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Sample records for absorption peak shifts

  1. Hydrogen bonding between acetate-based ionic liquids and water: Three types of IR absorption peaks and NMR chemical shifts change upon dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Cao, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yuwei; Mu, Tiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen-bonding interaction between acetate-based ionic liquids (AcIL) and water was investigated by attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) and 1H NMR. Interestingly, the relative change of chemical shift δ of 1H NMR upon dilution could be divided into three regions. All the H show an upfield shift in Regions 1 and 2 while a different tendency in Region 3 (upfield, no, and downfield shift classified as Types 1, 2, 3, respectively). For ATR-IR, the red, no, or blue shift of νOD (IR absorption peak of OD in D2O) and ν± (IR absorption peak of AcILs) also have three types, respectively. Two-Times Explosion Mechanism (TTEM) was proposed to interpret the dynamic processes of AcILs upon dilution macroscopically, meanwhile an Inferior Spring Model (ISM) was proposed to help to understand the TTEM microscopically, All those indicate that AcILs present the state of network, sub-network, cluster, sub-cluster, ion pairs and sub-ion pairs in sequence upon dilution by water and the elongation of hydrogen bonding between AcILs-water, between cation-anion of AcILs is plastic deformation rather than elastic deformation.

  2. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  3. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  4. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  5. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  6. Microwave peak absorption frequency of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangze; Chen, Mingdong

    2008-09-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction is a new effective method which has practical applications in many fields. Microwave heating is one of its physical mechanisms, and it also has the characteristic of selectivity. When the applied microwave frequency equals a certain absorption frequency of the material (or specific component), the material will intensively absorb microwave energy. This is also known as resonant absorption, and the frequency is called the peak absorption frequency which depends on the physical structure of the material. In this work, dynamic hydrogen bond energy was included in molecular activation energy; with the liquid cell model, the expression of interaction energy between dipolar molecules was derived. The rotational relaxation time was gotten from the Eyring viscosity formula. Then based on the relationship between dielectric dissipation coefficient and relaxation time, the expression of microwave peak absorption frequency as a function of the material physical structure, rotational inertia and electrical dipole moment of molecules was established. These theoretical formulas were applied to water and benzene, and the calculated results agree fairly well with the experimental data. This work can not only deepen the study of the interaction between microwave and material, but also provide a possible guide for the experiment of microwave-assisted extraction.

  7. Peak Shift Phenomenon: A Teaching Activity for Basic Learning Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Kenneth D.

    2002-01-01

    Stimulus discrimination is a standard subject in undergraduate courses presenting basic principles of learning, and a particularly interesting aspect of discrimination is the peak shift phenomenon. Peak shift occurs in generalization tests following intradimensional discrimination training as a displacement of peak responding away from the S+ (a…

  8. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  9. Determination of the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jia-Hua; Wang, Zhe; Lebanowski, Logan; Lin, Guey-Lin; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-08-01

    A physically motivated function was developed to accurately determine the total absorption peak in an electromagnetic calorimeter and to overcome biases present in many commonly used methods. The function is the convolution of a detector resolution function with the sum of a delta function, which represents the complete absorption of energy, and a tail function, which describes the partial absorption of energy and depends on the detector materials and structures. Its performance was tested with the simulation of three typical cases. The accuracy of the extracted peak value, resolution, and peak area was improved by an order of magnitude on average, relative to the Crystal Ball function.

  10. Cause of absorption band shift of disperse red-13 attached on silica spheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Hyung-Deok; Kim, Na-Rae; Bang, Byeong-Gyu; Park, Eun-Hye; Kang, Kwang-Sun

    2015-08-01

    A reversible color change and large absorption band shift have been observed for the disperse red-13 (DR-13) attached on the surface of the monodisperse silica spheres. Two step synthetic processes including urethane bond formation and hydrolysis-condensation reactions were used to attach the DR-13 on the surface of the silica spheres. After the reaction, the characteristic absorption peak at 2270 cm-1 representing the -N=C=O asymmetric stretching vibration disappeared, and the a new absorption peak at 1700 cm-1 corresponding the C=O stretching vibration appeared. A visual and reversible color change was observed before and after wetting in alcohol. Although the absorption peak of DR-13 in alcohol is at 510 nm, the absorption peak shifts to 788 nm when it is dried. The absorption peak shifts to 718 nm when it is wetted in alcohol. This result can be explained by the formation of intramolecular charge transfer band.

  11. Peak, multi-peak and broadband absorption in graphene-based one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloua, R.; Kebbab, Z.; Chiker, F.; Khadraoui, M.; Sahraoui, K.; Bouzidi, A.; Medles, M.; Mathieu, C.; Benramdane, N.

    2014-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of enhancing light absorption in graphene-based one dimensional photonic crystal. We demonstrate that it is possible to achieve total light absorption at technologically important wavelengths using one-dimensional graphene-based photonic crystals. By means of the transfer matrix method, we investigate the effect of refractive indices and layer numbers on the optical response of the structure. We found that it is possible to achieve one peak, multi-peak or broadband, and complete optical absorption. As a result, the proposed photonic structures enable myriad potential applications such as photodetection, shielding and optical sensing.

  12. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, A. V.; Gusarov, A. I.; Mégret, P.; Wuilpart, M.; Kinet, D.; Zhukov, A. V.; Novikov, S. G.; Svetukhin, V. V.; Fotiadi, A. A.

    2016-02-01

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ~100 kGy, the shift is ~20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing.

  13. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  14. Contingency discriminability and peak shift in concurrent schedules.

    PubMed

    Krägeloh, Christian U; Elliffe, Douglas M; Davison, Michael

    2006-07-01

    We investigated the effects of discriminative stimuli on choice in a highly variable environment using a procedure in which multiple two-key concurrent VI VI components changed every 10 reinforcers and were signaled by differential flashes of red and yellow keylights. Across conditions, five pigeons were exposed to a number of different combinations of the following component reinforcer ratios: 27:1, 9:1, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, 1:9, 1:27. Overall, there was clear control by the component signals in that preference, early in components and particularly before any reinforcers had been delivered, was ordinally related to the signaled reinforcer ratios. In conditions in which only two components arranged unequal reinforcer ratios (e.g., 27:1 and 1:27) with the remaining components arranging 1:1 reinforcer ratios, preference before the first reinforcer in a component showed peak shift in that the most extreme preference did not occur in the unequal reinforcer-ratio components, but in 1:1 components further towards the ends of the stimulus dimension. The contingency-discriminability model (Davison & Nevin, 1999) was fitted to the data and provided an excellent description of the interactions between stimulus and reinforcer effects in a highly variable environment. PMID:16903490

  15. GENETIC SIGNATURE OF ADAPTIVE PEAK SHIFT IN THREESPINE STICKLEBACK

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Sean M.; Tamkee, Patrick; Summers, Brian; Balabahadra, Sarita; Marks, Melissa; Kingsley, David M.; Schluter, Dolph

    2015-01-01

    Transition of an evolving population to a new adaptive optimum is predicted to leave a signature in the distribution of effect sizes of fixed mutations. If they affect many traits (are pleiotropic), large effect mutations should contribute more when a population evolves to a farther adaptive peak than to a nearer peak. We tested this prediction in wild threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) by comparing the estimated frequency of large effect genetic changes underlying evolution as the same ancestor adapted to two lake types since the end of the ice age. A higher frequency of large effect genetic changes (quantitative trait loci) contributed to adaptive evolution in populations that adapted to lakes representing a more distant optimum than to lakes in which the optimum phenotype was nearer to the ancestral state. Our results also indicate that pleiotropy, not just optimum overshoot, contributes to this difference. These results suggest that a series of adaptive improvements to a new environment leaves a detectable mark in the genome of wild populations. Although not all assumptions of the theory are likely met in natural systems, the prediction may be robust enough to the complexities of natural environments to be useful when forecasting adaptive responses to large environmental changes. PMID:22834743

  16. Simple peak shift analysis of time-of-flight data with a slow instrumental response function.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Goro; Tamura, Mamoru

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of time-of-flight (TOF) data is sometimes limited by the instrumental response function, and optical parameters are extracted from the observed response curve by several mathematical methods, such as deconvolution. In contrast to this, we demonstrate that a method using shifts of the peak time of the response curve with different source-detector separations can yield the average path length of the light traveling in a tissue-like sample without deconvolution. In addition, combining the intensity information allows us to separate the scattering and absorption coefficients. This simple method is more robust in signal-to-noise ratio than the moment analysis, which also does not require the deconvolution procedure, because the peak position is not significantly dependent on the baseline fluctuation and the contamination of the scattering. The analysis is demonstrated by TOF measurements of an Intralipid solution at 800 nm, and is applied to the measurements at 1.29 microm, where the temporal response of photomultiplier tubes is not sufficiently good. PMID:15847597

  17. REMOVING BARYON-ACOUSTIC-OSCILLATION PEAK SHIFTS WITH LOCAL DENSITY TRANSFORMS

    SciTech Connect

    McCullagh, Nuala; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2013-01-20

    Large-scale bulk flows in the universe distort the initial density field, broadening the baryon-acoustic-oscillation (BAO) feature that was imprinted when baryons were strongly coupled to photons. Additionally, there is a small shift inward in the peak of the conventional overdensity correlation function, a mass-weighted statistic. This shift occurs when high-density peaks move toward each other. We explore whether this shift can be removed by applying to the density field a transform (such as a logarithm) that gives fairer statistical weight to fluctuations in underdense regions. Using configuration-space perturbation theory in the Zel'dovich approximation, we find that the log-density correlation function shows a much smaller inward shift in the position of the BAO peak at low redshift than is seen in the overdensity correlation function. We also show that if the initial, Lagrangian density of matter parcels could be estimated at their Eulerian positions, giving a displaced-initial-density field, its peak shift would be even smaller. In fact, a transformed field that accentuates underdensities, such as the reciprocal of the density, pushes the peak the other way, outward. In our model, these shifts in the peak position can be attributed to shift terms, involving the derivative of the linear correlation function, that entirely vanish in this displaced-initial-density field.

  18. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  19. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  20. Shift in the LHC Higgs diphoton mass peak from interference with background

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stephen P.

    2012-10-01

    The Higgs diphoton amplitude from gluon fusion at the LHC interferes with the continuum background induced by quark loops. I investigate the effect of this interference on the position of the diphoton invariant mass peak used to help determine the Higgs mass. At leading order, the interference shifts the peak towards lower mass by an amount of order 150 MeV or more, with the precise value dependent on the methods used to analyze and fit the data.

  1. A Computer-Based Laboratory Project for the Study of Stimulus Generalization and Peak Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derenne, Adam; Loshek, Eevett

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes materials designed for classroom projects on stimulus generalization and peak shift. A computer program (originally written in QuickBASIC) is used for data collection and a Microsoft Excel file with macros organizes the raw data on a spreadsheet and creates generalization gradients. The program is designed for use with human…

  2. Spectral calibration for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer based on absorption peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, YaSheng; Chen, Yan; Liao, Ningfang; Lyu, Hang; He, Shufang; Wan, Lifang

    2015-08-01

    A new calibration method for infrared hyperspectral imaging Fourier transform spectrometer is presented. Two kinds of common materials as Polypropylene (PP) and Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films which have special absorption peaks in the infrared band were used in the calibration experiment. As the wavelengths at the sharp absorption peaks of the films are known, an infrared imaging spectrometer can be calibrated on spectra with two or three peaks. With high precision and stability, this method simplifies the calibration work. It is especially appropriate for the measuring condition with a lack of calibration equipment or with inconvenience to calibrate the multiple light sources outdoors.

  3. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  4. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-21

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications. PMID:27143336

  5. Twin-peaks absorption spectra of excess electron in ionic liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Kondoh, Takafumi; Yoshida, Yoichi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2014-07-01

    The solvated electron in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) has been the subject of several investigations and several reports exist on its nature and absorption spectrum. These studies concluded that the solvated electron exhibits an absorption spectrum peaking in the 1000-1400 nm region; a second absorption band peaking in the UV region has been assigned to the hole or dication radicals simultaneously formed in the system. Here we report on the fate of the excess electron in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, P14+/NTf2- using nanosecond pulse radiolysis. Scavenging experiments allowed us to record and disentangle the complex spectrum measured in P14+/NTf2-. We identified a bi-component absorption spectrum, due to the solvated electron, the absorption maxima located at 1080 nm and around 300 nm, as predicted by previous ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations for the dry excess electron. We also measured the spectra using different ionic liquids and confirmed the same feature of two absorption peaks. The present results have important implications for the characterization of solvated electrons in ionic liquids and better understanding of their structure and reactivity.

  6. Giant blue shifted photoluminescence peak from the edges of CVD grown monolayer MoS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yore, Alexander; Crumrine, Wendy; Smithe, Kirby; Pop, Eric; Wang, Bin; Newaz, Akm

    To probe the electronic and optical properties of direct band-gap monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides, such as band structure and excitons, micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy has become an attractive and standard tool. Here, we present our experimental work on spatial scanning of photoluminescence of monolayer MoS2 grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using an ultrasmall blue laser (wavelength 405 nm) beam spot with beam diameter as small as ~ 200 nm. We have observed a giant blue shift, as large as ~ 40 nm or ~ 100 meV, of the A-excitonic peak in the photoluminescence spectra from the edges when compared to luminescence from the inside. This giant blue shift may result from the following: (i) compressive strain at the edges; (ii) the enhanced dielectric screening caused by the increased electron density at the metallic Mo-edges; and (iii) chemical impurities.

  7. Tiny peaks vs mega backgrounds: a general spectroscopic method with applications in resonant Raman scattering and atmospheric absorptions.

    PubMed

    Auguié, Baptiste; Reigue, Antoine; Le Ru, Eric C; Etchegoin, Pablo G

    2012-09-18

    A simple method using standard spectrometers with charge-coupled device (CCD) detectors is described to routinely measure background-corrected spectra in situations where the signal is composed of weak spectral features (such as Raman peaks or absorption lines) engulfed in a much stronger (by as much as ∼10(5)) broad background. The principle of the method is to subtract the dominant fixed-structure noise and obtain a shot-noise limited spectrum. The final noise level can therefore be reduced as desired by sufficient integration time. The method requires multiple shifts of the diffraction gratings to extract the pixel-dependent noise structure, which is then used as a flat-field correction. An original peak-retrieval procedure is proposed, demonstrating accurate determination of peak lineshapes and linewidths and robustness on practical examples where conventional methods would not be applicable. Examples are discussed to illustrate the potential of the technique to perform routine resonant Raman measurements of fluorescent dyes with high quantum yield, using conventional Raman systems. The method can equally be applied to other situations where small features are masked by a broad overwhelming background. An explicit example is given with the measurement of weak absorption lines in atmospheric gases. PMID:22894881

  8. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  9. Hue-shift model for DLP projector with the white peaking function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Il-Su; Ha, Ho-Gun; Kim, Dae-Chul; Ha, Yeong-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Projectors have become common display devices, not only for office and school presentations, but also for home theater entertainment. Although a completely dark room is the ideal venue for watching a projected image, in most situations (including classrooms and conference rooms) the viewing conditions are not completely dark, and ambient light falling on the screen produces a background light level with the image projected on top. As the background light increases, it becomes more difficult to see the projected image, which becomes dull and may appear washed out. What is really happening is that the ambient light reduces the contrast of the image. While the amount of light contributing to the image remains the same, more light has been projected onto the screen by other light sources. This effect can be reduced by employing the white-peaking function of a digital light-processing (DLP) projector, which adjusts the white segment of the color wheel, resulting in more natural and vivid images. Although the chromaticity coordinates for an image projected with and without white peaking are the same, when white is added to the projected image, the perceived hue changes. This phenomenon is known as the Abney effect. This paper presents a model of this hue-shift phenomenon and proposes a hue-correction method. For evaluation purposes, an observer-preference test is conducted on several test images with and without hue shifts, and z-scores are utilized to compare the results.

  10. The shifting nature of vegetation controls on peak snowpack with varying slope and aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, J. A.; Harpold, A. A.; Broxton, P. D.; Brooks, P. D.

    2012-12-01

    The controls on peak seasonal snowpack are known to shift between forested and open environments as well as with slope and aspect. Peak snowpack is predicted well by interception models under uniformly dense canopy, while topography, wind and radiation are strong predictors in open areas. However, many basins have complex mosaics of forest canopy and small gaps, where snowpack controls involve complex interactions among climate, topography and forest structure. In this presentation we use a new fully distributed tree-scale model to investigate vegetation controls on snowpack for a range of slope and aspect, and we evaluate the energy balance in forest canopy and gap environments. The model is informed by airborne LiDAR and ground-based observations of climate, vegetation and snowpack. It represents interception, snow distribution by wind, latent and sensible heat fluxes, and radiative fluxes above and below the canopy at a grid scale of 1 m square on an hourly time step. First, the model is minimally calibrated using continuous records of snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). Next, the model is evaluated using distributed observations at peak accumulation. Finally, the domain is synthetically altered to introduce ranges of slope and aspect. Northerly aspects accumulate greater peak SWE than southerly aspects (e.g. 275 mm vs. 250 mm at a slope of 28 %) but show lower spatial variability (e. g. CV = 0.14 vs. CV = 0.17 at slope of 28 %). On northerly aspects, most of the snowpack remains shaded by vegetation, whereas on southerly aspects the northern portions of gaps and southern forest edges receive direct insolation during late winter. This difference in net radiation makes peak SWE in forest gaps and adjacent forest edges more sensitive to topography than SWE in areas under dense canopy. Tree-scale modeling of snow dynamics over synthetic terrain offers extensive possibilities to test interactions among vegetation and topographic controls.

  11. Evidence for an environment-dependent shift in the baryon acoustic oscillation peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roukema, Boudewijn F.; Buchert, Thomas; Ostrowski, Jan J.; France, Martin J.

    2015-04-01

    The Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric assumes comoving spatial rigidity of metrical properties. The curvature term in comoving coordinates is environment independent and cannot evolve. In the standard model, structure formation is interpreted accordingly: structures average out on the chosen metrical background, which remains rigid in comoving coordinates despite nonlinear structure growth. The latter claim needs to be tested, since it is a hypothesis that is not derived using general relativity. We introduce a test of the comoving rigidity assumption by measuring the two-point autocorrelation function on comoving scales - assuming FLRW comoving spatial rigidity - in order to detect shifts in the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak location for luminous red galaxy (LRG) pairs of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7. In tangential directions, subsets of pairs overlapping with superclusters or voids show the BAO peak. The tangential BAO peak location for overlap with Nadathur & Hotchkiss superclusters is 4.3 ± 1.6 h-1 Mpc less than that for LRG pairs unselected for supercluster overlap, and 6.6 ± 2.8 h-1 Mpc less than that of the complementary pairs. Liivamägi et al. superclusters give corresponding differences of 3.7 ± 2.9 h-1 Mpc and 6.3 ± 2.6 h-1 Mpc, respectively. We have found moderately significant evidence (Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests suggest very significant evidence) that the BAO peak location for supercluster-overlapping pairs is compressed by about 6 per cent compared to that of the complementary sample, providing a potential challenge to FLRW models and a benchmark for predictions from models based on an averaging approach that leaves the spatial metric a priori unspecified.

  12. Effect of metalworking fluid mist exposure on cross-shift decrement in peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Park, Donguk; Chin, Kuwon; Kwag, Hunseok; Youn, Kanwoo; Choi, Sangjun; Ha, Kwonchul; Yoon, Chungsik; Yim, Sanghyuk

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to metalworking fluids (MWF) mist and cross-shift decrements in peak expiratory flow (PEF) were evaluated and their relationship was analyzed using several statistical methods. The objective of this study was to assess workers, exposure to MWF mineral mist and to find the MWF mist level for predicting cross-shift decrements in PEF. A total of 158 workers handling water-soluble MWF had MWF mist exposures with an arithmetic mean (AM) of 0.4 mg/m(3) (range: LOD-13.5 mg/m(3)), and 9.2% of workers (219) showed a cross-shift decline greater than 10% in PEF. MWF mist exposure and cross-shift decrements in PEF that were matched (n=113) were linearly significantly associated (R(2)=0.036, p=0.045) although the correlation was quite weak (r=0.189). We found a slight increase in cross-shift decrements in PEF with increased exposure to MWF aerosol mass concentration. The MWF mist exposure level was categorized into two or three groups by the cutoffs of either the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Recommended Exposure Level (NIOSH REL: 0.5 mg/m(3)) or the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Notice of Intended Change (ACGIH NIC: 0.2 mg/m(3)). The cross-shift decrement in PEF observed from workers exposed to > or =0.2 mg/m(3) was slightly higher than that of the exposure level of < or =0.2 mg/m(3) at p=0.207 while significant differences among categorized exposure groups (2 categories, <0.5 and > or =0.5 mg/m(3), or 3 categories, <0.2, 0.2-0.5 and > or =0.5 mg/m(3)) were not detected. In order to find out whether there is a specific level that allows us to predict cross-shift decrements in PEF, several statistical models were constructed. Logistic regression showed that the MWF concentration, whether treated as a continuous variable or a categorical variable, was not significantly associated with cross-shift decrements dichotomized by a cutoff of either 10% or 15% in PEF. We couldn't find evidence of a significant PEF decrement

  13. Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak Load Shifting & Spinning Reserves: Cost Benefit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.

    2010-12-01

    Abstract In this paper, we present the results of an analytical cost-benefit study of residential smart appliances in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the EPA and DOE to provide a 5% credit to meet ENERGY STAR eligibility criteria for products that meet the definition of a smart appliance. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the challenges associated with increased electricity demand, and increased penetration of renewable sources of power. Our analytical model utilizes current annual appliance electricity consumption data, and estimates what the wholesale grid operating cost savings would be if some percentage of appliance loads were shifted away from peak hours to run during off-peak hours, and appliance loads serve power system balancing needs such as spinning reserves that would otherwise have to be provided by generators. Historical wholesale market clearing prices (location marginal and spinning reserve) from major wholesale power markets in the United States are used to estimate savings. The savings are then compared with the five percent credit, to determine if the savings in grid operating costs (benefits) are at least as high as the credit (cost) if not higher.

  14. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic

  15. Research on double resonance peaks and abnormal frequency shift in permeability spectra of annealed FeCoB films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bailin; Yang, Yi; Tang, Dongming; Zhang, Baoshan; Lu, Mu; Lu, Huaixian; Shi, Yi

    2011-02-01

    A FeCoB magnetic film was prepared by a magnetron sputtering method and then was divided into several small pieces for vacuum annealing at different temperatures. The dependence of the coercivity along the hard axis on the annealing temperature reveals a degeneration of softness with the growth of grain size when the annealing temperature is above 350 °C. In permeability spectra measurements, double resonance peaks and an abnormal positive shift in the resonance peak at higher frequency with the increase in annealing temperature are observed. The existence of two peaks is attributed to the double magnetic phases (Fe and FeCo) in the films. The positive shift in the resonance peak at higher frequency has been analyzed and ascribed to the enhanced internal stray fields with the annealing temperature. This phenomenon of positive frequency-shift is very fascinating and novel, which makes the ferromagnetic films more efficient for the applications in the noise absorbing area.

  16. Cross-shift peak expiratory flow changes are unassociated with respirable coal dust exposure among South African coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Naidoo, R.N.; Robins, T.G.; Becklake, M.; Seixas, N.; Thompson, M.L.

    2007-12-15

    he objectives of this study were to determine whether cross-shift changes in peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were related to respirable dust exposure in South African coalminers. Fifty workers were randomly selected from a cohort of 684 miners from 3 bituminous coal mines in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Peak expiratory efforts were measured prior to the commencement of the shift, and at the end of the shift on at least two occasions separated by at least 2 weeks, with full shift personal dust sampling being conducted on each occasion for each participant. Interviews were conducted, work histories were obtained and cumulative exposure estimates were constructed. Regression models examined the associations of cross-shift changes in PEFR with current and cumulative exposure, controlling for shift, smoking and past history of tuberculosis. There were marginal differences in cross-shift PEFR (ranging from 0.1 to 2 L/min). Linear regression analyses showed no association between cross-shift change in PEFR and current or cumulative exposure. The specific shift worked by participants in the study showed no effect. Our study showed no association between current respirable dust exposure and cross-shift changes in PEFR. There was a non-significant protective effect of cumulative dust exposure on the outcome, suggesting the presence of a 'healthy worker survivor effect' in this data.

  17. Asymmetric and symmetric absorption peaks observed in infrared spectra of CO2 adsorbed on TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakawa, Koichiro; Sato, Yoshinori; Fukutani, Katsuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Infrared spectra of CO2 physisorbed on titania nanotubes (TiNTs), predominantly in the anatase polymorph, were measured at 81 K. Asymmetric and symmetric absorption peaks due to the antisymmetric stretch vibration (ν3) of CO2 were observed at 2340 cm-1 and 2350 cm-1, respectively. On the basis of the exposure- and time-dependence of the spectrum, the 2340 cm-1 peak was attributed to CO2 at the defective sites related to subsurface O vacancies (Vos) while the 2350 cm-1 peak was assigned to that at the fivefold coordinated Ti4+ sites. It was found that the generalized Fano line shape was well fitted to the 2340 cm-1 peak. We also observed an absorption peak at 2372 cm-1, which was attributed to the combination band of ν3 and the external mode of CO2 at Ti4+.

  18. Red-shift law of intense laser-induced electro-absorption in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hong-Xiang; Zu, Hao-Yue; Wu, Shao-Yi; Sun, Kai; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2014-02-01

    A theoretical study on the red-shift of laser-induced electro-absorption is presented. It is found that laser-induced red-shift scales with the cube root of the pump laser intensity in the optical tunneling regime and has an obvious deviation from this scale in the multi-photon regime. Our results show that in the optical tunneling regime, the laser-induced red shift has the same law as that in the direct current (DC) approximation. Though the scales are the same in the optical tunneling regime, the physical pictures in the two cases are quite different. The electro-absorption in the DC case is a tunneling-assisted transition process, while the laser-induced electro-absorption is a mixed multi-photon process.

  19. Ocular Measures of Sleepiness Are Increased in Night Shift Workers Undergoing a Simulated Night Shift Near the Peak Time of the 6-Sulfatoxymelatonin Rhythm

    PubMed Central

    Ftouni, Suzanne; Sletten, Tracey L.; Nicholas, Christian L.; Kennaway, David J.; Lockley, Steven W.; Rajaratnam, Shantha M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The study examined the relationship between the circadian rhythm of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) and ocular measures of sleepiness and neurobehavioral performance in shift workers undergoing a simulated night shift. Methods: Twenty-two shift workers (mean age 33.4, SD 11.8 years) were tested at approximately the beginning (20:00) and the end (05:55) of a simulated night shift in the laboratory. At the time point corresponding to the end of the simulated shift, 14 participants were classified as being within range of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s) acrophase— defined as 3 hours before or after aMT6s peak—and 8 were classified as outside aMT6s acrophase range. Participants completed the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) and the auditory psychomotor vigilance task (aPVT). Waking electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded and infrared reflectance oculography was used to collect ocular measures of sleepiness: positive and negative amplitude/velocity ratio (PosAVR, NegAVR), mean blink total duration (BTD), the percentage of eye closure (%TEC), and a composite score of sleepiness levels (Johns Drowsiness Scale; JDS). Results: Participants who were tested within aMT6s acrophase range displayed higher levels of sleepiness on ocular measures (%TEC, BTD, PosAVR, JDS), objective sleepiness (EEG delta power frequency band), subjective ratings of sleepiness, and neurobehavioral performance, compared to those who were outside aMT6s acrophase range. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that objective ocular measures of sleepiness are sensitive to circadian rhythm misalignment in shift workers. Citation: Ftouni S, Sletten TL, Nicholas CL, Kennaway DJ, Lockley SW, Rajaratnam SM. Ocular measures of sleepiness are increased in night shift workers undergoing a simulated night shift near the peak time of the 6-sulfatoxymelatonin rhythm. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(10):1131–1141. PMID:26094925

  20. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  1. The core shift measurements for two-sided jets affected by Free-Free absorption using VLBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haga, Takafumi; Doi, Akihiro; Murata, Yasuhiro; Sudou, Hiroshi; Kameno, Seiji; Hada, Kazuhiro; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    A radio core represents the peak of intensity in VLBI images and is located at the base of jets. It appears at different positions depending on frequencies. This is known as "core shift", caused by absorption of the core emission. The position of the central engine in an AGN can be estimated accurately by measuring the core shift with multifrequency and phase-referencing observations. We observed NGC 4261 using the VLBA at seven frequencies. This source is a nearby FR-I type radio galaxy at the distance of 30 Mpc and has prominent two-sided jets. We measured the core shifts in not only approaching side but also counter side of the jets. The positions of core at infinity of frequency in both side indicated to come close asymptotically to the same position, which was separated by 82±16 μas from 43 GHz core position, corresponding to 310±60 Rs (Schwarzschild radius). This source also has another feature that there is a region affected by free-free absorption (FFA) in the vicinity of the core and toward the counter jet. Moreover, we also found the same feature in other three sources, 3C 84, Cen A and Cyg A, which are also nearby galaxies with two-sided jets and with an indication of the FFA regions. We will measure the core shifts in these sources by using same technique as NGC 4261 in order to study the structure of circumnuclear plasma, to determine the position of the central engine and to test core shifts due to FFA.

  2. Thermal frequency shift and tunable microwave absorption in BiFeO3 family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong; Fang, Xiaoyong; Cao, Maosheng

    2016-04-01

    Tunable frequency is highly sought-after task of researcher, because of the potential for applications in selecting frequency, absorber, imaging and biomedical diagnosis. Here, we report the original observation of thermal frequency shift of dielectric relaxation in La/Nd doped BiFeO3 (BFO) in X-band from 300 to 673 K. It exhibits an unexpected result: the relaxation shifts to lower frequency with increasing temperature. The relaxation maximally shifts about a quarter of X-band. The nonlinear term of lattice vibration plays an important role in the frequency shift. The frequency shift leads to tuning microwave absorption, which almost covers the whole X-band by changing temperature. Meanwhile, the great increase of dielectric loss of La/Nd doped BFO due to thermal excited electron hopping enhances microwave absorption above ~460 and ~480 K, respectively. The microwave absorption of La/Nd doped BFO surpasses ‑20 dB at 673 K, and the minimum reflection loss of La doped BFO reaches ‑39 dB. These results open a new pathway to develop BFO-based materials in electromagnetic functional materials and devices for tunable frequency, stealth and thermal imaging at long wavelength.

  3. Thermal frequency shift and tunable microwave absorption in BiFeO3 family.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Fang, Xiaoyong; Cao, Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    Tunable frequency is highly sought-after task of researcher, because of the potential for applications in selecting frequency, absorber, imaging and biomedical diagnosis. Here, we report the original observation of thermal frequency shift of dielectric relaxation in La/Nd doped BiFeO3 (BFO) in X-band from 300 to 673 K. It exhibits an unexpected result: the relaxation shifts to lower frequency with increasing temperature. The relaxation maximally shifts about a quarter of X-band. The nonlinear term of lattice vibration plays an important role in the frequency shift. The frequency shift leads to tuning microwave absorption, which almost covers the whole X-band by changing temperature. Meanwhile, the great increase of dielectric loss of La/Nd doped BFO due to thermal excited electron hopping enhances microwave absorption above ~460 and ~480 K, respectively. The microwave absorption of La/Nd doped BFO surpasses -20 dB at 673 K, and the minimum reflection loss of La doped BFO reaches -39 dB. These results open a new pathway to develop BFO-based materials in electromagnetic functional materials and devices for tunable frequency, stealth and thermal imaging at long wavelength. PMID:27093897

  4. Thermal frequency shift and tunable microwave absorption in BiFeO3 family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yong; Fang, Xiaoyong; Cao, Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    Tunable frequency is highly sought-after task of researcher, because of the potential for applications in selecting frequency, absorber, imaging and biomedical diagnosis. Here, we report the original observation of thermal frequency shift of dielectric relaxation in La/Nd doped BiFeO3 (BFO) in X-band from 300 to 673 K. It exhibits an unexpected result: the relaxation shifts to lower frequency with increasing temperature. The relaxation maximally shifts about a quarter of X-band. The nonlinear term of lattice vibration plays an important role in the frequency shift. The frequency shift leads to tuning microwave absorption, which almost covers the whole X-band by changing temperature. Meanwhile, the great increase of dielectric loss of La/Nd doped BFO due to thermal excited electron hopping enhances microwave absorption above ~460 and ~480 K, respectively. The microwave absorption of La/Nd doped BFO surpasses −20 dB at 673 K, and the minimum reflection loss of La doped BFO reaches −39 dB. These results open a new pathway to develop BFO-based materials in electromagnetic functional materials and devices for tunable frequency, stealth and thermal imaging at long wavelength. PMID:27093897

  5. Absorption Peaks: α, β, γ and Their Covariance with Age and Hemoglobin in Human Blood Samples Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Domínguez, J. L.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, F. A.; Martínez-Ortiz, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.

    2012-11-01

    This study reports the absorption peaks α, β, γ in the Soret band of photoacoustic (PA) signals and their covariance with age and hemoglobin in human blood samples through PA spectroscopy. Samples were taken randomly from a masculine population grouped in three categories according to age: infants, young adults, and senior adults. Samples were prepared with two drops of blood from a 0.5 mL insulin syringe with a needle gauge 31G over 5 mm circles of filter paper. It was observed that the PA signal, the amplitude as a function of the wavelength, has a behavior as that reported for human blood for the three absorption peaks α, β, γ. In particular, the ratio γ/ β is due to electronic transitions associated with charge-transfer interactions of iron orbitals with the ligand states. Through an evaluation of optical absorption peaks in blood samples and their covariance with age and hemoglobin concentration, a relationship was found for the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with such parameters. Specifically, a negative covariance in the Soret band of the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with respect to both age and hemoglobin was found. This showed a tendency in their behavior. Further experiments of different populations may corroborate these conclusions.

  6. Age-related shifts in distortion product otoacoustic emissions peak-ratios and amplitude modulation spectra.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L

    2015-09-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2 > f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  7. Age-related Shifts in Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions Peak-ratios and Amplitude Modulation Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jesyin; Bartlett, Edward L.

    2015-01-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) is an important temporal cue for precise speech and complex sound recognition. However, functional decline of the auditory periphery as well as degradation of central auditory processing due to aging can reduce the salience and resolution of temporal cues. Age-related deficits in central temporal processing have previously been observed at more rapid AM frequencies and various AM depths. These centrally observed changes result from cochlear changes compounded with changes along the ascending auditory pathway. In fact, a decrease in ability to detect temporally modulated sounds accurately could originate from changes in cochlear filtering properties and in cochlear mechanics due to aging. Nonetheless, few studies have examined cochlear mechanisms in AM detection. To assess integrity of the mechanical properties of the auditory periphery, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) are a tool commonly used in clinics and in research. In this study, we measured DPOAEs to reveal age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and degradation in AM detection by basilar membrane vibration. Two tones (f1 and f2, f2>f1) at various f2/f1 ratios and simultaneous presentation of one AM and one pure tone were used as stimuli to evoke DPOAEs. In addition of observing reduced DPOAE amplitudes and steeper slopes in the input-output DPOAE functions, higher peak f2/f1 ratios and broader f2/f1 tuning were also observed in aged animals. Aged animals generally had lower distortion product (DP) and first sideband (SB 1) responses evoked by an f1 pure tone and an f2 AM tone, regardless of whether the AM frequency was 45 Hz or 128 Hz. SB 1 thresholds, which corresponds to the smallest stimulus AM depth that can induce cochlear vibrations at the DP generator locus, were higher in aged animals as well. The results suggest that age-related changes in peak f2/f1 ratio and AM detection by basilar membrane vibration are consistent with a reduction in endocochlear

  8. Doping dependent blue shift and linewidth broadening of intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-14

    Blue shift and broadening of the absorption spectra of mid-infrared intersubband transition in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN 10 quantum wells were observed with increasing doping density. As the doping density was increased from 6.6 × 10{sup 11} to 6.0 × 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −2} per a quantum well, the intersubband absorption peak energy shifted from 274.0 meV to 302.9 meV, and the full width at half maximum increased from 56.4 meV to 112.4 meV. Theoretical calculations reveal that the blue shift is due to many body effects, and the intersubband linewidth in doped AlGaN/GaN QW is mainly determined by scattering due to interface roughness, LO phonons, and ionized impurities.

  9. Doping dependent blue shift and linewidth broadening of intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Teruhisa; Arita, Munetaka; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-09-01

    Blue shift and broadening of the absorption spectra of mid-infrared intersubband transition in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN 10 quantum wells were observed with increasing doping density. As the doping density was increased from 6.6 × 1011 to 6.0 × 1012 cm-2 per a quantum well, the intersubband absorption peak energy shifted from 274.0 meV to 302.9 meV, and the full width at half maximum increased from 56.4 meV to 112.4 meV. Theoretical calculations reveal that the blue shift is due to many body effects, and the intersubband linewidth in doped AlGaN/GaN QW is mainly determined by scattering due to interface roughness, LO phonons, and ionized impurities.

  10. On the Energy Shift between Near-Field and Far-Field Peak Intensities in Localized Plasmon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zuloaga, Jorge; Nordlander, Peter

    2011-03-09

    The localized plasmons of metallic nanoparticles and nanostructures are known to display an interesting and apparently universal phenomenon: upon optical excitation, the maximum near-field enhancements occur at lower energies than the maximum of the corresponding far-field spectrum. Here we present an explanation for this behavior, showing that it results directly from the physics of a driven and damped harmonic oscillator. We show that the magnitude of the shift between the near- and far-field peak intensities depends directly on the total damping of the system, whether it is intrinsic damping within the metal of the nanoparticle or radiative damping of the localized plasmon.

  11. On the bathochromic shift of the absorption by astaxanthin in crustacyanin: a quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbeej, Bo; Eriksson, Leif A.

    2003-06-01

    The structural origin of the bathochromic shift assumed by the electronic absorption spectrum of protein-bound astaxanthin, the carotenoid that upon binding to crustacyanin is responsible for the blue colouration of lobster shell, is investigated by means of quantum chemical methods. The calculations suggest that the bathochromic shift is largely due to one of the astaxanthin C4 keto groups being hydrogen-bonded to a histidine residue of the surrounding protein, and that the effect of this histidine is directly dependent on its protonation state. Out of the different methodologies (CIS, TD-DFT, and ZINDO/S) employed to calculate wavelengths of maximum absorption, the best agreement with experimental data is obtained using the semiempirical ZINDO/S method.

  12. On the Theory of the Shift Linear Photovoltaic Effect in Semiconductors of Tetrahedral Symmetry Under Two-Photon Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasulov, R. Ya.; Rasulov, V. R.; Eshboltaev, I.

    2016-05-01

    An occurrence of the current of the shift linear photovoltaic effect under two-photon absorption of light in semiconductors without a center of symmetry with a complex band structure is theoretically analyzed. The contributions both from the simultaneous absorption of two photons and successive absorption of two single photons to the photocurrent are taken into account.

  13. High-speed power training in older adults: A shift of the external resistance at which peak power is produced

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Stephen P.; Gibson, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that power training increases peak power in older adults. Evaluating the external resistance (% one repetition-maximum [1RM]) at which peak power is developed is critical given that changes in the components of peak power (force and velocity) are dependent on the %1RM at which peak power occurs. The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in peak power (and the external resistance at which peak power occurred) after 12 weeks of high-speed power training versus traditional slow-speed strength training. Seventy-two older men and women were randomized to high-speed power training at 40% of the one-repetition maximum (1RM) (HSPT: n=24 [70.8±6.8 yrs]); traditional RT at 80% 1RM (STR: n=22 [68.6±7.8 yrs]); or control (CON: n=18 [71.5±6.1 yrs]). Measures of muscle performance were obtained at baseline and after the 12-week training intervention. Changes in muscle power and 1RM strength improved similarly with both HSPT and SSST, but HSPT shifted the external resistance at which peak power was produced to a lower external resistance (from 67%1RM to 52%1RM) compared to SSST (from 65%1RM to 62%1RM)(p<0.05), thus increasing the velocity component of peak power (change: HSPT=0.18±0.21m/s; SSST=−0.03±0.15 m/s)(p<0.05). Because sufficient speed of the lower limb is necessary for functional tasks related to safety (crossing a busy intersection, fall prevention), HSPT should be implemented in older adults to improve power at lower external resistances, thus increasing the velocity component of power and making older adults safer in their environment. These data provide clinicians with the necessary information to tailor exercise programs to the individual needs of the older adult, affecting the components of power. PMID:23897022

  14. Origin of the red shifts in the optical absorption bands of nonplanar tetraalkylporphyrins.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Raid E; Gazeau, Stéphanie; Pécaut, Jacques; Marchon, Jean-Claude; Medforth, Craig J; Shelnutt, John A

    2003-02-01

    The view that the large red shifts seen in the UV-visible absorption bands of peripherally crowded nonplanar porphyrins are the result of nonplanar deformations of the macrocycle has recently been challenged by the suggestion that the red shifts arise from substituent-induced changes in the macrocycle bond lengths and bond angles, termed in-plane nuclear reorganization (IPNR). We have analyzed the contributions to the UV-visible band shifts in a series of nickel or zinc meso-tetraalkylporphyrins to establish the origins of the red shifts in these ruffled porphyrins. Structures were obtained using a molecular mechanics force field optimized for porphyrins, and the nonplanar deformations were quantified by using normal-coordinate structural decomposition (NSD). Transition energies were calculated by the INDO/S semiempirical method. These computational studies demonstrate conclusively that the large Soret band red shifts ( approximately 40 nm) seen for very nonplanar meso-tetra(tert-butyl)porphyrin compared to meso-tetra(methyl)porphyrin are primarily the result of nonplanar deformations and not IPNR. Strikingly, nonplanar deformations along the high-frequency 2B(1u) and 3B(1u) normal coordinates of the macrocycle are shown to contribute significantly to the observed red shifts, even though these deformations are an order of magnitude smaller than the observed ruffling (1B(1u)) deformation. Other structural and electronic influences on the UV-visible band shifts are discussed and problems with the recent studies are examined (e.g., the systematic underestimation of the 2B(1u) and 3B(1u) modes in artificially constrained porphyrin structures that leads to a mistaken attribution of the red shift to IPNR). The effect of nonplanar deformations on the UV-visible absorption bands is then probed experimentally with a series of novel bridled nickel chiroporphyrins. In these compounds, the substituent effect is essentially invariant and the amount of nonplanar deformation

  15. Defects, stress and abnormal shift of the (0 0 2) diffraction peak for Li-doped ZnO films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yow-Jon; Wang, Mu-Shan; Liu, Chia-Jyi; Huang, Hsueh-Jung

    2010-10-01

    The effect of changes in Li content on the structural property of sol-gel Li-doped ZnO films was investigated in this study. The observed changes of the Li incorporation-induced strain along c-axis are closely related to the different ratios between the concentrations of Li interstitials (Li i) and Li substituting for Zn (Li Zn) in the films. According to the observed results from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and photoluminescence measurements, we found that the domination of the dissociative mechanism in the Li-doped ZnO films led to transformation from Li Zn to Li i, involving the formation of Zn vacancies (V Zn). In addition, the interaction between these defects (that is, Li Zn, Li i, V Zn and oxygen vacancy) and the crystal structure may lead to the abnormal shift of the (0 0 2) diffraction peak position determined from XRD measurements.

  16. Application of wavelet transforms to determine peak shape parameters for interference detection in graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, D. A.; Littlejohn, D.; Boulo, P. R.; Soraghan, J. S.

    1998-08-01

    A procedure to quantify the shape of the absorbance-time profile, obtained during graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry, has been used to detect interference effects caused by the presence of a concomitant salt. The quantification of the absorption profile is achieved through the use of the Lipschitz regularity, α0, obtained from the wavelet transform of the absorbance-time profile. The temporal position of certain features and their associated values of α0 provide a unique description of the shape of the absorbance-time profile. Changes to the position or values of α0 between standard and sample atomizations may be indicative of uncorrected interference effects. A weak, but linear, dependence was found of the value of α0 upon the analyte concentration for Cr and Cu. The ability of the Lipschitz regularity to detect interference effects was illustrated for Pb, Se and Cu. For Pb, the lowest concentration of NaCl added, 0.005% m/v, changed both the values of α0 and the peak height absorbance. For Se, no change in the peak height and peak area absorbance signals was detected up to a NaCl concentration of 0.25% m/v. The values of the associated Lipschitz regularities were found to be invariant to NaCl concentration up to this value. For Cu, a concentration of 0.05% m/v NaCl reduced the peak height and peak area absorbance signals by approximately 25% and significantly altered the values of α0.

  17. Dependence of Brillouin frequency shift on water absorption ratio in polymer optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakawa, Kazunari; Koike, Kotaro; Hayashi, Neisei; Koike, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2016-06-01

    We studied the dependence of the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS) on the water-absorption ratio in poly(methyl methacrylate)-based polymer optical fibers (POFs) to clarify the effect of the humidity on POF-based Brillouin sensors. The BFS, deduced indirectly using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique, decreased monotonically as the water absorption ratio increased, mainly because of the decrease in the Young's modulus. For the same water absorption ratio, the BFS change was larger at a higher temperature. The maximal BFS changes (absolute values) at 40, 60, and 80 °C were 158, 285, and 510 MHz, respectively (corresponding to the temperature changes of ˜9 °C, ˜16 °C, and ˜30 °C). Thus, some countermeasure against the humidity is indispensable in implementing strain/temperature sensors based on Brillouin scattering in POFs, especially at a higher temperature. On the other hand, Brillouin-based distributed humidity sensors might be developed by exploiting the BFS dependence on water absorption in POFs.

  18. A laboratory investigation of a physical mechanism for the extended infrared absorption ('red shift') in wheat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutt, J. B.; Rowland, R. R.; Heartly, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    Laboratory spectral measurements, on the components of both greenhouse and field grown winter wheat, were performed to identify the component and its appropriate response which gave rise to the extended infrared absorption or 'red shift' reported by Collins. Results of this study indicated that inherent intraplant adaxial (upper) leaf reflectances were of sufficient variability to suggest that an admixture of mechanisms may have utility on identifying the booting and head emergence stages in the life cycle of wheat. The physical mechanism for the shift was found to be relatively independent of the inherent variability in leaf spectra, and to be dependent upon the difference in the mode of deposition of cuticle upon the abaxial (lower) surface relative to that of the adaxial (upper) surface, the position of the flag leaf, and thus the surface exposed to the incident light during heading and after emergence of the head.

  19. Thermochromic Absorption, Fluorescence Band Shifts and Dipole Moments of BADAN and ACRYLODAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawski, A.; Kukliński, B.; Bojarski, P.

    2002-08-01

    Using the thermochromic shift method of absorption and fluorescence bands, the electric dipole moments in the ground (μg) and excited (μe) state are simultaneously determined for BADAN (6-bromoacetyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene) and ACRYLODAN (6-acrylolyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene) in ethyl acetate. For these compounds the same ratio μe/μg = 2.9 was found, which is similar to that of PRODAN (6-propionyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene). The estimated empirical Onsager radii afor BADAN and ACRYLODAN are the same, and they are somewhat smaller than the calculated geometrical values.

  20. Two attosecond pulse transient absorption spectroscopy and extraction of the instantaneous AC Stark shift in helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bækhøj, Jens E.; Bojer Madsen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    In two attosecond pulse absorption spectroscopy (TAPAS) the use of two attosecond XUV pulses allows the extraction of atomic and molecular quantum mechanical dipole phases from spectroscopic measurements. TAPAS relies on interference between processes that individually only include a single XUV photon, and therefore does not rely on high intensity attosecond pulses. To show the usefulness and limitations of the TAPAS method we investigate its capability of capturing the instantaneous AC Stark shift induced by a midinfrared 3200 nm pulse in the | 1{{s}}2{{p}}> state of helium.

  1. Use of Residential Smart Appliances for Peak-Load Shifting and Spinning Reserves Cost/Benefit Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Robert G.; Srivastava, Viraj; Li, Shun

    2010-12-01

    In this report, we present the results of an analytical cost/benefit study of residential smart appliances from a utility/grid perspective in support of a joint stakeholder petition to the ENERGY STAR program within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE). The goal of the petition is in part to provide appliance manufacturers incentives to hasten the production of smart appliances. The underlying hypothesis is that smart appliances can play a critical role in addressing some of the societal challenges, such as anthropogenic global warming, associated with increased electricity demand, and facilitate increased penetration of renewable sources of power. The appliances we consider include refrigerator/freezers, clothes washers, clothes dryers, room air-conditioners, and dishwashers. The petition requests the recognition that providing an appliance with smart grid capability, i.e., products that meet the definition of a smart appliance, is at least equivalent to a corresponding five percent in operational machine efficiencies. It is then expected that given sufficient incentives and value propositions, and suitable automation capabilities built into smart appliances, residential consumers will be adopting these smart appliances and will be willing participants in addressing the aforementioned societal challenges by more effectively managing their home electricity consumption. The analytical model we utilize in our cost/benefit analysis consists of a set of user-definable assumptions such as the definition of on-peak (hours of day, days of week, months of year), the expected percentage of normal consumer electricity consumption (also referred to as appliance loads) that can shifted from peak hours to off-peak hours, the average power rating of each appliance, etc. Based on these assumptions, we then formulate what the wholesale grid operating-cost savings, or benefits, would be if the smart capabilities of appliances were invoked, and

  2. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  3. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  4. Experimental phasing using zinc and sulfur anomalous signals measured at the zinc absorption peak.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Min-Kyu; Ji, Chang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Won; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2013-10-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal required for bacterial growth and survival. Excess free iron can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species that can cause severe damage to cellular functions. Cells have developed iron-sensing regulators to maintain iron homeostasis at the transcription level. The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is an iron-responsive regulator that controls the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis, bacterial virulence, stress resistance, and redox metabolism. Here, we report the expression, purification, crystallization, and phasing of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis Fur (BsFur) in the absence of regulatory metal ions. Crystals were obtained by microbatch crystallization method at 295 K and diffraction data at a resolution of 2.6 Å was collected at the zinc peak wavelength (λ=1.2823 Å). Experimental phasing identified the positions of one zinc atom and four sulfur atoms of cysteine residues coordinating the zinc atom, indicating that the data contained a meaningful anomalous scattering originating from the ordered zinc-coordinating sulfur atoms, in spite of the small anomalous signals of sulfur atoms at the examined wavelength. PMID:24173644

  5. Glass Composition-Dependent Silicate Absorption Peaks in FTIR Spectroscopy: Implications for Measuring Sample Thickness and Molecular H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Nichols, A. R.; Schipper, C. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is often used to measure the H2O and CO2 contents of volcanic glasses. A key advantage of FTIR over other analytical techniques is that it can reveal not only total H2O concentration but also H2O speciation, i.e. how much H2O is present as molecular H2O (H2Om) and how much as hydroxyl groups (OH) bound to the silicate network. This H2O speciation data can be used to investigate cooling rate and glass transition temperature of volcanic glasses, and to interpret H2O contents of pyroclasts affected by partial bubble resorption during cooling or secondary hydration after deposition. FTIR in transmitted light requires sample wafers polished on both sides of known thickness. Thickness is commonly measured using a micrometer but this may damage fragile samples and in samples with non-uniform thickness, e.g. vesicular samples, it is difficult to position at the exact location of FTIR analysis. Furthermore, in FTIR images or maps of such samples it is impractical to determine the thickness across the whole of the analysed area, resulting either in only a selection of the collected data being processed quantitatively and the rest being unused, or results being presented in terms of absorbance, which does not account for variations in thickness.It is known that FTIR spectra contain absorption peaks related to the glass aluminosilicate network at wavenumbers of ~2000, ~1830 and ~1600 cm-1 [1]. These have been shown to be proportional to sample thickness at the analysis location for one obsidian composition with up to 0.66 wt% H2O [2]. We test whether this calibration can be applied more widely by analysing a range of synthetic and natural glasses (andesitic to rhyolitic) to examine how the position and relative intensities of the different silicate absorption peaks vary with composition and H2O content. Our data show that even minor differences in composition necessitate a unique calibration. Furthermore, importantly we show how

  6. Tuning the Protein-Induced Absorption Shifts of Retinal in Engineered Rhodopsin Mimics.

    PubMed

    Suomivuori, Carl-Mikael; Lang, Lucas; Sundholm, Dage; Gamiz-Hernandez, Ana P; Kaila, Ville R I

    2016-06-01

    Rational design of light-capturing properties requires understanding the molecular and electronic structure of chromophores in their native chemical or biological environment. We employ here large-scale quantum chemical calculations to study the light-capturing properties of retinal in recently designed human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) variants (Wang et al. Science, 2012, 338, 1340-1343). Our calculations show that these proteins absorb across a large part of the visible spectrum by combined polarization and electrostatic effects. These effects stabilize the ground or excited state energy levels of the retinal by perturbing the Schiff-base or β-ionone moieties of the chromophore, which in turn modulates the amount of charge transfer within the molecule. Based on the predicted tuning principles, we design putative in silico mutations that further shift the absorption properties of retinal in hCRBPII towards the ultraviolet and infrared regions of the spectrum. PMID:27120137

  7. A study of the observed shift in the peak position of olivine Raman spectra as a result of shock induced by hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriss, Kathryn H.; Burchell, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Kuebler et al. () identified variations in olivine Raman spectra based on the composition of individual olivine grains, leading to identification of olivine composition from Raman spectra alone. However, shock on a crystal lattice has since been shown to result in a structural change to the original material, which produces a shift in the Raman spectra of olivine grains compared with the original unshocked olivine (Foster et al. ). This suggests that the use of the compositional calculations from the Raman spectra, reported in Kuebler et al. (), may provide an incorrect compositional value for material that has experienced shock. Here, we have investigated the effect of impact speed (and hence peak shock pressure) on the shift in the Raman spectra for San Carlos olivine (Fo91) impacting Al foil. Powdered San Carlos olivine (grain size 1-10 μm) was fired at a range of impact speeds from 0.6 to 6.1 km s-1 (peak shock pressures 5-86 GPa) at Al foil to simulate capture over a wide range of peak shock pressures. A permanent change in the Raman spectra was found to be observed only for impact speeds greater than ~5 km s-1. The process that causes the shift is most likely linked to an increase in the peak pressure produced by the impact, but only after a minimum shock pressure associated with the speed at which the effect is first observed (here 65-86 GPa). At speeds around 6 km s-1 (peak shock pressures ~86 GPa), the shift in Raman peak positions is in a similar direction (red shift) to that observed by Foster et al. () but of twice the magnitude.

  8. A study of the observed shift in the peak position of olivine Raman spectra as a result of shock induced by hypervelocity impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harriss, Kathryn H.; Burchell, M. J.

    2016-07-01

    Kuebler et al. (2006) identified variations in olivine Raman spectra based on the composition of individual olivine grains, leading to identification of olivine composition from Raman spectra alone. However, shock on a crystal lattice has since been shown to result in a structural change to the original material, which produces a shift in the Raman spectra of olivine grains compared with the original unshocked olivine (Foster et al. 2013). This suggests that the use of the compositional calculations from the Raman spectra, reported in Kuebler et al. (2006), may provide an incorrect compositional value for material that has experienced shock. Here, we have investigated the effect of impact speed (and hence peak shock pressure) on the shift in the Raman spectra for San Carlos olivine (Fo91) impacting Al foil. Powdered San Carlos olivine (grain size 1-10 μm) was fired at a range of impact speeds from 0.6 to 6.1 km s-1 (peak shock pressures 5-86 GPa) at Al foil to simulate capture over a wide range of peak shock pressures. A permanent change in the Raman spectra was found to be observed only for impact speeds greater than ~5 km s-1. The process that causes the shift is most likely linked to an increase in the peak pressure produced by the impact, but only after a minimum shock pressure associated with the speed at which the effect is first observed (here 65-86 GPa). At speeds around 6 km s-1 (peak shock pressures ~86 GPa), the shift in Raman peak positions is in a similar direction (red shift) to that observed by Foster et al. (2013) but of twice the magnitude.

  9. The spectral variability of the GHZ-Peaked spectrum radio source PKS 1718-649 and a comparison of absorption models

    SciTech Connect

    Tingay, S. J.; Macquart, J.-P.; Wayth, R. B.; Trott, C. M.; Emrich, D.; Collier, J. D.; Wong, G. F.; Rees, G.; Stevens, J.; Carretti, E.; Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Deshpande, A. A.; Goeke, R.; and others

    2015-02-01

    Using the new wideband capabilities of the ATCA, we obtain spectra for PKS 1718-649, a well-known gigahertz-peaked spectrum radio source. The observations, between approximately 1 and 10 GHz over 3 epochs spanning approximately 21 months, reveal variability both above the spectral peak at ∼3 GHz and below the peak. The combination of the low- and high-frequency variability cannot be easily explained using a single absorption mechanism, such as free–free absorption or synchrotron self-absorption. We find that the PKS 1718-649 spectrum and its variability are best explained by variations in the free–free optical depth on our line of sight to the radio source at low frequencies (below the spectral peak) and the adiabatic expansion of the radio source itself at high frequencies (above the spectral peak). The optical depth variations are found to be plausible when X-ray continuum absorption variability seen in samples of active galactic nuclei is considered. We find that the cause of the peaked spectrum in PKS 1718-649 is most likely due to free–free absorption. In agreement with previous studies, we find that the spectrum at each epoch of observation is best fit by a free–free absorption model characterized by a power-law distribution of free–free absorbing clouds. This agreement is extended to frequencies below the 1 GHz lower limit of the ATCA by considering new observations with Parkes at 725 MHz and 199 MHz observations with the newly operational Murchison Widefield Array. These lower frequency observations argue against families of absorption models (both free–free and synchrotron self-absorption) that are based on simple homogenous structures.

  10. Atomic Transition Frequencies, Isotope Shifts, and Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine Structure Constant for Studies of Quasar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; King, J. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.

    Theories unifying gravity with other interactions suggest spatial and temporal variation of fundamental "constants" in the Universe. A change in the fine structure constant, α = {e}2/hslash c , could be detected via shifts in the frequencies of atomic transitions in quasar absorption systems. Recent studies using 140 absorption systems from the Keck telescope and 153 from the Very Large Telescope, suggest that α varies spatially (61). That is, in one direction on the sky α seems to have been smaller at the time of absorption, while in the opposite direction it seems to have been larger.

  11. Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate improves calcium absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during peak production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Zhao, J P; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Zhang, Q; Lin, H

    2015-01-01

    The advantage of supplemental sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on eggshell quality in laying hens changes with age. Besides increasing calcium (Ca) secretion in the eggshell gland, it may improve Ca absorption in the intestine or kidney. Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384), 25 weeks of age, were allocated to two treatment groups in two experiments, each of which included 4 replicates of 24 hens. Hens were fed a basal diet (control) or the basal diet containing 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg for 50 or 20 weeks in Experiment 1 or 2, respectively. A 24-h continuous lighting regimen was used to allow hens to consume the dietary supplements during the period of active eggshell formation. In Experiment 1, particularly from 25 to 50 weeks of age, and in Experiment 2, NaHCO3 supplementation favoured hen-d egg production at the expense of lower egg weight. The increased eggshell thickness should have nothing to do with the additional eggshell formation, because of the unchanged egg mass and daily eggshell calcification. At 35 weeks of age in both experiments, NaHCO3 supplementation increased duodenal expression of calbindin-d28k (CaBP-D28k) protein, contributing to higher Ca retention and balance. From 50 to 75 weeks of age in Experiment 1, the hens had little response to NaHCO3 supplementation and showed a negative trend on eggshell thickness and strength. It is concluded that dietary supplementation with 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg improves Ca absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during the peak but not late production period, with the introduction of continuous lighting. PMID:26569471

  12. An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2013-11-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend therefore on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features within the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The developed method and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which implies direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by successive crystallization. Application of the method to

  13. Technical Note: An X-ray absorption method for the identification of calcium phosphate species using peak-height ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) studies on calcium phosphate species (Ca-P) deal with marginal differences among subtle spectral features despite a hitherto missing systematic breakdown of these differences. Related fingerprinting approaches depend, therefore, on spectral libraries that are not validated against each other, incomplete and scattered among publications. This study compiled a comprehensive spectral library from published reference compound libraries in order to establish more clear-cut criteria for Ca-P determination by distinctive phosphorus K-edge XANES features. A specifically developed normalization method identified diagnostic spectral features in the compiled library, e.g. by uniform calculation of ratios between white-line and secondary peak heights. Post-processing of the spectra (n = 81) verified distinguishability among most but not all phases, which included hydroxylapatite (HAP), poorly crystalline HAP, amorphous HAP, fluorapatite, carbonate fluorapatite (CFAP), carbonate hydroxylapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), brushite, monetite, monocalcium phosphate, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP), anapaite, herderite, scholzite, messelite, whiteite and P on CaCO3. Particularly, peak-height ratios significantly improved analyte specificity, e.g. by supplementary breakdown into OCP and ACP. The spectral analysis also revealed Ca-P standards that were rarely investigated or inappropriately synthesized, and thus provides a basis for standard selection and synthesis. The method developed and resulting breakdown by species were subsequently tested on Ca-P spectra from studies on bone and sediment. The test indicated that bone material likely comprises only poorly crystalline apatite, which confirms direct nucleation of apatite in bone. This biological apatite formation is likely opposed to that of sedimentary apatite, which apparently forms by both direct nucleation and successive crystallization. Application of

  14. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds under Lap Shear Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-06-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) under lap shear loading condition. DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. Static weld strength tests using lap shear samples were performed on the joint populations with various fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with conventionally required fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 welds under lap shear loading. Moreover, failure mode has strong influence on weld peak load and energy absorption for all the DP800 welds and the TRIP800 small welds: welds failed in pullout mode have statistically higher strength and energy absorption than those failed in interfacial fracture mode. For TRIP800 welds above the critical fusion zone level, the influence of weld failure modes on peak load and energy absorption diminishes. Scatter plots of peak load and energy absorption versus weld fusion zone size were then constructed, and the results indicate that fusion zone size is the most critical factor in weld quality in terms of peak load and energy absorption for both DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds.

  15. [Research on the influence of LED temperature shifts on differential optical absorption spectroscopy for measuring NO2].

    PubMed

    Ling, Liu-Yi; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Zheng, Ni-Na; Ye, Cong-Lei; Li, Ang; Hu, Ren-Zhi

    2012-11-01

    Influences of LEDs (without etalon structure and center wavelengths are respectively 370 nm (near-UV), 452 nm (blue) and 660 nm(red)) temperature shifts on differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS) for measuring NO2 were studied. NO2 absorption spectra were formed using LED emitting spectra at 10 degrees C. The measured LED spectra at other temperatures were used as reference spectra of DOAS. Thus, NO2 differential optical densities under different LED temperature shifts were acquired and then NO2 differential cross-sections were fitted to the acquired differential optical densities. From fitting results, the linear relations of 0.995, 0.945 and 0.989 correlation between delta of fitting residual and near-UV, blue and red LEDs temperature shifts were found and their slopes are respectively 1.12 x 10(-3), 5.25 x 10(-5) and 7.45 x 10(-4) degrees C(-1). The fitting results show that the influence of temperature shifts of blue LED on DOAS retrieval is negligible and the temperature shifts of near-UV and red LED are impressible to DOAS measurement resulting in degradation of detection sensitivity. The retrieval results of blue LED with and without etalon with similar temperature properties were compared and showed that etalon of LED will greatly increase the influence of temperature shifts of LED on DOAS retrieval. PMID:23387143

  16. Identification of B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure peaks of boron nitride thin films prepared by sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Masahito; Miyamoto, Kazuyoshi; Mitamura, Tohru; Mochiji, Kozo

    2010-09-15

    Four {pi}{sup *} resonance peaks were observed in the B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of boron nitride thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering. In the past, these peaks have been explained as the K-absorption of boron atoms, which are present in environment containing nitrogen vacancies, the number of which is 1-3 corresponding to the three peaks at higher photon energy. However, the authors found that there was a strong correlation between the intensities of these three peaks and that of O-K absorption after wide range scanning and simultaneous measurement of nitrogen and oxygen K-absorptions of the BN films. Therefore, the authors conclude that these three peaks at the higher energy side correspond to boron atoms bound to one-to-three oxygen atoms instead of three nitrogen atoms surrounding the boron atom in the h-BN structure. The result of the first-principles calculation with a simple cluster model supported the validity of this explanation.

  17. Mechanism of Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions, Amorphization, and Absorption-Edge Shift in Photovoltaic Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Szafrański, Marek; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Our single-crystal X-ray diffraction study of methylammonium lead triiodide, MAPbI3, provides the first comprehensive structural information on the tetragonal phase II in the pressure range to 0.35 GPa, on the cubic phase IV stable between 0.35 and 2.5 GPa, and on the isostructural cubic phase V observed above 2.5 GPa, which undergoes a gradual amorphization. The optical absorption study confirms that up to 0.35 GPa, the absorption edge of MAPbI3 is red-shifted, allowing an extension of spectral absorption. The transitions to phases IV and V are associated with the abrupt blue shifts of the absorption edge. The strong increase of the energy gap in phase V result in a spectacular color change of the crystal from black to red around 3.5 GPa. The optical changes have been correlated with the pressure-induced strain of the MAPbI3 inorganic framework and its frustration, triggered by methylammonium cations trapped at random orientations in the squeezed voids. PMID:27538989

  18. The {ital b} Distribution and the Velocity Structure of Absorption Peaks in the Ly{alpha} Forest

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, L.

    1999-06-01

    A theory is developed that relates the observed {ital b} parameter of a Ly{alpha} absorption line to the velocity curvature of the corresponding peak in the optical depth fluctuation. Its relation to the traditional interpretation of {ital b} as the thermal broadening width is discussed. It is demonstrated that, independent of the details of the cosmological model, the differential {ital b} distribution has a high-{ital b} asymptote of dN/db{proportional_to}b{sup {minus}m}, where m{ge}5, when we make the reasonable assumption that low-curvature fluctuations are statistically favored over high-curvature ones. There in general always exist lines much broader than the thermal width. We develop a linear perturbative analysis of the optical depth fluctuation, which yields a single-parameter prediction for the full {ital b} distribution. In addition to exhibiting the high-velocity tail, it qualitatively explains the observed sharp low-{ital b} cutoff{emdash}a simple reflection of the fact that high-curvature fluctuations are relatively rare. Although the existence of the high-{ital b} asymptote, which is independent of the validity of the linear expansion, is consistent with the observed {ital b} distribution, a detailed comparison of the linear prediction with six observational data sets indicates that higher order corrections are not negligible. The perturbative analysis nonetheless offers valuable insights into the dependence of the {ital b} distribution on cosmological parameters such as {Omega} and the power spectrum. A key parameter is the effective smoothing scale of the optical depth fluctuation, which is in turn determined by three scales: the thermal broadening width, the baryon smoothing scale (approximately the Jeans scale), and the observation/simulation resolution. The first two are determined by reionization history, but are comparable in general, whereas the third varies by about an order of magnitude in current hydrodynamic simulations. Studies with non

  19. Thickness-dependent blue shift in the excitonic peak of conformally grown ZnO:Al on ion-beam fabricated self-organized Si ripples

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, T.; Kumar, M.; Som, T.; Nandy, S.; Satpati, B.; Saini, C. P.; Kanjilal, A.

    2015-09-14

    Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films of thicknesses 5,10, 15, 20, and 30 nm were deposited on 500 eV argon ion-beam fabricated nanoscale self-organized rippled-Si substrates at room temperature and are compared with similar films deposited on pristine-Si substrates (without ripples). It is observed that morphology of self-organized AZO films is driven by the underlying substrate morphology. For instance, for pristine-Si substrates, a granular morphology evolves for all AZO films. On the other hand, for rippled-Si substrates, morphologies having chain-like arrangement (anisotropic in nature) are observed up to a thickness of 20 nm, while a granular morphology evolves (isotropic in nature) for 30 nm-thick film. Photoluminescence studies reveal that excitonic peaks corresponding to 5–15 nm-thick AZO films, grown on rippled-Si templates, show a blue shift of 8 nm and 3 nm, respectively, whereas the peak shift is negligible for 20-nm thick film (with respect to their pristine counter parts). The observed blue shifts are substantiated by diffuse reflectance study and attributed to quantum confinement effect, associated with the size of the AZO grains and their spatial arrangements driven by the anisotropic morphology of underlying rippled-Si templates. The present findings will be useful for making tunable AZO-based light-emitting devices.

  20. Red tide detection by means of peak shift of remote sensing reflectance and possibility of red tide detection with polarized radiance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Kohei; Terayama, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    A method for detection of red tide by means of remote sensing reflectance peak shift is proposed together with suspended solid influence eliminations. Although remote sensing reflectance peak is situated at around 550nm for sea water without suffered from red tide, the peak is shifted to the longer wavelength when sea water is suffered from red tide. Based on this fact, it is capable to detect red tide using high wavelength resolution of spectral-radiometers. The proposed system uses web camera with band-pass filter on the optics surface. Acquired imagery data can be transmitted through wireless LAN to Internet terminal and can be archived in server through Internet. Validity of the proposed method is confirmed with the system deployed in Ariake Sea which is situated in northern Kyushu, Japan. Also a method for red tide detection with satellite imagery data is attempted with suspended solid influence eliminations. Furthermore, a possibility of red tide detection with polarized radiance measurements is discussed through polarization camera derived sue surface imagery data, in particular, for non-spherical shape of red tide.

  1. Structural and optical properties of size controlled Si nanocrystals in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix: The nature of photoluminescence peak shift

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenina, A. Hiller, D.; Gutsch, S.; Zacharias, M.; Dyakov, S. A.; Trouillet, V.; Bruns, M.; Mirabella, S.; Löper, P.; López-Conesa, L.; López-Vidrier, J.; Peiró, F.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d’Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C Estradé, S. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d’Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, C CCiT, Scientific and Technical Centers, Universitat de Barcelona, C and others

    2013-11-14

    Superlattices of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and Si-rich silicon nitride thin layers with varying thickness were prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. After high temperature annealing, Si nanocrystals were formed in the former Si-rich nitride layers. The control of the Si quantum dots size via the SiN{sub x} layer thickness was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The size of the nanocrystals was well in agreement with the former thickness of the respective Si-rich silicon nitride layers. In addition X-ray diffraction evidenced that the Si quantum dots are crystalline whereas the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix remains amorphous even after annealing at 1200 °C. Despite the proven Si nanocrystals formation with controlled sizes, the photoluminescence was 2 orders of magnitude weaker than for Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2} matrix. Also, a systematic peak shift was not found. The SiN{sub x}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} superlattices showed photoluminescence peak positions in the range of 540–660 nm (2.3–1.9 eV), thus quite similar to the bulk Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} film having peak position at 577 nm (2.15 eV). These rather weak shifts and scattering around the position observed for stoichiometric Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are not in agreement with quantum confinement theory. Therefore theoretical calculations coupled with the experimental results of different barrier thicknesses were performed. As a result the commonly observed photoluminescence red shift, which was previously often attributed to quantum-confinement effect for silicon nanocrystals, was well described by the interference effect of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surrounding matrix luminescence.

  2. How resonance-continuum interference changes 750 GeV diphoton excess: signal enhancement and peak shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sunghoon; Song, Jeonghyeon; Yoon, Yeo Woong

    2016-05-01

    A hypothetical new scalar resonance, a candidate explanation for the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess at the LHC 13 TeV, necessarily interferes with the continuum background gg → γγ. The interference has two considerable effects: (1) enhancing or suppressing diphoton signal rate due to the imaginary-part interference and (2) distorting resonance shape due to the real-part interference. We study them based on the best-fit analysis of two benchmark models: two Higgs doublets with ˜50 GeV width (exhibiting the imaginary-part interference effect) and a singlet scalar with 5 GeV width (exhibiting the real-part one), both extended with vector-like fermions. We find that the resonance contribution can be enhanced by a factor of 2 (1.6) for 3 (6) fb signal rate, or the 68% CL allowed mass region is shifted by O (1) GeV. If the best-fit excess rate decreases in the future data, the interference effects will become more significant.

  3. How resonance-continuum interference changes 750 GeV diphoton excess: Signal enhancement and peak shift

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jung, Sunghoon; Song, Jeonghyeon; Yoon, Yeo Woong

    2016-05-02

    A hypothetical new scalar resonance, a candidate explanation for the recently observed 750 GeV diphoton excess at the LHC 13 TeV, necessarily interferes with the continuum background gg → γγ. The interference has two considerable effects: (1) enhancing or suppressing diphoton signal rate due to the imaginary-part interference and (2) distorting resonance shape due to the real-part interference. We study them based on the best-fit analysis of two benchmark models: two Higgs doublets with ~50 GeV width (exhibiting the imaginary-part interference effect) and a singlet scalar with 5 GeV width (exhibiting the real-part one), both extended with vector-like fermions. Furthermore,more » we find that the resonance contribution can be enhanced by a factor of 2 (1.6) for 3 (6) fb signal rate, or the 68% CL allowed mass region is shifted by O (1) GeV. If the best-fit excess rate decreases in the future data, the interference effects will become more significant.« less

  4. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry and Environmental Science)

    1993-01-29

    The theoretical model for the absorption part of a particular type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) (see Technical Progress Report No. 7) has been developed. The numerical simulations of the model compare well with the experimental results presented in the last report (Technical Progress Report No. 7). A number of experiments were carried out also for Mode 2 type of operation by varying the time for initial pressurization of the hollow fiber module as well as the total absorption time. These were done to provide a basis for comparison with the theoretical model to be developed later. We have initiated RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents such as 19.5 % aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) for the absorption of C0[sub 2] from a C0[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixture. Six experiments were carried out using Mode 3 type of operation and a C0[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixture containing 9.9% CO, and balance N[sub 2]. Excellent purification was obtained. No C0[sub 2] was observed in the purified high pressure gas outlet for absorption time of up to 14 seconds; the purified high pressure gas flow rate was also considerable. Module No. 5 was used for all experiments. The details of the module are given in Technical Progress Report No. 7.

  5. Attosecond transient absorption of argon atoms in the vacuum ultraviolet region: line energy shifts versus coherent population transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wei; Warrick, Erika R.; Neumark, Daniel M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Using attosecond transient absorption, the dipole response of an argon atom in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region is studied when an external electromagnetic field is present. An isolated attosecond VUV pulse populates Rydberg states lying 15 eV above the argon ground state. A synchronized few-cycle near infrared (NIR) pulse modifies the oscillating dipoles of argon impulsively, leading to alterations in the VUV absorption spectra. As the NIR pulse is delayed with respect to the VUV pulse, multiple features in the absorption profile emerge simultaneously including line broadening, sideband structure, sub-cycle fast modulations, and 5-10 fs slow modulations. These features indicate the coexistence of two general processes of the light-matter interaction: the energy shift of individual atomic levels and coherent population transfer between atomic eigenstates, revealing coherent superpositions. An intuitive formula is derived to treat both effects in a unifying framework, allowing one to identify and quantify the two processes in a single absorption spectrogram.

  6. Influence of Reduced Graphene Oxide on Effective Absorption Bandwidth Shift of Hybrid Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Ameer, Shahid; Gul, Iftikhar Hussain

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic nanoparticle composite NiFe2O4 has traditionally been studied for high-frequency microwave absorption with marginal performance towards low-frequency radar bands (particularly L and S bands). Here, NiFe2O4 nanoparticles and nanohybrids using large-diameter graphene oxide (GO) sheets are prepared via solvothermal synthesis for low-frequency wide bandwidth shielding (L and S radar bands). The synthesized materials were characterized using XRD, SEM, FTIR and microwave magneto dielectric spectroscopy. The dimension of these solvothermally synthesized pristine particles and hybrids lies within 30-58 nm. Microwave magneto-dielectric spectroscopy was performed in the low-frequency region in the 1 MHz-3 GHz spectrum. The as-synthesized pristine nanoparticles and hybrids were found to be highly absorbing for microwaves throughout the L and S radar bands (< -10 dB from 1 MHz to 3 GHz). This excellent microwave absorbing property induced by graphene sheet coupling shows application of these materials with absorption bandwidth which is tailored such that these could be used for low frequency. Previously, these were used for high frequency absorptions (typically > 4 GHz) with limited selective bandwidth. PMID:27270944

  7. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S.

    1992-09-24

    This investigation is concerned with the separation of gas mixtures using a novel concept of rapid pressure swing absorption (RAPSAB) of gas in a stationary absorbent liquid through gas-liquid interfaces immobilized in the pore mouths of hydrophobic microporous membranes. The process is implemented in a module well-packed with hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber membranes. Before we proceed to RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents, it is necessary to make an effort to compare experimental results with those predicted by the models. The only model developed so far involved a type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) for which limited data were acquired earlier. A number of experiments have, therefore, been conducted in this mode to characterize the absorption part of the cycle. A new and more compact module (Module No. 5) was made using 840 fibers and a teflon casing inside the stainless steel shell to exactly define the fiber packing density. This allows an exact calculation of Happel's free surface radius. Experiments were carried out using a CO[sub 2]-N[sub 2] mixture of around 10% CO[sub 2] and balanced N[sub 2] using both modules 4 and 5 over a wide range of absorption times.

  8. Influence of Reduced Graphene Oxide on Effective Absorption Bandwidth Shift of Hybrid Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Ameer, Shahid; Gul, Iftikhar Hussain

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic nanoparticle composite NiFe2O4 has traditionally been studied for high-frequency microwave absorption with marginal performance towards low-frequency radar bands (particularly L and S bands). Here, NiFe2O4 nanoparticles and nanohybrids using large-diameter graphene oxide (GO) sheets are prepared via solvothermal synthesis for low-frequency wide bandwidth shielding (L and S radar bands). The synthesized materials were characterized using XRD, SEM, FTIR and microwave magneto dielectric spectroscopy. The dimension of these solvothermally synthesized pristine particles and hybrids lies within 30–58 nm. Microwave magneto-dielectric spectroscopy was performed in the low-frequency region in the 1 MHz-3 GHz spectrum. The as-synthesized pristine nanoparticles and hybrids were found to be highly absorbing for microwaves throughout the L and S radar bands (< −10 dB from 1 MHz to 3 GHz). This excellent microwave absorbing property induced by graphene sheet coupling shows application of these materials with absorption bandwidth which is tailored such that these could be used for low frequency. Previously, these were used for high frequency absorptions (typically > 4 GHz) with limited selective bandwidth. PMID:27270944

  9. Hydrophilic Indolium Cycloruthenated Complex System for Visual Detection of Bisulfite with a Large Red Shift in Absorption.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianlong; Hu, Rongrong; Li, Xianghong; Zhu, Jun; Luo, Facheng; Niu, Xuehu; Li, Mei; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-19

    Bisulfite, as an important additive in foodstuffs, is one of the most widely distributed environmental pollutants. The excessive intake of bisulfite may cause asthmatic attacks and allergic reactions. Therefore, the determination and visual detection of bisulfite are very important. Herein, a newly designed hydrophilic indolium cycloruthenated complex, [Ru(mepbi)(bpy)2](+) [1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and Hmepbi = 3,3-dimethyl-1-ethyl-2-[4-(pyridin-2-yl)styryl]benzo[e]indolium iodide (3)], was successfully synthesized and used as a bisulfite probe. The bisulfite underwent a 1,4-addition reaction with complex 1 in PBS buffer (10 mM, pH 7.40), resulting in a dramatic change in absorption spectra with a red shift of over 100 nm and a remarkable change in solution color from yellow to pink. It is worth noting that this obvious bathochromic shift is rarely observed in the detection of bisulfite through an addition reaction. The detection limit was calculated to be as low as 0.12 μM by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Moreover, complex 1 was also used to detect bisulfite in sugar samples (granulated and crystal sugar) with good recovery. PMID:26700219

  10. On the absorption and electromagnetic field spectral shifts in plasmonic nanotriangle arrays.

    PubMed

    Vedraine, Sylvain; Hou, Renjie; Norton, Peter R; Lagugné-Labarthet, François

    2014-06-01

    The behavior of the electromagnetic field interaction with gold nanotriangles organized in bow-tie arrays is investigated. A side-by-side comparison between the measured absorbance of the array and the modelled integrated electric field resonances confined around the gold structures is presented and discussed to explain the spectral shift between both parameters. Finite difference time domain calculations and Raman measurements of gold triangles of different sizes and periodicity are systematically performed. Numerical calculations show that the spectral maximum of the electric field varies in distinct areas over the metallic structures. PMID:24921524

  11. Design of microresonator quantum well intensity modulators based on an absorption blue-shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Pile, B.; Taylor, G. W.

    2011-09-01

    A micro resonator quantum well intensity modulator for operation in the wavelength band around 1μm is described. High efficiency 90° bends are used to form the resonator and also provide optimal coupling to the external waveguide. The benefits are to reduce loss, to relax the lithography requirements and to provide more flexible contact designs to the modulator. The characteristics of modulator are analyzed using optical simulation tools and based on measured absorption parameters. The modulator operates with two distinctly different electrode configurations which are both based on the index change calculated using Kramers-Kronig relations. A model including parasitic is developed for HSPICE transient simulations and run in the AGILENT ADS environment. The performance parameters are determined to be an extinction ratio of 10.4dB, a bandwidth of 33GHz, and a dc power less than 1mW for device dimensions of 16×6μm2.

  12. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below. PMID:25150556

  13. Electronic absorption spectra and solvatochromic shifts by the vertical excitation model: solvated clusters and molecular dynamics sampling.

    PubMed

    Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-01-22

    A physically realistic treatment of solvatochromic shifts in liquid-phase electronic absorption spectra requires a proper account for various short- and long-range equilibrium and nonequilibrium solute-solvent interactions. The present article demonstrates that such a treatment can be accomplished using a mixed discrete-continuum approach based on the two-time-scale self-consistent state-specific vertical excitation model (called VEM) for electronic excitation in solution. We apply this mixed approach in combination with time-dependent density functional theory to compute UV/vis absorption spectra in solution for the n → π* ((1)A2) transition for acetone in methanol and in water, the π → π* ((1)A1) transition for para-nitroaniline (PNA) in methanol and in water, the n → π* ((1)B1) transition for pyridine in water, and the n → π* ((1)B1) transition for pyrimidine in water. Hydrogen bonding and first-solvation-shell-specific complexation are included by means of explicit solvent molecules, and solute-solvent dispersion is included by using the solvation model with state-specific polarizability (SMSSP). Geometries of microsolvated clusters were treated in two different ways, (i) using single liquid-phase global-minimum solute-solvent clusters containing up to two explicit solvent molecules and (ii) using solute-solvent cluster snapshots derived from molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. The calculations in water involve using VEM/TDDFT excitation energies and oscillator strengths computed over 200 MD-derived solute-solvent clusters and convoluted with Gaussian functions. We also calculate ground- and excited-state dipole moments for interpretation. We find that inclusion of explicit solvent molecules generally improves the agreement with experiment and can be recommended as a way to include the effect of hydrogen bonding in solvatochromic shifts. PMID:25159827

  14. Solvatochromic Shifts in UV-Vis Absorption Spectra: The Challenging Case of 4-Nitropyridine N-Oxide.

    PubMed

    Budzák, Šimon; Laurent, Adéle D; Laurence, Christian; Medved', Miroslav; Jacquemin, Denis

    2016-04-12

    4-Nitropyridine N-oxide is a well-known molecular probe for which the experimental UV/vis absorption spectrum has been measured in a large number of solvents. Previous measurements and their analyses suggest a dominant role of the solvent hydrogen-bond donation (HBD) capability in the solvatochromic shifts measured for the absorption spectra. Herein, we analyze these solvatochromic effects using a series of complementary approaches, including empirical solvent parameters, high-level calculation of the excited-state dipole and polarizability, several flavors of the polarizable continuum model, as well as dynamics using an effective fragment potential (EFP) description of the solvent molecules. First, applying a recently proposed set of solvent parameters, we show the importance of dispersion interactions for non-HBD solvents. This statement confronts advanced coupled-cluster and multireference calculations of dipole moments and polarizabilities of both the ground and excited states in gas phase. We further address the pros and cons of implicit solvent models combined to time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) in describing the solvents effects for all (HBD and non-HBD) media, the simplest linear-response approach turning out to be the most adequate. Finally, we show that the explicit TD-DFT/EFP2 models work correctly for HBD molecules and allow for restoration of the main experimental trends. PMID:26967198

  15. Shift of optical absorption edge in SnO2 films with high concentrations of nitrogen grown by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jie; Lu, Yinmei; Meyer, Bruno K.; Hofmann, Detlev M.; Eickhoff, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The optical and electrical properties of n-type SnO2 films with high concentrations of nitrogen (SnO2:N) grown by chemical vapor deposition are studied. The carrier concentration increases from 4.1 × 1018 to 3.9 × 1019 cm-3 and the absorption edge shifts from 4.26 to 4.08 eV with increasing NH3 flow rate. Typical Urbach tails were observed from the absorption spectra and the Urbach energy increases from 0.321 to 0.526 eV with increasing NH3 flow rate. An "effective" absorption edge of about 4.61 eV was obtained for all investigated samples from fitting the extrapolations of the Urbach tails. Burstein-Moss effect, electron-impurity, and electron-electron interactions are shown to play a minor role for the shift of the absorption edges in SnO2:N thin films.

  16. Effects of Fusion Zone Size and Failure Mode on Peak Load and Energy Absorption of Advanced High Strength Steel Spot Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of fusion zone size on failure modes, static strength and energy absorption of resistance spot welds (RSW) of advanced high strength steels (AHSS). DP800 and TRIP800 spot welds are considered. The main failure modes for spot welds are nugget pullout and interfacial fracture. Partial interfacial fracture is also observed. The critical fusion zone sizes to ensure nugget pull-out failure mode are developed for both DP800 and TRIP800 using limit load based analytical model and micro-hardness measurements of the weld cross sections. Static weld strength tests using cross tension samples were performed on the joint populations with controlled fusion zone sizes. The resulted peak load and energy absorption levels associated with each failure mode were studied for all the weld populations using statistical data analysis tools. The results in this study show that AHSS spot welds with fusion zone size of can not produce nugget pullout mode for both the DP800 and TRIP800 materials examined. The critical fusion zone size for nugget pullout shall be derived for individual materials based on different base metal properties as well as different heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld properties resulted from different welding parameters.

  17. Predicting the Shifts of Absorption Maxima of Azulene Derivatives Using Molecular Modeling and ZINDO CI Calculations of UV-Vis Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patalinghug, Wyona C.; Chang, Maharlika; Solis, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    The deep blue color of azulene is drastically changed by the addition of substituents such as CH[subscript 3], F, or CHO. Computational semiempirical methods using ZINDO CI are used to model azulene and azulene derivatives and to calculate their UV-vis spectra. The calculated spectra are used to show the trends in absorption band shifts upon…

  18. Crafting Core/Graded Shell-Shell Quantum Dots with Suppressed Re-absorption and Tunable Stokes Shift as High Optical Gain Materials.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Chun Hao; Yoon, Young Jun; Malak, Sidney T; Zhai, Yaxin; Thomas, Edwin L; Vardeny, Valy; Tsukruk, Vladimir V; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-04-11

    The key to utilizing quantum dots (QDs) as lasing media is to effectively reduce non-radiative processes, such as Auger recombination and surface trapping. A robust strategy to craft a set of CdSe/Cd1-x Znx Se1-y Sy /ZnS core/graded shell-shell QDs with suppressed re-absorption, reduced Auger recombination rate, and tunable Stokes shift is presented. In sharp contrast to conventional CdSe/ZnS QDs, which have a large energy level mismatch between CdSe and ZnS and thus show strong re-absorption and a constrained Stokes shift, the as-synthesized CdSe/Cd1-x Znx Se1-y Sy /ZnS QDs exhibited the suppressed re-absorption of CdSe core and tunable Stokes shift as a direct consequence of the delocalization of the electron wavefunction over the entire QD. Such Stokes shift-engineered QDs with suppressed re-absorption may represent an important class of building blocks for use in lasers, light emitting diodes, solar concentrators, and parity-time symmetry materials and devices. PMID:26990250

  19. Concerted single-nanowire absorption and emission spectroscopy: Explaining the origin of the size-dependent Stokes shift in single cadmium selenide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vietmeyer, F.; Chatterjee, R.; McDonald, M. P.; Kuno, M.

    2015-02-01

    Concerted single-nanowire (NW) absorption and emission spectroscopies have been used to measure Stokes shifts in the optical response of individual CdSe NWs. Obtained spectra are free of inhomogeneous broadening inherent to ensemble measurements. They reveal apparent size-dependent NW Stokes shifts with magnitudes on the order of 30 meV. Given that an effective mass model previously used to explain CdSe NW excited state progressions predicts no sizable emission Stokes shift, we have investigated modifications to the theory to rationalize their existence. This has entailed better accounting for the effects of crystal field splitting on NW band edge states. What results are important changes to the spectroscopic assignment of NW band edge transitions that arise from the crossing of hole levels. Furthermore, these modifications simultaneously predict Stokes shifts with size-dependent magnitudes up to 20 meV. However, quantitative agreement with experiment is only achieved by accounting for the role of exciton trap states. Consequently, we conclude that CdSe NW Stokes shifts contain both intrinsic and extrinsic contributions—the latter arising from band edge exciton potential energy fluctuations. At a broader level, these concerted absorption and emission measurements have provided detailed insight into the electronic structure of CdSe NWs, beyond what could be obtained using either single-particle absorption or emission spectroscopies alone.

  20. Evidence for a Peak Shift in a Humoral Response to Helminths: Age Profiles of IgE in the Shuar of Ecuador, the Tsimane of Bolivia, and the U.S. NHANES

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Aaron D.; Gurven, Michael D.; Sugiyama, Lawrence S.; Madimenos, Felicia C.; Liebert, Melissa A.; Martin, Melanie A.; Kaplan, Hillard S.; Snodgrass, J. Josh

    2011-01-01

    Background The peak shift model predicts that the age-profile of a pathogen's prevalence depends upon its transmission rate, peaking earlier in populations with higher transmission and declining as partial immunity is acquired. Helminth infections are associated with increased immunoglobulin E (IgE), which may convey partial immunity and influence the peak shift. Although studies have noted peak shifts in helminths, corresponding peak shifts in total IgE have not been investigated, nor has the age-patterning been carefully examined across populations. We test for differences in the age-patterning of IgE between two South American forager-horticulturalist populations and the United States: the Tsimane of Bolivia (n = 832), the Shuar of Ecuador (n = 289), and the U.S. NHANES (n = 8,336). We then examine the relationship between total IgE and helminth prevalences in the Tsimane. Methodology/Principal Findings Total IgE levels were assessed in serum and dried blood spots and age-patterns examined with non-linear regression models. Tsimane had the highest IgE (geometric mean  = 8,182 IU/ml), followed by Shuar (1,252 IU/ml), and NHANES (52 IU/ml). Consistent with predictions, higher population IgE was associated with steeper increases at early ages and earlier peaks: Tsimane IgE peaked at 7 years, Shuar at 10 years, and NHANES at 17 years. For Tsimane, the age-pattern was compared with fecal helminth prevalences. Overall, 57% had detectable eggs or larva, with hookworm (45.4%) and Ascaris lumbricoides (19.9%) the most prevalent. The peak in total IgE occurred around the peak in A. lumbricoides, which was associated with higher IgE in children <10, but with lower IgE in adolescents. Conclusions The age-patterning suggests a peak shift in total IgE similar to that seen in helminth infections, particularly A. lumbricoides. This age-patterning may have implications for understanding the effects of helminths on other health outcomes, such as allergy, growth

  1. Excited state dipole moments of chloroanilines and chlorophenols from solvatochromic shifts in electronic absorption spectra: Support for the concept of excited state group moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhumirashi, L. S.; Satpute, R. S.

    The dipole moments of isomeric o-, m- and p-chloroanilines and chlorophenols in electronically excited L a and L b states are estimated from solvent induced polarization shifts in electronic absorption spectra. It is observed that μ e( L a) > μ e( L b) > μ g, which is consistent with the general theory of polarization red shift. The μ es are found to be approximately co-linear with the corresponding μ gs. The concept of group moments is extended to aromatic molecules in excited states. This approach is found to be useful in understanding correlations among the excited states of mono- and disubstituted benzenes.

  2. o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption: syntheses and uncaging cross-sections for one- and two-photon excitation.

    PubMed

    Aujard, Isabelle; Benbrahim, Chouaha; Gouget, Marine; Ruel, Odile; Baudin, Jean-Bernard; Neveu, Pierre; Jullien, Ludovic

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the o-nitrobenzyl platform for designing photolabile protecting groups with red-shifted absorption that could be photolyzed upon one- and two-photon excitation. Several synthetic pathways to build different conjugated o-nitrobenzyl backbones, as well as to vary the benzylic position, are reported. Relative to the reference 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyl group, several o-nitrobenzyl derivatives exhibit a large and red-shifted one-photon absorption within the near-UV range. Uncaging after one-photon excitation was studied by measuring UV-visible absorption and steady-state fluorescence emission on model caged ethers and esters. In the whole series investigated, the caged substrates were released cleanly upon photolysis. Quantum yields of uncaging after one-photon absorption lie within the 0.1-1 % range. We observed that these drop as the maximum wavelength absorption of the o-nitrobenzyl protecting group is increased. A new method based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) after two-photon excitation was used to measure the action uncaging cross section for two-photon excitation. The series of o-nitrobenzyl caged fluorescent coumarins investigated exhibit values within the 0.1-0.01 Goeppert-Mayer (GM) range. Such results are in line with the low quantum yields of uncaging associated with cross-sections of 1-50 GM for two-photon absorption. Although the cross-sections for one- and two-photon absorption of o-nitrobenzyl photolabile protecting groups can be readily improved, we emphasize the difficulty in enlarging the corresponding action uncaging cross-sections in view of the observed trend of their quantum yield of uncaging. PMID:16763952

  3. The origin of the unusual Qy red shift in LH1-RC complexes from purple bacteria Thermochromatium tepidum as revealed by Stark absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Yu, Long-Jiang; Wang-Otomo, Zheng-Yu; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2015-12-01

    Native LH1-RC of photosynthetic purple bacteria Thermochromatium (Tch.) tepidum, B915, has an ultra-red BChl a Qy absorption. Two blue-shifted complexes obtained by chemical modification, B893 and B882, have increasing full widths at half maximum (FWHM) and decreasing transition dipole oscillator strength. 77K Stark absorption spectroscopy studies were employed for the three complexes, trying to understand the origin of the 915 nm absorption. We found that Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of both Qy and carotenoid (Car) bands are larger than for other purple bacterial LH complexes reported previously. Moreover, the red shifts of the Qy bands are associated with (1) increasing Tr(∆α) and |∆μ| of the Qy band, (2) the red shift of the Car Stark signal and (3) the increasing |∆μ| of the Car band. Based on the results and the crystal structure, a combined effect of exciton-charge transfer (CT) states mixing, and inhomogeneous narrowing of the BChl a site energy is proposed to be the origin of the 915 nm absorption. CT-exciton state mixing has long been found to be the origin of strong Stark signal in LH1 and special pair, and the more extent of the mixing in Tch. tepidum LH1 is mainly the consequence of the shorter BChl-BChl distances. The less flexible protein structure results in a smaller site energy disorder (inhomogeneous narrowing), which was demonstrated to be able to influence |∆μ| and absorption. PMID:26341015

  4. Peak shifted properties of the "low background NaI(Tl) detectors": An experimental study of response function behavior in different temperature and acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Moghaddam, Y.; Rafat Motavalli, L.; Miri Hakimabadi, H.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the necessity of using low background NaI detector in sensitive and accurate measurements, study on the response function variations in different conditions is very important. These types of detectors have different responses in various measurement conditions, including time, temperature and high voltage. In this study, the response function of 76 B 76 LB NaI (SCIONIX) in different conditions is discussed. According to the channel shifting in these detectors and its direct effect on degrading the resolution, the most convenient measurement condition for these detectors, is proposed. Finally, it is recommended that before long-time measurements a "waiting time" is needed to avoid the channel shifting effects.

  5. Intermolecular interaction as the origin of red shifts in absorption spectra of zinc-phthalocyanine from first-principles.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Susumu; Yasuda, Taiga; Inagaki, Kouji; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Manseki, Kazuhiro; Yanagida, Shozo

    2013-11-01

    We investigate electronic origins of a redshift in absorption spectra of a dimerized zinc phthalocyanine molecule (ZnPc) by means of hybrid density functional theoretical calculations. In terms of the molecular orbital (MO) picture, the dimerization splits energy levels of frontier MOs such as the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) of the constituent molecules. Consequently, the absorption wavelength seems to become longer than the monomer as the overlap between the monomers becomes larger. However, for a ZnPc dimer configuration with its cofacially stacked monomer arrangement, the calculated absorption spectra within the time-dependent density functional theory indicates no redshift but blueshift in the Q-band absorption spectrum, i.e., a typical H-aggregate. The origin of the apparently contradictory result is elucidated by the conventional description of the interaction between monomer transition dipoles in molecular dimers [Kasha, M. Radiat. Res. 1963, 20, 55]. The redshift is caused by an interaction between the two head-to-tail transition dipoles of the monomers, while the side-by-side arranged transition dipoles result in a blueshift. By tuning the dipole-dipole interaction based on the electronic natures of the HOMO and the LUMO, we describe a slipped-stacked ZnPc dimer configuration in which the Q-band absorption wavelength increases by as large as 144 nm relative to the monomer Q-band. PMID:24106753

  6. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  7. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  8. Investigation of broadening and shift of vapour absorption lines of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O in the frequency range 7184 – 7186 cm{sup -1}

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdinskii, A I; Pereslavtseva, A A; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya

    2014-10-31

    We present the results of investigation of water vapour absorption spectra in the 7184 – 7186 cm{sup -1} range that is of particular interest from the viewpoint of possible application of the data obtained for monitoring water vapour in the Earth's stratosphere. The doublet of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O near ν = 7185.596 cm{sup -1} is analysed. The coefficients of broadening and shift of water vapour lines are found in the selected range in mixtures with buffer gases and compared to those obtained by other authors. (laser spectroscopy)

  9. Full-Quantum chemical calculation of the absorption maximum of bacteriorhodopsin: a comprehensive analysis of the amino acid residues contributing to the opsin shift

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomohiko; Matsuura, Azuma; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Herein, the absorption maximum of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is calculated using our recently developed method in which the whole protein can be treated quantum mechanically at the level of INDO/S-CIS//ONIOM (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p): AMBER). The full quantum mechanical calculation is shown to reproduce the so-called opsin shift of bR with an error of less than 0.04 eV. We also apply the same calculation for 226 different bR mutants, each of which was constructed by replacing any one of the amino acid residues of the wild-type bR with Gly. This substitution makes it possible to elucidate the extent to which each amino acid contributes to the opsin shift and to estimate the inter-residue synergistic effect. It was found that one of the most important contributions to the opsin shift is the electron transfer from Tyr185 to the chromophore upon excitation. We also indicate that some aromatic (Trp86, Trp182) and polar (Ser141, Thr142) residues, located in the vicinity of the retinal polyene chain and the β-ionone ring, respectively, play an important role in compensating for the large blue-shift induced by both the counterion residues (Asp85, Asp212) and an internal water molecule (W402) located near the Schiff base linkage. In particular, the effect of Trp86 is comparable to that of Tyr185. In addition, Ser141 and Thr142 were found to contribute to an increase in the dipole moment of bR in the excited state. Finally, we provide a complete energy diagram for the opsin shift together with the contribution of the chromophore-protein steric interaction. PMID:27493528

  10. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  11. Two-Photon Absorption of Bacteriorhodopsin: Formation of a Red-Shifted Thermally Stable Photoproduct F620

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Thorsten; Hampp, Norbert A.

    2005-01-01

    By means of high-intensity 532 nm laser pulses, a photochemical conversion of the initial B570 state of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) to a stable photoproduct absorbing maximally at ≈620 nm in BR suspensions and at ≈610 nm in BR films is induced. This state, which we named F620, is photochemically further converted to a group of three products with maximal absorptions in the wavelength range from 340 nm to 380 nm, which show identical spectral properties to the so-called P360 state reported in the literature. The photoconversion from B570 to F620 is most likely a resonant two-photon absorption induced step. The formation of F620 and P360 leads to a distinguished photo-induced permanent optical anisotropy in BR films. The spectral dependence of the photo-induced anisotropy and the anisotropy orientations at the educt (B570) and product (F620) wavelengths are strong indicators that F620 is formed in a direct photochemical step from B570. The chemical nature of the P360 products probably is that of a retro-retinal containing BR, but the structural characteristics of the F620 state are still unclear. The photo-induced permanent anisotropy induced by short laser pulses in BR films helps to better understand the photochemical pathways related to this transition, and it is interesting in view of potential applications as this feature is the molecular basis for permanent optical data storage using BR films. PMID:15894635

  12. Effect of a Single Water Molecule on the Electronic Absorption by o- and p-Nitrophenolate: A Shift to the Red or to the Blue?

    PubMed

    Houmøller, Jørgen; Wanko, Marius; Rubio, Angel; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted

    2015-11-25

    Many photoactive biomolecules are anions and exhibit ππ* optical transitions but with a degree of charge transfer (CT) character determined by the local environment. The phenolate moiety is a common structural motif among biochromophores and luminophores, and nitrophenolates are good model systems because the nitro substituent allows for CT-like transitions. Here we report gas-phase absorption spectra of o- and p-nitrophenolate·H2O complexes to decipher the effect of just one H2O and compare them with ab initio calculations of vertical excitation energies. The experimental band maximum is at 3.01 and 3.00 eV for ortho and para isomers, respectively, and is red-shifted by 0.10 and 0.13 eV relative to the bare ions, respectively. These shifts indicate that the transition has become more CT-like because of localization of negative charge on the phenolate oxygen, i.e., diminished delocalization of the negative excess charge. However, the transition bears less CT than that of m-nitrophenolate·H2O because this complex absorbs further to the red (2.56 eV). Our work emphasizes the importance of local perturbations: one water causes a larger shift than experienced in bulk for para isomer and almost the full shift for ortho isomer. Predicting microenvironmental effects in the boundary between CT and non-CT with high accuracy is nontrivial. However, in agreement with experiment, our calculations show a competition between the effects of electronic delocalization and electrostatic interaction with the solvent molecule. As a result, the excitation energy of ortho and para isomers is less sensitive to hydration than that of the meta isomer because donor and acceptor orbitals are only weakly coupled in the meta isomer. PMID:26549521

  13. Variable Doppler shifts of the thermal wind absorption lines in low-mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madej, O. K.; Jonker, P. G.; Díaz Trigo, M.; Miškovičová, I.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we address the general applicability of the method pioneered by Zhang, Liao & Yao in which the motion of the compact object can be tracked using wind X-ray absorption lines. We present the velocity measurements of the thermal wind lines observed in the X-ray spectrum of a few low-mass X-ray binaries: GX 13+1, H 1743-322, GRO J1655-40 and GRS 1915+105. We find that the variability in the velocity of the wind lines in about all of the sources is larger than conceivable radial velocity variations of the compact object. GX 13+1 provides a potential exception, although it would require the red giant star to be massive with a mass of ≈5-6 M⊙. We conclude that the variability of the source luminosity occurring on a time-scale of days/months can affect the outflow properties making it difficult to track the orbital motion of the compact object using current observations. Given the intrinsic variability of the outflows we suggest that low-mass X-ray binaries showing stable coronae instead of an outflow (e.g. 4U 1254-69, MXB 1659-29, 4U 1624-49) could be more suitable targets for tracking the orbital motion of the compact object.

  14. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  15. Rydberg and π-π* transitions in film surfaces of various kinds of nylons studied by attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations: peak shifts in the spectra and their relation to nylon structure and hydrogen bondings.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Yasunaga, Manaka; Sato, Harumi; Fukuda, Ryoichi; Ehara, Masahiro; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2014-10-01

    Attenuated total reflection far-ultraviolet (ATR-FUV) spectra in the 145-260 nm region were measured for surfaces (thickness 50-200 nm) of various kinds of nylons in cast films to explore their electronic transitions in the FUV region. ATR-FUV spectra show two major bands near 150 and 200 nm in the surface condensed phase of nylons. Transmittance (Tr) spectra were also observed in particular for the analysis of valence excitations. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT/CAM-B3LYP) calculations were carried out using the model systems to provide the definitive assignments of their absorption spectra and to elucidate their peak shifts in several nylons, in particular, focusing on their crystal alignment structures and intermolecular hydrogen bondings. Two major bands of nylon films near 150 and 200 nm are characterized as σ-Rydberg 3p and π-π* transitions of nylons, respectively. These assignments are also coherent with those of liquid n-alkanes (n = 5-14) and liquid amides observed previously. The Rydberg transitions are delocalized over the hydrocarbon chains, while the π-π* transitions are relatively localized at the amide group. Differences in the peak positions and intensity were found in both ATR- and Tr-FUV spectra for different nylons. A red-shift of the π-π* amide band in the FUV spectra of nylon-6 and nylon-6/6 models in α-form is attributed to the crystal structure pattern and the intermolecular hydrogen bondings, which result in the different delocalization character of the π-π* transitions and transition dipole coupling. PMID:25203613

  16. The influence of hyperfine structure and isotope shift on the detection of Rb by 2 f-wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectrometry—experimental verification of simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, Jörgen; Axner, Ove

    1998-12-01

    This work presents an experimental verification of a previously developed methodology for simulation of the 2 f-wavelength modulation diode laser absorption spectrometry technique (2 f-WM-DLAS) when the influence of hyperfine structure, isotope shift and collisional broadening and shift of an atomic transition is taken into account [J. Gustafsson, D. Rojas and O. Axner, Spectrochim. Acta, 52B, 1937-1953 (1997)]. The pilot element in the simulations was Rb, detected at the 780 nm 5s 2S 1/2-5p 2P 3/2 transition, in low-pressure cells and atmospheric-pressure reservoirs (e.g. graphite furnaces). This experimental investigation verifies that the simulations are able to predict, with good accuracy, experimental 2 f-WM signals from Rb atoms under both low-pressure, room-temperature conditions and atmospheric-pressure, high-temperature conditions. This implies that the previously published simulation methodology can be used for predicting and optimizing 2 f-WM signal strengths and shapes from Rb atoms (and thereby presumably also from other atoms) under a variety of pressure and temperature conditions.

  17. Direction dependence of the magneto-optical absorption in nanowires with Rashba interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakr, M. R.

    2016-09-01

    We study the directional dependence of the absorption spectrum of ballistic nanowires in the presence of gate-controlled Rashba spin-orbit interaction and an in-plane magnetic field. In the weak Rashba regime, our analytical and numerical results show that the absorption peaks associated with the first and third intersubband transitions exhibit frequency shifts and strong amplitude modulations as the direction of the magnetic field changes. If the field is parallel to the nanowire axis, these peaks disappear and the resonance frequencies of the whole absorption spectrum are given merely in terms of the Zeeman splitting and the energy scale characterizing the confinement potential. The second transition has an absorption peak that suffers an opposite frequency shift with amplitude that is largely direction independent. The amplitude modulation and frequency shift of the absorption spectrum is periodic in the angle that the magnetic field makes with the nanowire axis.

  18. A practical method for determining γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency considering coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections for the measurement of environmental samples after the Fukushima reactor accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Oba, Yurika; Takada, Momo

    2016-09-01

    A method for determining the γ-ray full-energy peak efficiency at positions close to three Ge detectors and at the well port of a well-type detector was developed for measuring environmental volume samples containing 137Cs, 134Cs and 40K. The efficiency was estimated by considering two correction factors: coincidence-summing and self-absorption corrections. The coincidence-summing correction for a cascade transition nuclide was estimated by an experimental method involving measuring a sample at the far and close positions of a detector. The derived coincidence-summing correction factors were compared with those of analytical and Monte Carlo simulation methods and good agreements were obtained. Differences in the matrix of the calibration source and the environmental sample resulted in an increase or decrease of the full-energy peak counts due to the self-absorption of γ-rays in the sample. The correction factor was derived as a function of the densities of several matrix materials. The present method was applied to the measurement of environmental samples and also low-level radioactivity measurements of water samples using the well-type detector.

  19. Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO{sub 2} from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, Kamalesh; Jie, Xingming; Chau, John; Obuskovic, Gordana

    2013-03-31

    Using the ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide ([bmim][DCA]) as the absorbent on the shell side of a membrane module containing either a porous hydrophobized ceramic tubule or porous hydrophobized polyether ether ketone (PEEK) hollow fiber membranes, studies for CO{sub 2} removal from hot simulated pre-combustion shifted syngas were carried out by a novel pressure swing membrane absorption (PSMAB) process. Helium was used as a surrogate for H{sub 2} in a simulated shifted syngas with CO{sub 2} around 40% (dry gas basis). In this cyclic separation process, the membrane module was used to achieve non-dispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas (689-1724 kPag; 100-250 psig) at temperatures between 25-1000C into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by among other cycle steps controlled desorption of the absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. Two product streams were obtained, one He-rich and the other CO{sub 2}-rich. Addition of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer of generation 0 to IL [bmim][DCA] improved the system performance at higher temperatures. The solubilities of CO{sub 2} and He were determined in the ionic liquid with or without the dendrimer in solution as well as in the presence or absence of moisture; polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was also studied as a replacement for the IL. The solubility selectivity of the ionic liquid containing the dendrimer for CO{sub 2} over helium was considerably larger than that for the pure ionic liquid. The solubility of CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-He solubility selectivity of PEG 400 and a solution of the dendrimer in PEG 400 were higher than the corresponding ones in the IL, [bmim][DCA]. A mathematical model was developed to describe the PSMAB process; a numerical solution of the governing equations described successfully the observed performance of the PSMAB process for the pure ionic liquid-based system.

  20. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H. M.; Inamdar, S. R.; Wari, M. N.

    2016-02-01

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π → π* transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μe). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μe) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state.

  1. The electronic absorption edge of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, O.C.; Mitra-Kirtley, S.; Zhu, Yifu

    1992-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of more than 20 crude oils and asphaltenes are examined. The spectral location of the electronic absorption edge varies over a wide range, from the near-infrared for heavy oils and asphaltenes to the near-UV for gas condensates. The functional form of the electronic absorption edge for all crude oils (measured) is characteristic of the {open_quotes}Urbach tail,{close_quotes} a phenomenology which describes electronic absorption edges in wide-ranging materials. The crude oils all show similar Urbach widths, which are significantly larger than those generally found for various materials but are similar to those previously reported for asphaltenes. Monotonically increasing absorption at higher photon energy continues for all crude oils until the spectral region is reached where single-ring aromatics dominate absorption. However, the rate of increasing absorption at higher energies moderates, thereby deviating from the Urbach behavior. Fluorescence emission spectra exhibit small red shifts from the excitation wavelength and small fluorescence peak widths in the Urbach regions of different crude oils, but show large red shifts and large peak widths in spectral regions which deviate from the Urbach behavior. This observation implies that the Urbach spectral region is dominated by lowest-energy electronic absorption of corresponding chromophores. Thus, the Urbach tail gives a direct measure of the population distribution of chromophores in crude oils. Implied population distributions are consistent with thermally activated growth of large chromophores from small ones. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Absorption spectra of monolayer MoS2 in high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hung-Duen; Her, Jim-Long; Takeyama, Shojiro; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Wang, Kai-Hsuan

    2015-03-01

    We have measured the absorption spectra of monolayer MoS2 film at several temperatures in pulsed high magnetic fields up to 52 T. At room temperature, the observed spectrum dominated by two main peaks, which are located at 660 nm and 606 nm. These peaks are ascribed to excition and trion absorption peaks respectively [1]. At low temperature (4.2 K), two peaks show the blue shift to 633 nm and 588 nm, respectively. Irrespective of the temperature, applying magnetic field does not show pronounced influence on the peaks even in 52 T.

  3. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong vs band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  4. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong n8 band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  5. IR absorption and Raman spectra of single crystals of stable germanium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavva, V. A.; Kotereva, T. V.; Lipskiy, V. A.; Nezhdanov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The Raman and IR absorption spectra of single crystals of germanium isotopes 72Ge, 73Ge, 74Ge, and 76Ge in the region of phonon absorption and interband electronic transitions are studied at room temperature. The dependence of the Raman peak position on the atomic mass has the form ν ~ M -1/2. The shifts of the phonon absorption peaks of individual isotopes with respect to germanium of natural isotopic composition natGe are determined. With increasing average atomic mass of germanium, these peaks shift to longer wavelengths. In the region of interband electronic transitions, the intrinsic absorption edge of 76Ge is observed to shift by 1 meV to higher energies with respect to Ge of natural isotopic composition. For isotopes with atomic masses close to that of natural germanium (72Ge,73Ge, 74Ge), we found no significant difference in the band gap width at room temperature.

  6. Absorption coefficients and frequency shifts measurement in the spectral range of 1071.88-1084.62 cm-1 vs. pressure for chlorodifluoromethane (CHClF2) using tunable CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sharif

    2013-02-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption in the spectral range of (1071.88-1084.62 cm-1) vs. pressure in chlorodifluoromethane (CFC-22, F-22, and CHClF2) was studied using a tunable continuous wave (CW) CO2 laser radiation on 9R branch lines with a maximum output power of about 2.12 W, provided with an absorber cell located outside the laser cavity. The absorption coefficients were determined vs. the gas pressure between 0.2 mbar and 170 mbar at lines from 9R branch for CFC-22. The frequency shifts of the absorption lines of CFC-22 in relative to the central frequencies of laser lines were calculated vs. the pressure on the basis of these absorption coefficients. The chosen lines were selected according to IR spectrum of the studied gas given by HITRAN cross section database. So the absorption was achieved for CFC-22 at the spectral lines of 9R branch situated from 9R (10) to 9R (30) emitted by a tunable CW CO2 laser. The absorption cross sections of CFC-22 determined in this work were compared with the relevant data given by HITRAN cross section database and a reasonable agreement was observed.

  7. Absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts of fundamental and first overtone bands for OH stretching vibration of methanol upon methanol-pyridine complex formation in CCl4: analysis by NIR/IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Futami, Yoshisuke; Ozaki, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-02-21

    Infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) spectra were measured for methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in carbon tetrachloride. Upon the formation of the methanol-pyridine complex, the frequencies of both the fundamental and first overtone bands of the OH stretching vibration shifted to lower frequencies, and the absorption intensity of the fundamental increased significantly, while that of the first overtone decreased markedly. By using quantum chemical calculations, we estimated the absorption intensities and frequencies of the fundamental and first overtone bands for the OH stretching vibration based on the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The calculated results well reproduced the experimental results. The molecular vibration potentials and dipole moment functions of the OH stretching vibration modes were compared between methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in terms of absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts. The large change in the dipole moment function was found to be the main cause for the variations in absorption intensity for the fundamental and first overtone bands. PMID:26862859

  8. Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Liu, Guanghui; Huang, Lu; Zheng, Xianyi

    2015-08-01

    Linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients of spherical dome shells are theoretically investigated within analytical wave functions and numerical quantized energy levels. Our results show that the inner radius, the outer radius and the cut-off angle of spherical dome shells have great influences on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients as well as the total optical absorption coefficients. It is found that with the increase of the inner radius and the outer radius, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients exhibit a blueshift and a redshift, respectively. However, with the increase of the cut-off angle, linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients do not shift. Besides, the resonant peaks of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients climb up and then decrease with increasing the cut-off angle. The influences of the incident optical intensity on the total optical absorption coefficients are studied. It is found that the bleaching effect occurs at higher incident optical intensity.

  9. Growth of Au nanoparticle films and the effect of nanoparticle shape on plasmon peak wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Horikoshi, S. Matsumoto, N.; Kato, T.; Omata, Y.

    2014-05-21

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and thus have potential for use in a wide range of applications. A facile technique for the preparation of NP films using an electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma sputtering method without a dewetting process is described. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observations revealed that the Au NPs grew independently as island-like particles during the first stage of sputtering and then coalesced with one another as sputtering time increased to ultimately form a continuous film. A plasmon absorption peak was observed via optical measurement of absorption efficiency. The LSPR peak shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) with an increase in sputtering time. The cause of this plasmon peak shift was theoretically investigated using the finite-difference time-domain calculation method. A realistic statistical distribution of the particle shapes based on FE-SEM observations was applied for the analysis, which has not been previously reported. It was determined that the change in the shape of the NPs from spheroidal to oval or slender due to coalescence with neighbouring NPs caused the LSPR peak shift. These results may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling the characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as their size, shape, number density, and coverage.

  10. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas. Technical progress report, August 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S.

    1993-01-29

    The theoretical model for the absorption part of a particular type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) (see Technical Progress Report No. 7) has been developed. The numerical simulations of the model compare well with the experimental results presented in the last report (Technical Progress Report No. 7). A number of experiments were carried out also for Mode 2 type of operation by varying the time for initial pressurization of the hollow fiber module as well as the total absorption time. These were done to provide a basis for comparison with the theoretical model to be developed later. We have initiated RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents such as 19.5 % aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA) for the absorption of C0{sub 2} from a C0{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixture. Six experiments were carried out using Mode 3 type of operation and a C0{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixture containing 9.9% CO, and balance N{sub 2}. Excellent purification was obtained. No C0{sub 2} was observed in the purified high pressure gas outlet for absorption time of up to 14 seconds; the purified high pressure gas flow rate was also considerable. Module No. 5 was used for all experiments. The details of the module are given in Technical Progress Report No. 7.

  11. Absorption spectrum of the PbS-doped silica fibers fabricated by ALD and MCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Tang; Wen, Jianxiang; Dong, Yanhua; Wang, Tingyun

    2012-11-01

    The technique of atomic layer deposition (ALD) has been introduced to fabricate PbS-doped silica fibers, whose absorption peaks are discovered to be shifted from 1230 nm to 920 nm when the number of ALD deposition cycles varies from 80 to 30 during optical fiber preform fabrication. This is explained by suggesting that the PbS doped in fiber are under the 3D quantum confinement, i.e., quantum dots (QDs). An effective-mass approximat ion of the PbS QDs ' sizes is then made to show the shift of absorption peaks can be attributed to the change of size distribution of these dots.

  12. A new model for pressure-induced shifts of electronic absorption bands as applied to neat CS sub 2 and CS sub 2 in n-hexane and dichloromethane solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, S.F.; Swanson, B.I. )

    1990-01-25

    The authors propose a model for the pressure dependence of electronic absorption spectra and apply it to the authors data on CS{sub 2} both in neat phase and in hexane and dichloromethane solid solutions. They believe that their data represent a rather severe test of this model and argue that any model for the pressure dependence of electronic absorption spectra must include certain minimal effects - dispersive or dielectric and repulsive or volume effects - in order to adequately represent the data. They discuss previous models at some length in order to delineate the limits of their applicability. They further acknowledge and define the limits of the applicability of their model to solvent-induced shifts in general.

  13. Rapid pressure swing absorption cleanup of post-shift reactor synthesis gas. Technical progress report, April 1, 1992--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sirkar, K.K.; Majumdar, S.; Bhaumik, S.

    1992-09-24

    This investigation is concerned with the separation of gas mixtures using a novel concept of rapid pressure swing absorption (RAPSAB) of gas in a stationary absorbent liquid through gas-liquid interfaces immobilized in the pore mouths of hydrophobic microporous membranes. The process is implemented in a module well-packed with hydrophobic microporous hollow fiber membranes. Before we proceed to RAPSAB studies with reactive absorbents, it is necessary to make an effort to compare experimental results with those predicted by the models. The only model developed so far involved a type of RAPSAB cycle (Mode 3) for which limited data were acquired earlier. A number of experiments have, therefore, been conducted in this mode to characterize the absorption part of the cycle. A new and more compact module (Module No. 5) was made using 840 fibers and a teflon casing inside the stainless steel shell to exactly define the fiber packing density. This allows an exact calculation of Happel`s free surface radius. Experiments were carried out using a CO{sub 2}-N{sub 2} mixture of around 10% CO{sub 2} and balanced N{sub 2} using both modules 4 and 5 over a wide range of absorption times.

  14. A new highly selective, ratiometric and colorimetric fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) with a remarkable red shift in absorption and emission spectra based on internal charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Sen, Debabrata; Das, Nirmal Kumar

    2010-02-19

    A new 1,8-diaminonaphthalene based ratiometric and highly selective colorimetric "off-on" type of fluorescent probe, receptor 2 has been designed and synthesized that senses only Cu(2+) among the other heavy and transition metal ions examined on the basis of internal charge transfer (ICT). The visual sensitivity of the receptor 2 is remarkable, showing dual color changes from colorless (receptor) to purple followed by blue and a large red shift in emission upon Cu(2+) complexation. PMID:20104900

  15. Water absorption lines, 931-961 nm - Selected intensities, N2-collision-broadening coefficients, self-broadening coefficients, and pressure shifts in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Gentry, B.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Intensities were measured for 97 lines of H2O vapor between 932 and 961 nm. The lines were selected for their potential usefulness for remote laser measurements of H2O vapor in the earth's atmosphere. The spectra were obtained with several different H2O vapor abundances and N2 broadening gas pressures; the spectral resolution was 0.046/cm FWHM. Measured H2O line intensities range from 7 x 10 to the -25th to 7 x 10 to the -22nd/cm per (molecules/sq cm). H2O self-broadening coefficients were measured for 13 of these strongest lines; the mean value was 0.5/cm per atm. N2-collision-broadening coefficients were measured for 73 lines, and the average was 0.11 cm per atm HWHM. Pressure shifts in air were determined for a sample of six lines between 948 and 950 nm; these lines shift to lower frequency by an amount comparable to 0.1 of the collision-broadened widths measured in air or N2. The measured intensities of many lines of 300-000 band are much larger than expected from prior computations, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. Coriolis interactions with the stronger 201-000 band appear to be the primary cause of the enhancement of these line intensities.

  16. The OH - absorption spectra of low doped lithium niobate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yongfa; Zhang, Wanlin; Xu, Jingjun; Yan, Wenbo; Liu, Hongde; Xie, Xiang; Li, Xiaochun; Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Guangyin

    2004-07-01

    The OH - absorption spectra of low doped lithium niobate (LiNbO 3) crystals have been investigated. Though no apparent band shift is observed in these absorption spectra, their shapes are quite different. In order to analyze the information on the defect structure underlying these OH - absorption bands, the normalization and difference methods were employed. It was found that although the doping concentrations are under the thresholds the doping ions have apparent affect to the site occupation of OH - ions. The OH - vibrations related to Mg Li+ (Mg 2+ occupying Li-site) and In Li2+ are 3483 and 3484 cm -1 in LiNbO 3:Mg and LiNbO 3:In crystals, respectively. The absorption peak of LiNbO 3:Ti (2.5 mol%) crystal at 3487 cm -1 is mainly related to Ti Li3+-OH - and the 3489 cm -1 peak of LiNbO 3:Mg (5.0 mol%), Ti (10.0 mol%) related to Mg Li+-OH -, Ti Nb--OH - and Ti Li3+-OH -. Doping with Na improves the peak intensity near 3466 cm -1 and induces a new absorption peak at 3470 cm -1. The absorption bands of LiNbO 3 crystals codoped with trivalent ions are associated with the co-effect of the doped ions and have some different characteristics from mono-doped crystals.

  17. Portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J P

    1997-02-01

    There are several portable peak flow meters available. These instruments vary in construction and performance. Guidelines are recommended for minimum performance and testing of portable peak flow meters, with the aim of establishing a procedure for standardizing all peak flow meters. Future studies to clarify the usefulness of mechanical test apparatus and clinical trials of peak flow meters are also recommended. PMID:9098706

  18. Infrared absorption spectra of molecular crystals: Possible evidence for small-polaron formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pržulj, Željko; Čevizović, Dalibor; Zeković, Slobodan; Ivić, Zoran

    2008-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the position of the so-called anomalous band peaked at 1650cm in the IR-absorption spectrum of crystalline acetanilide (ACN) is theoretically investigated within the small-polaron theory. Its pronounced shift towards the position of the normal band is predicted with the rise of temperature. Interpretation of the IR-absorption spectra in terms of small-polaron model has been critically assessed on the basis of these results.

  19. Optical investigations of blue shift in ZnS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Douri, Y.; Verma, K. D.; Prakash, Deo

    2015-12-01

    ZnS quantum dots were synthesized using sulfur source of sodium sulphide and mercaptoethanol via chemical bath deposition technique. The synthesized ZnS QDs were analyzed and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry. The average particle size goes down to 1.9 nm as capping agent concentration increases and corresponding absorption coefficient peak goes down to 265 nm. The blue shift within absorption-wavelength was elaborated. The refractive index and optical dielectric constant are calculated. A correlation between energy gap and absorption coefficient aside and particle size another side is discussed.

  20. The effect of different particle sizes of polyethylene on the absorption of myrrh in mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lei; Li, Bin; Zuo, Jian; Zhang, Cunlin

    2015-08-01

    Terahertz radiation lies between far-infrared and microwave in electromagnetic spectrum with frequency from 0.1 to 10 THz. Absorption spectra of different mass ratio of the myrrh and polyethylene can be gained by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in this paper. It is found that absorption spectra show a slight red-shift with the decrease of the mass ratio of myrrh and polyethylene. On the other hand, different particle sizes of polyethylene (PE) mixed with myrrh absorption spectra were measured. Due to the different sizes of polyethylene particles, there are some differences in the vibration peak intensity, peak position and peak numbers in the absorption spectra. The experimental results show that the scattering effect leads to this phenomenon.

  1. Thickness Optimization for Petroleum Coke in Microwave Dehydrating Based on the Analysis of Dynamic Absorption Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Xiaobiao; Chen, Junruo; Peng, Jinhui; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Weifeng; Guo, Shenghui; Chen, Guo

    2015-07-01

    An analytical approach is proposed to optimize the thickness of petroleum coke for achieving maximum microwave power absorption in microwave heating based on analysis of reflection loss (RL). The microwave RL of the petroleum coke layer was studied over the moisture content range of 1%-5% at 20 °C and the petroleum coke (10% moisture content) in the temperature range of 20 to 100 °C at 2.45 GHz. The results show that RL depends sensitively on the thickness of the petroleum coke and the absorption peak shifts towards a larger thickness as the moisture content of the petroleum coke increases. There exists a matching thickness corresponding to the maximum microwave absorption, the maximum absorbing peak decreases when the thickness of petroleum coke exceeds the matching thickness. We also show that the absorption peak is found to move towards a smaller thickness region with increasing petroleum coke temperature.

  2. Influence of Ba/Fe mole ratios on magnetic properties, crystallite size and shifting of X-ray diffraction peaks of nanocrystalline BaFe12O19 powder, prepared by sol gel auto combu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suastiyanti, Dwita; Sudarmaji, Arif; Soegijono, Bambang

    2012-06-01

    Barium hexaferrite BaFe12O19 (BFO) is of great importance as permanent magnets, particularly for magnetic recording as well as in microwave devices. Nano-crystalline BFO powders were prepared by sol gel auto combustion method in citric acid - metal nitrates system. Hence the mole ratios of Ba/Fe were variated at 1:12; 1:11.5 and 1:11. Ratio of cation to fuel was fixed at 1:1. An appropriate amount of amonia solution was added dropwise to this solution with constant stirring until the PH reached 7 in all cases. Heating at 850oC for 10 hours for each sample to get final formation of BFO nanocrystalline. The data from XRD showing the lattice parameters a,c and the unit-cell volume V, confirm that BFO with ratio 1:12 has same crystall parameters with ratio 1:11. Ratio of Ba/Fe 1:12 and 1:11 have diffraction pattern similarly at almost each 2 θ for each samples. Ratio of Ba/Fe 1: 11.5 has the finest crystallite size 22 nm. Almost diffraction pattern peaks of Ba/Fe 1:11.5 move to the left from of Ba/Fe 1:12 then return to diffraction pattern of Ba/Fe 1:12 for Ba/Fe 1:11. SEM observations show the particle size less than 100 nm and the same shape for each sample. Ratio of Ba/Fe 1: 12 gives the highest intrinsic coercive Hc = 427.3 kA/m. The highest remanent magnetization is at ratio 1:11 with Mr = 0.170 T. BFO with mole ratio 1:11.5 has the finest grain 22 nm, good magnetic properties and the highest value of best FoM 89%.

  3. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the ‘core/shell’ interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon. PMID:22548846

  4. Peak flow meter (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A peak flow meter is commonly used by a person with asthma to measure the amount of air that can be ... become narrow or blocked due to asthma, peak flow values will drop because the person cannot blow ...

  5. Infrared electronic absorption in a single-component molecular metal.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Sasa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Wakako; Fujiwara, Emiko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Okano, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2004-01-21

    The infrared spectra of the crystal of transition metal complex molecules with extended-TTF ligands, Ni(tmdt)2, which is the first single-component molecular metal that has a stable metallic state even at low temperatures, exhibited an extremely low-energy electronic absorption around 2200 cm-1 (tmdt = trimethylenetetrathiafulvalenedithiolate). The systematic shift of the absorption peaks for molecules similar to Ni(tmdt)2, which range from metallic to semiconducting crystals, shows that the single-component molecular conductors are composed of molecules with unprecedentedly small HOMO-LUMO gaps. PMID:14719914

  6. Shifting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, E.P.; Welch, W.R.

    1984-03-13

    An improved shifting tool connectable in a well tool string and useful to engage and position a slidable sleeve in a sliding sleeve device in a well flow conductor. The selectively profiled shifting tool keys provide better fit with and more contact area between keys and slidable sleeves. When the engaged slidable sleeve cannot be moved up and the shifting tool is not automatically disengaged, emergency disengagement means may be utilized by applying upward force to the shifting tool sufficient to shear pins and cause all keys to be cammed inwardly at both ends to completely disengage for removal of the shifting tool from the sliding sleeve device.

  7. Stark shift of the absorption spectra in Ge/Ge1-xSnx/Ge type-I single QW cell for mid-wavelength infra-red modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahyaoui, N.; Sfina, N.; Lazzari, J.-L.; Bournel, A.; Said, M.

    2015-09-01

    For mid-wavelength infra-red (MWIR) modulation or detection applications, we propose α-Sn rich Ge/Ge1-xSnx/Ge a type-I single quantum wells (SQW) partially strain compensated on Ge1-ySny relaxed layers grown onto (0 0 1)-oriented Ge substrate. Such elementary cells with W-like potential profiles of conduction and valence bands have been modeled by solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation under an applied external electrical field. First, strain effects on electrons, heavy holes (hh) and light holes (lh) energy bands for strained/relaxed Ge1-xSnx/Ge1-ySny heterointerfaces are investigated using the model-solid theory in the whole ranges (0 ⩽ x, y ⩽ 1) of Sn compositions. From the obtained band-discontinuities, band gaps and effective masses, Ge1-ySny/Ge/Ge0.80Sn0.20/Ge/Ge1-ySny cells are computed as a function of the Ge0.80Sn0.20 well width for three compositions of the Ge1-ySny buffer layer (y = 0.05, 0.07 and 0.09) in order to get the optimum quantum confinement of electrons and holes levels while keeping a reasonable amount of averaged strain in the cell. The electric field effect on the absorption spectra is given. An absorption coefficient in the 6× to 3 × 103 cm-1 range is reasonably obtained for a SQW at room temperature with a rather large Stark shift of the direct transition between 0.46 and 0.38 eV (i.e., λ = 3.26-2.70 μm) at large external fields (50 kV/cm). These characteristics are attractive for the design of MWIR optical modulators.

  8. Specific absorption spectra of hemoglobin at different PO2 levels: potential noninvasive method to detect PO2 in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Zhu, Zhirong; Zeng, Changchun; Nie, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb), as one of main components of blood, has a unique quaternary structure. Its release of oxygen is controlled by oxygen partial pressure (PO2). We investigate the specific spectroscopic changes in Hb under different PO2 levels to optimize clinical methods of measuring tissue PO2. The transmissivity of Hb under different PO2 levels is measured with a UV/Vis fiber optic spectrometer. Its plotted absorption spectral curve shows two high absorption peaks at 540 and 576 nm and an absorption valley at 560 nm when PO2 is higher than 100 mm Hg. The two high absorption peaks decrease gradually with a decrease in PO2, whereas the absorption valley at 560 nm increases. When PO2 decreases to approximately 0 mm Hg, the two high absorption peaks disappear completely, while the absorption valley has a hypochromic shift (8 to 10 nm) and forms a specific high absorption peak at approximately 550 nm. The same phenomena can be observed in visible reflectance spectra of finger-tip microcirculation. Specific changes in extinction coefficient and absorption spectra of Hb occur along with variations in PO2, which could be used to explain pathological changes caused by tissue hypoxia and for early detection of oxygen deficiency diseases in clinical monitoring.

  9. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  10. Contingency Discriminability and Peak Shift in Concurrent Schedules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krageloh, Christian U.; Elliffe, Douglas M.; Davison, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effects of discriminative stimuli on choice in a highly variable environment using a procedure in which multiple two-key concurrent VI VI components changed every 10 reinforcers and were signaled by differential flashes of red and yellow keylights. Across conditions, five pigeons were exposed to a number of different…

  11. Shifting Attention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram, Jenni

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the shifts in attention and focus as one teacher introduces and explains an image that represents the processes involved in a numeric problem that his students have been working on. This paper takes a micro-analytic approach to examine how the focus of attention shifts through what the teacher and students do and say in the…

  12. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  13. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  14. Reward Value Effects on Timing in the Peak Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effect of motivational variables on timing in the peak procedure. In Experiment 1, rats received a 60-s peak procedure that was coupled with long-term, between-phase changes in reinforcer magnitude. Increases in reinforcer magnitude produced a leftward shift in the peak that persisted for 20 sessions of training. In…

  15. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  16. Multiscale peak alignment for chromatographic datasets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Liang, Yi-Zeng; Lu, Hong-Mei; Tan, Bin-Bin; Xu, Xiao-Na; Ferro, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Chromatography has been extensively applied in many fields, such as metabolomics and quality control of herbal medicines. Preprocessing, especially peak alignment, is a time-consuming task prior to the extraction of useful information from the datasets by chemometrics and statistics. To accurately and rapidly align shift peaks among one-dimensional chromatograms, multiscale peak alignment (MSPA) is presented in this research. Peaks of each chromatogram were detected based on continuous wavelet transform (CWT) and aligned against a reference chromatogram from large to small scale gradually, and the aligning procedure is accelerated by fast Fourier transform cross correlation. The presented method was compared with two widely used alignment methods on chromatographic dataset, which demonstrates that MSPA can preserve the shapes of peaks and has an excellent speed during alignment. Furthermore, MSPA method is robust and not sensitive to noise and baseline. MSPA was implemented and is available at http://code.google.com/p/mspa. PMID:22222564

  17. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael B.; Hargens, Alan R.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Ebert, Douglas J.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Laurie, Steven S.; Garcia, Kathleen M.; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Martin, David S.; Liu, John; Macias, Brandon R.; Arbeille, Philippe; Danielson, Richard; Chang, Douglas; Gunga, Hanns-Christian; Johnston, Smith L.; Westby, Christian M.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert J.; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shifts elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to VIIP. We will test this hypothesis and a possible countermeasure in ISS astronauts.

  18. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - make peak flow a habit; Reactive airway disease - peak flow; Bronchial asthma - peak flow ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  19. Hale Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the mountains that make up the central peak region of Hale Crater, located near 35.8oS, 36.5oW. Dark, smooth-surfaced sand dunes are seen to be climbing up the mountainous slopes. The central peak of a crater consists of rock brought up during the impact from below the crater floor. This autumn image is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  20. Absorption and fluorescence of alexandrite and of titanium in sapphire and glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Hess, R. V.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1985-01-01

    The fluorescence and absorption data for titanium in crystalline sapphire and titanium doped into two silicate and one phosphate glass structures are analyzed. It is observed that the Ti-doped silicate glass sample exhibits no absorption related to the Ti(III) ion, the Ti-doped phosphate glass is deep blue, the absorption line width of the glass samples are a factor of two larger than that of sapphire, and the absorption peak for the Ti in the glass shifted about 100 nm to the red from the Ti:sapphire absorption peak. This shift reveals that the Ti(III) ion is sensitive to the crystalline environment and not to the glass environment. The photoluminescence spectra for Ti-doped sapphire and alexandrite are compared. It is detected that the Ti:sapphire exhibits a broader spectrum than that for alexandrite with a peak at 750 nm. The three zero phonon transitions of Ti:Al2O3 at liquid nitrogen temperatures are studied.

  1. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M. B.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Laurie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Gunga, H.; Johnston, S.; Westby, C.; Ribeiro, L.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms responsible for the ocular structural and functional changes that characterize the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (ICP) syndrome (VIIP) are unclear, but hypothesized to be secondary to the cephalad fluid shift experienced in spaceflight. This study will relate the fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight with VIIP symptoms. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, can be predicted preflight with acute hemodynamic manipulations, and also if lower body negative pressure (LBNP) can reverse the VIIP effects. METHODS: Physiologic variables will be examined pre-, in- and post-flight in 10 International Space Station crewmembers including: fluid compartmentalization (D2O and NaBr dilution); interstitial tissue thickness (ultrasound); vascular dimensions and dynamics (ultrasound and MRI (including cerebrospinal fluid pulsatility)); ocular measures (optical coherence tomography, intraocular pressure, ultrasound); and ICP measures (tympanic membrane displacement, otoacoustic emissions). Pre- and post-flight measures will be assessed while upright, supine and during 15 deg head-down tilt (HDT). In-flight measures will occur early and late during 6 or 12 month missions. LBNP will be evaluated as a countermeasure during HDT and during spaceflight. RESULTS: The first two crewmembers are in the preflight testing phase. Preliminary results characterize the acute fluid shifts experienced from upright, to supine and HDT postures (increased stroke volume, jugular dimensions and measures of ICP) which are reversed with 25 millimeters Hg LBNP. DISCUSSION: Initial results indicate that acute cephalad fluid shifts may be related to VIIP symptoms, but also may be reversible by LBNP. The effect of a chronic fluid shift has yet to be evaluated. Learning Objectives: Current spaceflight VIIP research is described

  2. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  3. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  4. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  5. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, M.; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Lauriie, S.; Garcia, K.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Ribeiro, L.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Danielson, R.; Chang, D.; Johnston, S.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S.

    2016-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low-Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 50% of ISS astronauts experienced more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the spaceflight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration spaceflight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during spaceflight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's preflight conditions and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. METHODS: We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by

  6. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure of NaBr and Ge at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, R.; Crozier, E.D.; Whitmore, J.E.; Seary, A.J.; Tranquada, J.M.

    1980-06-01

    The x-ray absorption spectra of Ge and of Br in NaBr have been measured to pressures of 52 and 21 kbars, respectively, in a boron carbide and diamond anvil cell in which pressure was measured via the ruby-fluorescence technique. Although Bragg peaks from the diamond anvil reduced the accuracy, atomic spacings in both materials could be determined by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) analysis. Changes in the nearest-neighbor separations in NaBr, and Ge to at least 40 kbars, agreed with literature values, indicating that the EXAFS phase shifts are quite insensitive to such pressures. In addition the near-edge peak positions in the NaBr spectra appeared to readily shift with pressure, which suggests that NaBr may be quite suitable as a pressure standard in future work of this type.

  7. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  8. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  9. Peak of Desire

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Julie Y.; Bargh, John A.

    2008-01-01

    In three studies, we explore the existence of an evolved sensitivity to the peak as consistent with the evolutionary origins of many of our basic preferences. Activating the evolved motive of mating activates related adaptive mechanisms, including a general sensitivity to cues of growth and decay associated with determining mate value in human courtship. We establish that priming the mating goal also activates as well an evaluative bias that influences how people evaluate cues of growth. Specifically, living kinds that are immature or past their prime are devalued, whereas living kinds at their peak become increasingly valued. Study 1 establishes this goal-driven effect for human stimuli indirectly related to the mating goal. Studies 2 and 3 establish that the evaluative bias produced by the active mating goal extends to living kinds but not artifacts. PMID:18578847

  10. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  11. DIAMOND PEAK WILDERNESS, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherrod, David R.; Moyle, Phillip R.

    1984-01-01

    No metallic mineral resources were identified during a mineral survey of the Diamond Peak Wilderness in Oregon. Cinder cones within the wilderness contain substantial cinder resources, but similar deposits that are more accessible occur outside the wilderness. The area could have geothermal resources, but available data are insufficient to evaluate their potential. Several deep holes could be drilled in areas of the High Cascades outside the wilderness, from which extrapolations of the geothermal potential of the several Cascade wilderness could be made.

  12. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1peak absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  13. Fluid Shifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenger, Michael; Hargens, A.; Dulchavsky, S.; Ebert, D.; Lee, S.; Sargsyan, A.; Martin, D.; Lui, J.; Macias, B.; Arbeille, P.; Platts, S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA is focusing on long-duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS) and future exploration-class missions beyond low Earth orbit. Visual acuity changes observed after short-duration missions were largely transient, but more than 30% of ISS astronauts experience more profound, chronic changes with objective structural and functional findings such as papilledema and choroidal folds. Globe flattening, optic nerve sheath dilation, and optic nerve tortuosity also are apparent. This pattern is referred to as the visual impairment and intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome. VIIP signs and symptoms, as well as postflight lumbar puncture data, suggest that elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) may be associated with the space flight-induced cephalad fluid shifts, but this hypothesis has not been tested. The purpose of this study is to characterize fluid distribution and compartmentalization associated with long-duration space flight, and to correlate these findings with vision changes and other elements of the VIIP syndrome. We also seek to determine whether the magnitude of fluid shifts during space flight, as well as the VIIP-related effects of those shifts, is predicted by the crewmember's pre-flight condition and responses to acute hemodynamic manipulations (such as head-down tilt). Lastly, we will evaluate the patterns of fluid distribution in ISS astronauts during acute reversal of fluid shifts through application of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) interventions to characterize and explain general and individual responses. We will examine a variety of physiologic variables in 10 long-duration ISS crewmembers using the test conditions and timeline presented in the Figure below. Measures include: (1) fluid compartmentalization (total body water by D2O, extracellular fluid by NaBr, intracellular fluid by calculation, plasma volume by CO rebreathe, interstitial fluid by calculation); (2) forehead/eyelids, tibia, calcaneus tissue thickness (by ultrasound

  14. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  15. X-ray Absorption Studies in Spinel-Type LiMn 2O 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. S.; Jang, L. Y.; Chen, J. M.; Tsai, Y. C.; Hwang, Y. D.; Liu, R. G.

    1997-02-01

    The electronic structure of the spinel-type LiMn2O4as the cathode material for the application in secondary batteries was probed using both MnK- andL23-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra. Based on the energy shifts of the absorption peaks in the XANES spectrum correlated to the effective charge, the valence of Mn in LiMn2O4was determined to be ∼4+. This suggests that the chemical substitution of low valent Li+ions into the Mn sites is possible to result in high valence of Mn.

  16. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa

    2014-04-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O-H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  17. Ab initio calculation of the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Martiniano, Hugo F. M. C.; Galamba, Nuno; Cabral, Benedito J. Costa

    2014-04-28

    The electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water was investigated by coupling a one-body energy decomposition scheme to configurations generated by classical and Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD). A Frenkel exciton Hamiltonian formalism was adopted and the excitation energies in the liquid phase were calculated with the equation of motion coupled cluster with single and double excitations method. Molecular dynamics configurations were generated by different approaches. Classical MD were carried out with the TIP4P-Ew and AMOEBA force fields. The BLYP and BLYP-D3 exchange-correlation functionals were used in BOMD. Theoretical and experimental results for the electronic absorption spectrum of liquid water are in good agreement. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between the structure of liquid water predicted by the different models and the electronic absorption spectrum. The theoretical gas to liquid phase blue-shift of the peak positions of the electronic absorption spectrum is in good agreement with experiment. The overall shift is determined by a competition between the O–H stretching of the water monomer in liquid water that leads to a red-shift and polarization effects that induce a blue-shift. The results illustrate the importance of coupling many-body energy decomposition schemes to molecular dynamics configurations to carry out ab initio calculations of the electronic properties in liquid phase.

  18. Anomalously Large Polarization Effect Responsible for Excitonic Red Shifts in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids

    SciTech Connect

    A Wolcott; V Doyeux; C Nelson; R Gearba; K Lei; K Yager; A dolocan; K Williams; D Nguyen; X Zhu

    2011-12-31

    The formation of solid thin films from colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is often accompanied by red shifts in excitonic transitions, but the mechanisms responsible for the red shifts are under debate. We quantitatively address this issue using optical absorption spectroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of PbSe QDs with controlled inter-QD distance, which was determined by the length of alkanedithiol linking molecules. With decreasing inter-QD distance, the first and second exciton absorption peaks show increasing red shifts. Using thin films consisting of large and isolated QDs embedded in a matrix of small QDs, we determine that a dominant contribution to the observed red shift is due to changes in polarization of the dielectric environment surrounding each QD ({approx}88%), while electronic or transition dipole coupling plays a lesser role. However, the observed red shifts are more than 1 order of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions based on the dielectric polarization effect for spherical QDs. We attribute this anomalously large polarization effect to deviations of the exciton wave functions from eigenfunctions of the idealized spherical quantum well model.

  19. Room-Temperature Absorption Edge of InGaN/GaN Quantum Wells Characterized by Photoacoustic Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Yosuke; Takagi, Daigo; Sano, Tatsuji; Tabata, Shin; Kobayashi, Naoki; Shen, Qing; Toyoda, Taro; Yamamoto, Jun; Ban, Yuzaburo; Matsumoto, Kou

    2008-12-01

    The absorption edges of five periods of InxGa1-xN (3 nm)/GaN (15 nm) (x=0.07-0.23) quantum wells (QWs) are characterized by photoacoustic (PA) measurement at room temperature. The absorption edge is determined by differentiating the PA signal curve to obtain the inflection point on the assumption that the signal curve consists of Urbach tail in the low-energy region and Elliott's equation in the high-energy region. The constant absorption edge of GaN is observed at 3.4 eV and an absorption edge redshift with increasing In composition is observed for InGaN QWs. As a result, the Stokes shift increases with In composition and the highest shift of 435 meV is observed at x=0.23. From the energy calculation of optical transition in the InGaN/GaN QWs under an internal polarization field, the transition between the ground states confined in the well with a triangular potential causes a low-energy shift in the photoluminescence peak from the bulk band-gap energy, and the excited bound states whose wave functions are confined by the step-linear potential extending over the GaN barrier lead to the high-energy shift in the absorption edge.

  20. Make peak flow a habit!

    MedlinePlus

    Checking your peak flow is one of the best ways to control your asthma and to keep it from getting worse. Asthma attacks ... Most times, they build slowly. Checking your peak flow can tell you if an attack is coming, ...

  1. Separation of overlapping vibrational peaks in terahertz spectra using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ishii, Shinya; Otani, Chiko

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were measured during isothermal crystallization at 90-120 °C. The temporal changes in the absorption spectra were analyzed using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS). In the asynchronous plot, cross peaks were observed around 2.4 THz, suggesting that two vibrational modes overlap in the raw spectrum. By comparing this to the peak at 2.9 THz corresponding to the stretching mode of the helical structure of PHB and the assignment obtained using polarization spectroscopy, we concluded that the high-frequency band could be attributed to the vibration of the helical structure and the low-frequency band to the vibration between the helical structures. The exact frequencies of the overlapping vibrational bands and their assignments provide a new means to inspect the thermal behavior of the intermolecular vibrational modes. The large red-shift of the interhelix vibrational mode suggests a large anharmonicity in the vibrational potential.

  2. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  3. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use

    PubMed Central

    Gleick, Peter H.; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of “peak oil”—a peaking and then decline in oil production—has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of “peak water”: peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak “ecological” water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use. PMID:20498082

  4. Decoupling approximation design using the peak to peak gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Linear system design for accurate decoupling approximation is examined using the peak to peak gain of the error system. The design problem consists in finding values of system parameters to ensure that this gain is small. For this purpose a computationally inexpensive upper bound on the peak to peak gain, namely the star norm, is minimized using a stochastic method. Examples of the methodology's application to tensegrity structures design are presented. Connections between the accuracy of the approximation, the damping matrix, and the natural frequencies of the system are examined, as well as decoupling in the context of open and closed loop control.

  5. Electronic absorption spectra of imidazolium-based ionic liquids studied by far-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Ichiro; Kurawaki, Yuji; Morisawa, Yusuke; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-08-10

    Electronic absorption spectra of imidazolium-based ionic liquids were studied by far- and deep-ultraviolet spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The absorption spectra in the 145-300 nm region of imidazolium-based ionic liquids, [Cnmim](+)[BF4](-) (n = 2, 4, 8) and [C4mim](+)[PF6](-), were recorded using our original attenuated total reflectance (ATR) system spectrometer. The obtained spectra had two definitive peaks at ∼160 and ∼210 nm. Depending on the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl side chain, the peak wavelength around 160 nm changed, while that around 210 nm remained at almost the same wavelength. Quantum chemical calculation results based on the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) also showed the corresponding peak shifts. In contrast, there was almost no significant difference between [C4mim](+)[BF4](-) and [C4mim](+)[PF6](-), which corresponded with our calculations. Therefore, it can be concluded that the absorption spectra in the 145-300 nm region are mainly determined by the cations when fluorine-containing anions are adopted. In addition, upon addition of organic solvent (acetonitrile) to [C4mim](+)[BF4](-), small peak shifts to the longer wavelength were revealed for both peaks at ∼160 and ∼210 nm. The peak shift in the deep-ultraviolet region (≤200 nm) in the presence of the solvent, which indicates the change of electronic states of the ionic liquid, was experimentally observed for the first time by using the ATR spectrometer. PMID:27471106

  6. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  7. Computational design of small organic dyes with strong visible absorption by controlled quinoidization of the thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi Yin; Tu, Wei Han; Manzhos, Sergei

    2014-02-01

    We present rational design of phenothiazine dyes by controlled quinoidization of the thiophene unit. We systematically study the effect of electron-withdrawing functional groups including pseudo- and super-halogens. We propose a new dye where a fumaronitrile unit induces an increase in the bond length alternation and a concurrent red shift in the absorption spectrum vs. the parent dye. The visible absorption peak is predicted at 520 nm, in CH2Cl2 vs. 450 nm for the parent dye. The LUMO and HOMO levels of the new dye are suitable for injection into TiO2 and regeneration by available redox shuttles, respectively.

  8. On the off-stoichiometric peaking of adiabatic flame temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.; Lu, T.F.; Makino, A.

    2006-06-15

    The characteristic rich shifting of the maximum adiabatic flame temperature from the stoichiometric value for mixtures of hydrocarbon and air is demonstrated to be caused by product dissociation and hence reduced amount of heat release. Since the extent of dissociation is greater on the lean side as a result of the stoichiometry of dissociated products, the peaking occurs on the rich side. The specific heat per unit mass of the mixture is shown to increase monotonically with increasing fuel concentration, and as such tends to shift the peak toward the lean side. It is further shown that this is the cause for the lean shifting of the adiabatic flame temperature of oxidizer-enriched mixtures of N{sub m}H{sub n} and F{sub 2} and of NH{sub 3} and O{sub 2}, with various amounts of inert dilution, even though their maximum heat release still peaks on the rich side. (author)

  9. X-ray absorption spectral studies of copper (II) mixed ligand complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, B.; Dar, Davood Ah; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the K-edge of copper have been studied in two copper mixed ligand complexes, one having tetramethyethylenediamine (tmen) and the other having tetraethyethylenediamine (teen) as one of the ligands. The spectra have been recorded at BL-8 dispersive extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) beamline at the 2.5 GeV INDUS- 2 synchrotron, RRCAT, Indore, India. The data obtained has been processed using the data analysis program Athena. The energy of the K-absorption edge, chemical shift, edge-width and shift of the principal absorption maximum in the complexes have been determined and discussed. The values of these parameters have been found to be approximately the same in both the complexes indicating that the two complexes possess similar chemical environment around the copper metal atom. The chemical shift has been utilized to estimate effective nuclear charge on the absorbing atom. The normalized EXAFS spectra have been Fourier transformed. The position of the first peak in the Fourier transform gives the value of first shell bond length, which is shorter than the actual bond length because of energy dependence of the phase factors in the sine function of the EXAFS equation. This distance is thus the phase- uncorrected bond length. Bond length has also been determined by Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (LSS) methods. The results obtained from LSS and the Fourier transformation methods are comparable with each other, since both are phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  10. X-shaped Electro-Optic Chromophore with Remarkably Blue-Shifted Optical Absorption. Synthesis, Characterization, Linear/Nonlinear Optical Properties, Self-Assembly, and Thin Film Microstructural Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Kang,H.; Evmenenko, G.; Dutta, P.; Clays, K.; Song, K.; Marks, T.

    2006-01-01

    A novel type of 'X-shaped' two-dimensional electro-optic (EO) chromophore with extended conjugation has been synthesized and characterized. This chromophore is found to exhibit a remarkably blue-shifted optical maximum (357 nm in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) while maintaining a very large first hyperpolarizability ({beta}). Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) measurements at 800 nm provide a {beta}{sub zzz} value of 1840 x 10{sup -30} esu. Self-assembled thin films of this chromophore were fabricated via a layer-by-layer chemisorptive siloxane-based approach. The chromophoric multilayers have been characterized by transmission optical spectroscopy, advancing contact angle measurements, synchrotron X-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, and angle-dependent polarized second harmonic generation spectroscopy. The self-assembled chromophoric films exhibit a dramatically blue-shifted optical maximum (325 nm) while maintaining a large EO response ({chi}({sup 2}){sub 333} {approx} 232 pm/V at 1064 nm; r{sub 33} {approx} 45 pm/V at 1310 nm). This work demonstrates an attractive approach to developing EO materials offering improved nonlinearity-transparency trade-offs.

  11. X-Shaped electro-optic chromophore with remarkably blue-shifted optical absorption. Synthesis, characterization, linear/nonlinear optical properties, self-assembly, and thin film microstructural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hu; Evmenenko, Guennadi; Dutta, Pulak; Clays, Koen; Song, Kai; Marks, Tobin J

    2006-05-10

    A novel type of "X-shaped" two-dimensional electro-optic (EO) chromophore with extended conjugation has been synthesized and characterized. This chromophore is found to exhibit a remarkably blue-shifted optical maximum (357 nm in CH(2)Cl(2)) while maintaining a very large first hyperpolarizability (beta). Hyper-Rayleigh Scattering (HRS) measurements at 800 nm provide a beta(zzz) value of 1840 x 10(-30) esu. Self-assembled thin films of this chromophore were fabricated via a layer-by-layer chemisorptive siloxane-based approach. The chromophoric multilayers have been characterized by transmission optical spectroscopy, advancing contact angle measurements, synchrotron X-ray reflectivity, atomic force microscopy, and angle-dependent polarized second harmonic generation spectroscopy. The self-assembled chromophoric films exhibit a dramatically blue-shifted optical maximum (325 nm) while maintaining a large EO response (chi(2)(333) approximately 232 pm/V at 1064 nm; r(33) approximately 45 pm/V at 1310 nm). This work demonstrates an attractive approach to developing EO materials offering improved nonlinearity-transparency trade-offs. PMID:16669690

  12. Omnidirectional polarization insensitive tunable absorption in graphene metamaterial of nanodisk structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Renxia; Bao, Jie; Jiao, Zheng; Xu, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Tunable absorption based on graphene metamaterial with nanodisk structure at near-infrared frequency was investigated using the finite difference time domain method. The absorption of the nanodisk structure which consisting of Au-MgF2-graphene-Au-polyimide (from bottom to top) can be tuned by the chemical potential of graphene at certain diameter of nanodisk. The permittivity of graphene is discussed with different chemical potential to obtain tunable absorption. It is shown that the increased value of the chemical potential of graphene can lead to blue-shifted of the absorption peaks and the values decreased. Moreover, dual-band and triple-band absorption can be achieved for resonance frequencies at normal incidence. Compared with diameter of nanodisks, the multilayer structure shows multi-band absorber, and an omnidirectional absorption at 195.25 THz is insensitive to TE/TM polarization. This omnidirectional polarization insensitive absorption may be applied by optical communications such as optical absorber, near infrared stealth, and filter.

  13. Broadband terahertz absorption enabled by coating an ultrathin antireflection film on doped semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongxing; Shi, Fenghua; Chen, Yihang

    2016-09-01

    We show that perfect absorption of terahertz wave can be achieved in a compact system where an ultrathin film of lossless dielectric is coated on a doped semiconductor substrate. Due to the nontrivial reflection phase shift at the interface between the two media, strong resonant behavior and the concomitant antireflection occur at wavelengths that are much larger than the thickness of the dielectric film, resulting in strong absorption of the incident wave in a wide frequency range. Using this mechanism, we design a broadband terahertz absorber by coating a Ge film on a highly doped GaAs substrate. We show that such a system not only has a perfect absorption peak, but also exhibits high absorptance (over 0.9) within a fractional bandwidth of over 20%. By varying the free carrier density in the GaAs substrate, the central frequency of the absorption band can be tuned from 1.79 to 2.69 THz. In addition, the absorption performance of the proposed system is shown to be insensitive to both incident angle and polarization. Our results offer a low-cost way for the design of absorption-based THz devices. PMID:27607670

  14. Strain- and twist-engineered optical absorption of few-layer black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Qian; Kong, XiangHua; Qiao, JingSi; Ji, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Density functional and many-body perturbation theories calculations were carried out to investigate fundamental and optical bandgap, exciton binding energy and optical absorption property of normal and strain- and twist-engineered few-layer black phosphorus (BP). We found that the fundamental bandgaps of few layer BP can be engineered by layer stacking and in-plane strain, with linear relationships to their associated exciton binding energies. The strain-dependent optical absorption behaviors are also anisotropic that the position of the first absorption peak monotonically blue-shifts as the strain applies to either direction for incident light polarized along the armchair direction, but this is not the case for that along the zigzag direction. Given those striking properties, we proposed two prototype devices for building potentially more balanced light absorbers and light filter passes, which promotes further applications and investigations of BP in nanoelectronics and optoelectronics.

  15. Sound absorption of a rib-stiffened plate covered by anechoic coatings.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinyi; Jin, Zhongkun; Yin, Yao; Liu, Bilong

    2015-03-01

    Underwater vehicles are often equipped with anechoic coatings to absorb the sound waves of active sonar and attenuate the noise emitted from the vessels. Rubber layers with periodically distributed air cavities are widely used as anechoic coatings. In this paper, the sound absorption of anechoic coatings embedded with doubly periodic cavities and backed with periodically rib-stiffened plates is investigated using a finite element method (FEM) with Bloch-periodic boundary conditions. Numerical results given by the FEM are compared with those of a simplified transfer impedance approach to explain the shifting of the main absorption peak. Further a simplified FEM approach, which reduces calculation time significantly and maintains the reasonable accuracy, is proposed for a comparison. The results indicate that the plate and the ribs can have significant impacts on the absorption performance of anechoic coatings, especially at low frequencies. PMID:25786965

  16. Characterizing Earthquake Rupture Properties Using Peak High-Frequency Offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, L.; Meng, L.

    2014-12-01

    Teleseismic array back-projection (BP) of high frequency (~1Hz) seismic waves has been recently applied to image the aftershock sequence of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake. The BP method proves to be effective in capturing early aftershocks that are difficult to be detected due to the contamination of the mainshock coda wave. Furthermore, since the event detection is based on the identification of the local peaks in time series of the BP power, the resulting event location corresponds to the peak high-frequency energy rather than the hypocenter. In this work, we show that the comparison between the BP-determined catalog and conventional phase-picking catalog provides estimates of the spatial and temporal offset between the hypocenter and the peak high-frequency radiation. We propose to measure this peak high-frequency shift of global earthquakes between M4.0 to M7.0. We average the BP locations calibrated by multiple reference events to minimize the uncertainty due to the variation of 3D path effects. In our initial effort focusing on the foreshock and aftershock sequence of the 2014 Iquique earthquake, we find systematic shifts of the peak high-frequency energy towards the down-dip direction. We find that the amount of the shift is a good indication of rupture length, which scales with the earthquake magnitude. Further investigations of the peak high frequency offset may provide constraints on earthquake source properties such as rupture directivity, rupture duration, rupture speed, and stress drop.

  17. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  18. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  19. CHANGES IN LOWER EXTREMITY MOVEMENT AND POWER ABSORPTION DURING FOREFOOT STRIKING AND BAREFOOT RUNNING

    PubMed Central

    Green, Douglas H.; Wurzinger, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Background: Both forefoot strike shod (FFS) and barefoot (BF) running styles result in different mechanics when compared to rearfoot strike (RFS) shod running. Additionally, running mechanics of FFS and BF running are similar to one another. Comparing the mechanical changes occurring in each of these patterns is necessary to understand potential benefits and risks of these running styles. The authors hypothesized that FFS and BF conditions would result in increased sagittal plane joint angles at initial contact and that FFS and BF conditions would demonstrate a shift in sagittal plane joint power from the knee to the ankle when compared to the RFS condition. Finally, total lower extremity power absorption will be least in BF and greatest in the RFS shod condition. Methods: The study included 10 male and 10 female RFS runners who completed 3‐dimensional running analysis in 3 conditions: shod with RFS, shod with FFS, and BF. Variables were the angles of plantarflexion, knee flexion, and hip flexion at initial contact and peak sagittal plane joint power at the hip, knee, and ankle during stance phase. Results: Running with a FFS pattern and BF resulted in significantly greater plantarflexion and significantly less negative knee power (absorption) when compared to shod RFS condition. FFS condition runners landed in the most plantarflexion and demonstrated the most peak ankle power absorption and lowest knee power absorption between the 3 conditions. BF and FFS conditions demonstrated decreased total lower extremity power absorption compared to the shod RFS condition but did not differ from one another. Conclusions: BF and FFS running result in reduced total lower extremity power, hip power and knee power and a shift of power absorption from the knee to the ankle. Clinical Relevance: Alterations associated with BF running patterns are present in a FFS pattern when wearing shoes. Additionally, both patterns result in increased demand at the foot and ankle as

  20. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com; Liu, Z. W.; Chen, Q. E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge of the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.

  1. Isotope shifts in methane near 6000/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, K.; Halsey, G. W.; Jennings, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Isotope shifts for cleanly resolved vibrational-rotational absorption lines of CH4-12 and CH4-13 were measured by a 5-m focal length Littrow spectrometer in the 6000/cm range. The methane isotopes were held in separate absorption cells: 20 torr of CH4-13 in a 1-m cell, and 5 torr of CH4-12 in a White cell of 4-m optical path length. Measured shifts for the cleanly resolved singlets R(0), R(1), Q(1) and P(1) are summarized in tabular form.

  2. Visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Edward T.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    1981-01-01

    The visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene at ≈ 108 K from 5500 Å to 7200 Å was measured by using a pulsed tunable dye laser, immersed-transducer, gated-detection opto-acoustic spectroscopy technique. The absorption features show the strongest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈2 × 10-2 cm-1 and the weakest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈1 × 10-4 cm-1. Proposed assignments of the observed absorption peaks involve combinations of overtones of local and normal modes of vibration of ethylene. PMID:16592978

  3. The relevance of food peak architecture in trophic interactions.

    PubMed

    Vatka, Emma; Orell, Markku; Rytkönen, Seppo

    2016-04-01

    Phenological shifts and associated changes in the temporal match between trophic levels have been a major focus of the study of ecological consequences of climate change. Previously, the food peak has been thought to respond as an entity to warming temperatures. However, food peak architecture, that is, timings and abundances of prey species and the level of synchrony between them, determines the timing and shape of the food peak. We demonstrate this with a case example of three passerine prey species and their predator. We explored temporal trends in the timing, height, width, and peakedness of prey availabilities and explained their variation with food peak architecture and ambient temperatures of prebreeding and breeding seasons. We found a temporal match between the predator's breeding schedule and food availability. Temporal trends in the timing of the food peak or in the synchrony between the prey species were not found. However, the food peak has become wider and more peaked over time. With more peaked food availabilities, predator's breeding success will depend more on the temporal match between its breeding schedule and the food peak, ultimately affecting the timing of breeding in the predator population. The height and width of the food peak depended on the abundances and breeding season lengths of individual prey species and their reciprocal synchronies. Peakednesses of separate prey species' availability distributions alone explained the peakedness of the food peak. Timing and quantity of food production were associated with temperatures of various time periods with variable relevance in different prey species. Alternating abundances of early and late breeding prey species caused high annual fluctuation in the timing of the food peak. Interestingly, the food peak may become later even when prey species' schedules are advanced. Climate warming can thus produce unexpected changes in the food availabilities, intervening in trophic interactions. PMID

  4. Data for phase angle shift with frequency.

    PubMed

    Paul, T; Banerjee, D; Kargupta, K

    2016-06-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  5. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  6. Anisotropic shift of surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles doped in nematic liquid crystal

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Amit; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Study of the liquid crystal (LC) director around nanoparticles has been an important topic of research very recently, since it allows design and fabrication of next-generation LC devices that are impossible in the past. In our experiment, alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were dispersed in nematic LC. Analysis of the LC director around GNPs was performed by investigating the behavior of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) absorption peaks of the GNPs using spectrophotometry technique. It is found that the incident linearly polarized light orientated at 0°, 45°, and 90° angles with respect to the rubbing direction experiences varying interaction with the LC medium. The corresponding transmission of light reveals the anisotropic shift in wavelength of SPP peak. The anisotropic behavior of SPPs of the GNPs is in agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:25322010

  7. Anisotropic shift of surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles doped in nematic liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Amit; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-10-01

    Study of the liquid crystal (LC) director around nanoparticles has been an important topic of research very recently, since it allows design and fabrication of next-generation LC devices that are impossible in the past. In our experiment, alkanethiol-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were dispersed in nematic LC. Analysis of the LC director around GNPs was performed by investigating the behavior of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) absorption peaks of the GNPs using spectrophotometry technique. It is found that the incident linearly polarized light orientated at 0°, 45°, and 90° angles with respect to the rubbing direction experiences varying interaction with the LC medium. The corresponding transmission of light reveals the anisotropic shift in wavelength of SPP peak. The anisotropic behavior of SPPs of the GNPs is in agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:25322010

  8. Psychopathology of Shift Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akinnawo, Ebenezer Olutope

    1989-01-01

    Examined incidence and nature of general psychopathology among Nigerian shift workers (N=320). Found shift workers more significantly psychopathological than non-shift workers (p<0.001). Prominent disorders among shift workers were intellectual, sleep, mood, and general somatic disorders. No significant difference could be attributed to gender and…

  9. A combined strategy of mass fragmentation, post-column cobalt complexation and shift in ultraviolet absorption spectra to determine the uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase metabolism profiling of flavones after oral administration of a flavone mixture in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Dai, Peimin; Zeng, Xuejun; Qi, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Lijun; Yan, Tongmeng; Wang, Ying; Lu, Linlin; Hu, Ming; Wang, Xinchun; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-05-22

    The use of dietary flavones is becoming increasingly popular for their prevention of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and other diseases. Despite many pharmacokinetic studies on flavone mixtures, the position(s) of glucuronidation sites on the flavone skeleton in vivo remain(s) uncertain because of the lack of a convenient method to differentiate the isomers in biological samples. Accordingly, this study aimed to develop a new strategy to identify the position of the mono-O-glucuronide of flavones in vivo and to simultaneously determine the parent agent and its major metabolites responsible for complex pharmacokinetic characteristics. The novel strategy involves accurate mass measurements of flavone glucuronides, their [Co(II) (flavone glucuronide-H) (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)2](+) complexes generated via the post-column addition of CoBr2 and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, and their mass spectrometric fragmentation by UPLC-DAD-Q-TOF and the comparison of retention times with biosynthesized standards of different isomers that were identified by analyzing the shift in UV spectra compared with the spectra of their respective aglycones. We successfully generated a metabolite profiling of flavones in rat plasma after oral administration of a flavone mixture from Dracocephalum moldavica L., which was used here as the model to demonstrate the strategy. Twelve flavone glucuronides, which were glucuronidated derivatives of acacetin, apigenin, luteolin, diosmetin, chrysoeriol and cirsimaritin, were detected and identified. Glucuronidation of the flavone skeleton at the 3'-/7-position was more prevalent, however, luteolin 4'-glucuronide levels exceeded luteolin 7-glucuronide levels. Based on the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) metabolism profiling of flavones in rat plasma, six main compounds (tilianin, acacetin 7-glucuronide, apigenin 7-glucuronide, luteolin 3'-glucuronide, acacetin, and apigenin) were selected as pharmacokinetic markers. Pharmacokinetic

  10. Two classes of speculative peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehner, Bertrand M.

    2001-10-01

    Speculation not only occurs in financial markets but also in numerous other markets, e.g. commodities, real estate, collectibles, and so on. Such speculative movements result in price peaks which share many common characteristics: same order of magnitude of duration with respect to amplitude, same shape (the so-called sharp-peak pattern). Such similarities suggest (at least as a first approximation) a common speculative behavior. However, a closer examination shows that in fact there are (at least) two distinct classes of speculative peaks. For the first, referred to as class U, (i) the amplitude of the peak is negatively correlated with the price at the start of the peak (ii) the ensemble coefficient of variation exhibits a trough. Opposite results are observed for the second class that we refer to as class S. Once these empirical observations have been made we try to understand how they should be interpreted. First, we show that the two properties are in fact related in the sense that the second is a consequence of the first. Secondly, by listing a number of cases belonging to each class we observe that the markets in the S-class offer collection of items from which investors can select those they prefer. On the contrary, U-markets consist of undifferentiated products for which a selection cannot be made in the same way. All prices considered in the paper are real (i.e., deflated) prices.

  11. Hubbert's Peak: A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Oil and its by-products, as used in manufacturing, agriculture, and transportation, are the lifeblood of today's 7 billion-person population and our 65T world economy. Despite this importance, estimates of future oil production seem dominated by wishful thinking rather than quantitative analysis. Better studies are needed. In 1956, Dr. M.King Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Thus, the peak of oil production is referred to as ``Hubbert's Peak.'' Prof. Al Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on population and oil. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. This paper extends this line of work to include analyses of individual countries, inclusion of multiple Gaussian peaks, and analysis of reserves data. While this is not strictly a predictive theory, we will demonstrate a ``closed'' story connecting production, oil-in-place, and reserves. This gives us the ``most likely'' estimate of future oil availability. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  12. Absorption spectra of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; Wu, M. F.; Hsieh, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The low-frequency optical absorption properties of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field are investigated by using the gradient approximation. The spectral function exhibits symmetric delta-function like prominent peaks structure in a uniform magnetic field, and changes to asymmetric square-root divergent peaks structure when subjecting to a composite field. These asymmetric divergent peaks can be further classified into principal and secondary peaks. The spectral intensity and frequency of the absorption peaks depend sensitively on the strength and modulation period of the composite field. The transition channels of the absorption peaks are also analyzed. There exists an optical selection rule which is caused by the orthogonal properties of the sublattice wave functions. The evolution of the spectral frequency of the absorption peaks with the field strength is explored.

  13. Femtosecond transient absorption dynamics of close-packed gold nanocrystal monolayer arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Eah, S.-K.; Jaeger, H. M.; Scherer, N. F.; Lin, X.-M.; Weiderrecht, G. P.; Univ. of Chicago

    2004-03-11

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy is used to investigate hot electron dynamics of close-packed 6 nm gold nanocrystal monolayers. Morphology changes of the monolayer caused by the laser pump pulse are monitored by transmission electron microscopy. At low pump power, the monolayer maintains its structural integrity. Hot electrons induced by the pump pulse decay through electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling inside the nanocrystals with a decay constant that is similar to the value for bulk films. At high pump power, irreversible particle aggregation and sintering occur in the nanocrystal monolayer, which cause damping and peak shifting of the transient bleach signal.

  14. Stochastic acceleration in peaked spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Zasenko, V.; Zagorodny, A.; Weiland, J.

    2005-06-15

    Diffusion in velocity space of test particles undergoing external random electric fields with spectra varying from low intensive and broad to high intensive and narrow (peaked) is considered. It is shown that to achieve consistency between simulation and prediction of the microscopic model, which is reduced to Fokker-Planck-type equation, it is necessary, in the case of peaked spectrum, to account for temporal variation of diffusion coefficient occurring in the early stage. An analytical approximation for the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with a time and velocity dependent diffusion coefficients is proposed.

  15. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  16. Will peak oil accelerate carbon dioxide emissions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldeira, K.; Davis, S. J.; Cao, L.

    2008-12-01

    The relative scarcity of oil suggests that oil production is peaking and will decline thereafter. Some have suggested that this represents an opportunity to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. However, in the absence of constraints on carbon dioxide emission, "peak oil" may drive a shift towards increased reliance on coal as a primary energy source. Because coal per unit energy, in the absence of carbon capture and disposal, releases more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than oil, "peak oil" may lead to an acceleration of carbon dioxide emissions. We will never run out of oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce, prices will rise and therefore consumption will diminish. As prices rise, other primary energy sources will become increasingly competitive with oil. The developed world uses oil primarily as a source of transportation fuels. The developing world uses oil primarily for heat and power, but the trend is towards increasing reliance on oil for transportation. Liquid fuels, including petroleum derivatives such as gasoline and diesel fuel, are attractive as transportation fuels because of their relative abundance of energy per unit mass and volume. Such considerations are especially important for the air transport industry. Today, there is little that can compete with petroleum-derived transportation fuels. Future CO2 emissions from the transportation sector largely depend on what replaces oil as a source of fuel. Some have suggested that biomass-derived ethanol, hydrogen, or electricity could play this role. Each of these potential substitutes has its own drawbacks (e.g., low power density per unit area in the case of biomass, low power density per unit volume in the case of hydrogen, and low power density per unit mass in the case of battery storage). Thus, it is entirely likely that liquefaction of coal could become the primary means by which transportation fuels are produced. Since the burning of coal produces more CO2 per unit energy than does the burning of

  17. Gear shift control mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Janson, D.A.

    1987-03-10

    A gear shift control mechanism is described comprising: multiple shift rods directed substantially parallel to one another, each rod carrying a shift fork for axial movement; a shift lever supported for pivotal movement about a first axis directed parallel to the axes of the shift rods and for pivotal movement about a second axis directed substantially perpendicular to the axes of the shift rods. The lever is moveable about the first axis and the second axis into engagement with a selected shift fork; interlock means located on each lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis for blocking engagement with the shift forks; detent means for holding the shift lever in multiple predetermined angular positions about the second axis; and spring means located on a lateral side of the shift lever and mounted for pivotal movement about the first axis into interference contact with the shift forks for producing a force tending to resiliently bias the shift lever out of engagement with the selected shift fork.

  18. [The measurement and analysis of visible-absorption spectrum and fluorescence spectrum of lycopene].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-zhan; Li, Ping; Dai, Song-hui; Wu, Da-cheng; Li, Rui-xia; Yang, Jian-hui; Xiao, Hai-bo

    2005-11-01

    Using ICCD spectral detection system, the absorbency of lycopene-carbon bisulfide solution with different concentration was measured, and the result shows that in a specified range the absorption rule of lycopene solution agrees with Lambert-Beer Law. Absorption spectral wavelength shifts were measured respectively when lycopene was dissolved in acetone, normal hexane, petroleum ether, benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide, and comparing to acetone, different red-shift appeared when lycopene was dissolved in benzene, ethyl acetate, and carbon bisulfide when water was added in lycopene-acetone solution, t he absorbency of lycopene dropped, the fine structure of absorption spectrum became indistinct, and a new absorption peak appeared in UV. The reason for these phenomena is that the solvent molecule had different effect on lycopene molecule when lycopene was dissolved in different solvent. Using fluorecence spectrophotometer, fluorescence spectra of lycopene in different concentrations were collected, and the results show that the fluorescence spectra of lycopene were mainly in 500-680 nm. When concentration was lower than 50 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity linearly increased with increasing concentration, and when concentration was higher than 60 microg x mL(-1), the fluorescence intensity dropped because of the interaction between lycopene molecules. PMID:16499057

  19. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... meter. Proper cleaning with mild detergent in hot water will keep your peak flow meter working accurately and may keep you healthier. Related Content News: American Lung Association Applauds EPA’s Update to Cross-State Air Pollution Rule News: American Lung Association Invests More Than $ ...

  20. Peak Stress Testing Protocol Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of peak flows during wet weather is a common challenge across the country for municipal wastewater utilities with separate and/or combined sewer systems. Increases in wastewater flow resulting from infiltration and inflow (I/I) during wet weather events can result in op...

  1. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  2. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  3. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  4. Manipulation of Goos-Hänchen shifts in the atomic configuration of mercury via interacting dark-state resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Radmehr, Arash; Sahrai, M.

    2014-11-01

    We study the manipulation of Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts for the reflected and transmitted probe light pulses injected into a cavity containing four-level configuration mercury atoms where the probe transition is in the ultraviolet (UV) region with a wavelength of 253.7 nm . Different behaviors of the GH shifts can be observed in the absence, or presence, of two driving fields as well as an incoherent pump field. When neither coherent driving fields nor incoherent pumping is turned on, we realize negative reflected GH shifts for anomalous dispersion. Including only one driving field leads to subluminal-based light propagation with positive lateral shifts at certain incident angles. Taking into account the impact of both driving fields, negative GH shifts reappear in the reflected part of the incident light. The origin of this defect is attributed to interacting double dark resonances due to a high-resolution absorption peaks with a very steep negative slope of dispersion in the susceptibility profile. We then show that one can surpass this defect by applying a weak incoherent pumping field to obtain positive GH shifts for both reflected and transmitted light beams. Finally, using the 6 1P1↔6 1S0 transition of Hg, we generalize our study to the case where the wavelength of the probe transition is 185 nm which is in the vacuum-ultraviolet domain. Although the number of oscillations is now increased, however, similar results are reported with respect to the case of UV transition.

  5. Time- and space-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum irradiated by a subpicosecond high-power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzortzakis, S.; Audebert, P.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J. P.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Nagels, V.; Gary, S.; Shepherd, R.; Girard, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Gauthier, J.-C.

    2006-05-01

    The ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas was measured using point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy. An aluminum plasma was produced with a subpicosecond beam of the 100-TW laser at the LULI facility and probed at different times with a picosecond X-ray backlighter created with a synchronized subpicosecond laser beam. Fourier-Domain-Interferometry (FDI) was used to measure the electron temperature at the peak of the heating laser pulse. Absorption X-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma, with limited longitudinal gradients as shown by hydrodynamic simulations. The shift of the Al K-edge was measured in the cold dense plasma located at the edge of the heated plasma. From the 1s 2p absorption spectra, the average ionization was measured as a function of time and was also modeled with a collisional-radiative atomic physics code coupled with hydrodynamic simulations.

  6. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOEpatents

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  7. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  8. A simple pharmacokinetics subroutine for modeling double peak phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Massoud

    2006-04-01

    Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs. Numerous reasons have been implicated in causing the double peak. DRUG-KNT--a pharmacokinetic software developed previously for fitting one and two compartment kinetics using the iterative curve stripping method--was modified and a revised subroutine was incorporated to solve double-peak models. This subroutine considers the double peak as two hypothetical doses administered with a time gap. The fitting capability of the presented model was verified using four sets of data showing double peak profiles extracted from the literature (piroxicam, ranitidine, phenazopyridine and talinolol). Visual inspection and statistical diagnostics showed that the present algorithm provided adequate curve fit disregarding the mechanism involved in the emergence of the secondary peaks. Statistical diagnostic parameters (RSS, AIC and R2) generally showed good fitness in the plasma profile prediction by this model. It was concluded that the algorithm presented herein provides adequate predicted curves in cases of the double peak phenomenon. PMID:16400712

  9. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  10. Absorption spectroscopic and FTIR studies on EDA complexes between TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) with amines in DMSO and determination of the vertical electron affinity of TNT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Lahiri, S. C.

    2008-06-01

    TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene) formed deep red 1:1 CT complexes with chromogenic agents like isopropylamine, ethylenediamine, bis(3-aminopropyl)amine and tetraethylenepentamine in DMSO. The complexes were also observed in solvents like methanol, acetone, etc. when the amines were present in large excess. The isopropylamine, complex showed three absorption peaks (at 378, 532 and 629 nm) whereas higher amines showed four peaks (at 370, 463, 532 and 629 nm). The peak at 463 nm vanished rapidly. The peak of the complexes near 530 nm required about 8-10 min to develop and the complexes were stable for about an hour but the peak slowly shifted towards 500 nm and the complexes were found to be stable for more than 24 h. The evidence of complex formation was obtained from distinct spots in HPTLC plates and from the shifts in frequencies and formation of new peaks in FTIR spectra. The peaks near 460 nm (transient) and 530 nm may be due to Janovsky reaction but could not be established. The extinction coefficients of the complexes were determined directly which enabled the accurate determination of the association constants KDA with TNT and amines in stoichiometric ratios. The results were verified using iterative method. The quantfication of TNT was made using ɛ value of the complex with ethylenediamine. The vertical electron affinity ( EA) of TNT was calculated using the method suggested by Mulliken.

  11. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  12. Dual-peak dose measurement for radiochromic films by a newly developed spectral microdensitometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.Y.; Fung, K.K.L.; Kwok, C.S.

    2005-06-15

    Radiochromic film (RCF) dosimetry is usually based on densitometric methods which use an analyzing light source of a fixed or a broad spectrum of wavelengths. These methods have not exploited the sensitivity of the dose response of the RCF otherwise attainable by using a light source with wavelengths peaked at the two absorption peaks in the absorption spectrum of the RCF. A new algorithm of dual-peak dose measurement for the RCF has been proposed in this paper to make use of these dual absorption peaks to achieve the maximum attainable sensitivity. This technique relies on the measurement of the transmittance of the RCF at the wavelength of the major and minor absorption peaks, respectively. The dual-peak dose measurement is accomplished with the aid of a novel spectral microdensitometer developed in our Institute. The microdensitometer utilizes a monochromator to provide a light source of which the wavelength can be matched precisely to the wavelength of the absorption peaks of the RCF. The doses obtained at these wavelengths are fed into a weighted objective function and an optimum dose is searched by minimizing the objective function to give the best estimate of the dose deposited on the film. An initial test shows that there is a good agreement between the estimated and actual dose deposited; and the maximum discrepancy was found to be less than 1%.

  13. Molecular level all-optical logic with chlorophyll absorption spectrum and polarization sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, B.; Bhattacharyya (Bhaumik), S.

    2008-06-01

    Chlorophyll is suggested as a suitable medium for realizing optical Boolean logic at the molecular level in view of its wavelength-selective property and polarization sensitivity in the visible region. Spectrophotometric studies are made with solutions of total chlorophyll and chromatographically isolated components, viz. chlorophyll a and b and carotenoids extracted from pumpkin leaves of different maturity stages. The absorption features of matured chlorophyll with two characteristic absorption peaks and one transmission band are molecular properties and independent of concentration. A qualitative explanation of such an absorption property is presented in terms of a ‘particle in a box’ model and the property is employed to simulate two-input optical logic operations. If both of the inputs are either red or blue, absorption is high. If either one is absent and replaced by a wavelength of the transmission band, e.g. green, absorption is low. Assigning these values as 0 s or 1 s, AND and OR operations can be performed. A NOT operation can be simulated with the transmittance instead of the absorbance. Also, the shift in absorbance values for two different polarizations of the same monochromatic light can simulate two logical states with a single wavelength. Cyclic change in absorbance is noted over a rotation of 360° for both red and blue peaks, although the difference is not very large. Red monochromatic light with polarizations apart by 90°, corresponding to maximum and minimum absorption, respectively, may be assigned as the two logical states. The fluorescence emissions for different pigment components are measured at different excitation wavelengths and the effect of fluorescence on the red absorbance is concluded to be negligible.

  14. The Sacramento Peak fast microphotometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrambide, M. R.; Dunn, R. B.; Healy, A. W.; Porter, R.; Widener, A. L.; November, L. J.; Spence, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The Sacramento Peak Observatory Fast Microphotometer translates an optical system that includes a laser and photodiode detector across the film to scan the Y direction. A stepping motor moves the film gate in the X direction. This arrangement affords high positional accuracy, low noise (0.002 RMS density units), modest speed (5000 points/second), large dynamic range (4.5 density units), high stability (0.005 density units), and low scattered light. The Fast Microphotometer is interfaced to the host computer by a 6502 microprocessor.

  15. Solar investigation at Terskol Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlov-Vasiljev, K. A.; Vasiljeva, I. E.

    2003-04-01

    During 1980--1990 regular observations of the solar disk spectrum and active solar structures were carried out with SEF-1 and ATsU-26 telescopes at Terskol Peak in the framework of the program ``Energy distribution in the solar spectrum in absolute energy units''. In order to refine the fine structure of telluric lines, observations with ATsU-26 telescope were carried out in parallel. This telescope was also used for the investigation of the solar active structures. In this paper the observational technique is described. The obtained results and energy distribution in the solar disk center in absolute energy units are presented.

  16. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  17. Maxometers (peak wind speed anemometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, J. W.; Camp, D. W.; Turner, R. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An instrument for measuring peak wind speeds under severe environmental conditions is described, comprising an elongated cylinder housed in an outer casing. The cylinder contains a piston attached to a longitudinally movable guided rod having a pressure disk mounted on one projecting end. Wind pressure against the pressure disk depresses the movable rod. When the wind reaches its maximum speed, the rod is locked by a ball clutch mechanism in the position of maximum inward movement. Thereafter maximum wind speed or pressure readings may be taken from calibrated indexing means.

  18. PolyaPeak: Detecting Transcription Factor Binding Sites from ChIP-seq Using Peak Shape Information

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Ji, Hongkai

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-seq is a powerful technology for detecting genomic regions where a protein of interest interacts with DNA. ChIP-seq data for mapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have a characteristic pattern: around each binding site, sequence reads aligned to the forward and reverse strands of the reference genome form two separate peaks shifted away from each other, and the true binding site is located in between these two peaks. While it has been shown previously that the accuracy and resolution of binding site detection can be improved by modeling the pattern, efficient methods are unavailable to fully utilize that information in TFBS detection procedure. We present PolyaPeak, a new method to improve TFBS detection by incorporating the peak shape information. PolyaPeak describes peak shapes using a flexible Pólya model. The shapes are automatically learnt from the data using Minorization-Maximization (MM) algorithm, then integrated with the read count information via a hierarchical model to distinguish true binding sites from background noises. Extensive real data analyses show that PolyaPeak is capable of robustly improving TFBS detection compared with existing methods. An R package is freely available. PMID:24608116

  19. Thermochromism and optical absorption in Langmuir-Blodgett films of alkyl-substituted polythiophenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlskog, M.; Paloheimo, J.; Stubb, H.; Dyreklev, P.; Fahlman, M.; Inganas, O.; Andersson, M. R.

    1994-07-01

    Thermochromism and optical absorption in mono- and multilayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films of poly(3-alkylthiophenes), poly(3-octyl-2,2-bithiophene), and poly(3-octyl-2,2;5,2(double prime)-terthiophene) were studied. In sparsely alkylated polythiophenes the magnitude of the thermochromic shift was smaller than in poly(3-alkylthiophenes) and roughly proportional to the sidechain concentration. Results of valence Effective Hamiltonian calculations were compared with the experimental results of thermochromism. A vibronic structure was found in the absorption spectra of Langmuir-Blodgett films at room temperature. The vibronic splitting in poly(3-hexylthiophene) was approximately 0.18 eV as previously has been observed in poly(3-alkylthiophenes) but in poly(3-octyl-2,2;5,2(double prime)-terthiophene) it was 0.20-0.25 eV. The vibronic peaks stay approximately at constant energies and vanish at elevated temperatures.

  20. Greatly Enhanced Optical Absorption of a Defective MoS2 Monolayer through Oxygen Passivation.

    PubMed

    Shu, Huabing; Li, Yunhai; Niu, Xianghong; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-05-25

    Structural defects in the molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayer are widely reported and greatly degrade the transport and photoluminescence. However, how they influence the optical absorption properties remains unclear. In this work, by employing many-body perturbation theory calculations, we investigate the influence of sulfur vacancies (SVs), the main type of intrinsic defects in the MoS2 monolayer, on the optical absorption and exciton effect. Our calculations reveal that the presence of SVs creates localized midgap states in the bandgap, which results in a dramatic red-shift of the absorption peak and stronger absorbance in the visible light and near-infrared region. Nevertheless, the SVs can be finely repaired by oxygen passivation and are beneficial to the formation of the stable localized excitons, which greatly enhance the optical absorption in the spectral range. The defect-mediated/-engineered absorption mechanism is well understood, which offers insightful guides for improving the performance of two-dimensional dichalcogenide-based optoelectronic devices. PMID:27144902

  1. Observation of confinement effects through liner and nonlinear absorption spectroscopy in cuprous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, H.; Rakesh Kumar, Y.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2015-02-01

    Cuprous oxide nano clusters, micro cubes and micro particles were successfully synthesized by reducing copper (II) salt with ascorbic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide via a co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of pure single phase cubic. Raman spectrum shows the inevitable presence of CuO on the surface of the Cu2O powders which may have an impact on the stability of the phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data revealed that the morphology evolves from nanoclusters to micro cubes and micro particles by increasing the concentration of NaOH. Linear optical measurements show that the absorption peak maximum shifts towards red with changing morphology from nano clusters to micro cubes and micro particles. The nonlinear optical properties were studied using open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Samples exhibited saturable as well as reverse saturable absorption. The results show that the transition from SA to RSA is ascribed to excited-state absorption (ESA) induced by two-photon absorption (TPA) process. Due to confinement effects (enhanced band gap) we observed enhanced nonlinear absorption coefficient (βeff) in the case of nano-clusters compared to their micro-cubes and micro-particles.

  2. Seismic signatures of carbonate caves affected by near-surface absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ying; Wang, Yanghua

    2015-12-01

    The near-surface absorption within a low-velocity zone generally has an exponential attenuation effect on seismic waves. But how does this absorption affect seismic signatures of karstic caves in deep carbonate reservoirs? Seismic simulation and analysis reveals that, although this near-surface absorption attenuates the wave energy of a continuous reflection, it does not alter the basic kinematic shape of bead-string reflections, a special seismic characteristic associated with carbonate caves in the Tarim Basin, China. Therefore, the bead-strings in seismic profiles can be utilized, with a great certainty, for interpreting the existence of caves within the deep carbonate reservoirs and for evaluating their pore spaces. Nevertheless, the difference between the central frequency and the peak frequency is increased along with the increment in the absorption. While the wave energy of bead-string reflections remains strong, due to the interference of seismic multiples generated by big impedance contrast between the infill materials of a cave and the surrounding carbonate rocks, the central frequency is shifted linearly with respect to the near-surface absorption. These two features can be exploited simultaneously, for a stable attenuation analysis of field seismic data.

  3. Effects of core position of locally resonant scatterers on low-frequency acoustic absorption in viscoelastic panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jie; Wen, Ji-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Gang; Yin, Jian-Fei; Yang, Hai-Bin

    2015-08-01

    Locally resonant sonic materials, due to their ability to control the propagation of low-frequency elastic waves, have become a promising option for underwater sound absorption materials. In this paper, the finite element method is used to investigate the absorption characteristics of a viscoelastic panel periodically embedded with a type of infinite-long non-coaxially cylindrical locally resonant scatterers (LRSs). The effect of the core position in the coating layer of the LRS on the low-frequency (500 Hz-3000 Hz) sound absorption property is investigated. With increasing the longitudinal core eccentricity e, there occur few changes in the absorptance at the frequencies below 1500 Hz, however, the absorptance above 1500 Hz becomes gradually better and the valid absorption (with absorptance above 0.8) frequency band (VAFB) of the viscoelastic panel becomes accordingly broader. The absorption mechanism is revealed by using the displacement field maps of the viscoelastic panel and the steel slab. The results show two typical resonance modes. One is the overall resonance mode (ORM) caused by steel backing, and the other is the core resonance mode (CRM) caused by LRS. The absorptance of the viscoelastic panel by ORM is induced mainly by the vibration of the steel slab and affected little by core position. On the contrary, with increasing the core eccentricity, the CRM shifts toward high frequency band and decouples with the ORM, leading to two separate absorption peaks and the broadened VAFB of the panel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51275519).

  4. Etched-multilayer phase shifting masks for EUV lithography

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Henry N.; Taylor, John S.

    2005-04-05

    A method is disclosed for the implementation of phase shifting masks for EUV lithography. The method involves directly etching material away from the multilayer coating of the mask, to cause a refractive phase shift in the mask. By etching into the multilayer (for example, by reactive ion etching), rather than depositing extra material on the top of the multilayer, there will be minimal absorption loss associated with the phase shift.

  5. [The photoluminescence and absorption properties of Co/AAO nano-array composites].

    PubMed

    Li, Shou-Yi; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Li, Yan; Wang, Jian; Ma, Bao-Hong

    2008-03-01

    Ordered Co/AAO nano-array structures were fabricated by alternating current (AC) electrodeposition method within the cylindrical pores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template prepared in oxalic acid electrolyte. The photoluminescence (PL) emission and photoabsorption of AAO templates and Co/AAO nano-array structures were investigated respectively. The results show that a marked photoluminescence band of AAO membranes occurs in the wavelength range of 350-550 nm and their PL peak position is at 395 nm. And with the increase in the deposition amount of Co nanoparticles, the PL intensity of Co/AAO nano-array structures decreases gradually, and their peak positions of the PL are invariable (395 nm). Meanwhile the absorption edges of Co/AAO show a larger redshift, and the largest shift from the near ultraviolet to the infrared exceeds 380 nm. The above phenomena caused by Co nano-particles in Co/AAO composite were analyzed. PMID:18536402

  6. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  7. Optical absorption and TEM studies of silver nanoparticle embedded BaO-CaF2-P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Manoj Kumar; Shashikala, H. D.

    2016-05-01

    Silver nanoparticle embedded 30BaO-20CaF2-50P2O5-4Ag2O-4SnO glasses were prepared by melt-quenching and subsequent heat treatment process. Silver-doped glasses were heat treated at temperatures 500 °C, 525°C and 550 °C for a fixed duration of 10 hours to incorporate metal nanoparticles into the glass matrix. Appearance and shift in peak positions of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands in the optical absorption spectra of heat treated glass samples indicated that both formation and growth of nanoparticle depended on heat treatment temperature. Glass sample heat treated at 525 °C showed a SPR peak around 3 eV, which indicated that spherical nanoparticles smaller than 20 nm were formed inside the glass matrix. Whereas sample heat treated at 550 °C showed a size dependent red shift in SPR peak due to the presence of silver nanoparticles of size larger than 20 nm. Size of the nanoparticles calculated using full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of absorption band showed a good agreement with the particle size obtained from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis.

  8. Assessment of the timing of daily peak streamflow during melt season in a snow dominated watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies have shown that gauge-observed daily streamflow peak times (DPT) during spring snowmelt can exhibit distinct temporal shifts through the season. These shifts have been attributed to three processes that affect the timing of snowmelt arrival: 1) melt flux translation through the snow...

  9. Spin canting effect and microwave absorption properties of Sm-Mn substituted nanosized material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Imran; Naseem, Shahzad; Naeem Ashiq, Muhammad; Asif Iqbal, M.; Ali, Irshad; Khan, M. A.; Niaz, Shanawar; Rana, M. U.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the substitutional effect of rare earth element Sm3+ and divalent Mn2+ on structural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties of hexagonal ferrites, a series of Sr2-x Smx Ni2 Fe28-yMnyO46 X-type hexagonal ferrites with concentration (x=0.00, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10 and y=0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) was synthesized by the sol-gel method. The XRD analysis shows that the material crystallized into single X-type hexagonal phase. The absorption bands at low wave number in FTIR curves are the characteristics of the X-type hexagonal ferrites. Decreasing trend in the magnetic properties with the substitution of Sm-Mn contents was also observed, which may be attributed to the oxidation of Mn2+ ions into Mn3+ ions and spin canting effect of rare earth element Sm3+. The reflection loss peak shifted towards the low frequency and microwave absorption properties of the material enhanced with the substitution of Sm-Mn contents which reflects its applications in super high frequency (SHF) devices. The attenuation constant curves are in good agreement with the reflection loss peak.

  10. Temperature Dependence of Crystal Structure and THz Absorption Spectra of Organic Nonlinear Optical Stilbazolium Material for High-Output THz-Wave Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukawa, Takeshi; Hoshina, Hiromichi; Hoshikawa, Akinori; Otani, Chiko; Ishigaki, Toru

    2016-06-01

    A stilbazolium material comprising 4-dimethylamino- N'-methyl-4'-stilbazolium tosylate (DAST), which has a large nonlinear optical susceptibility, was studied for application in terahertz (THz)-wave generation. The temperature-dependent structure of the DAST crystal was measured by using powder X-ray diffraction from -100 to 200 °C, indicating a volume expansion of 4.6 %. The lattice constants show anisotropic thermal expansion. Also, the temperature dependence of THz absorption spectra was measured by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) in the temperature range varying from -80 to 88.1 °C. A strong absorption peak was found at around 1 THz, shifting slightly toward a lower frequency with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of the THz spectra was compared with that of X-ray diffraction. The shifting of THz-vibrational frequencies of the DAST crystal suggests that the change in its lattice structure is temperature dependent.

  11. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  12. Temperature dependence of the absorption edge of vitreous silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, C. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    During an investigation of the optical properties of high-purity vitreous silica (fused quartz), which is being developed by NASA as a reflective and ablative heat shield, some interesting properties of theoretical and experimental nature have become apparent which otherwise may have remained unnoticed. Of particular interest for the NASA application is the shift of the absorption edge toward longer wavelengths with increasing temperature. The results of studies of this shift and of the spectral dependence of the absorption edge are summarized in the present paper. Plots of the absorption edge and the absorption spectrum of fused quartz vs temperature are given and discussed.

  13. Peak load management: Potential options

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J.E.; De Steese, J.G.; Schultz, R.W.; Kellogg, M.A.

    1989-10-01

    This report reviews options that may be alternatives to transmission construction (ATT) applicable both generally and at specific locations in the service area of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Some of these options have potential as specific alternatives to the Shelton-Fairmount 230-kV Reinforcement Project, which is the focus of this study. A listing of 31 peak load management (PLM) options is included. Estimated costs and normalized hourly load shapes, corresponding to the respective base load and controlled load cases, are considered for 15 of the above options. A summary page is presented for each of these options, grouped with respect to its applicability in the residential, commercial, industrial, and agricultural sectors. The report contains comments on PLM measures for which load shape management characteristics are not yet available. These comments address the potential relevance of the options and the possible difficulty that may be encountered in characterizing their value should be of interest in this investigation. The report also identifies options that could improve the efficiency of the three customer utility distribution systems supplied by the Shelton-Fairmount Reinforcement Project. Potential cogeneration options in the Olympic Peninsula are also discussed. These discussions focus on the options that appear to be most promising on the Olympic Peninsula. Finally, a short list of options is recommended for investigation in the next phase of this study. 9 refs., 24 tabs.

  14. Balmer line shifts in quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulentic, J. W.; Marziani, P.; Del Olmo, A.; Zamfir, S.

    2016-02-01

    We offer a broad review of Balmer line phenomenology in type 1 active galactic nuclei, briefly summarising luminosity and radio loudness effects, and discussing interpretation in terms of nebular physics along the 4D eigenvector 1 sequence of quasars. We stress that relatively rare, peculiar Balmer line profiles (i.e., with large shifts with respect to the rest frame or double and multiple peaked) that start attracted attentions since the 1970s are still passable of multiple dynamical interpretation. More mainstream objects are still not fully understood as well, since competing dynamical models and geometries are possible. Further progress may come from inter-line comparison across the 4D Eigenvector 1 sequence.

  15. Pressure-induced structural distortion of TbMnO3 : A combined x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. M.; Chou, T. L.; Lee, J. M.; Chen, S. A.; Chan, T. S.; Chen, T. H.; Lu, K. T.; Chuang, W. T.; Sheu, H.-S.; Chen, S. W.; Lin, C. M.; Hiraoka, N.; Ishii, H.; Tsuei, K. D.; Yang, T. J.

    2009-04-01

    The variation of electronic states and structural distortion in highly compressed multiferroic TbMnO3 was probed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation. Refined XRD data enabled observation of a reduced local Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion of Mn sites within MnO6 octahedra in TbMnO3 with increasing hydrostatic pressure. A progressively increasing intensity of the white line in MnK -edge x-ray absorption spectra of TbMnO3 was detected with increasing pressure. The absorption threshold of MnK -edge spectra of TbMnO3 is shifted toward higher energy, whereas the pre-edge peak is slightly shifted to lower energy with increasing hydrostatic pressure. We provide spectral evidence for pressure-induced bandwidth broadening for mangnites. The enhanced intensity of the white line and the shifted absorption threshold of MnK -edge spectra are explained in terms of a reduced JT distortion of MnO6 octahedra in compressed TbMnO3 . Comparison of XAS data with full-multiple-scattering calculations using code FDMNES shows satisfactory agreement between experimental and calculated MnK -edge spectra.

  16. Determination of peak expiratory flow.

    PubMed

    Kano, S; Burton, D L; Lanteri, C J; Sly, P D

    1993-10-01

    It is still unknown whether peak expiratory flow (PEF) is determined by "wave speed" flow limitation in the airways. To investigate the influences of airway mechanical properties on PEF, five healthy adults performed maximal forced expiratory effort (MFEE) manoeuvres, in the standard manner and following breathholds at total lung capacity (TLC) of 2 s and 10 s. Oesophageal pressure (Poes) was measured as an index of respiratory effort. Subjects also performed a MFEE following a 10 s breathhold during which intrathoracic pressure was voluntarily raised by a Valsalva manoeuvre, which would increase transmural pressure and cross-sectional area of the extrathoracic airway. Additional MFEEs were performed with the neck fully flexed and extended, to change longitudinal tracheal tension. In separate studies, PEF was measured with a spirometer and with a pneumotachograph. Breathholds at TLC (2 s and 10 s), and neck flexion reduced PEF by a mean of 9.8% (SD 2.9%), 9.6% (SD 1.6%), and 8.7% (SD 2.8%), respectively, when measured with the spirometer. The same pattern of results was seen when measured with the pneumotachograph. These reductions occurred despite similar respiratory effort. Voluntarily raising intrathoracic pressure during a 10 s breathhold did not reverse a fall in PEF. MFEE manoeuvre with neck extension did not result in an increase in PEF, the group mean % changes being -3.0% (SD 5.0%). We conclude that these results do not allow the hypothesis that "wave-speed" (Vws) is reached at PEF to be rejected. A breathhold at TLC could increase airway wall compliance by allowing stress-relaxation of the airway, thus reducing the "Vws" achievable. PMID:8287953

  17. Solvent stark effects and spectral shifts. II

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, M; Swain, J; Shum, Y Y; Merin, R; Chen, R H.H.

    1981-03-01

    Solvent shifts of the energies of the lowest /sup 1/L/sub a/ bands of the electronic absorption spectra of anthracene, chrysene, phenanthrene, and tetracene and of the lowest /sup 1/L/sub b/ bands of the electronic absorption spectra of naphthalene, phenanthrene, chrysene, and picene are reported. The origins of these shifts are analyzed in terms of theories developed by Baur and Nicol and by Abe. Satisfactory fits of the experimental data are obtained for theoretical expressions derived from both theories, but discrepancies are observed between the relative magnitudes assigned to the various contributions to the shifts by the two theories. The magnitudes of the parameters of the Baur and Nicol theory, relating solvent shifts to the dielectric constant and refractive index of the solvent, are found to be the same within experimental precision for the /sup 1/L/sub a/ transitions in all of the molecules studied; a similar regularity of the parameters for the /sup 1/L/sub b/ transitions also is observed.

  18. Ultrafast shift and rectification photocurrents in GaAs quantum wells: Excitation intensity dependence and the importance of band mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duc, Huynh Thanh; Podzimski, Reinold; Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Bieler, Mark; Meier, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    A microscopic approach that is based on the multisubband semiconductor Bloch equations formulated in the basis of a 14-band k .p model is employed to compute the temporal dynamics of photocurrents in GaAs quantum wells following excitation with femtosecond laser pulses. This approach provides a transparent description of the interband, intersubband, and intraband excitations, fully includes all resonant as well as off-resonant excitations, and treats the light-matter interaction nonperturbatively. For linearly polarized excitations, the photocurrents contain contributions from shift and rectification currents. We numerically compute and analyze these currents generated by excitation with femtosecond laser pulses for [110]- and [111]-oriented GaAs quantum wells. It is shown that the often employed perturbative χ(2 ) approach breaks down for peak fields larger than about 10 kV/cm, and that nonperturbative effects lead to a reduction of the peak values of the shift and rectification currents and to temporal oscillations that originate from Rabi flopping. In particular, we find a complex oscillatory photon energy dependence of the magnitudes of the shift and rectification currents. Our simulations demonstrate that this dependence is the result of mixing between the heavy- and light-hole valence bands. This is a surprising finding since the band mixing has an even larger influence on the strength of the photocurrents than the absorption coefficient. For [110]-oriented GaAs quantum wells, the calculated photon energy dependence is compared to experimental results, and good agreement is obtained. This validates our theoretical approach.

  19. Optical absorptions of the low-lying states with higher angular momenta of a D{sup -} system in a spherical quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Wenfang

    2013-01-31

    Optical absorptions of the low-lying states with higher angular momenta of the D{sup -} system in a spherical quantum dot (QD) with the Gaussian potential are studied by using the matrix diagonalisation method and the compact density-matrix approach. The linear, nonlinear third-order and total optical absorption coefficients are calculated for the {sup 1}P{sup -} {yields} {sup 1}D{sup +} and {sup 1}D{sup +} {yields} {sup 1}F{sup -} transitions. Numerical results for GaAs/Ga{sub 1-x}Al{sub x}As QDs are presented. The calculated results show that with increasing quantum numbers describing the angular momenta of transitions the optical absorption peaks shift towards lower energies and their intensities increase. (quantum dots)

  20. In situ x-ray-absorption spectroscopy study of hydrogen absorption by nickel-magnesium thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farangis, B.; Nachimuthu, P.; Richardson, T. J.; Slack, J. L.; Perera, R. C.; Gullikson, E. M.; Lindle, D. W.; Rubin, M.

    2003-02-01

    Structural and electronic properties of co-sputtered Ni-Mg thin films with varying Ni to Mg ratio were studied by in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the Ni L-edge and Mg K-edge regions. Codeposition of the metals led to increased disorder and decreased coordination around Ni and Mg compared to pure metal films. Exposure of the metallic films to hydrogen resulted in formation of hydrides and increased disorder. The presence of hydrogen as a near neighbor around Mg caused a drastic reduction in the intensities of multiple scattering resonances at higher energies. The optical switching behavior and changes in the x-ray spectra varied with Ni to Mg atomic ratio. Pure Mg films with Pd overlayers were converted to MgH2: The H atoms occupy regular sites as in bulk MgH2. Although optical switching was slow in the absence of Ni, the amount of H2 absorption was large. Incorporation of Ni in Mg films led to an increase in the speed of optical switching but decreased maximum transparency. Significant shifts in the Ni L3 and L2 peaks are consistent with strong interaction with hydrogen in the mixed films.

  1. Temperature-dependent excitonic photoluminescence excited by two-photon absorption in perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ke; Xu, Zhongjie; Chen, Runze; Zheng, Xin; Cheng, Xiangai; Jiang, Tian

    2016-08-15

    Recently, lead halide perovskite quantum dots have been reported with potential for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications due to their excellent luminescent properties. Herein excitonic photoluminescence (PL) excited by two-photon absorption in perovskite CsPbBr3 quantum dots (QDs) has been studied at a broad temperature range, from 80 to 380 K. Two-photon absorption has been investigated and the absorption coefficient is up to 0.085 cm/GW at room temperature. Moreover, the PL spectrum excited by two-photon absorption shows a linear blue-shift (0.32 meV/K) below the temperature of 220 K. However, for higher temperatures, the PL peak approaches a roughly constant value and shows temperature-independent chromaticity up to 380 K. This behavior is distinct from the general red-shift for semiconductors and can be attributed to the result of thermal expansion, electron-phonon interaction and structural phase transition around 360 K. The strong nonlinear absorption and temperature-independent chromaticity of CsPbBr3 QDs observed in temperature range from 220 to 380 K will offer new opportunities in nonlinear photonics, light-harvesting, and light-emitting devices. PMID:27519098

  2. Our World: Fluid Shift

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about the circulatory system and how gravity aids blood flow in our bodies here on Earth. Find out how NASA flight surgeons help the astronauts deal with the fluid shift that happens during s...

  3. Shape-Shifting Plastic

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-20

    A new plastic developed by ORNL and Washington State University transforms from its original shape through a series of temporary shapes and returns to its initial form. The shape-shifting process is controlled through changes in temperature

  4. Molecular Electronic Shift Registers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose N.

    1990-01-01

    Molecular-scale shift registers eventually constructed as parts of high-density integrated memory circuits. In principle, variety of organic molecules makes possible large number of different configurations and modes of operation for such shift-register devices. Several classes of devices and implementations in some specific types of molecules proposed. All based on transfer of electrons or holes along chains of repeating molecular units.

  5. Characterization of red-shifted phycobilisomes isolated from the chlorophyll f-containing cyanobacterium Halomicronema hongdechloris.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaqiong; Lin, Yuankui; Garvey, Christopher J; Birch, Debra; Corkery, Robert W; Loughlin, Patrick C; Scheer, Hugo; Willows, Robert D; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Phycobilisomes are the main light-harvesting protein complexes in cyanobacteria and some algae. It is commonly accepted that these complexes only absorb green and orange light, complementing chlorophyll absorbance. Here, we present a new phycobilisome derived complex that consists only of allophycocyanin core subunits, having red-shifted absorption peaks of 653 and 712 nm. These red-shifted phycobiliprotein complexes were isolated from the chlorophyll f-containing cyanobacterium, Halomicronema hongdechloris, grown under monochromatic 730 nm-wavelength (far-red) light. The 3D model obtained from single particle analysis reveals a double disk assembly of 120-145 Å with two α/β allophycocyanin trimers fitting into the two separated disks. They are significantly smaller than typical phycobilisomes formed from allophycocyanin subunits and core-membrane linker proteins, which fit well with a reduced distance between thylakoid membranes observed from cells grown under far-red light. Spectral analysis of the dissociated and denatured phycobiliprotein complexes grown under both these light conditions shows that the same bilin chromophore, phycocyanobilin, is exclusively used. Our findings show that red-shifted phycobilisomes are required for assisting efficient far-red light harvesting. Their discovery provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms of light harvesting under extreme conditions for photosynthesis, as well as the strategies involved in flexible chromatic acclimation to diverse light conditions. PMID:26514405

  6. Peak Ring Craters and Multiring Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melosh, H. J.

    2015-09-01

    Understanding of the mechanics of peak-ring crater and basin formation has expanded greatly due to the high precision data on lunar gravity from GRAIL. Peak rings coincide with the edges of underlying mantle uplifts on the Moon.

  7. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  8. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  9. Discourse Peak as Zone of Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longacre, Robert E.

    Defining peak as the climax of discourse, this paper argues that it is important to identify peak in order to get at the overall grammar of a given discourse. The paper presents case studies in which four instances of peak in narrative discourses occur in languages from four different parts of the world. It also illustrates the occurrence of a…

  10. Role of Planar Conformations in Aggregation Induced Spectral Shifts of Supermolecular Oligofluorenols in Solutions and Films: A Combined Experimental and MD/TD-DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiangai; Zhang, Wanwan; Xie, Ling-Hai; Ma, Jing; Huang, Wei; Liu, Wenjian

    2015-08-13

    The supramolecular approach of fluorenol polymers brings about excellent self-assembly behavior to fabricate organogels and superstructured thin films through highly directional noncovalent interactions. To understand the aggregation effects on electronic structures, the packing structures and the UV/vis absorption spectra of oligofluorenols (PFOHn, n = 1/3-8), with and without OC8H17 side chains, were studied experimentally and theoretically in crystal, amorphous solids, and solutions, respectively. For the ground state in vacuum the steric repulsion between two adjacent fluorenol units renders the PFOH oligomers twisted in a helix conformation, while the molecular aggregation favors the appearance of planar π-conjugated structures. In comparison with the crystal packing, the content of planar conformation (with the torsion angle less than 20°) is increased in amorphous solids. The hydroxyl groups in oligofluorenols facilitate the formation of hydrogen bonding networks. The red shift in absorption spectra was observed in a systematic experimental study of unsubstituted and substituted oligofluorenols with the increasing concentration both in toluene and chloroform solutions. The subsitituted oligofluorenol R-PFOH1 with only one OC8H17 side chain exhibited a shoulder peak at 430-440 nm, which is different from PFOH1 without side chain and 3R-PFO1 with three OC8H17 side chain. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations, which were carried out on conformation ensembles taken from a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, revealed that the increase in the content of planar π-conjugated conformations is correlated to the red shift in the absorption spectra upon increasing the solution concentrations. The aggregation-induced red-shift in absorption spectra of oligofluorenols, as well as the blue-shift for oligothiophenes, was rationalized in a unified way from the increased (and reduced) content of planar conformations in molecular

  11. Red and blue shift of liquid water's excited states: A many body perturbation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, accurate optical absorption spectrum of liquid H2O is calculated in the energy range of 5-20 eV to probe the nature of water's excited states by means of many body perturbation approach. Main features of recent inelastic X-ray measurements are well reproduced, such as a bound excitonic peak at 7.9 eV with a shoulder at 9.4 eV as well as the absorption maximum at 13.9 eV, followed by a broad shoulder at 18.4 eV. The spectrum is dominated by excitonic effects impacting the structures of the spectrum at low and higher energy regimes mixed by single particle effects at high energies. The exciton distribution of the low-energy states, in particular of S1, is highly anisotropic and localized mostly on one water molecule. The S1 state is essentially a HOCO-LUCO (highest occupied crystal orbital - lowest unoccupied crystal orbital) transition and of intra-molecular type, showing a localized valence character. Once the excitation energy is increased, a significant change in the character of the electronically excited states occurs, characterized through emergence of multiple quasi-particle peaks at 7.9 eV in the quasi-particle (QP) transition profile and in the occurring delocalized exciton density distribution, spread over many more water molecules. The exciton delocalization following a change of the character of excited states at around 7.9 eV causes the blue shift of the first absorption band with respect to water monomer S1. However, due to reduction of the electronic band gap from gas to liquid phase, following enhanced screening upon condensation, the localized S1 state of liquid water is red-shifted with respect to S1 state of water monomer. For higher excitations, near vertical ionization energy (11 eV), quasi-free electrons emerge, in agreement with the conduction band electron picture. Furthermore, the occurring red and blue shift of the excited states are independent of the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions to the

  12. Inhibition of norfloxacin absorption by dairy products.

    PubMed Central

    Kivistö, K T; Ojala-Karlsson, P; Neuvonen, P J

    1992-01-01

    Seven healthy subjects received, after an overnight fast, a single 200-mg oral dose of norfloxacin with water, whole milk, and unflavored yoghurt. Coadministration of milk or yoghurt reduced the extent of norfloxacin absorption and the mean peak concentration in plasma by approximately 50%. Taking of norfloxacin with these liquid dairy products should be avoided. PMID:1605619

  13. Electronic structure and optical absorption spectra of CdSe covered with ZnSe and ZnS epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, So Jeong; Lee, Geunsik; Kim, Jai Sam; Shin, Seung Koo; Yoon, Young-Gui

    2006-02-01

    Using the first-principles methods we compute the electronic structure and the absorption spectra for a wurtzite CdSe (0001) slab covered with zincblende ZnSe and ZnS epilayers. For each structure we compute the DOS and the imaginary part of the dielectric function. We find that the semiconductor passivation shifts the 'near Fermi-level' states of the bare CdSe slab down to lower energy levels. The migration suggests the decrease of surface effects and energy loss. We observe the substantial reduction of the abnormal peaks in the absorption spectra of the bare CdSe slab, which seems to be a consequence of the DOS migration. This is consistent with the experimental results that a proper passivation enhance the luminescence efficiency. We also study the case that the epilayer surface is terminated with PH 3 and find the PH 3 passivation also reduces the surface state to some extent.

  14. SIMPLE MODELS OF METAL-LINE ABSORPTION AND EMISSION FROM COOL GAS OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Rubin, Kate

    2011-06-10

    We analyze the absorption and emission-line profiles produced by a set of simple, cool gas wind models motivated by galactic-scale outflow observations. We implement Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques that track the propagation of scattered and fluorescent photons to generate one-dimensional spectra and two-dimensional spectral images. We focus on the Mg II {lambda}{lambda}2796, 2803 doublet and Fe II UV1 multiplet at {lambda} {approx} 2600 A, but the results are applicable to other transitions that trace outflows (e.g., Na I, H I Ly{alpha}, Si II). By design, the resonance transitions show blueshifted absorption but one also predicts strong resonance and fine-structure line emission at roughly the systemic velocity. This line-emission 'fills in' the absorption, reducing the equivalent width by up to 50%, shifting the absorption-line centroid by tens of km s{sup -1}, and reducing the effective opacity near systemic. Analysis of cool gas outflows that ignores this line emission may incorrectly infer that the gas is partially covered, measure a significantly lower peak optical depth, and/or conclude that gas at systemic velocity is absent (e.g., an interstellar or slowly infalling component). Because the Fe II lines are connected by optically thin transitions to fine-structure levels, their profiles more closely reproduce the intrinsic opacity of the wind. Together these results naturally explain the absorption and emission-line characteristics observed for star-forming galaxies at z < 1. We also study a scenario promoted to describe the outflows of z {approx} 3 Lyman break galaxies and find profiles inconsistent with the observations due to scattered photon emission. Although line emission complicates the analysis of absorption-line profiles, the surface brightness profiles offer a unique means of assessing the morphology and size of galactic-scale winds. Furthermore, the kinematics and line ratios offer powerful diagnostics of outflows, motivating deep

  15. Simple Models of Metal-line Absorption and Emission from Cool Gas Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Kasen, Daniel; Rubin, Kate

    2011-06-01

    We analyze the absorption and emission-line profiles produced by a set of simple, cool gas wind models motivated by galactic-scale outflow observations. We implement Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques that track the propagation of scattered and fluorescent photons to generate one-dimensional spectra and two-dimensional spectral images. We focus on the Mg II λλ2796, 2803 doublet and Fe II UV1 multiplet at λ ≈ 2600 Å, but the results are applicable to other transitions that trace outflows (e.g., Na I, H I Lyα, Si II). By design, the resonance transitions show blueshifted absorption but one also predicts strong resonance and fine-structure line emission at roughly the systemic velocity. This line-emission "fills in" the absorption, reducing the equivalent width by up to 50%, shifting the absorption-line centroid by tens of km s-1, and reducing the effective opacity near systemic. Analysis of cool gas outflows that ignores this line emission may incorrectly infer that the gas is partially covered, measure a significantly lower peak optical depth, and/or conclude that gas at systemic velocity is absent (e.g., an interstellar or slowly infalling component). Because the Fe II lines are connected by optically thin transitions to fine-structure levels, their profiles more closely reproduce the intrinsic opacity of the wind. Together these results naturally explain the absorption and emission-line characteristics observed for star-forming galaxies at z < 1. We also study a scenario promoted to describe the outflows of z ~ 3 Lyman break galaxies and find profiles inconsistent with the observations due to scattered photon emission. Although line emission complicates the analysis of absorption-line profiles, the surface brightness profiles offer a unique means of assessing the morphology and size of galactic-scale winds. Furthermore, the kinematics and line ratios offer powerful diagnostics of outflows, motivating deep, spatially extended spectroscopic

  16. First attempt to monitor atmospheric glyoxal using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Lundin, Patrik; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Hu, Jiandong; Zhao, Guangyu; Svanberg, Sune; Bood, Joakim; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO), as an indicator of photochemical "hot spots", was for the first time the subject of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) campaign. The strongest absorption line of glyoxal in the blue wavelength region - 455.1 nm - was chosen as the experimental absorption wavelength. In order to handle the effects of absorption cross-section variation of the interfering gas - nitrogen dioxide (NO2) - three-wavelength DIAL measurements simultaneously detecting glyoxal and NO2, were performed. The differential absorption curves, recorded in July 2012, indicate an extremely low glyoxal concentration in Lund, Sweden, although it is expected to be peaking at this time of the year.

  17. Terahertz intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Edmunds, C.; Malis, O.; Shao, J.; Shirazi-HD, M.; Manfra, M. J.

    2014-07-14

    We demonstrate THz intersubband absorption (15.6–26.1 meV) in m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells. We find a trend of decreasing peak energy with increasing quantum well width, in agreement with theoretical expectations. However, a blue-shift of the transition energy of up to 14 meV was observed relative to the calculated values. This blue-shift is shown to decrease with decreasing charge density and is, therefore, attributed to many-body effects. Furthermore, a ∼40% reduction in the linewidth (from roughly 8 to 5 meV) was obtained by reducing the total sheet density and inserting undoped AlGaN layers that separate the wavefunctions from the ionized impurities in the barriers.

  18. Terahertz intersubband absorption in non-polar m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmunds, C.; Shao, J.; Shirazi-HD, M.; Manfra, M. J.; Malis, O.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate THz intersubband absorption (15.6-26.1 meV) in m-plane AlGaN/GaN quantum wells. We find a trend of decreasing peak energy with increasing quantum well width, in agreement with theoretical expectations. However, a blue-shift of the transition energy of up to 14 meV was observed relative to the calculated values. This blue-shift is shown to decrease with decreasing charge density and is, therefore, attributed to many-body effects. Furthermore, a ˜40% reduction in the linewidth (from roughly 8 to 5 meV) was obtained by reducing the total sheet density and inserting undoped AlGaN layers that separate the wavefunctions from the ionized impurities in the barriers.

  19. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; de Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-07-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes.

  20. Super-Resonant Intracavity Coherent Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Malara, P.; Campanella, C. E.; Giorgini, A.; Avino, S.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2016-01-01

    The capability of optical resonators to extend the effective radiation-matter interaction length originates from a multipass effect, hence is intrinsically limited by the resonator’s quality factor. Here, we show that this constraint can be overcome by combining the concepts of resonant interaction and coherent perfect absorption (CPA). We demonstrate and investigate super-resonant coherent absorption in a coupled Fabry-Perot (FP)/ring cavity structure. At the FP resonant wavelengths, the described phenomenon gives rise to split modes with a nearly-transparent peak and a peak whose transmission is exceptionally sensitive to the intracavity loss. For small losses, the effective interaction pathlength of these modes is proportional respectively to the ratio and the product of the individual finesse coefficients of the two resonators. The results presented extend the conventional definition of resonant absorption and point to a way of circumventing the technological limitations of ultrahigh-quality resonators in spectroscopy and optical sensing schemes. PMID:27364475

  1. Predicting catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Weissmann, Haim; Shnerb, Nadav M

    2016-05-21

    Catastrophic shifts are known to pose a serious threat to ecology, and a reliable set of early warning indicators is desperately needed. However, the tools suggested so far have two problems. First, they cannot discriminate between a smooth transition and an imminent irreversible shift. Second, they aimed at predicting the tipping point where a state loses its stability, but in noisy spatial system the actual transition occurs when an alternative state invades. Here we suggest a cluster tracking technique that solves both problems, distinguishing between smooth and catastrophic transitions and to identify an imminent shift in both cases. Our method may allow for the prediction, and thus hopefully the prevention of such transitions, avoiding their destructive outcomes. PMID:26970446

  2. Isotope shift in chromium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furmann, B.; Jarosz, A.; Stefańska, D.; Dembczyński, J.; Stachowska, E.

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-three spectral lines of chromium atom in the blue-violet region (425-465 nm) have been investigated with the method of laser-induced resonance fluorescence on an atomic beam. For all the lines, the isotope shifts for every pair of chromium isotopes have been determined. The lines can be divided into six groups, according to the configuration of the upper and lower levels. Electronic factors of the field shift and the specific mass shift ( Fik and MikSMS, respectively) have been evaluated and the values for each pure configuration involved have been determined. Comparison of the values Fik and MikSMS to the ab initio calculations results has been performed. The presence of crossed second order (CSO) effects has been observed.

  3. On the trail of double peak hydrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Carreras, Núria; Hissler, Christophe; Gourdol, Laurent; Klaus, Julian; Juilleret, Jérôme; François Iffly, Jean; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.; Pfister, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    A double peak hydrograph features two peaks as a response to a unique rainfall pulse. The first peak occurs at the same time or shortly after the precipitation has started and it corresponds to a fast catchment response to precipitation. The delayed peak normally starts during the recession of the first peak, when the precipitation has already ceased. Double peak hydrographs may occur for various reasons. They can occur (i) in large catchments when lag times in tributary responses are large, (ii) in urban catchments where the first peak is often caused by direct surface runoff on impervious land cover, and the delayed peak to slower subsurface flow, and (iii) in non-urban catchments, where the first and the delayed discharge peaks are explained by different runoff mechanisms (e.g. overland flow, subsurface flow and/or deep groundwater flow) that have different response times. Here we focus on the third case, as a formal description of the different hydrological mechanisms explaining these complex hydrological dynamics across catchments with diverse physiographic characteristics is still needed. Based on a review of studies documenting double peak events we have established a formal classification of catchments presenting double peak events based on their regolith structure (geological substratum and/or its weathered products). We describe the different hydrological mechanisms that trigger these complex hydrological dynamics across each catchment type. We then use hydrometric time series of precipitation, runoff, soil moisture and groundwater levels collected in the Weierbach (0.46 km2) headwater catchment (Luxembourg) to better understand double peak hydrograph generation. Specifically, we aim to find out (1) if the generation of a double peak hydrograph is a threshold process, (2) if the hysteretic relationships between storage and discharge are consistent during single and double peak hydrographs, and (3) if different functional landscape units (the hillslopes

  4. Differential phase shift of partially reflected radio waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to differential absorption experiments is shown to be both feasible and desirable. The phase information can provide a more sensitive measurement of electron density above about 75 km. The differential phase shift is only weakly dependent on collision frequency in this range, and so an accurate collision frequency profile is not a prerequisite. The differential phase shift and differential absorption measurements taken together can provide both electron density and collision frequency data from about 70 to 90 km.

  5. Clustering properties of high matter density peaks from UVES observations of QSO pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.

    2003-06-01

    The association of high H 0 column density absorption systems in QSO spectra with galactic objects has been widely verified at redshifts up to z ~ 1, by direct imaging of QSO fields and follow-up spectroscopy (Guillemin & Bergeron 1997; Le Brun et al. 1997). We study the transverse clustering properties of these tracers of high matter density peaks, by looking for coincident absorption systems in adjacent lines of sight toward QSO pairs and groups (D'Odorico et al. 2002).

  6. X-Ray Absorption Spectra of Uranium by Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hirohiko; Fujima, Kazumi; Taniguchi, Kazuo; Miyake, Chie; Imoto, Shosuke

    1981-08-01

    The X-ray absorption spectra of U, UO2 and UCl4 near the U OIV and OV thresholds have been measured by use of synchrotron radiation. The absorption peaks at about 100 eV and 110 eV are observed for all of these materials. However, the detailed structure of the spectra depend on the chemical state.

  7. Infra-red absorption lines by molecules in grain mantles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, W.; Allamandola, L. J.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1980-06-01

    The laboratory spectrum of a solid mixture of H2O, CO, CH3OH, and NH3 at a temperature of 10 K reproduces the shape and peak positions of interstellar features. It is shown that the broad absorption features evident in the MIR spectra of some astronomical objects associated with interstellar dust can be explained by absorptions of molecules in grain mantles.

  8. Shifting Up a Gear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Shift workers are often excluded from educational opportunities on and off the job. General education and leisure learning needs are addressed less than job-specific training needs. Providers should consider open/distance learning, creative marketing, targeted funding, and consortia of employer-developed programs. (SK)

  9. Eluding catastrophic shifts

    PubMed Central

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A.; Levin, Simon A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences. PMID:25825772

  10. Eluding catastrophic shifts.

    PubMed

    Villa Martín, Paula; Bonachela, Juan A; Levin, Simon A; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2015-04-14

    Transitions between regimes with radically different properties are ubiquitous in nature. Such transitions can occur either smoothly or in an abrupt and catastrophic fashion. Important examples of the latter can be found in ecology, climate sciences, and economics, to name a few, where regime shifts have catastrophic consequences that are mostly irreversible (e.g., desertification, coral reef collapses, and market crashes). Predicting and preventing these abrupt transitions remains a challenging and important task. Usually, simple deterministic equations are used to model and rationalize these complex situations. However, stochastic effects might have a profound effect. Here we use 1D and 2D spatially explicit models to show that intrinsic (demographic) stochasticity can alter deterministic predictions dramatically, especially in the presence of other realistic features such as limited mobility or spatial heterogeneity. In particular, these ingredients can alter the possibility of catastrophic shifts by giving rise to much smoother and easily reversible continuous ones. The ideas presented here can help further understand catastrophic shifts and contribute to the discussion about the possibility of preventing such shifts to minimize their disruptive ecological, economic, and societal consequences. PMID:25825772

  11. Trophic shift, not collapse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Rutherford, Edward S.; Stow, Craig A.; Roseman, Edward F.; He, Ji X.

    2013-01-01

    scientists who are closely monitoring Lake Huron’s food web, we believe that the ongoing changes are more accurately characterized as a trophic shift in which benthic pathways have become more prominent. While decreases in abundance have occurred for some species, others are experiencing improved reproduction resulting in the restoration of several important native species.

  12. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  13. Light Absorption in Arctic Sea Ice - Black Carbon vs Chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Hunke, E. C.; Flanner, M.; Wang, H.; Dubey, M. K.; Jeffery, N.

    2015-12-01

    The fingerprint of climate change is more obvious in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. This is not only because the surface temperature there has increased at twice the rate of global mean temperature but also because Arctic sea ice extent has reached a record low of 49% reduction relative to the 1979-2000 climatology. Radiation absorption through black carbon (BC) deposited on Arctic snow and sea ice surface is one of the major hypothesized contributors to the decline. However, we note that chlorophyll-a absorption owing to increasing biology activity in this region could be a major competitor during boreal spring. Modeling of sea-ice physical and biological processes together with experiments and field observations promise rapid progress in the quality of Arctic ice predictions. Here we develop a dynamic ice system module to investigate discrete absorption of both BC and chlorophyll in the Arctic, using BC deposition fields from version 5 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) and vertically distributed layers of chlorophyll concentrations from Sea Ice Model (CICE). To this point, our black carbon mixing ratios compare well with available in situ data. Both results are in the same order of magnitude. Estimates from our calculations show that sea ice and snow around the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay has the least black carbon absorption while values at the ice-ocean perimeter in the region of the Barents Sea peak significantly. With regard to pigment concentrations, high amounts of chlorophyll are produced in Arctic sea ice by the bottom microbial community, and also within the columnar pack wherever substantial biological activity takes place in the presence of moderate light. We show that the percentage of photons absorbed by chlorophyll in the spring is comparable to the amount attributed to BC, especially in areas where the total deposition rates are decreasing with time on interannual timescale. We expect a continuous increase in

  14. Acetaminophen overdose associated with double serum concentration peaks

    PubMed Central

    Papazoglu, Cristian; Ang, Jonathan R.; Mandel, Michael; Basak, Prasanta; Jesmajian, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen is the most commonly used analgesic–antipyretic medication in the United States. Acetaminophen overdose, a frequent cause of drug toxicity, has been recognized as the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal hepatic necrosis. N-Acetylcysteine is the recommended antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Despite evidence on the efficacy of N-acetylcysteine for prevention of hepatic injury, controversy persists about the optimal duration of the therapy. Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old male with acetaminophen overdose and opioid co-ingestion who developed a second peak in acetaminophen serum levels after completing the recommended 21-hour intravenous N-acetylcysteine protocol and when the standard criteria for monitoring drug levels was achieved. Prolongation of N-acetylcysteine infusion beyond the standard protocol, despite a significant gap in treatment, was critical for successful avoidance of hepatotoxicity. Delay in acetaminophen absorption may be associated with a second peak in serum concentration following an initial declining trend, especially in cases of concomitant ingestion of opioids. In patients with acetaminophen toxicity who co-ingest other medications that may potentially delay gastric emptying or in those with risk factors for delayed absorption of acetaminophen, we recommend close monitoring of aminotransferase enzyme levels, as well as trending acetaminophen concentrations until undetectable before discontinuing the antidote therapy. PMID:26653695

  15. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  16. How does the plasmonic enhancement of molecular absorption depend on the energy gap between molecular excitation and plasmon modes: a mixed TDDFT/FDTD investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Li, Guang; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-07-14

    A real-time time-dependent density functional theory coupled with the classical electrodynamics finite difference time domain technique is employed to systematically investigate the optical properties of hybrid systems composed of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and organic adsorbates. The results demonstrate that the molecular absorption spectra throughout the whole energy range can be enhanced by the surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs; however, the absorption enhancement ratio (AER) for each absorption band differs significantly from the others, leading to the quite different spectral profiles of the hybrid complexes in contrast to those of isolated molecules or sole NPs. Detailed investigations reveal that the AER is sensitive to the energy gap between the molecular excitation and plasmon modes. As anticipated, two separate absorption bands, corresponding to the isolated molecules and sole NPs, have been observed at a large energy gap. When the energy gap approaches zero, the molecular excitation strongly couples with the plasmon mode to form the hybrid exciton band, which possesses the significantly enhanced absorption intensity, a red-shifted peak position, a surprising strongly asymmetric shape of the absorption band, and the nonlinear Fano effect. Furthermore, the dependence of surface localized fields and the scattering response functions (SRFs) on the geometrical parameters of NPs, the NP-molecule separation distance, and the external-field polarizations has also been depicted. PMID:26058430

  17. The structure of the aggregate form of bacteriochlorophyll c showing the Q y absorption above 740 nm: a 1H-NMR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Matsuura, Katsumi; Shimada, Keizo; Koyama, Yasushi

    1996-09-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll c (3 1S, 8-isobutyl-12-ethyl, farnesyl) was dissolved in a mixture of methylene chloride and carbon tetrachloride (1 : 3), and changes in the 1H-NMR spectrum caused by the titration of methanol were traced. On the basis of the changes in chemical shift due to the ring-current effect of the neighboring macrocycles and in peak intensity (broadening) due to their stacking, the structure of the aggregate form showing the Q y absorption band above 740 nm is proposed: the macrocycles are stacked to form a one-dimensional inclined column, the y axis of each macrocycle being parallel to the long axis of the column.

  18. Absorption-Emission study of Zn1-xAlxO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogamalar, N. Rajeswari; Bose, A. Chandra

    2011-07-01

    One-dimensional aluminum doped ZnO (ZnO:Al) nanorod is achieved by the controlled addition of metal nitrate as precursors in the presence of long chain poly-ethylene glycol (PEG) at 160 °C for 20 h through hydrothermal method. The as-synthesized ZnO nanorods are single crystalline, exhibiting an oriented growth along (0001) direction. Comprehensive structural analyses using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) indicate that the dopant Al atom occupies Zn sites in ZnO. XRD pattern of the Zn1-xAlxO sample shows the formation of wurtzite hexagonal phase however, when the dopant concentration exceeds 9 at.% impurity phase corresponding to Al2O3 appears. The dopant effects on lattice vibration and electronic transitions of the ZnO nanocrystals have been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission recorded at room temperature. The characteristic absorption peak of doped ZnO shifts toward higher wavelength side thus, exhibiting a red shift phenomenon with decrease in optical band gap. Near band edge (NBE) to defect emission ratio is increased with increase in dopant concentration, indicating the degradation in crystallnity and enhancement in oxygen vacancies.

  19. In situ and air index measurements: influence of the deposition parameters on the shift of TiO2/SiO2 Fabry-Perot filters.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, B; Borgogno, J P; Albrand, G; Pelletier, E

    1986-11-01

    We measure the refractive index of thin films of TiO2 and SiO2 for given deposition parameters. Two complementary methods are used. The first is a postdeposition technique which uses the measurements of reflectance and transmittance in air. The second, in contrast, makes use of in situ measurements (under vacuum and during the actual deposition of the layer). The differences between the values deduced from the two methods can be explained by the amount of atmospheric moisture adsorbed by films. One tries to minimize these shifts for the two materials by choosing deposition parameters. The difficulties come from the absorption losses which must be as small as possible. We use the measured refractive indices of individual layers to give good numerical prediction of the wavelength shift (observed during the admittance of air after deposition in the vacuum chamber) of the transmittance peak of multidielectric Fabry-Perot filters. PMID:18235719

  20. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  1. Impedance Characteristics of the Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazawa, Yohei

    2009-10-01

    The plasma absorption probe (PAP) is a diagnostics for determination of spatially resolved electron density.footnotetextH. Kokura, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38 5262 (1999). PAP has attracted considerable interest because of its applicability in a reactive plasma. The simple structure of the probe allows us a robust measurement while the mechanism of the absorption is complicated and there are still some uncertainty.footnotetextM. Lapke, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121502 (2007) In this study, we focus on the frequency characteristics of the impedance instead of the absorption spectrum. An electromagnetic field simulation reveals that there is only one parallel resonance in the impedance characteristics even in a case there are many peaks in absorption spectrum. Thus, the impedance characteristics provide a clue to understanding the mechanism.

  2. A method for modelling peak signal statistics on a mobile satellite transponder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilodeau, Andre; Lecours, Michel; Pelletier, Marcel; Delisle, Gilles Y.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation method is proposed. The simulation was developed to model the peak duration and energy content of signal peaks in a mobile communication satellite operating in a Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) mode and presents an estimate of those power peaks for a system where the channels are modeled as band limited Gaussian noise, which is taken as a reasonable representation for Amplitude Commanded Single Sideband (ACSSB), Minimum Shift Keying (MSK), or Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated signals. The simulation results show that, under this hypothesis, the level of the signal power peaks for 10 percent, 1 percent, and 0.1 percent of the time are well described by a Rayleigh law and that their duration is extremely short and inversely proportional to the total FDM system bandwidth.

  3. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  4. Shifts in flowering phenology reshape a subalpine plant community

    PubMed Central

    CaraDonna, Paul J.; Iler, Amy M.; Inouye, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Phenology—the timing of biological events—is highly sensitive to climate change. However, our general understanding of how phenology responds to climate change is based almost solely on incomplete assessments of phenology (such as first date of flowering) rather than on entire phenological distributions. Using a uniquely comprehensive 39-y flowering phenology dataset from the Colorado Rocky Mountains that contains more than 2 million flower counts, we reveal a diversity of species-level phenological shifts that bring into question the accuracy of previous estimates of long-term phenological change. For 60 species, we show that first, peak, and last flowering rarely shift uniformly and instead usually shift independently of one another, resulting in a diversity of phenological changes through time. Shifts in the timing of first flowering on average overestimate the magnitude of shifts in the timing of peak flowering, fail to predict shifts in the timing of last flowering, and underrepresent the number of species changing phenology in this plant community. Ultimately, this diversity of species-level phenological shifts contributes to altered coflowering patterns within the community, a redistribution of floral abundance across the season, and an expansion of the flowering season by more than I mo during the course of our study period. These results demonstrate the substantial reshaping of ecological communities that can be attributed to shifts in phenology. PMID:24639544

  5. Shifts in flowering phenology reshape a subalpine plant community.

    PubMed

    CaraDonna, Paul J; Iler, Amy M; Inouye, David W

    2014-04-01

    Phenology--the timing of biological events--is highly sensitive to climate change. However, our general understanding of how phenology responds to climate change is based almost solely on incomplete assessments of phenology (such as first date of flowering) rather than on entire phenological distributions. Using a uniquely comprehensive 39-y flowering phenology dataset from the Colorado Rocky Mountains that contains more than 2 million flower counts, we reveal a diversity of species-level phenological shifts that bring into question the accuracy of previous estimates of long-term phenological change. For 60 species, we show that first, peak, and last flowering rarely shift uniformly and instead usually shift independently of one another, resulting in a diversity of phenological changes through time. Shifts in the timing of first flowering on average overestimate the magnitude of shifts in the timing of peak flowering, fail to predict shifts in the timing of last flowering, and underrepresent the number of species changing phenology in this plant community. Ultimately, this diversity of species-level phenological shifts contributes to altered coflowering patterns within the community, a redistribution of floral abundance across the season, and an expansion of the flowering season by more than I mo during the course of our study period. These results demonstrate the substantial reshaping of ecological communities that can be attributed to shifts in phenology. PMID:24639544

  6. Characterization of the rare earth orthophosphates and Ce-doped LaPO{sub 4} by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Shuh, D.K.; Perry, D.; Terminello, L.J.; Boatner, L.A.; Abraham, M.M.

    1993-12-31

    X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) of the Rare Earth (RE) 3d levels yields sharp peaks near the edges as a result of strong, quasi-atomic 3d{sup 10}4f {yields} 3d{sup 9}4f{sup n+1} (M{sub 4,5}) transitions that contain a wealth of spectroscopic features. XAS is a useful technique for the characterization of 4f-occupancy, 4f-hybridization, and valence in RE-containing materials. The XAS measurements of the single crystal RE-orthophosphates, as well as a range of Cedoped ({approx}1--30%) LaPO{sub 4} hosts were performed at the 3d edge in the total electron yield mode at beamline 8-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). The XAS spectra of the RE ions in the orthophosphate matrix generally resemble that of the corresponding RE metal and emphasize the major contribution of the trivalent state to the electronic transitions occurring at the 3d edge. There is no energy shift of the La and Ce absorption peaks with Ce doping and furthermore, no additional transitions are observed in either spectral region. However, accompanying the Ce doping there is a significant narrowing of the La absorption peak full width half maximum that contrasts to the Ce features that exhibit no contraction. The La and Ce spectra indicate that the Ce-doping of LaPO{sub 4} is purely substitutional.

  7. Ambiguous red shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfman, Carl E.

    2010-12-01

    A one-parameter conformal invariance of Maxwell's equations allows the wavelengths of electromagnetic waves to change as they propagate, and do so even in otherwise field-free space. This produces an ambiguity in interpretations of stellar red shifts. Experiments that will determine the value of the group parameter, and thereby remove the ambiguity, are proposed. They are based on an analysis of the anomalous frequency shifts uncovered in the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft studies, and physical interpretation of an isomorphism discovered by E.L. Hill. If the group parameter is found to be non-zero, Hubble's relations will have to be reinterpreted and space-time metrics will have to be altered. The cosmological consequences of the transformations are even more extensive because, though they change frequencies they do not alter the energy and momentum conservation laws of classical and quantum-electrodynamical fields established by Cunningham and by Białynicki-Birula.

  8. Shifts that divide population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muneepeerakul, Rachata; Qubbaj, Murad; Aggarwal, Rimjhim; Anderies, John M.; Janssen, Marco

    2014-05-01

    How does a population of organisms in an ecosystem or of people in a society respond to rapid shifts in the environment? Answers to this question are critical to our ability to anticipate and cope with a changing ecohydrological system. We have developed a generic model of adaptation mechanisms, based on replicator dynamics, in which we derive a simple and insightful threshold condition that separates two important types of responses: 'cohesive transition' in which the whole population changes gradually together, and 'population-dividing transition' in which the population splits into two groups with one eventually dominating the other. The threshold depends on the magnitude of the shift and the shape of the fitness landscape. Division in populations can fundamentally alter the functioning of and induce subsequent feedbacks within the system; knowing the condition that gives rise to such division is thus fundamentally important.

  9. The shifted penalty method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarise, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    The method presented here is a variation of the classical penalty one, suited to reduce penetration of the contacting surfaces. The slight but crucial modification concerns the introduction of a shift parameter that moves the minimum point of the constrained potential toward the exact value, without any penalty increase. With respect to the classical augmentation procedures, the solution improvement is embedded within the original penalty contribution. The problem is almost consistently linearized, and the shift is updated before each Newton's iteration. However, adding few iterations, with respect to the original penalty method, a reduction of the penetration of several orders of magnitude can be achieved. The numerical tests have shown very attractive characteristics and very stable solution paths. This permits to foresee a wide area of applications, not only in contact mechanics, but for any problem, like e.g. incompressible materials, where a penalty contribution is required.

  10. Characterization of a Highly Efficient Blue-shifted Channelrhodopsin from the Marine Alga Platymonas subcordiformis*

    PubMed Central

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Li, Hai; Janz, Roger; Spudich, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Rhodopsin photosensors of phototactic algae act as light-gated cation channels when expressed in animal cells. These proteins (channelrhodopsins) are extensively used for millisecond scale photocontrol of cellular functions (optogenetics). We report characterization of PsChR, one of the phototaxis receptors in the alga Platymonas (Tetraselmis) subcordiformis. PsChR exhibited ∼3-fold higher unitary conductance and greater relative permeability for Na+ ions, as compared with the most frequently used channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Photocurrents generated by PsChR in HEK293 cells showed lesser inactivation and faster peak recovery than those by CrChR2. Their maximal spectral sensitivity was at 445 nm, making PsChR the most blue-shifted channelrhodopsin so far identified. The λmax of detergent-purified PsChR was 437 nm at neutral pH and exhibited red shifts (pKa values at 6.6 and 3.8) upon acidification. The purified pigment undergoes a photocycle with a prominent red-shifted intermediate whose formation and decay kinetics match the kinetics of channel opening and closing. The rise and decay of an M-like intermediate prior to formation of this putative conductive state were faster than in CrChR2. PsChR mediated sufficient light-induced membrane depolarization in cultured hippocampal neurons to trigger reliable repetitive spiking at the upper threshold frequency of the neurons. At low frequencies spiking probability decreases less with PsChR than with CrChR2 because of the faster recovery of the former. Its blue-shifted absorption enables optogenetics at wavelengths even below 400 nm. A combination of characteristics makes PsChR important for further research on structure-function relationships in ChRs and potentially useful for optogenetics, especially for combinatorial applications when short wavelength excitation is required. PMID:23995841

  11. Characterization of a highly efficient blue-shifted channelrhodopsin from the marine alga Platymonas subcordiformis.

    PubMed

    Govorunova, Elena G; Sineshchekov, Oleg A; Li, Hai; Janz, Roger; Spudich, John L

    2013-10-11

    Rhodopsin photosensors of phototactic algae act as light-gated cation channels when expressed in animal cells. These proteins (channelrhodopsins) are extensively used for millisecond scale photocontrol of cellular functions (optogenetics). We report characterization of PsChR, one of the phototaxis receptors in the alga Platymonas (Tetraselmis) subcordiformis. PsChR exhibited ∼3-fold higher unitary conductance and greater relative permeability for Na(+) ions, as compared with the most frequently used channelrhodopsin-2 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (CrChR2). Photocurrents generated by PsChR in HEK293 cells showed lesser inactivation and faster peak recovery than those by CrChR2. Their maximal spectral sensitivity was at 445 nm, making PsChR the most blue-shifted channelrhodopsin so far identified. The λmax of detergent-purified PsChR was 437 nm at neutral pH and exhibited red shifts (pKa values at 6.6 and 3.8) upon acidification. The purified pigment undergoes a photocycle with a prominent red-shifted intermediate whose formation and decay kinetics match the kinetics of channel opening and closing. The rise and decay of an M-like intermediate prior to formation of this putative conductive state were faster than in CrChR2. PsChR mediated sufficient light-induced membrane depolarization in cultured hippocampal neurons to trigger reliable repetitive spiking at the upper threshold frequency of the neurons. At low frequencies spiking probability decreases less with PsChR than with CrChR2 because of the faster recovery of the former. Its blue-shifted absorption enables optogenetics at wavelengths even below 400 nm. A combination of characteristics makes PsChR important for further research on structure-function relationships in ChRs and potentially useful for optogenetics, especially for combinatorial applications when short wavelength excitation is required. PMID:23995841

  12. Giant Goos-Hänchen shift via spontaneous generated coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziauddin

    2015-11-01

    The influence of spontaneous generated coherence (SGC) on the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift in the reflected light is presented. A weak probe light is incident on a cavity containing three-level gaseous atomic medium consist of 85Rb atoms. The atom-field interaction follows electromagnetically induced transparency configuration, and the SGC modifies the dispersion and absorption properties of a system [Y. Niu and S. Gong, Phys. Rev. A 73, 053811 (2006)]. The SGC enhances the Kerr nonlinearity which leads to giant negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light. Further, the control of negative and positive GH shifts is achieved via manipulation of probe field detuning.

  13. Shifts of the Al-26 line due to Galactic rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skibo, Jeff; Ramaty, Reuven

    1991-01-01

    The shape of the Al-26 line is evaluated using a Galactic disk rotation curve and assuming various galactic distributions of radioactive aluminum. The line shape depends on galactic longitude, detector opening angle, and the assumed aluminum distribution. For a detector of 20 deg aperture and 2.5 keV resolution, the shift of the line peak can be as large as 0.4 keV. Such a shift could be detected with the proposed nuclear astrophysics explorer.

  14. The Boson peak in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line TW. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih. PMID:23771033

  15. Weld peaking on heavy aluminum structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayless, E.; Poorman, R.; Sexton, J.

    1978-01-01

    Weld peaking is usually undesirable in any welded structure. In heavy structures, the forces involved in the welding process become very large and difficult to handle. With the shuttle's solid rocket booster, the weld peaking resulted in two major problems: (1) reduced mechanical properties across the weld joint, and (2) fit-up difficulties in subsequent assembly operation. Peaking from the weld shrinkage forces can be fairly well predicted in simple structures; however, in welding complicated assemblies, the amount of peaking is unpredictable because of unknown stresses from machining and forming, stresses induced by the fixturing, and stresses from welds in other parts of the assembly. When excessive peaking is encountered, it can be corrected using the shrinkage forces resulting from the welding process. Application of these forces is discussed in this report.

  16. Multiscale peak detection in wavelet space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Tong, Xia; Peng, Ying; Ma, Pan; Zhang, Ming-Jin; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-12-01

    Accurate peak detection is essential for analyzing high-throughput datasets generated by analytical instruments. Derivatives with noise reduction and matched filtration are frequently used, but they are sensitive to baseline variations, random noise and deviations in the peak shape. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based method is more practical and popular in this situation, which can increase the accuracy and reliability by identifying peaks across scales in wavelet space and implicitly removing noise as well as the baseline. However, its computational load is relatively high and the estimated features of peaks may not be accurate in the case of peaks that are overlapping, dense or weak. In this study, we present multi-scale peak detection (MSPD) by taking full advantage of additional information in wavelet space including ridges, valleys, and zero-crossings. It can achieve a high accuracy by thresholding each detected peak with the maximum of its ridge. It has been comprehensively evaluated with MALDI-TOF spectra in proteomics, the CAMDA 2006 SELDI dataset as well as the Romanian database of Raman spectra, which is particularly suitable for detecting peaks in high-throughput analytical signals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that MSPD can detect more true peaks while keeping the false discovery rate lower than MassSpecWavelet and MALDIquant methods. Superior results in Raman spectra suggest that MSPD seems to be a more universal method for peak detection. MSPD has been designed and implemented efficiently in Python and Cython. It is available as an open source package at . PMID:26514234

  17. Cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide quantum dots in glass: Processing, growth, and optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Pratima Gattu Naga

    Glasses containing cadmium sulfide and lead sulfide particles were prepared, and their properties were studied. These particles exhibit quantum confinement behavior when they are smaller than their Bohr exciton radii. Quantum confinement leads to size dependence in the optical absorption of particles. This size dependence can tune the optical absorption of the material to a particular wavelength or energy and possibly enhances the nonlinear optical absorption of the particles. These properties have potential applications in photonic devices. To control the growth of these semiconductor particles in glass, the glass processing conditions were studied. CdS-doped glasses were initially prepared with CdO and ZnS. The sublimation temperature for ZnS is at 1185°C; whereas, CdO sublimes at 1559°C, and CdS at 980°C. Loss of both cadmium and sulfur was observed in open crucible melts, even when CdO and ZnS were used. Improvements in glass processing were made by use of preheat and a cover during the glass melting, resulting in better retention of both dopants. Direct CdS addition to the glasses was possible with these improvements, thus eliminating complications of zinc incorporation during the growth of the semiconductor particles. These methods were successfully applied to the synthesis of PbS-doped glasses. CdS and PbS particles were grown in alkali borosilicate glasses, and their optical absorption spectra were measured as a function of heat treatment temperature and time. The position of the absorption peak and edge shifted to longer wave-lengths, or lower energies, with longer heat treatments at a constant temperature. Both CdS and PbS particles exhibited quantum confinement. These measurements were used to calculate particle sizes from quantum confinement models. Comparisons with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the 1-term effective-mass approximation was appropriate for estimating CdS particle sizes. A sophisticated four-band envelope

  18. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  19. Evidence for ultra-fast outflows in radio-quiet AGNs. I. Detection and statistical incidence of Fe K-shell absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombesi, F.; Cappi, M.; Reeves, J. N.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Yaqoob, T.; Braito, V.; Dadina, M.

    2010-10-01

    Context. Blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines have been detected in recent years between 7 and 10 keV in the X-ray spectra of several radio-quiet AGNs. The derived blue-shifted velocities of the lines can often reach mildly relativistic values, up to 0.2-0.4c. These findings are important because they suggest the presence of a previously unknown massive and highly ionized absorbing material outflowing from their nuclei, possibly connected with accretion disk winds/outflows. Aims: The scope of the present work is to statistically quantify the parameters and incidence of the blue-shifted Fe K absorption lines through a uniform analysis on a large sample of radio-quiet AGNs. This allows us to assess their global detection significance and to overcome any possible publication bias. Methods: We performed a blind search for narrow absorption features at energies greater than 6.4 keV in a sample of 42 radio-quiet AGNs observed with XMM-Newton. A simple uniform model composed by an absorbed power-law plus Gaussian emission and absorption lines provided a good fit for all the data sets. We derived the absorption lines parameters and calculated their detailed detection significance making use of the classical F-test and extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We detect 36 narrow absorption lines on a total of 101 XMM-Newton EPIC pn observations. The number of absorption lines at rest-frame energies higher than 7 keV is 22. Their global probability to be generated by random fluctuations is very low, less than 3 × 10-8, and their detection have been independently confirmed by a spectral analysis of the MOS data, with associated random probability <10-7. We identify the lines as Fe XXV and Fe XXVI K-shell resonant absorption. They are systematically blue-shifted, with a velocity distribution ranging from zero up to ~0.3c, with a peak and mean value at ~0.1c. We detect variability of the lines on both EWs and blue-shifted velocities among different XMM-Newton observations

  20. PeakRanger: A cloud-enabled peak caller for ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), coupled with massively parallel short-read sequencing (seq) is used to probe chromatin dynamics. Although there are many algorithms to call peaks from ChIP-seq datasets, most are tuned either to handle punctate sites, such as transcriptional factor binding sites, or broad regions, such as histone modification marks; few can do both. Other algorithms are limited in their configurability, performance on large data sets, and ability to distinguish closely-spaced peaks. Results In this paper, we introduce PeakRanger, a peak caller software package that works equally well on punctate and broad sites, can resolve closely-spaced peaks, has excellent performance, and is easily customized. In addition, PeakRanger can be run in a parallel cloud computing environment to obtain extremely high performance on very large data sets. We present a series of benchmarks to evaluate PeakRanger against 10 other peak callers, and demonstrate the performance of PeakRanger on both real and synthetic data sets. We also present real world usages of PeakRanger, including peak-calling in the modENCODE project. Conclusions Compared to other peak callers tested, PeakRanger offers improved resolution in distinguishing extremely closely-spaced peaks. PeakRanger has above-average spatial accuracy in terms of identifying the precise location of binding events. PeakRanger also has excellent sensitivity and specificity in all benchmarks evaluated. In addition, PeakRanger offers significant improvements in run time when running on a single processor system, and very marked improvements when allowed to take advantage of the MapReduce parallel environment offered by a cloud computing resource. PeakRanger can be downloaded at the official site of modENCODE project: http://www.modencode.org/software/ranger/ PMID:21554709

  1. Geological study of uranium potential of the Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley Region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, D.; Kettler, R.M.; Swanson, S.C.

    1980-09-01

    The results of a geological survey of the Kingston Peak Formation on the western slope of the Panamint Range near Death Valley are discussed. The geology of the Panamint mountains was mapped on topographic base maps of the Telescope Peak and Manly Peak quadrangles. Radiometric suveys of the area were conducted using gamma ray spectrometers. Samples of the conglomerate were analyzed using delayed neutron, neutron activation, atomic absorption, and LECO analysis. It is concluded that uranium mineralization in the Favorable Submember is significant and further exploration is warranted. The monazite-fenotime related uranium and thorium mineralization in the Mountain Girl quartz pebble conglomerate is of no economic interest. (DMC)

  2. Reduced Graphene Oxide Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanocomposites for Enhanced Efficient and Lightweight Electromagnetic Wave Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Huijing; Sun, Yihui; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, reduced graphene oxide functionalized with cobalt ferrite nanocomposites (CoFe@rGO) as a novel type of electromagnetic wave (EW) absorbing materials was successfully prepared by a three-step chemical method including hydrothermal synthesis, annealing process and mixing with paraffin. The effect of the sample thickness and the amount of paraffin on the EW absorption properties of the composites was studied, revealing that the absorption peaks shifted toward the low frequency regions with the increasing thickness while other conditions had little or no effect. It is found that the CoFe@rGO enhanced both dielectric losses and magnetic losses and had the best EW absorption properties and the wide wavelength coverage of the hole Ku-Band when adding only 5wt% composites to paraffin. Therefore, CoFe@rGO could be used as an efficient and lightweight EW absorber. Compared with the research into traditional absorbing materials, this figures of merit are typically of the same order of magnitude, but given the lightweight nature of the material and the high level of compatibility with mass production standards, making use of CoFe@rGO as an electromagnetic absorber material shows great potential for real product applications. PMID:27587001

  3. Reduced Graphene Oxide Functionalized with Cobalt Ferrite Nanocomposites for Enhanced Efficient and Lightweight Electromagnetic Wave Absorption.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Liao, Qingliang; Liu, Shuo; Guo, Huijing; Sun, Yihui; Zhang, Guangjie; Zhang, Yue

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, reduced graphene oxide functionalized with cobalt ferrite nanocomposites (CoFe@rGO) as a novel type of electromagnetic wave (EW) absorbing materials was successfully prepared by a three-step chemical method including hydrothermal synthesis, annealing process and mixing with paraffin. The effect of the sample thickness and the amount of paraffin on the EW absorption properties of the composites was studied, revealing that the absorption peaks shifted toward the low frequency regions with the increasing thickness while other conditions had little or no effect. It is found that the CoFe@rGO enhanced both dielectric losses and magnetic losses and had the best EW absorption properties and the wide wavelength coverage of the hole Ku-Band when adding only 5wt% composites to paraffin. Therefore, CoFe@rGO could be used as an efficient and lightweight EW absorber. Compared with the research into traditional absorbing materials, this figures of merit are typically of the same order of magnitude, but given the lightweight nature of the material and the high level of compatibility with mass production standards, making use of CoFe@rGO as an electromagnetic absorber material shows great potential for real product applications. PMID:27587001

  4. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  5. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cina, Jeffrey A.; Kovac, Philip A.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Dean, Jacob C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done.

  6. Hydrogen absorption behavior into boron films by glow discharges in hydrogen and helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuzuki, K.; Natsir, M.; Inoue, N.; Sagara, A.; Noda, N.; Motojima, O.; Mochizuki, T.; Hino, T.; Yamashina, T.

    1997-02-01

    Hydrogen absorption behavior into boron films deposited on graphite and stainless steel (SS) has been studied. Hydrogen absorption into a H-depleted boron film was investigated during a hydrogen glow discharge with pressure drop measured by a diaphragm gauge. It was found that, after strong but short time absorption at initial phase, hydrogen atoms were slowly (a few percents of injected H atoms) but continuously absorbed without saturation up to 3 h, which was not observed with SS liner without boron coating. Hydrogen atoms were not only desorbed but also implanted into the film during a helium glow discharge and thus, hydrogen atoms were accumulated in the film when H 2 and He discharges were repeated alternately. These accumulation effects enhanced by ions from the glow discharge were investigated quantitatively and the effect of bombarding ion species (H + or He +) was discussed. Depth profile of H atoms was measured by elastic recoil detection (ERD). The density of only near surface region was increased when the hydrogen atoms were injected. Longer time exposure to H 2 discharge resulted in increase in surface density and shift of the peak position to deeper into the film. These results were explained by diffusion of H atoms due to ion impact into the films with keeping its saturation level if we consider resolution of ERD method of 25 nm. From the results, applicability of boron film as protection layer of tritium permeation is discussed.

  7. On the optical absorption of the anionic GFP chromophore in vacuum, solution, and protein.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Alessio; Caruso, Pasquale; Tenuta, Silvia; Rega, Nadia

    2013-12-21

    In spite of the large number of experimental and theoretical studies, the optical absorption trend of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore in several environments has not been fully understood. We calculated at the same level of time dependent density functional theory the vertical excitation energy of the anionic GFP chromophore in the protein and in ethanol, dioxane, methanol and water solutions. As result, we reproduced for the first time the experimental trend of the absorption peaks with 0.015 eV as the standard deviation of the accuracy. This systematic error allowed us to analyze with confidence the relative weight of several solvation effects on the vertical excitation energy. Experimental trends not correlated with the solvent polarity were therefore explained with a fine balance of different steric and electronic effects on the photophysics of the chromophore. As an indirect and remarkable result, the present analysis confirms that the optical absorption of the chromophore in the gas phase is close to the value of 2.84 eV extrapolated by Dong et al. (J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2006, 128, 12038), and, as a consequence, that the protein environment induces a red shift of 0.23 eV. PMID:24177429

  8. UV absorption spectrum of the C2 Criegee intermediate CH{sub 3}CHOO

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mica C.; Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2014-08-21

    The UV spectrum of CH{sub 3}CHOO was measured by transient absorption in a flow cell at 295 K. The absolute absorption cross sections of CH{sub 3}CHOO were measured by laser depletion in a molecular beam to be (1.06 ± 0.09) × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 308 nm and (9.7 ± 0.6) × 10{sup −18} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 352 nm. After scaling the UV spectrum of CH{sub 3}CHOO to the absolute cross section at 308 nm, the peak UV cross section is (1.27 ± 0.11) × 10{sup −17} cm{sup 2} molecule{sup −1} at 328 nm. Compared to the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO, the UV absorption band of CH{sub 3}CHOO is similar in intensity but blue shifted by 14 nm, resulting in a 20% slower photolysis rate estimated for CH{sub 3}CHOO in the atmosphere.

  9. UV absorption spectrum of the C2 Criegee intermediate CH3CHOO.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Ting, Wei-Lun; Chang, Chun-Hung; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2014-08-21

    The UV spectrum of CH3CHOO was measured by transient absorption in a flow cell at 295 K. The absolute absorption cross sections of CH3CHOO were measured by laser depletion in a molecular beam to be (1.06 ± 0.09) × 10(-17) cm(2) molecule(-1) at 308 nm and (9.7 ± 0.6) × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) at 352 nm. After scaling the UV spectrum of CH3CHOO to the absolute cross section at 308 nm, the peak UV cross section is (1.27 ± 0.11) × 10(-17) cm(2) molecule(-1) at 328 nm. Compared to the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, the UV absorption band of CH3CHOO is similar in intensity but blue shifted by 14 nm, resulting in a 20% slower photolysis rate estimated for CH3CHOO in the atmosphere. PMID:25149781

  10. Visible-ultraviolet absorption cross sections for NO2 as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Mcdaniel, A. H.; Shetter, R. E.; Madronich, S.

    1988-01-01

    A redetermination of the temperature dependence of the absorption cross-section (sigma) of NO2 in the visible-ultraviolet region was made in order to provide a more reliable data base for the calculation of NO2 photolysis rates in the atmosphere. Experiments over a wide range of temperatures and NO2 concentrations were conducted. The integral of a plot of sigma versus the inverse of the wavelength was essentially independent of temperature. Increasing temperature produced a shift of the spectrum toward longer wavelengths, resulting in a small negative temperature dependence of sigma over the 264-400 nm range and a small positive dependence over the 450-649 nm range. Increasing temperature produced broadening of individual spectral features, resulting in a systematic lowering of peaks and filling of valleys. Recommended cross sections are presented for use in tropospheric NO2 photolysis rate calculations.

  11. Variation in optical-absorption edge in SiN{sub x} layers with silicon clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, M. D. Volodin, V. A.; Marin, D. V.; Arzhannikova, S. A.; Kamaev, G. N.; Kochubei, S. A.; Popov, A. A.

    2008-02-15

    Using optical methods, data on optical constants are obtained for silicon nitride films synthesized by plasma-chemical vapor deposition (PCVD). Models for calculating the permittivity in the model of inhomogeneous phase mixture of silicon and silicon nitride are considered. It is found that the optical-absorption edge (E{sub g}) and the photoluminescence peak shift to longer wavelengths with increasing nitrogen atomic fraction x in sin{sub x} films. When x approaches the value 4/3 characteristic for stoichiometric silicon nitride Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, a nonlinear sharp increase in E{sub g} is observed. Using Raman scattering, Si-Si bonds are revealed, which confirms the direct formation of silicon clusters during the film deposition. The relation between the composition of nonstoichiometric silicon nitride films, values of permittivity, and the optical-band width is established for light transmission.

  12. Peaks theory and the excursion set approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Aseem; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-11-01

    We describe a model of dark matter halo abundances and clustering which combines the two most widely used approaches to this problem: that based on peaks and the other based on excursion sets. Our approach can be thought of as addressing the cloud-in-cloud problem for peaks and/or modifying the excursion set approach so that it averages over a special subset, rather than all possible walks. In this respect, it seeks to account for correlations between steps in the walk as well as correlations between walks. We first show how the excursion set and peaks models can be written in the same formalism, and then use this correspondence to write our combined excursion set peaks model. We then give simple expressions for the mass function and bias, showing that even the linear halo bias factor is predicted to be k-dependent as a consequence of the non-locality associated with the peak constraint. At large masses, our model has little or no need to rescale the variable δc from the value associated with spherical collapse, and suggests a simple explanation for why the linear halo bias factor appears to lie above that based on the peak-background split at high masses when such a rescaling is assumed. Although we have concentrated on peaks, our analysis is more generally applicable to other traditionally single-scale analyses of large-scale structure.

  13. Effect of migraine attacks on paracetamol absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Tokola, R A; Neuvonen, P J

    1984-01-01

    The absorption of effervescent paracetamol (1000 mg) was investigated in nine female patients during a migraine attack and in the same patients when headache free. Migraine attack decreased (P less than 0.05) the areas under the serum paracetamol concentration-time curves (AUC) of 0-2 h, 0-4 h and 0-6 h and the peak serum concentration. The severity of nausea correlated significantly with the decrease in the AUC values. Our results support findings of delayed gastric emptying in migraine attacks. Both a delay and an impairment of drug absorption may follow. PMID:6529526

  14. Dust-on-snow and the timing of peak streamflow in the upper Rio Grande

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dust radiative forcing on high elevation snowpack is well-documented in the southern Rockies. Various field studies show that dust deposits decrease snow albedo and increase absorption of solar radiation, leading to earlier snowmelt and peak stream flows. These findings have implications for the use...

  15. Design principles of shift current photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ashley; Fregoso, Benjamin; de Juan, Fernando; Moore, Joel

    While the basic principles and limitations of conventional solar cells are well understood, relatively little attention has gone toward evaluating and maximizing the potential efficiency of photovoltaic devices based on shift currents. In this work, a sum rule approach is introduced and used to outline design principles for optimizing shift currents for photon energies near the band gap, which depend on wavefunctions via Berry connections as well as standard band structure. Using these we identify two new classes of shift current photovoltaics, ferroelectric polymer films and orthorhombic monochalcogenides, both of which exhibit peak photoresponsivities larger than predictions for previously-known photovoltaics of this type. Using physically-motivated tight-binding models, the full frequency dependent response of these materials is obtained. Exploring the phase space of these models, we find photoresponsivities that can exceed 100 mA/W. These results show that considering the microscopic origin of shift current via effective models allows one to improve the possible efficiency of devices using this mechanism and better grasp their potential to compete with conventional solar cells. This work was completed with the support of an NSERC Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement.

  16. Comparison of red-shifted firefly luciferase Ppy RE9 and conventional Luc2 as bioluminescence imaging reporter genes for in vivo imaging of stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yajie; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W. M.

    2012-01-01

    One critical issue for noninvasive imaging of transplanted bioluminescent cells is the large amount of light absorption in tissue when emission wavelengths below 600 nm are used. Luciferase with a red-shifted spectrum can potentially bypass this limitation. We assessed and compared a mutant of firefly luciferase (Ppy RE9, PRE9) against the yellow luciferase luc2 gene for use in cell transplantation studies. C17.2 neural stem cells expressing PRE9-Venus and luc2-Venus were sorted by flow cytometry and assessed for bioluminescence in vitro in culture and in vivo after transplantation into the brain of immunodeficient Rag2-/- mice. We found that the luminescence from PRE9 was stable, with a peak emission at 620 nm, shifted to the red compared to that of luc2. The emission peak for PRE9 was pH-independent, in contrast to luc2, and much less affected by tissue absorbance compared to that of luc2. However, the total emitted light radiance from PRE9 was substantially lower than that of luc2, both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude that PRE9 has favorable properties as compared to luc2 in terms of pH independence, red-shifted spectrum, tissue light penetration, and signal quantification, justifying further optimization of protein expression and enzymatic activity.

  17. Shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra and shifted Hurwitz numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Quan

    2016-05-01

    We construct the shifted genus expanded W ∞ algebra, which is isomorphic to the central subalgebra A ∞ of infinite symmetric group algebra and to the shifted Schur symmetrical function algebra Λ* defined by Okounkov and Olshanskii. As an application, we get some differential equations for the generating functions of the shifted Hurwitz numbers; thus, we can express the generating functions in terms of the shifted genus expanded cut-and-join operators.

  18. Noise-driven optical absorption coefficients of impurity doped quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, Jayanta; Saha, Surajit; Pal, Suvajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-01-01

    We make an extensive investigation of linear, third-order nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients (ACs) of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in presence and absence of noise. The noise invoked in the present study is a Gaussian white noise. The quantum dot is doped with repulsive Gaussian impurity. Noise has been introduced to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field acts as a source of confinement and a static external electric field has been applied. The AC profiles have been studied as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as optical intensity, electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, relaxation time, Al concentration, dopant potential, and noise strength take on different values. In addition, the role of mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) on the AC profiles has also been analyzed meticulously. The AC profiles often consist of a number of interesting observations such as one photon resonance enhancement, shift of AC peak position, variation of AC peak intensity, and bleaching of AC peak. However, presence of noise alters the features of AC profiles and leads to some interesting manifestations. Multiplicative noise brings about more complexity in the AC profiles than its additive counterpart. The observations indeed illuminate several useful aspects in the study of linear and nonlinear optical properties of doped QD systems, specially in presence of noise. The findings are expected to be quite relevant from a technological perspective.

  19. In Brief: Timing of peak oil uncertain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2007-04-01

    According to the Hubbert peak theory, oil production in any geographic area will follow a bellshaped curve. The timing of the `peak' in global oil production is important because after that point, there will be less and less oil available for consumption. A new report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office found that most studies estimate that peak oil production will occur sometime between now and 2040. The uncertainty in these estimates could be reduced with better information about worldwide supply and demand, and alternative fuels and transportation technologies could mitigate the effects of a global decline in oil production. However, the report found no coordinated U.S. federal strategy to address these issues. The report, ``Uncertainty about Future Oil Supply Makes It Important to Develop a Strategy for Addressing a Peak and Decline in Oil Production,'' is available at http://www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-07-283

  20. Reducing Peak Demand by Time Zone Divisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, A.

    2014-09-01

    For a large country like India, the electrical power demand is also large and the infrastructure cost for power is the largest among all the core sectors of economy. India has an emerging economy which requires high rate of growth of infrastructure in the power generation, transmission and distribution. The current peak demand in the country is approximately 1,50,000 MW which shall have a planned growth of at least 50 % over the next five years (Seventeenth Electric Power Survey of India, Central Electricity Authority, Government of India, March 2007). By implementing the time zone divisions each comprising of an integral number of contiguous states based on their total peak demand and geographical location, the total peak demand of the nation can be significantly cut down by spreading the peak demand of various states over time. The projected reduction in capital expenditure over a plan period of 5 years is substantial. Also, the estimated reduction in operations expenditure cannot be ignored.

  1. Tectonics, Climate and Earth's highest peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robl, Jörg; Prasicek, Günther; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Prominent peaks characterized by high relief and steep slopes are among the most spectacular morphological features on Earth. In collisional orogens they result from the interplay of tectonically driven crustal thickening and climatically induced destruction of overthickened crust by erosional surface processes. The glacial buzz-saw hypothesis proposes a superior status of climate in limiting mountain relief and peak altitude due to glacial erosion. It implies that peak altitude declines with duration of glacial occupation, i.e., towards high latitudes. This is in strong contrast with high peaks existing in high latitude mountain ranges (e.g. Mt. St. Elias range) and the idea of peak uplift due to isostatic compensation of spatially variable erosional unloading an over-thickened orogenic crust. In this study we investigate landscape dissection, crustal thickness and vertical strain rates in tectonically active mountain ranges to evaluate the influence of erosion on (latitudinal) variations in peak altitude. We analyze the spatial distribution of serval thousand prominent peaks on Earth extracted from the global ETOPO1 digital elevation model with a novel numerical tool. We compare this dataset to crustal thickness, thickening rate (vertical strain rate) and mean elevation. We use the ratios of mean elevation to peak elevation (landscape dissection) and peak elevation to crustal thickness (long-term impact of erosion on crustal thickness) as indicators for the influence of erosional surface processes on peak uplift and the vertical strain rate as a proxy for the mechanical state of the orogen. Our analysis reveals that crustal thickness and peak elevation correlate well in orogens that have reached a mechanically limited state (vertical strain rate near zero) where plate convergence is already balanced by lateral extrusion and gravitational collapse and plateaus are formed. On the Tibetan Plateau crustal thickness serves to predict peak elevation up to an altitude

  2. Flu Season Hasn't Peaked Yet

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157852.html Flu Season Hasn't Peaked Yet This year's vaccine ... 2016 FRIDAY, March 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- This flu season continues to be the mildest in the ...

  3. Observing at Kitt Peak National Observatory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Martin

    1981-01-01

    Presents an abridged version of a chapter from the author's book "In Quest of Telescopes." Includes personal experiences at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and comments on telescopes, photographs, and making observations. (SK)

  4. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  5. Temperature-Dependence of Air-Broadened Line Widths and Shifts in the nu3 Band of Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mary A. H.; Rinsland, Curtis P.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Cox, A. M.

    2006-01-01

    The 9.6-micron bands of O3 are used by many remote-sensing experiments for retrievals of terrestrial atmospheric ozone concentration profiles. Line parameter errors can contribute significantly to the total errors in these retrievals, particularly for nadir-viewing. The McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak was used to record numerous high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of O3 broadened by various gases at temperatures between 160 and 300 K. Over 30 spectra were analyzed simultaneously using a multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting technique to determine Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with their temperature dependences for selected transitions in the 3 fundamental band of (16)O3. We compare the present results with other measurements reported in the literature and with the ozone parameters on the 2000 and 2004 editions of the HITRAN database.

  6. Forward-peaked scattering of polarized light.

    PubMed

    Clark, Julia P; Kim, Arnold D

    2014-11-15

    Polarized light propagation in a multiple scattering medium is governed by the vector radiative transfer equation. We analyze the vector radiative transfer equation in asymptotic limit of forward-peaked scattering and derive an approximate system of equations for the Stokes parameters, which we call the vector Fokker-Planck approximation. The vector Fokker-Planck approximation provides valuable insight into several outstanding issues regarding the forward-peaked scattering of polarized light such as the polarization memory phenomenon. PMID:25490484

  7. Transmission shift control assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Dzioba, D.L.

    1989-04-18

    This patent describes a transmission shift control assembly mounted on a steering column having a longitudinal axis comprising: bracket means secured to the steering column; transmission shift cable means having a portion secured to the bracket means and a portion linearly movable relative to the secured portion; mounting means on the bracket cable drive arm means having an axis and being rotatably mounted on the rotary axis on the mounting means oblique to the longitudinal axis and including a cable connecting portion secured to the movable portion of the cable means and lever mounting means adjacent the mounting means; operator control means including lever means, pin means for pivotally mounting the lever means on the lever mounting means on an axis substantially perpendicular to the rotary axis and positioning arm means formed on the lever means and extending from the pin means; and detent gate means disposed on the bracket means in position to abut the positioning arm means for limiting the extent of pivotal movement of the lever means.

  8. Shifted nondiffractive Bessel beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Kotlyar, Victor V.; Porfirev, Alexey A.

    2015-05-01

    Nondiffractive Bessel beams are well known to have infinite energy and infinite orbital angular momentum (OAM). However, when normalized to unity of energy, their OAM is finite. In this work, we derive an analytical relationship for calculating the normalized OAM of the superposition of off-axis Bessel beams characterized by the same topological charge. We show that if the constituent beams of the superposition have real-valued weight coefficients, the total OAM of the superposition of the Bessel beams equals that of an individual nonshifted Bessel beam. This property enables generating nondiffractive beams with different intensity distributions but identical OAM. The superposition of a set of identical Bessel beams centered on an arbitrary-radius circle is shown to be equivalent to an individual constituent Bessel beam put in the circle center. As a result of a complex shift of the Bessel beam, the transverse intensity distribution and OAM of the beam are also shown to change. We show that, in the superposition of two or more complex-shifted Bessel beams, the OAM may remain unchanged, while the intensity distribution is changed. Numerical simulation is in good agreement with theory.

  9. Cosmic microwave background acoustic peak locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Z.; Knox, L.; Mulroe, B.; Narimani, A.

    2016-07-01

    The Planck collaboration has measured the temperature and polarization of the cosmic microwave background well enough to determine the locations of eight peaks in the temperature (TT) power spectrum, five peaks in the polarization (EE) power spectrum and 12 extrema in the cross (TE) power spectrum. The relative locations of these extrema give a striking, and beautiful, demonstration of what we expect from acoustic oscillations in the plasma; e.g. that EE peaks fall half way between TT peaks. We expect this because the temperature map is predominantly sourced by temperature variations in the last scattering surface, while the polarization map is predominantly sourced by gradients in the velocity field, and the harmonic oscillations have temperature and velocity 90 deg out of phase. However, there are large differences in expectations for extrema locations from simple analytic models versus numerical calculations. Here, we quantitatively explore the origin of these differences in gravitational potential transients, neutrino free-streaming, the breakdown of tight coupling, the shape of the primordial power spectrum, details of the geometric projection from three to two dimensions, and the thickness of the last scattering surface. We also compare the peak locations determined from Planck measurements to expectations under the Λ cold dark matter model. Taking into account how the peak locations were determined, we find them to be in agreement.

  10. Peak Effect in High-Tc Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Xinsheng

    1996-03-01

    Like many low-Tc superconductors, high-quality YBCO single crystals are found(X.S. Ling and J.I. Budnick, in Magnetic Susceptibility of Superconductors and Other Spin Systems), edited by R.A. Hein, T.L. Francavilla, and D.H. Liebenberg (Plenum Press, New York, 1991), p.377. to exhibit a striking peak effect. In a magnetic field, the temperature dependence of the critical current has a pronounced peak below T_c(H). Pippard(A.B. Pippard, Phil. Mag. 19), 217 (1969)., and subsequently Larkin and Ovchinnikov(A.I. Larkin and Yu.N. Ovchinnikov, J. Low Temp. Phys. 34), 409 (1979)., attributed the onset of the peak effect to a softening of the vortex lattice. In this talk, the experimental discovery^1 of the peak effect in high-Tc superconductors will be described, followed by a brief historical perspective of the understanding of this phenomenon and a discussion of a new model(X.S. Ling, C. Tang, S. Bhattacharya, and P.M. Chaikin, cond-mat/9504109, (NEC Preprint 1995).) for the peak effect. In this model, the peak effect is an interesting manifestation of the vortex-lattice melting in the presence of weak random pinning potentials. The rise of critical current with increasing temperature is a signature of the ``melting'' of the Larkin domains. This work is done in collaboration with Joe Budnick, Chao Tang, Shobo Bhattacharya, Paul Chaikin, and Boyd Veal.

  11. Mechanisms Underlying Carotenoid Absorption in Oxygenic Photosynthetic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M.; Galzerano, Denise; Telfer, Alison; Pascal, Andrew A.; Robert, Bruno; Ilioaia, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    The electronic properties of carotenoid molecules underlie their multiple functions throughout biology, and tuning of these properties by their in vivo locus is of vital importance in a number of cases. This is exemplified by photosynthetic carotenoids, which perform both light-harvesting and photoprotective roles essential to the photosynthetic process. However, despite a large number of scientific studies performed in this field, the mechanism(s) used to modulate the electronic properties of carotenoids remain elusive. We have chosen two specific cases, the two β-carotene molecules in photosystem II reaction centers and the two luteins in the major photosystem II light-harvesting complex, to investigate how such a tuning of their electronic structure may occur. Indeed, in each case, identical molecular species in the same protein are seen to exhibit different electronic properties (most notably, shifted absorption peaks). We assess which molecular parameters are responsible for this in vivo tuning process and attempt to assign it to specific molecular events imposed by their binding pockets. PMID:23720734

  12. Mechanisms underlying carotenoid absorption in oxygenic photosynthetic proteins.

    PubMed

    Mendes-Pinto, Maria M; Galzerano, Denise; Telfer, Alison; Pascal, Andrew A; Robert, Bruno; Ilioaia, Cristian

    2013-06-28

    The electronic properties of carotenoid molecules underlie their multiple functions throughout biology, and tuning of these properties by their in vivo locus is of vital importance in a number of cases. This is exemplified by photosynthetic carotenoids, which perform both light-harvesting and photoprotective roles essential to the photosynthetic process. However, despite a large number of scientific studies performed in this field, the mechanism(s) used to modulate the electronic properties of carotenoids remain elusive. We have chosen two specific cases, the two β-carotene molecules in photosystem II reaction centers and the two luteins in the major photosystem II light-harvesting complex, to investigate how such a tuning of their electronic structure may occur. Indeed, in each case, identical molecular species in the same protein are seen to exhibit different electronic properties (most notably, shifted absorption peaks). We assess which molecular parameters are responsible for this in vivo tuning process and attempt to assign it to specific molecular events imposed by their binding pockets. PMID:23720734

  13. Changes in acoustic emission peaks in precipitation strengthened alloys with heat treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Carpenter, S.H.

    1983-01-01

    Acoustic emission was measured during tensile deformation in a number of precipitation-strengthened alloys as a function of prior heat treatment. The alloys tested included 7075, 6061, and 2219 aluminum; a modified A-286 stainless steel (JBK-75) and an experimental beryllium-containing stainless steel; and Incoloy 903. A rms voltage peak was observed in all the alloys near the onset of plastic flow, and a second peak was usually observed in 7075, 2219, and Incoloy 903 at plastic strains greater than 1%. Some evidence of a second peak was also observed in 6061 aluminum. Changes with heat treatment in the stress and strain at which the second peak occurred were consistent with the peak arising from the fracture of inclusions. The shifts in the location of the peak were in a direction so as to make the stress on the inclusions at the second peak relatively insensitive to prior heat treatment. The amplitude distributions of acoustic emission signals were also consistent with this interpretation. The strain at which the first acoustic emission peak occurred also varied with heat treatment, but the dependence of peak location on prior aging was different for the various alloys.

  14. Origin of the first sharp diffraction peak in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crupi, Cristina; Carini, Giuseppe; González, Miguel; D'Angelo, Giovanna

    2015-10-01

    Although glasses have been largely used for a wide variety of technological applications, much of their underlying structure and dynamical properties remain puzzling. We present a detailed investigation of the intermediate-range structure of a series of alkaline borate glasses carried out by performing neutron diffraction measurements. We propose that the first sharp diffraction peak of glasses arises from the periodicity of the boundaries of voids in a random network and explain its compositional and pressure dependence. In this framework, the planar section of a void is an n -membered ring of all-side vertex sharing basic structural units. Furthermore, we suggest that thermally activated relaxations responsible for the ultrasonic absorption in borate glasses stem from transverse motions of atoms bridging structural units confining voids.

  15. Exciton-Like Behavior in Low-Energy Absorption Spectra of Simple Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakshi, Mira Hemendraray

    The valence excitation (ns('2) (--->) nsnp) spectra of Mg, Zn, and Ca impurities at various concentrations in Li have been measured. Polarization modulation ellipsometry was used to determine the impurity-induced changes in real and imaginary parts of the dielectric function simultaneously, together with the differential reflectivity, in the energy range 1.5 - 4.5 eV. The most important result at sufficiently dilute alloy compositions, is that the system investigated display a distinct absorption peak above the Drude background. The height of this peak varies linearly with impurity content. The impurity-specific character of these spectral features points to exciton-like behavior at low-energy, arising from atomic-like excitations in which the electron and the hole linger together at the impurity site. Existing theories of alloy spectra do not explain these effects, because they do not include the Coulomb correlations between the interacting quasiparticles created in the optical event, or the way in which the interacting pair is confined to the impurity site by the mutual field. A remarkable added result of this research is that the exciton-like behavior can be followed with increasing impurity content, all the way to the pure Mg response, when it becomes the interband transition. This has led Kunz and Flynn to reformulate the theory of optical absorption including excited state interactions; and to apply the theory to the spectrum of pure Mg. The Coulomb interaction causes striking effects which are in generally good agreement with experiment. Zn-Li alloys behave differently. At an alloy composition for which Zn-Zn interactions become prevalent, the local, impurity-specific character of the spectrum disappears, leaving only a featureless Drude-like absorption. These results have provoked cluster calculations by Boisvert and Kunz, which predict the spectral shifts, and exhibit qualitatively similar persistence for Mg-Li, and broadening for Zn-Li.

  16. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  17. Shifting epidemiology of Flaviviridae.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lyle R; Marfin, Anthony A

    2005-04-01

    The dengue, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever viruses are important mosquito-borne viruses whose epidemiology is shifting in response to changing societal factors, such as increasing commerce, urbanization of rural areas, and population growth. All four viruses are expanding geographically, as exemplified by the emergence of West Nile virus in the Americas and Japanese encephalitis virus in Australasia. The large, recent global outbreaks of severe neurological disease caused by West Nile virus, the increasing frequency of dengue hemorrhagic fever outbreaks in the Americas, and the emergence of yellow fever virus vaccination-associated viscerotropic disease, are new clinical epidemiologic trends. These worrisome epidemiologic trends will probably continue in coming decades, as a reversal of their societal and biological drivers is not in sight. Nevertheless, the substantial reductions in Japanese encephalitis virus incidence resulting from vaccination programs and economic development in some Asian countries provide some encouragement within this overall guarded outlook. PMID:16225801

  18. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  19. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1999-08-03

    An interferometer is disclosed which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 11 figs.

  20. Phase shifting interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. Whereas current interferometers illuminate the optic to be tested with an aberrated wavefront which also limits the accuracy of the measurement, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical measurement wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  1. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  2. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-01

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader π* and σ* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) — (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the π* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the "pre-peak", in the subtracted spectra and the π*/σ* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore, it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the π*/σ* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.

  3. Nasal peak inspiratory flow at altitude.

    PubMed

    Barry, P W; Mason, N P; Richalet, J P

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated whether there are changes in nasal peak inspiratory flow (NPIF) during hypobaric hypoxia under controlled environmental conditions. During operation Everest III (COMEX '97), eight subjects ascended to a simulated altitude of 8,848 m in a hypobaric chamber. NPIF was recorded at simulated altitudes of 0 m, 5,000 m and 8,000 m. Oral peak inspiratory and expiratory flow (OPIF, OPEF) were also measured. Ambient air temperature and humidity were controlled. NPIF increased by a mean +/- SD of 16 +/- 12% from sea level to 8,000 m, whereas OPIF increased by 47 +/- 14%. NPIF rose by 0.085 +/- 0.03 L x s(-1) per kilometre of ascent (p<0.05), significantly less than the rise in OPIF and OPEF of 0.35 +/- 0.10 and 0.33 +/- 0.04 L x s(-1) per kilometre (p<0.0005). Nasal peak inspiratory flow rises with ascent to altitude. The rise in nasal peak inspiratory flow with altitude was far less than oral peak inspiratory flow and less than the predicted rise according to changes in air density. This suggests flow limitation at the nose, and occurs under controlled environmental conditions, refuting the hypothesis that nasal blockage at altitude is due to the inhalation of cold, dry air. Further work is needed to determine if nasal blockage limits activity at altitude. PMID:11843316

  4. In-vivo absorption properties of algal pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidigare, Robert R.; Ondrusek, Michael E.; Morrow, John H.; Kiefer, Dale A.

    1990-09-01

    Estimates of the in vivo specific absorption coefficients (m2 mg'; 400-750 nm, 2 nm intervals) for the major algal pigment groups (chlorophylls, carotenoids and phycobilins) are presented. "Unpackaged" absorption coefficients were initially obtained by measuring the absorption properties of pure pigment standards spectrophotometrically and "shifting" their absorption maxima to match in vivo positions. Two approaches for estimating the phytoplankton absorption coefficient (spectral reconstruction and spectral decomposition) are compared by linear regression analysis, incorporating concurrent measurements of particulate absorption and pigmentation performed in the Sargasso Sea. Results suggest that "pigment package" effects are minimal for natural assemblages of open-oceanic phytoplankton and that accessory pigments do not always co-vary with chlorophyll a over depth and time.

  5. Absorption and emission in defective cholesteric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Harutyunyan, M. Z.; Matinyan, G. K.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Rostovtsev, Yu V.; Kurizki, G.; Scully, M. O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated peculiarities of absorption, emission and photonic density of states of a cholesteric liquid crystal with an isotropic defect layer inside. The influence of the defect layer position on absorption and emission in the system was studied. It was shown that for non-diffracting circularly polarized incident light absorption/emission is maximum if the defect is in the centre of the system; and for diffracting circularly polarized incident light absorption/emission is maximum if the defect is shifted from the centre of the system to its left border from where light is incident. We also investigated influence of the defect layer thickness and those parameters which characterize loss and gain on absorption and emission. The influence of anisotropic absorption in the cholesteric liquid crystal layer on photonic density states was investigated, too.

  6. Chromatographic peak alignment using derivative dynamic time warping.

    PubMed

    Bork, Christopher; Ng, Kenneth; Liu, Yinhan; Yee, Alex; Pohlscheidt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chromatogram overlays are frequently used to monitor inter-batch performance of bioprocess purification steps. However, the objective analysis of chromatograms is difficult due to peak shifts caused by variable phase durations or unexpected process holds. Furthermore, synchronization of batch process data may also be required prior to performing multivariate analysis techniques. Dynamic time warping was originally developed as a method for spoken word recognition, but shows potential in the objective analysis of time variant signals, such as manufacturing data. In this work we will discuss the application of dynamic time warping with a derivative weighting function to align chromatograms to facilitate process monitoring and fault detection. In addition, we will demonstrate the utility of this method as a preprocessing step for multivariate model development. PMID:23292764

  7. Nitrogen K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of purine-containing nucleotides in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Hiroyuki; Fukao, Taishi; Minami, Hirotake; Ukai, Masatoshi; Fujii, Kentaro; Yokoya, Akinari; Fukuda, Yoshihiro; Saitoh, Yuji

    2014-08-01

    The N K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the purine-containing nucleotide, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP), in aqueous solution are measured under various pH conditions. The spectra show characteristic peaks, which originate from resonant excitations of N 1s electrons to π* orbitals inside the guanine moiety of GMP. The relative intensities of these peaks depend on the pH values of the solution. The pH dependence is explained by the core-level shift of N atoms at specific sites caused by protonation and deprotonation. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical spectra calculated by using density functional theory for GMP and the other purine-containing nucleotides, adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and adenosine 5'-triphosphate. The N K-edge XANES spectra for all of these nucleotides are classified by the numbers of N atoms with particular chemical bonding characteristics in the purine moiety.

  8. SPANISH PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation and a survey of mines and prospects were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas Counties, in south-central Colorado. Anomalous gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in rocks and in stream sediments from drainage basins in the vicinity of the old mines and prospects on West Spanish Peak indicate a substantiated mineral-resource potential for base and precious metals in the area surrounding this peak; however, the mineralized veins are sparse, small in size, and generally low in grade. There is a possibility that coal may underlie the study area, but it would be at great depth and it is unlikely that it would have survived the intense igneous activity in the area. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil and gas because of the lack of structural traps and the igneous activity.

  9. The PEAK experience in South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    The PEAK Institute was developed to provide a linkage for formal (schoolteachers) and nonformal educators (extension agents) with agricultural scientists of Clemson University`s South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station System. The goal of the Institute was to enable teams of educators and researchers to develop and provide PEAK science and math learning experiences related to relevant agricultural and environmental issues of local communities for both classroom and 4-H Club experiences. The Peak Institute was conducted through a twenty day residential Institute held in June for middle school and high school teachers who were teamed with an Extension agent from their community. These educators participated in hands-on, minds-on sessions conducted by agricultural researchers and Clemson University Cooperative Extension specialists. Participants were given the opportunity to see frontier science being conducted by scientists from a variety of agricultural laboratories.

  10. Hydraulically actuated well shifting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.A.

    1992-10-20

    This patent describes a hydraulically actuated shifting tool for actuating a sliding member in a well tool. It comprises: a housing having a hydraulic fluid bore therein; shifting dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the housing; locking dog means positioned on the housing for movement away and toward the body; shifting dog hydraulic actuating means in fluid communication with the bore for causing engagement of the shifting dogs with the sliding member; locking dog hydraulic actuating means in communication with the bore for causing engagement of the locking dogs with the locking means; and hydraulic shifting means in communication with the bore for causing relative movement between the shifting dog means and the locking dog means for shifting the sliding sleeve.

  11. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kort-Kamp, Wilton; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego

    We show that the magneto-optical response of a graphene-on-substrate system in the presence of an external magnetic field strongly affects light beam shifts. In the quantum Hall regime, we predict quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hänchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts. The Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are given in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hänchen ones in discrete multiples of α2. Due to time-reversal symmetry breaking the IF shifts change sign when the direction of the applied magnetic field is reversed, while the other shifts remain unchanged. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field. We acknowledge the LANL LDRD program for financial support.

  12. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  13. Paleomagnetism of the Becker Peak stock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. A.; Housen, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of plutonic rocks, although subject to uncertainty due to lack of paleohorizontal control, can provide important constrains of patterns of regional deformation, and can play a role in evaluation of tectonic models and reconstructions. Many plutonic rocks of the Cascades have been well-studied via paleomagnetism, but there are many that lack robust data sets. One such pluton, the Beckler Peak stock, is a late Cretaceous tonalitic stock, with biotite and amphibole K-Ar ages of 93 to 82 Ma (Engels and Crowder, 1971, Yeats and Engels, 1971). The Beckler Peak stock is considered to be a companion body to the larger Mt. Stuart Batholith, but is separated from the Mt. Stuart Batholith by the Evergreen Fault. For this study five paleomagnetic sites were sampled from the Beckler Peak stock near Skykomish, Washington. After low temperature and thermal demagnetization site means were calculated for the four sites where at least two samples survived demagnetization. Unblocking temperatures were indicative of magnetite and hematite as the carriers of remanence. Two of the site means were disregarded due to anomalous directions likely due to sites being from very large slump blocks. The two acceptable site means, along with a Beckler Peak stock site mean from Beck and Noson (1972) and another from Housen et al. (2003) give a stock-wide mean of D = 3.8°, I = 41.9°, k = 32.9, and α95 = 16.2°. This direction is consistent with mean directions for the Mount Stuart batholith determined by Beck and Noson (1972), Beck et al. (1981), and Housen et al. (2003). This directional consistency supports an association between the Beckler Peak stock and the Mt. Stuart Batholith, or at least that these two plutonic bodies were emplaced in the same structural block, and that any post-magnetization deformation (such as rotation and/or tilt associated with the Evergreen Fault) between the Beckler Peak stock and the Mt. Stuart Batholith was minor.

  14. MOSES AND DENNISON PEAK ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Lipton, David A.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was conducted in the Moses and Dennison Peak Roadless Areas, southeastern Sierra Nevada, California. One area within the Moses Roadless Area is classified as having substantiated mineral-resource potential for small base-metal skarn deposits. Additionally, geochemical data indicate probable potential for small base-metal skarn deposits from one locality within Dennison Peak Roadless Area and for small tungsten skarn deposits from a region within Moses Roadless Area. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  15. Understanding the Role of Controls on the Timing of Daily Streamflow Peak and its Seasonal Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Kumar, M.; Wang, R.; Winstral, A. H.; Marks, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and prediction of snowmelt generated streamflow at sub-daily time scales is important for reservoir scheduling and climate change characterization. This is particularly important in the Western U.S. where over 50 - 70% of water supply is provided by snowmelt during the melting period. Previous studies reported that daily peak flow timing might shift earlier in some basins, but later in others during the melt season. This shift of peak flow timing was attributed to three crucial processes: translation time of liquid water flux through snowpack, translation time from the base of snowpacks to river channels, and translation time in the river channels to stream gage stations. Here we evaluate our ability to simulate the sub-daily streamflow peak time and quantitatively explore the relative contribution from each individual factor. Our analysis shows that the timing of the daily peak is dominantly controlled by melt translation time from the bottom of snowpack to the river channel, while the seasonal variation in daily peak is influenced the most by translation time through the snow pack. An additional factor, the increasing trend of temperature and radiation in melt season, is also contributing to the timing of peak streamflow and its variations.

  16. Dispersive Extinction Theory of Cosmic Red Shift -- An Alternative to the Big Bang Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling Jun

    2006-04-01

    A dispersive extinction theory is presented to explain the cosmic red shift and the 2.7 K background radiation as an alternative to the currently prevailing Doppler shift theory and the Big Bang Theory. According to this theory, the cosmic red shift and the 2.7 K background radiation are due to the dispersive scattering and absorption of star light by the space medium. An estimate of the non-linear absorption constant is given by comparing the result to the Hubble constant derived from the observational data. An experimental method is designed to test the validity of the dispersive extinction theory as opposed to the Doppler shift theory. Keywords: red shift, Doppler shift, Big Bang Theory, dispersive extinction theory.

  17. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  18. Design of separately tunable terahertz two-peak absorber based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Longhui; Hu, Fangrong; Xu, Xinlong; Wang, Yue'e.; Guo, Enze

    2016-06-01

    A separately tunable terahertz (THz) two-peak absorber based on graphene is presented. From bottom to top, the absorber contains four layers, i.e., gold reflector, graphene patch array, polyimide and metal split-ring resonator (SRR) array layer. The controlling voltage is applied between the reflector and two separated surface electrodes to tune the Fermi level of graphene. As a result, these two absorption peaks can be separately tuned by the controlling voltages. The finite integral technique (FIT) is used to study the absorption theory and modulation mechanism. The simulation results show that the absorption of low-frequency and that of high-frequency are 95.5% and 90.0%, respectively. And the maximum modulation depths of them are about 49% and 71%, respectively. Moreover, the absorber is insensitive to polarization and still has good absorption at large angle. The separately tunable THz two-peak absorber offers a new way for the development of frequency selective detectors working in the range of microwave, THz and infrared.

  19. Relationships between peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, and modified mercalli intensity in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Heaton, T.H.; Kanamori, H.

    1999-01-01

    We have developed regression relationships between Modified Mercalli Intensity (Imm) and peak ground acceleration (PGA) and velocity (PGV) by comparing horizontal peak ground motions to observed intensities for eight significant California earthquakes. For the limited range of Modified Mercalli intensities (Imm), we find that for peak acceleration with V ??? Imm ??? VIII, Imm = 3.66 log(PGA) - 1.66, and for peak velocity with V ??? Imm ??? IX, Imm = 3.47 log(PGV) + 2.35. From comparison with observed intensity maps, we find that a combined regression based on peak velocity for intensity > VII and on peak acceleration for intensity < VII is most suitable for reproducing observed Imm patterns, consistent with high intensities being related to damage (proportional to ground velocity) and with lower intensities determined by felt accounts (most sensitive to higher-frequency ground acceleration). These new Imm relationships are significantly different from the Trifunac and Brady (1975) correlations, which have been used extensively in loss estimation.

  20. Switching from "absorption within transparency" to "transparency within transparency" in an electromagnetically induced absorption dominated transition.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Katrin; Molella, Luca Spani; Rinkleff, Rolf-Hermann; Danzmann, Karsten

    2008-05-01

    The absorption of a resonant coupling laser driving a closed degenerate two-level system in an atomic cesium beam was investigated as a function of the detuning of a second laser probing the same transition. The measurements were performed for four different polarization combinations of the two laser beams. Except for the beams of counterrotating polarizations all coupling-laser absorption profiles showed "absorption within transparency," i.e., the absorption in the region around the two-photon resonance was smaller than the absorption corresponding to the one-photon transition induced by the coupling laser, and an extra absorption peak was observed on this curve at the two-photon resonance. With regard to the beams of counterrotating polarizations we observed a switch from absorption within transparency to "transparency within transparency" when the probe-laser power exceeded the constant coupling-laser power. In other words, the cesium ensemble became mostly transparent to the coupling-laser beam at the two-photon resonance. PMID:18451960

  1. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers

  2. Antiretroviral therapy: Shifting sands.

    PubMed

    Sashindran, V K; Chauhan, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    HIV/AIDS has been an extremely difficult pandemic to control. However, with the advent of antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV has now been transformed into a chronic illness in patients who have continued treatment access and excellent long-term adherence. Existing indications for ART initiation in asymptomatic patients were based on CD4 levels; however, recent evidence has broken the shackles of CD4 levels. Early initiation of ART in HIV patients irrespective of CD4 counts can have profound positive impact on morbidity and mortality. Early initiation of ART has been found not only beneficial for patients but also to community as it reduces the risk of transmission. There have been few financial concerns about providing ART to all HIV-positive people but various studies have proven that early initiation of ART not only proves to be cost-effective but also contributes to economic and social growth of community. A novel multidisciplinary approach with early initiation and availability of ART at its heart can turn the tide in our favor in future. Effective preexposure prophylaxis and postexposure prophylaxis can also lower transmission risk of HIV in community. New understanding of HIV pathogenesis is opening new vistas to cure and prevention. Various promising candidate vaccines and drugs are undergoing aggressive clinical trials, raising optimism for an ever-elusive cure for HIV. This review describes various facets of tectonic shift in management of HIV. PMID:26900224

  3. Correlated peak relative light intensity and peak current in triggered lightning subsequent return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between peak relative light intensity L(R) and stroke peak current I(R) is examined for 39 subsequent return strokes in two triggered lightning flashes. One flash contained 19 strokes and the other 20 strokes for which direct measurements were available of the return stroke peak current at ground. Peak currents ranged from 1.6 to 21 kA. The measurements of peak relative light intensity were obtained from photographic streak recordings using calibrated film and microsecond resolution. Correlations, significant at better than the 0.1 percent level, were found for several functional relationships. Although a relation between L(R) and I(R) is evident in these data, none of the analytical relations considered is clearly favored. The correlation between L(R) and the maximum rate of current rise is also examined, but less correlation than between L(R) and I(R) is found. In addition, the peak relative intensity near ground is evaluated for 22 dart leaders, and a mean ratio of peak dart leader to peak return stroke relative light intensity was found to be 0.1 with a range of 0.02-0.23. Using two different methods, the peak current near ground in these dart leaders is estimated to range from 0.1 to 6 kA.

  4. Occurrence and behavior of system peaks in RP HPLC with solely aqueous mobile phases.

    PubMed

    Kalíková, Kveta; Hruska, Vlastimil; Svobodová, Jana; Chudoba, Richard; Gas, Bohuslav; Tesarová, Eva

    2009-09-01

    System peaks are important but often also disturbing phenomena occurring in separation systems. Behavior of system peaks was studied in reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP HPLC) systems consisting of an RP Amide C16 column and aqueous solutions of organic acids with alkaline metal hydroxides as mobile phases. Binary mobile phases, composed of benzoic acid and lithium hydroxide (LiOH) or cesium hydroxide (CsOH), yielded two system peaks. The first peak was stationary and the second one moved with dilution of the mobile phase or with changes of the alkaline metal hydroxide concentration. The latter changes affected dissociation of the benzoic acid present in the mobile phase and thereby its retention. The presumption that the first system peak is not influenced by the type of alkaline metal cation and that it is related to the non-adsorbed component of the mobile phase was confirmed by a cyclic procedure. Three-component mobile phases composed of benzoic acid, tropic acid, and a hydroxide gave rise to three system peaks as expected. The first peak was again stationary and the two others shifted depending on the concentration variation of both acids. Resonance causing a zigzag peak, well described in capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), was observed if 1-pentanol was injected into a chromatographic system with one-component mobile phase. PMID:19639550

  5. Toward absorption contrast imaging of biological tissues in vivo by using photothermal optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2014-03-01

    Optical coherence tomography has been proven in the last two decades its clinical value by providing 3D non-invasive in vivo biopsy of the biological samples. In addition to structural information given by the backscattered intensity, the optical absorption will also provide another powerful contrast. Optical absorbers in biological tissues exhibits important role such as hemoglobin and melanin. However, current methods of absorption contrast take long time and not suitable for in vivo imaging. Toward in vivo absorption contrast imaging, we developed photothermal OCT system by combining swept-source OCT system and excitation laser. A swept-source OCT system is used with a wavelength swept laser at 1310 nm with a scanning rate and range of 47 kHz and of 100 nm, respectively. Photocurrents from balanced photoreceivers are sampled by a high-speed digitizer by using k-clock from the source to sample optical spectrum in k-linear domain. The sensitivity of 107 dB for two polarization channels is achieved. At the sample arm, the OCT probe beam and an excitation laser are combined by a dielectric mirror. The fiber-coupled laser diode of 406 nm wavelength is used for excitation since the absorption of hemoglobin has peak around this wavelength. In order to evaluate the ability of this system, phase stability of the system was measured. The standard deviation of the phase shift is measured as 0.0028 radians, where the signal-to-noise-limited value is approximately 0.001. Several issues for in vivo case, motion, blood flow, thermal damage, and etc. will be addressed here.

  6. Silicon waveguide polarization rotation Bragg grating with phase shift section and sampled grating scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okayama, Hideaki; Onawa, Yosuke; Shimura, Daisuke; Yaegashi, Hiroki; Sasaki, Hironori

    2016-08-01

    We describe a Bragg grating with a phase shift section and a sampled grating scheme that converts input polarization to orthogonal polarization. A very narrow polarization-independent wavelength peak can be generated by phase shift structures and polarization-independent multiple diffraction peaks by sampled gratings. The characteristics of the device were examined by transfer matrix and finite-difference time-domain methods.

  7. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Short, David

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in predicting peak winds at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron requested the AMU develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network , Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations, and CCAFS sounding s from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created mul tiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence , the temperature inversion depth and strength, wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft.

  8. Six Ways To Foster Peak Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevilla, Christine; Wells, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses six initiatives that organizations can support to ensure peak performance: individual knowledge portfolios; mentoring and apprenticeship relationships; electronic conferencing systems; organizational knowledge repository; community of practice; reward and recognition. Defines each initiative and describes how to make each one work in an…

  9. Avoiding the False Peaks in Correlation Discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S

    2009-07-31

    Fiducials imprinted on laser beams are used to perform video image based alignment of the 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In many video images, matched filtering is used to detect the location of these fiducials. Generally, the highest correlation peak is used to determine the position of the fiducials. However, when the signal to-be-detected is very weak compared to the noise, this approach totally breaks down. The highest peaks act as traps for false detection. The active target images used for automatic alignment in the National Ignition Facility are examples of such images. In these images, the fiducials of interest exhibit extremely low intensity and contrast, surrounded by high intensity reflection from metallic objects. Consequently, the highest correlation peaks are caused by these bright objects. In this work, we show how the shape of the correlation is exploited to isolate the valid matches from hundreds of invalid correlation peaks, and therefore identify extremely faint fiducials under very challenging imaging conditions.

  10. Hubbert's Peak: the Impending World oil Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffeyes, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Global oil production will probably reach a peak sometime during this decade. After the peak, the world's production of crude oil will fall, never to rise again. The world will not run out of energy, but developing alternative energy sources on a large scale will take at least 10 years. The slowdown in oil production may already be beginning; the current price fluctuations for crude oil and natural gas may be the preamble to a major crisis. In 1956, the geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s.1 Almost everyone, inside and outside the oil industry, rejected Hubbert's analysis. The controversy raged until 1970, when the U.S. production of crude oil started to fall. Hubbert was right. Around 1995, several analysts began applying Hubbert's method to world oil production, and most of them estimate that the peak year for world oil will be between 2004 and 2008. These analyses were reported in some of the most widely circulated sources: Nature, Science, and Scientific American.2 None of our political leaders seem to be paying attention. If the predictions are correct, there will be enormous effects on the world economy. Even the poorest nations need fuel to run irrigation pumps. The industrialized nations will be bidding against one another for the dwindling oil supply. The good news is that we will put less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The bad news is that my pickup truck has a 25-gallon tank.

  11. Peak structural response to nonstationary random excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinozuka, M.; Yang, J.-N.

    1971-01-01

    Study establishes distribution function of peak response values, based on frequency interpretation. Excitations considered include impact loading on landing gears and aircraft gust loading. Because of relative severity of excitations, prediction of fatigue and maximum response characteristics is important part of task of structural analysis and design.

  12. Double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Fei; Zhang, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Wenbin; Chen, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports double-peak subauroral ion drifts (DSAIDs), which is unique subset of subauroral ion drifts (SAIDs). A statistical analysis has been carried out for the first time with a database of 454 DSAID events identified from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program observations from 1987 to 2012. Both case studies and statistical analyses show that the two velocity peaks of DSAIDs are associated with two ion temperature peaks and two region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) peaks in the midlatitude ionospheric trough located in the low-conductance subauroral region. DSAIDs are regional and vary significantly with magnetic local time. DSAIDs can evolve from/to SAIDs during their lifetimes, which are from several minutes to tens of minutes. Comparisons between the ionospheric parameters of DSAIDs and SAIDs indicate that double-layer region-2 field-aligned currents (R2-FACs) may be the main driver of DSAIDs. It is also found that DSAIDs happen during more disturbed conditions compared with SAIDs.

  13. Peak power scaling of thulium-doped ultrafast fiber laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, Martin; Gaida, Christian; Stutzki, Fabian; Jauregui, Cesar; Limpert, Jens; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    We investigate challenges for scaling the output peak power of thulium-doped fiber chirped-pulse amplification systems (FCPA) to and beyond the GW-level. A major limitation for reaching high peak powers in the 2 μm regime is the presence of strong water vapor absorption features that cause detrimental propagation effects in the spatial and the temporal domain. Based on the investigation and understanding of these effects mitigation strategies have been developed, that have been one of the keys to demonstrate a new record pulse peak power of more than 200 MW from a thulium-based ultrafast fiber laser. Future experiments can ultimately lead to a further increase of pulse peak power way beyond the GW-level.

  14. Spanish Peaks, Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Spanish Peaks, on the eastern flank of the Sangre de Cristo range, abruptly rise 7,000 feet above the western Great Plains. Settlers, treasure hunters, trappers, gold and silver miners have long sighted on these prominent landmarks along the Taos branch of the Santa Fe trail. Well before the westward migration, the mountains figured in the legends and history of the Ute, Apache, Comanche, and earlier tribes. 'Las Cumbres Espanolas' are also mentioned in chronicles of exploration by Spaniards including Ulibarri in 1706 and later by de Anza, who eventually founded San Francisco (California). This exceptional view (STS108-720-32), captured by the crew of Space Shuttle mission STS108, portrays the Spanish Peaks in the context of the southern Rocky Mountains. Uplift of the Sangre de Cristo began about 75 million years ago and produced the long north-trending ridges of faulted and folded rock to the west of the paired peaks. After uplift had ceased (26 to 22 million years ago), the large masses of igneous rock (granite, granodiorite, syenodiorite) that form the Peaks were emplaced (Penn, 1995-2001). East and West Spanish Peaks are 'stocks'-bodies of molten rock that intruded sedimentary layers, cooled and solidified, and were later exposed by erosion. East Peak (E), at 12,708 ft is almost circular and is about 5 1/2 miles long by 3 miles wide, while West Peak (W), at 13,623 ft is roughly 2 3/4 miles long by 1 3/4 miles wide. Great dikes-long stone walls-radiate outward from the mountains like spokes of a wheel, a prominent one forms a broad arc northeast of East Spanish Peak. As the molten rock rose, it forced its way into vertical cracks and joints in the sedimentary strata; the less resistant material was then eroded away, leaving walls of hard rock from 1 foot to 100 feet wide, up to 100 feet high, and as long as 14 miles. Dikes trending almost east-west are also common in the region. For more information visit: Sangres.com: The Spanish Peaks (accessed January 16

  15. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  16. The spatial resolution of epidemic peaks.

    PubMed

    Mills, Harriet L; Riley, Steven

    2014-04-01

    The emergence of novel respiratory pathogens can challenge the capacity of key health care resources, such as intensive care units, that are constrained to serve only specific geographical populations. An ability to predict the magnitude and timing of peak incidence at the scale of a single large population would help to accurately assess the value of interventions designed to reduce that peak. However, current disease-dynamic theory does not provide a clear understanding of the relationship between: epidemic trajectories at the scale of interest (e.g. city); population mobility; and higher resolution spatial effects (e.g. transmission within small neighbourhoods). Here, we used a spatially-explicit stochastic meta-population model of arbitrary spatial resolution to determine the effect of resolution on model-derived epidemic trajectories. We simulated an influenza-like pathogen spreading across theoretical and actual population densities and varied our assumptions about mobility using Latin-Hypercube sampling. Even though, by design, cumulative attack rates were the same for all resolutions and mobilities, peak incidences were different. Clear thresholds existed for all tested populations, such that models with resolutions lower than the threshold substantially overestimated population-wide peak incidence. The effect of resolution was most important in populations which were of lower density and lower mobility. With the expectation of accurate spatial incidence datasets in the near future, our objective was to provide a framework for how to use these data correctly in a spatial meta-population model. Our results suggest that there is a fundamental spatial resolution for any pathogen-population pair. If underlying interactions between pathogens and spatially heterogeneous populations are represented at this resolution or higher, accurate predictions of peak incidence for city-scale epidemics are feasible. PMID:24722420

  17. Study of gain and photoresponse characteristics for back-illuminated separate absorption and multiplication GaN avalanche photodiodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaodong; Pan, Ming; Hou, Liwei; Xie, Wei; Hu, Weida Xu, Jintong; Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Xiaoshuang Lu, Wei

    2014-01-07

    The gain and photoresponse characteristics have been numerically studied for back-illuminated separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) GaN avalanche photodiodes (APDs). The parameters of fundamental models are calibrated by simultaneously comparing the simulated dark and light current characteristics with the experimental results. Effects of environmental temperatures and device dimensions on gain characteristics have been investigated, and a method to achieve the optimum thickness of charge layer is obtained. The dependence of gain characteristics and breakdown voltage on the doping concentration of the charge layer is also studied in detail to get the optimal charge layer. The bias-dependent spectral responsivity and quantum efficiency are then presented to study the photoresponse mechanisms inside SAM GaN APDs. It is found the responsivity peak red-shifts at first due to the Franz-Keldysh effect and then blue-shifts due to the reach-through effect of the absorption layer. Finally, a new SAM GaN/AlGaN heterojunction APD structure is proposed for optimizing SAM GaN APDs.

  18. Theoretical analysis of the absorption spectra of organic dyes differing by the conjugation sequence: illusion of negative solvatochromism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzhos, Sergei; Segawa, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2012-06-01

    Absorption peak maxima of two organic dyes differing by the position of the methine unit differ by 61 nm in dioxane and 128 nm in acetonnitrile. The difference is not reproduced by TDDFT using ab initio or hybrid functionals. TDDFT errors are different between the molecules due to a different albeit small extent of charge transfer, leading to a qualitative failure of TDDFT to predict relative energetics of the dyes. The TDDFT errors in non-polar solvents (such as dioxane) could be corrected based on the approach of Peach et al. (J. Chem. Phy. 128, 044118 (2008)). Here, we focus on the effect on the absorption spectrum of a polar solvent, specifically of the different between the two molecules sign of the solvatochromic shift vs. dioxane. Using the corrrection due to Peach et al, the absolute TDDFT errors can be brought within accetable ranges of 0.2-0.3 eV with the PCM solvent model, and the blue shift vs.dioxane is reporoduced, although both dyes are predicted to exhibit positive solvatochromism. The inclusion of explicit solvent molecules forming hydrogen bonds with the dye did not appreciably change neither TDDFT energies nor the correction term. These results show the importance of a more careful assessment of computational errors in the strategy of computationaly dye design by changing the conjugation order, where they are expected to be more important than in the case of an extension of the size of conjugation, and more so when polar solvents are used.

  19. Tunable absorption in heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metallic film and Fibonacci fractal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Jie; Du, Gui-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the anomalous optical properties of heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metal film and a truncated Fibonacci fractal photonic crystal. It is found that one or multiple highly reflected peaks, even enhanced transmission narrowband, can be realized in the near-complete absorption broadband, where the photonic crystals are selected with various Fibonacci sequences or a given sequence as the basic unit. These properties are significant to design important reflection or transmission optical devices in the visible and near-infrared ranges.

  20. Portable shift register

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Bourret, S.C.; Hansen, W.J.; Hicks, D.V.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Krick, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    An electronics package for a small, battery-operated, self-contained, neutron coincidence counter based on a portable shift-register (PSR) has been developed. The counter was developed for applications not adequately addressed by commercial packages, including in-plant measurements to demonstrate compliance with regulations (domestic and international), in-plant process control, and in-field measurements (environmental monitoring or safeguards). Our package's features, which address these applications, include the following: Small size for portability and ease of installation;battery or mains operation; a built-in battery to power the unit and a typical detector such as a small sample counter, for over 6 h if power lines are bad or noisy, if there is a temporary absence of power, or if portability is desired; complete support, including bias, for standard neutron detectors; a powerful communications package to easily facilitate robust external control over a serial port; and a C-library to simplify creating external control programs in computers or other controllers. Whereas the PSR specifically addresses the applications mentioned above, it also performs all the measurements made by previous electronics packages for neutron coincidence counters developed at Los Alamos and commercialized. The PSR electronics package, exclusive of carrying handle, is 8 by 10 by 20 cm; it contains the circuit boards, battery, and bias supply and weighs less than 2 kg. This instrument package is the second in an emerging family of portable measurement instruments being developed; the first was the Miniature and Modular Multichannel Analyzer (M[sup 3]CA). The PSR makes extensive use of hardware and software developed for the M[sup 3]CA; like the M[sup 3]CA, it is intended primarily for use with an external controller interfaced over a serial channel.

  1. Oxygen-17 NMR Shifts Caused by Cr{Sup ++} in Aqueous Solutions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jackson, J. A.; Lemons, J. F.; Taube, H.

    1962-01-01

    Cr{sup ++} in solution produces a paramagnetic shift in the NMR absorption of O{sup 17} in ClO{sub 4}{sup -}, as well as the expected paramagnetic shift for O{sup 17} in H{sub 2}O. As the concentration of ClO{sub 4}{sup -} increases, the shift in the H{sub 2}O{sup 17} absorption is diminished, and eventually changes sign. The effects are ascribed to preferential replacement by ClO{sub 4}{sup -} of water molecules from the axial positions in the first coordination sphere about Cr{sup ++}.

  2. Photocycles of bacteriorhodopsin in light- and dark-adapted purple membrane studied by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hofrichter, J; Henry, E R; Lozier, R H

    1989-01-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectra have been measured throughout the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin in both light-adapted and dark-adapted purple membrane (PM). The data from dark-adapted samples are interpretable as the superposition of two photocycles arising independently from the all-trans and 13-cis retinal isomers that coexist in the dark-adapted state. The presence of a photocycle in dark-adapted PM which is indistinguishable from that observed for light-adapted PM under the same experimental conditions is demonstrated by the observation of the same five relaxation rates associated with essentially identical changes in the photoproduct spectra. This cycle is attributed to the all-trans component. The cycle of the 13-cis component is revealed by scaling the data measured for the light-adapted sample and subtracting it from the data on the dark-adapted mixture. At times less than 1 ms, the resulting difference spectra are nearly time-independent. The peak of the difference spectrum is near 600 nm, although there appears to be a slight (approximately 2 nm) blue-shift in the first few microseconds. Subsequently the amplitude of this spectrum decays and the peak of the difference spectrum shifts in two relaxations. Most of the amplitude of the photoproduct difference spectrum (approximately 80%) decays in a single relaxation having a time constant of approximately 35 ms. The difference spectrum remaining after this relaxation peaks at approximately 590 nm and is indistinguishable from the classical light-dark difference spectrum, which we find, in experiments performed on a much longer time scale, to peak at 588 nm. The decay of this remaining photo-product is not resolvable in the nanosecond kinetic experiments, but dark adaptation of a completely light-adapted sample is found to occur exponentially with a relaxation time of approximately 2,000 s under the conditions of our experiments. PMID:2819234

  3. Zero-shifted accelerometer outputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galef, Arnold

    1986-08-01

    It is claimed that the commonly appearing zero-shift in pyroshock data is usually a symptom of a malfunctioning measurement system, so that the data can not be repaired (by high-pass filtering or equivalent) unless tests can be devised that permit the demonstration that the system is operating in a linear mode in all respects other than the shift. The likely cause of the zero-shift and its prevention are discussed.

  4. Instrument Measures Shift In Focus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steimle, Lawrence J.

    1992-01-01

    Optical components tested at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared. Focus-shift-measuring instrument easy to use. Operated in lighted room, without having to make delicate adjustments while peering through microscope. Measures distance along which focal point of converging beam of light shifted by introduction of nominally plane parallel optical component into beam. Intended primarily for measuring focus shifts produced by windows and filters at wavelengths from 120 to 1,100 nanometers. Portable, compact, and relatively inexpensive for degree of precision.

  5. Red-shifted fluorescence of sound dental hard tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-07-01

    Autofluorescence spectra were recorded in vitro from dentin, enamel, and whole teeth. The spectra exhibited a broad peak shifted by about 50 to 75 nm from the excitation wavelength and the shape of the spectra remained similar regardless of the excitation wavelength. The maximum of the autofluorescence spectra also exhibited a red-shift that depended upon the laser excitation wavelength. The amplitude of the red-shifted fluorescence spectra produced by 444 and 532 nm excitation lasers were compared to that produced by a 405 nm excitation laser. It was determined that the autofluorescence amplitude was not proportional to the inverse fourth power of the excitation laser wavelength. Therefore, the red-shifted fluorescence is not compatible with the previously proposed mechanism of Raman scattering. Instead, the mechanism giving rise to the laser-induced dental autofluorescence is explained by the red-edge-excitation effect.

  6. Nonlinear intersubband optical absorption in a semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahn, D.; Chuang, S. L.

    1987-01-01

    The third-order nonlinear intersubband absorption in a semiconductor quantum well is studied theoretically using the density matrix formalism including intrasubband relaxation. It is shown that the peak absorption is reduced by half for an optical intensity 1 MW/sq cm for the well size L = 126.5 A with 3.0 x 10 to the 16th/cu cm electrons.

  7. No effect of food intake on clobazam absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Cenraud, B; Guyot, M; Levy, R H; Brachet-Liermain, A; Morselli, P L; Moreland, T A; Loiseau, P

    1983-01-01

    The kinetics of clobazam taken 3 h before, during, and 3 h after a standard hospital meal were studied in six healthy volunteers. Peak plasma levels were significantly lower when the drug was taken with or after meals suggesting that the rate of absorption was reduced by food. The mean area under the concentration vs time curve was not affected by the time of drug administration indicating that the meal had no effect upon the extent of absorption. PMID:6661360

  8. Quantized beam shifts in graphene

    SciTech Connect

    de Melo Kort-Kamp, Wilton Junior; Sinitsyn, Nikolai; Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto

    2015-10-08

    We predict the existence of quantized Imbert-Fedorov, Goos-Hanchen, and photonic spin Hall shifts for light beams impinging on a graphene-on-substrate system in an external magnetic field. In the quantum Hall regime the Imbert-Fedorov and photonic spin Hall shifts are quantized in integer multiples of the fine structure constant α, while the Goos-Hanchen ones in multiples of α2. We investigate the influence on these shifts of magnetic field, temperature, and material dispersion and dissipation. An experimental demonstration of quantized beam shifts could be achieved at terahertz frequencies for moderate values of the magnetic field.

  9. Doppler-shifted self-reflected wave from a semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuelzgen, Alex; Hughes, S.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1997-06-01

    We report the first experimental observation of a self- reflected wave inside a very dense saturable absorber. An intense femtosecond pulse saturates the absorption and causes a density front moving into the semiconductor sample. Due to the motion of the boundary between saturated and unsaturated areas of the sample the light reflected at this boundary is red-shifted by the Doppler effect. The spectrally shifted reflection makes it possible to distinguish between surface reflection and self-reflection and is used to proof the concept of the dynamic nonlinear skin effect experimentally. Quite well agreement with model calculations is found.

  10. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  11. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  13. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  14. Shifts in fisheries management: adapting to regime shifts

    PubMed Central

    King, Jacquelynne R.; McFarlane, Gordon A.; Punt, André E.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, fisheries management was based on optimizing yield and maintaining a target biomass, with little regard given to low-frequency environmental forcing. However, this policy was often unsuccessful. In the last two to three decades, fisheries science and management have undergone a shift towards balancing sustainable yield with conservation, with the goal of including ecosystem considerations in decision-making frameworks. Scientific understanding of low-frequency climate–ocean variability, which is manifested as ecosystem regime shifts and states, has led to attempts to incorporate these shifts and states into fisheries assessment and management. To date, operationalizing these attempts to provide tactical advice has met with limited success. We review efforts to incorporate regime shifts and states into the assessment and management of fisheries resources, propose directions for future investigation and outline a potential framework to include regime shifts and changes in ecosystem states into fisheries management.

  15. Predicting VO2peak from Submaximal- and Peak Exercise Models: The HUNT 3 Fitness Study, Norway

    PubMed Central

    Loe, Henrik; Nes, Bjarne M.; Wisløff, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) is seldom assessed in health care settings although being inversely linked to cardiovascular risk and all-cause mortality. The aim of this study was to develop VO2peak prediction models for men and women based on directly measured VO2peak from a large healthy population Methods VO2peak prediction models based on submaximal- and peak performance treadmill work were derived from multiple regression analysis. 4637 healthy men and women aged 20–90 years were included. Data splitting was used to generate validation and cross-validation samples. Results The accuracy for the peak performance models were 10.5% (SEE = 4.63 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) and 11.5% (SEE = 4.11 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) for men and women, respectively, with 75% and 72% of the variance explained. For the submaximal performance models accuracy were 14.1% (SEE = 6.24 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) and 14.4% (SEE = 5.17 mL⋅kg-1⋅min-1) for men and women, respectively, with 55% and 56% of the variance explained. The validation and cross-validation samples displayed SEE and variance explained in agreement with the total sample. Cross-classification between measured and predicted VO2peak accurately classified 91% of the participants within the correct or nearest quintile of measured VO2peak. Conclusion Judicious use of the exercise prediction models presented in this study offers valuable information in providing a fairly accurate assessment of VO2peak, which may be beneficial for risk stratification in health care settings. PMID:26794677

  16. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  17. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  18. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  19. Plasmonic nature of the terahertz conductivity peak in single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Hároz, Erik H; Jin, Zehua; Ren, Lei; Wang, Xuan; Arvidson, Rolf S; Lüttge, Andreas; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    Plasmon resonance is expected to occur in metallic and doped semiconducting carbon nanotubes in the terahertz frequency range, but its convincing identification has so far been elusive. The origin of the terahertz conductivity peak commonly observed for carbon nanotube ensembles remains controversial. Here we present results of optical, terahertz, and direct current (DC) transport measurements on highly enriched metallic and semiconducting nanotube films. A broad and strong terahertz conductivity peak appears in both types of films, whose behaviors are consistent with the plasmon resonance explanation, firmly ruling out other alternative explanations such as absorption due to curvature-induced gaps. PMID:24224898

  20. Peak Oil, Food Systems, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Cindy L.; Kirschenmann, Frederick L.; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all. PMID:21778492

  1. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on... 12 and 13, T. 7 N., R. 4 W. on the Yountville U.S.G.S. map; (10) Then following the section boundary... elevation, located in section 10, T. N., R. 4 W.; (12) Then northwest in a straight line approximately...

  2. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on... 12 and 13, T. 7 N., R. 4 W. on the Yountville U.S.G.S. map; (10) Then following the section boundary... elevation, located in section 10, T. N., R. 4 W.; (12) Then northwest in a straight line approximately...

  3. Age does not alter acetaminophen absorption.

    PubMed

    Divoll, M; Ameer, B; Abernethy, D R; Greenblatt, D J

    1982-04-01

    Twenty-eight healthy volunteers (age range, 22-78 years) received 650 mg of acetaminophen (AAP) on three separate occasions. The modes of administration were 1) intravenous, 5-minute infusion; 2) oral, with two 325-mg tablets; and 3) oral, with 650 mg as an elixir preparation. Plasma levels of AAP were determined in blood samples drawn up to 12 hours after the dose. The mean (+/- sd) kinetic variables for absorption of AAP from tablets in young and elderly were peak plasma concentration, 11.8 (+/- 4.2) vs 10.9 (+/- 4.1) micrograms/ml; peak time, 0.79 (+/- .54) vs 0.69 (+/- .40) hours after the dose; absorption half-life, 12.6 (+/- 9.8) vs. 8.2 (+/- 5.3) minutes; and absolute systemic availability, 79 (+/- 9) vs 72 (+/- 11) per cent. For AAP elixir, the corresponding values were 12.6 (+/- 5.4) vs 13.7 (+/- 6.0) micrograms/ml; 0.52 (+/- .24) vs 0.54 (+/- .51) hours; 8.6 (+/- 6.2) vs 6.1 (+/- 6.6) minutes; and 87 (+/- 9) vs 80 (+/- 9) per cent. Absolute bioavailability of both oral dosage forms was significantly less then 100 per cent in all groups. Elderly subjects tended to show lower availability of both oral preparations, but the difference was of borderline significance (P less than .50). Age did not influence any other measures of absorption. Since the absorption rate of acetaminophen may be indicative of the gastric emptying rate, age does not appear to alter this rate-limiting step in drug absorption. PMID:7069091

  4. Effects of fictive temperature and halogen doping on the boson peak in silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimodaira, N.; Saito, K.; Hiramitsu, N.; Matsushita, S.; Ikushima, A. J.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of structural disorder on the boson peak in the Raman scattering of silica glass. The structural disorder was controlled in two ways: fictive temperature (Tf) and concentration of doped halogen element (F or Cl). As results, it has been simply demonstrated from nonreduced Raman spectra that (1) the peak position and full width at half maximum of the boson peak linearly increase with increasing Tf irrespective of the halogen concentrations, and in contrast, (2) the intensity is rather strongly dependent on the halogen concentrations than Tf . Since the result in (1) is much similar to the dependence on Tf and fluorine concentration for the IR absorption around 2260cm-1 , it has been concluded that the boson peak in silica glass is microscopically related to the average magnitude and distribution of Si-O-Si bond angles in glass network. The intensity enhancement in (2) has suggested two possibilities about the contribution of the doped halogen element to the boson peak: One is a direct contribution of F or Cl atoms due to diffusive motions falling within the range of the boson peak. The other is an indirect contribution introduced by the termination of Si-O-Si bridges to some sort of vibrational motions, which may be related to the boson peak.

  5. Revisiting Twomey's approximation for peak supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipway, B. J.

    2015-04-01

    Twomey's seminal 1959 paper provided lower and upper bound approximations to the estimation of peak supersaturation within an updraft and thus provides the first closed expression for the number of nucleated cloud droplets. The form of this approximation is simple, but provides a surprisingly good estimate and has subsequently been employed in more sophisticated treatments of nucleation parametrization. In the current paper, we revisit the lower bound approximation of Twomey and make a small adjustment that can be used to obtain a more accurate calculation of peak supersaturation under all potential aerosol loadings and thermodynamic conditions. In order to make full use of this improved approximation, the underlying integro-differential equation for supersaturation evolution and the condition for calculating peak supersaturation are examined. A simple rearrangement of the algebra allows for an expression to be written down that can then be solved with a single lookup table with only one independent variable for an underlying lognormal aerosol population. While multimodal aerosol with N different dispersion characteristics requires 2N+1 inputs to calculate the activation fraction, only N of these one-dimensional lookup tables are needed. No additional information is required in the lookup table to deal with additional chemical, physical or thermodynamic properties. The resulting implementation provides a relatively simple, yet computationally cheap, physically based parametrization of droplet nucleation for use in climate and Numerical Weather Prediction models.

  6. [Fast spectral modeling based on Voigt peaks].

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-rong; Dai, Lian-kui

    2012-03-01

    Indirect hard modeling (IHM) is a recently introduced method for quantitative spectral analysis, which was applied to the analysis of nonlinear relation between mixture spectrum and component concentration. In addition, IHM is an effectual technology for the analysis of components of mixture with molecular interactions and strongly overlapping bands. Before the establishment of regression model, IHM needs to model the measured spectrum as a sum of Voigt peaks. The precision of the spectral model has immediate impact on the accuracy of the regression model. A spectrum often includes dozens or even hundreds of Voigt peaks, which mean that spectral modeling is a optimization problem with high dimensionality in fact. So, large operation overhead is needed and the solution would not be numerically unique due to the ill-condition of the optimization problem. An improved spectral modeling method is presented in the present paper, which reduces the dimensionality of optimization problem by determining the overlapped peaks in spectrum. Experimental results show that the spectral modeling based on the new method is more accurate and needs much shorter running time than conventional method. PMID:22582612

  7. METing SUSY on the Z peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenboim, G.; Bernabeu, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Romero, E.; Vives, O.

    2016-02-01

    Recently the ATLAS experiment announced a 3 σ excess at the Z-peak consisting of 29 pairs of leptons together with two or more jets, ET^{miss} > 225 GeV and HT > 600 GeV, to be compared with 10.6 ± 3.2 expected lepton pairs in the Standard Model. No excess outside the Z-peak was observed. By trying to explain this signal with SUSY we find that only relatively light gluinos, m_{tilde{g}} ≲ 1.2 TeV, together with a heavy neutralino NLSP of m_{tilde{χ }} ≳ 400 GeV decaying predominantly to Z-boson plus a light gravitino, such that nearly every gluino produces at least one Z-boson in its decay chain, could reproduce the excess. We construct an explicit general gauge mediation model able to reproduce the observed signal overcoming all the experimental limits. Needless to say, more sophisticated models could also reproduce the signal, however, any model would have to exhibit the following features: light gluinos, or heavy particles with a strong production cross section, producing at least one Z-boson in its decay chain. The implications of our findings for the Run II at LHC with the scaling on the Z peak, as well as for the direct search of gluinos and other SUSY particles, are pointed out.

  8. Eyesight and the solar Wien peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overduin, James M.

    2003-03-01

    It is sometimes said that humans see best at yellow-green wavelengths because they have evolved under a Sun whose blackbody spectrum has a Wien peak in the green part of the spectrum. However, as a function of frequency, the solar blackbody spectrum peaks in the infrared. Why did human vision not evolve toward a peak sensitivity in this range, if the eye is an efficient quantum detector of photons? The puzzle is resolved if we assume that natural selection acted in such a way as to maximize the amount of energy that can be detected by the retina across a range of wavelengths (whose upper and lower limits are fixed by biological constraints). It is then found that our eyes are indeed perfectly adapted to life under a class G2 star. Extending this reasoning allows educated guesses to be made about the kind of eyesight that might have evolved in extrasolar planetary systems such as that of the red dwarf Gliese 876.

  9. Difference in peak weight transfer and timing based on golf handicap.

    PubMed

    Queen, Robin M; Butler, Robert J; Dai, Boyi; Barnes, C Lowry

    2013-09-01

    Weight shift during the golf swing has been a topic of discussion among golf professionals; however, it is still unclear how weight shift varies in golfers of different performance levels. The main purpose of this study was to examine the following: (a) the changes in the peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and the timing of these events between high (HHCP) and low handicap (LHCP) golfers and (b) the differences between the leading and trailing legs. Twenty-eight male golfers were recruited and divided based on having an LHCP < 9 or HHCP > 9. Three-dimensional GRF peaks and the timing of the peaks were recorded bilaterally during a golf swing. The golf swing was divided into different phases: (a) address to the top of the backswing, (b) top of the backswing to ball contact, and (c) ball contact to the end of follow through. Repeated measures analyses of variance (α = 0.05) were completed for each study variable: the magnitude and the timing of peak vertical GRF, peak lateral GRF, and peak medial GRF (α = 0.05). The LHCP group had a greater transfer of vertical force from the trailing foot to the leading foot in phase 2 than the HHCP group. The LHCP group also demonstrated earlier timing of peak vertical force throughout the golf swing than the HHCP group. The LHCP and HHCP groups demonstrated different magnitudes of peak lateral force. The LHCP group had an earlier timing of peak lateral GRF in phase 2 and earlier timing of peak medial GRF in phases 1 and 2 than the HHCP group. In general, LHCP golfers demonstrated greater and earlier force generation than HHCP golfers. It may be relevant to consider both the magnitude of the forces and the timing of these events during golf-specific training to improve performance. These data reveal weight shifting differences that can be addressed by teaching professionals to help their students better understand weight transfer during the golf swing to optimize performance. PMID:23222089

  10. X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Investigation of Copper(II) Mixed Ligand Complexes with Pyridinedicarboxylic Acid as Primary Ligand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dar, D. Ah.; Gaur, A.; Soni, B.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.; Jha, S. N.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-05-01

    The X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra at the K-edge of the copper complexes Cu(PDC)(Mim)3 H2O ( 1) and Cu(PDC)2(EA)2H2O ( 2) (where PDC - Pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, Mim - 2-methylimidazole, and EA - ethyl acetate) have been investigated. The experimental extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of complex 1 have been analyzed by fitting the theoretical model generated from its own crystallographic data. The crystallographic data for complex 2 are not available. It has been found by comparing the intensity of the pre-edge peaks and X-ray absorption near edge structure features of complexes 1 and 2 that both complexes possess square pyramidal geometry around the copper centers and thus complex 2 is analogous to complex 1. Hence, the theoretical model generated for complex 1 has been fitted to the experimental EXAFS data of complex 2 to determine the structural parameters of complex 2. The coordination geometry of both complexes has been depicted. Further, the chemical shifts have been used to determine the oxidation state as well as to estimate the effective nuclear charge on the copper atom.

  11. Quantifying peak discharges for historical floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    It is usually advantageous to use information regarding historical floods, if available, to define the flood-frequency relation for a stream. Peak stages can sometimes be determined for outstanding floods that occurred many years ago before systematic gaging of streams began. In the United States, this information is usually not available for more than 100-200 years, but in countries with long cultural histories, such as China, historical flood data are available at some sites as far back as 2,000 years or more. It is important in flood studies to be able to assign a maximum discharge rate and an associated error range to the historical flood. This paper describes the significant characteristics and uncertainties of four commonly used methods for estimating the peak discharge of a flood. These methods are: (1) rating curve (stage-discharge relation) extension; (2) slope conveyance; (3) slope area; and (4) step backwater. Logarithmic extensions of rating curves are based on theoretical plotting techniques that results in straight line extensions provided that channel shape and roughness do not change significantly. The slope-conveyance and slope-area methods are based on the Manning equation, which requires specific data on channel size, shape and roughness, as well as the water-surface slope for one or more cross-sections in a relatively straight reach of channel. The slope-conveyance method is used primarily for shaping and extending rating curves, whereas the slope-area method is used for specific floods. The step-backwater method, also based on the Manning equation, requires more cross-section data than the slope-area ethod, but has a water-surface profile convergence characteristic that negates the need for known or estimated water-surface slope. Uncertainties in calculating peak discharge for historical floods may be quite large. Various investigations have shown that errors in calculating peak discharges by the slope-area method under ideal conditions for

  12. Aligned silver nanorod arrays as substrates for surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leverette, C L; Jacobs, S A; Shanmukh, S; Chaney, S B; Dluhy, R A; Zhao, Y-P

    2006-08-01

    Preferentially aligned silver nanorod arrays prepared by oblique angle vapor deposition were evaluated as substrates for surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroscopy. These nanorod arrays have an irregular surface lattice and are composed of tilted, cylindrically shaped nanorods that have an average length of 868 nm +/- 95 nm and an average diameter of 99 nm +/- 29 nm. The overall enhancement factor for chemisorbed organic films of para-nitrobenzoic acid (PNBA) deposited onto the Ag nanorod arrays analyzed by external reflection SEIRA was calculated to be 31 +/- 9 compared to infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) obtained from a 500 nm Ag film substrate. This enhancement is attributed to the unique optical properties of the nanorod arrays as well as the increased surface area provided by the nanorod substrate. SEIRA reflection-absorbance intensity was observed with both p- and s-polarized incident radiation with angles of incidence ranging from 25 degrees to 80 degrees . The largest intensity was achieved with p-polarization and incident angles larger than 75 degrees . Polarization-dependent ultraviolet/visible/near-infrared (UV/Vis/NIR) spectra of the nanorod arrays demonstrate that the red-shifted surface plasmon peaks of the elongated nanorods may be partially responsible for the observed SEIRA response. The SEIRA detection limit for the Ag nanorod arrays was estimated to be 0.08 ng/cm(2). Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and SEIRA analysis of chemisorbed PNBA utilizing the same nanorod substrate is demonstrated. PMID:16925927

  13. Ab initio optical absorption spectra of size-expanded xDNA base assemblies.

    PubMed

    Varsano, Daniele; Garbesi, Anna; Di Felice, Rosa

    2007-12-20

    We present the results of time-dependent density functional theory calculations of the optical absorption spectra of synthetic nucleobases and of their hydrogen-bonded and stacked base pairs. We focus on size-expanded analogues of the natural nucleobases obtained through the insertion of a benzene ring bonded to the planar heterocycles (x-bases), according to the protocol designed and realized by the group of Eric Kool (e.g., see: Gao, J.; Liu, H.; Kool, E.T. Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 2005, 44, 3118, and references therein). We find that the modifications of the frontier electron orbitals with respect to natural bases, which are induced by the presence of the aromatic ring, also affect the optical response. In particular, the absorption onset is pinned by the benzene component of the HOMO of each x-base (xA, xG, xT, xC). In addition, the main trait of the H-bonding interbase coupling is a conspicuous red shift of spectral peaks in the low-energy range. Finally, the hypochromicity, a well-known fingerprint of stacking, is more pronounced in stacked xG-C and xA-T pairs than that in stacked G-C and A-T pairs, an index of enhanced stacking. PMID:18034470

  14. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  15. The Compton Effect Red Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kierein, John

    2004-05-01

    In 1923 (Phil Mag. 46, 897.) A. H. Compton noted that the Compton effect produces a red shift for all wavelengths when the scattered electron is free and not bound to an atom or molecule. He suggested that the red shift in the visible spectrum at the limb of the sun is larger than that at the center due to the Compton effect from the greater number of free electrons in the sun's atmosphere along the line of sight. Kierein and Sharp (1968, Solar Physics 3, 450) quantified this and showed a good correlation of red shift observations with the variation in the number of these electrons along the line of sight from center to limb and suggested that the quasar red shift and cosmological red shift could be similarly explained. Grote Reber mapped and measured the background hectometric radiation and found it to be unexpectedly bright. In 1968 (J. Franklin Inst. 285,1), while describing these measurements and maps he explained this brightness as being due to the Compton effect causing the cosmological red shift and accelerating intergalactic electrons. The resulting universe is static. The predicted red shift from the Compton effect deviates from Hubble's law only at large red shifts.

  16. Flexible Schedules and Shift Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beers, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    Flexible work hours have gained prominence, as more than 25 million workers (27.6% of all full-time workers) can now vary their schedules. However, there has been little change since the mid-1980s in the proportion who work a shift other than a regular daytime shift. (JOW)

  17. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  18. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  19. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by topological insulator thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, L. L.; Xu, W.

    2014-08-11

    We present a theoretical study on the absorption of the surface acoustic waves (SAWs) by Dirac electrons in topological insulator (TI) thin films (TITFs). We find that due to momentum and energy conservation laws, the absorption of the SAWs in TITFs can only be achieved via intra-band electronic transitions. The strong absorption can be observed up to sub-terahertz frequencies. With increasing temperature, the absorption intensity increases significantly and the cut-off frequency is blue-shifted. More interestingly, we find that the absorption of the SAWs by the TITFs can be markedly enhanced by the tunable subgap in the Dirac energy spectrum of the TI surface states. Such a subgap is absent in conventional two-dimensional electron gases (2DEGs) and in the gapless Dirac 2DEG such as graphene. This study is pertinent to the exploration of the acoustic properties of TIs and to potential application of TIs as tunable SAW devices working at hypersonic frequencies.

  20. A naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible multiple peak metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heli; Song, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-01

    We report a naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible metamaterial absorber. The visible metamaterial absorber consisting of a silver dendritic/dielectric/metal structure shows multiple absorption peaks. By incorporating a gain material (rhodamine B) into the dielectric layer, the maximal magnitude of the absorption peak can be improved by about 30%. As the metamaterial absorber is sensitive to the refractive index of glucose solutions, it can function as a sensor that quickly responds to variations of the refractive index of the liquid. Meanwhile, since the response is presented via color changes, it can be clearly observed by the naked eyes. Further experiments have confirmed that the sensor can be used repeatedly. PMID:25822141

  1. Chemical shift driven geometry optimization.

    PubMed

    Witter, Raiker; Priess, Wolfram; Sternberg, Ulrich

    2002-01-30

    A new method for refinement of 3D molecular structures by geometry optimization is presented. Prerequisites are a force field and a very fast procedure for the calculation of chemical shifts in every step of optimization. To the energy, provided by the force field (COSMOS force field), a pseudoenergy, depending on the difference between experimental and calculated chemical shifts, is added. In addition to the energy gradients, pseudoforces are computed. This requires the derivatives of the chemical shifts with respect to the coordinates. The pseudoforces are analytically derived from the integral expressions of the bond polarization theory. Single chemical shift values attributed to corresponding atoms are considered for structural correction. As a first example, this method is applied for proton position refinement of the D-mannitol X-ray structure. A crystal structure refinement with 13C chemical shift pseudoforces is carried out. PMID:11924742

  2. Nonlocal nonlinear refraction in Hibiscus sabdariffa with large phase shifts.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Martínez, D; Alvarado-Méndez, E; Trejo-Durán, M; Vázquez-Guevara, M A

    2014-10-20

    In this work we present a study of nonlinear optical properties in organic materials (hibiscus sabdariffa). Our results demonstrate that the medium exhibits a highly nonlocal nonlinear response. We show preliminary numerical results of the transmittance as nonlocal response by considering, simultaneously, the nonlinear absorption and refraction in media. Numerical results are accord to measurement obtained by Z- scan technique where we observe large phase shifts. We also analyze the far field diffraction ring patterns of the sample. PMID:25401548

  3. Light shift and light broadening in the Rb-87 maser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busca, G.; Tetu, M.; Vanier, J.

    1973-01-01

    A description of measurements of light-shift and light-broadening parameters for an Rb-87 maser operating between the field independent levels is reported. A parallel study of the spectral profile of the D1 pumping line is described. Comparison between the experimental results and theoretical calculations, taking into account the spatial inhomogeneity of the pumping light in the absorption cell, is presented.

  4. Research on tunable phase shift induced by piezoelectric transducer in linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating with the V-I transmission matrix formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Liangying; Pei, Li; Liu, Chao; Wang, Jianshuai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the V-I transmission matrix (V-I TM) is proposed to analyze the tunable single phase shift (SPS) and multiple phase shifts (MPS) inserted in a linearly chirped fiber Bragg grating (LCFBG). According to the simulation results, the peaks appear on the transmission spectrum, when the phase shifts are induced in the LCFBG. With the increase of the phase shift, the center wavelength of the peak moves toward long wavelength region. A remarkable degree of bilateral symmetry can be found as characteristic of the depth of peaks. The maximum depth caused by inserted π-shift is the symmetric axis. Moreover, when MPS are inserted simultaneously, the appeared peaks are independent and the variation tendency of each peak is the same with that caused by SPS. The experiment of phase shift induced by a piezoelectric transducer (PZT) verifies the correctness of the simulation, and a narrow bandwidth of 0.028 nm is acquired.

  5. X-ray absorption fine structure of artificial antigens for cadmium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Liang; Liu, Aiping; Chen, Fusheng; Wang, Xiaohong

    2011-11-01

    Immunoassay technology as a quick and large-scale screening method to detect metal ions in foods and environmental samples has rapidly been developed due to several advantages over conventional instrument-intensive methods. Unlike biomacromolecule, metal ions are haptens without immunogenicity, so successful preparation of artificial antigens is the first critical step for establishing immunoassay methods for them. In the current paper, cadmium ions were conjugated to BSA and OVA, respectively, using bifunctional chelator, p-SCN-Bn-DTPA. The ultraviolet analysis indicated that the maximum absorption peak of Cd-p-SCN-DTPA-BSA and Cd-p-SCN-DTPA-OVA had a small peak shift and an apparent absorbance increase compared to that of BSA and OVA, and the extents of substitution of ɛ-amino in both conjugates were 51.2% and 58.6%, respectively. In addition, the EXAFS of conjugates implied that Cd 2+ coordinated with N and O atoms of DTPA in artificial antigens, the coordination type and number of Cd-DTPA, Cd-p-SCN-Bn-DTPA-BSA, Cd-p-SCN-Bn-DTPA-OVA were the same. XANES region and geometries of the three compounds were also same. These results implied that the three antigens had the similar local structure and atomic geometry. This was the first time that the XAFS was attempted for the identification of artificial heavy metal ion antigens.

  6. Structure and microwave absorption properties of Pr-Fe-Ni alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Jilei; Pan, Shunkang; Cheng, Lichun; Liu, Xing; Lin, Peihao

    2015-06-01

    The Pr2Fe17-xNix (X=0.0, 0.2, 0.6, 1.0) alloy powders were obtained by arc smelting and high energy ball milling method. The phase structure, morphology and particle size of the powders were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser diffraction-based particle size analyzer, respectively. The saturation magnetization and electromagnetic parameters were determined by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and vector network analyzer (VNA), respectively. The results indicate that the lattice parameter and the saturation magnetization of Pr2Fe17-xNix alloys decrease with increasing Ni content. And the minimum absorption peak frequency shifts towards the higher region with increasing Ni content. Compared to the powders without heat treatment, the powders tempered at 100 °C for 2 h have better absorbing properties. The minimum reflectivity peak value of Pr2Fe16Ni alloy reaches about -23.6 dB at 2.72 GHz with the matching thickness of 3.5 mm.

  7. Control of enhanced optical absorption in {mu}c-Si

    SciTech Connect

    Kalkan, A.K.; Fonash, S.J.

    1997-07-01

    The influence of grain size on the enhanced optical absorption of {micro}c-Si has been investigated using films of various grain sizes prepared by solid phase crystallization. The authors show that they can control this grain size and therefore the degree of absorption changes. For grain sizes below a threshold range significant absorption enhancement can be seen in the photon energy range of 1 to {approximately}3 eV and the absorption characteristics of these films show that the dominant mode of optical transitions is indirect. A correlation between first order Raman peak broadening and enhanced absorption was found suggesting both effects are related to confinement. A simple model was developed to see how confinement in the crystallites could influence indirect optical transitions.

  8. Measuring non-local Lagrangian peak bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagetti, Matteo; Chan, Kwan Chuen; Desjacques, Vincent; Paranjape, Aseem

    2014-06-01

    We investigate non-local Lagrangian bias contributions involving gradients of the linear density field, for which we have predictions from the excursion set peak formalism. We begin by writing down a bias expansion which includes all the bias terms, including the non-local ones. Having checked that the model furnishes a reasonable fit to the halo mass function, we develop a one-point cross-correlation technique to measure bias factors associated with χ2-distributed quantities. We validate the method with numerical realizations of peaks of Gaussian random fields before we apply it to N-body simulations. We focus on the lowest (quadratic) order non-local contributions -2χ _{10}(k_1\\cdot k_2) and χ _{01}[3(k_1\\cdot k_2)^2-k_1^2 k_2^2], where k_1, k_2 are wave modes. We can reproduce our measurement of χ10 if we allow for an offset between the Lagrangian halo centre-of-mass and the peak position. The sign and magnitude of χ10 is consistent with Lagrangian haloes sitting near linear density maxima. The resulting contribution to the halo bias can safely be ignored for M = 1013 M⊙ h-1, but could become relevant at larger halo masses. For the second non-local bias χ01 however, we measure a much larger magnitude than predicted by our model. We speculate that some of this discrepancy might originate from non-local Lagrangian contributions induced by non-spherical collapse.

  9. Cost and sensitivity of restricted active-space calculations of metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Rahul V; Delcey, Mickaël G; Guo, Meiyuan; Odelius, Michael; Lundberg, Marcus

    2016-02-15

    The restricted active-space (RAS) approach can accurately simulate metal L-edge X-ray absorption spectra of first-row transition metal complexes without the use of any fitting parameters. These characteristics provide a unique capability to identify unknown chemical species and to analyze their electronic structure. To find the best balance between cost and accuracy, the sensitivity of the simulated spectra with respect to the method variables has been tested for two models, [FeCl6 ](3-) and [Fe(CN)6 ](3-) . For these systems, the reference calculations give deviations, when compared with experiment, of ≤1 eV in peak positions, ≤30% for the relative intensity of major peaks, and ≤50% for minor peaks. When compared with these deviations, the simulated spectra are sensitive to the number of final states, the inclusion of dynamical correlation, and the ionization potential electron affinity shift, in addition to the selection of the active space. The spectra are less sensitive to the quality of the basis set and even a double-ζ basis gives reasonable results. The inclusion of dynamical correlation through second-order perturbation theory can be done efficiently using the state-specific formalism without correlating the core orbitals. Although these observations are not directly transferable to other systems, they can, together with a cost analysis, aid in the design of RAS models and help to extend the use of this powerful approach to a wider range of transition metal systems. PMID:26502979

  10. Calculating weighted estimates of peak streamflow statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, Timothy A.; Berenbrock, Charles; Kiang, Julie E.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Federal guidelines for flood-frequency estimation, the uncertainty of peak streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flow at a streamgage, can be reduced by combining the at-site estimate with the regional regression estimate to obtain a weighted estimate of the flow statistic. The procedure assumes the estimates are independent, which is reasonable in most practical situations. The purpose of this publication is to describe and make available a method for calculating a weighted estimate from the uncertainty or variance of the two independent estimates.

  11. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported. PMID:26661473

  12. The measurement of absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases - The absorption of CO and O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Read, William G.; Cohen, Edward A.; Pickett, Herbert M.; Hillig, Kurt W., II

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus is described that will measure absolute absorption of millimeter radiation in gases. The method measures the change in the quality factor of a Fabry-Perot resonator with and without gas present. The magnitude of the change is interpreted in terms of the absorption of the lossy medium inside the resonator. Experiments have been performed on the 115-GHz CO line and the 119-GHz O2 line at two different temperatures to determine the linewidth parameter and the peak absorption value. These numbers can be combined to give the integrated intensity which can be accurately calculated from results of spectroscopy measurements. The CO results are within 2 percent percent of theoretically predicted valves. Measurements on O2 have shown that absorption can be measured as accurately as 0.5 dB/km with this technique. Results have been obtained for oxygen absolute absorption in the 60-80-GHz region.

  13. Documented and potential extreme peak discharges and relation between potential extreme peak discharges and probable maximum flood peak discharges in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Asquith, W.H.; Slade, R.M., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Department of Transportation, conducted a study of extreme flood potential for Texas. Potential extreme peak discharges, derived from the relation between documented extreme peak discharges and their contributing drainage areas, can provide valuable information concerning the maximum expected peak discharge that could occur at a stream site. Documented extreme peak discharges and associated data were aggregated for 832 sites with and without streamflow-gaging stations in natural basins in Texas. A potential extreme peak discharge curve was developed for each of 11 hydrologic regions in Texas and for the State as a whole, based on documented extreme peak discharges and associated contributing drainage areas. The curve envelops, for a large range of drainage areas, the largest documented extreme peak discharges. Potential extreme peak discharges estimated from the curves were compared to probable maximum flood peak discharges estimated from various simulation models.

  14. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  15. All-in-quartz optics for low focal shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomqvist, Mats; Blomster, Ola; Pålsson, Magnus; Campbell, Stuart; Becker, Frank; Rath, Wolfram

    2011-02-01

    High laser power levels in combination with increasing beam quality bring optics performance into focus, particularly with regard to systems with low focal shifts along the optical axis. In industrial applications, this often influences the overall performance of the process, especially if the focal shift is comparable to or in excess of the Rayleigh length. It is commonly accepted that the focal shifts are of thermal nature where lens material, lens coating, geometry and surface contamination all contribute to the direction and extent of the focal shifts. In this paper we will present a novel design of lens packages where a patented all-in-quartz concept is explored. By mounting quartz lenses in hermetically sealed quartz tubes and applying water cooling on the perimeter of the quartz tubes we will reduce or eliminate a number of contributing factors to focal shift problems. The hermetic sealing, carried out in a clean-room environment, will minimize lens surface contamination. Differences in thermal expansion between lens and housing are eliminated as the lens and housing will be of the same material. Absorption of scattered laser light will be efficient as the energy is removed quickly by cooling water and not absorbed by fixed surroundings. Finally, indirect heating from the housing transmitted by radiation and convection to the lenses is avoided. Values of the normalized System Focal Shift Factors (SFSF) for the all-in-quartz optics will be compared to standard lens assemblies at multi-kW laser power levels.

  16. A Protein Concentration Measurement System Using a Flexural Plate-Wave Frequency-Shift Readout Technique

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chua-Chin; Sung, Tzu-Chiao; Hsu, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Yue-Da; Chen, Yun-Chi; Lee, Ming-Chih; Huang, I-Yu

    2013-01-01

    A protein concentration measurement system with two-port flexural plate-wave (FPW) biosensors using a frequency-shift readout technique is presented in this paper. The proposed frequency-shift readout method employs a peak detecting scheme to measure the amount of resonant frequency shift. The proposed system is composed of a linear frequency generator, a pair of peak detectors, two registers, and a subtractor. The frequency sweep range of the linear frequency generator is limited to 2 MHz to 10 MHz according to the characteristics of the FPW biosensors. The proposed frequency-shift readout circuit is carried out on silicon using a standard 0.18 μm CMOS technology. The sensitivity of the peak detectors is measured to be 10 mV. The power consumption of the proposed protein concentration measurement system is 48 mW given a 0.1 MHz system clock. PMID:23344375

  17. Dynamic phase-shifting photoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Asundi, A; Tong, L; Boay, C G

    2001-08-01

    The application of phase-shifting photoelasticity to a real-time dynamic event involves simultaneous recording of the four phase-shifted images. Here an instrument, believed to be novel, is developed and described for this purpose. Use of a Multispec Imager is introduced into digital photoelasticity for the first time to our knowledge. This device enables splitting the optical energy of an object into four identical paths, thus permitting recording of the required four phase-shifted images. Experimental demonstration is provided for validation. PMID:18360395

  18. Interpretations of cosmological spectral shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østvang, Dag

    2013-03-01

    It is shown that for Robertson-Walker models with flat or closed space sections, all of the cosmological spectral shift can be attributed to the non-flat connection (and thus indirectly to space-time curvature). For Robertson-Walker models with hyperbolic space sections, it is shown that cosmological spectral shifts uniquely split up into "kinematic" and "gravitational" parts provided that distances are small. For large distances no such unique split-up exists in general. A number of common, but incorrect assertions found in the literature regarding interpretations of cosmological spectral shifts, is pointed out.

  19. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  20. Low peak-power laser ultrasonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, S. G.; Cleary, A.; Veres, I. A.; Culshaw, B.; Thursby, G.; McKee, C.; Swift, C.; Armstrong, I.

    2011-09-01

    Techniques for the successful excitation of guided ultrasonic waves using a low peak-power laser ultrasonic source are discussed and compared with more conventional Q-switched laser sources. The paper considers acoustic propagation in thin plates, in which the frequencies used, typically only the fundamental guided wave modes, are considered. Aspects of excitation and detection geometry are considered along with the physical mechanisms of photo-acoustic generation and the practical issues surrounding available source wavelengths and power outputs. Understanding of the effects of these constraints is critical for the successful application of the technique. Continuous wave excitation and fully arbitrary modulation schemes are compared, and a technique to control the bandwidth of Golay code modulation is introduced. It is shown that earlier work by the authors was capable of guided wave detection at peak-power densities of 104 W cm- 2. Later work has focussed on the use of erbium-doped fibre amplifiers combined with Golay code modulation to improve the recovered signal-to-noise ratio. Two key applications of the techniques are considered: material properties measurements (using inversion of dispersion curve data) and acoustic emission system calibration.

  1. Multiplasmon Absorption in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablan, Marinko; Chang, Darrick E.

    2015-06-01

    We show that graphene possesses a strong nonlinear optical response in the form of multiplasmon absorption, with exciting implications in classical and quantum nonlinear optics. Specifically, we predict that graphene nanoribbons can be used as saturable absorbers with low saturation intensity in the far-infrared and terahertz spectrum. Moreover, we predict that two-plasmon absorption and extreme localization of plasmon fields in graphene nanodisks can lead to a plasmon blockade effect, in which a single quantized plasmon strongly suppresses the possibility of exciting a second plasmon.

  2. Chaotic Systems with Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions Dq obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D1 in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results.

  3. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  4. Gain-assisted control of the Goos-Haenchen shift

    SciTech Connect

    Ziauddin,; Qamar, Sajid

    2011-11-15

    A gain-assisted model is considered to study the Goos-Haenchen (GH) shift behavior in the reflected and transmitted light. In this model, a probe light is incident on a cavity containing three-level dilute gaseous atomic medium. The atom-field interaction follows two-photon Raman transitions, and the dielectric susceptibility of the medium exhibits dispersion and gain properties [L. J. Wang, A. Kuzmich, and A. Dogariu, Nature (London) 406, 227 (2000)]. Under appropriate conditions, two gain peaks are observed with anomalous dispersion between the peaks, whereas normal dispersion can be observed at and around the gain maxima. The manipulation of the detuning associated with the probe light field which interacts with the intracavity medium during its propagation through the cavity can lead to a control over negative and positive GH shift in the reflected and transmitted light beam via the anomalous and normal dispersion of the medium.

  5. Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schundler, Elizabeth; Mansur, David J.; Vaillancourt, Robert; Benedict-Gill, Ryan; Newbry, Scott P.; Engel, James R.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia

    2013-05-01

    We report on our current status towards the development of a prototype Fourier transform infrared phase shift cavity ring down spectrometer (FTIR-PS-CRDS) system under a U.S. EPA SBIR contract. Our system uses the inherent wavelength-dependent modulation imposed by the FTIR on a broadband thermal source for the phase shift measurement. This spectrally-dependent phase shift is proportional to the spectrally-dependent ring down time, which is proportional to the losses of the cavity including those due to molecular absorption. Our approach is a broadband and spectral range enhancement to conventional CRDS which is typically done in the near IR at a single wavelength; at the same time our approach is a sensitivity enhancement to traditional FTIR owing to the long effective path of the resonant cavity. In this paper we present a summary of the theory including performance projections and the design details of the prototype FTIR-PS-CRDS system.

  6. Inhibition of digoxin absorption by neomycin.

    PubMed

    Lindenbaum, J; Maulitz, R M; Butler, V P

    1976-09-01

    The effect of the administration of the antibiotic neomycin sulfate on the absorption of digoxin was assessed in crossover studies in normal human volunteers. Doses of neomycin (1 and 3 g) markedly depressed serum digoxin concentrations, the areas under the serum concentration-time curves, and cumulative 6-day urinary digoxin excretion after the oral ingestion of 0.5 mg of the cardiac glycoside in tablet form. Neomycin also prolonged the mean time at which peak serum digoxin levels were attained by 1.7 to 3 hr. The inhibition of digoxin absorption was also seen: (1) when the antibiotic was given 3 or 6 hr before the cardiac glycoside, (2) with digoxin tablets of varying dissolution rate, (3) when digoxin or neomycin solutions were used instead of tablets, and (4) in a patient who had had a total gastrectomy. When neomycin was administered with maintenance doses of digoxin, steady state serum digoxin concentrations were significantly reduced. When neomycin was given after a 9-day period of digitalization, the terminal serum digoxin half-life was not significantly shortened. Single doses of neomycin did not interfere with the extent of absorption of d-xylose. In vitro, neomycin did not affect the movement of digoxin across dialysis membranes, nor did it precipitate digoxin out of human bile or intestinal fluid. Neomycin thus clearly depresses the rate and extent of digoxin absorption in man. The mechanism of this effect remains to be established. PMID:950089

  7. Dimension effect in lattice absorption of silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I. A.; Ordin, S. V.

    2005-12-01

    We report high-sensitive experimental investigations of the SiC powders transmission spectra in the lattice oscillations region. For the SiC powders with the grain size of the order of the wave length the transmission minimum is shifted to the low-frequency range with respect to the transverse oscillation frequency of a single crystal ω T orresponding to phonon absorption with greater wave vectors. The decrease of the grain size leads to the shift and narrowing of the lattice absorption band to the high-frequency region. The observed change in the form and position of an absorption band corresponds to the narrowing of an optical phonon band due to decrease of the crystalline grain size, and approaching the lattice oscillation frequency to the frequency of molecular oscillations of Si-C in carbosilane owing to the surface energy contribution increase.

  8. Multispectrum Analysis of Self-And N-2-Broadening, Shifting and Line Mixing Coefficients in The nu(6) Band of (CH3D)-C-12

    SciTech Connect

    Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris; Brown, Linda R.; Smith, Mary A.; Rinsland, C.P.; Sams, Robert L.; Sharpe, Steven W.

    2003-01-15

    A multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique has been applied to determine accurate zero-pressure line center positions, Lorentz self-broadening and N2-broadening coefficients and self-induced and N2-induced pressure shift coefficients of transitions in the v6 (E) perpendicular band of 12 CH3D between 1035 and 1270 cm-1. High-resolution room temperature absorption spectra recorded with two Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) were analyzed together. Three spectra at 0.002 cm-1 resolution recorded using the Bruker IFS 120 HR at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and fourteen spectra obtained with the McMath-Pierce FTS (0.006 cm-1 resolution) at the National Solar Observatory (NSO) on Kitt Peak were used in the analysis.

  9. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  10. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-05-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed.

  11. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed of the day is an important forecast element in the 45th Weather Squadron's (45 WS) daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts. The forecasts are used for ground and space launch operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45 WS also issues wind advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect wind gusts to meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated peak wind speeds are challenging to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October - April. In Phase I of this task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool to help the 45 WS forecast non-convective winds at KSC/CCAFS for the 24-hour period of 0800 to 0800 local time. The tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displayed the forecast of peak wind speed, 5-minute average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, timing of the peak wind and probability the peak speed would meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt. For the current task (Phase II ), the 45 WS requested additional observations be used for the creation of the forecast equations by expanding the period of record (POR). Additional parameters were evaluated as predictors, including wind speeds between 500 ft and 3000 ft, static stability classification, Bulk Richardson Number, mixing depth, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion strength and depth and wind direction. Using a verification data set, the AMU compared the performance of the Phase I and II prediction methods. Just as in Phase I, the tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel GUI. The 45 WS requested the tool also be available in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The AMU first expanded the POR by two years by adding tower observations, surface observations and CCAFS (XMR) soundings for the cool season months of March 2007 to April 2009. The POR was expanded

  12. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  13. Autocorrelation peaks in congruential pseudorandom number generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Merrick, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    The complete correlation structure of several congruential pseudorandom number generators (PRNG) of the same type and small cycle length was studied to deal with the problem of congruential PRNG almost repeating themselves at intervals smaller than their cycle lengths, during simulation of bandpass filtered normal random noise. Maximum period multiplicative and mixed congruential generators were studied, with inferences drawn from examination of several tractable members of a class of random number generators, and moduli from 2 to the 5th power to 2 to the 9th power. High correlation is shown to exist in mixed and multiplicative congruential random number generators and prime moduli Lehmer generators for shifts a fraction of their cycle length. The random noise sequences in question are required when simulating electrical noise, air turbulence, or time variation of wind parameters.

  14. Mechanisms of large Stokes shift and aggregation-enhanced emission of osmapentalyne cations in solution: combined MD simulations and QM/MM calculations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Xu; Ju, Ming-Gang; Zang, Hang; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-10-01

    Osmapentalyne cations synthesized recently show remarkable optical properties, such as near-infrared emission, unusual large Stokes shift and aggregation-enhanced emission. Here, the mechanisms behind those novel optical behaviors are revealed from the combined molecular dynamics simulations and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The results demonstrate that the large Stokes shift in the gas phase comes from a photoexcitation-induced deformation of the osmium plane, whereas in solution it corresponds to the variation of osmium ring symmetry. Although the central chromophore ring dominates the absorption and emission processes, the protecting groups PPh3 join the emission. As osmapentalyne cations are aggregated together in solution, the radical distribution functions of their mass-central distances display several peaks immersed in a broad envelope due to different aggregation pathways. However, the chromophore centers are protected by the PPh3 groups, the aggregation structures do not affect the Stokes shift too much, and the calculated aggregate-enhanced emission is consistent with experimental measurements. PMID:26339695

  15. Measurements of argon broadened Lorentz width and pressure-induced line shift coefficients in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    1989-01-01

    Room temperature argon broadened halfwidth and pressure-induced line shift coefficients have been determined for 118 transitions in the nu4 band of (C-12)H4 from analysis of high resolution laboratory absorption spectra recorded with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer operated on Kitt Peak by the National Solar Observatory. Transitions up to J-double-prime = 12 have been measured using a nonlinear least-squares spectral fitting procedure. The variation of the measured halfwidth coefficients with symmetry type and rotational quantum number is very similar to that measured previously for N2 and air broadening, but the absolute values of the argon broadening coefficients are all smaller. On average, the ratio of the argon broadened halfwidth coefficient to the corresponding N2 broadened halfwidth coefficient is 0.877 + or - 0.017 (2 Sigma). More than 95 percent of the pressure-induced shifts are negative with values ranging from -0.0081 to +0.0055/cm atm. The pressure shifts in argon are nearly equal to corresponding values measured previously in N2 and air.

  16. Temperature Dependences of Air-Broadening and Shift Parameters in the ν_3 Band of Ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2015-06-01

    Line parameter errors can contribute significantly to the total errors in retrievals of terrestrial atmospheric ozone concentration profiles using the strong 9.6-μm band, particularly for nadir-viewing experiments Detailed knowledge of the interfering ozone signal is also needed for retrievals of other atmospheric species in this spectral region. We have determined Lorentz air-broadening and pressure-induced shift coefficients along with their temperature dependences for a number of transitions in the ν_3 fundamental band of 16O_3. These results were obtained by applying the multispectrum nonlinear least-squares fitting technique to a set of 31 high-resolution infrared absorption spectra of O_3 recorded at temperatures between 160 and 300 K with several different room-temperature and coolable sample cells at the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak. We compare our results with other available measurements and with the ozone line parameters in the HITRAN database. J.~Worden et al., J.~Geophys.~Res. 109 (2004) 9308-9319. R.~Beer et al., Geophys.~Res.~Lett. 35 (2008) L09801. D.~Chris Benner et al., JQSRT 53 (1995) 705-721. Rothman et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 130 (2013) 4. JQSRT 130 (2013) 4-50.

  17. Nonlocal optical effects on the Goos-Hänchen shifts at multilayered hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chih-Wei; Bian, Tingting; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Leung, P. T.

    2016-02-01

    The lateral beam shift of light incident on a multilayered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) is investigated using a theoretical model which emphasizes the nonlocal optical response of the indefinite material. By applying an effective local response theory formulated recently in the literature, it is found that nonlocal effects only affect p polarized light in this Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift of the incident beam; leading to a blue-shifted peak for positive shifts at high frequencies and red-shifted dip for negative shifts at low frequencies in the GH shift spectrum. An account for the observed phenomenon is given by referring to the ‘Brewster condition’ for the reflected wave from the HMM. This observation thus provides a relatively direct probe for the nonlocal response of the HMM.

  18. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  19. Total absorption Cherenkov spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovski, E. I.

    2015-05-01

    A short review of 50 years of work done with Cherenkov detectors in laboratories at the Lebedev Physical Institute is presented. The report considers some issues concerning the use of Cherenkov total absorption counters based on lead glass and heavy crystals in accelerator experiments.

  20. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  1. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  2. ZINC ABSORPTION BY INFANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc absorption, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...

  3. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  4. Mineral resources of the Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas, Hinsdale County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, R.F.; Grauch, R.I.; Hon, K.; Bove, D.J.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Korzeb, S.L.

    1987-01-01

    The Redcloud Peak and Handies Peak Wilderness Study Areas are located 2-12 mi southwest of Lake City, CO. Much of the study areas has high mineral resource potential for precious and base metals in various ore deposit types. The rest of the study areas has moderate potential for these commodities. Two areas in the Redcloud Peak study area have moderate potential for molybdenum and copper in quartz monzonite-associated porphyry deposits. Part of the Handies Peak study area has moderate potential for molybdenum in granite-related porphyry deposits. The southwestern part of the Redcloud Peak study area has high potential for uranium in vein-type deposits. Moderate potential for this commodity extends over other parts of both study areas. The mineral resource potential for gold and silver (in clastic-sediment-hosted disseminated-type epithermal deposits) is low in those parts of both study areas underlain by the Henson Member of the Silverton Volcanics. The mineral and energy resource potential for aluminum (in alunite deposits), uranium (in disseminated deposits), and geothermal sources is low throughout both study areas. Based on currently available data, there is no energy resource potential for coal, oil, and natural gas. The study areas have no identified resources.

  5. Twin Peaks in 360-degree panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' approximately 1-2 kilometers away were imaged by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) as part of a 360-degree color panorama, taken over sols 8, 9 and 10. A lander petal and deflated airbag are at the bottom of the image.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  6. NMR solvent peak suppression by nonlinear excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitt, Malcolm H.

    1988-03-01

    Most existing NMR solvent peak suppression sequences provide a satisfactory dependence of the intensity of excited signals on frequency but poor phase characteristics. In practice this leads to spectral distortions which generally become more severe as the frequency selectivity of the sequence is increased. However, it is shown that by working well outside the linear response regime, excitation schemes which combine high frequency selectivity with good phase properties may be devised. Sequences of six rectangular radio-frequency pulses were discovered using a combination of coherent averaging theory to treat the near-resonant behavior and numerical simulation further from resonance. Extensive use of symmetry greatly simplifies both the coherent averaging calculations and the numerical simulations. The new pulse sequences have been given the acronym NERO (nonlinear excitation rejecting on-resonance). Experimental spectra of an enzyme in dilute aqueous solution are shown.

  7. BUFFALO PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Wood, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colorado. On the basis of this study there is a probable mineral-resource potential for silver vein and bedding replacement deposits along the Weston Pass fault zone, for hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits in the vicinity of the Parkdale iron pit, and for gold vein deposits in the parts of the Granite and Four Mile districts that are within the wilderness study area. A probable barite resource potential occurs at Rough and Tumbling Creek and near Spring Creek on the east side of the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  8. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2014-01-15

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify and validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.

  9. Neuron absorption study and mid-IR optical excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Kostov, Yordan; Bewley, William W.; Kim, Chul-Soo; Kim, Mijin; Canedy, Chadwick L.; Merritt, Charles D.; Vurgaftman, Igor; Meyer, Jerry R.; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal optical excitation can provide non-contacting tools to explore brain circuitry and a durable stimulation interface for cardiac pacing and visual as well as auditory sensory neuronal stimulation. To obtain accurate absorption spectra, we scan the transmission of neurons in cell culture medium, and normalize it by subtracting out the absorption spectrum of the medium alone. The resulting spectra show that the main neuronal absorption peaks are in the 3000- 6000nm band, although there is a smaller peak near 1450nm. By coupling the output of a 3μm interband cascade laser (ICL) into a mid-IR fluorozirconate fiber, we can effectively deliver more than 1J/cm2 photon intensity to the excitation site for neuronal stimulation.

  10. Single-particle absorption spectroscopy by photothermal contrast.

    PubMed

    Yorulmaz, Mustafa; Nizzero, Sara; Hoggard, Anneli; Wang, Lin-Yung; Cai, Yi-Yu; Su, Man-Nung; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan

    2015-05-13

    Removing effects of sample heterogeneity through single-molecule and single-particle techniques has advanced many fields. While background free luminescence and scattering spectroscopy is widely used, recording the absorption spectrum only is rather difficult. Here we present an approach capable of recording pure absorption spectra of individual nanostructures. We demonstrate the implementation of single-particle absorption spectroscopy on strongly scattering plasmonic nanoparticles by combining photothermal microscopy with a supercontinuum laser and an innovative calibration procedure that accounts for chromatic aberrations and wavelength-dependent excitation powers. Comparison of the absorption spectra to the scattering spectra of the same individual gold nanoparticles reveals the blueshift of the absorption spectra, as predicted by Mie theory but previously not detectable in extinction measurements that measure the sum of absorption and scattering. By covering a wavelength range of 300 nm, we are furthermore able to record absorption spectra of single gold nanorods with different aspect ratios. We find that the spectral shift between absorption and scattering for the longitudinal plasmon resonance decreases as a function of nanorod aspect ratio, which is in agreement with simulations. PMID:25849105

  11. Indicating pressure and environmental effects by means of the spectral shift with rhodamine B and fluorescein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johann, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    Fluorescence absorption and emission wavelengths can be influenced by environmental conditions, such as pressure, temperature and concentration. Here those effects are explored with an emphasis on determining the potential of rhodamine B and fluorescein as high-pressure indicators. The red shift of the emission peak maxima of rhodamine B and fluorescein are investigated in dependence of pressure up to 200 MPa using as the solvents water, ethanol and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) with rhodamine B and water, polystyrene beads and melamine resin beads with fluorescein. Emission spectra recording and peak fitting is done automatically at time intervals of down to a second and with 0.3 nm wavelength resolution. The wavenumber-pressure relation for rhodamine B reveals increasing divergence from linear behavior in the sequence of the solvents water, ethanol and silicone rubber. Graphical correlation of the data diverging only slightly from linearity with a selection of polarity functions is enabled using the concept of `deviation from linearity (DL)' plots. Using the example of rhodamine B dissolved in PDMS elastomer it is shown that there is a temperature induced irreversible molecular reordering, when scanning between 3 and ˜50°C, and a polarity change in the proximity of the embedded dye molecule. Swelling studies are performed with PDMS containing rhodamine B, where the elastomer is first put in water, then in ethanol and again in water. There a complex solvent exchange process is revealed in the elastomer demonstrating the feasibility of fluorescence spectroscopy, when observing variations in wavelength, to indicate and enlighten molecular rearrangements and swelling dynamics in the polymer, and polarity changes and solvent exchange processes in the dye solvation shell.

  12. Reducing Residential Peak Electricity Demand with Mechanical Pre-Cooling of Building Thermal Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Will; Walker, Iain; Roux, Jordan

    2014-08-01

    This study uses an advanced airflow, energy and humidity modelling tool to evaluate the potential for residential mechanical pre-cooling of building thermal mass to shift electricity loads away from the peak electricity demand period. The focus of this study is residential buildings with low thermal mass, such as timber-frame houses typical to the US. Simulations were performed for homes in 12 US DOE climate zones. The results show that the effectiveness of mechanical pre-cooling is highly dependent on climate zone and the selected pre-cooling strategy. The expected energy trade-off between cooling peak energy savings and increased off-peak energy use is also shown.

  13. Dust extinction and absorption: the challenge of porous grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchinnikov, N. V.; Il'in, V. B.; Henning, Th.; Dubkova, D. N.

    2006-01-01

    In many models of dusty objects in space the grains are assumed to be composite or fluffy. However, the computation of the optical properties of such particles is still a very difficult problem. We analyze how the increase of grain porosity influences basic features of cosmic dust - interstellar extinction, dust temperature, infrared bands and millimeter opacity. It is found that an increase of porosity leads to an increase of extinction cross sections at some wavelengths and a decrease at others depending on the grain model. However, this behaviour is sufficient to reproduce the extinction curve in the direction of the star σ Sco using current solar abundances. In the case of the star ζ Oph our model requires larger amounts of carbon and iron in the dust-phase than is available. Porous grains can reproduce the flat extinction across the 3 - 8 μm wavelength range measured for several lines of sight by ISO and Spitzer. Porous grains are generally cooler than compact grains. At the same time, the temperature of very porous grains becomes slightly larger in the case of the EMT-Mie calculations in comparison with the results found from the layered-sphere model. The layered-sphere model predicts a broadening of infrared bands and a shift of the peak position to larger wavelengths as porosity grows. In the case of the EMT-Mie model variations of the feature profile are less significant. It is also shown that the millimeter mass absorption coefficients grow as porosity increases with a faster growth occurring for particles with Rayleigh/non-Rayleigh inclusions. As a result, for very porous particles the coefficients given by two models can differ by a factor of about 3.

  14. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. THE CASE OF EQUAL PEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.; Stevens, A. C.; Rosario, D. J. E-mail: shields@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: acs0196@mail.utexas.edu

    2012-06-10

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked narrow lines (DPAGNs) may be caused by kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs, bipolar outflows, or rotating gaseous disks. We examine the class of DPAGNs in which the two narrow-line components have closely similar intensity as being especially likely to involve disks or jets. Two spectroscopic indicators support this likelihood. For DPAGNs from Smith et al., the 'equal-peaked' objects (EPAGNs) have [Ne V]/[O III]ratios lower than for a control sample of non-double-peaked AGNs. This is unexpected for a pair of normal AGNs in a galactic merger, but may be consistent with [O III] emission from a rotating ring with relatively little gas at small radii. Also, [O III]/H{beta} ratios of the redshifted and blueshifted systems in the EPAGN are more similar to each other than in a control sample, suggestive of a single ionizing source and inconsistent with the binary interpretation.

  15. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  16. Understanding the double peaked El Niño in coupled GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Felicity S.; Wittenberg, Andrew T.; Brown, Jaclyn N.; Marsland, Simon J.; Holbrook, Neil J.

    2016-06-01

    Coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) simulate a diverse range of El Niño-Southern Oscillation behaviors. "Double peaked" El Niño events—where two separate centers of positive sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies evolve concurrently in the eastern and western equatorial Pacific—have been evidenced in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5 CGCMs and are without precedent in observations. The characteristic CGCM double peaked El Niño may be mistaken for a central Pacific warming event in El Niño composites, shifted westwards due to the cold tongue bias. In results from the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator coupled model, we find that the western Pacific warm peak of the double peaked El Niño event emerges due to an excessive westward extension of the climatological cold tongue, displacing the region of strong zonal SST gradients towards the west Pacific. A coincident westward shift in the zonal current anomalies reinforces the western peak in SST anomalies, leading to a zonal separation between the warming effect of zonal advection (in the west Pacific) and that of vertical advection (in the east Pacific). Meridional advection and net surface heat fluxes further drive growth of the western Pacific warm peak. Our results demonstrate that understanding historical CGCM El Niño behaviors is a necessary precursor to interpreting projections of future CGCM El Niño behaviors, such as changes in the frequency of eastern Pacific El Niño events, under global warming scenarios.

  17. Absorption and pharmacokinetics of phenylbutazone in Welsh Mountain ponies.

    PubMed

    Maitho, T E; Lees, P; Taylor, J B

    1986-03-01

    The disposition of phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg), administered intravenously to six Welsh Mountain ponies, was described by a two-compartment open model. Pharmacokinetic parameters were not significantly different after morning dosing in comparison with afternoon dosing. When phenylbutazone (4.4 mg/kg) was administered orally to the same ponies, marked variations in time to peak concentrations were produced with different feeding schedules. When access to hay was permitted before and after dosing, the mean time to peak concentration was 13.2 +/- 1.2 h and double peaks in the plasma concentration-time curve were common. Double peaks were also encountered when phenylbutazone was given to ponies deprived of food prior to, and allowed access to hay after, dosing. In this circumstance, mean times to peak concentration were much shorter (3.8 +/- 1.3 h after morning dosing and 5.3 +/- 1.5 h followed afternoon dosing). Absorption was more regular and double peaks were less apparent when food was withheld both before and after dosing. In order to explain these findings, it is tentatively postulated that, whereas some of the administered dose of phenylbutazone may be absorbed quickly, some may become adsorbed on to the feed and subsequently released by fermentative digestion in the large intestine and/or caecum. The consequences of delayed absorption in fed animals for toxicity and clinical efficacy, and for the use of phenylbutazone in equestrian sports, are considered. Delayed absorption in ponies given access to hay was not accompanied by a significant reduction in total absorption. Bioavailability was estimated to be approximately 69% in fed and 78% in unfed ponies. Estimates of bioavailability gave similar values for morning (72%) and afternoon (71%) dosing. PMID:3701913

  18. Measurements and Theoretical Calculations of N2-broadening and N2-shift Coefficients in the v2 band of CH3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predoi-Cross, A.; Hambrook, Kyle; Brawley-Tremblay, Marco; Bouanich, J. P.; Smith, Mary Ann H.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report measured Lorentz N2-broadening and N2-induced pressure-shift coefficients of CH3D in the v2 fundamental band using a multispectrum fitting technique. These measurements were made by analyzing 11 laboratory absorption spectra recorded at 0.0056 cm(exp -1) resolution using the McMath-Pierce Fourier transform spectrometer located at the National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak, Arizona. The spectra were obtained using two absorption cells with path lengths of 10.2 and 25 cm. The total sample pressures ranged from 0.98 to 402.25 Torr with CH3D volume mixing ratios of 0.01 in nitrogen. We have been able to determine the N2 pressure- broadening coefficients of 368 v2 transitions with quantum numbers as high as J"= 20 and K = 16, where K" = K' equivalent to K (for a parallel band). The measured N2-broadening coefficients range from 0.0248 to 0.0742 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1) at 296 K. All the measured pressure-shifts are negative. The reported N2-induced pressure-shift coefficients vary from about 0.0003 to 0.0094 cm(exp -1) atm(exp -1). We have examined the dependence of the measured broadening and shift parameters on the J", and K quantum numbers and also developed empirical expressions to describe the broadening coefficients in terms of m (m = -J", J", and J" + 1 in the (sup Q)P-, (sup Q)Q-, and (sup Q)R-branch, respectively) and K. On average, the empirical expressions reproduce the measured broadening coefficients to within 4.7%. The N2-broadening and pressureshift coefficients were calculated on the basis of a semiclassical model of interacting linear molecules performed by considering in addition to the electrostatic contributions the atom atom Lennard-Jones potential. The theoretical results of the broadening coefficients are in good overall agreement with the experimental data (8.7%). The N2-pressure shifts whose vibrational contribution is derived from parameters fitted in the (sup Q)Q-branch of self-induced shifts of CH3D, are also in

  19. Integrated reformer and shift reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, Jeffrey M.; Clawson, Lawrence G.; Mitchell, William L.; Dorson, Matthew H.

    2006-06-27

    A hydrocarbon fuel reformer for producing diatomic hydrogen gas is disclosed. The reformer includes a first reaction vessel, a shift reactor vessel annularly disposed about the first reaction vessel, including a first shift reactor zone, and a first helical tube disposed within the first shift reactor zone having an inlet end communicating with a water supply source. The water supply source is preferably adapted to supply liquid-phase water to the first helical tube at flow conditions sufficient to ensure discharge of liquid-phase and steam-phase water from an outlet end of the first helical tube. The reformer may further include a first catalyst bed disposed in the first shift reactor zone, having a low-temperature shift catalyst in contact with the first helical tube. The catalyst bed includes a plurality of coil sections disposed in coaxial relation to other coil sections and to the central longitudinal axis of the reformer, each coil section extending between the first and second ends, and each coil section being in direct fluid communication with at least one other coil section.

  20. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL