 16 lb of SO{sub x} per year per machine.

  11. New aspects concerning the energy transfer in carotenoids by measuring intracavity absorption spectra and delayed fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettermann, Hans; Bouschen, Werner; Ulrich, Lars; Domnick, Gabriele; Martin, H. D.

    1999-05-01

    The first excited singlet state and the lower energetic triplet states of carotenoids are considered to be involved in the light-harvesting as well as in the photochemical protection of cells, respectively. For this reason, the symmetry-forbidden S 0-S 1 (1 1A g-2 1A g) transitions and the multiplicity-forbidden S 0-T 2 (1 1A g-2 3A g) transition of the model carotenoid 8,13-dimethyl-2,2,19,19-tetramethoxy-icosa-4,6,8,10,12,14,16-heptaene-3,18-dione were investigated by intracavity absorption spectroscopy from low-concentrated ethanolic solutions. Both transitions are shaped by promoting modes caused by Herzberg-Teller coupling and the sequence of these modes allows the precise determination of the non-visible S 0-S 1 (0-0)- and S 0-T 2 (0-0)-transitions. The assignments of the singlet-triplet transitions were additionally supported by measuring delayed fluorescence from crystalline samples by directly exciting vibronic triplet states. The vibronic coupling is promoted by C-H bending vibrations of the chain and mainly by deformation modes of the terminating groups of the carotenoid.

  12. Asymmetric absorption and emission of energy by a macroscopic mechanical oscillator in a microwave circuit optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, Jennifer; Palomaki, Tauno; Kerckhoff, Joseph; Teufel, John; Simmonds, Raymond; Lehnert, Konrad

    2012-02-01

    We measure the asymmetry in rates for emission and absorption of mechanical energy in an electromechanical system composed of a macroscopic suspended membrane coupled to a high-Q, superconducting microwave resonant circuit. This asymmetry is inherently quantum mechanical because it arises from the inability to annihilate the mechanical ground state. As such, it is only appreciable when the average mechanical occupancy approaches one. This measurement is now possible due to the recent achievement of ground state cooling of macroscopic mechanical oscillators [1,2]. Crucially, we measure the thermal cavity photon occupancy and account for it in our analysis. Failure to correctly account for the interference of these thermal photons with the mechanical signal can lead to a misinterpretation of the data and an overestimate of the emission/absorption asymmetry. [4pt] [1] J. D. Teufel, T. Donner, Dale Li, J. W. Harlow, M. S. Allman, K. Cicak, A. J. Sirois, J. D. Whittaker, K. W. Lehnert, R. W. Simmonds, ``Sideband Cooling Micromechanical Motion to the Quantum Ground State,'' Nature, 475, 359-363 (2011).[0pt] [2] Jasper Chan, et al, ``Laser cooling of a nanomechanical oscillator into its quantum ground state,'' Nature, 478, 89-92 (2011).

  13. Single-photon absorption and dynamic control of the exciton energy in a coupled quantum-dot-cavity system

    SciTech Connect

    Johne, R.; Fiore, A.

    2011-11-15

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic interaction of a quantum dot in a nanocavity with time-symmetric single-photon pulses. The simulations, based on a wave-function approach, reveal that almost perfect single-photon absorption occurs for quantum-dot-cavity systems operating on the edge between strong- and weak-coupling regimes. The computed maximum absorption probability is close to unity for pulses with a typical length comparable to half of the Rabi period. Furthermore, the dynamic control of the quantum-dot energy via electric fields allows the freezing of the light-matter interaction, leaving the quantum dot in its excited state. Shaping of single-photon wave packets by the electric field control is limited by the occurrence of chirping of the single-photon pulse. This understanding of the interaction of single-photon pulses with the quantum-dot-cavity system provides the basis for the development of advanced protocols for quantum-information processing in the solid state.

  14. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  15. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  16. Energy Absorption in a Load-Unload Cycle of Knee Implant Using Fractal Model of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, Mohammad; Farhang, Kambiz

    2016-05-01

    Roughness measurement of knee implant surfaces is investigated. The study of roughness measurement show that the topography of knee implant surface is multi-scale and surface spectra follows a power law behavior. A magnification of rough surface topography implies that there is no difference between original and magnified profile of implant surface. For implant surface, statistical parameters such as variance of height, curvature, and slope are found to be scale-dependent. Fractal representation of implant surface shows that the size-distribution of the multi-scale contacts spots follows a power law and is characterized by the fractal dimension of implant surface. Fractal surface description of the rough surfaces of knee implant is used to obtain force-displacement relationship of the contact force. Using an approximate function through the fusion of two piecewise functions, energy absorption of a knee implant in a single cycle of load-unload is obtained.

  17. Method and apparatus for simulating atomospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, Bhushan L.

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth's surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO.sub.2 and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO.sub.2 and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO.sub.2 and moisture.

  18. Method and apparatus for simulating atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to water vapor and CO{sub 2}

    DOEpatents

    Sopori, B.L.

    1995-06-20

    A method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of the simulation of sunlight reaching the earth`s surface includes a relatively small heated chamber having an optical inlet and an optical outlet, the chamber having a cavity that can be filled with a heated stream of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. A simulated beam comprising infrared and near infrared light can be directed through the chamber cavity containing the CO{sub 2} and water vapor, whereby the spectral characteristics of the beam are altered so that the output beam from the chamber contains wavelength bands that accurately replicate atmospheric absorption of solar energy due to atmospheric CO{sub 2} and moisture. 8 figs.

  19. Resonant vortex-core reversal in magnetic nano-spheres as robust mechanism of efficient energy absorption and emission

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Koog; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Lee, Jehyun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Min-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    We report on novel vortex-core reversal dynamics in nano-spheres of single-vortex spin configuration as revealed by micromagnetic simulations combined with analytical derivations. When the frequency of an AC magnetic field is tuned to the frequency of the vortex-core precession around the direction of a given static field, oscillatory vortex-core reversals occur, and additionally, the frequency is found to change with both the strength of the applied AC field and the particle size. Such resonant vortex-core reversals in nano-spheres may provide a new and efficient means of energy absorption by, and emission from, magnetic nanoparticles, which system can be effectively implemented in bio-applications such as magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:27531408

  20. Azadipyrromethene cyclometalation in neutral Ru(II) complexes: photosensitizers with extended near-infrared absorption for solar energy conversion applications.

    PubMed

    Bessette, André; Cibian, Mihaela; Ferreira, Janaina G; DiMarco, Brian N; Bélanger, Francis; Désilets, Denis; Meyer, Gerald J; Hanan, Garry S

    2016-06-28

    In the on-going quest to harvest near-infrared (NIR) photons for energy conversion applications, a novel family of neutral ruthenium(ii) sensitizers has been developed by cyclometalation of an azadipyrromethene chromophore. These rare examples of neutral ruthenium complexes based on polypyridine ligands exhibit an impressive panchromaticity achieved by the cyclometalation strategy, with strong light absorption in the 600-800 nm range that tails beyond 1100 nm in the terpyridine-based adducts. Evaluation of the potential for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) and Organic Photovoltaic (OPV) applications is made through rationalization of the structure-property relationship by spectroscopic, electrochemical, X-ray structural and computational modelization investigations. Spectroscopic evidence for photo-induced charge injection into the conduction band of TiO2 is also provided. PMID:27264670

  1. GRBs Radiative Processes: Synchrotron and Synchrotron Self-Absorption From a Power Law Electrons Distribution with Finite Energy Range

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2010-10-31

    Synchrotron emission behind relativistic magnetic internal-external shocks in gamma-ray bursts cosmological explosions is assumed to be the basic emission mechanism for prompt and afterglow emissions. Inverse Compton from relativistic electrons can also have appreciable effects by upscattering initial synchrotron or blackbody photons or other photons fields up to GeV-TeV energies. For extreme physical conditions such as high magnetic fields (e.g., B>10{sup 5} Gauss) self-absorption is not negligible and can hardly affect spectra at least for the low energy range. In this paper we present calculations of the synchrotron power, P{sub {nu}}, and their asymptotic forms, generated by a power law relativistic electron distribution of type N{sub e}({gamma}) = C{gamma}{sup -p} with {gamma}{sub 1}<{gamma}<{gamma}{sub 2}, especially for finite values of the higher limit {gamma}{sub 2}. For this aim we defined the dimensionless parametric function Z{sub p}(x,{eta}) with x = {nu}/{nu}{sub 1} and {eta} = {gamma}{sub 2}/{gamma}{sub 1} so that P{sub {nu}{proportional_to}Zp}({nu}/{nu}{sub 1},{eta}), with {nu}{sub 1} = (3/4{pi}){gamma}{sub 1}{sup 2}qBsin{theta}/mc({theta} being the pitch angle). Asymptotic forms of this later are derived for three different frequency ranges, i.e., x<<1, 1<>{eta}{sup 2}. These results are then used to calculate the absorption coefficient, {alpha}{sub {nu}}, and the source function, S{sub {nu}}, together with their asymptotic forms through the dimensionless parametric functions H{sub p}(x,{eta}) and Y{sub p}(x,{eta}), respectively. Further calculation details are also presented and discussed.

  2. Theoretical Estimation of the Acoustic Energy Generation and Absorption Caused by Jet Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Iwagami, Sho; Kobayashi, Taizo; Takami, Toshiya

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the energy transfer between the fluid field and acoustic field caused by a jet driven by an acoustic particle velocity field across it, which is the key to understanding the aerodynamic sound generation of flue instruments, such as the recorder, flute, and organ pipe. Howe's energy corollary allows us to estimate the energy transfer between these two fields. For simplicity, we consider the situation such that a free jet is driven by a uniform acoustic particle velocity field across it. We improve the semi-empirical model of the oscillating jet, i.e., exponentially growing jet model, which has been studied in the field of musical acoustics, and introduce a polynomially growing jet model so as to apply Howe's formula to it. It is found that the relative phase between the acoustic oscillation and jet oscillation, which changes with the distance from the flue exit, determines the quantity of the energy transfer between the two fields. The acoustic energy is mainly generated in the downstream area, but it is consumed in the upstream area near the flue exit in driving the jet. This theoretical examination well explains the numerical calculation of Howe's formula for the two-dimensional flue instrument model in our previous work [Fluid Dyn. Res. 46, 061411 (2014)] as well as the experimental result of Yoshikawa et al. [J. Sound Vib. 331, 2558 (2012)].

  3. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2016-04-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  4. Evaluation of energy absorption of new concepts of aircraft composite subfloor intersections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa E.; Carden, Huey D.

    1989-01-01

    Forty-one composite aircraft subfloor intersection specimens were tested to determine the effects of geometry and material on the energy absorbing behavior, failure characteristics, and post-crush structural integrity of the specimens. The intersections were constructed of twelve ply + or - 45 sub 6 laminates of either Kevlar 49/934 or AS-4/934 graphite-epoxy in heights of 4, 8, and 12 inches. The geometry of the specimens varied in the designs of the intersection attachment angle. Four different geometries were tested.

  5. Rigorous Bound on Energy Absorption and Generic Relaxation in Periodically Driven Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takashi; Kuwahara, Tomotaka; Saito, Keiji

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the universal nature of relaxation in isolated many-body quantum systems subjected to global and strong periodic driving. Our rigorous Floquet analysis shows that the energy of the system remains almost constant up to an exponentially long time in frequency for arbitrary initial states and that an effective Hamiltonian obtained by a truncation of the Floquet-Magnus expansion is a quasiconserved quantity in a long time scale. These two general properties lead to an intriguing classification on the initial stage of relaxation, one of which is similar to the prethermalization phenomenon in nearly integrable systems.

  6. Energy transmission transformer for a wireless capsule endoscope: analysis of specific absorption rate and current density in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Nagato, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic influences on the analysis of biological tissue surrounding a prototype energy transmission system for a wireless capsule endoscope. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by electromagnetic simulator in a model consisting of primary coil and a human trunk including the skin, fat, muscle, small intestine, backbone, and blood. First, electric and magnetic strength in the same conditions as the analytical model were measured and compared to the analytical values to confirm the validity of the analysis. Then, SAR and current density as a function of frequency and output power were analyzed. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by comparing the analytical values with the measured ones. The SAR was below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). At the same time, the results for current density show that the influence on biological tissue was lowest in the 300-400 kHz range, indicating that it was possible to transmit energy safely up to 160 mW. In addition, we confirmed that the current density has decreased by reducing the primary coil's current. PMID:18595805

  7. Probing the many energy-transfer processes in the photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II at 77 K using energy-selective sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, H. M.; Kleima, F. J.; van Stokkum, I. H. M.; van Grondelle, R.; van Amerongen, H.

    1996-10-01

    The dynamics of energy equilibration in the main plant light-harvesting complex, LHCII, at a temperature of 77 K was probed using sub-picosecond excitation pulses at 649, 661, 672 and 682 nm and detection of the resulting difference absorption spectra from 630 to 700 nm. We find three distinct chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a (Chl a) transfer times, of < 0.3, 0.6 and 4-9 ps, respectively. From a comparison of the amplitudes of the bleaching signal, a plausible scheme for the Chl b to Chl a transfer in the LHCII complex is proposed. Two Chl b molecules transfer energy to Chl a in less than 0.3 ps, two Chl b molecules transfer with 0.6 ps and one Chl b has a transfer time of 4-9 ps. In the Chl a absorption region, a 2.4 ps energy-transfer process from a pigment absorbing around 661 nm, and a 0.4 ps process from a pigment absorbing around 672 nm is found. Furthermore, evidence is found for slow, 10-20 ps energy-transfer processes between some of the Chl a molecules. The data are compared to model calculations using the 3.4 Å LHCII monomer structure (containing 5 Chl b and 7 Chl a molecules) and Förster energy transfer. We conclude that the observed energy-transfer rates are consistent with both the preliminary assignment of the Chl identities ( a or b) of Kühlbrandt et al. and a recent proposal for the arrangement of some of the transition dipole moments (Gülen et al.). Singlet-singlet and singlet-triplet annihilation processes are observed in two different experiments, and both these processes occur with time constants of 2-3 and 12-20 ps, suggesting that both annihilation pathways are at least partly limited by slow energy transfer. The wide range of observed time constants in the equilibration, from < 0.3 to ˜ 20 ps, most likely reflects the irregular arrangement of the pigments in the complex, which shows much less symmetry than the recently obtained structure of the peripheral antenna complex of purple bacteria, LH-II (McDermott et al.).

  8. Dynamic mechanical analysis and high strain-rate energy absorption characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube reinforced woven fiber-glass composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG) layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE) and...

  9. Infrared electronic absorption in a single-component molecular metal.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Sasa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Wakako; Fujiwara, Emiko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Okano, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2004-01-21

    The infrared spectra of the crystal of transition metal complex molecules with extended-TTF ligands, Ni(tmdt)2, which is the first single-component molecular metal that has a stable metallic state even at low temperatures, exhibited an extremely low-energy electronic absorption around 2200 cm-1 (tmdt = trimethylenetetrathiafulvalenedithiolate). The systematic shift of the absorption peaks for molecules similar to Ni(tmdt)2, which range from metallic to semiconducting crystals, shows that the single-component molecular conductors are composed of molecules with unprecedentedly small HOMO-LUMO gaps. PMID:14719914

  10. Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us po

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Credit: Image courtesy Barbara Summey, NASA Goddard Visualization Analysis Lab, based upon data processed by Takmeng Wong, CERES Science Team, NASA Langley Research Center Satellite: Terra Sensor: CERES Image Date: 09-30-2001 VE Record ID: 11546 Description: Absorption of solar energy heats up our planet's surface and the atmosphere and makes life for us possible. But the energy cannot stay bound up in the Earth's environment forever. If it did then the Earth would be as hot as the Sun. Instead, as the surface and the atmosphere warm, they emit thermal longwave radiation, some of which escapes into space and allows the Earth to cool. This false-color image of the Earth was produced on September 30, 2001, by the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The image shows where more or less heat, in the form of longwave radiation, is emanating from the top of Earth's atmosphere. As one can see in the image, the thermal radiation leaving the oceans is fairly uniform. The blue swaths across the central Pacific represent thick clouds, the tops of which are so high they are among the coldest places on Earth. In the American Southwest, which can be seen in the upper righthand corner of the globe, there is often little cloud cover to block outgoing radiation and relatively little water to absorb solar energy. Consequently, the amount of outgoing radiation in the American Southwest exceeds that of the oceans. Also, that region was experiencing an extreme heatwave when these data were acquired. Recently, NASA researchers discovered that incoming solar radiation and outgoing thermal radiation increased in the tropics from the 1980s to the 1990s. (Click to read the press release .) They believe that the reason for the unexpected increase has to do with an apparent change in circulation patterns around the globe, which effectively reduced the amount of water vapor and cloud cover in the upper reaches of the atmosphere

  11. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Checking your peak flow is one of the best ways to control your asthma and to keep it from getting worse. Asthma attacks ... Most times, they build slowly. Checking your peak flow can tell you if an attack is coming, ...

  12. Single-molecule spectroscopy and femtosecond transient absorption studies on the excitation energy transfer process in ApcE(1-240) dimers.

    PubMed

    Long, Saran; Zhou, Meng; Tang, Kun; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Niu, Yingli; Guo, Qianjin; Zhao, Kai-Hong; Xia, Andong

    2015-05-28

    ApcE(1-240) dimers with one intrinsic phycocyanobilin (PCB) chromophore in each monomer that is truncated from the core-membrane linker (ApcE) of phycobilisomes (PBS) in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 show a sharp and significantly red-shifted absorption. Two explanations either conformation-dependent Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) or the strong exciton coupling limit have been proposed for red-shifted absorption. This is a classic example of the special pair in the photosynthetic light harvesting proteins, but the mechanism of this interaction is still a matter of intense debate. We report the studies using single-molecule and transient absorption spectra on the interaction in the special pair of ApcE dimers. Our results demonstrate the presence of conformation-dependent FRET between the two PCB chromophores in ApcE dimers. The broad distributions of fluorescence intensities, lifetimes and polarization difference from single-molecule measurements reveal the heterogeneity of local protein-pigment environments in ApcE dimers, where the same molecular structures but different protein environments are the main reason for the two PCB chromophores with different spectral properties. The excitation energy transfer rate between the donor and the acceptor about (110 ps)(-1) is determined from transient absorption measurements. The red-shifted absorption in ApcE dimers could result from more extending conformation, which shows another type of absorption redshift that does not depend on strong exciton coupling. The results here stress the importance of conformation-controlled spectral properties of the chemically identical chromophores, which could be a general feature to control energy/electron transfer, widely existing in the light harvesting complexes. PMID:25925197

  13. A Complete Overhaul of the Electron Energy-Loss Spectroscopy and X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Database: eelsdb.eu.

    PubMed

    Ewels, Philip; Sikora, Thierry; Serin, Virginie; Ewels, Chris P; Lajaunie, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) database has been completely rewritten, with an improved design, user interface, and a number of new tools. The database is accessible at https://eelsdb.eu/ and can now be used without registration. The submission process has been streamlined to encourage spectrum submissions and the new design gives greater emphasis on contributors' original work by highlighting their papers. With numerous new filters and a powerful search function, it is now simple to explore the database of several hundred EELS and XAS spectra. Interactive plots allow spectra to be overlaid, facilitating online comparison. An application-programming interface has been created, allowing external tools and software to easily access the information held within the database. In addition to the database itself, users can post and manage job adverts and read the latest news and events regarding the EELS and XAS communities. In accordance with the ongoing drive toward open access data increasingly demanded by funding bodies, the database will facilitate open access data sharing of EELS and XAS spectra. PMID:26899024

  14. Many-body dynamics and energy relaxation times in a wide semiconductor quantum well as probed by nonlinear far-infrared absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwin, M.S.; Craig, K.; Unterrainer, K.

    1995-12-31

    In quantum wells, absorption between the quantized subbands of the conduction band does not take place at the difference of the subband energies; the interactions of the electrons shift the intersubband absorption to higher frequency; this is called the depolarization shift. This shift can be thought of as a dynamic screening effect, and depends upon the difference in population between the subbands of interest. These are the first group of measurements of the dynamics of the depolarization shift, and they offer the possibility of both increased understanding of many-body interactions in real systems, and the possibility of novel quasi-optical devices operating in the far-infared (FIR).

  15. NOTE: Absorption spectra variations of EBT radiochromic film from radiation exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, M. J.; Cheung, T.; Yu, P. K. N.

    2005-07-01

    Gafchromic EBT radiochromic film is one of the newest radiation-induced auto-developing x-ray analysis films available for therapeutic radiation dosimetry in radiotherapy applications. The spectral absorption properties in the visible wavelengths have been investigated and results show two main peaks in absorption located at 636 nm and 585 nm. These absorption peaks are different to many other radiochromic film products such as Gafchromic MD-55 and HS film where two peaks were located at 676 nm and 617 nm respectively. The general shape of the absorption spectra is similar to older designs. A much higher sensitivity is found at high-energy x-rays with an average 0.6 OD per Gy variation in OD seen within the first Gy measured at 636 nm using 6 MV x-rays. This is compared to approximately 0.09 OD units for the first Gy at the 676 nm absorption peak for HS film at 6 MV x-ray energy. The film's blue colour is visually different from older varieties of Gafchromic film with a higher intensity of mid-range blue within the film. The film provides adequate relative absorbed dose measurement for clinical radiotherapy x-ray assessment in the 1 2 Gy dose range which with further investigation may be useful for fractionated radiotherapy dose assessment.

  16. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  17. Energy Savings and Peak Demand Reduction of a SEER 21 Heat Pump vs. a SEER 13 Heat Pump with Attic and Indoor Duct Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.; Withers, C.

    2014-03-01

    This report describes results of experiments that were conducted in an unoccupied 1600 square foot house--the Manufactured Housing (MH Lab) at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC)--to evaluate the delivered performance as well as the relative performance of a SEER 21 variable capacity heat pump versus a SEER 13 heat pump. The performance was evaluated with two different duct systems: a standard attic duct system and an indoor duct system located in a dropped-ceiling space.

  18. Decoupling approximation design using the peak to peak gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Linear system design for accurate decoupling approximation is examined using the peak to peak gain of the error system. The design problem consists in finding values of system parameters to ensure that this gain is small. For this purpose a computationally inexpensive upper bound on the peak to peak gain, namely the star norm, is minimized using a stochastic method. Examples of the methodology's application to tensegrity structures design are presented. Connections between the accuracy of the approximation, the damping matrix, and the natural frequencies of the system are examined, as well as decoupling in the context of open and closed loop control.

  19. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  20. Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra, AB Initio Calculations, and Carbonyl Wagging Potential Energy Functions of Cyclobutanone, Cyclopentanone, BICYCLO[3.1.0]HEXAN-3-ONE, and TETRAHYDROFURAN-3-ONE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soono; Dakkouri, Marwan; Choo, Jaebum; Laane, Jaan

    2000-03-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of cyclobutanone, cyclopentanone, bicyclo[3.1.0]hexan-3-one, and tetrahydrofuran-3-one were recorded and analyzed in the 28,000 - 44,000 cm-1 region. Several dozen absorption bands were assigned for each molecule. These arise from combinations of the ring vibrations and the C=O wagging vibrations. Assigned bands were compared with previously recorded jet-cooled fluorescence excitation spectra. Additional C=O out-of-plane wagging bands were found for cyclopentanone and tetrahydrofuran-3-one, and the potential energy functions for this vibration in these molecules were recalculated. These potential energy functions have barriers to inversion reflecting the fact that the carbonyl group is bent out of the ring plane in the S1(n, π*) excited electronic state.

  1. Coal-fuelled systems for peaking power with 100% CO2 capture through integration of solid oxide fuel cells with compressed air energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nease, Jake; Adams, Thomas A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a coal-fuelled integrated solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and compressed air energy storage (CAES) system in a load-following power production scenario is discussed. Sixteen SOFC-based plants with optional carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) and syngas shifting steps are simulated and compared to a state-of-the-art supercritical pulverised coal (SCPC) plant. Simulations are performed using a combination of MATLAB and Aspen Plus v7.3. It was found that adding CAES to a SOFC-based plant can provide load-following capabilities with relatively small effects on efficiencies (1-2% HHV depending on the system configuration) and levelized costs of electricity (∼0.35 ¢ kW-1 h-1). The load-following capabilities, as measured by least-squares metrics, show that this system may utilize coal and achieve excellent load-tracking that is not adversely affected by the inclusion of CCS. Adding CCS to the SOFC/CAES system reduces measurable direct CO2 emission to zero. A seasonal partial plant shutdown schedule is found to reduce fuel consumption by 9.5% while allowing for cleaning and maintenance windows for the SOFC stacks without significantly affecting the performance of the system (∼1% HHV reduction in efficiency). The SOFC-based systems with CCS are found to become economically attractive relative to SCPC above carbon taxes of 22 ton-1.

  2. Effect of quantum dot size and size distribution on the intersublevel transitions and absorption coefficients of III-V semiconductor quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Kabi, Sanjib; Perera, A. G. Unil

    2015-03-28

    The intersublevel absorption peak energy and absorption coefficient of non-uniform quantum dot (QD) ensembles are calculated analytically. The effect of size variations and size distribution of QDs on their energy states is analyzed. The dots are considered as a quantum box with finite potential at the barriers and the size distribution described by a Gaussian function. The influence of the aspect ratio (base to height ratio) of the QDs on the optical transitions is studied. Our model predicts the dot size (height and base) accurately to determine the absorption peaks and corresponding absorption coefficient. We also compute the absorption coefficient of the QD with different size distributions to verify the results calculated using this model with the reported experimental and other theoretical results.

  3. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  4. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  5. Control of optical bandgap energy and optical absorption coefficient by geometric parameters in sub-10 nm silicon-nanodisc array structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairuz Budiman, Mohd; Hu, Weiguo; Igarashi, Makoto; Tsukamoto, Rikako; Isoda, Taiga; Itoh, Kohei M.; Yamashita, Ichiro; Murayama, Akihiro; Okada, Yoshitaka; Samukawa, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    A sub-10 nm, high-density, periodic silicon-nanodisc (Si-ND) array has been fabricated using a new top-down process, which involves a 2D array bio-template etching mask made of Listeria-Dps with a 4.5 nm diameter iron oxide core and damage-free neutral-beam etching (Si-ND diameter: 6.4 nm). An Si-ND array with an SiO2 matrix demonstrated more controllable optical bandgap energy due to the fine tunability of the Si-ND thickness and diameter. Unlike the case of shrinking Si-ND thickness, the case of shrinking Si-ND diameter simultaneously increased the optical absorption coefficient and the optical bandgap energy. The optical absorption coefficient became higher due to the decrease in the center-to-center distance of NDs to enhance wavefunction coupling. This means that our 6 nm diameter Si-ND structure can satisfy the strict requirements of optical bandgap energy control and high absorption coefficient for achieving realistic Si quantum dot solar cells.

  6. Light absorption during alkali atom-noble gas atom interactions at thermal energies: a quantum dynamics treatment.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexander B; Reyes, Andrés; Micha, David A

    2006-10-21

    The absorption of light during atomic collisions is treated by coupling electronic excitations, treated quantum mechanically, to the motion of the nuclei described within a short de Broglie wavelength approximation, using a density matrix approach. The time-dependent electric dipole of the system provides the intensity of light absorption in a treatment valid for transient phenomena, and the Fourier transform of time-dependent intensities gives absorption spectra that are very sensitive to details of the interaction potentials of excited diatomic states. We consider several sets of atomic expansion functions and atomic pseudopotentials, and introduce new parametrizations to provide light absorption spectra in good agreement with experimentally measured and ab initio calculated spectra. To this end, we describe the electronic excitation of the valence electron of excited alkali atoms in collisions with noble gas atoms with a procedure that combines l-dependent atomic pseudopotentials, including two- and three-body polarization terms, and a treatment of the dynamics based on the eikonal approximation of atomic motions and time-dependent molecular orbitals. We present results for the collision induced absorption spectra in the Li-He system at 720 K, which display both atomic and molecular transition intensities. PMID:17059261

  7. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  8. MOSES AND DENNISON PEAK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Lipton, David A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was conducted in the Moses and Dennison Peak Roadless Areas, southeastern Sierra Nevada, California. One area within the Moses Roadless Area is classified as having substantiated mineral-resource potential for small base-metal skarn deposits. Additionally, geochemical data indicate probable potential for small base-metal skarn deposits from one locality within Dennison Peak Roadless Area and for small tungsten skarn deposits from a region within Moses Roadless Area. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  9. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  10. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  11. Influence of vitamin D and estrogen receptor gene polymorphisms on calcium absorption: BsmI predicts a greater decrease during energy restriction.

    PubMed

    Chang, B; Schlussel, Y; Sukumar, D; Schneider, S H; Shapses, S A

    2015-12-01

    Low calcium absorption is associated with low bone mass and fracture. In this study, we use gold standard methods of fractional calcium absorption (FCA) to determine whether polymorphisms of intestinal receptors, vitamin D receptor (VDR) and estrogen receptor α (ESR1), influence the response to energy restriction. Fractional calcium absorption was measured using dual stable isotopes ((42)Ca and (43)Ca) in women given adequate calcium and vitamin D and examined at baseline and after 6 weeks of energy restriction or no intervention. After genotyping, the relationship between VDR and ESR1 genotypes/haplotypes and FCA response was assessed using several genetic models. One-hundred and sixty-eight women (53 ± 11 years of age) were included in this analysis. The ESR1 polymorphisms, PvuII and XbaI and VDR polymorphisms (TaqI, ApaI) did not significantly influence FCA. The BB genotype of the VDR polymorphism, BsmI, was associated with a greater decrease in FCA than the Bb/bb genotype. Multiple linear regression showed that the BsmI polymorphism or the VDR haplotype, BAt, in addition to changes in weight and vitamin D intake explained ~16% of the variation in changes in FCA. In conclusion, the reduction in calcium absorption due to energy restriction is greatest for those with the BB genotype. Previous candidate gene studies show that VDR polymorphisms are associated with higher risk for osteoporosis, and the current study supports the notion that the BsmI polymorphism in intestinal VDR may be contributing to alterations in bone health. PMID:26165414

  12. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Scott

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum and which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all of the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.

  13. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Q. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.

  14. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  15. Effect of transverse electric field and temperature on light absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel-coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Firsov, D. A.; Vorobjev, L. E.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya. Balagula, R. M.; Kulagina, M. M.; Vasil’iev, A. P.

    2015-11-15

    The photoluminescence and intersubband absorption spectra are studied in GaAs/AlGaAs tunnel- coupled quantum well structures. The peak positions in the photoluminescence and absorption spectra are consistent with the theoretically calculated energies of optical carrier transitions. The effect of a transverse electric field and temperature on intersubband light absorption is studied. It is caused by electron redistribution between the size-quantization levels and a variation in the energy spectrum of quantum wells. The variation in the refractive index in the energy region of observed intersubband transitions is estimated using Kramers–Kronig relations.

  16. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  17. Rich magneto-absorption spectra of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Do, Thi-Nga; Shih, Po-Hsin; Chang, Cheng-Peng; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2016-06-29

    A generalized tight-binding model is developed to investigate the feature-rich magneto-optical properties of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene. Three intragroup and six intergroup inter-Landau-level (inter-LL) optical excitations largely enrich magneto-absorption peaks. In general, the former are much higher than the latter, depending on the phases and amplitudes of LL wavefunctions. The absorption spectra exhibit single- or twin-peak structures which are determined by quantum modes, LL energy spectra and Fermion distribution. The splitting LLs, with different localization centers (2/6 and 4/6 positions in a unit cell), can generate very distinct absorption spectra. There exist extra single peaks because of LL anti-crossings. AAB, AAA, ABA, and ABC stackings considerably differ from one another in terms of the inter-LL category, frequency, intensity, and structure of absorption peaks. The main characteristics of LL wavefunctions and energy spectra and the Fermi-Dirac function are responsible for the configuration-enriched magneto-optical spectra. PMID:27305856

  18. Frequency-dependent energy absorption in the body and tail of the rodent carcass exposed to radiofrequency radiation. Final report, 31 June-31 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Bixby, R.R.; Padilla, J.M.

    1987-04-01

    The proportion of energy absorbed by the tail of a rat carcass was determined. Male (288 g - 457 g) and female (195 g - 249 g) Sprague-Dawley rat carcasses were exposed to far-field, continuous-wave radiofrequency radiation (RFR). The carcasses were split into two mixed groups: one group was exposed to 700-MHz RFR; and the other, to 350-MHz RFR. Immediately after each exposure, the tail was severed, and the specific absorption rates (SAR) of the tail and body were determined by Dewar flask calorimetry. For example, a 195 g female exposed to 700 MHz yielded SARs of 1.26 and 3.64 mW/g (normalized to 1 nW/cm2 incident power density) for its body and tail, respectively; the tail contributed 6.7% to the total energy absorption. For a 205 g female exposed to 350 MHz, however, the tail contributed 19.0% to the whole-body absorption. Normalized SARs of 0.40 and 4.03 nW/g per mW/cm2 were obtained for the body and tail, respectively.

  19. Förster resonance energy transfer, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. I. Full cumulant expansions and system-bath entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jian; Cao, Jianshu

    2015-03-07

    We study the Förster resonant energy transfer rate, absorption and emission spectra in multichromophoric systems. The multichromophoric Förster theory (MCFT) is determined from an overlap integral of generalized matrices related to the donor’s emission and acceptor’s absorption spectra, which are obtained via a full 2nd-order cumulant expansion technique developed in this work. We calculate the spectra and MCFT rate for both localized and delocalized systems, and calibrate the analytical 2nd-order cumulant expansion with the exact stochastic path integral method. We present three essential findings: (i) The role of the initial entanglement between the donor and its bath is found to be crucial in both the emission spectrum and the MCFT rate. (ii) The absorption spectra obtained by the cumulant expansion method are nearly identical to the exact spectra for both localized and delocalized systems, even when the system-bath coupling is far from the perturbative regime. (iii) For the emission spectra, the cumulant expansion can give reliable results for localized systems, but fail to provide reliable spectra of the high-lying excited states of a delocalized system, when the system-bath coupling is large and the thermal energy is small. This paper also provides a simple golden-rule derivation of the MCFT, reviews existing methods, and motivates further developments in the subsequent papers.

  20. Evaluation of intensity and energy interaction parameters for the complexation of Pr(III) with selected nucleoside and nucleotide through absorption spectral studies.

    PubMed

    Bendangsenla, N; Moaienla, T; David Singh, Th; Sumitra, Ch; Rajmuhon Singh, N; Indira Devi, M

    2013-02-15

    The interactions of Pr(III) with nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied in different organic solvents employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. The magnitudes of the variations in both energy and intensity interaction parameters were used to explore the degree of outer and inner sphere co-ordination, incidence of covalency and the extent of metal 4f-orbital involvement in chemical bonding. Various electronic spectral parameters like Slater-Condon (F(k)), Racah (E(k)), Lande parameter (ξ(4f)), Nephelauxatic ratio (β), bonding (b(1/2)), percentage covalency (δ) and intensity parameters like oscillator strength (P) and Judd Ofelt electronic dipole intensity parameter (T(λ), λ=2,4,6) have been evaluated. The variation of these evaluated parameters were employed to interpret the nature of binding of Pr(III) with different ligands i.e. Adenosine/ATP in presence and absence of Ca(2+). PMID:23257345

  1. Single-dot absorption spectroscopy and theory of silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sychugov, Ilya; Pevere, Federico; Luo, Jun-Wei; Zunger, Alex; Linnros, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Photoluminescence excitation measurements have been performed on single, unstrained oxide-embedded Si nanocrystals. Having overcome the challenge of detecting weak emission, we observe four broad peaks in the absorption curve above the optically emitting state. Atomistic calculations of the Si nanocrystal energy levels agree well with the experimental results and allow identification of some of the observed transitions. An analysis of their physical nature reveals that they largely retain the indirect band-gap structure of the bulk material with some intermixing of direct band-gap character at higher energies.

  2. Visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Edward T.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    1981-01-01

    The visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene at ≈ 108 K from 5500 Å to 7200 Å was measured by using a pulsed tunable dye laser, immersed-transducer, gated-detection opto-acoustic spectroscopy technique. The absorption features show the strongest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈2 × 10-2 cm-1 and the weakest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈1 × 10-4 cm-1. Proposed assignments of the observed absorption peaks involve combinations of overtones of local and normal modes of vibration of ethylene. PMID:16592978

  3. Hubbert's Peak: the Impending World oil Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffeyes, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Global oil production will probably reach a peak sometime during this decade. After the peak, the world's production of crude oil will fall, never to rise again. The world will not run out of energy, but developing alternative energy sources on a large scale will take at least 10 years. The slowdown in oil production may already be beginning; the current price fluctuations for crude oil and natural gas may be the preamble to a major crisis. In 1956, the geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s.1 Almost everyone, inside and outside the oil industry, rejected Hubbert's analysis. The controversy raged until 1970, when the U.S. production of crude oil started to fall. Hubbert was right. Around 1995, several analysts began applying Hubbert's method to world oil production, and most of them estimate that the peak year for world oil will be between 2004 and 2008. These analyses were reported in some of the most widely circulated sources: Nature, Science, and Scientific American.2 None of our political leaders seem to be paying attention. If the predictions are correct, there will be enormous effects on the world economy. Even the poorest nations need fuel to run irrigation pumps. The industrialized nations will be bidding against one another for the dwindling oil supply. The good news is that we will put less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The bad news is that my pickup truck has a 25-gallon tank.

  4. Theoretical X-ray production cross sections at incident photon energies across L{sub i} (i=1-3) absorption edges of Br

    SciTech Connect

    Puri, Sanjiv

    2015-08-28

    The X-ray production (XRP) cross sections, σ{sub Lk} (k = l, η, α, β{sub 6}, β{sub 1}, β{sub 3}, β{sub 4}, β{sub 9,10}, γ{sub 1,5}, γ{sub 2,3}) have been evaluated at incident photon energies across the L{sub i}(i=1-3) absorption edge energies of {sub 35}Br using theoretical data sets of different physical parameters, namely, the L{sub i}(i=1-3) sub-shell the X-ray emission rates based on the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, the fluorescence and Coster Kronig yields based on the Dirac-Hartree-Slater (DHS) model, and two sets of the photoionisation cross sections based on the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Slater (RHFS) model and the Dirac-Fock (DF) model, in order to highlight the importance of electron exchange effects at photon energies in vicinity of absorption edge energies.

  5. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  6. Challenges and Solutions for Frequency and Energy References for Spaceborne and Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Andreas; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Witschas, Benjamin; Wirth, Martin; Büdenbender, Christian; Amediek, Axel; Ehret, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The stringent requirements for both the frequency stability and power reference represent a challenging task for Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars (IPDA) to measure greenhouse gas columns from satellite or aircraft. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. The concepts and realization of these important sub-systems are discussed.

  7. Peak acceleration during impact with helmet materials: effects of impactor mass and speed.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Timothy Paul

    2014-01-01

    The impact properties of six foam materials used for energy absorption as the liner of children's helmets, reported by Gimbel and Hoshizaki are considered further. In high-energy impacts, almost complete compression of the energy-absorbing material (bottoming out) may occur, and the severity of the impact increases greatly. Too soft a material means bottoming out occurs at low speeds, but if it is too stiff, the material itself is injurious. The fitting of equations to results in 'no bottoming out' and 'bottoming out' conditions may help assessment of what compromise is appropriate. The equations in this article correspond to peak acceleration being proportional to power functions of impactor speed and mass. 1. When there was no bottoming out, peak acceleration was found to be proportional to m (∧)(c-1).v (∧)(2c), with c being approximately 0.25. 2. For bottoming out, peak acceleration was found to be proportional to m (∧)(p).v (∧)(q), with p and q being approximately 2 and approximately 3. 3. The constants of proportionality were related to material density in a regular way. PMID:24444232

  8. First-principles calculation of ground and excited-state absorption spectra of ruby and alexandrite considering lattice relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Shinta; Sasaki, Tomomi; Taniguchi, Rie; Ishii, Takugo; Ogasawara, Kazuyoshi

    2009-02-01

    We performed first-principles calculations of multiplet structures and the corresponding ground-state absorption and excited-state absorption spectra for ruby (Cr3+:α-Al2O3) and alexandrite (Cr3+:BeAl2O4) which included lattice relaxation. The lattice relaxation was estimated using the first-principles total energy and molecular-dynamics method of the CASTEP code. The multiplet structure and absorption spectra were calculated using the configuration-interaction method based on density-functional calculations. For both ruby and alexandrite, the theoretical absorption spectra, which were already in reasonable agreement with experimental spectra, were further improved by consideration of lattice relaxation. In the case of ruby, the peak positions and peak intensities were improved through the use of models with relaxations of 11 or more atoms. For alexandrite, the polarization dependence of the U band was significantly improved, even by a model with a relaxation of only seven atoms.

  9. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  10. Hubbert's Peak: A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Oil and its by-products, as used in manufacturing, agriculture, and transportation, are the lifeblood of today's 7 billion-person population and our 65T world economy. Despite this importance, estimates of future oil production seem dominated by wishful thinking rather than quantitative analysis. Better studies are needed. In 1956, Dr. M.King Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Thus, the peak of oil production is referred to as ``Hubbert's Peak.'' Prof. Al Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on population and oil. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. This paper extends this line of work to include analyses of individual countries, inclusion of multiple Gaussian peaks, and analysis of reserves data. While this is not strictly a predictive theory, we will demonstrate a ``closed'' story connecting production, oil-in-place, and reserves. This gives us the ``most likely'' estimate of future oil availability. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  11. Neutron-induced peaks in Ge detectors from evaporation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gete, E.; Measday, D. F.; Moftah, B. A.; Saliba, M. A.; Stocki, T. J.

    1997-02-01

    We have studied the peak shapes at 596 and 691 keV resulting from fast neutron interactions inside germanium detectors. We have used neutrons from a 252Cf source, as well as from the 28Si(μ -, nv), and 209Bi(π -, xn) reactions to compare the peaks and to check for a dependence of peak shape on the incoming neutron energy. In our investigation, no difference between these three measurements has been observed. In a comparison of these peak shapes with other studies, we found similar results to ours except for those measurements using monoenergetic neutrons in which a significant variation with neutron energy has been observed.

  12. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+641. 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km/s) spectrum of the broad-absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 angstroms, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III lambda977, Ly-beta, O VI lambda-lambda-1032,1038, Ly-alpha, N V lambda-lambda-1238,1242, Si IV lambda-lambda-1393,1402, and C IV lambda-lambda-1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km/s with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly-alpha flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The ultraviolet continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 angstroms in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21)/s, unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  13. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+64. 3.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; Fisher, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km s(exp -1) spectrum of the mini broad absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 A, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III (lambda)977, Ly(beta), O VI (lambda)(lambda)1032,1038, Ly(alpha), N V (lambda)(lambda)1238,1242, Si IV (lambda)(lambda)1393,1402, and C IV (lambda)(lambda)1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km s(exp -1) with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly(alpha) flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The UV (ultraviolet) continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 A in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  14. Study on peak shape fitting method in radon progeny measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinmin; Zhang, Lei; Abdumomin, Kadir; Tang, Yushi; Guo, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    Alpha spectrum measurement is one of the most important methods to measure radon progeny concentration in environment. However, the accuracy of this method is affected by the peak tailing due to the energy losses of alpha particles. This article presents a peak shape fitting method that can overcome the peak tailing problem in most situations. On a typical measured alpha spectrum curve, consecutive peaks overlap even their energies are not close to each other, and it is difficult to calculate the exact count of each peak. The peak shape fitting method uses combination of Gaussian and exponential functions, which can depict features of those peaks, to fit the measured curve. It can provide net counts of each peak explicitly, which was used in the Kerr method of calculation procedure for radon progeny concentration measurement. The results show that the fitting curve fits well with the measured curve, and the influence of the peak tailing is reduced. The method was further validated by the agreement between radon equilibrium equivalent concentration based on this method and the measured values of some commercial radon monitors, such as EQF3220 and WLx. In addition, this method improves the accuracy of individual radon progeny concentration measurement. Especially for the (218)Po peak, after eliminating the peak tailing influence, the calculated result of (218)Po concentration has been reduced by 21 %. PMID:25920795

  15. Part-body and multibody effects on absorption of radio-frequency electromagnetic energy by animals and by models of man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, O. P.; Hagmann, M. J.; Dandrea, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Fine structure in the whole-body resonant curve for radio-frequency energy deposition in man can be attributed to part-body resonances. As for head resonance, which occurs near 350 MHz in man, the absorptive cross section is nearly three times the physical cross section of the head. The arm has a prominent resonance at 150 MHz. Numerical solutions, antenna theory, and experimental results on animals have shown that whole-body energy deposition may be increased by 50 percent or more because of multiple bodies that are strategically located in the field. Empirical equations for SARs are also presented along with test data for several species of laboratory animals. Barbiturate anesthesia is sufficiently disruptive of thermoregulation that delta Ts of colonic temperature yield energy dose values in several mammals that compare quite favorably with those based on whole-body calorimetry.

  16. Modeling of gamma ray energy-absorption buildup factors for thermoluminescent dosimetric materials using multilayer perceptron neural network: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucuk, Nil; Manohara, S. R.; Hanagodimath, S. M.; Gerward, L.

    2013-05-01

    In this work, multilayered perceptron neural networks (MLPNNs) were presented for the computation of the gamma-ray energy absorption buildup factors (BA) of seven thermoluminescent dosimetric (TLD) materials [LiF, BeO, Na2B4O7, CaSO4, Li2B4O7, KMgF3, Ca3(PO4)2] in the energy region 0.015-15 MeV, and for penetration depths up to 10 mfp (mean-free-path). The MLPNNs have been trained by a Levenberg-Marquardt learning algorithm. The developed model is in 99% agreement with the ANSI/ANS-6.4.3 standard data set. Furthermore, the model is fast and does not require tremendous computational efforts. The estimated BA data for TLD materials have been given with penetration depth and incident photon energy as comparative to the results of the interpolation method using the Geometrical Progression (G-P) fitting formula.

  17. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  18. Absorption spectra of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; Wu, M. F.; Hsieh, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The low-frequency optical absorption properties of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field are investigated by using the gradient approximation. The spectral function exhibits symmetric delta-function like prominent peaks structure in a uniform magnetic field, and changes to asymmetric square-root divergent peaks structure when subjecting to a composite field. These asymmetric divergent peaks can be further classified into principal and secondary peaks. The spectral intensity and frequency of the absorption peaks depend sensitively on the strength and modulation period of the composite field. The transition channels of the absorption peaks are also analyzed. There exists an optical selection rule which is caused by the orthogonal properties of the sublattice wave functions. The evolution of the spectral frequency of the absorption peaks with the field strength is explored.

  19. Effects of heat transfer and energy absorption in the ablation of biological tissues by pulsetrain-burst (>100 MHz) ultrafast laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrester, Paul; Bol, Kieran; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin

    2006-09-01

    Energy absorption and heat transfer are important factors for regulating the effects of ablation of biological tissues. Heat transfer to surrounding material may be desirable when ablating hard tissue, such as teeth or bone, since melting can produce helpful material modifications. However, when ablating soft tissue it is important to minimize heat transfer to avoid damage to healthy tissue - for example, in eye refractive surgery (e.g., Lasik), nanosecond pulses produce gross absorption and heating in tissue, leading to shockwaves, which kill and thin the non-replicating epithelial cells on the inside of the cornea; ultrafast pulses are recognized to reduce this effect. Using a laser system that delivers 1ps pulses in 10μs pulsetrains at 133MHz we have studied a range of heat- and energy-transfer effects on hard and soft tissue. We describe the ablation of tooth dentin and enamel under various conditions to determine the ablation rate and chemical changes that occur. Furthermore, we characterize the impact of pulsetrain-burst treatment of collagen-based tissue to determine more efficient methods of energy transfer to soft tissues. By studying the optical science of laser tissue interaction we hope to be able to make qualitative improvements to medical treatments using lasers.

  20. Stochastic acceleration in peaked spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zasenko, V.; Zagorodny, A.; Weiland, J.

    2005-06-15

    Diffusion in velocity space of test particles undergoing external random electric fields with spectra varying from low intensive and broad to high intensive and narrow (peaked) is considered. It is shown that to achieve consistency between simulation and prediction of the microscopic model, which is reduced to Fokker-Planck-type equation, it is necessary, in the case of peaked spectrum, to account for temporal variation of diffusion coefficient occurring in the early stage. An analytical approximation for the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with a time and velocity dependent diffusion coefficients is proposed.

  1. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  2. Picosecond transient absorption rise time for ultrafast tagging of the interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillating crystals in high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Mechinsky, V.; Tikhomirov, A.; Vasil'ev, A.; Lecoq, P.

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the first results of a search of a signature for picosecond time stamps of the interaction between ionizing particles and transparent crystalline media. The induced absorption with sub-picosecond rise time observed in a cerium fluoride scintillation single crystal under UV excitation is directly associated with the ionization of Ce3+ atoms in CeF3 crystals, and the very fast occurrence thereof can be used to generate picosecond-precise time stamps corresponding to the interaction of ionizing particles with the crystal in high energy physics experiments.

  3. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  4. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  5. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  6. Peak Stress Testing Protocol Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of peak flows during wet weather is a common challenge across the country for municipal wastewater utilities with separate and/or combined sewer systems. Increases in wastewater flow resulting from infiltration and inflow (I/I) during wet weather events can result in op...

  7. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  8. Energy spectra of single neutrons and charged particles emitted following the absorption of stopped negative pions in 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernigoi, C.; Gabrielli, I.; Grion, N.; Pauli, G.; Saitta, B.; Ricci, R. A.; Boccaccio, P.; Viesti, G.

    1981-02-01

    Energy spectra have been measured of single neutrons, protons and deuterons emitted following the capture at rest of negative pions in 4He. The neutron energy spectrum has been measured with an energy resolution of 4% at 90 MeV. The absolute number of stopped pions has been measured.

  9. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7K : energy transfer and charge separation.

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S. R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Chemistry; LANL; NREL; Northwestern Univ.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approx}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251-2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin {alpha} Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to our earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup -1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup -1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup -1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation energies ({>=}1 {mu}J) at

  10. Time-resolved absorption changes of the pheophytin Q{sub x} band in isolated photosystem II reaction centers at 7 K: Energy transfer and charge separation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, S.R.; Seibert, M.; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1999-09-30

    The pheophytin a Q{sub x} spectral region of the isolated photosystem II reaction center was investigated at 7 K using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. At this temperature, uphill energy transfer, which greatly complicates the interpretation of the kinetics at or near room temperature, should be essentially shut off. Low-energy ({approximately}100 nJ) pulses at 661 and 683 nm were used to excite the short-wavelength and long-wavelength sides of the composite Q{sub y} band, providing preferential excitation of the accessory pigment pool and P680, respectively. The data analysis uses a background subtraction technique developed earlier (Greenfield et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 2251--2255) to remove the kinetic components of the data that are due to the large time-dependent changes in the background that are present in this spectral region. The instantaneous amplitude of the bleach of the pheophytin a Q{sub x} band with 683 nm excitation is roughly two-thirds of its final amplitude, providing strong evidence of a multimer description of the reaction center core. The subsequent growth of the bleach shows biphasic kinetics, similar to the earlier results at 278 K. The rate constant of the faster component is (5 ps){sup {minus}1} for 683 nm excitation (a factor of almost two faster than at 278 K), and represents the intrinsic rate constant for charge separation. The bleach growth with 661 nm excitation is also biphasic; however, the faster component appears to be a composite of a (5 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation following subpicosecond energy transfer to the long-wavelength pigments and a roughly (22 ps){sup {minus}1} component corresponding to charge separation limited by slow energy transfer. The combined quantum yield for these two energy transfer processes is near unity. For both excitation wavelengths, there is also a roughly (100 ps){sup {minus}1} component to the bleach growth. Exposure to high excitation

  11. Mineral content of vertebral trabecular bone: accuracy of dual energy quantitative computed tomography evaluated against neutron activation analysis and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Louis, O; Van den Winkel, P; Covens, P; Schoutens, A; Osteaux, M

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of preprocessing dual energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT) for assessment of trabecular bone mineral content (BMC) in lumbar vertebrae. The BMC of 49 lumbar vertebrae taken from 16 cadavers was measured using dual energy QCT with advanced software and hardware capabilities, including an automated definition of the trabecular region of interest (ROI). The midvertebral part of each vertebral body was embedded in a polyester resin and, subsequently, an experimental ROI was cut out using a scanjet image transmission procedure and a computer-assisted milling machine in order to mimic the ROI defined on QCT. After low temperature ashing, the experimental ROIs reduced to a bone powder were submitted to either nondestructive neutron activation analysis (n = 49) or to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (n = 45). BMC obtained with neutron activation analysis was closely related (r = 0.896) to that derived from atomic absorption spectrometry, taken as the gold standard, with, however, a slight overestimation. BMC values measured by QCT were highly correlated with those assessed using the two reference methods, all correlation coefficients being > 0.841. The standard errors of the estimate ranged 47.4-58.9 mg calcium hydroxyapatite in the regressions of BMC obtained with reference methods against BMC assessed by single energy QCT, 47.1-51.9 in the regressions involving dual energy QCT. We conclude that the trabecular BMC of lumbar vertebrae can be accurately measured by QCT and that the superiority in accuracy of dual energy is moderate, which is possible a characteristic of the preprocessing method. PMID:8024849

  12. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  13. Mineral resources of the Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas, Hinsdale County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, R.F.; Grauch, R.I.; Hon, K.; Bove, D.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Korzeb, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas are located 2-12 mi southwest of Lake City, CO. Much of the study areas has high mineral resource potential for precious and base metals in various ore deposit types. The rest of the study areas has moderate potential for these commodities. Two areas in the Redcloud Peak study area have moderate potential for molybdenum and copper in quartz monzonite-associated porphyry deposits. Part of the Handies Peak study area has moderate potential for molybdenum in granite-related porphyry deposits. The southwestern part of the Redcloud Peak study area has high potential for uranium in vein-type deposits. Moderate potential for this commodity extends over other parts of both study areas. The mineral resource potential for gold and silver (in clastic-sediment-hosted disseminated-type epithermal deposits) is low in those parts of both study areas underlain by the Henson Member of the Silverton Volcanics. The mineral and energy resource potential for aluminum (in alunite deposits), uranium (in disseminated deposits), and geothermal sources is low throughout both study areas. Based on currently available data, there is no energy resource potential for coal, oil, and natural gas. The study areas have no identified resources.

  14. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  15. Mid-IR near-perfect absorption with a SiC photonic crystal with angle-controlled polarization selectivity.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, G C R; Foteinopoulou, S

    2012-06-01

    We theoretically investigate mid-IR absorption enhancement with a SiC one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) microstructure at the frequency regime of the phonon-polariton band gap, where efficient absorption is unattainable in the bulk material. Our study reveals an intricate relationship between absorption efficiency and the energy velocity of light propagation, that is far more complex than hitherto believed. In particular, our findings suggest that absorption peaks away from the photonic-crystal band edge where energy velocity is minimum. While efficient absorption is still associated with a slow-light mode, the latter is faster by at least an order of magnitude in comparison to the bulk material. Moreover, our calculations suggest that absorption becomes optimal when light gradually slow downs as it enters the PC. Relying on this insight, we achieved near-perfect absorption around the phonon-polariton mid-gap frequency with a PC with a suitably terminated end face. We further demonstrate that the near-perfect absorptive property can be tuned with the incident light angle, to be polarization insensitive or polarization selective. We believe our proposed non-metallic paradigm opens up a new route for harnessing infrared absorption with semiconductor and ionic-crystal materials. PMID:22714331

  16. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOEpatents

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  17. Electronic structure and absorption spectrum of biexciton obtained by using exciton basis

    SciTech Connect

    Shiau, Shiue-Yuan; Combescot, Monique; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2013-09-15

    We approach the biexciton Schrödinger equation not through the free-carrier basis as usually done, but through the free-exciton basis, exciton–exciton interactions being treated according to the recently developed composite boson many-body formalism which allows an exact handling of carrier exchange between excitons, as induced by the Pauli exclusion principle. We numerically solve the resulting biexciton Schrödinger equation with the exciton levels restricted to the ground state and we derive the biexciton ground state as well as the bound and unbound excited states as a function of hole-to-electron mass ratio. The biexciton ground-state energy we find, agrees reasonably well with variational results. Next, we use the obtained biexciton wave functions to calculate optical absorption in the presence of a dilute exciton gas in quantum well. We find an asymmetric peak with a characteristic low-energy tail, identified with the biexciton ground state, and a set of Lorentzian-like peaks associated with biexciton unbound states, i.e., exciton–exciton scattering states. Last, we propose a pump–probe experiment to probe the momentum distribution of the exciton condensate. -- Highlights: •New composite boson many-body theory is used to derive exactly the biexciton Schrödinger equation using the exciton basis. •We solved the 2D and 3D biexciton ground- and excited-state binding energies for various electron-to-hole mass ratios. •The absorption spectrum shows an asymmetric low-energy peak identified with the biexciton ground state. •High-energy Lorentzian-like peaks in the absorption spectrum are associated with the exciton–exciton scattering states. •The exciton gas momentum distribution can be determined by the absorption spectrum via the biexciton wave functions.

  18. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  20. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon. PMID:16400712

  1. Absorption spectra of irradiated XRCT radiochromic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-06-01

    Gafchromic XRCT radiochromic film is a self-developing high sensitivity radiochromic film product which can be used for assessment of delivered radiation doses which could match applications such as computed tomography (CT) dosimetry. The film automatically changes colour upon irradiation changing from a yellow to green/brown colour. The absorption spectra of Gafchromic XRCT radiochromic film as measured with reflectance spectrophotometry have been investigated to analyse the dosimetry characteristics of the film. Results show two main absorption peaks produced from irradiation located at 636 nm and 585 nm. This is similar to EBT Gafchromic film. A high level of sensitivity is found for this film with a 1 cGy applied dose producing an approximate net optical density change of 0.3 at 636 nm. This high sensitivity combined with its relatively energy independent nature around the 100 kVp to 150 kVp x-ray energy range provides a unique enhancement in dosimetric measurement capabilities over currently available dosimetry films for CT applications.

  2. Impact of intermediate localized states on nonlinear optical absorption of Ga-Ge-Se nanocolloidal solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, Indu; Divya, S.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Thomas, Sheenu

    2013-01-01

    We present the linear and nonlinear optical studies on nanocolloidal solutions of Ga9Ge27Se64 glass with varying concentrations. Optical bandgap of the material is found to vary with respect to the concentration of the solute in the solution. An intermediate peak in the band tail of the absorption spectra is observed due to the presence of energy band in the forbidden gap. The existence of fluorescence emission confirms the above argument. Nonlinear absorption is studied using open aperture Z-scan technique. The mechanism behind nonlinear absorption is predicted as two photon as well as two step photon absorption. Nonlinearity increases with decrease in optical bandgap which in turn depends on the concentration of the nanocolloidal solutions.

  3. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone affects energy homeostasis and intestinal fat absorption in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Even, Patrick; Lafont, René; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2014-04-10

    In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a supplementation of a high-fat diet with a quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone (QE) or pure 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) could prevent the development of obesity. In line with the anti-obesity effect of QE, we used indirect calorimetry to examine the effect of dietary QE and 20E in high-fat fed mice on different components of energy metabolism. Mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by QE or pure 20E for 3 weeks. As compared to mice maintained on a low-fat diet, HF feeding resulted in a marked physiological shift in energy homeostasis, associating a decrease in global energy expenditure (EE) and an increase in lipid utilization as assessed by the lower respiratory quotient (RQ). Supplementation with 20E increased energy expenditure while food intake and activity were not affected. Furthermore QE and 20E promoted a higher rate of glucose oxidation leading to an increased RQ value. In QE and 20E-treated HFD fed mice, there was an increase in fecal lipid excretion without any change in stool amount. Our study indicates that anti-obesity effect of QE can be explained by a global increase in energy expenditure, a shift in glucose metabolism towards oxidation to the detriment of lipogenesis and a decrease in dietary lipid absorption leading to reduced dietary lipid storage in adipose tissue. PMID:24534167

  4. Zener Relaxation Peak in an Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zheng-Cun; Cheng, He-Fa; Gong, Chen-Li; Wei, Jian-Ning; Han, Fu-Sheng

    2002-11-01

    We have studied the temperature spectra of internal friction and relative dynamic modulus of the Fe-(25 wt%)Cr-(5 wt%)Al alloy with different grain sizes. It is found that a peak appears in the internal friction versus temperature plot at about 550°C. The peak is of a stable relaxation and is reversible, which occurs not only during heating but also during cooling. Its activation energy is 2.5 (+/- 0.15) eV in terms of the Arrhenius relation. In addition, the peak is not obvious in specimens with a smaller grain size. It is suggested that the peak originates from Zener relaxation.

  5. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head & brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.; Christ, A.; Bit-Babik, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases.

  6. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  7. Peak Performance for Healthy Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKale, Chuck; Townsend, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Far from the limelight of LEED, Energy Star or Green Globes certifications are the energy codes developed and updated by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the International Code Council (ICC) through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) as minimum guidelines for building envelope,…

  8. United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, R.J.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

  9. X-ray Absorption Studies in Spinel-Type LiMn 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. S.; Jang, L. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Tsai, Y. C.; Hwang, Y. D.; Liu, R. G.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic structure of the spinel-type LiMn2O4as the cathode material for the application in secondary batteries was probed using both MnK- andL23-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra. Based on the energy shifts of the absorption peaks in the XANES spectrum correlated to the effective charge, the valence of Mn in LiMn2O4was determined to be ∼4+. This suggests that the chemical substitution of low valent Li+ions into the Mn sites is possible to result in high valence of Mn.

  10. Dual-peak dose measurement for radiochromic films by a newly developed spectral microdensitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Fung, K.K.L.; Kwok, C.S.

    2005-06-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry is usually based on densitometric methods which use an analyzing light source of a fixed or a broad spectrum of wavelengths. These methods have not exploited the sensitivity of the dose response of the RCF otherwise attainable by using a light source with wavelengths peaked at the two absorption peaks in the absorption spectrum of the RCF. A new algorithm of dual-peak dose measurement for the RCF has been proposed in this paper to make use of these dual absorption peaks to achieve the maximum attainable sensitivity. This technique relies on the measurement of the transmittance of the RCF at the wavelength of the major and minor absorption peaks, respectively. The dual-peak dose measurement is accomplished with the aid of a novel spectral microdensitometer developed in our Institute. The microdensitometer utilizes a monochromator to provide a light source of which the wavelength can be matched precisely to the wavelength of the absorption peaks of the RCF. The doses obtained at these wavelengths are fed into a weighted objective function and an optimum dose is searched by minimizing the objective function to give the best estimate of the dose deposited on the film. An initial test shows that there is a good agreement between the estimated and actual dose deposited; and the maximum discrepancy was found to be less than 1%.

  11. Mathematical description and method of calculation of fluctuations in energy absorption in small volumes of material irradiated by ionizing particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lappa, A.V.

    1985-03-01

    This paper presents closed representations obtained for the density of the distribution and the moments of the absorbed energy in an isolated region of an irradiated absorber. For a broad class of problems, these quantities are expressed in terms of the differential flux densities of charged particles integrated over the angles and defined energy functions. This is dependent on the dimensions of the region and the material present there. The method of calculation deriving from the given representations is discussed.

  12. Eyesight and the solar Wien peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James M.

    2003-03-01

    It is sometimes said that humans see best at yellow-green wavelengths because they have evolved under a Sun whose blackbody spectrum has a Wien peak in the green part of the spectrum. However, as a function of frequency, the solar blackbody spectrum peaks in the infrared. Why did human vision not evolve toward a peak sensitivity in this range, if the eye is an efficient quantum detector of photons? The puzzle is resolved if we assume that natural selection acted in such a way as to maximize the amount of energy that can be detected by the retina across a range of wavelengths (whose upper and lower limits are fixed by biological constraints). It is then found that our eyes are indeed perfectly adapted to life under a class G2 star. Extending this reasoning allows educated guesses to be made about the kind of eyesight that might have evolved in extrasolar planetary systems such as that of the red dwarf Gliese 876.

  13. Evaluation of Compton attenuation and photoelectric absorption coefficients by convolution of scattering and primary functions and counts ratio on energy spectra

    PubMed Central

    Ashoor, Mansour; Asgari, Afrouz; Khorshidi, Abdollah; Rezaei, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Estimation of Compton attenuation and the photoelectric absorption coefficients were explored at various depths. Methods: A new method was proposed for estimating the depth based on the convolution of two exponential functions, namely convolution of scattering and primary functions (CSPF), which the convolved result will conform to the photopeak region of energy spectrum with the variable energy-window widths (EWWs) and a theory on the scattering cross-section. The triple energy-windows (TEW) and extended triple energy-windows scatter correction (ETEW) methods were used to estimate the scattered and primary photons according to the energy spectra at various depths due to a better performance than the other methods in nuclear medicine. For this purpose, the energy spectra were employed, and a distinct phantom along with a technetium-99 m source was simulated by Monte Carlo method. Results: The simulated results indicate that the EWW, used to calculate the scattered and primary counts in terms of the integral operators on the functions, was proportional to the depth as an exponential function. The depth will be calculated by the combination of either TEW or ETEW and proposed method resulting in the distinct energy-window. The EWWs for primary photons were in good agreement with those of scattered photons at the same as depths. The average errors between these windows for both methods TEW, and ETEW were 7.25% and 6.03% at different depths, respectively. The EWW value for functions of scattered and primary photons was reduced by increasing the depth in the CSPF method. Conclusions: This coefficient may be an index for the scattering cross-section. PMID:26170567

  14. Off-peak electric heat for broiler houses

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, K.M.; Beston, T.A.; Collins, N.E.; McCarthy, G.S.

    1983-06-01

    An instrumented broiler house (5,000 bird capacity) was heated from September 1982 to February 1983 using off-peak electric energy. A storage/exchange tank containing water received heat energy from 10 PM to 6 AM and transferred heat to house air to maintain temperature. Cost of construction and operation are presented. Off-peak pricing was evaluated using our systems analysis model.

  15. The Sacramento Peak fast microphotometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrambide, M. R.; Dunn, R. B.; Healy, A. W.; Porter, R.; Widener, A. L.; November, L. J.; Spence, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Sacramento Peak Observatory Fast Microphotometer translates an optical system that includes a laser and photodiode detector across the film to scan the Y direction. A stepping motor moves the film gate in the X direction. This arrangement affords high positional accuracy, low noise (0.002 RMS density units), modest speed (5000 points/second), large dynamic range (4.5 density units), high stability (0.005 density units), and low scattered light. The Fast Microphotometer is interfaced to the host computer by a 6502 microprocessor.

  16. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  17. Yield and energy absorption in single and multi-phase glassy polymers subjected to multiaxial stress states: Theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Ramaswamy

    This thesis investigates the macroscopic yield behavior and microscopic energy absorption mechanisms in single and multiphase polymers. One unique aspect is the evaluation of polymers under multiaxial loading conditions. This is important because in many applications polymers are subjected to complex loading conditions and hence optimal design requires experimental evaluation and modeling of behavior under multiaxial stress states. This work has resulted in a more quantitative understanding of yield and energy absorption in the different polymers considered. Multiaxial stress states are achieved using thin-walled hollow cylinder specimens. The hollow tubes are simultaneously subjected to internal pressure and axial load, leading to biaxial stress states. Stress states ranging from uniaxial compression to equibiaxial tension are interrogated using the same specimen geometry, a procedure uncovering true material behavior. In the first part of this study, a generalized model for the yield behavior of single-phase polymers is evaluated for a polycarbonate system. The generalized model accounts not only accounts for viscoelasticity (i.e., rate and temperature dependence) but also the effect of pressure on yield behavior. The effects of physical aging on the behavior of amorphous polycarbonate are also highlighted. For rubber-modified polymers, existing models for both macroscopic yield behavior and the onset of microscopic damage (e.g., cavitation) are evaluated under multiaxial conditions (chapter 3). Serious discrepancies are found for both cases, prompting an investigation into the nature of energy absorption mechanisms in the materials. Apart from the chosen rubber-modified systems, a toughening mechanism in the form of overlapping parallel cracks is identified to be generic to a range of polymers (chapter 4). The last part of the thesis (chapter 5) involves a quantitative investigation of interactions in overlapping crack patterns. This effort is vital, because for

  18. Determination of the K absorption edge energy of Ho in element and its compounds using the bremsstrahlung technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niranjana, K. M.; Badiger, N. M.

    2013-05-01

    The K shell binding energies of Ho in element and in compounds Ho2O3 and HoF3 have been measured for the first time by adopting a novel method. The method involves a weak beta source, an external bremsstrahlung (EB) converter, element and compound targets and a high-resolution HPGe detector coupled to a 16K multichannel analyser. A spectrum of continuous EB photons, produced by the interaction of beta particles from a 90Sr-90Y radioactive source with an iron foil, is allowed to pass through the element and compound targets of Ho. The spectrum of transmitted EB photons is measured with a high-resolution HPGe detector spectrometer. The transmitted spectrum shows a sudden drop in intensity at K shell binding energy of the target. Such a sudden drop, which is essentially due to the onset of the K shell photoelectric effect, has been used to determine the K shell binding energy of Ho in element. The K shell binding energies of Ho in Ho2O3 and HoF3 compounds have also been determined using the same technique. From these data, the chemical shift in the K shell binding energy has been measured. It is found to be positive for Ho2O3 and negative for HoF3, indicating the dependence of the chemical shift on the crystal structure.

  19. SYNCHROTRON AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION: ASYMPTOTIC FORMS FOR FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2009-12-10

    We calculate and plot the synchrotron power, P {sub n}u, the absorption coefficient, alpha{sub n}u, and the source function, S {sub n}u, for a power-law distribution of charged particles with Lorentz parameter values gamma{sub 1} <= gamma <= gamma{sub 2}. For this purpose, we define parametric functions Z{sub p} (x, eta), H{sub p} (x, eta), and Y{sub p} (x, eta) with eta = gamma{sub 2}/gamma{sub 1}, such that P {sub n}u propor to Z{sub p} (gamma{sup -2} {sub 1}nu/nu{sub 0}, eta), alpha{sub n}u propor to H{sub p} (gamma{sup -2} {sub 1}nu/nu{sub 0}, eta), and S {sub n}u propor to Y{sub p} (gamma{sup -2} {sub 1}nu/nu{sub 0}, eta). Corresponding asymptotic forms are also calculated and plotted for three frequency ranges, i.e., x << 1, 1 << x << eta{sup 2}, and x >> eta{sup 2}, especially in the case of finite parameter eta. Asymptotic forms of the middle range are possible for functions Z{sub p} and Y{sub p} for p>1/3, and for function H{sub p} for all positive values of index p. A characteristic value, eta {sub c}(p, epsilon) (with epsilon << 1), is then defined for each of the above functions so that for eta approx> eta {sub c}(p, epsilon) the middle range asymptotic forms could be considered. Further calculation details are also presented and discussed.

  20. Liquid helium cryostat with internal fluorescence detection for x-ray absorption studies in the 2-6 keV energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane Holman, Karen L.; Latimer, Matthew J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2004-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in the intermediate x-ray region (2-6 keV) for dilute biological samples has been limited because of detector/flux limitations and inadequate cryogenic instrumentation. We have designed and constructed a new tailpiece/sample chamber for a commercially available liquid helium cooled cryostat which overcomes difficulties related to low fluorescence signals by using thin window materials and incorporating an internal photodiode detector. With the apparatus, XAS data at the Cl, S, and Ca K edges have been collected on frozen solutions and biological samples at temperatures down to 60 K. A separate chamber has been incorporated for collecting room-temperature spectra of standard compounds (for energy calibration purposes) which prevents contamination of the cryostat chamber and allows the sample to remain undisturbed, both important concerns for studying dilute and radiation-sensitive samples.