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Sample records for absorption peaks centered

  1. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  2. Gigahertz-peaked Spectra Pulsars and Thermal Absorption Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kijak, J.; Basu, R.; Lewandowski, W.

    2017-05-10

    We present the results of our radio interferometric observations of pulsars at 325 and 610 MHz using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. We used the imaging method to estimate the flux densities of several pulsars at these radio frequencies. The analysis of the shapes of the pulsar spectra allowed us to identify five new gigahertz-peaked spectra (GPS) pulsars. Using the hypothesis that the spectral turnovers are caused by thermal free–free absorption in the interstellar medium, we modeled the spectra of all known objects of this kind. Using the model, we were able to put some observational constraints on the physicalmore » parameters of the absorbing matter, which allows us to distinguish between the possible sources of absorption. We also discuss the possible effects of the existence of GPS pulsars on future search surveys, showing that the optimal frequency range for finding such objects would be from a few GHz (for regular GPS sources) to possibly 10 GHz for pulsars and radio magnetars exhibiting very strong absorption.« less

  3. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  4. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  5. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-21

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.

  6. Sharp Absorption Peaks in THz Spectra Valuable for Crystal Quality Evaluation of Middle Molecular Weight Pharmaceuticals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Tetsuo; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Otsuka, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    Middle molecular weight (MMW) pharmaceuticals (MW 400 4000) are attracting attention for their possible use in new medications. Sharp absorption peaks were observed in MMW pharmaceuticals at low temperatures by measuring with a high-resolution terahertz (THz) spectrometer. As examples, high-resolution THz spectra for amoxicillin trihydrate, atorvastatin calcium trihydrate, probucol, and α,β,γ,δ-tetrakis(1-methylpyridinium-4-yl)porphyrin p-toluenesulfonate (TMPyP) were obtained at 10 K. Typically observed as peaks with full width at half-height (FWHM) values as low as 5.639 GHz at 0.96492 THz in amoxicillin trihydrate and 8.857 GHz at 1.07974 THz for probucol, many sharp peaks of MMW pharmaceuticals could be observed. Such narrow absorption peaks enable evaluation of the crystal quality of MMW pharmaceuticals and afford sensitive detection of impurities.

  7. Temperature shift of intraband absorption peak in tunnel-coupled QW structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, V.; Firsov, D. A.; Duque, C. A.; Tulupenko, V.; Balagula, R. M.; Vinnichenko, M. Ya.; Vorobjev, L. E.

    2017-04-01

    An experimental study of the intersubband light absorption by the 100-period GaAs/Al0.25Ga0.75As double quantum well heterostructure doped with silicon is reported and interpreted. Small temperature redshift of the 1-3 intersubband absorption peak is detected. Numerical calculations of the absorption coefficient including self-consistent Hartree calculations of the bottom of the conduction band show good agreement with the observed phenomena. The temperature dependence of energy gap of the material and the depolarization shift should be accounted for to explain the shift.

  8. The line-locking hypothesis, absorption by intervening galaxies, and the z = 1.95 peak in redshifts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burbidge, G.

    1978-01-01

    The controversy over whether the absorption spectrum in QSOs is intrinsic or extrinsic is approached with attention to the peak of redshifts at z = 1.95. Also considered are the line-locking and the intervening galaxy hypotheses. The line locking hypothesis is based on observations that certain ratios found in absorption line QSOs are preferred, and leads inevitably to the conclusion that the absorption line systems are intrinsic. The intervening galaxy hypothesis is based on absorption redshifts resulting from given absorption cross-sections of galactic clusters and the intergalactic medium, and would lead to the theoretical conclusion that most QSOs show strong absorption, a conclusion which is not supported by empirical data. The 1.95 peak, on the other hand, is most probably an intrinsic property of QSOs. The peak is enhanced by redshift, and it is noted that both an emission and an absorption redshift peak are seen at 1.95.

  9. New types of high field pinning centers and pinning centers for the peak effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajda, Daniel; Zaleski, Andrzej; Morawski, Andrzej; Hossain, Md Shahriar A.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we report the results of a study that shows the existence of pinning centers inside grains and between grains in NbTi wires. We accurately show the ranges of magnetic fields in which the individual pinning centers operate. The pinning centers inside grains are activated in high magnetic fields above 6 T. We show the range of magnetic fields in which individual defects, dislocations, precipitates inside grains and substitutions in the crystal lattice can operate. We show the existence of a new kind of high field pinning center, which operates in high magnetic fields from 8 to ˜9.5 T. We indicate that dislocations create pinning centers in the range of magnetic fields from 6 to 8 T. In addition, our measurements suggest that the peak effect (increased critical current density (J c) near the upper critical field (B c2)) could be attributed to martensitic (needle-shaped) α‧-Ti inclusions inside grains. These centers are very important because they work very effectively in magnetic fields above 9.5-10 T. We also show that the α-Ti precipitates (between grains) with a thickness similar to the coherence length create pinning centers which work very effectively in magnetic fields from 3 to 6 T. In magnetic fields below 3 T, they act very efficiently in grain boundaries. The measurements indicate that the pinning centers created by dislocations only can be tested by transport measurements. This indicates that dislocations do not increase the magnetic critical current density (J cm). Cold drawing improves pinning centers at grain boundaries and increases the dislocation density, and cold-drawing pinning centers are responsible for the peak effect.

  10. Phonons in Confinement and the Boson Peak Using Nuclear Inelastic Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asthalter, T.; Bauer, M.; van Bürck, U.; Sergueev, I.; Franz, H.; Chumakov, A. I.

    2002-12-01

    We have applied nuclear inelastic absorption (NIA) to the molecular glass former dibutylphthalate/ferrocene, both in bulk and in nanoporous matrices having pore sizes of 50 and 25 Å, respectively. The quantity g(E)/E 2, where g(E) is the vibrational phonon density of states (VDOS) of the resonant nuclei, exhibits a pronounced maximum at low energies. Confinement in pores leads to a suppression of the VDOS below 1.5 meV, independent of the pore size. Also in the scaled heat capacity C(T)/T 3, we observe a decrease of the peak maximum for low temperatures. Our observations are discussed in the light of experimental and theoretical results on nanocrystals and a recent theoretical model for the boson peak.

  11. THERMAL ABSORPTION AS THE CAUSE OF GIGAHERTZ-PEAKED SPECTRA IN PULSARS AND MAGNETARS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, Wojciech; Rożko, Karolina; Kijak, Jarosław

    2015-07-20

    We present a model that explains the observed deviation of the spectra of some pulsars and magnetars from the power-law spectra that are seen in the bulk of the pulsar population. Our model is based on the assumption that the observed variety of pulsar spectra can be naturally explained by the thermal free–free absorption that takes place in the surroundings of the pulsars. In this context, the variety of the pulsar spectra can be explained according to the shape, density, and temperature of the absorbing media and the optical path of the line of sight across it. We have putmore » specific emphasis on the case of the radio magnetar SGR J1745–2900 (also known as the Sgr A* magnetar), modeling the rapid variations of the pulsar spectrum after the outburst of 2013 April as due to the free–free absorption of the radio emission in the electron material ejected during the magnetar outburst. The ejecta expands with time and consequently the absorption rate decreases and the shape of the spectrum changes in such a way that the peak frequency shifts toward the lower radio frequencies. In the hypothesis of an absorbing medium, we also discuss the similarity between the spectral behavior of the binary pulsar B1259–63 and the spectral peculiarities of isolated pulsars.« less

  12. Analysis and Assessment of Peak Lightning Current Probabilities at the NASA Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.; Vaughan, W. W.

    1999-01-01

    This technical memorandum presents a summary by the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch at the Marshall Space Flight Center of lightning characteristics and lightning criteria for the protection of aerospace vehicles. Probability estimates are included for certain lightning strikes (peak currents of 200, 100, and 50 kA) applicable to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Shuttle at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, during rollout, on-pad, and boost/launch phases. Results of an extensive literature search to compile information on this subject are presented in order to answer key questions posed by the Space Shuttle Program Office at the Johnson Space Center concerning peak lightning current probabilities if a vehicle is hit by a lightning cloud-to-ground stroke. Vehicle-triggered lightning probability estimates for the aforementioned peak currents are still being worked. Section 4.5, however, does provide some insight on estimating these same peaks.

  13. Absorption Peaks: α, β, γ and Their Covariance with Age and Hemoglobin in Human Blood Samples Using Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Domínguez, J. L.; Hernández-Aguilar, C.; Domínguez-Pacheco, F. A.; Martínez-Ortiz, E.; Cruz-Orea, A.; Sánchez-Sinencio, F.

    2012-11-01

    This study reports the absorption peaks α, β, γ in the Soret band of photoacoustic (PA) signals and their covariance with age and hemoglobin in human blood samples through PA spectroscopy. Samples were taken randomly from a masculine population grouped in three categories according to age: infants, young adults, and senior adults. Samples were prepared with two drops of blood from a 0.5 mL insulin syringe with a needle gauge 31G over 5 mm circles of filter paper. It was observed that the PA signal, the amplitude as a function of the wavelength, has a behavior as that reported for human blood for the three absorption peaks α, β, γ. In particular, the ratio γ/ β is due to electronic transitions associated with charge-transfer interactions of iron orbitals with the ligand states. Through an evaluation of optical absorption peaks in blood samples and their covariance with age and hemoglobin concentration, a relationship was found for the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with such parameters. Specifically, a negative covariance in the Soret band of the ratio peaks γ/ β and γ/ α with respect to both age and hemoglobin was found. This showed a tendency in their behavior. Further experiments of different populations may corroborate these conclusions.

  14. Potential for deep basin-centered gas accumulation in Travis Peak (Hosston) Formation, Gulf Coastal Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartberger, Charles E.; Dyman, Thaddeus S.; Condon, Steven M.

    2003-01-01

    The potential of Lower Cretaceous sandstones of the Travis Peak Formation in the northern Gulf Coast Basin to harbor a basin-centered gas accumulation was evaluated by examining (1) the depositional and diagenetic history and reservoir properties of Travis Peak sandstones, (2) the presence and quality of source rocks for generating gas, (3) the burial and thermal history of source rocks and time of gas generation and migration relative to tectonic development of Travis Peak traps, (4) gas and water recoveries from drill-stem and formation tests, (5) the distribution of abnormal pressures based on shut-in-pressure data, and (6) the presence or absence of gas-water contacts associated with gas accumulations in Travis Peak sandstones. The Travis Peak Formation (and correlative Hosston Formation) is a basinward-thickening wedge of terrigenous clastic sedimentary rocks that underlies the northern Gulf Coast Basin from eastern Texas across northern Louisiana to southern Mississippi. Clastic infl ux was focused in two main fl uvial-deltaic depocenters?one located in northeastern Texas and the other in southeastern Mississippi and northeastern Louisiana. Across the main hydrocarbon-productive trend in eastern Texas and northern Louisiana, the Travis Peak Formation is about 2,000 ft thick. Most Travis Peak hydrocarbon production in eastern Texas comes from drilling depths between 6,000 and 10,000 ft. Signifi cant decrease in porosity and permeability occurs through that depth interval. Above 8,000-ft drilling depth in eastern Texas, Travis Peak sandstone matrix permeabilities often are signifi cantly higher than the 0.1-millidarcy (mD) cutoff that characterizes tight-gas reservoirs. Below 8,000 ft, matrix permeability of Travis Peak sandstones is low because of pervasive quartz cementation, but abundant natural fractures impart signifi cant fracture permeability. Although pressure data within the middle and lower Travis Peak Formation are limited in eastern Texas

  15. The room temperature annealing peak in ionomers: Ionic crystallites or water absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, R.J.; Grady, B.P.; Cooper, S.L.

    1994-03-28

    A quaternized diol, 3-(trimethylammonio)-1,2-propanediol neutralized with either bromine or iodine, was used to produce a polyurethane cationomer with a poly(tetramethylene oxide) soft segment and a 4,4[prime]-diphenylmethane diisocyanate hard segment. If those cationomers were annealed at room temperature for a period of approximately 1 month in a desiccator filled with dry CaSO[sub 4], differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies showed an endotherm centered near 70 C which was not present in the unannealed polymer and did not reappear upon subsequent cooling and heating cycles in the DSC. Some authors have suggested that a very similar endotherm found in other ionomers, most notablymore » ethylene-methacrylic acid (E-MAA) copolymer ionomers, was due to an order-disorder transition within the ionic aggregates, i.e. ionic crystallite melting. In order to isolate the origin of this endotherm, the local environment around the anion in compression molded bromine neutralized samples was measured using the extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) technique. By measuring the change in the local environment over the temperature range corresponding to the DSC endotherm, it has been shown that this endotherm corresponds to water leaving the bromine coordination shell, rather than ionic crystallite melting. Other studies which include thoroughly drying the material in a vacuum oven below the transition temperature to remove the water suggest that the endotherm is due to the energetic change associated with water leaving the coordination environment of the anion in combination with water vaporization.« less

  16. A Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    This conference abstract describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violatioas.The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean end peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  17. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    ;Pure shift; NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  19. Comment on "Hydrogen Balmer beta: The separation between line peaks for plasma electron density diagnostics and self-absorption test"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Surmick, David M.; Parigger, Christian G.

    2015-07-01

    In this letter, we present a brief comment regarding the recently published paper by Ivković et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2015;154:1-8. Reference is made to previous experimental results to indicate that self absorption must have occurred; however, when carefully considering error propagation, both widths and peak-separation predict electron densities within the error margins. Yet the diagnosis method and the presented details on the use of the hydrogen beta peak separation are viewed as a welcomed contribution in studies of laser-induced plasma.

  20. Total absorption peak by use of a rigid frame porous layer backed by a rigid multi-irregularities grating.

    PubMed

    Groby, J-P; Lauriks, W; Vigran, T E

    2010-05-01

    The acoustic properties of a low resistivity porous layer backed by a rigid plate containing periodic rectangular irregularities, creating a multicomponent diffraction gratings, are investigated. Numerical and experimental results show that the structure possesses a total absorption peak at the frequency of the modified mode of the layer, when designed as proposed in the article. These results are explained by an analysis of the acoustic response of the whole structure and especially by the modal analysis of the configuration. When more than one irregularity per spatial period is considered, additional higher frequency peaks are observed.

  1. The effect of interstellar absorption on measurements of the baryon acoustic peak in the Lyman α forest

    SciTech Connect

    Vadai, Yishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Baron, Dalya

    In recent years, the autocorrelation of the hydrogen Lyman α forest has been used to observe the baryon acoustic peak at redshift 2 < z < 3.5 using tens of thousands of QSO spectra from the BOSS survey. However, the interstellar medium of the Milky Way introduces absorption lines into the spectrum of any extragalactic source. These lines, while weak and undetectable in a single BOSS spectrum, could potentially bias the cosmological signal. In order to examine this, we generate absorption line maps by stacking over a million spectra of galaxies and QSOs. Here, we find that the systematics introducedmore » are too small to affect the current accuracy of the baryon acoustic peak, but might be relevant to future surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We outline a method to account for this with future data sets.« less

  2. The effect of interstellar absorption on measurements of the baryon acoustic peak in the Lyman α forest

    DOE PAGES

    Vadai, Yishay; Poznanski, Dovi; Baron, Dalya; ...

    2017-08-14

    In recent years, the autocorrelation of the hydrogen Lyman α forest has been used to observe the baryon acoustic peak at redshift 2 < z < 3.5 using tens of thousands of QSO spectra from the BOSS survey. However, the interstellar medium of the Milky Way introduces absorption lines into the spectrum of any extragalactic source. These lines, while weak and undetectable in a single BOSS spectrum, could potentially bias the cosmological signal. In order to examine this, we generate absorption line maps by stacking over a million spectra of galaxies and QSOs. Here, we find that the systematics introducedmore » are too small to affect the current accuracy of the baryon acoustic peak, but might be relevant to future surveys such as the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). We outline a method to account for this with future data sets.« less

  3. Design of parallel transmission pulses for simultaneous multislice with explicit control for peak power and local specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Bastien; Setsompop, Kawin; Ye, Huihui; Poser, Benedikt A; Stenger, Andrew V; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-05-01

    To design parallel transmit (pTx) simultaneous multislice (SMS) spokes pulses with explicit control for peak power and local and global specific absorption rate (SAR). We design SMS pTx least-squares and magnitude least squares spokes pulses while constraining local SAR using the virtual observation points (VOPs) compression of SAR matrices. We evaluate our approach in simulations of a head (7T) and a body (3T) coil with eight channels arranged in two z-rows. For many of our simulations, control of average power by Tikhonov regularization of the SMS pTx spokes pulse design yielded pulses that violated hardware and SAR safety limits. On the other hand, control of peak power alone yielded pulses that violated local SAR limits. Pulses optimized with control of both local SAR and peak power satisfied all constraints and therefore had the best excitation performance under limited power and SAR constraints. These results extend our previous results for single slice pTx excitations but are more pronounced because of the large power demands and SAR of SMS pulses. Explicit control of local SAR and peak power is required to generate optimal SMS pTx excitations satisfying both the system's hardware limits and regulatory safety limits. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

    2008-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of

  5. Estimation of absorption rate constant (ka) following oral administration by Wagner-Nelson, Loo-Riegelman, and statistical moments in the presence of a secondary peak.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Iftekhar

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of Wagner-Nelson, Loo-Reigelman, and statistical moments methods in determining the absorption rate constant(s) in the presence of a secondary peak. These methods were also evaluated when there were two absorption rates without a secondary peak. Different sets of plasma concentration versus time data for a hypothetical drug following one or two compartment models were generated by simulation. The true ka was compared with the ka estimated by Wagner-Nelson, Loo-Riegelman and statistical moments methods. The results of this study indicate that Wagner-Nelson, Loo-Riegelman and statistical moments methods may not be used for the estimation of absorption rate constants in the presence of a secondary peak or when absorption takes place with two absorption rates.

  6. Identification of B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure peaks of boron nitride thin films prepared by sputtering deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Niibe, Masahito; Miyamoto, Kazuyoshi; Mitamura, Tohru

    2010-09-15

    Four {pi}{sup *} resonance peaks were observed in the B-K near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of boron nitride thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering. In the past, these peaks have been explained as the K-absorption of boron atoms, which are present in environment containing nitrogen vacancies, the number of which is 1-3 corresponding to the three peaks at higher photon energy. However, the authors found that there was a strong correlation between the intensities of these three peaks and that of O-K absorption after wide range scanning and simultaneous measurement of nitrogen and oxygen K-absorptions of the BNmore » films. Therefore, the authors conclude that these three peaks at the higher energy side correspond to boron atoms bound to one-to-three oxygen atoms instead of three nitrogen atoms surrounding the boron atom in the h-BN structure. The result of the first-principles calculation with a simple cluster model supported the validity of this explanation.« less

  7. Developing a Peak Wind Probability Forecast Tool for Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, WInifred; Roeder, William

    2007-01-01

    This conference presentation describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in east-central Florida. The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool will include climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  8. Performance characteristics of single effect lithium bromide/ water absorption chiller for small data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysore, Abhishek Arun Babu

    A medium data center consists of servers performing operations such as file sharing, collaboration and email. There are a large number of small and medium data centers across the world which consume more energy and are less efficient when compared to large data center facilities of companies such as GOOGLE, APPLE and FACEBOOK. Such companies are making their data center facilities more environmental friendly by employing renewable energy solutions such as wind and solar to power the data center or in data center cooling. This not only reduces the carbon footprint significantly but also decreases the costs incurred over a period of time. Cooling of data center play a vital role in proper functioning of the servers. It is found that cooling consumes about 50% of the total power consumed by the data center. Traditional method of cooling includes the use of mechanical compression chillers which consume lot of power and is not desirable. In order to eliminate the use of mechanical compressor chillers renewable energy resources such as solar and wind should be employed. One such technology is solar thermal cooling by means of absorption chiller which is powered by solar energy. The absorption chiller unit can be coupled with either flat plate or evacuated tube collectors in order to achieve the required inlet temperature for the generator of the absorption chiller unit. In this study a modular data center is considered having a cooling load requirement of 23kw. The performance characteristics of a single stage Lithium Bromide/ water refrigeration is presented in this study considering the cooling load of 23kw. Performance characteristics of each of the 4 heat exchangers within the unit is discussed which helps in customizing the unit according to the users' specific needs. This analysis helps in studying the importance of different properties such as the effect of inlet temperatures of hot water for generator, inlet temperatures of cooling water for absorber and

  9. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  10. On the stability of the fragments and associated properties at the peak center-of-mass energy of light fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, Preeti

    2016-05-01

    We simulate semi-central symmetric system reactions, for center-of-mass energies at which maximal number of light fragments (2 ≤ A ≤ 4) occurs and at a fixed Ec.m. = 60 AMeV. The study was carried out with soft EOS using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. We studied various properties of fragments at peak Ec.m. and also at constant energy (Ec.m. = 60 AMeV) to find out the relative difference between the properties at both energies.

  11. On the stability of the fragments and associated properties at the peak center-of-mass energy of light fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, Preeti

    We simulate semi-central symmetric system reactions, for center-of-mass energies at which maximal number of light fragments (2 ≤ A ≤ 4) occurs and at a fixed E{sub c.m.} = 60 AMeV. The study was carried out with soft EOS using isospin-dependent quantum molecular dynamics (IQMD) model. We studied various properties of fragments at peak E{sub c.m.} and also at constant energy (E{sub c.m.} = 60 AMeV) to find out the relative difference between the properties at both energies.

  12. The origin of the split B800 absorption peak in the LH2 complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Carey, Anne-Marie; Hacking, Kirsty; Picken, Nichola; Kelly, Sharon; Cogdell, Richard; Köhler, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the high-light peripheral light-harvesting (LH) complex from the photosynthetic purple bacterium Allochromatium vinosum features two strong absorptions around 800 and 850 nm. For the LH2 complexes from the species Rhodopseudomonas acidophila and Rhodospirillum molischianum, where high-resolution X-ray structures are available, similar bands have been observed and were assigned to two pigment pools of BChl a molecules that are arranged in two concentric rings (B800 and B850) with nine (acidophila) or eight (molischianum) repeat units, respectively. However, for the high-light peripheral LH complex from Alc. vinosum, the intruiging feature is that the B800 band is split into two components. We have studied this pigment-protein complex by ensemble CD spectroscopy and polarisation-resolved single-molecule spectroscopy. Assuming that the high-light peripheral LH complex in Alc. vinosum is constructed on the same modular principle as described for LH2 from Rps. acidophila and Rsp. molischianum, we used those repeat units as a starting point for simulating the spectra. We find the best agreement between simulation and experiment for a ring-like oligomer of 12 repeat units, where the mutual arrangement of the B800 and B850 rings resembles those from Rsp. molischianum. The splitting of the B800 band can be reproduced if both an excitonic coupling between dimers of B800 molecules and their interaction with the B850 manifold are taken into account. Such dimers predict an interesting apoprotein organisation as discussed below.

  13. [Determination of critical micelle concentration of alkyl polyglucoside (APG) nonionic surfactant aqueous system by multi-peaks Gaussian fitting of visible absorption spectra line shape].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Hua; Kong, Kai-Qing; He, Zheng-Ling; Liu, Zi-Li

    2007-07-01

    A multi-peaks Gaussian fitting on the line shape of visible spectra was used to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of alkyl polyglucoside (APG) nonionic surfactant aqueous system such as octyl beta D mono-glucoside (C8 G1) and decyl beta D mono-glucoside (C10 G1). Visible electronic absorption spectra of a series of different concentration C8G1 or C10G1 with crystal violet (CV) used as a probe were measured respectively and characterized by the overlap of the principal peak with lambda(max) at 598-609 nm and a shoulder at 538-569 nm assigned to monomer and dimer CV respectively. A multi-peaks Gaussian fitting was used to interpret the spectra and give relative integrating absorbance (A2/A1) of two peaks, red-shift (deltalambda) and half-width. A sudden change occurred at CMC in the curves of the relative integrating absorbance (A2/A1), red-shift (deltalambda) and half-width (w1, w2) versus the C8G1 or C10G1 surfactant concentrations. Significantly the dependence of the CMC upon the half-width was ob-served for the first time and successfully used to determine CMC of nonionic surfactant such as APG.

  14. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily morning forecast for ground and space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) must issue forecast advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect peak gusts for >= 25, >= 35, and >= 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. In Phase I of this task, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a cool-season (October - April) tool to help forecast the non-convective peak wind from the surface to 300 ft at KSC/CCAFS. During the warm season, these wind speeds are rarely exceeded except during convective winds or under the influence of tropical cyclones, for which other techniques are already in use. The tool used single and multiple linear regression equations to predict the peak wind from the morning sounding. The forecaster manually entered several observed sounding parameters into a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI), and then the tool displayed the forecast peak wind speed, average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, the timing of the peak wind and the probability the peak wind will meet or exceed 35, 50 and 60 kt. The 45 WS customers later dropped the requirement for >= 60 kt wind warnings. During Phase II of this task, the AMU expanded the period of record (POR) by six years to increase the number of observations used to create the forecast equations. A large number of possible predictors were evaluated from archived soundings, including inversion depth and strength, low-level wind shear, mixing height, temperature lapse rate and winds from the surface to 3000 ft. Each day in the POR was stratified in a number of ways, such as by low-level wind direction, synoptic weather pattern, precipitation and Bulk Richardson number. The most accurate Phase II equations were then selected for an independent verification. The Phase I and II forecast methods were

  16. Lead is not off center in PbTe: the importance of r-space phase information in extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keiber, T; Bridges, F; Sales, B C

    2013-08-30

    PbTe is a well-known thermoelectric material. Recent x-ray total scattering studies suggest that Pb moves off center along 100 in PbTe, by ∼0.2  Å at 300 K, producing a split Pb-Te pair distribution. We present an extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) study of PbTe (and Tl doped PbTe) to determine if Pb or Te is off center. EXAFS provides sensitive r- or k-space phase information which can differentiate between a split peak for the Pb-Te distribution (indicative of off-center Pb) and a thermally broadened peak. We find no evidence for a split peak for Pb-Te or Te-Pb. At 300 K, the vibration amplitude for Pb-Te (or Te-Pb) is large; this thermally induced disorder is indicative of weak bonds, and the large disorder is consistent with the low thermal conductivity at 300 K. We also find evidence of an anharmonic potential for the nearest Pb-Te bonds, consistent with the overall anharmonicity found for the phonon modes. This effect is modeled by a "skew" factor (C3) which significantly improves the fit of the Pb-Te and Te-Pb peaks for the high temperature EXAFS data; C3 becomes significant above approximately 150-200 K. The consequences of these results will be discussed.

  17. Polarized Infrared Absorption of Dipole Centers in Cadmium Halide and PbI2 Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakami, Mitsushi; Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2004-03-01

    Polarized infrared (IR) absorption measurements on CN- or OH- centers in cadmium halide and PbI2 crystals were carried out at 6 K with a high spectral resolution of 0.025 cm-1 at 2000 cm-1 by using a FTIR spectrometer. Several sharp absorption lines with widths less than 0.1 cm-1 are observed in the energy region of the stretching vibration, i.e. 2000 to 2250 cm-1 for CN- and 2500 to 4500 cm-1 for OH-. These lines are classified into several groups attributed to (1) an isolated center simply substituted for a halogen ion, (2) an interstitial center located between the cadmium and halogen ion sheets and (3) a coupled center with an anion vacancy or a host metal ion. Almost all of the dipole axes (bond axes) of the CN- ions doped in MI2 (M = Cd or Pb) are parallel to the crystal c-axes, while those of the isolated and coupled CN- centers in CdX2 (X = Cl or Br) lean away from the direction of the c-axis. The most OH- ions doped in CdX2 (X = Cl, Br or I) and PbI2 are arranged in the halogen-ion planes with their dipole axes parallel to the crystal c-axes. The first overtone yields values of χe and ωeχe for CN- and OH- in CdX2 and PbI2. These values explain well the isotope shift of the main stretching band in CdX2 and PbI2.

  18. MW peak power Er/Yb-doped fiber femtosecond laser amplifier at 1.5 µm center wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seongheum; Jang, Heesuk; Kim, Seungman; Kim, Young-Jin; Kim, Seung-Woo

    2017-08-01

    An erbium (Er)/ytterbium (Yb) co-doped double-clad fiber is configured to amplify single-mode pulses with a high average power of 10 W at a 1.5 µm center wavelength. The pulse duration at the exit of the Er/Yb fiber amplifier is measured to be ~440 fs after grating-based compression. The whole single-mode operation of the amplifier system permits the M 2-value of the output beam quality to be evaluated better than 1.05. By tuning the repetition rate from 100 MHz down to 600 kHz, the pulse peak power is scaled up to 19.1 MW to be the highest ever reported using an Er/Yb single-mode fiber. The proposed amplifier system is well suited for strong-power applications such as free-space LIDAR, non-thermal machining and medical surgery.

  19. Expedition 44 backup crew ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Timothy Peake (left), Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (ROSCOSMOS) (center), and NASA astronaut Timothy L. Kopra

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-02-19

    JSC2015E053686 (04/30/2015) --- Expedition 44 backup crew ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Timothy Peake (left), Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (ROSCOSMOS) (center), and NASA astronaut Timothy L. Kopra .

  20. An x-ray absorption study of the iron site in bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers.

    PubMed Central

    Bunker, G; Stern, E A; Blankenship, R E; Parson, W W

    1982-01-01

    Measurements were made of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the iron site in photosynthetic reaction centers from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides. Forms with two quinones, two quinones with added o-phenanthroline, and one quinone were studied. Only the two forms containing two quinones maintained their integrity and were analyzed. The spectra show directly that the added o-phenanthroline does not chelate the iron atom. Further analysis indicates that the iron is octahedrally coordinated by nitrogen and/or oxygen atoms located at various distances, with the average value of about 2.14 A. The analysis suggests that most of the ligands are nitrogens and that three of the nitrogen ligands belong to histidine rings. This interpretation accounts for several unusual features of the EXAFS spectrum. We speculate that the quinones are bound to the histidine rings in some manner. Qualitative features of the absorption edge spectra also are discussed and are related to the Fe-ligand distance. PMID:6977382

  1. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred

    2010-01-01

    This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds are an important forecast element for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to develop a short-range peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations.The tool includes climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds by month, hour, and direction, and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  2. Peak Wind Forecasts for the Launch-Critical Wind Towers on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Phase IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winifred

    2011-01-01

    This final report describes the development of a peak wind forecast tool to assist forecasters in determining the probability of violating launch commit criteria (LCC) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The peak winds arc an important forecast clement for both the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) programs. The LCC define specific peak wind thresholds for each launch operation that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the vehicle. The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) has found that peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October through April. Based on the importance of forecasting peak winds, the 45 WS tasked the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to update the statistics in the current peak-wind forecast tool to assist in forecasting LCC violations. The tool includes onshore and offshore flow climatologies of the 5-minute mean and peak winds and probability distributions of the peak winds as a function of the 5-minute mean wind speeds.

  3. Radiation torque on an absorptive spherical drop centered on an acoustic helicoidal Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L.

    2009-11-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic waves carry axial angular momentum and analysis shows that the axial radiation torque on an illuminated sphere is proportional to the power absorbed by the sphere [1]. Helicoidal acoustic beams also carry axial angular momentum and absorption of such a beam should also produce an axial radiation torque [2]. In the present work the acoustic radiation torque on solid spheres and spherical drops centered on acoustic helicoidal Bessel beams is examined. The torque is predicted to be proportional to the ratio of the absorbed power to the acoustic frequency. Depending on the beam helicity, the torque is parallel or anti-parallel to the beam axis. The analysis uses a relation between the scattering and the partial wave coefficients for a sphere in a helicoidal Bessel beam. Calculations suggest that beams with a low topological charge are more efficient for generating torques on solid spheres.[4pt] [1] P. L. Marston and J. H. Crichton, Phys. Rev. A. 30, 2508-2516 (1984).[0pt] [2] B. T. Hefner and P. L. Marston, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 106, 3313-3316 (1999).

  4. Tool for Forecasting Cool-Season Peak Winds Across Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Roeder, William P.

    2010-01-01

    Peak wind speed is important element in 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS). Forecasts issued for planning operations at KSC/CCAFS. 45 WS wind advisories issued for wind gusts greater than or equal to 25 kt. 35 kt and 50 kt from surface to 300 ft. AMU developed cool-season (Oct - Apr) tool to help 45 WS forecast: daily peak wind speed, 5-minute average speed at time of peak wind, and probability peak speed greater than or equal to 25 kt, 35 kt, 50 kt. AMU tool also forecasts daily average wind speed from 30 ft to 60 ft. Phase I and II tools delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). Phase II tool also delivered as Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) GUI. Phase I and II forecast methods were compared to climatology, 45 WS wind advisories and North American Mesoscale model (MesoNAM) forecasts in a verification data set.

  5. Fine-scale structure in the -185 kilometers per second absorption by HCO(+) in the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marr, Jonathan M.; Rudolph, Alexander L.; Pauls, Thomas A.; Wright, Melvyn C. H.; Backer, Donald C.

    1992-01-01

    We present a high-resolution study of the HCO(+) (J = 1-0) absorption by the 'high-velocity gas' at velocities between -170 and -200 km/s in Sgr A West. The absorption against the continuum radiation from the ionized gas features in Sgr A West (in particular the 'bar') is stronger than it is against Sgr A which is separated from the ionized gas by a few arcseconds. The positions of peak HCO(+) opacity coincide with the positions of Ne II emission at these velocities. These observations suggest that, even though emission is detected from gas at these high velocities over several arcminutes, some of the absorbing molecular gas may be mixed in with the ionized gas close to Sgr A. Simple calculations show that sufficient shielding can exist in the ionized features to allow molecules to survive very close to the ionizing source.

  6. Education, Technology, and Media: A Peak into My Summer Internship at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moon, James

    2004-01-01

    My name is James Moon and I am a senor at Tennessee State University where my major is Aeronautical and Industrial Technology with a concentration in industrial electronics. I am currently serving my internship in the Engineering and Technical Services Directorate at the Glenn Research Center (GRC). The Engineering and Technical Service Directorate provides the services and infrastructure for the Glenn Research Center to take research concepts to reality. They provide a full range of integrated services including engineering, advanced prototyping and testing, facility management, and information technology for NASA, industry, and academia. Engineering and Technical Services contains the core knowledge in Information Technology (IT). This includes data systems and analysis, inter and intranet based systems design and data security. Including the design and development of embedded real-time sohare applications for flight and supporting ground systems, Engineering and Technical Services provide a wide range of IT services and products specific to the Glenn Research Center research and engineering community.

  7. Ultraviolet absorption by highly ionized halo gas near the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Massa, D.

    1985-01-01

    Initial results are presented for a program to survey highly ionized gas in the Milky Way disk and halo. High-resolution IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) far-UV spectra were obtained for 12 stars at galactocentric distances less than 6 kpc. The stars are 0.7-2.2 kpc away from the plane. Most of the spectra contain exceedingly strong and broad interstellar absorption lines of weakly and highly ionized atoms. In addition to the normally strong lines of Si IV and C IV, strong interstellar NV lines have been detected in the spectra of eight stars. The detection of NV absorption (amounting to more than 10 times the predicted NV) provides an important new constraint on models for the origin of Galactic halo gas. A Galactic fountain operating in the presence of known UV and EUV radiation might explain the observations.

  8. The manifestation of optical centers in UV-Vis absorption and luminescence spectra of white blood human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'yeva, Yu G.; Yashchuk, V. M.; Zaika, L. A.; Snitserova, O. M.; Losytsky, M. Yu

    2016-12-01

    A white blood human cells spectral investigation is presented. The aim of this series of experiments was to obtain and analyze the absorption and luminescence (fluorescence and phosphorescence) spectra at room temperature and at 78 K of newly isolated white blood human cells and their organelles. As a result the optical centers and possible biochemical components that form the studied spectra where identified. Also the differences between the spectra of abnormal cells (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia BCLL) and normal ones were studied for the whole cells and individual organelles.

  9. Negligible shift of 3Ag- potential in longer-chain carotenoids as revealed by a single persistent peak of 3Ag-→1Ag- stimulated emission followed by 3Ag-←1Ag- transient-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunyong; Miki, Takeshi; Kakitani, Yoshinori; Koyama, Yasushi; Nagae, Hiroyoshi

    2007-12-01

    Upon excitation of lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin or spirilloxanthin to the 1Bu+(0) state, stimulated emission followed by transient-absorption was observed as a single peak with the 3Ag-(0) energy that had been determined by measurement of resonance-Raman excitation profiles. This observation was explained in terms of negligible shift of the 3Ag- potential, in reference to the 1Ag- potential, where only the 3Ag-(υ)→1Ag-(υ) emission and the 3Ag-(υ)←1Ag-(υ) absorption become allowed during the vibrational relaxation of υ = 2 → 1 → 0, starting from the 3Ag-(2) level generated by diabatic internal conversion from the 1Bu+(0) level, in anhydrorhodovibrin, for example.

  10. Absorption and emission spectra of Li atoms trapped in rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. J.; Balling, L. C.

    1980-10-01

    Pulsed-dye-laser excitation has been used to investigate the optical absorption and emission spectra of Li atoms trapped in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices at 10 °K. Attempts to stabilize Li atoms in a Ne matrix at 2 °K were unsuccessful. Results for all three rare gases were qualitatively the same. White light absorption scans showed a single absorption with three peaks centered near the free-atom 2s→2p transition wavelength. The intensity of fluorescence produced by dye-laser excitation within this absorption band was measured as a function of emission wavelength. Excitation of the longest- and shortest-wavelength absorption peaks produced identical emission profiles, but no distinct fluorescence signal was detected when the laser was tuned to the central absorption peaks, indicating that the apparent absorption triplet is actually the superposition of a singlet and a doublet absorption originating from two different trapping sites. No additional absorption bands were detected.

  11. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  12. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong vs band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  13. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong n8 band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  14. RBE and OER within the spread-out Bragg peak for proton beam therapy: in vitro study at the Proton Medical Research Center at the University of Tsukuba

    PubMed Central

    Kanemoto, Ayae; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Moritake, Takashi; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Sun, Lue; Sakae, Takeji; Kuno, Akihiro; Terunuma, Toshiyuki; Yasuoka, Kiyoshi; Mori, Yutaro; Tsuboi, Koji; Sakurai, Hideyuki

    2014-01-01

    There are few reports on the biological homogeneity within the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of proton beams. Therefore, to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells were irradiated at the plateau position (position A) and three different positions within a 6-cm-wide SOBP (position B, 26 mm proximal to the middle; position C, middle; position D, 26 mm distal to the middle) using 155-MeV/n proton beams under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions at the Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Japan. The RBE to the plateau region (RBEplateau) and the OER value were calculated from the doses corresponding to 10% survival data. Under the normoxic condition, the RBEplateau was 1.00, 0.99 and 1.09 for positions B, C and D, respectively. Under the hypoxic condition, the RBEplateau was 1.10, 1.06 and 1.12 for positions B, C and D, respectively. The OER was 2.84, 2.60, 2.63 and 2.76 for positions A, B, C and D, respectively. There were no significant differences in either the RBEplateau or the OER between these three positions within the SOBP. In conclusion, biological homogeneity need not necessarily be taken into account for treatment planning for proton beam therapy at the University of Tsukuba. PMID:24876271

  15. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts on Kennedy Space Center/Cape Canaveral Air Force Station: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred C.; Merceret, Francis J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the results of the ANU's (Applied Meteorology Unit) Short-Range Statistical Forecasting task for peak winds. The peak wind speeds are an important forecast element for the Space Shuttle and Expendable Launch Vehicle programs. The Keith Weather Squadron and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group indicate that peak winds are challenging to forecast. The Applied Meteorology Unit was tasked to develop tools that aid in short-range forecasts of peak winds at tower sites of operational interest. A 7 year record of wind tower data was used in the analysis. Hourly and directional climatologies by tower and month were developed to determine the seasonal behavior of the average and peak winds. In all climatologies, the average and peak wind speeds were highly variable in time. This indicated that the development of a peak wind forecasting tool would be difficult. Probability density functions (PDF) of peak wind speed were calculated to determine the distribution of peak speed with average speed. These provide forecasters with a means of determining the probability of meeting or exceeding a certain peak wind given an observed or forecast average speed. The climatologies and PDFs provide tools with which to make peak wind forecasts that are critical to safe operations.

  16. Demonstration of 4×100 Gbps discrete multitone transmission using electric absorption modulated laser at 1550-nm for dense wavelength division multiplexing intradata center connect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuming; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Xinying

    2017-03-01

    We experimentally demonstrate 4 lanes up to 400 Gbps discrete multitone transmission using an electric absorption modulated laser (EML) at 1550-nm for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) intradata center connects. This is the first demonstration of 4×100 Gb/s transmission using EML at 1550-nm, and it is compatible with the DWDM system at C-band.

  17. Body centered cubic magnesium niobium hydride with facile room temperature absorption and four weight percent reversible capacity.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Holt, Chris M B; Zahiri, Beniamin; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2012-08-21

    We have synthesized a new metastable metal hydride with promising hydrogen storage properties. Body centered cubic (bcc) magnesium niobium hydride (Mg(0.75)Nb(0.25))H(2) possesses 4.5 wt% hydrogen gravimetric density, with 4 wt% being reversible. Volumetric hydrogen absorption measurements yield an enthalpy of hydride formation of -53 kJ mol(-1) H(2), which indicates a significant thermodynamic destabilization relative to the baseline -77 kJ mol(-1) H(2) for rutile MgH(2). The hydrogenation cycling kinetics are remarkable. At room temperature and 1 bar hydrogen it takes 30 minutes to absorb a 1.5 μm thick film at sorption cycle 1, and 1 minute at cycle 5. Reversible desorption is achieved in about 60 minutes at 175 °C. Using ab initio calculations we have examined the thermodynamic stability of metallic alloys with hexagonal close packed (hcp) versus bcc crystal structure. Moreover we have analyzed the formation energies of the alloy hydrides that are bcc, rutile or fluorite.

  18. Urvara Peaks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-08-25

    NASA's Dawn spacecraft took this image that shows a mountain ridge, near lower left, that lies in the center of Urvara crater on Ceres. Urvara is an Indian and Iranian deity of plants and fields. The crater's diameter is 101 miles (163 kilometers). This view was acquired on August 19, 2015, from a distance of 915 miles (1,470 kilometers). The resolution of the image is 450 feet (140 meters) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19632

  19. Mountain Peaks

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-10

    Mountain peaks through the ice cover on Thurston Island off of western Antarctica as seen on the IceBridge flight on Nov. 5, 2014. Image Credit: NASA/Jim Yungel NASA’s Operation IceBridge collected some rare images on a flight out of Punta Arenas, Chile on Nov. 5, 2014, on a science flight over western Antarctica dubbed Ferrigno-Alison-Abbott 01. The crew snapped a few shots of a calving front of the Antarctic ice sheet. This particular flight plan was designed to collect data on changes in ice elevation along the coast near the Ferrigno and Alison ice streams, on the Abbot Ice Shelf, and grounded ice along the Eights Coast.

  20. Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 8 September 2003

    The degraded remains of this crater central peak have a surface cover that is characteristic of high latitudes. This type of surface material is thought to be a mixture of dust and ice. The nameless crater that this central peak is found in is approximately 150 km in diameter and is located in the southern highlands.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -51.6, Longitude 231.4 East (128.6 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Two density peaks in low magnetic field helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.; Ouyang, J. T., E-mail: jtouyang@bit.edu.cn, E-mail: lppmchenqiang@hotmail.com

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, we report two density peaks in argon helicon plasma under an axial magnetic field from 0 G to 250 G with Boswell-type antenna driven by radio frequency (RF) power of 13.56 MHz. The first peak locates at 40–55 G and the second one at 110–165 G, as the RF power is sustainably increased from 100 W to 250 W at Ar pressure of 0.35 Pa. The absorbed power of two peaks shows a linear relationship with the magnetic field. End views of the discharge taken by intensified charge coupled device reveal that, when the first peak appeared, the discharge luminance moves to the edge ofmore » the tube as the magnetic field increases. For the second peak, the strong discharge area is centered at the two antenna legs after the magnetic field reaches a threshold value. Comparing with the simulation, we suggest that the efficient power absorption of two peaks at which the efficient power absorption mainly appears in the near-antenna region is due to the mode conversion in bounded non-uniform helicon plasma. The two low-field peaks are caused, to some extent, by the excitation of Trivelpiece-Gould wave through non-resonance conversion.« less

  2. Complexities in pyroxene compositions derived from absorption band centers: Examples from Apollo samples, HED meteorites, synthetic pure pyroxenes, and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    We reexamine the relationship between pyroxene composition and near-infrared absorption bands, integrating measurements of diverse natural and synthetic samples. We test an algorithm (PLC) involving a two-part linear continuum removal and parabolic fits to the 1 and 2 μm bands—a computationally simple approach which can easily be automated and applied to remote sensing data. Employing a suite of synthetic pure pyroxenes, the PLC technique is shown to derive similar band centers to the modified Gaussian model. PLC analyses are extended to natural pyroxene-bearing materials, including (1) bulk lunar basalts and pyroxene separates, (2) diverse lunar soils, and (3) HED meteorites. For natural pyroxenes, the relationship between composition and absorption band center differs from that of synthetic pyroxenes. These differences arise from complexities inherent in natural materials such as exsolution, zoning, mixing, and space weathering. For these reasons, band center measurements of natural pyroxene-bearing materials are compositionally nonunique and could represent three distinct scenarios (1) pyroxene with a narrow compositional range, (2) complexly zoned pyroxene grains, or (3) a mixture of multiple pyroxene (or nonpyroxene) components. Therefore, a universal quantitative relationship between band centers and pyroxene composition cannot be uniquely derived for natural pyroxene-bearing materials without additional geologic context. Nevertheless, useful relative relationships between composition and band center persist in most cases. These relationships are used to interpret M3 data from the Humboldtianum Basin. Four distinct compositional units are identified (1) Mare Humboldtianum basalts, (2) distinct outer basalts, (3) low-Ca pyroxene-bearing materials, and (4) feldspathic materials.

  3. Proton beam spatial distribution and Bragg peak imaging by photoluminescence of color centers in lithium fluoride crystals at the TOP-IMPLART linear accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ampollini, A.; Bazzano, G.; Picardi, L.; Nenzi, P.; Trinca, E.; Vadrucci, M.; Bonfigli, F.; Nichelatti, E.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2017-11-01

    Solid-state radiation detectors based on the photoluminescence of stable point defects in lithium fluoride crystals have been used for advanced diagnostics during the commissioning of the segment up to 27 MeV of the TOP-IMPLART proton linear accelerator for proton therapy applications, under development at ENEA C.R. Frascati, Italy. The LiF detectors high intrinsic spatial resolution and wide dynamic range allow obtaining two-dimensional images of the beam transverse intensity distribution and also identifying the Bragg peak position with micrometric precision by using a conventional optical fluorescence microscope. Results of the proton beam characterization, among which, the estimation of beam energy components and dynamics, are reported and discussed for different operating conditions of the accelerator.

  4. Peaking Into the Dark

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    In this dramatic scene, an unnamed crater in Mercury's northern volcanic plains is bathed in darkness as the sun sits low on the horizon. Rising from the floor of the crater is its central peak, a small mountain resulting from the crater's formation. A central peak is a type of crater morphology that lies between "simple" and "peak ring" in the range of crater morphology on Mercury. This image was acquired as a high-resolution targeted observation. Targeted observations are images of a small area on Mercury's surface at resolutions much higher than the 200-meter/pixel morphology base map. It is not possible to cover all of Mercury's surface at this high resolution, but typically several areas of high scientific interest are imaged in this mode each week. The MESSENGER spacecraft is the first ever to orbit the planet Mercury, and the spacecraft's seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation are unraveling the history and evolution of the Solar System's innermost planet. During the first two years of orbital operations, MESSENGER acquired over 150,000 images and extensive other data sets. MESSENGER is capable of continuing orbital operations until early 2015. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Carnegie Institution of Washington NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  5. Tycho Crater's Peak

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-06-29

    NASA image release June 30, 2011 On June 10, 2011, NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter captured a dramatic sunrise view of Tycho crater. A very popular target with amateur astronomers, Tycho is located at 43.37°S, 348.68°E, and is about 51 miles (82 km) in diameter. The summit of the central peak is 1.24 miles (2 km) above the crater floor. The distance from Tycho's floor to its rim is about 2.92 miles (4.7 km). Tycho crater's central peak complex, shown here, is about 9.3 miles (15 km) wide, left to right (southeast to northwest in this view). › More information and related images › NASA's LRO website Credit: NASA Goddard/Arizona State University NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  6. Ablation in teeth with the free-electron laser around the absorption peak of hydroxyapatite (9.5 μm) and between 6.0 and 7.5 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Manfred; Walker, Rudolf; Weber, Heiner; van der Meer, Lex; McKinley, Jim T.; Tolk, Norman H.; Jean, Benedikt J.

    1996-04-01

    Pulsed IR laser ablation on dental hard substances was studied in the wavelength range between 9.5 and 11.5 micrometers with the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) in Nieuwegein/NL and between 6.0 and 7.5 micrometers with the FEL at Vanderbilt University in Nashville/TN. Depth, diameter and volume of the ablation crater were determined with a special silicon replica method and subsequent confocal laser topometry. The irradiated surfaces and the ejected debris were examined with an SEM 9.5 - 11.5 micrometers : depth, diameter and volume of the ablation crater are greater and the ablation threshold is lower for ablation with a wavelength corresponding to the absorption max. of hydroxyapatite (9.5 micrometers ), compared to ablation at wavelengths with lower absorption (10.5 - 11.5 micrometers ). For all wavelengths, no thermal cracking can be observed after ablation in dentine, however a small amount of thermal cracking can be observed after ablation in enamel. After ablation at 9.5 micrometers , a few droplets of solidified melt were seen on the irradiated areas, whereas the debris consisted only of solidified melt. In contrast, the surface and the debris obtained from ablation using the other wavelengths showed the natural structure of dentine 6.0 - 7.5 micrometers : the depth of the ablation crater increases and the ablation threshold decreases for an increasing absorption coefficient of the target material. Different tissue components absorbed the laser radiation of different wavelengths (around 6.0 micrometers water and collagen, 6.5 micrometers collagen and water, 7.0 micrometers carbonated hydroxyapatite). Nevertheless the results have shown no major influence on the primary tissue absorber.

  7. PeakWorks

    SciTech Connect

    2016-11-30

    The PeakWorks software is designed to assist in the quantitative analysis of atom probe tomography (APT) generated mass spectra. Specifically, through an interactive user interface, mass peaks can be identified automatically (defined by a threshold) and/or identified manually. The software then provides a means to assign specific elemental isotopes (including more than one) to each peak. The software also provides a means for the user to choose background subtraction of each peak based on background fitting functions, the choice of which is left to the users discretion. Peak ranging (the mass range over which peaks are integrated) is also automatedmore » allowing the user to chose a quantitative range (e.g. full-widthhalf- maximum). The software then integrates all identified peaks, providing a background-subtracted composition, which also includes the deconvolution of peaks (i.e. those peaks that happen to have overlapping isotopic masses). The software is also able to output a 'range file' that can be used in other software packages, such as within IVAS. A range file lists the peak identities, the mass range of each identified peak, and a color code for the peak. The software is also able to generate 'dummy' peak ranges within an outputted range file that can be used within IVAS to provide a means for background subtracted proximity histogram analysis.« less

  8. Novel absorptivity centering method utilizing normalized and factorized spectra for analysis of mixtures with overlapping spectra in different matrices using built-in spectrophotometer software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotfy, Hayam Mahmoud; Omran, Yasmin Rostom

    2018-07-01

    A novel, simple, rapid, accurate, and economical spectrophotometric method, namely absorptivity centering (a-Centering) has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of mixtures with partially and completely overlapping spectra in different matrices using either normalized or factorized spectrum using built-in spectrophotometer software without a need of special purchased program. Mixture I (Mix I) composed of Simvastatin (SM) and Ezetimibe (EZ) is the one with partial overlapping spectra formulated as tablets, while mixture II (Mix II) formed by Chloramphenicol (CPL) and Prednisolone acetate (PA) is that with complete overlapping spectra formulated as eye drops. These procedures do not require any separation steps. Resolution of spectrally overlapping binary mixtures has been achieved getting recovered zero-order (D0) spectrum of each drug, then absorbance was recorded at their maxima 238, 233.5, 273 and 242.5 nm for SM, EZ, CPL and PA, respectively. Calibration graphs were established with good correlation coefficients. The method shows significant advantages as simplicity, minimal data manipulation besides maximum reproducibility and robustness. Moreover, it was validated according to ICH guidelines. Selectivity was tested using laboratory-prepared mixtures. Accuracy, precision and repeatability were found to be within the acceptable limits. The proposed method is good enough to be applied to an assay of drugs in their combined formulations without any interference from excipients. The obtained results were statistically compared with those of the reported and official methods by applying t-test and F-test at 95% confidence level concluding that there is no significant difference with regard to accuracy and precision. Generally, this method could be used successfully for the routine quality control testing.

  9. Novel absorptivity centering method utilizing normalized and factorized spectra for analysis of mixtures with overlapping spectra in different matrices using built-in spectrophotometer software.

    PubMed

    Lotfy, Hayam Mahmoud; Omran, Yasmin Rostom

    2018-07-05

    A novel, simple, rapid, accurate, and economical spectrophotometric method, namely absorptivity centering (a-Centering) has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of mixtures with partially and completely overlapping spectra in different matrices using either normalized or factorized spectrum using built-in spectrophotometer software without a need of special purchased program. Mixture I (Mix I) composed of Simvastatin (SM) and Ezetimibe (EZ) is the one with partial overlapping spectra formulated as tablets, while mixture II (Mix II) formed by Chloramphenicol (CPL) and Prednisolone acetate (PA) is that with complete overlapping spectra formulated as eye drops. These procedures do not require any separation steps. Resolution of spectrally overlapping binary mixtures has been achieved getting recovered zero-order (D 0 ) spectrum of each drug, then absorbance was recorded at their maxima 238, 233.5, 273 and 242.5 nm for SM, EZ, CPL and PA, respectively. Calibration graphs were established with good correlation coefficients. The method shows significant advantages as simplicity, minimal data manipulation besides maximum reproducibility and robustness. Moreover, it was validated according to ICH guidelines. Selectivity was tested using laboratory-prepared mixtures. Accuracy, precision and repeatability were found to be within the acceptable limits. The proposed method is good enough to be applied to an assay of drugs in their combined formulations without any interference from excipients. The obtained results were statistically compared with those of the reported and official methods by applying t-test and F-test at 95% confidence level concluding that there is no significant difference with regard to accuracy and precision. Generally, this method could be used successfully for the routine quality control testing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Children’s Phthalate Intakes and Resultant Cumulative Exposures Estimated from Urine Compared with Estimates from Dust Ingestion, Inhalation and Dermal Absorption in Their Homes and Daycare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Langer, Sarka; Callesen, Michael; Toftum, Jørn; Clausen, Geo

    2013-01-01

    Total daily intakes of diethyl phthalate (DEP), di(n-butyl) phthalate (DnBP), di(isobutyl) phthalate (DiBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBzP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were calculated from phthalate metabolite levels measured in the urine of 431 Danish children between 3 and 6 years of age. For each child the intake attributable to exposures in the indoor environment via dust ingestion, inhalation and dermal absorption were estimated from the phthalate levels in the dust collected from the child’s home and daycare center. Based on the urine samples, DEHP had the highest total daily intake (median: 4.42 µg/d/kg-bw) and BBzP the lowest (median: 0.49 µg/d/kg-bw). For DEP, DnBP and DiBP, exposures to air and dust in the indoor environment accounted for approximately 100%, 15% and 50% of the total intake, respectively, with dermal absorption from the gas-phase being the major exposure pathway. More than 90% of the total intake of BBzP and DEHP came from sources other than indoor air and dust. Daily intake of DnBP and DiBP from all exposure pathways, based on levels of metabolites in urine samples, exceeded the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) for 22 and 23 children, respectively. Indoor exposures resulted in an average daily DiBP intake that exceeded the TDI for 14 children. Using the concept of relative cumulative Tolerable Daily Intake (TDIcum), which is applicable for phthalates that have established TDIs based on the same health endpoint, we examined the cumulative total exposure to DnBP, DiBP and DEHP from all pathways; it exceeded the tolerable levels for 30% of the children. From the three indoor pathways alone, several children had a cumulative intake that exceeded TDIcum. Exposures to phthalates present in the air and dust indoors meaningfully contribute to a child’s total intake of certain phthalates. Such exposures, by themselves, may lead to intakes exceeding current limit values. PMID:23626820

  11. Peak Experience Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Daniel G.; Evans, Jessica

    2010-01-01

    This paper emerges from the continued analysis of data collected in a series of international studies concerning Childhood Peak Experiences (CPEs) based on developments in understanding peak experiences in Maslow's hierarchy of needs initiated by Dr Edward Hoffman. Bridging from the series of studies, Canadian researchers explore collected…

  12. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  13. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  14. Peak power ratio generator

    DOEpatents

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  15. Pikes Peak, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brunstein, Craig; Quesenberry, Carol; Davis, John; Jackson, Gene; Scott, Glenn R.; D'Erchia, Terry D.; Swibas, Ed; Carter, Lorna; McKinney, Kevin; Cole, Jim

    2006-01-01

    For 200 years, Pikes Peak has been a symbol of America's Western Frontier--a beacon that drew prospectors during the great 1859-60 Gold Rush to the 'Pikes Peak country,' the scenic destination for hundreds of thousands of visitors each year, and an enduring source of pride for cities in the region, the State of Colorado, and the Nation. November 2006 marks the 200th anniversary of the Zebulon M. Pike expedition's first sighting of what has become one of the world's most famous mountains--Pikes Peak. In the decades following that sighting, Pikes Peak became symbolic of America's Western Frontier, embodying the spirit of Native Americans, early explorers, trappers, and traders who traversed the vast uncharted wilderness of the Western Great Plains and the Southern Rocky Mountains. High-quality printed paper copies of this poster are available at no cost from Information Services, U.S. Geological Survey (1-888-ASK-USGS).

  16. Peak Oil, Peak Coal and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J. W.

    2009-05-01

    Research on future climate change is driven by the family of scenarios developed for the IPCC assessment reports. These scenarios create projections of future energy demand using different story lines consisting of government policies, population projections, and economic models. None of these scenarios consider resources to be limiting. In many of these scenarios oil production is still increasing to 2100. Resource limitation (in a geological sense) is a real possibility that needs more serious consideration. The concept of 'Peak Oil' has been discussed since M. King Hubbert proposed in 1956 that US oil production would peak in 1970. His prediction was accurate. This concept is about production rate not reserves. For many oil producing countries (and all OPEC countries) reserves are closely guarded state secrets and appear to be overstated. Claims that the reserves are 'proven' cannot be independently verified. Hubbert's Linearization Model can be used to predict when half the ultimate oil will be produced and what the ultimate total cumulative production (Qt) will be. US oil production can be used as an example. This conceptual model shows that 90% of the ultimate US oil production (Qt = 225 billion barrels) will have occurred by 2011. This approach can then be used to suggest that total global production will be about 2200 billion barrels and that the half way point will be reached by about 2010. This amount is about 5 to 7 times less than assumed by the IPCC scenarios. The decline of Non-OPEC oil production appears to have started in 2004. Of the OPEC countries, only Saudi Arabia may have spare capacity, but even that is uncertain, because of lack of data transparency. The concept of 'Peak Coal' is more controversial, but even the US National Academy Report in 2007 concluded only a small fraction of previously estimated reserves in the US are actually minable reserves and that US reserves should be reassessed using modern methods. British coal production can be

  17. Automated asteroseismic peak detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Saravia Ortiz de Montellano, Andrés; Hekker, S.; Themeßl, N.

    2018-05-01

    Space observatories such as Kepler have provided data that can potentially revolutionize our understanding of stars. Through detailed asteroseismic analyses we are capable of determining fundamental stellar parameters and reveal the stellar internal structure with unprecedented accuracy. However, such detailed analyses, known as peak bagging, have so far been obtained for only a small percentage of the observed stars while most of the scientific potential of the available data remains unexplored. One of the major challenges in peak bagging is identifying how many solar-like oscillation modes are visible in a power density spectrum. Identification of oscillation modes is usually done by visual inspection that is time-consuming and has a degree of subjectivity. Here, we present a peak-detection algorithm especially suited for the detection of solar-like oscillations. It reliably characterizes the solar-like oscillations in a power density spectrum and estimates their parameters without human intervention. Furthermore, we provide a metric to characterize the false positive and false negative rates to provide further information about the reliability of a detected oscillation mode or the significance of a lack of detected oscillation modes. The algorithm presented here opens the possibility for detailed and automated peak bagging of the thousands of solar-like oscillators observed by Kepler.

  18. Impact Crater with Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 14 June 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image shows a classic example of a martian impact crater with a central peak. Central peaks are common in large, fresh craters on both Mars and the Moon. This peak formed during the extremely high-energy impact cratering event. In many martian craters the central peak has been either eroded or buried by later sedimentary processes, so the presence of a peak in this crater indicates that the crater is relatively young and has experienced little degradation. Observations of large craters on the Earth and the Moon, as well as computer modeling of the impact process, show that the central peak contains material brought from deep beneath the surface. The material exposed in these peaks will provide an excellent opportunity to study the composition of the martian interior using THEMIS multi-spectral infrared observations. The ejecta material around the crater can is well preserved, again indicating relatively little modification of this landform since its initial creation. The inner walls of this approximately 18 km diameter crater show complex slumping that likely occurred during the impact event. Since that time there has been some downslope movement of material to form the small chutes and gullies that can be seen on the inner crater wall. Small (50-100 m) mega-ripples composed of mobile material can be seen on the floor of the crater. Much of this material may have come from the walls of the crater itself, or may have been blown into the crater by the wind. The Story When a meteor smacked into the surface of Mars with extremely high energy, pow! Not only did it punch an 11-mile-wide crater in the smoother terrain, it created a central peak in the middle of the crater. This peak forms kind of on the 'rebound.' You can see this same effect if you drop a single drop of milk into a glass of milk. With craters, in the heat and fury of the impact, some of the land material can even liquefy. Central peaks like the one

  19. Origin of weak lensing convergence peaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jia; Haiman, Zoltán

    2016-08-01

    Weak lensing convergence peaks are a promising tool to probe nonlinear structure evolution at late times, providing additional cosmological information beyond second-order statistics. Previous theoretical and observational studies have shown that the cosmological constraints on Ωm and σ8 are improved by a factor of up to ≈2 when peak counts and second-order statistics are combined, compared to using the latter alone. We study the origin of lensing peaks using observational data from the 154 deg2 Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey. We found that while high peaks (with height κ >3.5 σκ , where σκ is the rms of the convergence κ ) are typically due to one single massive halo of ≈1 015M⊙ , low peaks (κ ≲σκ ) are associated with constellations of 2-8 smaller halos (≲1 013M⊙ ). In addition, halos responsible for forming low peaks are found to be significantly offset from the line of sight towards the peak center (impact parameter ≳ their virial radii), compared with ≈0.25 virial radii for halos linked with high peaks, hinting that low peaks are more immune to baryonic processes whose impact is confined to the inner regions of the dark matter halos. Our findings are in good agreement with results from the simulation work by Yang et al. [Phys. Rev. D 84, 043529 (2011)].

  20. INDIAN PEAKS WILDERNESS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Speltz, Charles N.

    1984-01-01

    The Indian Peaks Wilderness northwest of Denver is partly within the Colorado Mineral Belt, and the southeast part of it contains all the geologic characteristics associated with the several nearby mining districts. Two deposits have demonstrated mineral resources, one of copper and the other of uranium; both are surrounded by areas with probable potential. Two other areas have probable resource potential for copper, gold, and possibly molydenum. Detailed gravity and magnetic studies in the southeast part of the Indian Peaks Wilderness might detect in the subsurface igneous bodies that may be mineralized. Physical exploration such as drilling would be necessary to determine more precisely the copper resources at the Roaring Fork locality and uranium resources at Wheeler Basin.

  1. PEAK LIMITING AMPLIFIER

    DOEpatents

    Goldsworthy, W.W.; Robinson, J.B.

    1959-03-31

    A peak voltage amplitude limiting system adapted for use with a cascade type amplifier is described. In its detailed aspects, the invention includes an amplifier having at least a first triode tube and a second triode tube, the cathode of the second tube being connected to the anode of the first tube. A peak limiter triode tube has its control grid coupled to thc anode of the second tube and its anode connected to the cathode of the second tube. The operation of the limiter is controlled by a bias voltage source connected to the control grid of the limiter tube and the output of the system is taken from the anode of the second tube.

  2. PEAK READING VOLTMETER

    DOEpatents

    Dyer, A.L.

    1958-07-29

    An improvement in peak reading voltmeters is described, which provides for storing an electrical charge representative of the magnitude of a transient voltage pulse and thereafter measuring the stored charge, drawing oniy negligible energy from the storage element. The incoming voltage is rectified and stored in a condenser. The voltage of the capacitor is applied across a piezoelectric crystal between two parallel plates. Amy change in the voltage of the capacitor is reflected in a change in the dielectric constant of the crystal and the capacitance between a second pair of plates affixed to the crystal is altered. The latter capacitor forms part of the frequency determlning circuit of an oscillator and means is provided for indicating the frequency deviation which is a measure of the peak voltage applied to the voltmeter.

  3. Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living with Asthma > Managing Asthma Measuring Your Peak Flow Rate Download Instructions A peak flow meter is ... to use. Who Benefits from Using a Peak Flow Meter? Many healthcare providers believe that people who ...

  4. Kitt Peak speckle camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckinridge, J. B.; Mcalister, H. A.; Robinson, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    The speckle camera in regular use at Kitt Peak National Observatory since 1974 is described in detail. The design of the atmospheric dispersion compensation prisms, the use of film as a recording medium, the accuracy of double star measurements, and the next generation speckle camera are discussed. Photographs of double star speckle patterns with separations from 1.4 sec of arc to 4.7 sec of arc are shown to illustrate the quality of image formation with this camera, the effects of seeing on the patterns, and to illustrate the isoplanatic patch of the atmosphere.

  5. Sunset over "Twin Peaks"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-08-06

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed "Twin Peaks" form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA00783

  6. Hydrogen bonds in the vicinity of the special pair of the bacterial reaction center probed by hydrostatic high-pressure absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kangur, Liina; Jones, Michael R; Freiberg, Arvi

    2017-12-01

    Using the native bacteriochlorophyll a pigment cofactors as local probes, we investigated the response to external hydrostatic high pressure of reaction center membrane protein complexes from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Wild-type and engineered complexes were used with a varied number (0, 1 or 2) of hydrogen bonds that bind the reaction center primary donor bacteriochlorophyll cofactors to the surrounding protein scaffold. A pressure-induced breakage of hydrogen bonds was established for both detergent-purified and membrane-embedded reaction centers, but at rather different pressures: between 0.2 and 0.3GPa and at about 0.55GPa, respectively. The free energy change associated with the rupture of the single hydrogen bond present in wild-type reaction centers was estimated to be equal to 13-14kJ/mol. In the mutant with two symmetrical hydrogen bonds (FM197H) a single cooperative rupture of the two bonds was observed corresponding to an about twice stronger bond, rather than a sequential rupture of two individual bonds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  8. Sunset over Twin Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) about one minute after sunset on Mars on Sol 21. The prominent hills dubbed 'Twin Peaks' form a dark silhouette at the horizon, while the setting sun casts a pink glow over the darkening sky. The image was taken as part of a twilight study which indicates how the brightness of the sky fades with time after sunset. Scientists found that the sky stays bright for up to two hours after sunset, indicating that Martian dust extends very high into the atmosphere.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  9. Rich magneto-absorption spectra of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Do, Thi-Nga; Shih, Po-Hsin; Chang, Cheng-Peng; Lin, Chiun-Yan; Lin, Ming-Fa

    2016-06-29

    A generalized tight-binding model is developed to investigate the feature-rich magneto-optical properties of AAB-stacked trilayer graphene. Three intragroup and six intergroup inter-Landau-level (inter-LL) optical excitations largely enrich magneto-absorption peaks. In general, the former are much higher than the latter, depending on the phases and amplitudes of LL wavefunctions. The absorption spectra exhibit single- or twin-peak structures which are determined by quantum modes, LL energy spectra and Fermion distribution. The splitting LLs, with different localization centers (2/6 and 4/6 positions in a unit cell), can generate very distinct absorption spectra. There exist extra single peaks because of LL anti-crossings. AAB, AAA, ABA, and ABC stackings considerably differ from one another in terms of the inter-LL category, frequency, intensity, and structure of absorption peaks. The main characteristics of LL wavefunctions and energy spectra and the Fermi-Dirac function are responsible for the configuration-enriched magneto-optical spectra.

  10. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility. PMID:27958303

  11. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-12-13

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility.

  12. Electronic Absorption and MCD Spectra for Pd(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+), Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+), and Related Platinum-Centered Gold Cluster Complexes.

    PubMed

    Adrowski, Michael J.; Mason, W. Roy

    1997-03-26

    Electronic absorption and 7.0 T magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra in the UV-vis region, 1.6 to approximately 4.0 &mgr;m(-)(1) (1 &mgr;m(-)(1) = 10(4) cm(-)(1)) are reported for [Pd(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2) and [Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2) in acetonitrile solutions at room temperature. The MCD spectra are better resolved than the absorption spectra and consist of both A and B terms. The spectra are interpreted in terms of D(4)(d)() skeletal geometry and MO's that are approximated by 5s and 6s orbitals for Pd and Pt/Au atoms, respectively. The lowest energy excited configurations and states are attributed to intraframework (IF) Au(8)(2+) transitions. Evidence is also presented for Pt 5d --> Au 6s transitions in the MCD spectra for Pt(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+). Acetonitrile solution absorption and MCD spectra for the related Pt-centered cluster complexes [Pt(CO)(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(AuP(p-tolyl)(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(CuCl)(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(AgNO(3))(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(Hg)(2)(AuPPh(3))(8)](NO(3))(2), [Pt(HgCl)(2)(AuPPh(3))(8)](BF(4))(2), and [Pt(HgNO(3))(2)(AuPPh(3))(8)](BF(4))(2) are also reported and interpreted within the context of the model developed for the M(AuPPh(3))(8)(2+) complexes.

  13. Geikie Plateau Peak

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    A wider view of mountains showing the distinctive geology of the Geikie Plateau region in eastern Greenland, as seen from NASA's P-3B aircraft on April 16, 2012. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jefferson Beck =========== IceBridge, a six-year NASA mission, is the largest airborne survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown. It will yield an unprecedented three-dimensional view of Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets, ice shelves and sea ice. These flights will provide a yearly, multi-instrument look at the behavior of the rapidly changing features of the Greenland and Antarctic ice. Data collected during IceBridge will help scientists bridge the gap in polar observations between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) -- in orbit since 2003 -- and ICESat-2, planned for early 2016. ICESat stopped collecting science data in 2009, making IceBridge critical for ensuring a continuous series of observations. IceBridge will use airborne instruments to map Arctic and Antarctic areas once a year. IceBridge flights are conducted in March-May over Greenland and in October-November over Antarctica. Other smaller airborne surveys around the world are also part of the IceBridge campaign. To read more about IceBridge - Arctic 2012 go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/icebridge/index.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  14. Geikie Plateau Peak

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    Mountain ridges showing the distinctive geology of the Geikie Plateau region in eastern Greenland, as seen from NASA's P-3B aircraft on April 16, 2012. Credit: NASA/GSFC/Jefferson Beck =========== IceBridge, a six-year NASA mission, is the largest airborne survey of Earth's polar ice ever flown. It will yield an unprecedented three-dimensional view of Arctic and Antarctic ice sheets, ice shelves and sea ice. These flights will provide a yearly, multi-instrument look at the behavior of the rapidly changing features of the Greenland and Antarctic ice. Data collected during IceBridge will help scientists bridge the gap in polar observations between NASA's Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) -- in orbit since 2003 -- and ICESat-2, planned for early 2016. ICESat stopped collecting science data in 2009, making IceBridge critical for ensuring a continuous series of observations. IceBridge will use airborne instruments to map Arctic and Antarctic areas once a year. IceBridge flights are conducted in March-May over Greenland and in October-November over Antarctica. Other smaller airborne surveys around the world are also part of the IceBridge campaign. To read more about IceBridge - Arctic 2012 go to: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/icebridge/index.html NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  15. With St. Basil���s Cathedral in Red Square in Moscow serving as a backdrop, Expedition 46-47 crewmembers Tim Kopra of NASA (left), Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (right) pose for pictures Nov. 23 after laying flowers at the Kremlin Wall where Russian space icons are interred. Peake, Malenchenko and Kopra will launch on Dec. 15 on the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a six-month mission on the International Space Station..NASA/Seth Marcantel

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-23

    With St. Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square in Moscow serving as a backdrop, Expedition 46-47 crewmembers Tim Kopra of NASA (left), Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (right) pose for pictures Nov. 23 after laying flowers at the Kremlin Wall where Russian space icons are interred. Peake, Malenchenko and Kopra will launch on Dec. 15 on the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan for a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Seth Marcantel

  16. Percutaneous absorption

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Clinical effectiveness of topically applied medications depends on the ability of the active ingredient to leave its vehicle and penetrate into the epidermis. The stratum corneum is that layer of the epidermis which functionally is the most important in limiting percutaneous absorption, showing the characteristics of a composite semipermeable membrane. A mathematical expression of transepidermal diffusion may be derived from Fick's Law of mass transport; factors altering the rate of diffusion are discussed. PMID:4597976

  17. Studies on the nature of the primary reactions of photosystem II in photosynthesis. I. The electrochromic 515 nm absorption change as an appropriate indicator for the functional state of the photochemical active centers of system II in DCMY poisoned chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Renger, G; Wolff, C

    1975-01-01

    The field indicating electrochromic 515 nm absorption change has been measured under different excitation conditions in DCMU poisoned chloroplasts in the presence of benzylviologen as electron acceptor. It has been found: 1. The amplitude of the 515 nm absorption change is nearly completely suppressed under repetitive single turnover flash excitation conditions which kinetically block the back reaction around system II (P. Bennoun, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 216, 357 [1970]). 2. The amplitude of the 515 nm absorption change measured under repetitive single turnover flash excitation conditions which allow the completion of the back reaction during the dark time between the flashes (measuring light beam switched off) amounts in the presence of 2 mum DCMU nearly 50% of the electrochromic 515 nm amplitude obtained in the absence of DCMU. In DCMU poisoned chloroplasts this amplitude is significantly decreased by hydroxylaminhydrochloride, but nearly doubled in the presence of CDIP+ascorbate. 3. The dependence of the 515 nm amplitude on the time td between the flashes kinetically resembles the back reaction around system ?II. The time course of the back reaction can be fairly described either by a second order reaction or by a two phase exponential kinetics. 4. 1,3-dinitrobenzene (DNE) or alpha-bromo-alpha-benzylmalodinitril (BBMD) reduce the 515 nm amplitude in DCMU poisoned chloroplasts, but seem to influecne only slightly the kinetics of the back reaction. 5. The dependence of the 515 nm amplitude on the flash light intensity (the amplitude normalized to 1 at 100% flash light intensity) is not changed by DNB. Based on these experimental data it has been concluded that in DCMU poisoned chloroplasts the amplitude of the 515 nm absorption change reflects the functional state of photosystem II centers (designated as photoelectric dipole generators II) under suitable excitation conditions. Furthermore, it is inferred that in DCMU poisoned chlorplasts the photoelectric dipole

  18. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  19. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  20. Peak Experiences: Some Empirical Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wuthnow, Robert

    1978-01-01

    This article presents findings regarding peak experiences from a systematic random sample of 1,000 persons in the San Francisco-Oakland area. Evidence is presented on the incidence of peak experiences, on the kinds of life styles which tend to be associated with these experiences, and on some of the social implications that these experiences have.…

  1. How to use your peak flow meter

    MedlinePlus

    Peak flow meter - how to use; Asthma - peak flow meter; Reactive airway disease - peak flow meter; Bronchial asthma - peak flow meter ... your airways are narrowed and blocked due to asthma, your peak flow values drop. You can check ...

  2. Four Decades of Public Outreach at Kitt Peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, R.

    2005-12-01

    Since its inception in 1958, Kitt Peak has served as the U.S. national center for nighttime astronomy and daytime studies of the Sun. The Kitt Peak Visitor Center, constructed in 1964, serves as the hub for the thousands of visitors each year who come to explore "their" national observatory. For over 40 years, the visitor center has functioned as part-museum, part-interpretive center, and part-comfort station, along with transitory functions as an auditorium, classroom and media center. More than 2 million people have come to learn about the science, history, and mission of Kitt Peak National Observatory, NOAO, AURA, and the National Science Foundation http://www.noao.edu/outreach/kpoutreach.html.

  3. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III; Short, David

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in predicting peak winds at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45th Weather Squadron requested the AMU develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network , Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) surface observations, and CCAFS sounding s from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created mul tiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence , the temperature inversion depth and strength, wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft.

  4. In vivo and in vitro absorption spectrum of disulphonated aluminum phthalocyanine in tumor-bearing mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Canti, Gianfranco L.; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Valentini, Gianluca

    1995-03-01

    The absorption spectrum of disulphonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlS2Pc) between 650 nm and 695 nm was measured in vivo by means of time-resolved reflectance. The experiments were performed on mice bearing the L1210 leukemia 1, 4, and 7 hr after the i.p. administration of 2.5 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) of AlS2Pc. The absorption peak is centered at 685 nm, red-shifted of 10 - 15 nm with respect to the spectra obtained in solution in various environments. Measurements performed in vitro confirm the results in vivo and seem to suggest that the extracellular environment can cause the shift in the absorption line shape.

  5. An accelerated line-by-line option for MODTRAN combining on-the-fly generation of line center absorption within 0.1 cm-1 bins and pre-computed line tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander; Conforti, Patrick; Hawes, Fred

    2015-05-01

    A Line-By-Line (LBL) option is being developed for MODTRAN6. The motivation for this development is two-fold. Firstly, when MODTRAN is validated against an independent LBL model, it is difficult to isolate the source of discrepancies. One must verify consistency between pressure, temperature and density profiles, between column density calculations, between continuum and particulate data, between spectral convolution methods, and more. Introducing a LBL option directly within MODTRAN will insure common elements for all calculations other than those used to compute molecular transmittances. The second motivation for the LBL upgrade is that it will enable users to compute high spectral resolution transmittances and radiances for the full range of current MODTRAN applications. In particular, introducing the LBL feature into MODTRAN will enable first-principle calculations of scattered radiances, an option that is often not readily available with LBL models. MODTRAN will compute LBL transmittances within one 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin at a time, marching through the full requested band pass. The LBL algorithm will use the highly accurate, pressure- and temperature-dependent MODTRAN Padé approximant fits of the contribution from line tails to define the absorption from all molecular transitions centered more than 0.05 cm-1 from each 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin. The beauty of this approach is that the on-the-fly computations for each 0.1 cm-1 bin will only require explicit LBL summing of transitions centered within a 0.2 cm-1 spectral region. That is, the contribution from the more distant lines will be pre-computed via the Padé approximants. The status of the LBL effort will be presented. This will include initial thermal and solar radiance calculations, validation calculations, and self-validations of the MODTRAN band model against its own LBL calculations.

  6. Extragalactic Peaked-spectrum Radio Sources at Low Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Callingham, J. R.; Gaensler, B. M.; Sadler, E. M.

    We present a sample of 1483 sources that display spectral peaks between 72 MHz and 1.4 GHz, selected from the GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array (GLEAM) survey. The GLEAM survey is the widest fractional bandwidth all-sky survey to date, ideal for identifying peaked-spectrum sources at low radio frequencies. Our peaked-spectrum sources are the low-frequency analogs of gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) and compact-steep spectrum (CSS) sources, which have been hypothesized to be the precursors to massive radio galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of known peaked-spectrum candidates, and 95% of our sample have a newly characterized spectral peak.more » We highlight that some GPS sources peaking above 5 GHz have had multiple epochs of nuclear activity, and we demonstrate the possibility of identifying high-redshift ( z > 2) galaxies via steep optically thin spectral indices and low observed peak frequencies. The distribution of the optically thick spectral indices of our sample is consistent with past GPS/CSS samples but with a large dispersion, suggesting that the spectral peak is a product of an inhomogeneous environment that is individualistic. We find no dependence of observed peak frequency with redshift, consistent with the peaked-spectrum sample comprising both local CSS sources and high-redshift GPS sources. The 5 GHz luminosity distribution lacks the brightest GPS and CSS sources of previous samples, implying that a convolution of source evolution and redshift influences the type of peaked-spectrum sources identified below 1 GHz. Finally, we discuss sources with optically thick spectral indices that exceed the synchrotron self-absorption limit.« less

  7. Hubbert's Peak: A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Oil and its by-products, as used in manufacturing, agriculture, and transportation, are the lifeblood of today's 7 billion-person population and our 65T world economy. Despite this importance, estimates of future oil production seem dominated by wishful thinking rather than quantitative analysis. Better studies are needed. In 1956, Dr. M.King Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Thus, the peak of oil production is referred to as ``Hubbert's Peak.'' Prof. Al Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on population and oil. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. This paper extends this line of work to include analyses of individual countries, inclusion of multiple Gaussian peaks, and analysis of reserves data. While this is not strictly a predictive theory, we will demonstrate a ``closed'' story connecting production, oil-in-place, and reserves. This gives us the ``most likely'' estimate of future oil availability. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  8. Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women Osteoporosis: Peak Bone Mass in Women Bones are the framework for ... that affect peak bone mass. Factors Affecting Peak Bone Mass A variety of genetic and environmental factors ...

  9. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform muchmore » better than the FBI wavelets.« less

  10. Spanish Peaks, Sangre de Cristo Range, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    , 2002) Maher, Lewis J., Jr., 2001, Geology by Light Plane (accessed January 16, 2002) Penn, Brian, 1995-2001, Igneous Petrology of the Spanish Peaks (accessed January 16, 2002) Photograph STS-108-720-32 was taken in the December 2001 by the crew of Space Shuttle mission 108 using a Hasselblad camera with 250-mm lens, and is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts can be viewed at the NASA-JSC Gateway to Astronaut Photography of Earth.

  11. A near infrared line list for NH3: Analysis of a Kitt Peak spectrum after 35 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, Emma J.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Béguier, Serge; Campargue, Alain

    2016-07-01

    A Fourier Transform (FT) absorption spectrum of room temperature NH3 in the region 7400-8640 cm-1 is analysed using a variational line list and ground state energies determined using the MARVEL procedure. The spectrum was measured by Dr. Catherine de Bergh in 1980 and is available from the Kitt Peak data center. The centers and intensities of 8468 ammonia lines were retrieved using a multiline fitting procedure. 2474 lines are assigned to 21 bands providing 1692 experimental energies in the range 7500-9200 cm-1. The spectrum was assigned by the joint use of the BYTe variational line list and combination differences. The assignments and experimental energies presented in this work are the first for ammonia in the region 7400-8640 cm-1, considerably extending the range of known vibrational-excited states.

  12. Hubbert's Peak -- A Physicist's View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Oil, as used in agriculture and transportation, is the lifeblood of modern society. It is finite in quantity and will someday be exhausted. In 1956, Hubbert proposed a theory of resource production and applied it successfully to predict peak U.S. oil production in 1970. Bartlett extended this work in publications and lectures on the finite nature of oil and its production peak and depletion. Both Hubbert and Bartlett place peak world oil production at a similar time, essentially now. Central to these analyses are estimates of total ``oil in place'' obtained from engineering studies of oil reservoirs as this quantity determines the area under the Hubbert's Peak. Knowing the production history and the total oil in place allows us to make estimates of reserves, and therefore future oil availability. We will then examine reserves data for various countries, in particular OPEC countries, and see if these data tell us anything about the future availability of oil. Finally, we will comment on synthetic oil and the possibility of carbon-neutral synthetic oil for a sustainable future.

  13. Peake works on the WPA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-03-22

    ISS047e013845 (03/22/2016) --- ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Tim Peake works on the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) aboard the International Space Station. The WPA is is responsible for treating waste water aboard the station for recycling back into potable water.

  14. Peak Stress Testing Protocol Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treatment of peak flows during wet weather is a common challenge across the country for municipal wastewater utilities with separate and/or combined sewer systems. Increases in wastewater flow resulting from infiltration and inflow (I/I) during wet weather events can result in op...

  15. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  16. METHOD OF PEAK CURRENT MEASUREMENT

    DOEpatents

    Baker, G.E.

    1959-01-20

    The measurement and recording of peak electrical currents are described, and a method for utilizing the magnetic field of the current to erase a portion of an alternating constant frequency and amplitude signal from a magnetic mediums such as a magnetic tapes is presented. A portion of the flux from the current carrying conductor is concentrated into a magnetic path of defined area on the tape. After the current has been recorded, the tape is played back. The amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape immediately adjacent the defined flux area and the amplitude of the signal from the portion of the tape within the area are compared with the amplitude of the signal from an unerased portion of the tape to determine the percentage of signal erasure, and thereby obtain the peak value of currents flowing in the conductor.

  17. SPANISH PEAKS PRIMITIVE AREA, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calkins, James A.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Spanish Peaks Primitive Area, Montana, disclosed a small low-grade deposit of demonstrated chromite and asbestos resources. The chances for discovery of additional chrome resources are uncertain and the area has little promise for the occurrence of other mineral or energy resources. A reevaluation, sampling at depth, and testing for possible extensions of the Table Mountain asbestos and chromium deposit should be undertaken in the light of recent interpretations regarding its geologic setting.

  18. Peake in Columbus with sensor

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-01-26

    ISS046e024411 (01/26/2016) --- European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Timothy Peake prepares to install a space acceleration measurement system sensor inside the European Columbus module aboard the International Space Station. The device is used in an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the International Space Station resulting from the operation of hardware, crew activities, dockings and maneuvering. Results generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments.

  19. Behind their Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Kopra of NASA (left), Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (right) pose for pictures Dec. 9 after a traditional tree-planting ceremony. The trio will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Victor Zelentsov.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-09

    Behind their Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Kopra of NASA (left), Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (right) pose for pictures Dec. 9 after a traditional tree-planting ceremony. The trio will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  20. Twin Peaks (B/W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Twin Peaks are modest-size hills to the southwest of the Mars Pathfinder landing site. They were discovered on the first panoramas taken by the IMP camera on the 4th of July, 1997, and subsequently identified in Viking Orbiter images taken over 20 years ago. The peaks are approximately 30-35 meters (-100 feet) tall. North Twin is approximately 860 meters (2800 feet) from the lander, and South Twin is about a kilometer away (3300 feet). The scene includes bouldery ridges and swales or 'hummocks' of flood debris that range from a few tens of meters away from the lander to the distance of the South Twin Peak. The large rock at the right edge of the scene is nicknamed 'Hippo'. This rock is about a meter (3 feet) across and 25 meters (80 feet) distant.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  1. The Expedition 46-47 crewmembers arrive in Baikonur, Kazakhstan Nov. 30 for final pre-launch training following a flight from their training base at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia and are greeted by school children. Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (left), Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Tim Kopra of NASA (right), will launch Dec. 15 on the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA / Victor Zelentsov .

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-30

    The Expedition 46-47 crewmembers arrive in Baikonur, Kazakhstan Nov. 30 for final pre-launch training following a flight from their training base at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia and are greeted by school children. Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (left), Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, center) and Tim Kopra of NASA (right), will launch Dec. 15 on the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA / Victor Zelentsov

  2. GRANITE PEAK ROADLESS AREA, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huber, Donald F.; Thurber, Horace K.

    1984-01-01

    The Granite Peak Roadless Area occupies an area of about 5 sq mi in the southern part of the Trinity Alps of the Klamath Mountains, about 12 mi north-northeast of Weaverville, California. Rock and stream-sediment samples were analyzed. All streams draining the roadless area were sampled and representative samples of the rock types in the area were collected. Background values were established for each element and anomalous values were examined within their geologic settings and evaluated for their significance. On the basis of mineral surveys there seems little likelihood for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources.

  3. Ridge of Jagged Peaks on Titan

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-29

    This synthetic-aperture radar image was obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its T-120 pass over Titan's southern latitudes on June 7, 2016. The area shown here measures about 40 by 60 miles (70 by 100 kilometers) and is centered at about 60 degrees south latitude, 130 degrees west longitude. Radar illuminates the scene from the left at a 28-degree incidence angle. At the center of the image is a bright feature oriented from upper left to lower right. This is interpreted to be a long ridge with jagged peaks, likely created by methane rainfall erosion. Some of the individual peaks rise about 2,400 feet (800 meters) above the valley floor. The ridge has a considerably gentler slope on its left side (which appears brighter here) than on its right. Frequently, mountains shaped like this on Earth are fractured blocks of the planet's crust, thrusted upward and then tilted, creating a shallow slope on one side and a steeper slope on the fractured, faulted edge. Also presented here is an annotated version of the image, along with a radar image of the Dragoon Mountains in Arizona just east of Tucson. The Dragoon feature represents a tilted fault block, formed by spreading that has occurred across the western U.S., and has a similar shape to that of the Titan ridge. The Dragoon radar image was produced using data from NASA's Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/NGA). Radar illuminates the scene from the left in that image as well. Titan has displayed many features that are strikingly similar to Earth: lakes, seas, rivers, dunes and mountains. Scientists think it possible that, like Earth, the giant moon's crust has experienced familiar processes of uplift and spreading, followed by erosion. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20709

  4. Energetics of photosynthetic glow peaks

    PubMed Central

    DeVault, Don; Govindjee; Arnold, William

    1983-01-01

    By postulating temperature-dependent equilibria between two or more electron carriers acting as traps for electrons or holes, it is possible to modify the Randall-Wilkins theory of thermoluminescence so as to explain the abnormally large apparent activation energies and apparent frequency factors observed in photosynthetic glow curves when fitted by unmodified Randall-Wilkins theory. The equilibria serve to inhibit the formation of the light-emitting excited state by withholding the needed precursor state. When the inhibition is released at higher temperature by shift of equilibrium with temperature, the rise of the glow peak can be much faster than would result from Arrhenius behavior based on the true activation energy and so appears to correspond to a higher activation energy accompanied by a larger frequency factor. From another viewpoint, the enthalpy changes, ΔH, of the equilibria tend to add to the activation energy. Similarly the entropy changes, ΔS, of the equilibria tend to add to the entropy of activation, giving the large apparent frequency factors. The positive values of ΔS needed would correspond to entropy decreases in the forward early electron transport. A comparison of the glow peaks obtained by different workers is also presented. PMID:16593283

  5. Peakompactons: Peaked compact nonlinear waves

    DOE PAGES

    Christov, Ivan C.; Kress, Tyler; Saxena, Avadh

    2017-04-20

    This paper is meant as an accessible introduction to/tutorial on the analytical construction and numerical simulation of a class of nonstandard solitary waves termed peakompactons. We present that these peaked compactly supported waves arise as solutions to nonlinear evolution equations from a hierarchy of nonlinearly dispersive Korteweg–de Vries-type models. Peakompactons, like the now-well-known compactons and unlike the soliton solutions of the Korteweg–de Vries equation, have finite support, i.e., they are of finite wavelength. However, unlike compactons, peakompactons are also peaked, i.e., a higher spatial derivative suffers a jump discontinuity at the wave’s crest. Here, we construct such solutions exactly bymore » reducing the governing partial differential equation to a nonlinear ordinary differential equation and employing a phase-plane analysis. Lastly, a simple, but reliable, finite-difference scheme is also designed and tested for the simulation of collisions of peakompactons. In addition to the peakompacton class of solutions, the general physical features of the so-called K #(n,m) hierarchy of nonlinearly dispersive Korteweg–de Vries-type models are discussed as well.« less

  6. 5. VIEW TO THE EAST NORTH EAST FROM PEAK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW TO THE EAST NORTH EAST FROM PEAK OF THE TURBINE HALL. THE BRICK STACK TO THE RIGHT EXHAUSTED BOILER 904 WHICH WAS INSTALLED IN 1944. STEEL SHEATHED STRUCTURE IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH HOUSED BOILERS 902 AND 903. - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Cos Cob Power Plant, Sound Shore Drive, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  7. Femtosecond stimulated Raman evidence for charge-transfer character in pentacene singlet fission† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Actinic pump spectrum, discussion on ground state addition process, peak fitting procedure, transient absorption data, power dependence measurements, etalon pulse shaping, TIPS-pentacene FSRS data, and optimized geometry and frequency calculation results. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc03496b

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Stephanie M.; Silva, W. Ruchira

    2017-01-01

    Singlet fission is a spin-allowed process in which an excited singlet state evolves into two triplet states. We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, an ultrafast vibrational technique, to follow the molecular structural evolution during singlet fission in order to determine the mechanism of this process. In crystalline pentacene, we observe the formation of an intermediate characterized by pairs of excited state peaks that are red- and blue-shifted relative to the ground state features. We hypothesize that these features arise from the formation of cationic and anionic species due to partial transfer of electron density from one pentacene molecule to a neighboring molecule. These observations provide experimental evidence for the role of states with significant charge-transfer character which facilitate the singlet fission process in pentacene. Our work both provides new insight into the singlet fission mechanism in pentacene and demonstrates the utility of structurally-sensitive time-resolved spectroscopic techniques in monitoring ultrafast processes. PMID:29675170

  8. North Twin Peak in super resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This pair of images shows the result of taking a sequence of 25 identical exposures from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) of the northern Twin Peak, with small camera motions, and processing them with the Super-Resolution algorithm developed at NASA's Ames Research Center.

    The upper image is a representative input image, scaled up by a factor of five, with the pixel edges smoothed out for a fair comparison. The lower image allows significantly finer detail to be resolved.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

    The super-resolution research was conducted by Peter Cheeseman, Bob Kanefsky, Robin Hanson, and John Stutz of NASA's Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA. More information on this technology is available on the Ames Super Resolution home page at

    http://ic-www.arc.nasa.gov/ic/projects/bayes-group/ group/super-res/

  9. High-temperature measurements of methane and acetylene using quantum cascade laser absorption near 8 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, M. B.; Javed, T.; Farooq, A.

    2015-04-01

    The mid-infrared wavelength region near 8 μm contains absorption bands of several molecules such as water vapor, hydrogen peroxide, nitrous oxide, methane and acetylene. A new laser absorption sensor based on the ν4 band of methane and the ν4+ν5 band of acetylene is reported for interference-free, time-resolved measurements under combustion-relevant conditions. A detailed line-selection procedure was used to identify optimum transitions. Methane and acetylene were measured at the line centers of Q12 (1303.5 cm-1) and P23 (1275.5 cm-1) transitions, respectively. High-temperature absorption cross sections of methane and acetylene were measured at peaks (on-line) and valleys (off-line) of the selected absorption transitions. The differential absorption strategy was employed to eliminate interference absorption from large hydrocarbons. Experiments were performed behind reflected shock waves over a temperature range of 1200-2200 K, between pressures of 1-4 atm. The diagnostics were then applied to measure the respective species time-history profiles during the shock-heated pyrolysis of n-pentane.

  10. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  11. Establishment of peak bone mass.

    PubMed

    Mora, Stefano; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2003-03-01

    Among the main areas of progress in osteoporosis research during the last decade or so are the general recognition that this condition, which is the cause of so much pain in the elderly population, has its antecedents in childhood and the identification of the structural basis accounting for much of the differences in bone strength among humans. Nevertheless, current understanding of the bone mineral accrual process is far from complete. The search for genes that regulate bone mass acquisition is ongoing, and current results are not sufficient to identify subjects at risk. However, there is solid evidence that BMD measurements can be helpful for the selection of subjects that presumably would benefit from preventive interventions. The questions regarding the type of preventive interventions, their magnitude, and duration remain unanswered. Carefully designed controlled trials are needed. Nevertheless, previous experience indicates that weight-bearing activity and possibly calcium supplements are beneficial if they are begun during childhood and preferably before the onset of puberty. Modification of unhealthy lifestyles and increments in exercise or calcium assumption are logical interventions that should be implemented to improve bone mass gains in all children and adolescents who are at risk of failing to achieve an optimal peak bone mass.

  12. Neurofeedback training for peak performance.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Marek; Pąchalska, Maria; Ziółkowski, Artur; Mańko, Grzegorz; Łukaszewska, Beata; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz; Mirski, Andrzej; Kropotov, Iurii D

    2014-01-01

    One of the applications of the Neurofeedback methodology is peak performance in sport. The protocols of the neurofeedback are usually based on an assessment of the spectral parameters of spontaneous EEG in resting state conditions. The aim of the paper was to study whether the intensive neurofeedback training of a well-functioning Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport, could change the brain functioning reflected in changes in spontaneous EEG and event related potentials (ERPs). The case is presented of an Olympic athlete who has lost his performance confidence after injury in sport. He wanted to resume his activities by means of neurofeedback training. His QEEG/ERP parameters were assessed before and after 4 intensive sessions of neurotherapy. Dramatic and statistically significant changes that could not be explained by error measurement were observed in the patient. Neurofeedback training in the subject under study increased the amplitude of the monitoring component of ERPs generated in the anterior cingulate cortex, accompanied by an increase in beta activity over the medial prefrontal cortex. Taking these changes together, it can be concluded that that even a few sessions of neurofeedback in a high performance brain can significantly activate the prefrontal cortical areas associated with increasing confidence in sport performance.

  13. Carbohydrate absorption from one serving of fruit juice in young children: age and carbohydrate composition effects.

    PubMed

    Nobigrot, T; Chasalow, F I; Lifshitz, F

    1997-04-01

    To test the hypotheses that: the efficiency of carbohydrate absorption in childhood increases with age, and decreased carbohydrate absorption occurs more frequently with juices containing more fructose than glucose and/or sorbitol than with juices which contain equal amounts of fructose and glucose and are sorbitol-free. One hundred and four healthy children were recruited from the Ambulatory Center at Maimonides Children's Center. They were assigned to one of three age groups: approximately 1, 3 and 5 years of age. Each child received one age-specific dose (by randomization) of one of four juices: a) pear juice which contains fructose in excess to glucose and a large amount of sorbitol; b) apple juice which is similar to pear juice in its fructose to glucose ratio but contains four times less sorbitol than pear juice; c) white grape juice or d) purple grape juice both of which contain equal amounts of fructose and glucose and are sorbitol-free. Breath hydrogen excretion (BH2) was utilized as the index of carbohydrate absorption. It was measured in fasting children and at 30-minute intervals for 3 hours after drinking the single serving of juice. Multiple breath hydrogen related parameters were quantified and results were expressed as: BH2 peak, area under the curve, and degree of carbohydrate malabsorption. After the test, parents completed a questionnaire and recorded signs and symptoms of intestinal malabsorption for 24 hours. Pear juice related BH2 levels were significantly higher among children 1 and 3 years of age as compared to the levels achieved after the other juices. Apple juice related BH2 levels were significantly higher only among the youngest age group of children. There was no significant difference in carbohydrate absorption among the 5 year old children regardless of the juice consumed. Incomplete carbohydrate absorption (BH2 peak above 20 ppm) occurred more frequently after pear juice consumption (84%) than after apple juice (41%) or grape juice

  14. Sound absorption by clamped poroelastic plates.

    PubMed

    Aygun, H; Attenborough, K

    2008-09-01

    Measurements and predictions have been made of the absorption coefficient and the surface acoustic impedance of poroelastic plates clamped in a large impedance tube and separated from the rigid termination by an air gap. The measured and predicted absorption coefficient and surface impedance spectra exhibit low frequency peaks. The peak frequencies observed in the absorption coefficient are close to those predicted and measured in the deflection spectra of the clamped poroelastic plates. The influences of the rigidity of the clamping conditions and the width of the air gap have been investigated. Both influences are found to be important. Increasing the rigidity of clamping reduces the low frequency absorption peaks compared with those measured for simply supported plates or plates in an intermediate clamping condition. Results for a closed cell foam plate and for two open cell foam plates made from recycled materials are presented. For identical clamping conditions and width of air gap, the results for the different materials differ as a consequence mainly of their different elasticity, thickness, and cell structure.

  15. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  16. Reply to Comment on Axial oxygen-centered lattice instabilities in YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7]: An application of the analysis of extended x-ray-absorption fine structure in anharmonic systems' ''

    SciTech Connect

    Mustre de Leon, J.; Batistic, I.; Bishop, A.R.

    1993-05-01

    We assert that the one-site Cu(1)-O(4) model, suggested in the Comment by Thomsen and Cardona [Phys. Rev. B 47, 12 320 (1993)] is inconsistent with polarized x-ray-absorption fine-structure and diffraction results. We also show that the two-site Cu(1)-O(4) distribution is not inconsistent with optical measurements, although a rigid double-well modeling of this distribution is [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 3236 (1992)].

  17. Determination of optical absorption coefficient with focusing photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Zeng, Zhiping; Xie, Wenming; Chen, Wei R

    2012-06-01

    Absorption coefficient of biological tissue is an important factor for photothermal therapy and photoacoustic imaging. However, its determination remains a challenge. In this paper, we propose a method using focusing photoacoustic imaging technique to quantify the target optical absorption coefficient. It utilizes the ratio of the amplitude of the peak signal from the top boundary of the target to that from the bottom boundary based on wavelet transform. This method is self-calibrating. Factors, such as absolute optical fluence, ultrasound parameters, and Grüneisen parameter, can be canceled by dividing the amplitudes of the two peaks. To demonstrate this method, we quantified the optical absorption coefficient of a target with various concentrations of an absorbing dye. This method is particularly useful to provide accurate absorption coefficient for predicting the outcomes of photothermal interaction for cancer treatment with absorption enhancement.

  18. A model to forecast peak spreading.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-04-01

    As traffic congestion increases, the K-factor, defined as the proportion of the 24-hour traffic volume that occurs during the peak hour, may decrease. This behavioral response is known as peak spreading: as congestion grows during the peak travel tim...

  19. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Atlas Peak. 9.140 Section... THE TREASURY LIQUORS AMERICAN VITICULTURAL AREAS Approved American Viticultural Areas § 9.140 Atlas Peak. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Atlas Peak.” (b...

  20. Peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Austin, Samuel H.; Krstolic, Jennifer L.; Wiegand, Ute

    2011-01-01

    Peak-flow annual exceedance probabilities, also called probability-percent chance flow estimates, and regional regression equations are provided describing the peak-flow characteristics of Virginia streams. Statistical methods are used to evaluate peak-flow data. Analysis of Virginia peak-flow data collected from 1895 through 2007 is summarized. Methods are provided for estimating unregulated peak flow of gaged and ungaged streams. Station peak-flow characteristics identified by fitting the logarithms of annual peak flows to a Log Pearson Type III frequency distribution yield annual exceedance probabilities of 0.5, 0.4292, 0.2, 0.1, 0.04, 0.02, 0.01, 0.005, and 0.002 for 476 streamgaging stations. Stream basin characteristics computed using spatial data and a geographic information system are used as explanatory variables in regional regression model equations for six physiographic regions to estimate regional annual exceedance probabilities at gaged and ungaged sites. Weighted peak-flow values that combine annual exceedance probabilities computed from gaging station data and from regional regression equations provide improved peak-flow estimates. Text, figures, and lists are provided summarizing selected peak-flow sites, delineated physiographic regions, peak-flow estimates, basin characteristics, regional regression model equations, error estimates, definitions, data sources, and candidate regression model equations. This study supersedes previous studies of peak flows in Virginia.

  1. Fast clustering using adaptive density peak detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yifan

    2017-12-01

    Common limitations of clustering methods include the slow algorithm convergence, the instability of the pre-specification on a number of intrinsic parameters, and the lack of robustness to outliers. A recent clustering approach proposed a fast search algorithm of cluster centers based on their local densities. However, the selection of the key intrinsic parameters in the algorithm was not systematically investigated. It is relatively difficult to estimate the "optimal" parameters since the original definition of the local density in the algorithm is based on a truncated counting measure. In this paper, we propose a clustering procedure with adaptive density peak detection, where the local density is estimated through the nonparametric multivariate kernel estimation. The model parameter is then able to be calculated from the equations with statistical theoretical justification. We also develop an automatic cluster centroid selection method through maximizing an average silhouette index. The advantage and flexibility of the proposed method are demonstrated through simulation studies and the analysis of a few benchmark gene expression data sets. The method only needs to perform in one single step without any iteration and thus is fast and has a great potential to apply on big data analysis. A user-friendly R package ADPclust is developed for public use.

  2. Lava Flow on Mawson Peak, Heard Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    In October 2012, satellites measured subtle signals that suggested volcanic activity on remote Heard Island. These images, captured several months later, show proof of an eruption on Mawson Peak. By April 7, 2013, Mawson's steep-walled summit crater had filled, and a trickle of lava had spilled down the volcano’s southwestern flank. On April 20, the lava flow remained visible and had even widened slightly just below the summit. These natural-color images were collected by the Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on the Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite. Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory Read more: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=81024 NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  3. East Peak Fire Burn Scar, Colorado [annotated

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On June 22, 2013, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this false-color image of the East Peak fire burning in southern Colorado near Trinidad. Burned areas appear dark red, while actively burning areas look orange. Dark green areas are forests; light green areas are grasslands. Lightning ignited the blaze on June 19, 2013. By June 25, it had burned nearly 13,500 acres (5,500 hectares). NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Adam Voiland. Instrument: Landsat 8 - OLI More images from this event: 1.usa.gov/14DesQC Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  4. The 5-day wave and ionospheric absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    In a previous paper, Fraser and Thorpe (1976) indicated that the average partial-coherence spectra for three summers and the average for three winters at a southern mid-latitude site had a dominant peak at a period of about six days. This peak in coherence between absorption and temperature is anomalous, and the present paper explains how some of the unexpected coherence features can be explained by the five-day wave described by Geisler and Dickinson (1976) and whose existence in the upper stratosphere was discussed by Rodgers (1976).

  5. Peak Wind Tool for General Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2010-01-01

    The expected peak wind speed of the day is an important forecast element in the 45th Weather Squadron's (45 WS) daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts. The forecasts are used for ground and space launch operations at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The 45 WS also issues wind advisories for KSC/CCAFS when they expect wind gusts to meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt thresholds at any level from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated peak wind speeds are challenging to forecast, particularly in the cool season months of October - April. In Phase I of this task, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a tool to help the 45 WS forecast non-convective winds at KSC/CCAFS for the 24-hour period of 0800 to 0800 local time. The tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI displayed the forecast of peak wind speed, 5-minute average wind speed at the time of the peak wind, timing of the peak wind and probability the peak speed would meet or exceed 25 kt, 35 kt and 50 kt. For the current task (Phase II ), the 45 WS requested additional observations be used for the creation of the forecast equations by expanding the period of record (POR). Additional parameters were evaluated as predictors, including wind speeds between 500 ft and 3000 ft, static stability classification, Bulk Richardson Number, mixing depth, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion strength and depth and wind direction. Using a verification data set, the AMU compared the performance of the Phase I and II prediction methods. Just as in Phase I, the tool was delivered as a Microsoft Excel GUI. The 45 WS requested the tool also be available in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS). The AMU first expanded the POR by two years by adding tower observations, surface observations and CCAFS (XMR) soundings for the cool season months of March 2007 to April 2009. The POR was expanded

  6. The peak electromagnetic power radiated by lightning return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krider, E. P.; Guo, C.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the peak electromagnetic (EM) power radiated by return strokes have been made by integrating the Poynting vector of measured fields over an imaginary hemispherical surface that is centered on the lightning source, assuming that ground losses are negligible. Values of the peak EM power from first and subsequent strokes have means and standard deviations of 2 + or - 2 x 10 to the 10th and 3 + or - 4 x 10 to the 9th W, respectively. The average EM power that is radiated by subsequent strokes, at the time of the field peak, is about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the optical power that is radiated by these strokes in the wavelength interval from 0.4 to 1.1 micron; hence an upper limit to the radiative efficiency of a subsequent stroke is of the order of 1 percent or less at this time.

  7. Light Absorption in Arctic Sea Ice - Black Carbon vs Chlorophyll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunro, O. O.; Wingenter, O. W.; Elliott, S.; Hunke, E. C.; Flanner, M.; Wang, H.; Dubey, M. K.; Jeffery, N.

    2015-12-01

    The fingerprint of climate change is more obvious in the Arctic than any other place on Earth. This is not only because the surface temperature there has increased at twice the rate of global mean temperature but also because Arctic sea ice extent has reached a record low of 49% reduction relative to the 1979-2000 climatology. Radiation absorption through black carbon (BC) deposited on Arctic snow and sea ice surface is one of the major hypothesized contributors to the decline. However, we note that chlorophyll-a absorption owing to increasing biology activity in this region could be a major competitor during boreal spring. Modeling of sea-ice physical and biological processes together with experiments and field observations promise rapid progress in the quality of Arctic ice predictions. Here we develop a dynamic ice system module to investigate discrete absorption of both BC and chlorophyll in the Arctic, using BC deposition fields from version 5 of Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) and vertically distributed layers of chlorophyll concentrations from Sea Ice Model (CICE). To this point, our black carbon mixing ratios compare well with available in situ data. Both results are in the same order of magnitude. Estimates from our calculations show that sea ice and snow around the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Baffin Bay has the least black carbon absorption while values at the ice-ocean perimeter in the region of the Barents Sea peak significantly. With regard to pigment concentrations, high amounts of chlorophyll are produced in Arctic sea ice by the bottom microbial community, and also within the columnar pack wherever substantial biological activity takes place in the presence of moderate light. We show that the percentage of photons absorbed by chlorophyll in the spring is comparable to the amount attributed to BC, especially in areas where the total deposition rates are decreasing with time on interannual timescale. We expect a continuous increase in

  8. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  9. Tunable electromagnetically induced absorption based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Maoyong; Wang, Tongling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhang, Yuping

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an electronically induced absorption (EIA) structure based on graphene at the infrared frequency is proposed. A pair of nanorods is coupled to a ring resonator, resulting in electronically induced transparency (EIT), and then, Babinet's principle is applied to transform the EIT structure into an EIA structure. Based on the bright and dark modes of the coupling schemes, the adjustment of the coupling strength between the dark and bright modes can be achieved by changing the asymmetry degree. In addition, the transparency window and the absorption peak can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy of graphene. This graphene-based EIA structure can develop the path in narrow-band filtering and, absorptive switching in the future.

  10. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  11. Impact of the definition of peak standardized uptake value on quantification of treatment response.

    PubMed

    Vanderhoek, Matt; Perlman, Scott B; Jeraj, Robert

    2012-01-01

    PET-based treatment response assessment typically measures the change in maximum standardized uptake value (SUV(max)), which is adversely affected by noise. Peak SUV (SUV(peak)) has been recommended as a more robust alternative, but its associated region of interest (ROI(peak)) is not uniquely defined. We investigated the impact of different ROI(peak) definitions on quantification of SUV(peak) and tumor response. Seventeen patients with solid malignancies were treated with a multitargeted receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor resulting in a variety of responses. Using the cellular proliferation marker 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT), whole-body PET/CT scans were acquired at baseline and during treatment. (18)F-FLT-avid lesions (∼2/patient) were segmented on PET images, and tumor response was assessed via the relative change in SUV(peak). For each tumor, 24 different SUV(peaks) were determined by changing ROI(peak) shape (circles vs. spheres), size (7.5-20 mm), and location (centered on SUV(max) vs. placed in highest-uptake region), encompassing different definitions from the literature. Within each tumor, variations in the 24 SUV(peaks) and tumor responses were measured using coefficient of variation (CV), standardized deviation (SD), and range. For each ROI(peak) definition, a population average SUV(peak) and tumor response were determined over all tumors. A substantial variation in both SUV(peak) and tumor response resulted from changing the ROI(peak) definition. The variable ROI(peak) definition led to an intratumor SUV(peak) variation ranging from 49% above to 46% below the mean (CV, 17%) and an intratumor SUV(peak) response variation ranging from 49% above to 35% below the mean (SD, 9%). The variable ROI(peak) definition led to a population average SUV(peak) variation ranging from 24% above to 28% below the mean (CV, 14%) and a population average SUV(peak) response variation ranging from only 3% above to 3% below the mean (SD, 2%). The size of ROI(peak

  12. Absorption enhancement in non-coplanar silver nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhihui; Zhou, Zhiping; Ren, Xincheng; Bai, Shaomin; Li, Hongjian; Cao, Dongmei; Li, Gang; Cao, Guangtao

    2018-07-01

    We propose non-coplanar silver nanowire (AgNW) networks placed on a SiO2 layer. A notable absorption peak is observed in our proposed structure, and compared with the absorption of coplanar periodic AgNW networks and periodic AgNW gratings, the absorption performance of the non-coplanar AgNW networks demonstrates obvious advantages. It could be determined that the absorption ratio in this non-coplanar AgNW networks can reach 95%. In addition, several parameters that have important effects on the absorption of the non-coplanar AgNW networks are discussed in detail. Our research may provide guidance for the fundamental exploration of plasmonic absorption device applications.

  13. Triple-band metamaterial absorption utilizing single rectangular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Jik; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, YoungPak

    2017-01-01

    In the general metamaterial absorber, the single absorption band is made by the single meta-pattern. Here, we introduce the triple-band metamaterial absorber only utilizing single rectangular hole. We also demonstrate the absorption mechanism of the triple absorption. The first absorption peak was caused by the fundamental magnetic resonance in the metallic part between rectangular holes. The second absorption was generated by induced tornado magnetic field. The process of realizing the second band is also presented. The third absorption was induced by the third-harmonic magnetic resonance in the metallic region between rectangular holes. In addition, the visible-range triple-band absorber was also realized by using similar but smaller single rectangular-hole structure. These results render the simple metamaterials for high frequency in large scale, which can be useful in the fabrication of metamaterials operating in the optical range.

  14. Gigahertz-peaked spectra pulsars in Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, R.; RoŻko, K.; Kijak, J.; Lewandowski, W.

    2018-04-01

    We have carried out a detailed study of the spectral nature of six pulsars surrounded by pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). The pulsar flux density was estimated using the interferometric imaging technique of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at three frequencies 325, 610, and 1280 MHz. The spectra showed a turnover around gigahertz frequency in four out of six pulsars. It has been suggested that the gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) in pulsars arises due to thermal absorption of the pulsar emission in surrounding medium like PWNe, H II regions, supernova remnants, etc. The relatively high incidence of GPS behaviour in pulsars surrounded by PWNe imparts further credence to this view. The pulsar J1747-2958 associated with the well-known Mouse nebula was also observed in our sample and exhibited GPS behaviour. The pulsar was detected as a point source in the high-resolution images. However, the pulsed emission was not seen in the phased-array mode. It is possible that the pulsed emission was affected by extreme scattering causing considerable smearing of the emission at low radio frequencies. The GPS spectra were modelled using the thermal free-free absorption and the estimated absorber properties were largely consistent with PWNe. The spatial resolution of the images made it unlikely that the point source associated with J1747-2958 was the compact head of the PWNe, but the synchrotron self-absorption seen in such sources was a better fit to the estimated spectral shape.

  15. Soft X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of High-Abrasion-Furnace Carbon Black

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Harada, Ryusuke; Gullikson, Eric M.

    2007-02-02

    The soft x-ray absorption spectra of high-abrasion-furnace carbon black were measured to obtain local-structure/chemical-states information of the primary particles and/or crystallites. The soft x-ray absorption spectral features of carbon black represent broader {pi}* and {sigma}* peak structures compared to highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The subtracted spectra between the carbon black and HOPG, (carbon black) - (HOPG), show double-peak structures on both sides of the {pi}* peak. The lower-energy peak, denoted as the 'pre-peak', in the subtracted spectra and the {pi}*/{sigma}* peak intensity ratio in the absorption spectra clearly depend on the specific surface area by nitrogen adsorption (NSA). Therefore,more » it is concluded that the pre-peak intensity and the {pi}*/{sigma}* ratio reflect the local graphitic structure of carbon black.« less

  16. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  17. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  18. [A peak recognition algorithm designed for chromatographic peaks of transformer oil].

    PubMed

    Ou, Linjun; Cao, Jian

    2014-09-01

    In the field of the chromatographic peak identification of the transformer oil, the traditional first-order derivative requires slope threshold to achieve peak identification. In terms of its shortcomings of low automation and easy distortion, the first-order derivative method was improved by applying the moving average iterative method and the normalized analysis techniques to identify the peaks. Accurate identification of the chromatographic peaks was realized through using multiple iterations of the moving average of signal curves and square wave curves to determine the optimal value of the normalized peak identification parameters, combined with the absolute peak retention times and peak window. The experimental results show that this algorithm can accurately identify the peaks and is not sensitive to the noise, the chromatographic peak width or the peak shape changes. It has strong adaptability to meet the on-site requirements of online monitoring devices of dissolved gases in transformer oil.

  19. Dust-on-snow and the timing of peak streamflow in the upper Rio Grande

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dust radiative forcing on high elevation snowpack is well-documented in the southern Rockies. Various field studies show that dust deposits decrease snow albedo and increase absorption of solar radiation, leading to earlier snowmelt and peak stream flows. These findings have implications for the use...

  20. Controlling enhanced absorption in graphene metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qihui; Liu, Peiguo; Bian, Li-an; Liu, Hanqing; Liu, Chenxi; Chen, Genghui

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a controllable terahertz (THz) metamaterial absorber (MA) is designed with the circuit analog method. Taking advantage of the patterned graphene on SiO2/doped Si/polyimide substrates with a gold reflector, the controllable MA achieves perfect absorption at 0.75 THz. The chemical potential of graphene is regulated by controlling the voltage between graphene and doped Si layers. As the chemical potential varies from 0 eV to 0.5 eV, the MA is changed from reflection (<0.37) to absorption (>0.99). The distributions of surface current and electric field are illustrated to analyze the resonant characteristic of patterned graphene. According to the resonant characteristic, we introduce patterned graphene elements with different dimension in a unit cell, which effectively extends the effective absorption bandwidth (absorption > 0 . 9) from 0.67-0.93 THz to 0.52-0.95 THz. Moreover, replacing part of the graphene structure with gold, the switchable MA is turned into a frequency tunable MA. The absorption peak moves from 0.62 THz to 0.92 THz as the chemical potential increases from 0.1 eV to 0.5 eV. These designs overcome limitation of traditional absorbers and exhibit great potentials in many practical applications.

  1. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor); Hua, Duy H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  2. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  3. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  4. Coupling between absorption and scattering in disordered colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Anna; Hwang, Victoria; Park, Jin-Gyu; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    We aim to understand how scattering and absorption are coupled in disordered colloidal suspensions containing absorbing molecules (dyes). When the absorption length is shorter than the transport length, absorption dominates, and absorption and scattering can be seen as two additive effects. However, when the transport length is shorter than the absorption length, the scattering and absorption become coupled, as multiple scattering increases the path length of the light in the sample, leading to a higher probability of absorption. To quantify this synergistic effect, we measure the diffuse reflectance spectra of colloidal samples of varying dye concentrations, thicknesses, and particle concentrations, and we calculate the transport length and absorption length from our measurements, using a radiative transfer model. At particle concentrations so high that the particles form disordered packings, we find a minimum in the transport length. We show that selecting a dye where the absorption peak matches the location of the minimum in the transport length allows for enhanced absorption. Kraft-Heinz Corporation, NSF GRFP 2015200426.

  5. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... straight line approximately one mile to an unnamed pass with an elevation of 1485 feet, located on Soda Canyon Road; (3) Then easterly in a straight line approximately 0.5 miles to an unnamed peak of 2135 feet... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on...

  6. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... straight line approximately one mile to an unnamed pass with an elevation of 1485 feet, located on Soda Canyon Road; (3) Then easterly in a straight line approximately 0.5 miles to an unnamed peak of 2135 feet... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on...

  7. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... straight line approximately one mile to an unnamed pass with an elevation of 1485 feet, located on Soda Canyon Road; (3) Then easterly in a straight line approximately 0.5 miles to an unnamed peak of 2135 feet... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on...

  8. 27 CFR 9.140 - Atlas Peak.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... straight line approximately one mile to an unnamed pass with an elevation of 1485 feet, located on Soda Canyon Road; (3) Then easterly in a straight line approximately 0.5 miles to an unnamed peak of 2135 feet... miles to the highest point of an unnamed peak of 1268 feet elevation in section 12, T. 6 N., R. 4 W. on...

  9. Laser Atmospheric Absorption Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    A. Modification of Commercial C09 Laser 50 B. CW HF/DF Laser System * 53 C. Microcomputer Data Link 55 D . Fourier Transform...improved accuracy are used [5]. c. The absorption coefficient is listed for each absorbing species separately which some codes require. d . A super...series of water vapor absorption measurements was planned. The results of the first four lines studied are presented here in Figures 33a- d . Figure

  10. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  11. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  12. Propagation of ultrashort laser pulses in water: linear absorption and onset of nonlinear spectral transformation.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Alexei V; Naveira, Lucas M; Poudel, Milan P; Strohaber, James; Trendafilova, Cynthia S; Buck, William C; Wang, Jieyu; Strycker, Benjamin D; Wang, Chao; Schuessler, Hans; Kolomenskii, Alexandre; Kattawar, George W

    2010-01-20

    We study propagation of short laser pulses through water and use a spectral hole filling technique to essentially perform a sensitive balanced comparison of absorption coefficients for pulses of different duration. This study is motivated by an alleged violation of the Bouguer-Lambert-Beer law at low light intensities, where the pulse propagation is expected to be linear, and by a possible observation of femtosecond optical precursors in water. We find that at low intensities, absorption of laser light is determined solely by its spectrum and does not directly depend on the pulse duration, in agreement with our earlier work and in contradiction to some work of others. However, as the laser fluence is increased, interaction of light with water becomes nonlinear, causing energy exchange among the pulse's spectral components and resulting in peak-intensity dependent (and therefore pulse-duration dependent) transmission. For 30 fs pulses at 800 nm center wavelength, we determine the onset of nonlinear propagation effects to occur at a peak value of about 0.12 mJ/cm(2) of input laser energy fluence.

  13. The Boson peak in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Wikfeldt, K Thor; Schlesinger, Daniel; Pettersson, Lars G M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2013-01-01

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line TW. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih.

  14. Absorption fluids data survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  15. Automated peak picking and peak integration in macromolecular NMR spectra using AUTOPSY.

    PubMed

    Koradi, R; Billeter, M; Engeli, M; Güntert, P; Wüthrich, K

    1998-12-01

    A new approach for automated peak picking of multidimensional protein NMR spectra with strong overlap is introduced, which makes use of the program AUTOPSY (automated peak picking for NMR spectroscopy). The main elements of this program are a novel function for local noise level calculation, the use of symmetry considerations, and the use of lineshapes extracted from well-separated peaks for resolving groups of strongly overlapping peaks. The algorithm generates peak lists with precise chemical shift and integral intensities, and a reliability measure for the recognition of each peak. The results of automated peak picking of NOESY spectra with AUTOPSY were tested in combination with the combined automated NOESY cross peak assignment and structure calculation routine NOAH implemented in the program DYANA. The quality of the resulting structures was found to be comparable with those from corresponding data obtained with manual peak picking. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  16. Peak tree: a new tool for multiscale hierarchical representation and peak detection of mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Houqiang; Wang, Honghui; Wong, Stephen T C; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Peak detection is one of the most important steps in mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. However, the detection result is greatly affected by severe spectrum variations. Unfortunately, most current peak detection methods are neither flexible enough to revise false detection results nor robust enough to resist spectrum variations. To improve flexibility, we introduce peak tree to represent the peak information in MS spectra. Each tree node is a peak judgment on a range of scales, and each tree decomposition, as a set of nodes, is a candidate peak detection result. To improve robustness, we combine peak detection and common peak alignment into a closed-loop framework, which finds the optimal decomposition via both peak intensity and common peak information. The common peak information is derived and loopily refined from the density clustering of the latest peak detection result. Finally, we present an improved ant colony optimization biomarker selection method to build a whole MS analysis system. Experiment shows that our peak detection method can better resist spectrum variations and provide higher sensitivity and lower false detection rates than conventional methods. The benefits from our peak-tree-based system for MS disease analysis are also proved on real SELDI data.

  17. Peak distortion effects in analytical ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wahab, M Farooq; Anderson, Jordan K; Abdelrady, Mohamed; Lucy, Charles A

    2014-01-07

    The elution profile of chromatographic peaks provides fundamental understanding of the processes that occur in the mobile phase and the stationary phase. Major advances have been made in the column chemistry and suppressor technology in ion chromatography (IC) to handle a variety of sample matrices and ions. However, if the samples contain high concentrations of matrix ions, the overloaded peak elution profile is distorted. Consequently, the trace peaks shift their positions in the chromatogram in a manner that depends on the peak shape of the overloading analyte. In this work, the peak shapes in IC are examined from a fundamental perspective. Three commercial IC columns AS16, AS18, and AS23 were studied with borate, hydroxide and carbonate as suppressible eluents. Monovalent ions (chloride, bromide, and nitrate) are used as model analytes under analytical (0.1 mM) to overload conditions (10-500 mM). Both peak fronting and tailing are observed. On the basis of competitive Langmuir isotherms, if the eluent anion is more strongly retained than the analyte ion on an ion exchanger, the analyte peak is fronting. If the eluent is more weakly retained on the stationary phase, the analyte peak always tails under overload conditions regardless of the stationary phase capacity. If the charge of the analyte and eluent anions are different (e.g., Br(-) vs CO3(2-)), the analyte peak shapes depend on the eluent concentration in a more complex pattern. It was shown that there are interesting similarities with peak distortions due to strongly retained mobile phase components in other modes of liquid chromatography.

  18. Multiscale peak detection in wavelet space.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Min; Tong, Xia; Peng, Ying; Ma, Pan; Zhang, Ming-Jin; Lu, Hong-Mei; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Liang, Yi-Zeng

    2015-12-07

    Accurate peak detection is essential for analyzing high-throughput datasets generated by analytical instruments. Derivatives with noise reduction and matched filtration are frequently used, but they are sensitive to baseline variations, random noise and deviations in the peak shape. A continuous wavelet transform (CWT)-based method is more practical and popular in this situation, which can increase the accuracy and reliability by identifying peaks across scales in wavelet space and implicitly removing noise as well as the baseline. However, its computational load is relatively high and the estimated features of peaks may not be accurate in the case of peaks that are overlapping, dense or weak. In this study, we present multi-scale peak detection (MSPD) by taking full advantage of additional information in wavelet space including ridges, valleys, and zero-crossings. It can achieve a high accuracy by thresholding each detected peak with the maximum of its ridge. It has been comprehensively evaluated with MALDI-TOF spectra in proteomics, the CAMDA 2006 SELDI dataset as well as the Romanian database of Raman spectra, which is particularly suitable for detecting peaks in high-throughput analytical signals. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that MSPD can detect more true peaks while keeping the false discovery rate lower than MassSpecWavelet and MALDIquant methods. Superior results in Raman spectra suggest that MSPD seems to be a more universal method for peak detection. MSPD has been designed and implemented efficiently in Python and Cython. It is available as an open source package at .

  19. Photo-induced intersubband absorption in {Si}/{SiGe} quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucaud, P.; Gao, L.; Visocekas, F.; Moussa, Z.; Lourtioz, J.-M.; Julien, F. H.; Sagnes, I.; Campidelli, Y.; Badoz, P.-A.; Vagos, P.

    1995-12-01

    We have investigated photo-induced intersubband absorption in the valence band of {Si}/{SiGe} quantum wells. Carriers are optically generated in the quantum wells using an argon ion laser. The resulting infrared absorption is probed with a step-scan Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The photo-induced infrared absorption in SiGe quantum wells is dominated by two contributions: the free carrier absorption, which is similar to bulk absorption in a uniformly doped SiGe layer, and the valence subband absorption in the quantum wells. Both p- and s-polarized intersubband absorptions are measured. We have observed that the photo-induced intersubband absorption in doped samples is shifted to lower energy as compared to direct intersubband absorption. This absorption process is attributed to carriers away from the Brillouin zone center. We show that the photo-induced technique is appropriate to study valence band mixing effects and their influence on intersubband absorption.

  20. Hurricane Mitch: Peak Discharge for Selected River Reachesin Honduras

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Mark E.; Phillips, Jeffrey V.; Spahr, Norman E.

    2002-01-01

    Hurricane Mitch began as a tropical depression in the Caribbean Sea on 22 October 1998. By 26 October, Mitch had strengthened to a Category 5 storm as defined by the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale (National Climate Data Center, 1999a), and on 27 October was threatening the northern coast of Honduras (fig. 1). After making landfall 2 days later (29 October), the storm drifted south and west across Honduras, wreaking destruction throughout the country before reaching the Guatemalan border on 31 October. According to the National Climate Data Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (National Climate Data Center, 1999b), Hurricane Mitch ranks among the five strongest storms on record in the Atlantic Basin in terms of its sustained winds, barometric pressure, and duration. Hurricane Mitch also was one of the worst Atlantic storms in terms of loss of life and property. The regionwide death toll was estimated to be more than 9,000; thousands of people were reported missing. Economic losses in the region were more than $7.5 billion (U.S. Agency for International Development, 1999). Honduras suffered the most widespread devastation during the storm. More than 5,000 deaths, and economic losses of more than $4 billion, were reported by the Government of Honduras. Honduran officials estimated that Hurricane Mitch destroyed 50 years of economic development. In addition to the human and economic losses, intense flooding and landslides scarred the Honduran landscape - hydrologic and geomorphologic processes throughout the country likely will be affected for many years. As part of the U.S. Government's response to the disaster, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted post-flood measurements of peak discharge at 16 river sites throughout Honduras (fig. 2). Such measurements, termed 'indirect' measurements, are used to determine peak flows when direct measurements (using current meters or dye studies, for example) cannot be made. Indirect measurements of

  1. PeakRanger: A cloud-enabled peak caller for ChIP-seq data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), coupled with massively parallel short-read sequencing (seq) is used to probe chromatin dynamics. Although there are many algorithms to call peaks from ChIP-seq datasets, most are tuned either to handle punctate sites, such as transcriptional factor binding sites, or broad regions, such as histone modification marks; few can do both. Other algorithms are limited in their configurability, performance on large data sets, and ability to distinguish closely-spaced peaks. Results In this paper, we introduce PeakRanger, a peak caller software package that works equally well on punctate and broad sites, can resolve closely-spaced peaks, has excellent performance, and is easily customized. In addition, PeakRanger can be run in a parallel cloud computing environment to obtain extremely high performance on very large data sets. We present a series of benchmarks to evaluate PeakRanger against 10 other peak callers, and demonstrate the performance of PeakRanger on both real and synthetic data sets. We also present real world usages of PeakRanger, including peak-calling in the modENCODE project. Conclusions Compared to other peak callers tested, PeakRanger offers improved resolution in distinguishing extremely closely-spaced peaks. PeakRanger has above-average spatial accuracy in terms of identifying the precise location of binding events. PeakRanger also has excellent sensitivity and specificity in all benchmarks evaluated. In addition, PeakRanger offers significant improvements in run time when running on a single processor system, and very marked improvements when allowed to take advantage of the MapReduce parallel environment offered by a cloud computing resource. PeakRanger can be downloaded at the official site of modENCODE project: http://www.modencode.org/software/ranger/ PMID:21554709

  2. The binuclear nickel center in the A-cluster of acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and two biomimetic dinickel complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapers, P.; Mebs, S.; Ilina, Y.; Warner, D. S.; Wörmann, C.; Schuth, N.; Kositzki, R.; Dau, H.; Limberg, C.; Dobbek, H.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is involved in the bacterial carbon oxide conversion pathway. The binuclear nickel sites in ACS enzyme and two biomimetic synthetic compounds containing a Ni(II)Ni(II) unit (1 and 2) were compared using XAS/XES. EXAFS analysis of ACS proteins revealed similar Ni-N/O/S bond lengths and Ni-Ni/Fe distances as in the crystal structure in oxidized ACS, but elongated Ni-ligand bonds in reduced ACS, suggesting more reduced nickel species. The XANES spectra of ACS and the dinickel complexes showed overall similar shapes, but less resolved pre-edge and edge features in ACS, attributed to more distorted square-planar nickel sites in particular in reduced ACS. DFT calculation of pre-edge absorption and Kβ2,5 emission features reproduced the experimental spectra of the synthetic complexes, was sensitive even to the small geometry differences in 1 and 2, and indicated low-spin Ni(II) sites. Comparison of nickel sites in proteins and biomimetic compounds is valuable for deducing structural and electronic differences in response to ligation and redox changes.

  3. Probing the influence of the center atom coordination structure in iron phthalocyanine multi-walled carbon nanotube-based oxygen reduction reaction catalysts by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yingxiang; Li, Zhipan; Xia, Dingguo; Zheng, Lirong; Liao, Yi; Li, Kai; Zuo, Xia

    2015-09-01

    Three different pentacoordinate iron phthalocyanine (FePc) electrocatalysts with an axial ligand (pyridyl group, Py) anchored to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are prepared by a microwave method as high performance composite electrocatalysts (FePc-Py/MWCNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For comparison, tetracoordinate FePc electrocatalysts without an axial ligand anchored to MWCNTs (FePc/MWCNTs) are assembled in the same way. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Raman spectroscopy (RS), and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) are used to characterize the obtained electrocatalysts. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples is measured by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), and the onset potential of all of the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts is found to be more positive than that of their FePc/MWCNTs counterparts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are employed to elucidate the relationship between molecular structure and electrocatalytic activity. XPS indicates that higher concentrations of Fe3+ and pyridine-type nitrogen play critical roles in determining the electrocatalytic ORR activity of the samples. XAFS spectroscopy reveals that the FePc-Py/MWCNTs electrocatalysts have a coordination geometry around Fe that is closer to the square pyramidal structure, a higher concentration of Fe3+, and a smaller phthalocyanine ring radius compared with those of FePc/MWCNTs.

  4. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  5. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  6. Saving Power at Peak Hours (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Piette, Mary Ann [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2018-05-23

    California needs new, responsive, demand-side energy technologies to ensure that periods of tight electricity supply on the grid don't turn into power outages. Led by Berkeley Lab's Mary Ann Piette, the California Energy Commission (through its Public Interest Energy Research Program) has established a Demand Response Research Center that addresses two motivations for adopting demand responsiveness: reducing average electricity prices and preventing future electricity crises. The research seeks to understand factors that influence "what works" in Demand Response. Piette's team is investigating the two types of demand response, load response and price response, that may influence and reduce the use of peak electric power through automated controls, peak pricing, advanced communications, and other strategies.

  7. [The study of CO2 cavity enhanced absorption and highly sensitive absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Pei, Shi-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Cui, Fen-Ping; Huang, Wei; Shao, Jie; Fan, Hong; Zhang, Wei-Jun

    2005-12-01

    Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a new spectral technology that is based on the cavity ring down absorption spectroscopy. In the present paper, a DFB encapsulation narrow line width tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as the light source. At the center output, the TDL radiation wavelength was 1.573 microm, and an optical cavity, which consisted of two high reflectivity mirrors (near 1.573 microm, the mirror reflectivity was about 0.994%), was used as a sample cell. A wavemeter was used to record the accurate frequency of the laser radiation. In the experiment, the method of scanning the optical cavity to change the cavity mode was used, when the laser frequency was coincident with one of the cavity mode; the laser radiation was coupled into the optical cavity and the detector could receive the light signals that escaped the optical cavity. As a result, the absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide weak absorption at low pressure was obtained with an absorption intensity of 1.816 x 10(-23) cm(-1) x (molecule x cm(-2)(-1) in a sample cell with a length of only 33.5 cm. An absorption sensitivity of about 3.62 x 10(-7) cm(-1) has been achieved. The experiment result indicated that the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy has the advantage of high sensivity, simple experimental setup, and easy operation.

  8. Colorful Central Peak in an Unnamed Crater

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-10-05

    The colorful rocks exposed in the central peak visible in this image from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter probably reflect variations in mineral content that were caused by water activity early in Mars history.

  9. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kean, J. W.; McGuire, L. A.; Rengers, F. K.; Smith, J. B.; Staley, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  10. Bayesian Peak Picking for NMR Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yichen; Gao, Xin; Liang, Faming

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein–DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method. PMID:24184964

  11. Managing Student Traffic during Peak Periods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raphael, Carol; Milks, Linda

    1980-01-01

    Some suggestions to help financial aid offices develop a rational system for coping with high traffic periods are offered. Creating a system to handle peak traffic periods involves three related components: planning, resource management, and evaluation. (MLW)

  12. Amplification of postwildfire peak flow by debris

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kean, Jason W.; McGuire, Luke; Rengers, Francis K.; Smith, Joel B.; Staley, Dennis M.

    2016-01-01

    In burned steeplands, the peak depth and discharge of postwildfire runoff can substantially increase from the addition of debris. Yet methods to estimate the increase over water flow are lacking. We quantified the potential amplification of peak stage and discharge using video observations of postwildfire runoff, compiled data on postwildfire peak flow (Qp), and a physically based model. Comparison of flood and debris flow data with similar distributions in drainage area (A) and rainfall intensity (I) showed that the median runoff coefficient (C = Qp/AI) of debris flows is 50 times greater than that of floods. The striking increase in Qp can be explained using a fully predictive model that describes the additional flow resistance caused by the emergence of coarse-grained surge fronts. The model provides estimates of the amplification of peak depth, discharge, and shear stress needed for assessing postwildfire hazards and constraining models of bedrock incision.

  13. Helping System Engineers Bridge the Peaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rungta, Neha; Tkachuk, Oksana; Person, Suzette; Biatek, Jason; Whalen, Michael W.; Castle, Joseph; Castle, JosephGundy-Burlet, Karen

    2014-01-01

    In our experience at NASA, system engineers generally follow the Twin Peaks approach when developing safety-critical systems. However, iterations between the peaks require considerable manual, and in some cases duplicate, effort. A significant part of the manual effort stems from the fact that requirements are written in English natural language rather than a formal notation. In this work, we propose an approach that enables system engineers to leverage formal requirements and automated test generation to streamline iterations, effectively "bridging the peaks". The key to the approach is a formal language notation that a) system engineers are comfortable with, b) is supported by a family of automated V&V tools, and c) is semantically rich enough to describe the requirements of interest. We believe the combination of formalizing requirements and providing tool support to automate the iterations will lead to a more efficient Twin Peaks implementation at NASA.

  14. Training Lessons Learned from Peak Performance Episodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    PEAK PERFORMAN4CE Fina Report- EPSOESOctober 1984-December 1985 % 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER * 7. AUTHOR(@) 6. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) James...L. Fobes - 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND) ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT, TASK U.S. Army Research Institute Field UnitAEA OKUINMER...peak performance indicates that three cogni- . tive components enable these episodes: psychological readiness (activating . optimal arousal and emotion

  15. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  16. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  17. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  18. Temperature dependent absorption cross-sections of O2-O2 collision pairs between 340 and 630 nm and at atmospherically relevant pressure.

    PubMed

    Thalman, Ryan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2013-10-07

    The collisions between two oxygen molecules give rise to O4 absorption in the Earth atmosphere. O4 absorption is relevant to atmospheric transmission and Earth's radiation budget. O4 is further used as a reference gas in Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) applications to infer properties of clouds and aerosols. The O4 absorption cross section spectrum of bands centered at 343, 360, 380, 446, 477, 532, 577 and 630 nm is investigated in dry air and oxygen as a function of temperature (203-295 K), and at 820 mbar pressure. We characterize the temperature dependent O4 line shape and provide high precision O4 absorption cross section reference spectra that are suitable for atmospheric O4 measurements. The peak absorption cross-section is found to increase at lower temperatures due to a corresponding narrowing of the spectral band width, while the integrated cross-section remains constant (within <3%, the uncertainty of our measurements). The enthalpy of formation is determined to be ΔH(250) = -0.12 ± 0.12 kJ mol(-1), which is essentially zero, and supports previous assignments of O4 as collision induced absorption (CIA). At 203 K, van der Waals complexes (O(2-dimer)) contribute less than 0.14% to the O4 absorption in air. We conclude that O(2-dimer) is not observable in the Earth atmosphere, and as a consequence the atmospheric O4 distribution is for all practical means and purposes independent of temperature, and can be predicted with an accuracy of better than 10(-3) from knowledge of the oxygen concentration profile.

  19. Spectroscopic properties and mechanisms of superbroadband lasing from fluorine(2)(+)** color centers in lithium fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Neil Wayne

    2000-12-01

    A temperature-dependent spectroscopic analysis of the color center laser medium, LiF:F2+**, is presented. Special attention is devoted to the well-known thermal- and photo-stable F2 +** color center as well as a new F2+**- like color center, conclusively discovered in this work. The standard F2 +** color center is shown to have l0abs. = 615 nm and peak emission near l0ems. = 906 nm. This new F2+**-like color center is found to have a peak absorption near l0abs. = 812 nm and peak emission near l0ems. = 1080 nm. Justification for the association of this new center with F2+**-Iike color centers is explained in the text. Standard F2+** color centers have kinetics of fluorescence lifetime of τ13K = 32 ns, τ300 K = 21 ns, for a quantum efficiency of fluorescence, η = 66%. Concerning the new F2+**-like color center, the 13 K lifetime was found to be τ ~ 5 ns. We show that Alexandrite laser radiation can simultaneously excite the absorption bands of both F2 +**-like centers in their region of spectral overlap. The resulting emission from both centers is the mechanism responsible for the superbroadband range of tunability, ~800-1300 nm, from this laser medium at room temperature. By using the results of the spectroscopic analysis, theoretical calculations are performed to develop a superbroadband laser based on this active medium. A super broadband laser provides laser emission that coincides with nearly the entire fluorescence bands of the material. This type of laser is made possible with the use of a novel laser cavity described in the text. This superbroadband laser was successfully realized under 633 run excitation from a Raman shifted (D2) second harmonic output of a Q-switched, Nd:YAG laser. Comparison of the experimental results from the LIF:F2 +** superbroadband laser show good agreement with the theoretical calculations for both spectral output and temporal signatures. It is also shown that with further technological developments, this crystal is the heart of

  20. Predicting Peak Flows following Forest Fires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliot, William J.; Miller, Mary Ellen; Dobre, Mariana

    2016-04-01

    Following forest fires, peak flows in perennial and ephemeral streams often increase by a factor of 10 or more. This increase in peak flow rate may overwhelm existing downstream structures, such as road culverts, causing serious damage to road fills at stream crossings. In order to predict peak flow rates following wildfires, we have applied two different tools. One is based on the U.S.D.A Natural Resource Conservation Service Curve Number Method (CN), and the other is by applying the Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) to the watershed. In our presentation, we will describe the science behind the two methods, and present the main variables for each model. We will then provide an example of a comparison of the two methods to a fire-prone watershed upstream of the City of Flagstaff, Arizona, USA, where a fire spread model was applied for current fuel loads, and for likely fuel loads following a fuel reduction treatment. When applying the curve number method, determining the time to peak flow can be problematic for low severity fires because the runoff flow paths are both surface and through shallow lateral flow. The WEPP watershed version incorporates shallow lateral flow into stream channels. However, the version of the WEPP model that was used for this study did not have channel routing capabilities, but rather relied on regression relationships to estimate peak flows from individual hillslope polygon peak runoff rates. We found that the two methods gave similar results if applied correctly, with the WEPP predictions somewhat greater than the CN predictions. Later releases of the WEPP model have incorporated alternative methods for routing peak flows that need to be evaluated.

  1. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  2. Peak-flow characteristics of Wyoming streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Kirk A.

    2003-01-01

    Peak-flow characteristics for unregulated streams in Wyoming are described in this report. Frequency relations for annual peak flows through water year 2000 at 364 streamflow-gaging stations in and near Wyoming were evaluated and revised or updated as needed. Analyses of historical floods, temporal trends, and generalized skew were included in the evaluation. Physical and climatic basin characteristics were determined for each gaging station using a geographic information system. Gaging stations with similar peak-flow and basin characteristics were grouped into six hydrologic regions. Regional statistical relations between peak-flow and basin characteristics were explored using multiple-regression techniques. Generalized least squares regression equations for estimating magnitudes of annual peak flows with selected recurrence intervals from 1.5 to 500 years were developed for each region. Average standard errors of estimate range from 34 to 131 percent. Average standard errors of prediction range from 35 to 135 percent. Several statistics for evaluating and comparing the errors in these estimates are described. Limitations of the equations are described. Methods for applying the regional equations for various circumstances are listed and examples are given.

  3. THE PEAKS AND GEOMETRY OF FITNESS LANDSCAPES

    PubMed Central

    CRONA, KRISTINA; GREENE, DEVIN; BARLOW, MIRIAM

    2012-01-01

    Fitness landscapes are central in the theory of adaptation. Recent work compares global and local properties of fitness landscapes. It has been shown that multi-peaked fitness landscapes have a local property called reciprocal sign epistasis interactions. The converse is not true. We show that no condition phrased in terms of reciprocal sign epistasis interactions only, implies multiple peaks. We give a sufficient condition for multiple peaks phrased in terms of two-way interactions. This result is surprising since it has been claimed that no sufficient local condition for multiple peaks exist. We show that our result cannot be generalized to sufficient conditions for three or more peaks. Our proof depends on fitness graphs, where nodes represent genotypes and where arrows point toward more fit genotypes. We also use fitness graphs in order to give a new brief proof of the equivalent characterizations of fitness landscapes lacking genetic constraints on accessible mutational trajectories. We compare a recent geometric classification of fitness landscape based on triangulations of polytopes with qualitative aspects of gene interactions. One observation is that fitness graphs provide information not contained in the geometric classification. We argue that a qualitative perspective may help relating theory of fitness landscapes and empirical observations. PMID:23036916

  4. Achieving high energy absorption capacity in cellular bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Chan, K. C.; Wu, F. F.; Xia, L.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have exhibited excellent energy-absorption performance by inheriting superior strength from the parent BMGs. However, how to achieve high energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs is vital but mysterious. In this work, using step-by-step observations of the deformation evolution of a series of cellular BMGs, the underlying mechanisms for the remarkable energy absorption capacity have been investigated by studying two influencing key factors: the peak stress and the decay of the peak stress during the plastic-flow plateau stages. An analytical model of the peak stress has been proposed, and the predicted results agree well with the experimental data. The decay of the peak stress has been attributed to the geometry change of the macroscopic cells, the formation of shear bands in the middle of the struts, and the “work-softening” nature of BMGs. The influencing factors such as the effect of the strut thickness and the number of unit cells have also been investigated and discussed. Strategies for achieving higher energy absorption capacity in cellular BMGs have been proposed. PMID:25973781

  5. Reducing microwave absorption with fast frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Juehang; Hubler, A

    2017-05-01

    We study the response of a two-level quantum system to a chirp signal, using both numerical and analytical methods. The numerical method is based on numerical solutions of the Schrödinger solution of the two-level system, while the analytical method is based on an approximate solution of the same equations. We find that when two-level systems are perturbed by a chirp signal, the peak population of the initially unpopulated state exhibits a high sensitivity to frequency modulation rate. We also find that the aforementioned sensitivity depends on the strength of the forcing, and weaker forcings result in a higher sensitivity, where the frequency modulation rate required to produce the same reduction in peak population would be lower. We discuss potential applications of this result in the field of microwave power transmission, as it shows applying fast frequency modulation to transmitted microwaves used for power transmission could decrease unintended absorption of microwaves by organic tissue.

  6. SPANISH PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Budding, Karin E.; Kluender, Steven E.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation and a survey of mines and prospects were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Spanish Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Huerfano and Las Animas Counties, in south-central Colorado. Anomalous gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in rocks and in stream sediments from drainage basins in the vicinity of the old mines and prospects on West Spanish Peak indicate a substantiated mineral-resource potential for base and precious metals in the area surrounding this peak; however, the mineralized veins are sparse, small in size, and generally low in grade. There is a possibility that coal may underlie the study area, but it would be at great depth and it is unlikely that it would have survived the intense igneous activity in the area. There is little likelihood for the occurrence of oil and gas because of the lack of structural traps and the igneous activity.

  7. Peak wavelength shifts and opponent color theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashdown, Ian; Salsbury, Marc

    2007-09-01

    We adapt the tenets of Hering's opponent color theory to the processing of data obtained from a tristimulus colorimeter to independently determine the intensity and possible peak wavelength shift of a narrowband LED. This information may then be used for example in an optical feedback loop to maintain constant intensity and chromaticity for a light source consisting of two LEDs with different peak wavelengths. This approach is particularly useful for LED backlighting of LCD display panels using red, green, and blue LEDs, wherein a tristimulus colorimeter can be used to maintain primary chromaticities to within broadcast standard limits in real time.

  8. Peak broadening and peak shift pole figures investigations by STRESS-SPEC diffractometer at FRM II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, W. M.; Randau, C.; Hofmann, M.; Brokmeier, H. G.; Mueller, M.; Schreyer, A.

    2012-02-01

    This paper studied for the first time peak intensity, peak position and FHWM pole figures with one time measurement at the neutron diffractometer STRESS-SPEC via in-situ tensile deformation on austenitic steel. Fibre distribution with its evolution from central tensile direction to normal direction of these three kinds of pole figures was obtained. Variation of peak position and FWHM can be correlated to the reorientation of the texture component.

  9. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  10. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  11. Correlated peak relative light intensity and peak current in triggered lightning subsequent return strokes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The correlation between peak relative light intensity L(R) and stroke peak current I(R) is examined for 39 subsequent return strokes in two triggered lightning flashes. One flash contained 19 strokes and the other 20 strokes for which direct measurements were available of the return stroke peak current at ground. Peak currents ranged from 1.6 to 21 kA. The measurements of peak relative light intensity were obtained from photographic streak recordings using calibrated film and microsecond resolution. Correlations, significant at better than the 0.1 percent level, were found for several functional relationships. Although a relation between L(R) and I(R) is evident in these data, none of the analytical relations considered is clearly favored. The correlation between L(R) and the maximum rate of current rise is also examined, but less correlation than between L(R) and I(R) is found. In addition, the peak relative intensity near ground is evaluated for 22 dart leaders, and a mean ratio of peak dart leader to peak return stroke relative light intensity was found to be 0.1 with a range of 0.02-0.23. Using two different methods, the peak current near ground in these dart leaders is estimated to range from 0.1 to 6 kA.

  12. Linear absorptive dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tip, A.

    1998-06-01

    Starting from Maxwell's equations for a linear, nonconducting, absorptive, and dispersive medium, characterized by the constitutive equations D(x,t)=ɛ1(x)E(x,t)+∫t-∞dsχ(x,t-s)E(x,s) and H(x,t)=B(x,t), a unitary time evolution and canonical formalism is obtained. Given the complex, coordinate, and frequency-dependent, electric permeability ɛ(x,ω), no further assumptions are made. The procedure leads to a proper definition of band gaps in the periodic case and a new continuity equation for energy flow. An S-matrix formalism for scattering from lossy objects is presented in full detail. A quantized version of the formalism is derived and applied to the generation of Čerenkov and transition radiation as well as atomic decay. The last case suggests a useful generalization of the density of states to the absorptive situation.

  13. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  14. Norfolk Schools Talked to Astronaut Tim Peake

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Tim Peake's mission to the International Space Station captured the imagination of the UK and this article describes a live radio link with him, to help him to reach out to pupils across the country and inspire them in STEM subjects. It describes the project, from bidding for the opportunity to host it, to the planning and realisation of the…

  15. Hubbert's Peak: the Impending World oil Shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deffeyes, K. S.

    2004-12-01

    Global oil production will probably reach a peak sometime during this decade. After the peak, the world's production of crude oil will fall, never to rise again. The world will not run out of energy, but developing alternative energy sources on a large scale will take at least 10 years. The slowdown in oil production may already be beginning; the current price fluctuations for crude oil and natural gas may be the preamble to a major crisis. In 1956, the geologist M. King Hubbert predicted that U.S. oil production would peak in the early 1970s.1 Almost everyone, inside and outside the oil industry, rejected Hubbert's analysis. The controversy raged until 1970, when the U.S. production of crude oil started to fall. Hubbert was right. Around 1995, several analysts began applying Hubbert's method to world oil production, and most of them estimate that the peak year for world oil will be between 2004 and 2008. These analyses were reported in some of the most widely circulated sources: Nature, Science, and Scientific American.2 None of our political leaders seem to be paying attention. If the predictions are correct, there will be enormous effects on the world economy. Even the poorest nations need fuel to run irrigation pumps. The industrialized nations will be bidding against one another for the dwindling oil supply. The good news is that we will put less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. The bad news is that my pickup truck has a 25-gallon tank.

  16. Six Ways To Foster Peak Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevilla, Christine; Wells, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses six initiatives that organizations can support to ensure peak performance: individual knowledge portfolios; mentoring and apprenticeship relationships; electronic conferencing systems; organizational knowledge repository; community of practice; reward and recognition. Defines each initiative and describes how to make each one work in an…

  17. Some Phenomenological Aspects of the Peak Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblatt, Howard S.; Bartlett, Iris

    1976-01-01

    This article relates the psychological dynamics of "peak experiences" to two concepts, intentionality and paradoxical intention, within the philosophical orientation of phenomenology. A review of early philosophical theories of self (Kant and Hume) is presented and compared with the experiential emphasis found in the phenomenology of Husserl.…

  18. Bayesian peak picking for NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yichen; Gao, Xin; Liang, Faming

    2014-02-01

    Protein structure determination is a very important topic in structural genomics, which helps people to understand varieties of biological functions such as protein-protein interactions, protein-DNA interactions and so on. Nowadays, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has often been used to determine the three-dimensional structures of protein in vivo. This study aims to automate the peak picking step, the most important and tricky step in NMR structure determination. We propose to model the NMR spectrum by a mixture of bivariate Gaussian densities and use the stochastic approximation Monte Carlo algorithm as the computational tool to solve the problem. Under the Bayesian framework, the peak picking problem is casted as a variable selection problem. The proposed method can automatically distinguish true peaks from false ones without preprocessing the data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort in the literature that tackles the peak picking problem for NMR spectrum data using Bayesian method. Copyright © 2013. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A "Peake" into Using Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    In December 2015, the media was full of Tim Peake and his adventures as he set off for the International Space Station as the first British ESA astronaut. The author set up a class blog as well as a Twitter account and created cross-curricular units of work around the "real" experience. Children really raised their game when they were…

  20. An alternative interpretation for cosmic ray peaks

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Doojin; Park, Jong -Chul

    2015-10-03

    We propose an alternative mechanism based upon dark matter (DM) interpretation for anomalous peak signatures in cosmic ray measurements, assuming an extended dark sector with two DM species. This is contrasted with previous effort to explain various line-like cosmic-ray excesses in the context of DM models where the relevant DM candidate directly annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles. The heavier DM is assumed to annihilate to an on-shell intermediate state. As the simplest choice, it decays directly into the lighter DM along with an unstable particle which in turn decays to a pair of SM states corresponding to the interestingmore » cosmic anomaly. We show that a sharp continuum energy peak can be readily generated under the proposed DM scenario, depending on dark sector particle mass spectra. Remarkably, such a peak is robustly identified as half the mass of the unstable particle. Furthermore, other underlying mass parameters are analytically related to the shape of energy spectrum. We apply this idea to the two well-known line excesses in the cosmic photon spectrum: 130 GeV γ-ray line and 3.5 keV X-ray line. As a result, each observed peak spectrum is well-reproduced by theoretical expectation predicated upon our suggested mechanism, and moreover, our resulting best fits provide rather improved χ 2 values.« less

  1. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  2. Phase change wallboard for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    George, K.L.; Shepard, M.

    1993-12-31

    After more than a decade of research in university and government laboratories, wallboard impregnated with a phase change material (PCM) appears to be close to commercialization, and could prove to be a powerful peak demand management tool for utilities, particularly in the residential sector. As a lightweight, easily installed thermal storage medium, PCM wallboard could be suitable for both new construction and retrofit applications. Computer simulations performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) predicted that PCM wallboard could shift more than 90 percent of the sensible load of a residential air-conditioning system to off-peak periods, and could permit a 30more » percent reduction in equipment capacity. Residential winter peak loads could also be reduced. An Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) simulation showed that PCM wallboard could reduce peak heating demand by a third in a Tennessee climate. With more than 70 billion square feet of plasterboard produced annually in the US, widespread adoption of PCM wallboard could have a significant impact on peak load, while moderating temperature swings and enhancing comfort in homes and perhaps commercial spaces as well. Energy savings are also possible when PCM wallboard is used to take advantage of solar gain. LANL simulations predict 28 percent heating energy savings in a Boston passive solar house, and 54 percent savings in Denver. ORNL researchers support these findings -- they calculate that moving windows to the south and adding PCM wallboard could save from one-third to one-half of the heating energy needed in a Denver home.« less

  3. A naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible multiple peak metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Ma, Heli; Song, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-03-26

    We report a naked eye refractive index sensor with a visible metamaterial absorber. The visible metamaterial absorber consisting of a silver dendritic/dielectric/metal structure shows multiple absorption peaks. By incorporating a gain material (rhodamine B) into the dielectric layer, the maximal magnitude of the absorption peak can be improved by about 30%. As the metamaterial absorber is sensitive to the refractive index of glucose solutions, it can function as a sensor that quickly responds to variations of the refractive index of the liquid. Meanwhile, since the response is presented via color changes, it can be clearly observed by the naked eyes. Further experiments have confirmed that the sensor can be used repeatedly.

  4. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  5. Harnessing Multiple Internal Reflections to Design Highly Absorptive Acoustic Metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen; Cummer, Steven A.

    2018-05-01

    The rapid development of metasurfaces has enabled numerous intriguing applications with acoustically thin sheets. Here we report the theory and experimental realization of a nonresonant sound-absorbing strategy using metasurfaces by harnessing multiple internal reflections. We theoretically and numerically show that the higher-order diffraction of thin gradient-index metasurfaces is tied to multiple internal reflections inside the unit cells. Highly absorbing acoustic metasurfaces can be realized by enforcing multiple internal reflections together with a small amount of loss. A reflective gradient-index acoustic metasurface is designed based on the theory, and we further experimentally verify the performance using a three-dimensional printed prototype. Measurements show over 99% energy absorption at the peak frequency and a 95% energy absorption bandwidth of around 600 Hz. The proposed mechanism provides an alternative route for sound absorption without the necessity of high absorption of the individual unit cells.

  6. Analyte-induced spectral filtering in femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    Here, we discuss the influence of spectral filtering by samples in femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Commercial instruments for transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) have become increasingly available to scientists in recent years and TA is becoming an established technique to measure the dynamics of photoexcited systems. Furthermore, we show that absorption of the excitation pulse by the sample can severely alter the spectrum and consequently the temporal pulse shape. This “spectral self-filtering” effect can lead to systematic errors and misinterpretation of data, most notably in concentration dependent measurements. Finally, the combination of narrow absorption peaks in the sample with ultrafast broadbandmore » excitation pulses is especially prone to this effect.« less

  7. Analyte-induced spectral filtering in femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Abraham, Baxter; Nieto-Pescador, Jesus; Gundlach, Lars

    2017-03-06

    Here, we discuss the influence of spectral filtering by samples in femtosecond transient absorption measurements. Commercial instruments for transient absorption spectroscopy (TA) have become increasingly available to scientists in recent years and TA is becoming an established technique to measure the dynamics of photoexcited systems. Furthermore, we show that absorption of the excitation pulse by the sample can severely alter the spectrum and consequently the temporal pulse shape. This “spectral self-filtering” effect can lead to systematic errors and misinterpretation of data, most notably in concentration dependent measurements. Finally, the combination of narrow absorption peaks in the sample with ultrafast broadbandmore » excitation pulses is especially prone to this effect.« less

  8. Effect of reservoir storage on peak flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mitchell, William D.

    1962-01-01

    For observation of small-basin flood peaks, numerous crest-stage gages now are operated at culverts in roadway embankments. To the extent that they obstruct the natural flood plains of the streams, these embankments serve to create detention reservoirs, and thus to reduce the magnitude of observed peak flows. Hence, it is desirable to obtain a factor, I/O, by which the observed outflow peaks may be adjusted to corresponding inflow peaks. The problem is made more difficult by the fact that, at most of these observation sites, only peak stages and discharges are observed, and complete hydrographs are not available. It is postulated that the inflow hydrographs may be described in terms of Q, the instantaneous discharge; A, the size of drainage area; Pe, the amount of rainfall excess; H, the time from beginning of rainfall excess; D, the duration of rainfall excess; and T and k, characteristic times for the drainage area, and indicative of the time lag between rainfall and runoff. These factors are combined into the dimensionless ratios (QT/APe), (H/T), (k/T), and (D/T), leading to families of inflow hydrographs in which the first ratio is the ordinate, the second is the abscissa, and the third and fourth are distinguishing parameters. Sixteen dimensionless inflow hydrographs have been routed through reservoir storage to obtain 139 corresponding outflow hydrographs. In most of the routings it has been assumed that the storage-outflow relation is linear; that is, that storage is some constant, K, times the outflow. The existence of nonlinear storage is recognized, and exploratory nonlinear routings are described, but analyses and conclusions are confined to the problems of linear storage. Comparisons between inflow hydrographs and outflow hydrographs indicate that, at least for linear storage, I/O=f(k/T, D/T, K/T) in which I and O are, respectively, the magnitudes of the inflow and the outflow peaks, and T, k, D, and K are as defined above. Diagrams are presented to

  9. The Peak Flow Working Group: test of portable peak flow meters by explosive decompression.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O F; Miller, M R

    1997-02-01

    In 1991, 50 new Vitalograph peak flow meters and 27 previously used mini-Wright peak flow meters were tested at three peak flows by use of a calibrator applying explosive decompression. The mini-Wright peak flow meters were also compared with eight new meters. For both makes of meter there was an excellent within-meter and between-meter variation. The accuracy, however, was poor, with a maximal overestimation of true flows of 50 and 70 L.min-1 in the interval from 200 to 400 L.min-1 for the Vitalograph and mini-Wright meters, respectively. The deviation is explained by the physical characteristics of the variable orifice peak flow meters. They have been supplied with equidistant scales, which give non-linear readings.

  10. Measurement of HCl absorption coefficients with a DF laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, C. H.; Allario, F.

    1977-01-01

    Absorption coefficients in the fundamental P-branch of HCl at several DF laser transitions from 2439.02/cm to 2862.87/cm have been measured experimentally. The 2-1 P(3) DF laser transition has been shown to overlap the P(6) HCl-37 absorption line within the halfwidth of an atmospherically broadened line. The absorption coefficient k was measured to be 5.64 plus or minus 0.28/(atm-cm) for a 0.27% mixture of HCl in N2 at a total pressure of 760 torr. A theoretical and experimental comparison of the pressure dependence of k showed that the 2-1 P(3) DF transition lies 1.32 plus or minus 0.15 GHz from the center of the P(6) HCl absorption line. Applications of these results to differential absorption lidar and to heterodyne detection are discussed.

  11. Effect of gear ratio on peak power and time to peak power in BMX cyclists.

    PubMed

    Rylands, Lee P; Roberts, Simon J; Hurst, Howard T

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to ascertain if gear ratio selection would have an effect on peak power and time to peak power production in elite Bicycle Motocross (BMX) cyclists. Eight male elite BMX riders volunteered for the study. Each rider performed three, 10-s maximal sprints on an Olympic standard indoor BMX track. The riders' bicycles were fitted with a portable SRM power meter. Each rider performed the three sprints using gear ratios of 41/16, 43/16 and 45/16 tooth. The results from the 41/16 and 45/16 gear ratios were compared to the current standard 43/16 gear ratio. Statistically, significant differences were found between the gear ratios for peak power (F(2,14) = 6.448; p = .010) and peak torque (F(2,14) = 4.777; p = .026), but no significant difference was found for time to peak power (F(2,14) = 0.200; p = .821). When comparing gear ratios, the results showed a 45/16 gear ratio elicited the highest peak power,1658 ± 221 W, compared to 1436 ± 129 W and 1380 ± 56 W, for the 43/16 and 41/16 ratios, respectively. The time to peak power showed a 41/16 tooth gear ratio attained peak power in -0.01 s and a 45/16 in 0.22 s compared to the 43/16. The findings of this study suggest that gear ratio choice has a significant effect on peak power production, though time to peak power output is not significantly affected. Therefore, selecting a higher gear ratio results in riders attaining higher power outputs without reducing their start time.

  12. Triangle singularities and XYZ quarkonium peaks

    SciTech Connect

    Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss analytical properties of partial waves derived from projection of a 4-legged amplitude with crossed-channel exchanges in the kinematic region of the direct channel that corresponds to the XYZ peaks in charmonium and bottomonium. We show that in general partial waves can develop anomalous branch points in the vicinity of the direct channel physical region. In a specific case, when these branch points lie on the opposite side of the unitary cut they pinch the integration contour in a dispersion relation and if the pinch happens close to threshold, the normal threshold cusp is enhanced. We show that this effect only occurs if masses of resonances in the crossed channel are in a specific, narrow range. We estimate the size of threshold enhancements originating from these anomalous singularities in reactions where themore » $$Z_c(3900)$$ and the $$Z_b(10610)$$ peaks have been observed.« less

  13. Peak Oil, Food Systems, and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Cindy L.; Kirschenmann, Frederick L.; Tinch, Jennifer; Lawrence, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak oil is the phenomenon whereby global oil supplies will peak, then decline, with extraction growing increasingly costly. Today's globalized industrial food system depends on oil for fueling farm machinery, producing pesticides, and transporting goods. Biofuels production links oil prices to food prices. We examined food system vulnerability to rising oil prices and the public health consequences. In the short term, high food prices harm food security and equity. Over time, high prices will force the entire food system to adapt. Strong preparation and advance investment may mitigate the extent of dislocation and hunger. Certain social and policy changes could smooth adaptation; public health has an essential role in promoting a proactive, smart, and equitable transition that increases resilience and enables adequate food for all. PMID:21778492

  14. Light, alpha, and Fe-peak element abundances in the galactic bulge

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Christian I.; Rich, R. Michael; Kobayashi, Chiaki

    2014-10-01

    We present radial velocities and chemical abundances of O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu for a sample of 156 red giant branch stars in two Galactic bulge fields centered near (l, b) = (+5.25,–3.02) and (0,–12). The (+5.25,–3.02) field also includes observations of the bulge globular cluster NGC 6553. The results are based on high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000), high signal-to-noise ration (S/N ≳ 70) FLAMES-GIRAFFE spectra obtained through the European Southern Observatory archive. However, we only selected a subset of the original observations that included spectra with both high S/N and that did notmore » show strong TiO absorption bands. This work extends previous analyses of this data set beyond Fe and the α-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti. While we find reasonable agreement with past work, the data presented here indicate that the bulge may exhibit a different chemical composition than the local thick disk, especially at [Fe/H] ≳ –0.5. In particular, the bulge [α/Fe] ratios may remain enhanced to a slightly higher [Fe/H] than the thick disk, and the Fe-peak elements Co, Ni, and Cu appear enhanced compared to the disk. There is also some evidence that the [Na/Fe] (but not [Al/Fe]) trends between the bulge and local disk may be different at low and high metallicity. We also find that the velocity dispersion decreases as a function of increasing [Fe/H] for both fields, and do not detect any significant cold, high-velocity populations. A comparison with chemical enrichment models indicates that a significant fraction of hypernovae may be required to explain the bulge abundance trends, and that initial mass functions that are steep, top-heavy (and do not include strong outflow), or truncated to avoid including contributions from stars >40 M {sub ☉} are ruled out, in particular because of disagreement with the Fe-peak abundance data. For most elements, the NGC 6553 stars exhibit abundance trends nearly identical to comparable metallicity bulge

  15. Pubertal Gynecomastia Coincides with Peak Height Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Limony, Yehuda; Friger, Michael; Hochberg, Ze’ev

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Pubertal gynecomastia (PG) occurs in up to 65% of adolescent boys. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the ages at which PG and peak height velocity occur in pubertal boys. Methods: This was a prospective study that was designed to detect PG within three months of its emergence. We examined one hundred and six boys who were followed for short stature and/or delayed puberty at three month intervals, and gynecomastia was observed in 43 of these boys (40.5%). Results: PG occurred in the 43 boys within a year of their peak height velocity, and most of these boys were at Tanner stage 3 for pubic hair and had testicular volumes between 8-10 mL. Conclusion: It is recommended that evaluation of height growth be included in the diagnostic approach to PG in boys with short stature and/or delayed puberty. The coincidence of age of peak height velocity and PG suggests a causal relationship between the two events and a role of insulin-like growth factor-1. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24072080

  16. Acquisition of peak responding: what is learned?

    PubMed

    Balci, Fuat; Gallistel, Charles R; Allen, Brian D; Frank, Krystal M; Gibson, Jacqueline M; Brunner, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how the common measures of timing performance behaved in the course of training on the peak procedure in C3H mice. Following fixed interval (FI) pre-training, mice received 16 days of training in the peak procedure. The peak time and spread were derived from the average response rates while the start and stop times and their relative variability were derived from a single-trial analysis. Temporal precision (response spread) appeared to improve in the course of training. This apparent improvement in precision was, however, an averaging artifact; it was mediated by the staggered appearance of timed stops, rather than by the delayed occurrence of start times. Trial-by-trial analysis of the stop times for individual subjects revealed that stops appeared abruptly after three to five sessions and their timing did not change as training was prolonged. Start times and the precision of start and stop times were generally stable throughout training. Our results show that subjects do not gradually learn to time their start or stop of responding. Instead, they learn the duration of the FI, with robust temporal control over the start of the response; the control over the stop of response appears abruptly later.

  17. Acquisition of peak responding: What is learned?

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Fuat; Gallistel, Charles R.; Allen, Brian D.; Frank, Krystal M.; Gibson, Jacqueline M.; Brunner, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how the common measures of timing performance behaved in the course of training on the peak procedure in C3H mice. Following fixed interval (FI) pre-training, mice received 16 days of training in the peak procedure. The peak time and spread were derived from the average response rates while the start and stop times and their relative variability were derived from a single-trial analysis. Temporal precision (response spread) appeared to improve in the course of training. This apparent improvement in precision was, however, an averaging artifact; it was mediated by the staggered appearance of timed stops, rather than by the delayed occurrence of start times. Trial-by-trial analysis of the stop times for individual subjects revealed that stops appeared abruptly after three to five sessions and their timing did not change as training was prolonged. Start times and the precision of start and stop times were generally stable throughout training. Our results show that subjects do not gradually learn to time their start or stop of responding. Instead, they learn the duration of the FI, with robust temporal control over the start of the response; the control over the stop of response appears abruptly later. PMID:18950695

  18. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  20. Electromagnetic-radiation absorption by water.

    PubMed

    Lunkenheimer, P; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Köhler, M; Wolf, M; Schwab, M; Loidl, A

    2017-12-01

    Why does a microwave oven work? How does biological tissue absorb electromagnetic radiation? Astonishingly, we do not have a definite answer to these simple questions because the microscopic processes governing the absorption of electromagnetic waves by water are largely unclarified. This absorption can be quantified by dielectric loss spectra, which reveal a huge peak at a frequency of the exciting electric field of about 20 GHz and a gradual tailing off toward higher frequencies. The microscopic interpretation of such spectra is highly controversial and various superpositions of relaxation and resonance processes ascribed to single-molecule or molecule-cluster motions have been proposed for their analysis. By combining dielectric, microwave, THz, and far-infrared spectroscopy, here we provide nearly continuous temperature-dependent broadband spectra of water. Moreover, we find that corresponding spectra for aqueous solutions reveal the same features as pure water. However, in contrast to the latter, crystallization in these solutions can be avoided by supercooling. As different spectral contributions tend to disentangle at low temperatures, this enables us to deconvolute them when approaching the glass transition under cooling. We find that the overall spectral development, including the 20 GHz feature (employed for microwave heating), closely resembles the behavior known for common supercooled liquids. Thus water's absorption of electromagnetic waves at room temperature is not unusual but very similar to that of glass-forming liquids at elevated temperatures, deep in the low-viscosity liquid regime, and should be interpreted along similar lines.

  1. Electromagnetic-radiation absorption by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunkenheimer, P.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Köhler, M.; Wolf, M.; Schwab, M.; Loidl, A.

    2017-12-01

    Why does a microwave oven work? How does biological tissue absorb electromagnetic radiation? Astonishingly, we do not have a definite answer to these simple questions because the microscopic processes governing the absorption of electromagnetic waves by water are largely unclarified. This absorption can be quantified by dielectric loss spectra, which reveal a huge peak at a frequency of the exciting electric field of about 20 GHz and a gradual tailing off toward higher frequencies. The microscopic interpretation of such spectra is highly controversial and various superpositions of relaxation and resonance processes ascribed to single-molecule or molecule-cluster motions have been proposed for their analysis. By combining dielectric, microwave, THz, and far-infrared spectroscopy, here we provide nearly continuous temperature-dependent broadband spectra of water. Moreover, we find that corresponding spectra for aqueous solutions reveal the same features as pure water. However, in contrast to the latter, crystallization in these solutions can be avoided by supercooling. As different spectral contributions tend to disentangle at low temperatures, this enables us to deconvolute them when approaching the glass transition under cooling. We find that the overall spectral development, including the 20 GHz feature (employed for microwave heating), closely resembles the behavior known for common supercooled liquids. Thus water's absorption of electromagnetic waves at room temperature is not unusual but very similar to that of glass-forming liquids at elevated temperatures, deep in the low-viscosity liquid regime, and should be interpreted along similar lines.

  2. Inapplicability of small-polaron model for the explanation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide.

    PubMed

    Zeković, Slobodan; Ivić, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    The applicability of small-polaron model for the interpretation of infrared absorption spectrum in acetanilide has been critically reexamined. It is shown that the energy difference between the normal and anomalous peak, calculated by means of small-polaron theory, displays pronounced temperature dependence which is in drastic contradiction with experiment. It is demonstrated that self-trapped states, which are recently suggested to explain theoretically the experimental absorption spectrum in protein, cannot cause the appearance of the peaks in absorption spectrum for acetanilide.

  3. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Center for Adaptive Optics A University of California Science and Technology Center home Contact Us Director: Claire Max Office: Room 205, Center for Adaptive Optics Phone: (831) 459-2049 Fax: (831 ) 459-5717 Email: max@ucolick.org Associate Director: Donald Gavel Office: Room 209, Center for Adaptive

  4. Can You Hear That Peak? Utilization of Auditory and Visual Feedback at Peak Limb Velocity.

    PubMed

    Loria, Tristan; de Grosbois, John; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-09-01

    At rest, the central nervous system combines and integrates multisensory cues to yield an optimal percept. When engaging in action, the relative weighing of sensory modalities has been shown to be altered. Because the timing of peak velocity is the critical moment in some goal-directed movements (e.g., overarm throwing), the current study sought to test whether visual and auditory cues are optimally integrated at that specific kinematic marker when it is the critical part of the trajectory. Participants performed an upper-limb movement in which they were required to reach their peak limb velocity when the right index finger intersected a virtual target (i.e., a flinging movement). Brief auditory, visual, or audiovisual feedback (i.e., 20 ms in duration) was provided to participants at peak limb velocity. Performance was assessed primarily through the resultant position of peak limb velocity and the variability of that position. Relative to when no feedback was provided, auditory feedback significantly reduced the resultant endpoint variability of the finger position at peak limb velocity. However, no such reductions were found for the visual or audiovisual feedback conditions. Further, providing both auditory and visual cues concurrently also failed to yield the theoretically predicted improvements in endpoint variability. Overall, the central nervous system can make significant use of an auditory cue but may not optimally integrate a visual and auditory cue at peak limb velocity, when peak velocity is the critical part of the trajectory.

  5. Quantifying peak discharges for historical floods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    It is usually advantageous to use information regarding historical floods, if available, to define the flood-frequency relation for a stream. Peak stages can sometimes be determined for outstanding floods that occurred many years ago before systematic gaging of streams began. In the United States, this information is usually not available for more than 100-200 years, but in countries with long cultural histories, such as China, historical flood data are available at some sites as far back as 2,000 years or more. It is important in flood studies to be able to assign a maximum discharge rate and an associated error range to the historical flood. This paper describes the significant characteristics and uncertainties of four commonly used methods for estimating the peak discharge of a flood. These methods are: (1) rating curve (stage-discharge relation) extension; (2) slope conveyance; (3) slope area; and (4) step backwater. Logarithmic extensions of rating curves are based on theoretical plotting techniques that results in straight line extensions provided that channel shape and roughness do not change significantly. The slope-conveyance and slope-area methods are based on the Manning equation, which requires specific data on channel size, shape and roughness, as well as the water-surface slope for one or more cross-sections in a relatively straight reach of channel. The slope-conveyance method is used primarily for shaping and extending rating curves, whereas the slope-area method is used for specific floods. The step-backwater method, also based on the Manning equation, requires more cross-section data than the slope-area ethod, but has a water-surface profile convergence characteristic that negates the need for known or estimated water-surface slope. Uncertainties in calculating peak discharge for historical floods may be quite large. Various investigations have shown that errors in calculating peak discharges by the slope-area method under ideal conditions for

  6. Enhanced broadband absorption in nanowire arrays with integrated Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaeipour, Mahtab; Pettersson, Håkan

    2018-05-01

    A near-unity unselective absorption spectrum is desirable for high-performance photovoltaics. Nanowire (NW) arrays are promising candidates for efficient solar cells due to nanophotonic absorption resonances in the solar spectrum. The absorption spectra, however, display undesired dips between the resonance peaks. To achieve improved unselective broadband absorption, we propose to enclose distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) in the bottom and top parts of indium phosphide (InP) NWs, respectively. We theoretically show that by enclosing only two periods of In0.56Ga0.44As/InP DBRs, an unselective 78% absorption efficiency (72% for NWs without DBRs) is obtained at normal incidence in the spectral range from 300 nm to 920 nm. Under oblique light incidence, the absorption efficiency is enhanced up to about 85% at an incidence angle of 50°. By increasing the number of DBR periods from two to five, the absorption efficiency is further enhanced up to 95% at normal incidence. In this work, we calculated optical spectra for InP NWs, but the results are expected to be valid for other direct band gap III-V semiconductor materials. We believe that our proposed idea of integrating DBRs in NWs offers great potential for high-performance photovoltaic applications.

  7. Monitoring Telluric Absorption with CAMAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ashley D.; Blake, Cullen H.; Sliski, David H.

    2017-08-01

    Ground-based astronomical observations may be limited by telluric water vapor absorption, which is highly variable in time and significantly complicates both spectroscopy and photometry in the near-infrared (NIR). To achieve the sensitivity required to detect Earth-sized exoplanets in the NIR, simultaneous monitoring of precipitable water vapor (PWV) becomes necessary to mitigate the impact of variable telluric lines on radial velocity measurements and transit light curves. To address this issue, we present the Camera for the Automatic Monitoring of Atmospheric Lines (CAMAL), a stand-alone, inexpensive six-inch aperture telescope dedicated to measuring PWV at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins. CAMAL utilizes three narrowband NIR filters to trace the amount of atmospheric water vapor affecting simultaneous observations with the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) and MINERVA-Red telescopes. Here, we present the current design of CAMAL, discuss our data analysis methods, and show results from 11 nights of PWV measurements taken with CAMAL. For seven nights of data we have independent PWV measurements extracted from high-resolution stellar spectra taken with the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrometer (TRES) also located on Mount Hopkins. We use the TRES spectra to calibrate the CAMAL absolute PWV scale. Comparisons between CAMAL and TRES PWV estimates show excellent agreement, matching to within 1 mm over a 10 mm range in PWV. Analysis of CAMAL’s photometric precision propagates to PWV measurements precise to better than 0.5 mm in dry (PWV < 4 mm) conditions. We also find that CAMAL-derived PWVs are highly correlated with those from a GPS-based water vapor monitor located approximately 90 km away at Kitt Peak National Observatory, with a root mean square PWV difference of 0.8 mm.

  8. Metformin Does Not Suppress Serum Thyrotropin by Increasing Levothyroxine Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Al-Alusi, Mostafa A.; Du, Lin; Li, Ning; Yeh, Michael W.; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Levothyroxine (LT4) absorption is affected by concomitant ingestion of certain minerals, medications, and foods. It has been hypothesized that metformin may suppress serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations by enhancing LT4 absorption or by directly affecting the hypothalamic–pituitary axis. This study examined the effect of metformin ingestion on LT4 absorption, as assessed by serum total thyroxine (TT4) concentrations. Methods: A modified Food and Drug Administration LT4 bioequivalence protocol was applied to healthy, metformin-naïve, euthyroid adult volunteers. Following an overnight fast, 600 μg LT4 was administered orally. Serum TT4 concentrations were measured at baseline and at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 4, and 6 h following LT4 administration. Measurements were performed before and after one week of metformin ingestion (850 mg three times daily). Peak serum TT4 concentrations, time to peak TT4 concentrations, and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) were calculated. Results: Twenty-six subjects (54% men, 27% white, age 33 ± 10 years) were studied. There were no significant differences in peak serum TT4 concentrations (p = 0.13) and time to peak TT4 concentrations (p = 0.19) before and after one week of metformin use. A trend toward reduced TT4 AUC was observed after metformin ingestion (pre-metformin 3893 ± 568 μg/dL-min, post-metformin 3765 ± 588 μg/dL-min, p = 0.09). Conclusions: LT4 absorption is unchanged by concomitant metformin ingestion. Mechanisms other than increased LT4 absorption may be responsible for the suppressed TSH concentrations observed in patients ingesting both drugs. PMID:26191653

  9. [Absorption Characteristics and Simulation of LLM-105 in the Terahertz Range].

    PubMed

    Meng, Zeng-rui; Shang, Li-ping; Du, Yu; Deng, Hu

    2015-07-01

    2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105), a novel explosive with high energy and low sensibility. In order to study the molecular structure characteristics of the explosive, the absorption spectra of LLM-105 in the frequency range of 0.2-2.4 THz were detected by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The results showed that a number of characteristic absorption peaks with different intensity located at 1.27, 1.59, 2.00, 2.08, 2.20, 2.29 THz. The article also simulated the absorption spectra of LLM-105 molecular crystal within 0.2-2.5 THz region by using Materials Studio 6.0 software based on density functional theory (DFT), and the simulated results agreed well with the experimental data except for the peak at 2.29 THz, which verified theoretically the accuracy of the experimental data. In addition, the vibrational modes of the characteristic peaks in the experimental absorption spectra were analyzed and identified, the results showed that the forming of the characteristic absorption peaks and the molecular vibration were closely related, which further provided important laboratory and technology support for the study of the transformation of molecule structure of LLM-105. There was no simulated frequency agreed with the experimental absorption peak at 2.29 THz, which may be caused by the vibration of the crystal lattice or other reasons.

  10. Growth of Au nanoparticle films and the effect of nanoparticle shape on plasmon peak wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikoshi, S.; Matsumoto, N.; Omata, Y.; Kato, T.

    2014-05-01

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) and thus have potential for use in a wide range of applications. A facile technique for the preparation of NP films using an electron-cyclotron-resonance plasma sputtering method without a dewetting process is described. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) observations revealed that the Au NPs grew independently as island-like particles during the first stage of sputtering and then coalesced with one another as sputtering time increased to ultimately form a continuous film. A plasmon absorption peak was observed via optical measurement of absorption efficiency. The LSPR peak shifted toward longer wavelengths (red shift) with an increase in sputtering time. The cause of this plasmon peak shift was theoretically investigated using the finite-difference time-domain calculation method. A realistic statistical distribution of the particle shapes based on FE-SEM observations was applied for the analysis, which has not been previously reported. It was determined that the change in the shape of the NPs from spheroidal to oval or slender due to coalescence with neighbouring NPs caused the LSPR peak shift. These results may enable the design of LSPR devices by controlling the characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as their size, shape, number density, and coverage.

  11. Measuring the educational impact of Promoting Environmental Awareness in Kids (PEAK): The development and implementation of a new scale

    Treesearch

    Jennifer Miller; Lindsey Brown; Eddie Hill; Amy Shellman; Ron Ramsing; Edwin Gómez

    2012-01-01

    The Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor Ethics (LNT) is a nonprofit educational organization that teaches skills and values for recreating responsibly in the out-of-doors. LNT developed Promoting Environmental Awareness in Kids (PEAK), based on seven ethical principles. The PEAK program provides a pack that contains several interactive activities specifically designed to...

  12. Neuroscience imaging enabled by new highly tunable and high peak power femtosecond lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakulinen, T.; Klein, J.

    2017-02-01

    Neuroscience applications benefit from recent developments in industrial femtosecond laser technology. New laser sources provide several megawatts of peak power at wavelength of 1040 nm, which enables simultaneous optogenetics photoactivation of tens or even hundreds of neurons using red shifted opsins. Another recent imaging trend is to move towards longer wavelengths, which would enable access to deeper layers of tissue due to lower scattering and lower absorption in the tissue. Femtosecond lasers pumping a non-collinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) enable the access to longer wavelengths with high peak powers. High peak powers of >10 MW at 1300 nm and 1700 nm allow effective 3-photon excitation of green and red shifted calcium indicators respectively and access to deeper, sub-cortex layers of the brain. Early results include in vivo detection of spontaneous activity in hippocampus within an intact mouse brain, where neurons express GCaMP6 activated in a 3-photon process at 1320 nm.

  13. Micrometoric Impact Effects: Peak Pressure versus Spectral Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Elizabeth; Lederer, S. M.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Keller, L. P.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    At the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center, we have investigated the surface properties of asteroids caused by collisions in the mid-infrared (2.5 to 16 microns) by impacting forsterite and enstatite across a range of velocities (as predicted by the Nice Model) and at varying temperatures. The crystal structure in these minerals can be deformed by the shock wave from the impact as well as sheared into smaller particle sizes. Our current focus is on the differing effects between 2.3 and 2.6 km/sec, as well as the differences between a cold sample at -20C and a room temperature sample at 25C. We find that the spectral variation and crystal deformation varies non-linearly with the peak shock pressure.

  14. Peak expiratory flow rate in handloom weavers.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, R R; Zodpey, S P; Deshpande, S G; Vasudeo, N D

    1998-04-01

    The present cross-sectional study with a comparison group was carried out to investigate peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) in handloom weavers and to study relationship between reduction in PEFR with age, smoking, duration of cotton dust exposure and respiratory morbidity. This study include 319 handloom weavers and equal number of individuals (group matched for age and pair matched for sex) in comparison group. The decline in PEFR was significantly associated with advancing age, longer duration of exposure to cotton dust, tobacco smoking and presence of respiratory morbidity on univariate analysis, whereas on multivariate analysis longer duration of exposure to cotton dust and tobacco smoking was found to be non significant.

  15. Forecasting peaks of seasonal influenza epidemics.

    PubMed

    Nsoesie, Elaine; Mararthe, Madhav; Brownstein, John

    2013-06-21

    We present a framework for near real-time forecast of influenza epidemics using a simulation optimization approach. The method combines an individual-based model and a simple root finding optimization method for parameter estimation and forecasting. In this study, retrospective forecasts were generated for seasonal influenza epidemics using web-based estimates of influenza activity from Google Flu Trends for 2004-2005, 2007-2008 and 2012-2013 flu seasons. In some cases, the peak could be forecasted 5-6 weeks ahead. This study adds to existing resources for influenza forecasting and the proposed method can be used in conjunction with other approaches in an ensemble framework.

  16. Energy peaks: A high energy physics outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschini, Roberto

    2017-12-01

    Energy distributions of decay products carry information on the kinematics of the decay in ways that are at the same time straightforward and quite hidden. I will review these properties and discuss their early historical applications, as well as more recent ones in the context of (i) methods for the measurement of masses of new physics particle with semi-invisible decays, (ii) the characterization of Dark Matter particles produced at colliders, (iii) precision mass measurements of Standard Model particles, in particular of the top quark. Finally, I will give an outlook of further developments and applications of energy peak method for high energy physics at colliders and beyond.

  17. Calculating weighted estimates of peak streamflow statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, Timothy A.; Berenbrock, Charles; Kiang, Julie E.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    According to the Federal guidelines for flood-frequency estimation, the uncertainty of peak streamflow statistics, such as the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flow at a streamgage, can be reduced by combining the at-site estimate with the regional regression estimate to obtain a weighted estimate of the flow statistic. The procedure assumes the estimates are independent, which is reasonable in most practical situations. The purpose of this publication is to describe and make available a method for calculating a weighted estimate from the uncertainty or variance of the two independent estimates.

  18. Octant vectorcardiography - the evaluation by peaks.

    PubMed

    Laufberger, V

    1982-01-01

    From the Frank lead potentials a computer prints out an elementary table. Therein, the electrical space of left ventricle depolarization is divided into eight spatial parts labelled by numbers 1-8 and called octants. Within these octants six peaks are determined labelled with letters ALPR-IS. Their localization is described by six-digit topograms characteristic for each patient. From 300 cases of patients after myocardial infarction, three data bases were compiled enabling every case to be classified into classes, subclasses and types. The follow up of patients according to these principles gives an objective and detailed image about the progress of coronary artery disease.

  19. Behind the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Kopra of NASA (left) plants a tree at a site bearing his name Dec. 9 in a traditional pre-launch ceremony. Looking on are his crewmates, Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (center) and Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, right). The trio will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Victor Zelentsov.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-09

    Behind the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Kopra of NASA (left) plants a tree at a site bearing his name Dec. 9 in a traditional pre-launch ceremony. Looking on are his crewmates, Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (center) and Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, right). The trio will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  20. Behind the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (center) plants a tree at a site bearing his name Dec. 9 in a traditional pre-launch ceremony. Looking on are his crewmates, Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, left, and Tim Kopra of NASA (right). The trio will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station...NASA/Victor Zelentsov.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-12-09

    Behind the Cosmonaut Hotel crew quarters in Baikonur, Kazakhstan, Expedition 46-47 crewmember Tim Peake of the European Space Agency (center) plants a tree at a site bearing his name Dec. 9 in a traditional pre-launch ceremony. Looking on are his crewmates, Yuri Malenchenko of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos, left, and Tim Kopra of NASA (right). The trio will launch Dec. 15 on their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft for a six-month mission on the International Space Station. NASA/Victor Zelentsov

  1. Theoretical modeling of the absorption spectrum of aqueous riboflavin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanetti-Polzi, Laura; Aschi, Massimiliano; Daidone, Isabella; Amadei, Andrea

    2017-02-01

    In this study we report the modeling of the absorption spectrum of riboflavin in water using a hybrid quantum/classical mechanical approach, the MD-PMM methodology. By means of MD-PMM calculations, with which the effect of riboflavin internal motions and of solvent interactions on the spectroscopic properties can be explicitly taken into account, we obtain an absorption spectrum in very good agreement with the experimental spectrum. In particular, the calculated peak maxima show a consistent improvement with respect to previous computational approaches. Moreover, the calculations show that the interaction with the environment may cause a relevant recombination of the gas-phase electronic states.

  2. PeakVizor: Visual Analytics of Peaks in Video Clickstreams from Massive Open Online Courses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing; Chen, Yuanzhe; Liu, Dongyu; Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Qu, Huamin

    2016-10-01

    Massive open online courses (MOOCs) aim to facilitate open-access and massive-participation education. These courses have attracted millions of learners recently. At present, most MOOC platforms record the web log data of learner interactions with course videos. Such large amounts of multivariate data pose a new challenge in terms of analyzing online learning behaviors. Previous studies have mainly focused on the aggregate behaviors of learners from a summative view; however, few attempts have been made to conduct a detailed analysis of such behaviors. To determine complex learning patterns in MOOC video interactions, this paper introduces a comprehensive visualization system called PeakVizor. This system enables course instructors and education experts to analyze the "peaks" or the video segments that generate numerous clickstreams. The system features three views at different levels: the overview with glyphs to display valuable statistics regarding the peaks detected; the flow view to present spatio-temporal information regarding the peaks; and the correlation view to show the correlation between different learner groups and the peaks. Case studies and interviews conducted with domain experts have demonstrated the usefulness and effectiveness of PeakVizor, and new findings about learning behaviors in MOOC platforms have been reported.

  3. Method and apparatus for current-output peak detection

    SciTech Connect

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2017-01-24

    A method and apparatus for a current-output peak detector. A current-output peak detector circuit is disclosed and works in two phases. The peak detector circuit includes switches to switch the peak detector circuit from the first phase to the second phase upon detection of the peak voltage of an input voltage signal. The peak detector generates a current output with a high degree of accuracy in the second phase.

  4. Research Opportunities for Undergraduate Students at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, W.; Hallar, G.

    2009-12-01

    GRASP (Geoscience Research at Storm Peak) is a program providing field research experiences for a diverse group of undergraduate students. GRASP is funded by the National Science Foundation. Its mission is to recruit students from underrepresented groups within the geoscience community allowing students to work and live at the Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL). Data previously collected at the facility forms the basis for continuing research projects that addresses climate change, atmospheric pollution, and cloud formation. Prior to arriving at SPL, students travel to the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) to learn about supercomputing, mathematical modeling, and scientific visualization. GRASP participants met at the campus of Howard University for a reunion workshop and presented their results in November 2008. This poster illustrates the given task and methods used to analyze an increased concentration of organic carbon detected between April 4 and 5, 2008 at SPL located at the summit of Mt. Warner in Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3,202 meters.

  5. MULTIMAGNON ABSORPTION IN MNF2-OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTRUM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The absorption spectrum of MnF2 at 4.2K in the 3900A region was measured in zero external fields and in high fields. Exciton lines with magnon ...sidebands are observed, accompanied by a large number of weak satellite lines. Results on the exciton and magnon absorptions are similar to those of...McClure et al. The satellite lines are interpreted as being multi- magnon absorptions, and it is possible to fit the energy of all the absorptions with

  6. Estimation of Seismic Attenuation beneath Tateyama Volcano, Central Japan by Using Peak Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, K.; Kawakata, H.; Hirano, S.; Doi, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Hida Mountain Range located in central Japan has a lot of active volcanoes. Katsumata et al. (1995, GJI) suggested the presence of regions with low-velocity and low-density as well as low Qanomaly at 5-15 km deep beneath the range. Tateyama volcano is located in the northern part of the range. Iwata et al. (2014, AGU Fall Meeting) quantitatively estimated strength of S-wave attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano using twofold spectral ratios and suggested that regions with high seismic attenuation exist in the south or the southeast of Tateyama volcano. However, it is difficult to estimate the contribution of scattering loss and intrinsic absorption to total attenuation on the basis of this method. In the present study, we focused on the peak delay (Takahashi et al., 2007, GJI) in seismic envelopes. We used seismograms observed at five NIED Hi-net stations near Tateyama volcano for 31 local earthquakes (MJMA2.5-4.0). We found seismograms recorded after passing below the southern part of the Hida Mountain Range show longer peak delay than those recorded before passing below the region, while there are no clear difference in peak delay for pairs of seismograms before and after passing below Tateyama volcano. It suggests that causes of the attenuation beneath Tateyama volcano and the southern part of the Hida Mountain Range are different. We used the peak delay values to evaluate the strength of intrinsic absorption. We assumed that the difference of whole peak delay between two seismograms for the same earthquake was caused by intrinsic absorption beneath the region between the two seismic stations. Wecalculated the change in amplitude and peak delay on the basis of a theory suggested by Azimi et al. (1966, Izvestia, Earth Physics). In case of the two envelopes are quite similar to each other, we conclude that intrinsic absorption is a major cause of total attenuation

  7. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  8. Triple effect absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.; Potnis, S.V.; Tang, J.

    1996-12-31

    Triple effect absorption chillers can achieve 50% COP improvement over double-effect systems. However, to translate this potential into cost-effective hardware, the most promising embodiments must be identified. In this study, 12 generic triple effect cycles and 76 possible hermetic loop arrangements of those 12 generic cycles were identified. The generic triple effect cycles were screened based on their pressure and solubility field requirements, generic COPs, risk involved in the component design, and number of components in a high corrosive environment. This screening identified four promising arrangements: Alkitrate Topping cycle, Pressure Staged Envelope cycle, High Pressure Overlap cycle, and Dual Loopmore » cycle. All of these arrangements have a very high COP ({approximately} 1.8), however the development risk and cost involved is different for each arrangement. Therefore, the selection of a particular arrangement will depend upon the specific situation under consideration.« less

  9. Nonequilibrium quantum absorption refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Fu-Lin

    2018-06-01

    We study a quantum absorption refrigerator, in which a target qubit is cooled by two machine qubits in a nonequilibrium steady-state. It is realized by a strong internal coupling in the two-qubit fridge and a vanishing tripartite interaction among the whole system. The coherence of a machine virtual qubit is investigated as quantumness of the fridge. A necessary condition for cooling shows that the quantum coherence is beneficial to the nonequilibrium fridge, while it is detrimental as far as the maximum coefficient of performance (COP) and the COP at maximum power are concerned. Here, the COP is defined only in terms of heat currents caused by the tripartite interaction, with the one maintaining the two-qubit nonequilibrium state being excluded. The later can be considered to have no direct involvement in extracting heat from the target, as it is not affected by the tripartite interaction.

  10. Absorption properties of alternative chromophores for use in laser tissue soldering applications.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Brian D; Heintzelman, Douglas L; McNally-Heintzelman, Karen M

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility of using alternative chromophores in laser tissue soldering applications was explored. Two commonly used chromophores, indocyanine green (ICG), and methylene blue (MB) were investigated, as well as three different food colorings: red #40 (RFC), blue #1 (BFC), and green consisting of yellow #5 and blue #1 (GFC). Three experimental studies were conducted: (i) The absorption profiles of the five chromophores, when diluted in deionized water and when bound to protein, were recorded; (ii) the effect of accumulated thermal dosages on the absorption profile of the chromophores was evaluated; and (iii) the stability of the absorption profiles of the chromophore-doped solutions when exposed to ambient light for extended time periods was measured. The peak absorption wavelengths of ICG, MB, RFC, and BFC, were found to be 805 nm, 665 nm, 503 nm, and 630 nm respectively in protein solder. The GFC had two absorption peaks at 426 nm and 630 nm, corresponding to the two dye components comprising this color. The peak absorption wavelength of ICG and MB was dependent on the choice of solvent (deionized water or protein). In contrast, the peak absorption wavelengths of the three chromophores were not dependent on the choice of solvent. ICG and MB showed a significant decrease in absorbance units with increased time and temperature when heated to temperature up to 100 degrees C. A significant decrease in the absorption peak occurred in the ICG and MB samples when exposed to ambient light for a period of 7 days. Negligible change in absorption with accumulated thermal dose up to 100 degrees C or light dose (over a period of 84 days) was observed for any of the three food colorings investigated.

  11. Outreach Plans for Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation 10,500 ft. SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. We plan to create a unique summer undergraduate education experiences for students of diversity at Storm Peak Laboratory. As stressed by the College Pathways to Science Education Standards [Siebert and McIntosh, 2001], to support changes in K-12 science education transformations must first be made at the college level, including inquiry-oriented opportunities to engage in meaningful research. These workshops will be designed to allow students to experience the excitement of science, increasing their likelihood of pursing careers within the fields of scientific education or research.

  12. Computation of peak discharge at culverts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, Rolland William

    1957-01-01

    Methods for computing peak flood flow through culverts on the basis of a field survey of highwater marks and culvert geometry are presented. These methods are derived from investigations of culvert flow as reported in the literature and on extensive laboratory studies of culvert flow. For convenience in computation, culvert flow has been classified into six types, according to the location of the control section and the relative heights of the head-water and tail-water levels. The type of flow which occurred at any site can be determined from the field data and the criteria given in this report. A discharge equation has been developed for each flow type by combining the energy and continuity equations for the distance between an approach section upstream from the culvert and a terminal section within the culvert barrel. The discharge coefficient applicable to each flow type is listed for the more common entrance geometries. Procedures for computing peak discharge through culverts are outlined in detail for each of the six flow types.

  13. NITPICK: peak identification for mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Renard, Bernhard Y; Kirchner, Marc; Steen, Hanno; Steen, Judith A J; Hamprecht, Fred A

    2008-08-28

    The reliable extraction of features from mass spectra is a fundamental step in the automated analysis of proteomic mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. This contribution proposes a sparse template regression approach to peak picking called NITPICK. NITPICK is a Non-greedy, Iterative Template-based peak PICKer that deconvolves complex overlapping isotope distributions in multicomponent mass spectra. NITPICK is based on fractional averaging, a novel extension to Senko's well-known averaging model, and on a modified version of sparse, non-negative least angle regression, for which a suitable, statistically motivated early stopping criterion has been derived. The strength of NITPICK is the deconvolution of overlapping mixture mass spectra. Extensive comparative evaluation has been carried out and results are provided for simulated and real-world data sets. NITPICK outperforms pepex, to date the only alternate, publicly available, non-greedy feature extraction routine. NITPICK is available as software package for the R programming language and can be downloaded from (http://hci.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/mip/proteomics/).

  14. NITPICK: peak identification for mass spectrometry data

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Bernhard Y; Kirchner, Marc; Steen , Hanno; Steen, Judith AJ; Hamprecht , Fred A

    2008-01-01

    Background The reliable extraction of features from mass spectra is a fundamental step in the automated analysis of proteomic mass spectrometry (MS) experiments. Results This contribution proposes a sparse template regression approach to peak picking called NITPICK. NITPICK is a Non-greedy, Iterative Template-based peak PICKer that deconvolves complex overlapping isotope distributions in multicomponent mass spectra. NITPICK is based on fractional averagine, a novel extension to Senko's well-known averagine model, and on a modified version of sparse, non-negative least angle regression, for which a suitable, statistically motivated early stopping criterion has been derived. The strength of NITPICK is the deconvolution of overlapping mixture mass spectra. Conclusion Extensive comparative evaluation has been carried out and results are provided for simulated and real-world data sets. NITPICK outperforms pepex, to date the only alternate, publicly available, non-greedy feature extraction routine. NITPICK is available as software package for the R programming language and can be downloaded from . PMID:18755032

  15. Peak capacity and peak capacity per unit time in capillary and microchip zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Joe P; Blackney, Donna M; Ennis, Erin J

    2017-11-10

    The origins of the peak capacity concept are described and the important contributions to the development of that concept in chromatography and electrophoresis are reviewed. Whereas numerous quantitative expressions have been reported for one- and two-dimensional separations, most are focused on chromatographic separations and few, if any, quantitative unbiased expressions have been developed for capillary or microchip zone electrophoresis. Making the common assumption that longitudinal diffusion is the predominant source of zone broadening in capillary electrophoresis, analytical expressions for the peak capacity are derived, first in terms of migration time, diffusion coefficient, migration distance, and desired resolution, and then in terms of the remaining underlying fundamental parameters (electric field, electroosmotic and electrophoretic mobilities) that determine the migration time. The latter expressions clearly illustrate the direct square root dependence of peak capacity on electric field and migration distance and the inverse square root dependence on solute diffusion coefficient. Conditions that result in a high peak capacity will result in a low peak capacity per unit time and vice-versa. For a given symmetrical range of relative electrophoretic mobilities for co- and counter-electroosmotic species (cations and anions), the peak capacity increases with the square root of the electric field even as the temporal window narrows considerably, resulting in a significant reduction in analysis time. Over a broad relative electrophoretic mobility interval [-0.9, 0.9], an approximately two-fold greater amount of peak capacity can be generated for counter-electroosmotic species although it takes about five-fold longer to do so, consistent with the well-known bias in migration time and resolving power for co- and counter-electroosmotic species. The optimum lower bound of the relative electrophoretic mobility interval [μ r,Z , μ r,A ] that provides the maximum

  16. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2010-11-01

    In a realistic three-dimensional model, optical matrix element and linear optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in the tight binding approximation are studied. In terms of absolute value of dipole matrix elements of the first three direct transitions at kz=0, we divided the zigzag BNNTs into three groups and investigated their optical absorption spectrum in energy ranges E<5, 77.5 eV. We found that in lower energies, E<5 eV, all groups show different behaviors while in the higher energies, 77.5 eV, their behaviors depend on their even or odd nanotube index. We also found that in the energy range 7peaks denoted by ‘A’ and ‘B’ where the ‘B’ peak energy position is approximately constant and is independent of the nanotube diameter. We also found that increasing the tubes diameter leads to red shift for all peaks except ‘A’ peak where this peak moves to higher energies. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  17. Sound absorption of a new oblique-section acoustic metamaterial with nested resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Nansha; Hou, Hong; Zhang, Yanni; Wu, Jiu Hui

    2018-02-01

    This study designs and investigates high-efficiency sound absorption of new oblique-section nested resonators. Impedance tube experiment results show that different combinations of oblique-section nest resonators have tunable low-frequency bandwidth characteristics. The sound absorption mechanism is due to air friction losses in the slotted region and the sample structure resonance. The acousto-electric analogy model demonstrates that the sound absorption peak and bandwidth can be modulated over an even wider frequency range by changing the geometric size and combinations of structures. The proposed structure can be easily fabricated and used in low-frequency sound absorption applications.

  18. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  19. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  20. Emissions Scenarios and Fossil-fuel Peaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecha, R.

    2008-12-01

    Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) emissions scenarios are based on detailed energy system models in which demographics, technology and economics are used to generate projections of future world energy consumption, and therefore, of greenhouse gas emissions. Built into the assumptions for these scenarios are estimates for ultimately recoverable resources of various fossil fuels. There is a growing chorus of critics who believe that the true extent of recoverable fossil resources is much smaller than the amounts taken as a baseline for the IPCC scenarios. In a climate optimist camp are those who contend that "peak oil" will lead to a switch to renewable energy sources, while others point out that high prices for oil caused by supply limitations could very well lead to a transition to liquid fuels that actually increase total carbon emissions. We examine a third scenario in which high energy prices, which are correlated with increasing infrastructure, exploration and development costs, conspire to limit the potential for making a switch to coal or natural gas for liquid fuels. In addition, the same increasing costs limit the potential for expansion of tar sand and shale oil recovery. In our qualitative model of the energy system, backed by data from short- and medium-term trends, we have a useful way to gain a sense of potential carbon emission bounds. A bound for 21st century emissions is investigated based on two assumptions: first, that extractable fossil-fuel resources follow the trends assumed by "peak oil" adherents, and second, that little is done in the way of climate mitigation policies. If resources, and perhaps more importantly, extraction rates, of fossil fuels are limited compared to assumptions in the emissions scenarios, a situation can arise in which emissions are supply-driven. However, we show that even in this "peak fossil-fuel" limit, carbon emissions are high enough to surpass 550 ppm or 2°C climate protection guardrails. Some

  1. Test of wind predictions for peak fire-danger stations in Oregon and Washington.

    Treesearch

    Owen P. Cramer

    1957-01-01

    Relative accuracy of several wind-speed forecasting methods was tested during the forest fire seasons of 1950 and 1951. For the study, three fire-weather forecast centers of the U. S. Weather Bureau prepared individual station forecasts for 11 peak stations within the national. forests of Oregon and Washington. These spot forecasts were considered...

  2. BUFFALO PEAKS WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedlund, D.C.; Wood, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Field investigations were conducted to evaluate the mineral-resource potential of the Buffalo Peaks Wilderness Study Area, Colorado. On the basis of this study there is a probable mineral-resource potential for silver vein and bedding replacement deposits along the Weston Pass fault zone, for hydrothermal vein-type uranium deposits in the vicinity of the Parkdale iron pit, and for gold vein deposits in the parts of the Granite and Four Mile districts that are within the wilderness study area. A probable barite resource potential occurs at Rough and Tumbling Creek and near Spring Creek on the east side of the study area. There is little promise for the occurrence of energy resources.

  3. Curiosity Drill After Drilling at Telegraph Peak

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-03-06

    This view from the Mast Camera (Mastcam) on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the rover's drill just after finishing a drilling operation at a target rock called "Telegraph Peak" on Feb. 24, 2015, the 908th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars. Three sols later, a fault-protection action by the rover halted a process of transferring sample powder that was collected during this drilling. The image is in raw color, as recorded directly by the camera, and has not been white-balanced. The fault-protection event, triggered by an irregularity in electrical current, led to engineering tests in subsequent days to diagnose the underlying cause. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19145

  4. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for Space Shuttle landings. As defined in the Shuttle Flight Rules (FRs), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMTJ) developed a personal computer based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak-wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center. However, the shuttle must land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at Kennedy Space Center in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested that a similar tool be developed for EAFB. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) personnel archived and performed quality control of 2-minute average and 10-minute peak wind speeds at each tower adjacent to the main runway at EAFB from 1997- 2004. They calculated wind climatologies and probabilities of average peak wind occurrence based on the average speed. The climatologies were calculated for each tower and month, and were stratified by hour, direction, and direction/hour. For the probabilities of peak wind occurrence, MSFC calculated empirical and modeled probabilities of meeting or exceeding specific 10-minute peak wind speeds using probability density functions. The AMU obtained and reformatted the data into Microsoft Excel PivotTables, which allows users to display different values with point-click-drag techniques. The GUT was then created from the PivotTables using Visual Basic for Applications code. The GUI is run through a macro within Microsoft Excel and allows forecasters to quickly display and

  5. Assignment of polarization-dependent peaks in carbon K-edge spectra from biogenic and geologic aragonite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dong; Metzler, Rebecca A; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Guo, Jinghua; Abrecht, Mike; Coppersmith, Susan N; Gilbert, P U P A

    2008-10-16

    Many biominerals, including mollusk and echinoderm shells, avian eggshells, modern and fossil bacterial sediments, planktonic coccolithophores, and foraminifera, contain carbonates in the form of biogenic aragonite or calcite. Here we analyze biogenic and geologic aragonite using different kinds of surface- and bulk-sensitive X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy at the carbon K-edge, as well as high-resolution scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Besides the well-known main pi* and sigma* carbonate peaks, we observed and fully characterized four minor peaks, at energies between the main pi* and sigma* peaks. As expected, the main peaks are similar in geologic and biogenic aragonite, while the minor peaks differ in relative intensity. In this and previous work, the minor peaks appear to be the ones most affected in biomineralization processes, hence the interest in characterizing them. Peak assignment was achieved by correlation of polarization-dependent behavior of the minor peaks with that of the main pi* and sigma* peaks. The present characterization provides the background for future studies of aragonitic biominerals.

  6. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters

    PubMed Central

    Takara, Glaucia Nency; Ruas, Gualberto; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; Jamami, Luciana Kawakami; Di Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires; Jamami, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF) from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. METHODS Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® peak flow meters. The highest value recorded for each subject for each device was compared to the corresponding spirometric values using Friedman’s test with Dunn’s post-hoc (p<0.05), Spearman’s correlation test and Bland-Altman’s agreement test. RESULTS The median and interquartile ranges for the spirometric values and the Air Zone®, Assess®, Galemed®, Personal Best® and Vitalograph® meters were 428 (263–688 L/min), 450 (350–800 L/min), 420 (310–720 L/min), 380 (300–735 L/min), 400 (310–685 L/min) and 415 (335–610 L/min), respectively. Significant differences were found when the spirometric values were compared to those recorded by the Air Zone® (p<0.001) and Galemed ® (p<0.01) meters. There was no agreement between the spirometric values and the five PEF meters. CONCLUSIONS The results suggest that the values recorded from Galemed® meters may underestimate the actual value, which could lead to unnecessary interventions, and that Air Zone® meters overestimate spirometric values, which could obfuscate the need for intervention. These findings must be taken into account when interpreting both devices’ results in younger people. These differences should also be considered when directly comparing values from different types of PEF meters. PMID:20535364

  7. Comparison of five portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    Takara, Glaucia Nency; Ruas, Gualberto; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; Jamami, Luciana Kawakami; Di Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires; Jamami, Mauricio

    2010-05-01

    To compare the measurements of spirometric peak expiratory flow (PEF) from five different PEF meters and to determine if their values are in agreement. Inaccurate equipment may result in incorrect diagnoses of asthma and inappropriate treatments. Sixty-eight healthy, sedentary and insufficiently active subjects, aged from 19 to 40 years, performed PEF measurements using Air Zone, Assess, Galemed, Personal Best and Vitalograph peak flow meters. The highest value recorded for each subject for each device was compared to the corresponding spirometric values using Friedman's test with Dunn's post-hoc (p<0.05), Spearman's correlation test and Bland-Altman's agreement test. The median and interquartile ranges for the spirometric values and the Air Zone, Assess, Galemed, Personal Best and Vitalograph meters were 428 (263-688 L/min), 450 (350-800 L/min), 420 (310-720 L/min), 380 (300-735 L/min), 400 (310-685 L/min) and 415 (335-610 L/min), respectively. Significant differences were found when the spirometric values were compared to those recorded by the Air Zone(R) (p<0.001) and Galemed (p<0.01) meters. There was no agreement between the spirometric values and the five PEF meters. The results suggest that the values recorded from Galemed meters may underestimate the actual value, which could lead to unnecessary interventions, and that Air Zone meters overestimate spirometric values, which could obfuscate the need for intervention. These findings must be taken into account when interpreting both devices' results in younger people. These differences should also be considered when directly comparing values from different types of PEF meters.

  8. Sample distribution in peak mode isotachophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, Shimon; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran, E-mail: mberco@technion.ac.il

    We present an analytical study of peak mode isotachophoresis (ITP), and provide closed form solutions for sample distribution and electric field, as well as for leading-, trailing-, and counter-ion concentration profiles. Importantly, the solution we present is valid not only for the case of fully ionized species, but also for systems of weak electrolytes which better represent real buffer systems and for multivalent analytes such as proteins and DNA. The model reveals two major scales which govern the electric field and buffer distributions, and an additional length scale governing analyte distribution. Using well-controlled experiments, and numerical simulations, we verify andmore » validate the model and highlight its key merits as well as its limitations. We demonstrate the use of the model for determining the peak concentration of focused sample based on known buffer and analyte properties, and show it differs significantly from commonly used approximations based on the interface width alone. We further apply our model for studying reactions between multiple species having different effective mobilities yet co-focused at a single ITP interface. We find a closed form expression for an effective-on rate which depends on reactants distributions, and derive the conditions for optimizing such reactions. Interestingly, the model reveals that maximum reaction rate is not necessarily obtained when the concentration profiles of the reacting species perfectly overlap. In addition to the exact solutions, we derive throughout several closed form engineering approximations which are based on elementary functions and are simple to implement, yet maintain the interplay between the important scales. Both the exact and approximate solutions provide insight into sample focusing and can be used to design and optimize ITP-based assays.« less

  9. Quasi-static energy absorption of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Jacobsen, AJ

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive modeling and numerical study focusing on the energy quasi-static crushing behavior and energy absorption characteristics of hollow tube microlattice structures. The peak stress and effective plateau stress of the hollow microlattice structures are deduced for different geometrical parameters which gives volume and mass densities of energy absorption, D-v and D-m, scale with the relative density, (rho) over bar, as D-v similar to (rho) over bar (1) (5) and D-m similar to (rho) over bar (0 5), respectively, fitting very well to the experimental results of both 60 degrees inclined and 90 degrees predominately microlattices. Then themore » strategies for energy absorption enhancement are proposed for the engineering design of microlattice structures. By introducing a gradient in the thickness or radius of the lattice members, the buckle propagation can be modulated resulting in an increase in energy absorption density that can exceed 40%. Liquid filler is another approach to improve energy absorption by strengthening the microtruss via circumference expansion, and the gain may be over 100% in terms of volume density. Insight into the correlations between microlattice architecture and energy absorption performance combined with the high degree of architecture control paves the way for designing high performance microlattice structures for a range of impact and impulse mitigation applications for vehicles and structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.« less

  10. Peak Pc Prediction in Conjunction Analysis: Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis. Pc Behavior Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallejo, J.J.; Hejduk, M.D.; Stamey, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite conjunction risk typically evaluated through the probability of collision (Pc). Considers both conjunction geometry and uncertainties in both state estimates. Conjunction events initially discovered through Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) screenings, usually seven days before Time of Closest Approach (TCA). However, JSpOC continues to track objects and issue conjunction updates. Changes in state estimate and reduced propagation time cause Pc to change as event develops. These changes a combination of potentially predictable development and unpredictable changes in state estimate covariance. Operationally useful datum: the peak Pc. If it can reasonably be inferred that the peak Pc value has passed, then risk assessment can be conducted against this peak value. If this value is below remediation level, then event intensity can be relaxed. Can the peak Pc location be reasonably predicted?

  11. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  12. Peak-flow frequency relations and evaluation of the peak-flow gaging network in Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soenksen, Philip J.; Miller, Lisa D.; Sharpe, Jennifer B.; Watton, Jason R.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of peak-flow magnitude and frequency are required for the efficient design of structures that convey flood flows or occupy floodways, such as bridges, culverts, and roads. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Roads, conducted a study to update peak-flow frequency analyses for selected streamflow-gaging stations, develop a new set of peak-flow frequency relations for ungaged streams, and evaluate the peak-flow gaging-station network for Nebraska. Data from stations located in or within about 50 miles of Nebraska were analyzed using guidelines of the Interagency Advisory Committee on Water Data in Bulletin 17B. New generalized skew relations were developed for use in frequency analyses of unregulated streams. Thirty-three drainage-basin characteristics related to morphology, soils, and precipitation were quantified using a geographic information system, related computer programs, and digital spatial data.For unregulated streams, eight sets of regional regression equations relating drainage-basin to peak-flow characteristics were developed for seven regions of the state using a generalized least squares procedure. Two sets of regional peak-flow frequency equations were developed for basins with average soil permeability greater than 4 inches per hour, and six sets of equations were developed for specific geographic areas, usually based on drainage-basin boundaries. Standard errors of estimate for the 100-year frequency equations (1percent probability) ranged from 12.1 to 63.8 percent. For regulated reaches of nine streams, graphs of peak flow for standard frequencies and distance upstream of the mouth were estimated.The regional networks of streamflow-gaging stations on unregulated streams were analyzed to evaluate how additional data might affect the average sampling errors of the newly developed peak-flow equations for the 100-year frequency occurrence. Results indicated that data from new stations, rather than more

  13. [Study of cholesterol concentration based on serum UV-visible absorption spectrum].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Min; Guo, Xin; Chen, Hui

    2009-04-01

    In the present paper, UV-visible absorption spectrum and neural network theory were used for the analysis of cholesterol concentration. Experimental investigation shows that the absorption spectrum has the following characteristics in the wave band of 350-600 nm: (1) There is a stronger absorption peak at 416 nm for the test sample with different cholesterol concentration; (2) There is a shoulder peak between 450 and 500 nm, whose central wavelength is 460 nm; (3) There is a weaker peak at 578 nm; (4) Absorption spectrums shape of different cholesterol concentration is different obviously. The absorption spectrum of serum is the synthesis result of cholesterol and other components (such as sugar), and the information is contained at each wavelength. There is no significant correlation between absorbance and cholesterol content at 416 nm, showing a random relation, so whether cholesterol content is abnormal is not determined by the absorbance peak at 416 nm. Based on the evident correlation between serum absorption spectrum and cholesterol concentration in the wave band of 455-475 nm, a neural network model was built to predict the cholesterol concentration. The correlation coefficient between predicted cholesterol content output A and objectives T reaches 0.968, which can be regarded as better prediction, and it provides a spectra test method of cholesterol concentration.

  14. Differential-optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    Two-cell spectrophone detects trace amounts of atmospheric pollutants by measuring absorption coefficients of gases with various laser sources. Device measures pressure difference between two tapered cells with differential manometer. Background signal is reduced by balanced window heating and balanced carrier gas absorption in two cells.

  15. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  16. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  17. Enhancing acoustic signal response and absorption of an underwater coated plate by embedding periodical inhomogeneities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanni; Pan, Jie

    2017-12-01

    An underwater structure is proposed for simultaneous detection and stealth purposes by embedding periodic signal conditioning plates (SCPs) at the interface of two elastic coatings attached to an elastic plate. Results show that the embedded SCPs can enhance sound absorption at frequencies below the coincidence frequency of the plate (f c ). Significantly enhanced absorption occurs at five peaks, of which the peak due to excited localized bending resonance in the outer coating between SCPs is the most significant. When the dilatational velocity of the outer coating equals that of the inner coating, nearly total absorption occurs in a wideband, owing to strong coupling between the localized waveguide resonance in the outer coating and that in the inner coating, and the diffraction waves by the SCPs. Meanwhile, an amplified acoustic signal of over 14 dB is observed at most frequencies within 0 ∼ f c at the coatings' interface close to the SCPs' edges, owing to focused stress formed there. Peaks in the signal response at maximal 30 dB are also observed. These peak frequencies are coincident with or close to the peak frequencies of absorption, demonstrating that significantly enhanced acoustic signal and absorption can be achieved simultaneously through the use of embedded periodic SCPs.

  18. Surface-plasmon mediated total absorption of light into silicon.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae Woong; Park, Woo Jae; Lee, Kyu Jin; Song, Seok Ho; Magnusson, Robert

    2011-10-10

    We report surface-plasmon mediated total absorption of light into a silicon substrate. For an Au grating on Si, we experimentally show that a surface-plasmon polariton (SPP) excited on the air/Au interface leads to total absorption with a rate nearly 10 times larger than the ohmic damping rate of collectively oscillating free electrons in the Au film. Rigorous numerical simulations show that the SPP resonantly enhances forward diffraction of light to multiple orders of lossy waves in the Si substrate with reflection and ohmic absorption in the Au film being negligible. The measured reflection and phase spectra reveal a quantitative relation between the peak absorbance and the associated reflection phase change, implying a resonant interference contribution to this effect. An analytic model of a dissipative quasi-bound resonator provides a general formula for the resonant absorbance-phase relation in excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  19. Structural study of aggregated β-carotene by absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li Ping; Wei, Liang Shu

    2017-10-01

    By UV-visible absorption spectroscope, the aggregated β-carotene in hydrated ethanol was studied in the temperature range of 5 55°C, with different ethanol/water ratio. And the structural evolutions of these aggregates with time were detected. The spectrophotometric analysis showed that the aggregate of β-carotene formed in 1:1 ethanol/water solution transfered from H-type to J-type with temperature increase. In 2:1 ethanol/water solution a new type of aggregate with strong coupling was predicated by the appearing absorption peak located at about 550 nm. In the time scales of 48 houses all the aggregated structures were stable, but the absorption intensity decreased with time. It was concluded that the types of aggregated β-carotene which wouldn't change with time depended on the solvent composition and temperature.

  20. Microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The microwave absorption properties of Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules prepared by an arc discharge method have been studied. The composition and the microstructure of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules were determined by means of X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscope observations. Silicides, in the forms of SiOx and SiC, mainly exist in the shells of the nanocapsules and result in a large amount of defects at the ‘core/shell’ interfaces as well as in the shells. The complex permittivity and microwave absorption properties of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules are improved by the doped silicides. Compared with those of Ni/C nanocapsules, the positions of maximum absorption peaks of the Ni/(C, silicides) nanocapsules exhibit large red shifts. An electric dipole model is proposed to explain this red shift phenomenon. PMID:22548846

  1. Absorption Cross-Sections of Sodium Diatomic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Zeng-Shevan

    1985-01-01

    The absorption cross sections of sodium dimers were studied using a heat pipe over operating in the non-heat-pipe mode. Three wavelength regions were observed. They are in the red, the green-blue, and the near ultraviolet regions. The absorption cross section depends on the wavelength of the incident light. Representative peak values for the v"=0 progression in the red and green-blue regions are 2.59 A sup 2 (average value) and 11.77 A sup 2 (T sub ave=624 K). The value for the C greater than X transitions is several tenths A sup 2. The cross sections were measured from absorption spectra taken as a function of temperature.

  2. Electron localization and optical absorption of polygonal quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitek, Anna; Serra, Llorenç; Gudmundsson, Vidar; Manolescu, Andrei

    2015-06-01

    We investigate theoretically polygonal quantum rings and focus mostly on the triangular geometry where the corner effects are maximal. Such rings can be seen as short core-shell nanowires, a generation of semiconductor heterostructures with multiple applications. We show how the geometry of the sample determines the electronic energy spectrum, and also the localization of electrons, with effects on the optical absorption. In particular, we show that irrespective of the ring shape low-energy electrons are always attracted by corners and are localized in their vicinity. The absorption spectrum in the presence of a magnetic field shows only two peaks within the corner-localized state domain, each associated with different circular polarization. This picture may be changed by an external electric field which allows previously forbidden transitions, and thus enables the number of corners to be determined. We show that polygonal quantum rings allow absorption of waves from distant ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum within one sample.

  3. Terahertz Absorption by Cellulose: Application to Ancient Paper Artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peccianti, M.; Fastampa, R.; Mosca Conte, A.; Pulci, O.; Violante, C.; Łojewska, J.; Clerici, M.; Morandotti, R.; Missori, M.

    2017-06-01

    Artifacts made of cellulose, such as ancient documents, pose a significant experimental challenge in the terahertz transmission spectra interpretation due to their small optical thickness. In this paper, we describe a method to recover the complex refractive index of cellulose fibers from the terahertz transmission data obtained on single freely standing paper sheets in the (0.2-3.5)-THz range. By using our technique, we eliminate Fabry-Perot effects and recover the absorption coefficient of the cellulose fibers. The obtained terahertz absorption spectra are explained in terms of absorption peaks of the cellulose crystalline phase superimposed to a background contribution due to a disordered hydrogen-bond network. The comparison between the experimental spectra with terahertz vibrational properties simulated by density-functional-theory calculations confirms this interpretation. In addition, evident changes in the terahertz absorption spectra are produced by natural and artificial aging on paper samples, whose final stage is characterized by a spectral profile with only two peaks at about 2.1 and 3.1 THz. These results can be used to provide a quantitative assessment of the state of preservation of cellulose artifacts.

  4. Improvement of depth resolution on photoacoustic imaging using multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, Yoshihisa; Fujiwara, Katsuji; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2007-07-01

    Commercial imaging systems, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are frequently used powerful tools for observing structures deep within the human body. However, they cannot precisely visualized several-tens micrometer-sized structures for lack of spatial resolution. In this presentation, we propose photoacoustic imaging using multiphoton absorption technique to generate ultrasonic waves as a means of improving depth resolution. Since the multiphoton absorption occurs at only the focus point and the employed infrared pulses deeply penetrate living tissues, it enables us to extract characteristic features of structures embedded in the living tissue. When nanosecond pulses from a 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser were focused on Rhodamine B/chloroform solution (absorption peak: 540 nm), the peak intensity of the generated photoacoustic signal was proportional to the square of the input pulse energy. This result shows that the photoacoustic signals can be induced by the two-photon absorption of infrared nanosecond pulse laser and also can be detected by a commercial low-frequency MHz transducer. Furthermore, in order to evaluate the depth resolution of multiphoton-photoacoustic imaging, we investigated the dependence of photoacoustic signal on depth position using a 1-mm-thick phantom in a water bath. We found that the depth resolution of two-photon photoacoustic imaging (1064 nm) is greater than that of one-photon photoacoustic imaging (532 nm). We conclude that evolving multiphoton-photoacoustic imaging technology renders feasible the investigation of biomedical phenomena at the deep layer in living tissue.

  5. Can You Hear That Peak? Utilization of Auditory and Visual Feedback at Peak Limb Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loria, Tristan; de Grosbois, John; Tremblay, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: At rest, the central nervous system combines and integrates multisensory cues to yield an optimal percept. When engaging in action, the relative weighing of sensory modalities has been shown to be altered. Because the timing of peak velocity is the critical moment in some goal-directed movements (e.g., overarm throwing), the current study…

  6. Peak high-frequency HRV and peak alpha frequency higher in PTSD.

    PubMed

    Wahbeh, Helané; Oken, Barry S

    2013-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is difficult to treat and current PTSD treatments are not effective for all people. Despite limited evidence for its efficacy, some clinicians have implemented biofeedback for PTSD treatment. As a first step in constructing an effective biofeedback treatment program, we assessed respiration, electroencephalography (EEG) and heart rate variability (HRV) as potential biofeedback parameters for a future clinical trial. This cross-sectional study included 86 veterans; 59 with and 27 without PTSD. Data were collected on EEG measures, HRV, and respiration rate during an attentive resting state. Measures were analyzed to assess sensitivity to PTSD status and the relationship to PTSD symptoms. Peak alpha frequency was higher in the PTSD group (F(1,84) = 6.14, p = 0.01). Peak high-frequency HRV was lower in the PTSD group (F(2,78) = 26.5, p < 0.00005) when adjusting for respiration rate. All other EEG and HRV measures and respiration were not different between groups. Peak high-frequency HRV and peak alpha frequency are sensitive to PTSD status and may be potential biofeedback parameters for future PTSD clinical trials.

  7. Peak High-Frequency HRV and Peak Alpha Frequency Higher in PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Oken, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is difficult to treat and current PTSD treatments are not effective for all people. Despite limited evidence for its efficacy, some clinicians have implemented biofeedback for PTSD treatment. As a first step in constructing an effective biofeedback treatment program, we assessed respiration, electroencephalography (EEG) and heart rate variability (HRV) as potential biofeedback parameters for a future clinical trial. This cross-sectional study included 86 veterans; 59 with and 27 without PTSD. Data were collected on EEG measures, HRV, and respiration rate during an attentive resting state. Measures were analyzed to assess sensitivity to PTSD status and the relationship to PTSD symptoms. Peak alpha frequency was higher in the PTSD group (F(1,84) = 6.14, p = 0.01). Peak high-frequency HRV was lower in the PTSD group (F(2,78) = 26.5, p<0.00005) when adjusting for respiration rate. All other EEG and HRV measures and respiration were not different between groups. Peak high-frequency HRV and peak alpha frequency are sensitive to PTSD status and may be potential biofeedback parameters for future PTSD clinical trials. PMID:23178990

  8. VASQUEZ PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, AND ST. LOUIS PEAK, AND WILLIAMS FORK ROADLESS AREAS, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theobald, P.K.; Bielski, A.M.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was conducted during the years 1979-82 in the Vasquez Peak Wilderness Study Area and in the St. Louis Peak and Williams Fork Roadless Areas, central Front Range, Colorado. Probable resource potential for the occurrence of copper, lead, zinc, and silver in massive sulfide deposits has been identified in calcareous metamorphic rocks in the northern part of the St. Louis Peak Roadless Area and in the southern part of the Williams Fork Roadless Area. A probable resource potential for vein-type uranium deposits is identified along the Berthoud Pass fault zone in the eastern part of the Vasquez Peak Wilderness Study Area. A large area encompassing the eastern and southeastern part of each of the three areas has probable and substantiated potential for either high-grade lead-zinc-silver vein deposits, or larger, lower-grade clustered vein deposits. A probable resource potential for stockwork molybdenum deposits related to porphyry molybdenum type mineralization exists beneath the lead-zinc-silver-rich veins. The nature of the geologic terrane indicates little likelihood for the occurrence of organic fuels.

  9. Peak phosphorus - peak food? The need to close the phosphorus cycle.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The peak in the world production of phosphorus has been predicted to occur in 2033, based on world reserves of rock phosphate (URR) reckoned at around 24,000 million tonnes (Mt), with around 18,000 Mt remaining. This figure was reckoned-up to 71,000 Mt, by the USGS, in 2012, but a production maximum during the present century is still highly probable. There are complex issues over what the demand will be for phosphorus in the future, as measured against a rising population (from 7 billion to over 9 billion in 2050), and a greater per capita demand for fertiliser to grow more grain, in part to feed animals and meet a rising demand for meat by a human species that is not merely more populous but more affluent. As a counterweight to this, we may expect that greater efficiencies in the use of phosphorus - including recycling from farms and of human and animal waste - will reduce the per capita demand for phosphate rock. The unseen game changer is peak oil, since phosphate is mined and recovered using machinery powered by liquid fuels refined from crude oil. Hence, peak oil and peak phosphorus might appear as conjoined twins. There is no unequivocal case that we can afford to ignore the likelihood of a supply-demand gap for phosphorus occurring sometime this century, and it would be perilous to do so.

  10. Skills Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canter, Patricia; And Others

    The services of the Living Skills Center for the Visually Handicapped, a habilitative service for blind young adults, are described. It is explained that the Center houses its participants in their own apartments in a large complex and has served over 70 young people in 4 years. The evaluation section describes such assessment instruments as an…

  11. Vanishing absorption and blueshifted emission in FeLoBAL quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiee, Alireza; Pirkola, Patrik; Hall, Patrick B.; Galati, Natalee; Rogerson, Jesse; Ameri, Abtin

    2016-07-01

    We study the dramatic decrease in iron absorption strength in the iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar SDSS J084133.15+200525.8. We report on the continued weakening of absorption in the prototype of this class of variable broad absorption line quasar, FBQS J140806.2+305448. We also report a third example of this class, SDSS J123103.70+392903.6; unlike the other two examples, it has undergone an increase in observed continuum brightness (at 3000 Å rest frame) as well as a decrease in iron absorption strength. These changes could be caused by absorber transverse motion or by ionization variability. We note that the Mg II and UV Fe II lines in several FeLoBAL quasars are blueshifted by thousands of km s-1 relative to the H β emission line peak. We suggest that such emission arises in the outflowing winds normally seen only in absorption.

  12. Human behavioral complexity peaks at age 25

    PubMed Central

    Brugger, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Random Item Generation tasks (RIG) are commonly used to assess high cognitive abilities such as inhibition or sustained attention. They also draw upon our approximate sense of complexity. A detrimental effect of aging on pseudo-random productions has been demonstrated for some tasks, but little is as yet known about the developmental curve of cognitive complexity over the lifespan. We investigate the complexity trajectory across the lifespan of human responses to five common RIG tasks, using a large sample (n = 3429). Our main finding is that the developmental curve of the estimated algorithmic complexity of responses is similar to what may be expected of a measure of higher cognitive abilities, with a performance peak around 25 and a decline starting around 60, suggesting that RIG tasks yield good estimates of such cognitive abilities. Our study illustrates that very short strings of, i.e., 10 items, are sufficient to have their complexity reliably estimated and to allow the documentation of an age-dependent decline in the approximate sense of complexity. PMID:28406953

  13. Modeling the peak of emergence in systems: Design and katachi.

    PubMed

    Cardier, Beth; Goranson, H T; Casas, Niccolo; Lundberg, Patric; Erioli, Alessio; Takaki, Ryuji; Nagy, Dénes; Ciavarra, Richard; Sanford, Larry D

    2017-12-01

    It is difficult to model emergence in biological systems using reductionist paradigms. A requirement for computational modeling is that individual entities can be recorded parametrically and related logically, but their transformation into whole systems cannot be captured this way. The problem stems from an inability to formally represent the implicit influences that inform emergent organization, such as context, shifts in causal agency or scale, and self-reference. This lack hampers biological systems modeling and its computational counterpart, indicating a need for new fundamental abstraction frameworks that support system-level characteristics. We develop an approach that formally captures these characteristics, focusing on the way they come together to enable transformation at the 'peak' of the emergent process. An example from virology is presented, in which two seemingly antagonistic systems - the herpes cold sore virus and its host - are capable of altering their basic biological objectives to achieve a new equilibrium. The usual barriers to modeling this process are overcome by incorporating mechanisms from practices centered on its emergent peak: design and katachi. In the Japanese science of form, katachi refers to the emergence of intrinsic structure from real situations, where an optimal balance between implicit influences is achieved. Design indicates how such optimization is guided by principles of flow. These practices leverage qualities of situated abstraction, which we understand through the intuitive method of physicist Kôdi Husimi. Early results indicate that this approach can capture the functional transformations of biological emergence, whilst being reasonably computable. Due to its geometric foundations and narrative-based extension to logic, the method will also generate speculative predictions. This research forms the foundations of a new biomedical modeling platform, which is discussed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Extrasolar Planet Transits Observed at Kitt Peak National Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sada, Pedro V.; Jennings, Donald E.; Deming, Drake; Jennings, Donald E.; Jackson, Brian; Hamilton, Catrina M.; Fraine, Jonathan; Peterson, Steven W.; Haase, Flynn; Bays, Kevin; hide

    2012-01-01

    We obtained J-, H-, and JH-band photometry of known extrasolar planet transiting systems at the 2.1 m Kitt Peak National Observatory Telescope using the FLAMINGOS infrared camera between 2008 October and 2011 October. From the derived light curves we have extracted the midtransit times, transit depths and transit durations for these events. The precise midtransit times obtained help improve the orbital periods and also constrain transit-time variations of the systems. For most cases the published system parameters successfully accounted for our observed light curves, but in some instances we derive improved planetary radii and orbital periods. We complemented our 2.1 m infrared observations using CCD z0-band and B-band photometry (plus two H(alpha) filter observations) obtained with the Kitt Peak Visitor Center Telescope, and with four H-band transits observed in 2007 October with the NSO's 1.6 m McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope. The principal highlights of our results are (1) Our ensemble of J-band planetary radii agree with optical radii, with the best-fit relation being RpRJ0:0017 0:979RpRvis. (2) We observe starspot crossings during the transit of WASP-11HAT-P-10. (3) We detect starspot crossings by HAT-P-11b (Kepler-3b), thus confirming that the magnetic evolution of the stellar active regions can be monitored even after the Kepler mission has ended. (4) We confirm a grazing transit for HAT-P-27WASP-40. In total, we present 57 individual transits of 32 known exoplanet systems.

  15. Measurement of Absorption Coefficient of Paraformaldehyde and Metaldehyde with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Xia, T.; Chen, Q.; Sun, Q.; Deng, Y.; Wang, C.

    2018-03-01

    The characteristic absorption spectra of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde in the terahertz frequency region are obtained by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). In order to reduce the absorption of terahertz (THz) wave by water vapor in the air and the background noise, the measurement system was filled with dry air and the measurements were conducted at the temperature of 24°C. Meanwhile, the humidity was controlled within 10% RH. The THz frequency domain spectra of samples and their references from 0 to 2.5 THz were analyzed via Fourier transform. The refractive index and absorption coefficients of the two aldehydes were calculated by the model formulas. From 0.1 to 2.5 THz, there appear two weak absorption peaks at 1.20 and 1.66 THz in the absorption spectra of paraformaldehyde. Only one distinct absorption peak emerges at 1.83 THz for metaldehyde. There are significant differences between the terahertz absorption coefficients of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde, which can be used as "fingerprints" to identify these substances. Furthermore, the relationship between the average absorption coefficients and mass concentrations was investigated and the average absorption coefficient-mass concentration diagrams of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde were shown. For paraformaldehyde, there is a linear relationship between the average absorption coefficient and the natural logarithm of mass concentration. For metaldehyde, there exists a simpler linear relationship between the average absorption coefficient and the mass concentration. Because of the characteristics of THz absorption of paraformaldehyde and metaldehyde, the THz-TDS can be applied to the qualitative and quantitative detection of the two aldehydes to reduce the unpredictable hazards due to these substances.

  16. An analysis of Super typhoon Rammasun's(2014) peak intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qinbo; Xu, Yinglong

    2016-04-01

    Super typhoon Rammasun (2014) made landfall over Hainan Island, China, at 0730UTC 18 July 2014. Due to the damage of the anemometers, the Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) and the bouy which by Rammasun passed, failed to obtain its peak wind. Lack of the direct evident, in real-time monitoring, its peak intensities were given by 110kts (.i.e. 60m/s)/910hPa,135kts/922hPa , and 90kts/935hPa based on Dvorak technique , which were made by China Meteorological Administration (CMA),Joint Typhoon Warning Center(JTWC), and Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) respectively. However, a minimum pressure of 881.2hPa recorded by a barometer which located at Qixhou island (19.982︒N,111.269︒E) while Rammasun approaching, indicates that its intensity was under estimated. By using observation data such as AWS, satellite, Doppler radar and wind tower near the ground, this study performs a detail evaluation to obtain its actual intensity. At 0521UTC, Qizhou Island station recorded 881.2hPa of the minimum station pressure and 899.2hPa of minimum sea level pressure (MSLP) while the anemometer had been destroyed. These are the lowest records in Chinese history and also are ones of the global lowest pressures obtained directly by barometer. It is evident that Rammasun's eyewall did not pass across Qizhou Island directly, so the actual MSLP should be lower than 899.2hPa. By applying wind-pressure relationship, it is reckoned that the reasonable MSLP and peak wind of Rammasun should be 888hPa and 70-76m/s, which makes Rammasun the strongest typhoon ever made landfall in China's history. In order to intuitively investigate the real intensity of Ramasun, eyewall structures are compared with some historical extreme typhoons (hurricanes) such as Saomai(2006), Haiyan(2013) and Katrina(2005). Satellite images show that the dense overcast convection strength of Rammasun is stronger than those when Saomai and Katrina were in their peak intensities and before landing, but weaker than Haiyan. The

  17. Call-Center Based Disease Management of Pediatric Asthmatics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    study locations. Purchase peak flow meters. Prepare and reproduce patient education materials, and informed consent work sheets. Contract Oracle data...identified. Electronic peak flow meters have been purchased. Patient education materials and informed consent documents have been reproduced. A web-based...Research Center * Study population identified via military and Foundation Health databases * Electronic peak flow meters purchased * Patient education materials

  18. Absorption of electromagnetic radiation in a quantum wire with an anisotropic parabolic potential in a transverse magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Karpunin, V. V., E-mail: karpuninvv@mail.ru; Margulis, V. A., E-mail: theorphysics@mrsu.ru

    2016-06-15

    An analytical expression for the coefficient of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by electrons in a quantum wire in a magnetic field is derived. The case of a magnetic field transverse with respect to the wire axis is considered. The resonance character of absorption is shown, and the resonance frequencies as functions of the field are determined. The effect of the scattering of electrons at optical phonons is studied, and it is shown that scattering is responsible for additional resonance absorption peaks.

  19. Research Opportunities at Storm Peak Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallar, A. G.; McCubbin, I. B.

    2006-12-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) operates a high elevation facility, Storm Peak Laboratory (SPL), located on the west summit of Mt. Werner in the Park Range near Steamboat Springs, Colorado at an elevation of 3210 m MSL (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). SPL provides an ideal location for long-term research on the interactions of atmospheric aerosol and gas- phase chemistry with cloud and natural radiation environments. The ridge-top location produces almost daily transition from free tropospheric to boundary layer air which occurs near midday in both summer and winter seasons. Long-term observations at SPL document the role of orographically induced mixing and convection on vertical pollutant transport and dispersion. During winter, SPL is above cloud base 25% of the time, providing a unique capability for studying aerosol-cloud interactions (Borys and Wetzel, 1997). A comprehensive set of continuous aerosol measurements was initiated at SPL in 2002. SPL includes an office-type laboratory room for computer and instrumentation setup with outside air ports and cable access to the roof deck, a cold room for precipitation and cloud rime ice sample handling and ice crystal microphotography, a 150 m2 roof deck area for outside sampling equipment, a full kitchen and two bunk rooms with sleeping space for nine persons. The laboratory is currently well equipped for aerosol and cloud measurements. Particles are sampled from an insulated, 15 cm diameter manifold within approximately 1 m of its horizontal entry point through an outside wall. The 4 m high vertical section outside the building is capped with an inverted can to exclude large particles.

  20. [Studying the fertility peak in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Zhong, L

    1989-07-01

    Beijing, China, is experiencing a baby boom in response to 2 periods of large population increase in the mid-1950s and early 1960s. The average number of annual births was 220,000 in the first period and 269,000 in the second period. The causes of the large increase in the population in the first period were an improvement of health conditions which led to a reduction in mortality, immigration flow, and an erroneous population policy. The causes in the second period were recuperative fertility after three years of natural calamity and increased fertility among immigrants. Net migration had an important role in population growth these two periods; it also will have an important impact in future population changes. According to population projections, another baby boom is expected to occur before the end of the end of the century. During the up-coming baby boom period, 1.54 million births are expected, 190,000 per annum. The average increase in population size is expected to 127,000 per year. In the peak year, it may be around 200,000. Thanks to the family planning (FP) program the occurrence of the third baby boom in Beijing has been postponed and the duration will be shortened. From 1972 to 1982, 2.57 million births was averted due to FP, which drastically reduced pressure on the demand for resources and on the momentum of the next baby boom. Another baby booms is not expected during the early half of the 21st century, although an elevated birth rate within the range of normal fluctuation is predicted. The projection was based on the assumption of restricted migration and the enforcement of the FP program. The realization of the projected population will depend on deferred marriage, deferred child-bearing, prolonged birth spacing, the prevention of high parity fertility, the maintenance of the current population policy, and control over the reproductive behavior of the new migrant population.

  1. D-peaks: a visual tool to display ChIP-seq peaks along the genome.

    PubMed

    Brohée, Sylvain; Bontempi, Gianluca

    2012-01-01

    ChIP-sequencing is a method of choice to localize the positions of protein binding sites on DNA on a whole genomic scale. The deciphering of the sequencing data produced by this novel technique is challenging and it is achieved by their rigorous interpretation using dedicated tools and adapted visualization programs. Here, we present a bioinformatics tool (D-peaks) that adds several possibilities (including, user-friendliness, high-quality, relative position with respect to the genomic features) to the well-known visualization browsers or databases already existing. D-peaks is directly available through its web interface http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/dpeaks/ as well as a command line tool.

  2. ITALIAN PEAK AND ITALIAN PEAK MIDDLE ROADLESS AREAS, IDAHO AND MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skipp, Betty; Lambeth, Robert H.

    1984-01-01

    The Italian Peak and Italian Peak Middle Roadless Areas, in southwestern Montana and east-central Idaho, contain areas of probable mineral-resource potential based on combined geologic, geophysical, and geochemical studies and prospect examination. Small areas along the western, southern, and northeastern boundaries of the roadless areas have probable mineral resource potential for zinc, lead, silver, and uranium. An area of probable resource potential just east of and including a part of the Birch Creek mining district, may contain stratabound and fault-controlled silver and base metals, even though geochemical anomalies are low, and extensive prospecting has not identified any significant mineralization. The roadless areas are a part of the overthrust belt, and oil and gas possibilities must be assessed.

  3. Relationship between height and width of resonance peaks in a whispering gallery mode resonator immersed in water and sucrose solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teraoka, Iwao; Yao, Haibei; Huiyi Luo, Natalie

    2017-06-01

    We employed a recently developed whispering gallery mode (WGM) dip sensor made of silica to obtain spectra for many resonance peaks in water and solutions of sucrose at different concentrations and thus having different refractive indices (RI). The apparent Q factor was estimated by fitting each peak profile in the busy resonance spectrum by a Lorentzian or a sum of Lorentzians. A plot of the Q factor as a function the peak height for all the peaks analyzed indicates a straight line with a negative slope as the upper limit, for each of water and the solutions. A coupling model for a resonator and a pair of fiber tapers to feed and pick up light, developed here, supports the presence of the upper limit. We also found that the round-trip attenuation of WGM was greater than the one estimated from light absorption by water, and the difference increased with the concentration of sucrose.

  4. Automatic quality assessment and peak identification of auditory brainstem responses with fitted parametric peaks.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Joaquin T; de la Torre, Angel; Alvarez, Isaac; Segura, Jose Carlos; Thornton, A Roger D; Sainz, Manuel; Vargas, Jose Luis

    2014-05-01

    The recording of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) is used worldwide for hearing screening purposes. In this process, a precise estimation of the most relevant components is essential for an accurate interpretation of these signals. This evaluation is usually carried out subjectively by an audiologist. However, the use of automatic methods for this purpose is being encouraged nowadays in order to reduce human evaluation biases and ensure uniformity among test conditions, patients, and screening personnel. This article describes a new method that performs automatic quality assessment and identification of the peaks, the fitted parametric peaks (FPP). This method is based on the use of synthesized peaks that are adjusted to the ABR response. The FPP is validated, on one hand, by an analysis of amplitudes and latencies measured manually by an audiologist and automatically by the FPP method in ABR signals recorded at different stimulation rates; and on the other hand, contrasting the performance of the FPP method with the automatic evaluation techniques based on the correlation coefficient, FSP, and cross correlation with a predefined template waveform by comparing the automatic evaluations of the quality of these methods with subjective evaluations provided by five experienced evaluators on a set of ABR signals of different quality. The results of this study suggest (a) that the FPP method can be used to provide an accurate parameterization of the peaks in terms of amplitude, latency, and width, and (b) that the FPP remains as the method that best approaches the averaged subjective quality evaluation, as well as provides the best results in terms of sensitivity and specificity in ABR signals validation. The significance of these findings and the clinical value of the FPP method are highlighted on this paper. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Investigation on optical absorption properties of ion irradiated single walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Vishalli,, E-mail: vishalli-2008@yahoo.com; Dharamvir, Keya, E-mail: keya@pu.ac.in; Kaur, Ramneek

    2015-08-28

    In the present study change in the optical absorption properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under nickel ion (60 MeV) irradiation at various fluences has been investigated. Langmuir Blodgett technique is used to deposit SWCNT thin film of uniform thickness. AFM analysis shows a network of interconnected bundles of nanotubes. UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectra indicate that the sample mainly contain SWCNTs of semiconducting nature. It has been found in absorption spectra that there is decrease in the intensity of the characteristic SWCNT peaks with increase in fluence. At fluence value 1×10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} there is almost complete suppression of themore » characteristic SWCNTs peaks.The decrease in the optical absorption with increase in fluence is due to the increase in the disorder in the system which leads to the decrease in optically active states.« less

  6. Gamma radiation-induced blue shift of resonance peaks of Bragg gratings in pure silica fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Faustov, A V; Mégret, P; Wuilpart, M

    2016-02-28

    We report the first observation of a significant gamma radiation-induced blue shift of the reflection/transmission peak of fibre Bragg gratings inscribed into pure-silica core fibres via multiphoton absorption of femtosecond pulses. At a total dose of ∼100 kGy, the shift is ∼20 pm. The observed effect is attributable to the ionising radiation-induced decrease in the density of the silica glass when the rate of colour centre formation is slow. We present results of experimental measurements that provide the key parameters of the dynamics of the gratings for remote dosimetry and temperature sensing. (laser crystals and braggg ratings)

  7. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW-LINE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. THE CASE OF EQUAL PEAKS

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K. L.; Shields, G. A.; Salviander, S.

    Active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with double-peaked narrow lines (DPAGNs) may be caused by kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs, bipolar outflows, or rotating gaseous disks. We examine the class of DPAGNs in which the two narrow-line components have closely similar intensity as being especially likely to involve disks or jets. Two spectroscopic indicators support this likelihood. For DPAGNs from Smith et al., the 'equal-peaked' objects (EPAGNs) have [Ne V]/[O III]ratios lower than for a control sample of non-double-peaked AGNs. This is unexpected for a pair of normal AGNs in a galactic merger, but may be consistent with [O III] emission from a rotatingmore » ring with relatively little gas at small radii. Also, [O III]/H{beta} ratios of the redshifted and blueshifted systems in the EPAGN are more similar to each other than in a control sample, suggestive of a single ionizing source and inconsistent with the binary interpretation.« less

  8. Equivalent peak resolution: characterization of the extent of separation for two components based on their relative peak overlap.

    PubMed

    Dvořák, Martin; Svobodová, Jana; Dubský, Pavel; Riesová, Martina; Vigh, Gyula; Gaš, Bohuslav

    2015-03-01

    Although the classical formula of peak resolution was derived to characterize the extent of separation only for Gaussian peaks of equal areas, it is often used even when the peaks follow non-Gaussian distributions and/or have unequal areas. This practice can result in misleading information about the extent of separation in terms of the severity of peak overlap. We propose here the use of the equivalent peak resolution value, a term based on relative peak overlap, to characterize the extent of separation that had been achieved. The definition of equivalent peak resolution is not constrained either by the form(s) of the concentration distribution function(s) of the peaks (Gaussian or non-Gaussian) or the relative area of the peaks. The equivalent peak resolution value and the classically defined peak resolution value are numerically identical when the separated peaks are Gaussian and have identical areas and SDs. Using our new freeware program, Resolution Analyzer, one can calculate both the classically defined and the equivalent peak resolution values. With the help of this tool, we demonstrate here that the classical peak resolution values mischaracterize the extent of peak overlap even when the peaks are Gaussian but have different areas. We show that under ideal conditions of the separation process, the relative peak overlap value is easily accessible by fitting the overall peak profile as the sum of two Gaussian functions. The applicability of the new approach is demonstrated on real separations. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Family Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-30

    34 Family Policy," December 30, 1988 o / (b) DoD Directive 4001.1, "Installation Management ,, September 4, 1986 (c) DoD 4165.63-M, "DoD Housing Management ... managing the competing demands of the military mission and the family . They shall provide the information and family services necessary to support single...effectiveness of Family Centers. The evaluation system shall include: (1) A management information report to allow Family Centers to reflect actual workloads

  10. The accuracy of portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Dickinson, S A; Hitchings, D J

    1992-11-01

    The variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is now commonly used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. It is essential for PEF meters to have a linear response in order to obtain an unbiased measurement of PEF variability. As the accuracy and linearity of portable PEF meters have not been rigorously tested in recent years this aspect of their performance has been investigated. The response of several portable PEF meters was tested with absolute standards of flow generated by a computer driven, servo controlled pump and their response was compared with that of a pneumotachograph. For each device tested the readings were highly repeatable to within the limits of accuracy with which the pointer position can be assessed by eye. The between instrument variation in reading for six identical devices expressed as a 95% confidence limit was, on average across the range of flows, +/- 8.5 l/min for the Mini-Wright, +/- 7.9 l/min for the Vitalograph, and +/- 6.4 l/min for the Ferraris. PEF meters based on the Wright meter all had similar error profiles with overreading of up to 80 l/min in the mid flow range from 300 to 500 l/min. This overreading was greatest for the Mini-Wright and Ferraris devices, and less so for the original Wright and Vitalograph meters. A Micro-Medical Turbine meter was accurate up to 400 l/min and then began to underread by up to 60 l/min at 720 l/min. For the low range devices the Vitalograph device was accurate to within 10 l/min up to 200 l/min, with the Mini-Wright overreading by up to 30 l/min above 150 l/min. Although the Mini-Wright, Ferraris, and Vitalograph meters gave remarkably repeatable results their error profiles for the full range meters will lead to important errors in recording PEF variability. This may lead to incorrect diagnosis and bias in implementing strategies of asthma treatment based on PEF measurement.

  11. The accuracy of portable peak flow meters.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, M R; Dickinson, S A; Hitchings, D J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The variability of peak expiratory flow (PEF) is now commonly used in the diagnosis and management of asthma. It is essential for PEF meters to have a linear response in order to obtain an unbiased measurement of PEF variability. As the accuracy and linearity of portable PEF meters have not been rigorously tested in recent years this aspect of their performance has been investigated. METHODS: The response of several portable PEF meters was tested with absolute standards of flow generated by a computer driven, servo controlled pump and their response was compared with that of a pneumotachograph. RESULTS: For each device tested the readings were highly repeatable to within the limits of accuracy with which the pointer position can be assessed by eye. The between instrument variation in reading for six identical devices expressed as a 95% confidence limit was, on average across the range of flows, +/- 8.5 l/min for the Mini-Wright, +/- 7.9 l/min for the Vitalograph, and +/- 6.4 l/min for the Ferraris. PEF meters based on the Wright meter all had similar error profiles with overreading of up to 80 l/min in the mid flow range from 300 to 500 l/min. This overreading was greatest for the Mini-Wright and Ferraris devices, and less so for the original Wright and Vitalograph meters. A Micro-Medical Turbine meter was accurate up to 400 l/min and then began to underread by up to 60 l/min at 720 l/min. For the low range devices the Vitalograph device was accurate to within 10 l/min up to 200 l/min, with the Mini-Wright overreading by up to 30 l/min above 150 l/min. CONCLUSION: Although the Mini-Wright, Ferraris, and Vitalograph meters gave remarkably repeatable results their error profiles for the full range meters will lead to important errors in recording PEF variability. This may lead to incorrect diagnosis and bias in implementing strategies of asthma treatment based on PEF measurement. PMID:1465746

  12. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode formore » Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.« less

  13. Sound absorption characteristics of aluminum foam with spherical cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunjie; Wang, Xinfu; Wang, Xingfu; Ren, Yuelu; Han, Fusheng; Wen, Cuie

    2011-12-01

    Aluminum foams were fabricated by an infiltration process. The foams possess spherical cells with a fixed porosity of 65% and varied pore sizes which ranged from 1.3 to 1.9 mm. The spherical cells are interconnected by small pores or pore openings on the cell walls that cause the foams show a characteristic of open cell structures. The sound absorption coefficient of the aluminum foams was measured by a standing wave tube and calculated by a transfer function method. It is shown that the sound absorption coefficient increases with an increase in the number of pore openings in the unit area or with a decrease of the diameter of the pore openings in the range of 0.3 to 0.4 mm. If backed with an air cavity, the resonant absorption peaks in the sound absorption coefficient versus frequency curves will be shifted toward lower frequencies as the cavity depth is increased. The samples with the same pore opening size but different pore size show almost the same absorption behavior, especially in the low frequency range. The present results are in good agreement with some theoretical predictions based on the acoustic impedance measurements of metal foams with circular apertures and cylindrical cavities and the principle of electroacoustic analogy.

  14. Resonant absorption of electromagnetic waves in transition anisotropic media.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kihong

    2017-11-27

    We study the mode conversion and resonant absorption phenomena occurring in a slab of a stratified anisotropic medium, optical axes of which are tilted with respect to the direction of inhomogeneity, using the invariant imbedding theory of wave propagation. When the tilt angle is zero, mode conversion occurs if the longitudinal component of the permittivity tensor, which is the one in the direction of inhomogeneity in the non-tilted case, varies from positive to negative values within the medium, while the transverse component plays no role. When the tilt angle is nonzero, the wave transmission and absorption show an asymmetry under the sign change of the incident angle in a range of the tilt angle, while the reflection is always symmetric. We calculate the reflectance, the transmittance and the absorptance for several configurations of the permittivity tensor and find that resonant absorption is greatly enhanced when the medium from the incident surface to the resonance region is hyperbolic than when it is elliptic. For certain configurations, the transmittance and absorptance curves display sharp peaks at some incident angles determined by the tilt angle.

  15. The U.S. Geological Survey Peak-Flow File Data Verification Project, 2008–16

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Goree, Burl B.; Williams-Sether, Tara; Mason, Robert R.

    2017-11-21

    Annual peak streamflow (peak flow) at a streamgage is defined as the maximum instantaneous flow in a water year. A water year begins on October 1 and continues through September 30 of the following year; for example, water year 2015 extends from October 1, 2014, through September 30, 2015. The accuracy, characterization, and completeness of the peak streamflow data are critical in determining flood-frequency estimates that are used daily to design water and transportation infrastructure, delineate flood-plain boundaries, and regulate development and utilization of lands throughout the United States and are essential to understanding the implications of climate and land-use change on flooding and high-flow conditions.As of November 14, 2016, peak-flow data existed for 27,240 unique streamgages in the United States and its territories. The data, collectively referred to as the “peak-flow file,” are available as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) public web interface, the National Water Information System, at https://nwis.waterdata.usgs.gov/usa/nwis/peak. Although the data have been routinely subjected to periodic review by the USGS Office of Surface Water and screening at the USGS Water Science Center level, these data were not reviewed in a national, systematic manner until 2008 when automated scripts were developed and applied to detect potential errors in peak-flow values and their associated dates, gage heights, and peak-flow qualification codes, as well as qualification codes associated with the gage heights. USGS scientists and hydrographers studied the resulting output, accessed basic records and field notes, and corrected observed errors or, more commonly, confirmed existing data as correct.This report summarizes the changes in peak-flow file data at a national level, illustrates their nature and causation, and identifies the streamgages affected by these changes. Specifically, the peak-flow data were compared for streamgages with peak flow

  16. Saturation analysis of ChIP-seq data for reproducible identification of binding peaks

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Peter; Hecht, Jochen; Ibrahim, Daniel M.; Krannich, Alexander; Truss, Matthias; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a powerful technology to identify the genome-wide locations of transcription factors and other DNA binding proteins. Computational ChIP-seq peak calling infers the location of protein–DNA interactions based on various measures of enrichment of sequence reads. In this work, we introduce an algorithm, Q, that uses an assessment of the quadratic enrichment of reads to center candidate peaks followed by statistical analysis of saturation of candidate peaks by 5′ ends of reads. We show that our method not only is substantially faster than several competing methods but also demonstrates statistically significant advantages with respect to reproducibility of results and in its ability to identify peaks with reproducible binding site motifs. We show that Q has superior performance in the delineation of double RNAPII and H3K4me3 peaks surrounding transcription start sites related to a better ability to resolve individual peaks. The method is implemented in C+l+ and is freely available under an open source license. PMID:26163319

  17. Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

  18. Petrographic Analysis and Geochemical Source Correlation of Pigeon Peak, Sutter Buttes, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, N. M.; Hausback, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Sutter Buttes are a volcanic complex located in the center of the Great Valley north of Sacramento. They are comprised of numerous inter-intruding andesite and rhyolite lava domes of varying compositions surrounded by a shallow rampart of associated tephras. The Pigeon Peak block-and-ash flow sequence is located in the rampart and made up of a porphyritic Biotite bearing Hornblende Andesite. The andesite blocks demonstrate a high degree of propylization in hornblende crystals, highly zoned plagioclase, trace olivine, and display a red to gray color gradation. DAR is an andesite dome located less than one mile from Pigeon Peak. Of the 15 to 25 andesite lava domes within four miles from Pigeon Peak, only DAR displays trace olivine, red to grey color stratification, low biotite content, and propylitized hornblende. These characteristic similarities suggest that DAR may be the source for Pigeon Peak. My investigation used microprobe analysis of the DAR and Pigeon Peak feldspar crystals to identify the magmatic history of the magma body before emplacement. Correlation of the anorthite zoning within the feldspars from both locations support my hypothesis that DAR is the source of the Pigeon Peak block-and-ash flow.

  19. Broadband absorption with gradient metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hoyeong; Chalabi, Hamidreza; Alù, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    A metasurface with appropriately designed transverse spatial inhomogeneities can provide the desired phase redistribution in response to an incident wave with arbitrary incident angle. This property of gradient metasurfaces has been used to modify light propagation in unusual manners, to transform the impinging optical wavefront with large flexibility. In this work, we show how gradient metasurfaces can be tailored to offer high absorption in thin absorptive layers, and how to design realistic metasurfaces for this purpose using dielectric materials.

  20. SEISMICITY OF THE LASSEN PEAK AREA, CALIFORNIA: 1981-1983.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walter, Stephen R.; Rojas, Vernonica; Kollmann, Auriel

    1984-01-01

    Over 700 earthquakes occurred in the vicinity of Lassen Peak, California, from February 1981 through December 1983. These earthquakes define a broad, northwest-trending seismic zone that extends from the Sierra Nevada through the Lassen Peak area and either terminates or is offset to the northeast about 20 kilometers northwest of Lassen Peak. Approximately 25% of these earthquakes are associated with the geothermal system south of Lassen Peak. Earthquakes in the geothermal area generally occur at depths shallower than 6 kilometers.

  1. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in quantum ring: effects of applied electric field and hydrostatic pressure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear intraband optical absorption coefficients in GaAs three-dimensional single quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and electric field, applied along the growth direction of the heterostructure, the energies of the ground and first excited states of a donor impurity have been found using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states are examined as functions of the dimensions of the structure, electric field, and hydrostatic pressure. We have also investigated the dependencies of the linear, nonlinear, and total optical absorption coefficients as a function of incident photon energy for several configurations of the system. It is found that the variation of distinct sizes of the structure leads to either a redshift and/or a blueshift of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. In addition, we have found that the application of an electric field leads to a redshift, whereas the influence of hydrostatic pressure leads to a blueshift (in the case of on-ring-center donor impurity position) of the resonant peaks of the intraband optical spectrum. PMID:23021497

  2. Infrared absorption spectra of molecular crystals: Possible evidence for small-polaron formation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pržulj, Željko; Čevizović, Dalibor; Zeković, Slobodan; Ivić, Zoran

    2008-09-01

    The temperature dependence of the position of the so-called anomalous band peaked at 1650cm in the IR-absorption spectrum of crystalline acetanilide (ACN) is theoretically investigated within the small-polaron theory. Its pronounced shift towards the position of the normal band is predicted with the rise of temperature. Interpretation of the IR-absorption spectra in terms of small-polaron model has been critically assessed on the basis of these results.

  3. 7 CFR 457.163 - Nursery peak inventory endorsement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nursery peak inventory endorsement. 457.163 Section... CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.163 Nursery peak inventory endorsement. Nursery Crop Insurance Peak Inventory Endorsement This endorsement is not continuous and must be...

  4. Peak water limits to freshwater withdrawal and use

    PubMed Central

    Gleick, Peter H.; Palaniappan, Meena

    2010-01-01

    Freshwater resources are fundamental for maintaining human health, agricultural production, economic activity as well as critical ecosystem functions. As populations and economies grow, new constraints on water resources are appearing, raising questions about limits to water availability. Such resource questions are not new. The specter of “peak oil”—a peaking and then decline in oil production—has long been predicted and debated. We present here a detailed assessment and definition of three concepts of “peak water”: peak renewable water, peak nonrenewable water, and peak ecological water. These concepts can help hydrologists, water managers, policy makers, and the public understand and manage different water systems more effectively and sustainably. Peak renewable water applies where flow constraints limit total water availability over time. Peak nonrenewable water is observable in groundwater systems where production rates substantially exceed natural recharge rates and where overpumping or contamination leads to a peak of production followed by a decline, similar to more traditional peak-oil curves. Peak “ecological” water is defined as the point beyond which the total costs of ecological disruptions and damages exceed the total value provided by human use of that water. Despite uncertainties in quantifying many of these costs and benefits in consistent ways, more and more watersheds appear to have already passed the point of peak water. Applying these concepts can help shift the way freshwater resources are managed toward more productive, equitable, efficient, and sustainable use. PMID:20498082

  5. Reward Value Effects on Timing in the Peak Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galtress, Tiffany; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effect of motivational variables on timing in the peak procedure. In Experiment 1, rats received a 60-s peak procedure that was coupled with long-term, between-phase changes in reinforcer magnitude. Increases in reinforcer magnitude produced a leftward shift in the peak that persisted for 20 sessions of training. In…

  6. Detection of the relationship between peak temperature and extreme precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Y.; Liu, J.; Zhiyong, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Under the background of climate change and human activities, the characteristics and pattern of precipitation have changed significantly in many regions. As the political and cultural center of China, the structure and character of precipitation in Jingjinji District has varied dramatically in recent years. In this paper, the daily precipitation data throughout the period 1960-2013 are selected for analyzing the spatial-temporal variability of precipitation. The results indicate that the frequency and intensity of precipitation presents an increasing trend. Based on the precipitation data, the maximum, minimum and mean precipitation in different temporal and spatial scales is calculated respectively. The temporal and spatial variation of temperature is obtained by using statistical methods. The relationship between temperature and precipitation in different range is analyzed. The curve relates daily precipitation extremes with local temperatures has a peak structure, increasing at the low-medium range of temperature variations but decreasing at high temperatures. The relationship between extreme precipitation is stronger in downtown than that in suburbs.

  7. East Peak Fire Burn Scar, Colorado [high res

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-12-08

    On June 22, 2013, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this false-color image of the East Peak fire burning in southern Colorado near Trinidad. Burned areas appear dark red, while actively burning areas look orange. Dark green areas are forests; light green areas are grasslands. Lightning ignited the blaze on June 19, 2013. By June 25, it had burned nearly 13,500 acres (5,500 hectares). NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Caption by Adam Voiland. Instrument: Landsat 8 - OLI More images from this event: 1.usa.gov/14DesQC Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  8. Relativistic jet feedback - II. Relationship to gigahertz peak spectrum and compact steep spectrum radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.

    2018-04-01

    We propose that Gigahertz Peak Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources are the signposts of relativistic jet feedback in evolving galaxies. Our simulations of relativistic jets interacting with a warm, inhomogeneous medium, utilizing cloud densities and velocity dispersions in the range derived from optical observations, show that free-free absorption can account for the ˜ GHz peak frequencies and low-frequency power laws inferred from the radio observations. These new computational models replace a power-law model for the free-free optical depth a more fundamental model involving disrupted log-normal distributions of warm gas. One feature of our new models is that at early stages, the low-frequency spectrum is steep but progressively flattens as a result of a broader distribution of optical depths, suggesting that the steep low-frequency spectra discovered by Callingham et al. may possibly be attributed to young sources. We also investigate the inverse correlation between peak frequency and size and find that the initial location on this correlation is determined by the average density of the warm ISM. The simulated sources track this correlation initially but eventually fall below it, indicating the need for a more extended ISM than presently modelled. GPS and CSS sources can potentially provide new insights into the phenomenon of AGN feedback since their peak frequencies and spectra are indicative of the density, turbulent structure, and distribution of gas in the host galaxy.

  9. Tunability of temperature-dependent absorption in a graphene-based hybrid nanostructure cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, Arezou; Namdar, Abdolrahman

    2018-04-01

    Enhanced absorption is obtained in a hybrid nanostructure composed of graphene and one-dimensional photonic crystal as a cavity in the visible wavelength range thanks to the localized electric field around the defect layers. The temperature-induced wavelength shift is revealed in the absorption spectra in which the peak wavelength is red-shifted by increasing the temperature. This temperature dependence comes from the thermal expansion and thermo-optical effects in the constituent layers of the structure. Moreover, the absorption peaks can be adjusted by varying the incident angle. The results show that absorption is sensitive to TE/TM polarization and its peak values for the TE mode are higher than the TM case. Also, the peak wavelength is blue-shifted by increasing the incident angle for both polarizations. Finally, the possibility of tuning the absorption using the electro-optical response of graphene sheets is discussed in detail. We believe our study may be beneficial for designing tunable graphene-based temperature-sensitive absorbers.

  10. Absorption spectrum of a two-level system subjected to a periodic pulse sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Fotso, H. F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    We investigate how the quantum control of a two-level system (TLS) coupled to photons can modify and tune the TLS’s photon absorption spectrum. Tuning and controlling the emission and the absorption is of much interest e.g. for the development of efficient interfaces between stationary and flying qubits in modern architectures for quantum computation and quantum communication. We consider the periodic pulse control, where the TLS is subjected to a periodic sequence of the near-resonant Rabi driving pulses, each pulse implementing a 180° rotation. For small inter-pulse delays, the absorption spectrum features a pronounced peak of stimulated emission at the pulsemore » frequency, as well as equidistant satellite peaks with smaller spectral weights. As long as the detuning between the carrier frequency of the driving and the TLS transition frequency remains moderate, this spectral shape shows little change. Therefore, the quantum control allows shifting the absorption peak to a desired position, and locks the absorption peak to the carrier frequency of the driving pulses. Detailed description of the spectrum, and its evolution as a function time, the inter-pulse spacing and the detuning, is presented.« less

  11. Absorption spectrum of a two-level system subjected to a periodic pulse sequence

    DOE PAGES

    Fotso, H. F.; Dobrovitski, V. V.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate how the quantum control of a two-level system (TLS) coupled to photons can modify and tune the TLS’s photon absorption spectrum. Tuning and controlling the emission and the absorption is of much interest e.g. for the development of efficient interfaces between stationary and flying qubits in modern architectures for quantum computation and quantum communication. We consider the periodic pulse control, where the TLS is subjected to a periodic sequence of the near-resonant Rabi driving pulses, each pulse implementing a 180° rotation. For small inter-pulse delays, the absorption spectrum features a pronounced peak of stimulated emission at the pulsemore » frequency, as well as equidistant satellite peaks with smaller spectral weights. As long as the detuning between the carrier frequency of the driving and the TLS transition frequency remains moderate, this spectral shape shows little change. Therefore, the quantum control allows shifting the absorption peak to a desired position, and locks the absorption peak to the carrier frequency of the driving pulses. Detailed description of the spectrum, and its evolution as a function time, the inter-pulse spacing and the detuning, is presented.« less

  12. [Using 2-DCOS to identify the molecular spectrum peaks for the isomer in the multi-component mixture gases Fourier transform infrared analysis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-Xin; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Jun-Hua

    2014-10-01

    The generalized two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared were used to identify hydrocarbon isomers in the mixed gases for absorption spectra resolution enhancement. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum of n-butane and iso-butane and the two-dimensional correlation infrared spectrum of concentration perturbation were used for analysis as an example. The all band and the main absorption peak wavelengths of Fourier transform infrared spectrum for single component gas showed that the spectra are similar, and if they were mixed together, absorption peaks overlap and peak is difficult to identify. The synchronous and asynchronous spectrum of two-dimensional correlation spectrum can clearly identify the iso-butane and normal butane and their respective characteristic absorption peak intensity. Iso-butane has strong absorption characteristics spectrum lines at 2,893, 2,954 and 2,893 cm(-1), and n-butane at 2,895 and 2,965 cm(-1). The analysis result in this paper preliminary verified that the two-dimensional infrared correlation spectroscopy can be used for resolution enhancement in Fourier transform infrared spectrum quantitative analysis.

  13. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  14. RADIOACTIVE IRON ABSORPTION BY GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Bale, W. F.; Ross, J. F.; Balfour, W. M.; Whipple, G. H.

    1943-01-01

    Iron absorption is a function of the gastro-intestinal mucosal epithelium. The normal non-anemic dog absorbs little iron but chronic anemia due to blood loss brings about considerable absorption—perhaps 5 to 15 times normal. In general the same differences are observed in man (1). Sudden change from normal to severe anemia within 24 hours does not significantly increase iron absorption. As the days pass new hemoglobin is formed. The body iron stores are depleted and within 7 days iron absorption is active, even when the red cell hematocrit is rising. Anoxemia of 50 per cent normal oxygen concentration for 48 hours does not significantly enhance iron absorption. In this respect it resembles acute anemia. Ordinary doses of iron given 1 to 6 hours before radio-iron will cause some "mucosa block"—that is an intake of radio-iron less than anticipated. Many variables which modify peristalsis come into this reaction. Iron given by vein some days before the dose of radio-iron does not appear to inhibit iron absorption. Plasma radio-iron absorption curves vary greatly. The curves may show sharp peaks in 1 to 2 hours when the iron is given in an empty stomach but after 6 hours when the radio-iron is given with food. Duration time of curves also varies widely, the plasma iron returning to normal in 6 to 12 hours. Gastric, duodenal, or jejunal pouches all show very active absorption of iron. The plasma concentration peak may reach a maximum before the solution of iron is removed from the gastric pouch—another example of "mucosa block." Absorption and distribution of radio-iron in the body of growing pups give very suggestive experimental data. The spleen, heart, upper gastro-intestinal tract, marrow, and pancreas show more radio-iron than was expected. The term "physiological saturation" with iron may be applied to the gastro-intestinal mucosal epithelium and explain one phase of acceptance or refusal of ingested iron. Desaturation is a matter of days not hours, whereas

  15. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Massive Central Peak and a Low Peak Ring in Gale Crater - Important Influences on the Formation of Mt. Sharp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.

    2015-01-01

    The Curiosity rover is exploring 155 km diameter Gale crater and Mt. Sharp, Gale's high central mound. This study addresses the central peak and proposed peak ring, and their influence on the overall morphology of the mountain.

  17. Gas compression in lungs decreases peak expiratory flow depending on resistance of peak flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, O F; Pedersen, T F; Miller, M R

    1997-11-01

    It has recently been shown (O. F. Pedersen T. R. Rasmussen, O. Omland, T. Sigsgaard, P. H. Quanjer. and M. R. Miller. Eur. Respir. J. 9: 828-833, 1996) that the added resistance of a mini-Wright peak flowmeter decreases peak expiratory flow (PEF) by approximately 8% compared with PEF measured by a pneumotachograph. To explore the reason for this, 10 healthy men (mean age 43 yr, range 33-58 yr) were examined in a body plethysmograph with facilities to measure mouth flow vs. expired volume as well as the change in thoracic gas volume (Vb) and alveolar pressure (PA). The subjects performed forced vital capacity maneuvers through orifices of different sizes and also a mini-Wright peak flowmeter. PEF with the meter and other added resistances were achieved when flow reached the perimeter of the flow-Vb curves. The mini-Wright PEF meter decreased PEF from 11.4 +/- 1.5 to 10.3 +/- 1.4 (SD) l/s (P < 0.001), PA increased from 6.7 +/- 1.9 to 9.3 +/- 2.7 kPa (P < 0.001), an increase equal to the pressure drop across the meter, and caused Vb at PEF to decrease by 0.24 +/- 0.09 liter (P < 0.001). We conclude that PEF obtained with an added resistance like a mini-Wright PEF meter is a wave-speed-determined maximal flow, but the added resistance causes gas compression because of increased PA at PEF. Therefore, Vb at PEF and, accordingly, PEF decrease.

  18. Point-Defect Nature of the Ultraviolet Absorption Band in AlN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alden, D.; Harris, J. S.; Bryan, Z.; Baker, J. N.; Reddy, P.; Mita, S.; Callsen, G.; Hoffmann, A.; Irving, D. L.; Collazo, R.; Sitar, Z.

    2018-05-01

    We present an approach where point defects and defect complexes are identified using power-dependent photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy, impurity data from SIMS, and density-functional-theory (DFT)-based calculations accounting for the total charge balance in the crystal. Employing the capabilities of such an experimental computational approach, in this work, the ultraviolet-C absorption band at 4.7 eV, as well as the 2.7- and 3.9-eV luminescence bands in AlN single crystals grown via physical vapor transport (PVT) are studied in detail. Photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy measurements demonstrate the relationship between the defect luminescent bands centered at 3.9 and 2.7 eV to the commonly observed absorption band centered at 4.7 eV. Accordingly, the thermodynamic transition energy for the absorption band at 4.7 eV and the luminescence band at 3.9 eV is estimated at 4.2 eV, in agreement with the thermodynamic transition energy for the CN- point defect. Finally, the 2.7-eV PL band is the result of a donor-acceptor pair transition between the VN and CN point defects since nitrogen vacancies are predicted to be present in the crystal in concentrations similar to carbon-employing charge-balance-constrained DFT calculations. Power-dependent photoluminescence measurements reveal the presence of the deep donor state with a thermodynamic transition energy of 5.0 eV, which we hypothesize to be nitrogen vacancies in agreement with predictions based on theory. The charge state, concentration, and type of impurities in the crystal are calculated considering a fixed amount of impurities and using a DFT-based defect solver, which considers their respective formation energies and the total charge balance in the crystal. The presented results show that nitrogen vacancies are the most likely candidate for the deep donor state involved in the donor-acceptor pair transition with peak emission at 2.7 eV for the conditions relevant to PVT growth.

  19. Memory Effect Manifested by a Boson Peak in Metallic Glass.

    PubMed

    Luo, P; Li, Y Z; Bai, H Y; Wen, P; Wang, W H

    2016-04-29

    We explore the correlation between a boson peak and structural relaxation in a typical metallic glass. Consistent with enthalpy recovery, a boson peak shows a memory effect in an aging-and-scan procedure. Single-step isothermal aging produces a monotonic decrease of enthalpy and boson peak intensity; for double-step isothermal aging, both enthalpy and boson peak intensity experience, coincidently, an incipient increase to a maximum and a subsequent decrease toward the equilibrium state. Our results indicate a direct link between slow structural relaxation and fast boson peak dynamics, which presents a profound understanding of the two dynamic behaviors in glass.

  20. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  1. Absorption spectra of localized surface plasmon resonance observed in an inline/picoliter spectrometer cell fabricated by a near ultraviolet femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Michiko; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2018-03-01

    Absorption spectra based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) were obtained with an inline/picoliter spectrometer cell. The spectrometer cell was fabricated into an optical glass fiber by focusing a near UV (NUV) femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 400 nm with an energy of 30 μJ. The laser beam was focused from two directions opposite to each other to fabricate a through-hole spectrometer cell. A diameter of the cell was approximately 3 μm, and the length was approximately 62.5 μm, which was nearly equal to the core diameter of the optical fiber. Liquid solution of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with a diameter of 5-10 nm was injected into the spectrometer cell with its volume of 0.4 pL. The absorption peak centered at 518 nm was observed. An increase of absorption associated with the increase of the number of nanoparticles was in agreement with the numerical calculation based on the Lambert-Beer law.

  2. Optical absorption, TL and IRSL of basic plagioclase megacrysts from the pinacate (Sonora, Mexico) quaternary alkalic volcanics.

    PubMed

    Chernov, V; Paz-Moreno, F; Piters, T M; Barboza-Flores, M

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents the first results of an investigation on optical absorption (OA), thermally and infrared stimulated luminescence (TL and IRSL) of the Pinacate plagioclase (labradorite). The OA spectra reveal two bands with maxima at 1.0 and 3.2 eV connected with absorption of the Fe3+ and Fe2+ and IR absorption at wavelengths longer than 2700 nm. The ultraviolet absorption varies exponentially with the photon energy following the 'vitreous' empirical Urbach rule indicating exponential distribution of localised states in the forbidden band. The natural TL is peaked at 700 K. Laboratory beta irradiation creates a very broad TL peak with maximum at 430 K. The change of the 430 K TL peak shape under the thermal cleaning procedure and dark storage after irradiation reveals a monotonous increasing of the activation energy that can be explained by the exponential distribution of traps. The IRSL response is weak and exhibits a typical decay behaviour.

  3. Study on peak shape fitting method in radon progeny measurement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinmin; Zhang, Lei; Abdumomin, Kadir; Tang, Yushi; Guo, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    Alpha spectrum measurement is one of the most important methods to measure radon progeny concentration in environment. However, the accuracy of this method is affected by the peak tailing due to the energy losses of alpha particles. This article presents a peak shape fitting method that can overcome the peak tailing problem in most situations. On a typical measured alpha spectrum curve, consecutive peaks overlap even their energies are not close to each other, and it is difficult to calculate the exact count of each peak. The peak shape fitting method uses combination of Gaussian and exponential functions, which can depict features of those peaks, to fit the measured curve. It can provide net counts of each peak explicitly, which was used in the Kerr method of calculation procedure for radon progeny concentration measurement. The results show that the fitting curve fits well with the measured curve, and the influence of the peak tailing is reduced. The method was further validated by the agreement between radon equilibrium equivalent concentration based on this method and the measured values of some commercial radon monitors, such as EQF3220 and WLx. In addition, this method improves the accuracy of individual radon progeny concentration measurement. Especially for the (218)Po peak, after eliminating the peak tailing influence, the calculated result of (218)Po concentration has been reduced by 21 %. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Optical absorption and photoluminescence study of nanocrystalline Zn0.92M0.08O (M: Li & Gd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punia, Khushboo; Lal, Ganesh; Kumar, Sudhish

    2018-05-01

    Nanocrystalline samples of Zn0.92Li0.08O and Zn0.92Gd0.08O have been synthesized using citrate sol-gel route without post synthesis annealing and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis-NIR and Photoluminescence spectroscopic measurements. Analysis of XRD pattern and PL spectra revealed single phase formation of the nanocrystalline Zn0.92Li0.08O and Zn0.92Gd0.08O in the wurtzite type hexagonal structure with intrinsic crystal and surface defects. UV-Vis-NIR optical absorption measurements show that the maximum photo absorption occurs below 600nm in the UV& visible band. The estimated values of band gap energy were found to be 2.53eV and 2.73eV for Zn0.92Li0.08O and Zn0.92Gd0.08O respectively. The photoluminescence spectra excited at the wavelength 325nm displays two broad peaks in the UV and visible bands centered at ˜416 nm & ˜602 nm for Zn0.92Gd0.08O and ˜406nm & ˜598nm for Zn0.92Li0.08O. Both Gd and Li doping in ZnO leads to considerable decrease in the optical band gap energy and red shifting of the UV emission band towards the visible band.

  5. Laser Absorption Measurements of Equivalence Ratios Studied Along With Their Coupling to Pressure Fluctuations in Lean Premixed Prevaporized (LPP) Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2001-01-01

    Concerns about damaging the Earth's ozone layer as a result of high levels of nitrogen oxides (known collectively as NOx) from high-altitude, high-speed aircraft have prompted the study of lean premixed prevaporized (LPP) combustion in aircraft engines. LPP combustion reduces NOx emissions principally by reducing the peak flame temperatures inside an engine. Recent advances in LPP technologies have realized exceptional reductions in pollutant emissions (single-digit ppm NOx for example). However, LPP combustion also presents major challenges: combustion instability and dynamic coupling effects between fluctuations in heat-release rate, dynamic pressure, and fuel pressure. These challenges are formidable and can literally shake an engine apart if uncontrolled. To better understand this phenomenon so that it can be controlled, we obtained real-time laser absorption measurements of the fuel vapor concentration (and equivalence ratio) simultaneously with the dynamic pressure, flame luminosity, and time-averaged gaseous emissions measurements in a research-type jet-A-fueled LPP combustor. The measurements were obtained in NASA Glenn Research Center's CE-5B optically accessible flame tube facility. The CE-5B facility provides inlet air temperatures and pressures similar to the actual operating conditions of real aircraft engines. The laser absorption measurements were performed using an infrared 3.39 micron HeNe laser in conjunction with a visible HeNe laser for liquid droplet scattering compensation.

  6. The formation of peak rings in large impact craters.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Joanna V; Gulick, Sean P S; Bralower, Timothy; Chenot, Elise; Christeson, Gail; Claeys, Philippe; Cockell, Charles; Collins, Gareth S; Coolen, Marco J L; Ferrière, Ludovic; Gebhardt, Catalina; Goto, Kazuhisa; Jones, Heather; Kring, David A; Le Ber, Erwan; Lofi, Johanna; Long, Xiao; Lowery, Christopher; Mellett, Claire; Ocampo-Torres, Rubén; Osinski, Gordon R; Perez-Cruz, Ligia; Pickersgill, Annemarie; Poelchau, Michael; Rae, Auriol; Rasmussen, Cornelia; Rebolledo-Vieyra, Mario; Riller, Ulrich; Sato, Honami; Schmitt, Douglas R; Smit, Jan; Tikoo, Sonia; Tomioka, Naotaka; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, Jaime; Whalen, Michael; Wittmann, Axel; Yamaguchi, Kosei E; Zylberman, William

    2016-11-18

    Large impacts provide a mechanism for resurfacing planets through mixing near-surface rocks with deeper material. Central peaks are formed from the dynamic uplift of rocks during crater formation. As crater size increases, central peaks transition to peak rings. Without samples, debate surrounds the mechanics of peak-ring formation and their depth of origin. Chicxulub is the only known impact structure on Earth with an unequivocal peak ring, but it is buried and only accessible through drilling. Expedition 364 sampled the Chicxulub peak ring, which we found was formed from uplifted, fractured, shocked, felsic basement rocks. The peak-ring rocks are cross-cut by dikes and shear zones and have an unusually low density and seismic velocity. Large impacts therefore generate vertical fluxes and increase porosity in planetary crust. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Gender-Specific Differences in Baseline, Peak, and Delta Serum Creatinine: The NACSELD Experience.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Jacqueline G; Wong, Florence; Reddy, K Rajender; Garcia-Tsao, Guadalupe; Kamath, Patrick S; Biggins, Scott W; Fallon, Michael B; Subramanian, Ram M; Maliakkal, B; Thacker, Leroy; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2017-03-01

    Women have lower serum creatinine values than men for similar renal function. We aimed to determine the differential effect of baseline, peak, and delta creatinine between genders on outcomes in infected hospitalized cirrhotic patients. North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease is a 15-center consortium of tertiary care hepatology centers prospectively enrolling infected cirrhotic inpatients. Baseline, peak, and delta creatinine during hospitalization were compared between genders, and their impact on overall survival, transplant-free survival, probability of transplantation, and need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) was analyzed. In total, 532 patients with cirrhosis (males = 59% median admission MELD = 20) had significantly lower median baseline (1.07 vs. 1.30 mg/dL, p < 0.0001) and peak creatinine (1.47 vs. 1.59 mg/dL, p = 0.024) in women than men during hospitalization for an infection, but both genders had similar delta creatinine levels (0.30 vs. 0.30 mg/dL, p = 0.957). Thirty-day mortality was similar between genders. RRT was not used more often in women (19 vs. 12%, p = 0.050), and women were 1.8 times more likely than men to receive RRT at the same creatinine (p = 0.028). Both peak and delta creatinine significantly predicted 6-month overall and transplant-free survival (p < 0.0001), but the probability of liver transplantation was affected by the interaction between gender and both peak and delta creatinine. Infected hospitalized cirrhotic women are significantly more likely than men to receive RRT at similar creatinine levels. Gender-specific differences in baseline, peak, and delta creatinine need further investigation to determine whether women need acute kidney injury treatment at lower creatinine thresholds than men.

  8. Automatic peak selection by a Benjamini-Hochberg-based algorithm.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ahmed; Kong, Xin-Bing; Liu, Zhi; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    A common issue in bioinformatics is that computational methods often generate a large number of predictions sorted according to certain confidence scores. A key problem is then determining how many predictions must be selected to include most of the true predictions while maintaining reasonably high precision. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based protein structure determination, for instance, computational peak picking methods are becoming more and more common, although expert-knowledge remains the method of choice to determine how many peaks among thousands of candidate peaks should be taken into consideration to capture the true peaks. Here, we propose a Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H)-based approach that automatically selects the number of peaks. We formulate the peak selection problem as a multiple testing problem. Given a candidate peak list sorted by either volumes or intensities, we first convert the peaks into [Formula: see text]-values and then apply the B-H-based algorithm to automatically select the number of peaks. The proposed approach is tested on the state-of-the-art peak picking methods, including WaVPeak [1] and PICKY [2]. Compared with the traditional fixed number-based approach, our approach returns significantly more true peaks. For instance, by combining WaVPeak or PICKY with the proposed method, the missing peak rates are on average reduced by 20% and 26%, respectively, in a benchmark set of 32 spectra extracted from eight proteins. The consensus of the B-H-selected peaks from both WaVPeak and PICKY achieves 88% recall and 83% precision, which significantly outperforms each individual method and the consensus method without using the B-H algorithm. The proposed method can be used as a standard procedure for any peak picking method and straightforwardly applied to some other prediction selection problems in bioinformatics. The source code, documentation and example data of the proposed method is available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/pages/software.aspx.

  9. Automatic Peak Selection by a Benjamini-Hochberg-Based Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Ahmed; Kong, Xin-Bing; Liu, Zhi; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2013-01-01

    A common issue in bioinformatics is that computational methods often generate a large number of predictions sorted according to certain confidence scores. A key problem is then determining how many predictions must be selected to include most of the true predictions while maintaining reasonably high precision. In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based protein structure determination, for instance, computational peak picking methods are becoming more and more common, although expert-knowledge remains the method of choice to determine how many peaks among thousands of candidate peaks should be taken into consideration to capture the true peaks. Here, we propose a Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H)-based approach that automatically selects the number of peaks. We formulate the peak selection problem as a multiple testing problem. Given a candidate peak list sorted by either volumes or intensities, we first convert the peaks into -values and then apply the B-H-based algorithm to automatically select the number of peaks. The proposed approach is tested on the state-of-the-art peak picking methods, including WaVPeak [1] and PICKY [2]. Compared with the traditional fixed number-based approach, our approach returns significantly more true peaks. For instance, by combining WaVPeak or PICKY with the proposed method, the missing peak rates are on average reduced by 20% and 26%, respectively, in a benchmark set of 32 spectra extracted from eight proteins. The consensus of the B-H-selected peaks from both WaVPeak and PICKY achieves 88% recall and 83% precision, which significantly outperforms each individual method and the consensus method without using the B-H algorithm. The proposed method can be used as a standard procedure for any peak picking method and straightforwardly applied to some other prediction selection problems in bioinformatics. The source code, documentation and example data of the proposed method is available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/pages/software.aspx. PMID

  10. Solar Absorptance of Cermet Coatings Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of solar Stirling convertors. In this application, the key role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. To achieve this objective, the cermet coating has a high solar absorptance value. Cermet coatings are manufactured utilizing sputter deposition, and many different metal and ceramic combinations can be created. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition, and hence, the optical properties of these coatings. The NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared and characterized a wide variety of cermet coatings utilizing different metals deposited in an aluminum oxide ceramic matrix. In addition, the atomic oxygen durability of these coatings has been evaluated.

  11. Separation of overlapping vibrational peaks in terahertz spectra using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiromichi; Ishii, Shinya; Otani, Chiko

    2014-07-01

    In this study, the terahertz (THz) absorption spectra of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) were measured during isothermal crystallization at 90-120 °C. The temporal changes in the absorption spectra were analyzed using two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2DCOS). In the asynchronous plot, cross peaks were observed around 2.4 THz, suggesting that two vibrational modes overlap in the raw spectrum. By comparing this to the peak at 2.9 THz corresponding to the stretching mode of the helical structure of PHB and the assignment obtained using polarization spectroscopy, we concluded that the high-frequency band could be attributed to the vibration of the helical structure and the low-frequency band to the vibration between the helical structures. The exact frequencies of the overlapping vibrational bands and their assignments provide a new means to inspect the thermal behavior of the intermolecular vibrational modes. The large red-shift of the interhelix vibrational mode suggests a large anharmonicity in the vibrational potential.

  12. Peak-discharge frequency and potential extreme peak discharge for natural streams in the Brazos River basin, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, Timothy H.

    1998-01-01

    The potential extreme peak-discharge curves as related to contributing drainage area were estimated for each of the three hydrologic regions from measured extreme peaks of record at 186 sites with streamflow-gaging stations and from measured extreme peaks at 37 sites without streamflow-gaging stations in and near the Brazos River Basin. The potential extreme peak-discharge curves generally are similar for hydrologic regions 1 and 2, and the curve for region 3 consistently is below the curves for regions 1 and 2, which indicates smaller peak discharges.

  13. Laser Irradiated Foam Targets: Absorption and Radiative Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvadori, Martina; Luigi Andreoli, Pier; Cipriani, Mattia; Consoli, Fabrizio; Cristofari, Giuseppe; De Angelis, Riccardo; di Giorgio, Giorgio; Giulietti, Danilo; Ingenito, Francesco; Gus'kov, Sergey Yu.; Rupasov, Alexander A.

    2018-01-01

    An experimental campaign to characterize the laser radiation absorption of foam targets and the subsequent emission of radiation from the produced plasma was carried out in the ABC facility of the ENEA Research Center in Frascati (Rome). Different targets have been used: plastic in solid or foam state and aluminum targets. The activated different diagnostics allowed to evaluate the plasma temperature, the density distribution, the fast particle spectrum and the yield of the X-Ray radiation emitted by the plasma for the different targets. These results confirm the foam homogenization action on laser-plasma interaction, mainly attributable to the volume absorption of the laser radiation propagating in such structured materials. These results were compared with simulation absorption models of the laser propagating into a foam target.

  14. Structural parameter effect of porous material on sound absorption performance of double-resonance material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Tian, Y.; Wang, Z. Q.; Nie, J. K.; Wang, G. K.; Liu, X. S.

    2017-06-01

    In view of the noise feature and service environment of urban power substations, this paper explores the idea of compound impedance, fills some porous sound-absorption material in the first resonance cavity of the double-resonance sound-absorption material, and designs a new-type of composite acoustic board. We conduct some acoustic characterizations according to the standard test of impedance tube, and research on the influence of assembly order, the thickness and area density of the filling material, and back cavity on material sound-absorption performance. The results show that the new-type of acoustic board consisting of aluminum fibrous material as inner structure, micro-porous board as outer structure, and polyester-filled space between them, has good sound-absorption performance for low frequency and full frequency noise. When the thickness, area density of filling material and thickness of back cavity increase, the sound absorption coefficient curve peak will move toward low frequency.

  15. Tunable multi-band absorption in metasurface of graphene ribbons based on composite structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Renxia; Jiao, Zheng; Bao, Jie

    2017-05-01

    A tunable multiband absorption based on a graphene metasurface of composite structure at mid-infrared frequency was investigated by the finite difference time domain method. The composite structure were composed of graphene ribbons and a gold-MgF2 layer which was sandwiched in between two dielectric slabs. The permittivity of graphene is discussed with different chemical potential to obtain tunable absorption. And the absorption of the composite structure can be tuned by the chemical potential of graphene at certain frequencies. The impedance matching was used to study the perfect absorption of the structure in our paper. The results show that multi-band absorption can be obtained and some absorption peaks of the composite structure can be tuned through the changing not only of the width of graphene ribbons and gaps, but also the dielectric and the chemical potential of graphene. However, another peak was hardly changed by parameters due to a different resonant mechanism in proposed structure. This flexibily tunable multiband absorption may be applied to optical communications such as optical absorbers, mid infrared stealth devices and filters.

  16. The effects of the electric and intense laser field on the binding energies of donor impurity states (1s and 2p±) and optical absorption between the related states in an asymmetric parabolic quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasapoglu, E.; Sakiroglu, S.; Sökmen, I.; Restrepo, R. L.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Duque, C. A.

    2016-10-01

    We have calculated the effects of electric and intense laser fields on the binding energies of the ground and some excited states of conduction electrons coupled to shallow donor impurities as well as the total optical absorption coefficient for transitions between 1s and 2p± electron-impurity states in a asymmetric parabolic GaAs/Ga1-x AlxAs quantum well. The binding energies were obtained using the effective-mass approximation within a variational scheme. Total absorption coefficient (linear and nonlinear absorption coefficient) for the transitions between any two impurity states were calculated from first- and third-order dielectric susceptibilities derived within a perturbation expansion for the density matrix formalism. Our results show that the effects of the electric field, intense laser field, and the impurity location on the binding energy of 1s-impurity state are more pronounced compared with other impurity states. If the well center is changed to be Lc<0 (Lc>0), the effective well width decreases (increases), and thus we can obtain the red or blue shift in the resonant peak position of the absorption coefficient by changing the intensities of the electric and non-resonant intense laser field as well as dimensions of the well and impurity positions.

  17. Architecture for Absorption Based Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Chugh, Devesh

    An absorption based heater is constructed on a fluid barrier heat exchanging plate such that it requires little space in a structure. The absorption based heater has a desorber, heat exchanger, and absorber sequentially placed on the fluid barrier heat exchanging plate. The vapor exchange faces of the desorber and the absorber are covered by a vapor permeable membrane that is permeable to a refrigerant vapor but impermeable to an absorbent. A process fluid flows on the side of the fluid barrier heat exchanging plate opposite the vapor exchange face through the absorber and subsequently through the heat exchanger. Themore » absorption based heater can include a second plate with a condenser situated parallel to the fluid barrier heat exchanging plate and opposing the desorber for condensation of the refrigerant for additional heating of the process fluid.« less

  18. Absorption of Orally Administered Hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mamoru; Maeshima, Takuya; Kubota, Takumi; Kurihara, Hitoshi; Masuda, Yasunobu; Nomura, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been utilized as a supplement. However, the absorption of orally administrated HA remains controversial. The degradation and absorption of HA in the intestine were investigated in this study. HA excretion into the feces, degradation in the intestinal tract, absorption through the large intestine, and translocation to the blood and skin were examined. HA administered orally was not detected in rat feces. HA was degraded by cecal content, but not by artificial gastric juice and intestinal juice. Oligosaccharide HA passed through excised large intestine sacs. Furthermore, disaccharides, tetrasaccharides, and polysaccharides HA were distributed to the skin of rats following oral administration of high molecular weight HA (300 kDa). The results of the study suggest that orally administered HA is degraded to oligosaccharides by intestinal bacteria, and oligosaccharide HA is absorbed in the large intestine and is subsequently distributed throughout the tissues, including the skin.

  19. Thermodynamic derivatives of infrared absorptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broersma, S.; Walls, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the concentration, pressure, and temperature dependence of the spectral absorptance of a vibrational absorption band. A smooth thermodynamic dependence was found for wavelength intervals where the average absorptance is less than 0.65. Individual rotational lines, whose parameters are often well known, were used as bases in the calculation of medium resolution spectra. Two modes of calculation were combined: well-separated rotational lines plus interaction terms, or strongly overlapping lines that were represented by a compound line of similar shape plus corrections. The 1.9- and 6.3-micron bands of H2O and the 4.3-micron band of CO2 were examined in detail and compared with experiment.

  20. Gold nanoparticles generated through "green route" bind Hg2+ with a concomitant blue shift in plasmon absorption peak.

    PubMed

    Radhakumary, C; Sreenivasan, K

    2011-07-21

    We discuss here a quick, simple, economic and ecofriendly method through a completely green route for the selective detection of Hg(2+) in aqueous samples. Here we exploited the ability of chitosan to generate gold nanoparticles and subsequently to act as a stabilizer for the formed nanoparticles. When chitosan stabilized gold nanoparticles (CH-Au NPs) are interacted with Hg(2+) a blue shift for its localized surface plasmon resonance absorbance (LSPR) band is observed. The blue shift is reasoned to be due to the formation of a thin layer of mercury over gold. A concentration as low as 0.01 ppm to a maximum of 100 ppm Hg(2+) can be detected based on this blue shift of the CH-Au NPs. While all other reported methods demand complex reaction steps and costly chemicals, the method we reported here is a simple, rapid and selective approach for the detection of Hg(2+). Our results also show that the CH-Au NPs have excellent selectivity to Hg(2+) over common cations namely, Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Ag(1+), Ce(4+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+).

  1. Thermal and Optical Characteristics of Defect Centers in Irradiated TLD-100 Dosimeters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi-Zamani, Hossein

    Sensitivity loss of a sensitized LiF:Mg,Ti,Al (TLD-100) dosimeter subject to repeated standard 673 K thermal treatments has been a major problem in radiation dosimetry. The cause for this loss in radiation response of the dosimeters has not been understood. If a used TLD is not annealed at an elevated temperature prior to reuse, there are residual deep electron trap centers still present in the dosimeter. These defect centers will interact with new incoming radiation and produce thermoluminescent trap centers. This will introduce a significant error in low dose measurements. In this research, first, thermal and optical characteristics of various defect centers produced in an irradiated TLD-100 single crystal were investigated and then an improved pre-irradiation isothermal/optical treatment process was introduced to bleach the TLD dosimeters prior to reuse and reduce the loss of sensitivity of sensitized dosimeter. Thermoluminescent materials were irradiated by gamma-rays from Co-60 source to produce sufficient concentration of various defect centers, then the crystals were heated or exposed to UV light at different temperature to change the concentration of various defect centers. The change in concentration of each trap center was determined by measuring the change in absorbance of light at a fixed photon energy as a function of temperature. The thermal activation energy and the frequency factor for each trap center were evaluated assuming a first order kinetic model over a specified temperature range. The value of activation energy and the frequency factor for Z_2 ^', Z_2, Z_3, and F trap centers in TLD-100 single crystals were found to be 1.49 +/- 0.04 eV, 4.76 times 10 ^{15} sec^{ -1}, 2.23 +/- 0.02 eV, 1.65 times 10^{23 } sec^{-1}; 3.01 +/- 0.02 eV, 2.90 times 10^{17} sec ^{-1}; and 2.81 +/- 0.08 eV, 5.43 times 10 ^{17} sec^{ -1}; respectively. After a correlation was made between the trap centers and TL glow peaks, kinetic parameters obtained from absorption

  2. QRS peak detection for heart rate monitoring on Android smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pambudi Utomo, Trio; Nuryani, Nuryani; Darmanto

    2017-11-01

    In this study, Android smartphone is used for heart rate monitoring and displaying electrocardiogram (ECG) graph. Heart rate determination is based on QRS peak detection. Two methods are studied to detect the QRS complex peak; they are Peak Threshold and Peak Filter. The acquisition of ECG data is utilized by AD8232 module from Analog Devices, three electrodes, and Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3. To record the ECG data from a patient, three electrodes are attached to particular body’s surface of a patient. Patient’s heart activity which is recorded by AD8232 module is decoded by Arduino UNO R3 into analog data. Then, the analog data is converted into a voltage value (mV) and is processed to get the QRS complex peak. Heart rate value is calculated by Microcontroller Arduino UNO R3 uses the QRS complex peak. Voltage, heart rate, and the QRS complex peak are sent to Android smartphone by Bluetooth HC-05. ECG data is displayed as the graph by Android smartphone. To evaluate the performance of QRS complex peak detection method, three parameters are used; they are positive predictive, accuracy and sensitivity. Positive predictive, accuracy, and sensitivity of Peak Threshold method is 92.39%, 70.30%, 74.62% and for Peak Filter method are 98.38%, 82.47%, 83.61%, respectively.

  3. Relationships between Electroencephalographic Spectral Peaks Across Frequency Bands

    PubMed Central

    van Albada, S. J.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-01-01

    The degree to which electroencephalographic spectral peaks are independent, and the relationships between their frequencies have been debated. A novel fitting method was used to determine peak parameters in the range 2–35 Hz from a large sample of eyes-closed spectra, and their interrelationships were investigated. Findings were compared with a mean-field model of thalamocortical activity, which predicts near-harmonic relationships between peaks. The subject set consisted of 1424 healthy subjects from the Brain Resource International Database. Peaks in the theta range occurred on average near half the alpha peak frequency, while peaks in the beta range tended to occur near twice and three times the alpha peak frequency on an individual-subject basis. Moreover, for the majority of subjects, alpha peak frequencies were significantly positively correlated with frequencies of peaks in the theta and low and high beta ranges. Such a harmonic progression agrees semiquantitatively with theoretical predictions from the mean-field model. These findings indicate a common or analogous source for different rhythms, and help to define appropriate individual frequency bands for peak identification. PMID:23483663

  4. Particle in cell simulation of peaking switch for breakdown evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Umbarkar, Sachin B.; Bindu, S.; Mangalvedekar, H.A.

    2014-07-01

    Marx generator connected to peaking capacitor and peaking switch can generate Ultra-Wideband (UWB) radiation. A new peaking switch is designed for converting the existing nanosecond Marx generator to a UWB source. The paper explains the particle in cell (PIC) simulation for this peaking switch, using MAGIC 3D software. This peaking switch electrode is made up of copper tungsten material and is fixed inside the hermitically sealed derlin material. The switch can withstand a gas pressure up to 13.5 kg/cm{sup 2}. The lower electrode of the switch is connected to the last stage of the Marx generator. Initially Marx generator (withoutmore » peaking stage) in air; gives the output pulse with peak amplitude of 113.75 kV and pulse rise time of 25 ns. Thus, we design a new peaking switch to improve the rise time of output pulse and to pressurize this peaking switch separately (i.e. Marx and peaking switch is at different pressure). The PIC simulation gives the particle charge density, current density, E counter plot, emitted electron current, and particle energy along the axis of gap between electrodes. The charge injection and electric field dependence on ionic dissociation phenomenon are briefly analyzed using this simulation. The model is simulated with different gases (N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and Air) under different pressure (2 kg/cm{sup 2}, 5 kg/cm{sup 2}, 10 kg/cm{sup 2}). (author)« less

  5. Impact effects of gamma irradiation on the optical and FT infrared absorption spectra of some Nd3+-doped soda lime phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzouk, M. A.; Elkashef, I. M.; Elbatal, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    The main aim of the present work is to study by two collective optical and FTIR spectral measurements some prepared Nd2O3-doped soda lime phosphate glasses before and after gamma irradiation with dose (9 Mrad). The spectral data reveal two strong UV absorption peaks which are correlated with unavoidable trace iron impurities beside extended additional characteristic bands due to Nd3+ ions. Gamma irradiation on the undoped glass produces slight decrease of the intensity of the UV absorption and the generation of an induced visible band and these effects are controlled with two photochemical reduction of some Fe3+ ions to Fe2+ ions together with the formation of nonbridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC) or phosphorous oxygen hole center (POHC). The impact effect of gamma irradiation on the spectra of Nd2O3-doped glasses is limited due to suggested shielding behavior of neodymium ions. FT-infrared spectra show vibrational modes due to main Q2-Q3 phosphate groups and the response of gamma irradiation of the IR spectra is low and the limited variations are related to suggested changes in some bond angles and bond lengths which cause the observed decrease to the intensities of some IR bands.

  6. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  7. Predicting rheological behavior and baking quality of wheat flour using a GlutoPeak test.

    PubMed

    Rakita, Slađana; Dokić, Ljubica; Dapčević Hadnađev, Tamara; Hadnađev, Miroslav; Torbica, Aleksandra

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this research was to gain an insight into the ability of the GlutoPeak instrument to predict flour functionality for bread making, as well as to determine which of the GlutoPeak parameters show the best potential in predicting dough rheological behavior and baking performance. Obtained results showed that GlutoPeak parameters correlated better with the indices of extensional rheological tests which consider constant dough hydration than with those which were performed at constant dough consistency. The GlutoPeak test showed that it is suitable for discriminating wheat varieties of good quality from those of poor quality, while the most discriminating index was maximum torque (MT). Moreover, MT value of 50 BU and aggregation energy value of 1,300 GPU were set as limits of wheat flour quality. The backward stepwise regression analysis revealed that a high-level prediction of indices which are highly affected by protein content (gluten content, flour water absorption, and dough tenacity) was achieved by using the GlutoPeak indices. Concerning bread quality, a moderate prediction of specific loaf volume and an intense level prediction of breadcrumb textural properties were accomplished by using the GlutoPeak parameters. The presented results indicated that the application of this quick test in wheat transformation chain for the assessment of baking quality would be useful. Baking test is considered as the most reliable method for assessing wheat-baking quality. However, baking test requires trained stuff, time, and large sample amount. These disadvantages have led to a growing demand to develop new rapid tests which would enable prediction of baked product quality with a limited flour size. Therefore, we tested the possibility of using a GlutoPeak tester to predict loaf volume and breadcrumb textural properties. Discrimination of wheat varieties according to quality with a restricted flour amount was also examined. Furthermore, we proposed the limit

  8. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  9. An Inexpensive Optical Absorption Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2006-09-01

    This optical absorption experiment can be put together in only a few minutes with materials found in most secondary or undergraduate stockrooms. The absorption material is the partly transparent flexible anti-static plastic material used to package solid-state devices. The detector is a hand-held photographic exposure meter of the type that was in common use before the advent of point-and-shoot cameras. A graph of the intensity of the transmitted light as a function of the number of sheets of the material is a decreasing exponential. The emphasis of the experiment is on the mathematical form.

  10. Narrow absorption lines with two observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Cao, Yue

    2015-07-01

    We assemble 3524 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with repeated observations to search for variations of the narrow C IV λ λ 1548,1551 and Mg II λ λ 2796,2803 absorption doublets in spectral regions shortward of 7000 Å in the observed frame, which corresponds to time-scales of about 150-2643 d in the quasar rest frame. In these quasar spectra, we detect 3580 C IV absorption systems with zabs = 1.5188-3.5212 and 1809 Mg II absorption systems with zabs = 0.3948-1.7167. In term of the absorber velocity (β) distribution in the quasar rest frame, we find a substantial number of C IV absorbers with β < 0.06, which might be connected to absorption of quasar outflows. The outflow absorption peaks at υ ≈ 2000 km s^{-1} and drops rapidly below this peak value. Among 3580 C IV absorption systems, 52 systems (˜1.5 per cent) show obvious variations in equivalent widths in the absorber rest frame (Wr): 16 enhanced, 16 emerged, 12 weakened and 8 disappeared systems, respectively. We find that changes in Wrλ1548 are related neither to the time-scales of the two SDSS observations nor to absorber velocities in the quasar rest frame. Variable absorption in low-ionization species is important to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbing gas. There are two variable Mg II absorption systems measured from SDSS spectra detected by Hacker et al. However, in our Mg II absorption sample, we find that neither shows variable absorption with confident levels of >4σ for λ2796 lines and >3σ for λ2803 lines.

  11. Peak firing rates of rat anterodorsal thalamic head direction cells are higher during faster passive rotations.

    PubMed

    Zugaro, Michaël B; Berthoz, Alain; Wiener, Sidney I

    2002-01-01

    Head direction cells discharge selectively when the head of the animal is oriented in a specific direction. The goal of this study was to determine how sensory signals arising from passive rotations (e.g., triggered by vestibular stimulation and dynamic visual inputs) influence the responses of anterodorsal thalamic head direction cells in the absence of voluntary movement cues (e.g., motor command, efference copy, and associated kinesthetic signals). Three unrestrained rats consumed water from a reservoir at the center of a circular platform while passively subjected to sinusoidal rotatory oscillations at fast (153 +/- 27 degrees/s, sd) and slow (38 +/- 15 degrees/s) peak velocities. In 14 anterodorsal thalamic head direction cells, the preferred directions, angular response ranges and baseline firing rates remained stable, but the peak firing rates were, on average, 36% higher during the fast rotations (Wilcoxon matched-pairs test, p < 0.001; variation range: +11% to approximately +100%). No cell changed its peak firing rate by less than 10%, while three cells (21%) increased their peak firing rates by more than 50%. The velocity-dependent increase in peak firing rates was similar for left and right rotations, and the skewness of the directional response curves were not significantly different between left and right turns (Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests, n = 14, ns). These results show that sensory signals concerning self-movements modulate the responses of the head direction cells in the absence of active locomotion.

  12. Simultaneous multielement atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnly, James M.; Miller-Ihli, Nancy J.; O'Haver, Thomas C.

    The extended analytical range capability of a simultaneous multielement atomic absorption continuum source spectrometer (SIMAAC) was tested for furnace atomization with respect to the signal measurement mode (peak height and area), the atomization mode (from the wall or from a platform), and the temperature program mode (stepped or ramped atomization). These parameters were evaluated with respect to the shapes of the analytical curves, the detection limits, carry-over contamination and accuracy. Peak area measurements gave more linear calibration curves. Methods for slowing the atomization step heating rate, the use of a ramped temperature program or a platform, produced similar calibration curves and longer linear ranges than atomization with a stepped temperature program. Peak height detection limits were best using stepped atomization from the wall. Peak area detection limits for all atomization modes were similar. Carry-over contamination was worse for peak area than peak height, worse for ramped atomization than stepped atomization, and worse for atomization from a platform than from the wall. Accurate determinations (100 ± 12% for Ca, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in National Bureau of Standards' Standard Reference Materials Bovine Liver 1577 and Rice Flour 1568 were obtained using peak area measurements with ramped atomization from the wall and stepped atomization from a platform. Only stepped atomization from a platform gave accurate recoveries for K. Accurate recoveries, 100 ± 10%, with precisions ranging from 1 to 36 % (standard deviation), were obtained for the determination of Al, Co, Cr, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni. Pb, V and Zn in Acidified Waters (NBS SRM 1643 and 1643a) using stepped atomization from a platform.

  13. REMOVING COOL CORES AND CENTRAL METALLICITY PEAKS IN GALAXY CLUSTERS WITH POWERFUL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS OUTBURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G., E-mail: fulai@ucolick.or

    2010-07-10

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy {approx}10{sup 61}-10{sup 62} erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we showmore » that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.« less

  14. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  15. Center for Adaptive Optics | Center

    Science.gov Websites

    Astronomy, UCSC's CfAO and ISEE, and Maui Community College, runs education and internship programs in postdocs. E-mail: cfao@ucolick.org Institutions: University of California, Berkeley Astronomy Department Retinal Imaging Laboratory Eye Center University of California, Irvine Department of Physics and Astronomy

  16. Metal powder absorptivity: Modeling and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Boley, C. D.; Mitchell, S. C.; Rubenchik, A. M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Here, we present results of numerical modeling and direct calorimetric measurements of the powder absorptivity for a number of metals. The modeling results generally correlate well with experiment. We show that the powder absorptivity is determined, to a great extent, by the absorptivity of a flat surface at normal incidence. Our results allow the prediction of the powder absorptivity from normal flat-surface absorptivity measurements.

  17. Metal powder absorptivity: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C. D.; Mitchell, S. C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    Here, we present results of numerical modeling and direct calorimetric measurements of the powder absorptivity for a number of metals. The modeling results generally correlate well with experiment. We show that the powder absorptivity is determined, to a great extent, by the absorptivity of a flat surface at normal incidence. Our results allow the prediction of the powder absorptivity from normal flat-surface absorptivity measurements.

  18. Peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Christina; Lyke, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Maslow (1970) defined peak experiences as the most wonderful experiences of a person's life, which may include a sense of awe, well-being, or transcendence. Furthermore, recent research has suggested that psilocybin can produce experiences subjectively rated as uniquely meaningful and significant (Griffiths et al. 2006). It is therefore possible that psilocybin may facilitate or change the nature of peak experiences in users compared to non-users. This study was designed to compare the peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users, to evaluate the frequency of peak experiences while under the influence of psilocybin, and to assess the perceived degree of alteration of consciousness during these experiences. Participants were recruited through convenience and snowball sampling from undergraduate classes and at a musical event. Participants were divided into three groups, those who reported a peak experience while under the influence of psilocybin (psilocybin peak experience: PPE), participants who had used psilocybin but reported their peak experiences did not occur while they were under the influence of psilocybin (non-psilocybin peak experience: NPPE), and participants who had never used psilocybin (non-user: NU). A total of 101 participants were asked to think about their peak experiences and complete a measure evaluating the degree of alteration of consciousness during that experience. Results indicated that 47% of psilocybin users reported their peak experience occurred while using psilocybin. In addition, there were significant differences among the three groups on all dimensions of alteration of consciousness. Future research is necessary to identify factors that influence the peak experiences of psilocybin users in naturalistic settings and contribute to the different characteristics of peak experiences of psilocybin users and non-users.

  19. Snow Peak, OR: Miocene and Pliocene Tholeiitic Volcanism in the Cascadia Forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, A. K.; Kent, A. J.; Nielsen, R. L.; Rowe, M. C.; Duncan, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Snow Peak is a voluminous (>150 km3), glacially dissected shield volcano located approximately 50 km southeast of Salem, OR, with a summit height of 1,310 m above sea level. Snow Peak lies approximately 60 km west of the current High Cascade arc axis. Lavas from the southeast face of Snow Peak have been previously dated using K-Ar at ~3 Ma. New Ar-Ar dating indicates that lavas from the northwest face are ~5.4 Ma, and the summit plug is ~6 Ma. Snow Peak volcanics unconformably overlie western Cascade volcanics aged from middle to late Miocene (~10- 17 Ma). The age of Snow Peak is broadly contemporaneous with the initiation of modern High Cascade volcanism. Snow Peak's location provides a rare opportunity to study magmas produced within the modern High Cascades forearc region. The goal of this investigation is to characterize the composition and timing of volcanism at Snow Peak and the role of volatiles in magma genesis. Hypotheses for the formation of Snow Peak include flux melting associated with the Cascadia subduction zone and/or decompression melting associated with extensional faulting. Preliminary geochemical data on the basalts from Snow Peak indicate that they are low-to-medium-K tholeiites (SiO2 47.9-51.7 wt.%, MgO 5.5- 8.3 wt.%, K2O, 0.36-0.55 wt.%) and that they range from primitive to moderately evolved (Mg# 0.51-0.61). Common phenocryst phases are plagioclase, olivine, and clinopyroxene. Textures are typically hypocrystalline, and fine-grained to porphyritic. Mantle-normalized multi-element plots indicate Snow Peak lavas are generally HFSE depleted and LILE enriched. These data are consistent with a preliminary interpretation of a subduction zone signature, yet the major element composition most closely resembles high alumina olivine tholeiite (HAOT), more indicative of extensional environments. The degree of LILE enrichment is significantly lower than in calc alkaline lavas from the High Cascades and western Cascades. Determining the petrogenesis of

  20. Controlling coulomb interactions in infrared stereometamaterials for unity light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudachathi, Renilkumar; Moritake, Yuto; Tanaka, Takuo

    2018-05-01

    We investigate the influence of near field interactions between the constituent 3D split ring resonators on the absorbance and resonance frequency of a stereo metamaterial based perfect light absorber. The experimental and theoretical analyses reveal that the magnetic resonance red shifts and broadens for both the decreasing vertical and lateral separations of the constituents within the metamaterial lattice, analogous to plasmon hybridization. The strong interparticle interactions for higher density reduce the effective cross-section per resonator, which results in weak light absorption observed in both experimental and theoretical analyses. The red shift of the magnetic resonance with increasing lattice density is an indication of the dominating electric dipole interactions and we analyzed the metamaterial system in an electrostatic point of view to explain the observed resonance shift and decreasing absorption peak. From these analyses, we found that the fill factor introduces two competing factors determining the absorption efficiency such as coulomb interactions between the constituent resonators and their number density in a given array structure. We predicted unity light absorption for a fill factor of 0.17 balancing these two opposing factors and demonstrate an experimental absorbance of 99.5% at resonance with our 3D device realized using residual stress induced bending of 2D patterns.

  1. Sub-band-gap absorption in Ga2O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peelaers, Hartwin; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2017-10-01

    β-Ga2O3 is a transparent conducting oxide that, due to its large bandgap of 4.8 eV, exhibits transparency into the UV. However, the free carriers that enable the conductivity can absorb light. We study the effect of free carriers on the properties of Ga2O3 using hybrid density functional theory. The presence of free carriers leads to sub-band-gap absorption and a Burstein-Moss shift in the onset of absorption. We find that for a concentration of 1020 carriers, the Fermi level is located 0.23 eV above the conduction-band minimum. This leads to an increase in the electron effective mass from 0.27-0.28 me to 0.35-0.37 me and a sub-band-gap absorption band with a peak value of 0.6 × 103 cm-1 at 3.37 eV for light polarized along the x or z direction. Both across-the-gap and free-carrier absorption depend strongly on the polarization of the incoming light. We also provide parametrizations of the conduction-band shape and the effective mass as a function of the Fermi level.

  2. A novel multiplex absorption spectrometer for time-resolved studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Thomas; Heard, Dwayne E.; Blitz, Mark A.

    2018-02-01

    A Time-Resolved Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Absorption Spectrometer (TRUVAS) has been developed that can simultaneously monitor absorption at all wavelengths between 200 and 800 nm with millisecond time resolution. A pulsed photolysis laser (KrF 248 nm) is used to initiate chemical reactions that create the target species. The absorption signals from these species evolve as the composition of the gas in the photolysis region changes over time. The instrument can operate at pressures over the range ˜10-800 Torr and can measure time-resolved absorbances <10-4 in the UV (300 nm) and even lower in the visible (580 nm) 2.3 × 10-5, with the peak of sensitivity at ˜500 nm. The novelty of this setup lies in the arrangement of the multipass optics. Although appearing similar to other multipass optical systems (in particular the Herriott cell), there are fundamental differences, most notably the ability to adjust each mirror to maximise the overlap between the probe beam and the photolysis laser. Another feature which aids the sensitivity and versatility of the system is the use of 2 high-throughput spectrographs coupled with sensitive line-array CCDs, which can measure absorbance from ˜200 to 800 nm simultaneously. The capability of the instrument is demonstrated via measurements of the absorption spectrum of the peroxy radical, HOCH2CH2O2, and its self-reaction kinetics.

  3. The Mysterious 6565 Å Absorption Feature of the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Shiv K.; Shchekinov, Yuri; Nath, Biman B.

    2017-12-01

    We consider various possible scenarios to explain the recent observation of what has been called a broad Hα absorption in our Galactic halo, with peak optical depth τ ≃ 0.01 and equivalent width W≃ 0.17 \\mathringA . We show that the absorbed feature cannot arise from the circumgalactic and ISM Hα absorption. As the observed absorption feature is quite broad ({{Δ }}λ ≃ 30 \\mathringA ), we also consider CNO lines that lie close to Hα as possible alternatives to explain the feature. We show that such lines could also not account for the observed feature. Instead, we suggest that it could arise from diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) carriers or polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) absorption. While we identify several such lines close to the Hα transition, we are unable to determine the molecule responsible for the observed feature, partly because of selection effects that prevent us from identifying DIBs/PAHs features close to Hα using local observations. Deep integration of a few extragalactic sources with high spectral resolution might allow us to distinguish between different possible explanations.

  4. Oxygen detection using the laser diode absorption technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Fox, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    Accurate measurement of the concentration and flow rate of gaseous oxygen is becoming of greater importance. The detection technique presented is based on the principal of light absorption by the Oxygen A-Band. Oxygen molecules have characteristics which attenuate radiation in the 759-770 nm wavelength range. With an ability to measure changes in the relative light transmission to less than 0.01 percent, a sensitive optical gas detection system was configured. This system is smaller in size and light in weight, has low energy requirements and has a rapid response time. In this research program, the application of temperature tuning laser diodes and their ability to be wavelength shifted to a selected absorption spectral peak has allowed concentrations as low as 1300 ppm to be detected.

  5. Soft x-ray absorption spectra of ilmenite family.

    PubMed

    Agui, A; Mizumaki, M; Saitoh, Y; Matsushita, T; Nakatani, T; Fukaya, A; Torikai, E

    2001-03-01

    We have carried out soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy to study the electronic structure of ilmenite family, such as MnTiO3, FeTiO3, and CoTiO3 at the soft x-ray beamline, BL23SU, at the SPring-8. The Ti and M L2,3 absorption spectra of MTiO3 (M=Mn, Fe, and Co) show spectra of Ti4+ and M2+ electron configurations, respectively. Except the Fe L2,3 spectrum, those spectra were understood within the O(h) symmetry around the transition metal ions. The Fe L3-edge spectrum clearly shows a doublet peak at the L3 edge, which is attributed to Fe2+ state, moreover the very high-resolution the L-edge spectra of transition metals show fine structures. The spectra of those ilmenites are compared.

  6. Terahertz absorption in graphite nanoplatelets/polylactic acid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychanok, D.; Angelova, P.; Paddubskaya, A.; Meisak, D.; Shashkova, L.; Demidenko, M.; Plyushch, A.; Ivanov, E.; Krastev, R.; Kotsilkova, R.; Ogrin, F. Y.; Kuzhir, P.

    2018-04-01

    The electromagnetic properties of composite materials based on poly(lactic) acid (PLA) filled with graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were investigated in the microwave (26–37 GHz) and terahertz (0.2–1 THz) frequency ranges. The maximum of the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity was observed close to 0.6 THz for composites with 1.5 and 3 wt.% of GNP. The experimental data of complex dielectric permittivity of GNP/PLA composites was modelled using the Maxwell-Garnett theory. The effects of fine dispersion, agglomeration, and percolation in GNP-based composites on its electromagnetic constitutive parameters, presence, and position of THz absorption peak are discussed on the basis of the modeling results and experimental data. The unique combination of conductive and geometrical parameters of GNP embedded into the PLA matrix below the percolation threshold allow us to obtain the THz-absorptive material, which may be effectively used as a 3D-printing filament.

  7. 15. INTERIOR, DETAIL OF SKYLIGHT AT ROOF PEAK, ORIGINAL BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. INTERIOR, DETAIL OF SKYLIGHT AT ROOF PEAK, ORIGINAL BUILDING - Newport News & Old Point Railway & Electric Company, Trolley Barn & Administration Building, 3400 Victoria Boulevard, Hampton, Hampton, VA

  8. Bayesian approach for peak detection in two-dimensional chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vivó-Truyols, Gabriel

    2012-03-20

    A new method for peak detection in two-dimensional chromatography is presented. In a first step, the method starts with a conventional one-dimensional peak detection algorithm to detect modulated peaks. In a second step, a sophisticated algorithm is constructed to decide which of the individual one-dimensional peaks have been originated from the same compound and should then be arranged in a two-dimensional peak. The merging algorithm is based on Bayesian inference. The user sets prior information about certain parameters (e.g., second-dimension retention time variability, first-dimension band broadening, chromatographic noise). On the basis of these priors, the algorithm calculates the probability of myriads of peak arrangements (i.e., ways of merging one-dimensional peaks), finding which of them holds the highest value. Uncertainty in each parameter can be accounted by adapting conveniently its probability distribution function, which in turn may change the final decision of the most probable peak arrangement. It has been demonstrated that the Bayesian approach presented in this paper follows the chromatographers' intuition. The algorithm has been applied and tested with LC × LC and GC × GC data and takes around 1 min to process chromatograms with several thousands of peaks.

  9. Automatic poisson peak harvesting for high throughput protein identification.

    PubMed

    Breen, E J; Hopwood, F G; Williams, K L; Wilkins, M R

    2000-06-01

    High throughput identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting requires an efficient means of picking peaks from mass spectra. Here, we report the development of a peak harvester to automatically pick monoisotopic peaks from spectra generated on matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometers. The peak harvester uses advanced mathematical morphology and watershed algorithms to first process spectra to stick representations. Subsequently, Poisson modelling is applied to determine which peak in an isotopically resolved group represents the monoisotopic mass of a peptide. We illustrate the features of the peak harvester with mass spectra of standard peptides, digests of gel-separated bovine serum albumin, and with Escherictia coli proteins prepared by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all cases, the peak harvester proved effective in its ability to pick similar monoisotopic peaks as an experienced human operator, and also proved effective in the identification of monoisotopic masses in cases where isotopic distributions of peptides were overlapping. The peak harvester can be operated in an interactive mode, or can be completely automated and linked through to peptide mass fingerprinting protein identification tools to achieve high throughput automated protein identification.

  10. Individual vision and peak distribution in collective actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng

    2017-06-01

    People make decisions on whether they should participate as participants or not as free riders in collective actions with heterogeneous visions. Besides of the utility heterogeneity and cost heterogeneity, this work includes and investigates the effect of vision heterogeneity by constructing a decision model, i.e. the revised peak model of participants. In this model, potential participants make decisions under the joint influence of utility, cost, and vision heterogeneities. The outcomes of simulations indicate that vision heterogeneity reduces the values of peaks, and the relative variance of peaks is stable. Under normal distributions of vision heterogeneity and other factors, the peaks of participants are normally distributed as well. Therefore, it is necessary to predict distribution traits of peaks based on distribution traits of related factors such as vision heterogeneity and so on. We predict the distribution of peaks with parameters of both mean and standard deviation, which provides the confident intervals and robust predictions of peaks. Besides, we validate the peak model of via the Yuyuan Incident, a real case in China (2014), and the model works well in explaining the dynamics and predicting the peak of real case.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide vapor cross sections: A flow cell study using laser absorption in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, B. L.; Ronney, P. D.; DeSain, J. D.

    2018-01-01

    The absorption spectra of vapors of concentrated hydrogen peroxide/water mixtures (without a carrier gas) were characterized at wavelengths from 1390 to 1470 nm utilizing a near-infrared diode laser. Low pressures were employed to examine these spectral features near the Doppler-broadened limit. An advantageous portion of the spectra near 1420 nm containing several distinct H2O2 peaks and one well-known H2O peak (for calibration) was identified and the cross-sections of these peaks determined. These cross section values can be employed to measure vapor-phase concentrations of H2O2 in propulsion, atmospheric chemistry, and sterilization applications.

  12. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I.more » Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has

  13. Aerosol Absorption and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Philip; Seinfeld, J. H.; Kinne, Stefan; Boucher, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006) significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the shortwave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing clear-sky from -0.79 to -0.53 W m(sup -2) (33%) and all-sky from -0.47 to -0.13W m(sup -2 (72%). Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19W m(sup -2) (36%) clear-sky and of 0.12W m(sup -2) (92%) all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05W m(sup -2) and a positive TOA forcing perturbation of 0

  14. Collisional Processing of Comet and Asteroid Surfaces: Velocity Effects on Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Jensen, E. A.; Wooden, D. H.; Lindsay, S. S.; Smith, D. C.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Cintala, M. J.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2012-01-01

    A new paradigm has emerged where 3.9 Gyr ago, a violent reshuffling reshaped the placement of small bodies in the solar system (the Nice model). Surface properties of these objects may have been affected by collisions caused by this event, and by collisions with other small bodies since their emplacement. These impacts affect the spectrographic observations of these bodies today. Shock effects (e.g., planar dislocations) manifest in minerals allowing astronomers to better understand geophysical impact processing that has occurred on small bodies. At the Experimental Impact Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center, we have impacted forsterite and enstatite across a range of velocities. We find that the amount of spectral variation, absorption wavelength, and full width half maximum of the absorbance peaks vary non-linearly with the velocity of the impact. We also find that the spectral variation increases with decreasing crystal size (single solid rock versus granular). Future analyses include quantification of the spectral changes with different impactor densities, temperature, and additional impact velocities. Results on diopside, fayalite, and magnesite can be found in Lederer et al., this meeting.

  15. Dependence of the absorption and optical surface plasmon scattering of MoS₂ nanoparticles on aspect ratio, size, and media.

    PubMed

    Yadgarov, Lena; Choi, Charina L; Sedova, Anastasiya; Cohen, Ayala; Rosentsveig, Rita; Bar-Elli, Omri; Oron, Dan; Dai, Hongjie; Tenne, Reshef

    2014-04-22

    The optical and electronic properties of suspensions of inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles of MoS2 are studied through light absorption and zeta-potential measurements and compared to those of the corresponding microscopic platelets. The total extinction measurements show that, in addition to excitonic peaks and the indirect band gap transition, a new peak is observed at 700-800 nm. This spectral peak has not been reported previously for MoS2. Comparison of the total extinction and decoupled absorption spectrum indicates that this peak largely originates from scattering. Furthermore, the dependence of this peak on nanoparticle size, shape, and surface charge, as well as solvent refractive index, suggests that this transition arises from a plasmon resonance.

  16. Prebiotics and the absorption of minerals: a review of experimental and human data

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Dietary factors, including calcium and vitamin D intake, absorption, and status, lifestyle factors including physical activity, and genetics interact to determine peak bone mass. The current recommended dietary intake of calcium (adequate intake, AI) of 1300 mg/day in the United States for adolescen...

  17. X-Ray Absorption near Edge Structure Spectroscopy of Nanodiamonds from the Allende Meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Hill, H.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.

    2000-01-01

    Carbon X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy shows Allende DM nanodiamonds have two pre-edge peaks, consistent with other small diamonds, but fail to show a diamond exciton which is seen in 3.6 nm diamond thin films.

  18. IUE detector saturation and the new 2800 A absorption feature 'discovered' by Karim, Hoyle, and Wickramasinghe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. D.; Sitko, M. L.

    1984-03-01

    The 2800 A feature of Karim et al. (1983) is shown to be the result of IUE detector saturation effects in overexposed spectra. A properly exposed spectrum and an overexposed one are shown. The latter shows a broad absorption peak at 2800 A while the former does not.

  19. Research on filling process of fuel and oxidant during detonation based on absorption spectrum technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Xiao-Jing; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-Sheng

    2014-12-01

    Research on detonation process is of great significance for the control optimization of pulse detonation engine. Based on absorption spectrum technology, the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant during detonation is researched. As one of the most important products, H2O is selected as the target of detonation diagnosis. Fiber distributed detonation test system is designed to enable the detonation diagnosis under adverse conditions in detonation process. The test system is verified to be reliable. Laser signals at different working frequency (5Hz, 10Hz and 20Hz) are detected. Change of relative laser intensity in one detonation circle is analyzed. The duration of filling process is inferred from the change of laser intensity, which is about 100~110ms. The peak of absorption spectrum is used to present the concentration of H2O during the filling process of fresh fuel and oxidant. Absorption spectrum is calculated, and the change of absorption peak is analyzed. Duration of filling process calculated with absorption peak consisted with the result inferred from the change of relative laser intensity. The pulse detonation engine worked normally and obtained the maximum thrust at 10Hz under experiment conditions. The results are verified through H2O gas concentration monitoring during detonation.

  20. Color-Center Production and Formation in Electron-Irradiated Magnesium Aluminate Spinel and Ceria

    DOE PAGES

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Lelong, Gerald; Guillaumet, Maxime; ...

    2016-06-20

    Single crystals of magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) with (100) or (110) orientations and cerium dioxide or ceria (CeO2) were irradiated by 1.0-MeV and 2.5-MeV electrons in a high fluence range. Point-defect production was studied by off-line UV-visible optical spectroscopy after irradiation. For spinel, regardless of both crystal orientation and electron energy, two characteristic broad bands centered at photon energies of 5.4 eV and 4.9 eV were assigned to F and F+ centers (neutral and singly-ionized oxygen vacancies), respectively, on the basis of available literature data. No clear differences in colour-centre formation were observed for the two crystal orientations. Using calculationsmore » of displacement cross sections by elastic collisions, these results are consistent with a very large threshold displacement energy (200 eV) for oxygen atoms at RT. A third very broad band centered at 3.7 eV might be attributed either to an oxygen hole center (V-type center) or an F2 dimer center (oxygen di-vacancy). The onset of recovery of these color centers took place at 200°C with almost full bleaching at 600°C. Activation energies (~0.3-0.4 eV) for defect recovery were deduced from the isochronal annealing data by using a first-order kinetics analysis. For ceria, a sub band-gap absorption feature peaked at ~3.1 eV was recorded for 2.5-MeV electron irradiation only. Assuming a ballistic process, we suggest that the latter defect might result from cerium atom displacement on the basis of computed cross sections.« less

  1. Optical absorption of zigzag single walled boron nitride nanotubes in axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chegel, Raad; Behzad, Somayeh

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the effect of axial magnetic field on the band structure, dipole matrix elements and absorption spectrum in different energy ranges, using tight binding approximation. It is found that magnetic field breaks the degeneracy in the band structure and creates new allowed transitions in the dipole matrix which leads to creation of new peaks in the absorption spectrum. It is found that, unlike to CNTs which show metallic-semiconductor transition, the BNNTs remain semiconductor in any magnetic field strength. By calculation the diameter dependence of peak positions, we found that the positions of three first peaks in the lower energy region (E <5.3 eV) are proportional to n-2. In the middle energy region (7 < E < 7.5 eV) all (n, 0) zigzag BNNTs, with even and odd nanotube index, have two distinct peaks in the absence of magnetic field which these peaks may be used to identify zigzag BNNTs from other tube chiralities. For odd (even) tubes, in the middle energy region, applying the magnetic field leads to splitting of these two peaks into three (five) distinct peaks.

  2. Absorption and subjective effects of caffeine from coffee, cola and capsules.

    PubMed

    Liguori, A; Hughes, J R; Grass, J A

    1997-11-01

    Coffee is often perceived as producing greater pharmacological effects than cola. The present study compared the magnitude and rapidity of peak caffeine levels and subjective effects between coffee and cola. Thirteen users of both coffee and cola (mean daily caffeine consumption = 456 mg) ingested 400 mg caffeine via 12 oz unsweetened coffee, 24 oz sugar-free cola or 2 capsules in a random, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design. Subjects provided a saliva sample and completed subjective effect scales 15 min before and 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min after ingestion. Mean peak saliva caffeine levels did not differ between coffee (9.7 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml) and cola (9.8 +/- 0.9 micrograms/ml) and appeared to be greater with these beverages than with the capsule (7.8 +/- 0.6 micrograms/ml; p = NS). Saliva caffeine levels peaked at similar times for coffee (42 +/- 5 min) and cola (39 +/- 5 min) but later for capsule (67 +/- 7 min; p = 0.004). There was no main effect of vehicle or interaction of vehicle and drug on magnitude of peak effect or time to peak increase on self-report scales. In summary, peak caffeine absorption, time to peak absorption, and subjective effects do not appear to be influenced by cola vs. coffee vehicle. Perceived differences in the effects of coffee vs. cola may be due to differences in dose, time of day, added sweetener, environmental setting or contingencies.

  3. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  4. Peak flowmeter resistance decreases peak expiratory flow in subjects with COPD.

    PubMed

    Miller, M R; Pedersen, O F

    2000-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the added resistance of a mini-Wright peak expiratory flow (PEF) meter reduced PEF by approximately 8% in normal subjects because of gas compression reducing thoracic gas volume at PEF and thus driving elastic recoil pressure. We undertook a body plethysmographic study in 15 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), age 65.9 +/- 6.3 yr (mean +/- SD, range 53-75 yr), to examine whether their recorded PEF was also limited by the added resistance of a PEF meter. The PEF meter increased alveolar pressure at PEF (Ppeak) from 3.7 +/- 1.4 to 4.7 +/- 1.5 kPa (P = 0.01), and PEF was reduced from 3.6 +/- 1.3 l/s to 3.2 +/- 0.9 l/s (P = 0.01). The influence of flow limitation on PEF and Ppeak was evaluated by a simple four-parameter model based on the wave-speed concept. We conclude that added external resistance in patients with COPD reduced PEF by the same mechanisms as in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the much lower Ppeak in COPD patients is a consequence of more severe flow limitation than in healthy subjects and not of deficient muscle strength.

  5. 42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. Peaks of Otter, Abbott Lake. View across lake to peaks of Outter Lodge, completed in 1964. Construction of the lake got underway in 1964. Looking east-northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  6. Comment on ``heating rate effects in thermoluminescent glow-peaks''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Y.

    1993-12-01

    In a recent article, Kitis et al. [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 73 (1993) 367] discuss the effect of heating rate on three well-known thermoluminescence (TL) glow peaks; the 110°C glow peak of Norwegian quartz, the 210°C "dosimetry" glow peak of LiF:Mg,Ti (peak 5 in TLD-700) and the 250°C glow peak of natural Cap 2 : MBLE. The authors state that they focus their attention on "single, well-separated, glow peaks" in order to "test the theory", presumably charge detrapping kinetic theory. To achieve this rather elusive goal for the 210°C peak in LiF:Mg,Ti, the authors employ a 140°C/60 min post-irradiation anneal to depopulate the low temperature peaks. There is, however, substantial evidence in the TL literature over the past three decades that an anneal of this duration at elevated temperatures induces various thermally activated clustering and precipitation processes leading to trap modification and possible creation of new traps.

  7. Forest Peak Research Natural Area: guidebook supplement 33.

    Treesearch

    Reid Schuller; Ronald L. Exeter

    2007-01-01

    This guidebook describes the Forest Peak Research Natural Area (RNA), a 62.8-ha (153.3-ac) tract containing a mature Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) forest and a grass bald within the Willamette Valley Foothill Ecoregion. Forest Peak RNA also contains an undisturbed third-order stream reach.

  8. Psychological Preparation for Peak Performance in Sports Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohuruogu, Ben; Jonathan, Ugwuanyi I.; Ikechukwu, Ugwu Jude

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to make an overview of various techniques, sport psychologist adopt in psychological preparation of athletes for peak performance. To attain peak performance in sports competitions, coaches and athletes should not base their prospect on physical training on sport skills alone rather should integrate both the mental and physical…

  9. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadowmore » domains.« less

  10. Rattler model of the boson peak at silica surfaces.

    PubMed

    Steurer, Wolfram; Tosatti, Erio

    2012-10-28

    Recent experiments unveiled two new aspects of the low-energy excitation spectrum of silica glass--commonly termed as the "boson peak" region. The first is that at low temperature the silica surface exhibits a different, softer boson peak than the bulk. The second is a giant thermal blueshift of the surface boson peak frequency causing it to cross and overcome the bulk peak with increasing temperature. Here we present a simple lattice model that reproduces this behavior in all its aspects. Each site consists of rigid tetrahedral units softly connected so as to be able to rotate anharmonically as "rattlers" in their cages. As shown by simulations, the model dynamics exhibits a boson-like peak, which has lower frequency at the surface where rattlers have a weaker restoring force. Upon heating however the larger angular freedom of surface units allows them to rattle more than in the bulk, leading to a steeper frequency increase similar to experiment.

  11. A High Peak Current Source for the CEBAF Injector

    SciTech Connect

    Yunn, Byung; Sinclair, Charles; Krafft, Geoffrey

    1992-07-01

    The CEBAF accelerator can drive high power IR and UV FELs, if a high peak current source is added to the existing front end. We present a design for a high peak current injector which is compatible with simultaneous operation of the accelerator for cw nulear physics (NP) beam. The high peak current injector provides 60 A peak current in 2 psec long bunches carrying 120 pC charge at 7.485 MHz. At 10 MeV that beam is combined with 5 MeV NP beam (0.13pC, 2 psec long bunches at 1497 MHz) in an energy combination chicane for simultaneous acceleration inmore » the injector linac. The modifications to the low-energy NP transport are described. Results of optical and beam dynamics calculations for both high peak current and NP beams in combined operation are presented.« less

  12. The gas-phase absorption spectrum of a neutral GFP model chromophore.

    PubMed

    Lammich, L; Petersen, M Axman; Nielsen, M Brøndsted; Andersen, L H

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the gas-phase absorption properties of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore in its neutral (protonated) charge state in a heavy-ion storage ring. To accomplish this we synthesized a new molecular chromophore with a charged NH(3) group attached to a neutral model chromophore of GFP. The gas-phase absorption cross section of this chromophore molecule as a function of the wavelength is compared to the well-known absorption profile of GFP. The chromophore has a maximum absorption at 415 +/- 5 nm. When corrected for the presence of the charged group attached to the GFP model chromophore, the unperturbed neutral chromophore is predicted to have an absorption maximum at 399 nm in vacuum. This is very close to the corresponding absorption peak of the protein at 397 nm. Together with previous data obtained with an anionic GFP model chromophore, the present data show that the absorption of GFP is primarily determined by intrinsic chromophore properties. In other words, there is strong experimental evidence that, in terms of absorption, the conditions in the hydrophobic interior of this protein are very close to those in vacuum.

  13. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.

    2013-02-07

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficientsmore » for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.« less

  14. Broadband and wide angle near-unity absorption in graphene-insulator-metal thin film stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H. J.; Zheng, G. G.; Chen, Y. Y.; Xu, L. H.

    2018-05-01

    Broadband unity absorption in graphene-insulator-metal (GIM) structures is demonstrated in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectra. The spectral characteristics possess broadband absorption peaks, by simply choosing a stack of GIM, while no nanofabrication steps and patterning are required, and thus can be easily fabricated to cover a large area. The electromagnetic (EM) waves can be entirely trapped and the absorption can be greatly enhanced are verified with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) methods. The position and the number of the absorption peak can be totally controlled by adjusting the thickness of the insulator layer. The proposed absorber maintains high absorption (above 90%) for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations, and for angles of incidence up to 80°. This work opens up a promising approach to realize perfect absorption (PA) with ultra-thin film, which could implicate many potential applications in optical detection and optoelectronic devices.

  15. Intersubband absorption in Si(1-x)Ge(x/Si superlattices for long wavelength infrared detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajakarunanayake, Yasantha; Mcgill, Tom C.

    1990-01-01

    Researchers calculated the absorption strengths for intersubband transitions in n-type Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si superlattices. These transitions can be used for the detection of long-wavelength infrared radiation. A significant advantage in Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si supperlattice detectors is the ability to detect normally incident light; in Ga(1-x)Al(x)As/GaAs superlattices, intersubband absorption is possible only if the incident light contains a polarization component in the growth direction of the superlattice. Researchers present detailed calculation of absorption coefficients, and peak absorption wavelengths for (100), (111) and (110) Si(1-x)Ge(x)/Si superlattices. Peak absorption strengths of about 2000 to 6000 cm(exp -1) were obtained for typical sheet doping concentrations (approx. equals 10(exp 12)cm(exp -2)). Absorption comparable to that in Ga(1-x)Al(x)As/GaAs superlattice detectors, compatibility with existing Si technology, and the ability to detect normally incident light make these devices promising for future applications.

  16. Understanding the double peaked El Niño in coupled GCMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Felicity S.; Wittenberg, Andrew T.; Brown, Jaclyn N.; Marsland, Simon J.; Holbrook, Neil J.

    2017-03-01

    Coupled general circulation models (CGCMs) simulate a diverse range of El Niño-Southern Oscillation behaviors. "Double peaked" El Niño events—where two separate centers of positive sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies evolve concurrently in the eastern and western equatorial Pacific—have been evidenced in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project version 5 CGCMs and are without precedent in observations. The characteristic CGCM double peaked El Niño may be mistaken for a central Pacific warming event in El Niño composites, shifted westwards due to the cold tongue bias. In results from the Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator coupled model, we find that the western Pacific warm peak of the double peaked El Niño event emerges due to an excessive westward extension of the climatological cold tongue, displacing the region of strong zonal SST gradients towards the west Pacific. A coincident westward shift in the zonal current anomalies reinforces the western peak in SST anomalies, leading to a zonal separation between the warming effect of zonal advection (in the west Pacific) and that of vertical advection (in the east Pacific). Meridional advection and net surface heat fluxes further drive growth of the western Pacific warm peak. Our results demonstrate that understanding historical CGCM El Niño behaviors is a necessary precursor to interpreting projections of future CGCM El Niño behaviors, such as changes in the frequency of eastern Pacific El Niño events, under global warming scenarios.

  17. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-06

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions' spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches).

  18. Ultraviolet absorption experiment MA-059

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hudson, R. D.; Anderson, J.; Kaufman, F.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1976-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption experiment performed during the Apollo Soyuz mission involved sending a beam of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen resonance radiation, strong unabsorbable oxygen and nitrogen radiation, and visual radiation, all filling the same 3 deg-wide field of view from the Apollo to the Soyuz. The radiation struck a retroreflector array on the Soyuz and was returned to a spectrometer onboard the Apollo. The density of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen between the two spacecraft was measured by observing the amount of resonance radiation absorbed when the line joining Apollo and Soyuz was perpendicular to their velocity with respect to the ambient atmosphere. Information concerning oxygen densities was also obtained by observation of resonantly fluorescent light. The absorption experiments for atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were successfully performed at a range of 500 meters, and abundant resonance fluorescence data were obtained.

  19. Landing gear energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Christopher P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A landing pad system is described for absorbing horizontal and vertical impact forces upon engagement with a landing surface where circumferentially arranged landing struts respectively have a clevis which receives a slidable rod member and where the upper portion of a slidable rod member is coupled to the clevis by friction washers which are force fit onto the rod member to provide for controlled constant force energy absorption when the rod member moves relative to the clevis. The lower end of the friction rod is pivotally attached by a ball and socket to a support plate where the support plate is arranged to slide in a transverse direction relative to a housing which contains an energy absorption material for absorbing energy in a transverse direction.

  20. AERONET derived (BC) aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, S.

    2015-12-01

    AERONET is a ground-based sun-/sky-photometer network with good annual statistics at more than 400 sites worldwide. Inversion methods applied to these data define all relevant column aerosol optical properties and reveal even microphysical detail. The extracted data include estimates for aerosol size-distributions and for aerosol refractive indices at four different solar wavelengths. Hereby, the imaginary parts of the refractive indices define the aerosol column absorption. For regional and global averages and radiative impact assessment with off-line radiative transfer, these local data have been extended with distribution patterns offered by AeroCom modeling experiments. Annual and seasonal absorption distributions for total aerosol and estimates for component contributions (such as BC) are presented and associated direct forcing impacts are quantified.

  1. Magneto-optical absorption and cyclotron-phonon resonance in graphene monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Phuong, Le Thi Thu; Phong, Tran Cong

    2018-03-01

    The optical absorption power by Dirac fermions in a graphene monolayer subjected to a perpendicular magnetic field is calculated using a projection operator technique. The electron-optical phonon interaction with optical deformation potential is taken into account. By varying the photon frequency (energy), we observe in the absorption power a series of cyclotron-phonon resonance (CPR) peaks (i.e., the phonon-assisted cyclotron resonance). It is seen that the resonant photon energy is linearly proportional to the square root of the magnetic field. Also, the half width at half maximum (HWHM) of CPR peaks depends on the magnetic field by the law HWHM = 7.42 √{B } but does not depend on the temperature. In particular, the magnetic field and temperature dependences of the position and HWHM of CPR peaks are in good agreement with those obtained recently by the perturbation theory and an experiment in graphene.

  2. Resonant tube for measurement of sound absorption in gases at low frequency/pressure ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J.; Griffin, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes a resonant tube for measuring sound absorption in gases, with specific emphasis on the vibrational relaxation peak of N2, over a range of frequency/pressure ratios from 0.1 to 2500 Hz/atm. The experimental background losses measured in argon agree with the theoretical wall losses except at few isolated frequencies. Rigid cavity terminations, external excitation, and a differential technique of background evaluation were used to minimize spurious contributions to the background losses. Room temperature measurements of sound absorption in binary mixtures of N2-CO2 in which both components are excitable resulted in the maximum frequency/pressure ratio in Hz/atm of 0.063 + 123m for the N2 vibrational relaxation peak, where m is mole percent of added CO2; the maximum ratio for the CO2 peak was 34,500 268m where m is mole percent of added N2.

  3. Detection of novel visible-light region absorbance peaks in the urine after alkalization in patients with alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Tokuhara, Yasunori; Shukuya, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masami; Mouri, Mariko; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Fujishiro, Midori; Takahashi, Tomoo; Okubo, Shigeo; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Kurano, Makoto; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Inagaki, Shinobu; Ishige-Wada, Mika; Usui, Hiromi; Yatomi, Yutaka; Shimosawa, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Alkaptonuria, caused by a deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, results in the accumulation of homogentisic acid (2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, HGA) in the urine. Alkaptonuria is suspected when the urine changes color after it is left to stand at room temperature for several hours to days; oxidation of homogentisic acid to benzoquinone acetic acid underlies this color change, which is accelerated by the addition of alkali. In an attempt to develop a facile screening test for alkaptonuria, we added alkali to urine samples obtained from patients with alkaptonuria and measured the absorbance spectra in the visible light region. We evaluated the characteristics of the absorption spectra of urine samples obtained from patients with alkaptonuria (n = 2) and compared them with those of urine specimens obtained from healthy volunteers (n = 5) and patients with phenylketonuria (n = 3), and also of synthetic homogentisic acid solution after alkalization. Alkalization of the urine samples and HGA solution was carried out by the addition of NaOH, KOH or NH4OH. The sample solutions were incubated at room temperature for 1 min, followed by measurement of the absorption spectra. Addition of alkali to alkaptonuric urine yielded characteristic absorption peaks at 406 nm and 430 nm; an identical result was obtained from HGA solution after alkalization. The absorbance values at both 406 nm and 430 nm increased in a time-dependent manner. In addition, the absorbance values at these peaks were greater in strongly alkaline samples (NaOH- KOH-added) as compared with those in weakly alkaline samples (NH4OH-added). In addition, the peaks disappeared following the addition of ascorbic acid to the samples. We found two characteristic peaks at 406 nm and 430 nm in both alkaptonuric urine and HGA solution after alkalization. This new quick and easy method may pave the way for the development of an easy method for the diagnosis of alkaptonuria.

  4. Detection of Novel Visible-Light Region Absorbance Peaks in the Urine after Alkalization in Patients with Alkaptonuria

    PubMed Central

    Tokuhara, Yasunori; Shukuya, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masami; Mouri, Mariko; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Fujishiro, Midori; Takahashi, Tomoo; Okubo, Shigeo; Yokota, Hiromitsu; Kurano, Makoto; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Inagaki, Shinobu; Ishige-Wada, Mika; Usui, Hiromi; Yatomi, Yutaka; Shimosawa, Tatsuo

    2014-01-01

    Background Alkaptonuria, caused by a deficiency of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, results in the accumulation of homogentisic acid (2,5-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, HGA) in the urine. Alkaptonuria is suspected when the urine changes color after it is left to stand at room temperature for several hours to days; oxidation of homogentisic acid to benzoquinone acetic acid underlies this color change, which is accelerated by the addition of alkali. In an attempt to develop a facile screening test for alkaptonuria, we added alkali to urine samples obtained from patients with alkaptonuria and measured the absorbance spectra in the visible light region. Methods We evaluated the characteristics of the absorption spectra of urine samples obtained from patients with alkaptonuria (n = 2) and compared them with those of urine specimens obtained from healthy volunteers (n = 5) and patients with phenylketonuria (n = 3), and also of synthetic homogentisic acid solution after alkalization. Alkalization of the urine samples and HGA solution was carried out by the addition of NaOH, KOH or NH4OH. The sample solutions were incubated at room temperature for 1 min, followed by measurement of the absorption spectra. Results Addition of alkali to alkaptonuric urine yielded characteristic absorption peaks at 406 nm and 430 nm; an identical result was obtained from HGA solution after alkalization. The absorbance values at both 406 nm and 430 nm increased in a time-dependent manner. In addition, the absorbance values at these peaks were greater in strongly alkaline samples (NaOH- KOH-added) as compared with those in weakly alkaline samples (NH4OH-added). In addition, the peaks disappeared following the addition of ascorbic acid to the samples. Conclusions We found two characteristic peaks at 406 nm and 430 nm in both alkaptonuric urine and HGA solution after alkalization. This new quick and easy method may pave the way for the development of an easy method for the diagnosis of

  5. Longitudinal Dependence of SEP Peak Intensities as Evidence of CME-Driven Shock Particle Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lario, D.; Roelof, E. C.; Decker, R. B.

    2014-05-01

    Multi-spacecraft observations of solar energetic particle (SEP) events allow us to estimate the longitudinal distributions of SEP peak intensities. By fitting a Gaussian functional form to the ensemble of SEP peak intensities measured by two or more spacecraft as a function of the longitudinal distance between the associated parent solar flare and the footpoint labels of the magnetic field lines connecting each spacecraft with the Sun, we found that such distributions are not centered at nominal well-connected flare longitudes but slightly offset to the west of the associated flare (Lario et al. 2006, 2013). We offer an interpretation of this result in terms of long-lived particle injection from shocks driven by the associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs). By assuming that (i) CME-driven shocks are centered on the longitude of the associated solar flare, (ii) the injection of shock accelerated particles maximizes at the nose of the shock which propagates radially outward from the Sun, and (iii) SEP particle injection from the shock starts at a certain distance above the solar surface, we infer an average radial distance where shocks are located when peak intensities in the prompt component of the SEP events are observed. We estimate the heliocentric distance of the CME-driven shock when particle injection from the shock maximizes and conclude that the injection of ˜20 MeV protons and near-relativistic electrons maximizes well inside ˜0.2 AU.

  6. Photodetector with enhanced light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Kane, James

    1985-01-01

    A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the absorption of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.

  7. Evaluation of different time domain peak models using extreme learning machine-based peak detection for EEG signal.

    PubMed

    Adam, Asrul; Ibrahim, Zuwairie; Mokhtar, Norrima; Shapiai, Mohd Ibrahim; Cumming, Paul; Mubin, Marizan

    2016-01-01

    Various peak models have been introduced to detect and analyze peaks in the time domain analysis of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals. In general, peak model in the time domain analysis consists of a set of signal parameters, such as amplitude, width, and slope. Models including those proposed by Dumpala, Acir, Liu, and Dingle are routinely used to detect peaks in EEG signals acquired in clinical studies of epilepsy or eye blink. The optimal peak model is the most reliable peak detection performance in a particular application. A fair measure of performance of different models requires a common and unbiased platform. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the four different peak models using the extreme learning machine (ELM)-based peak detection algorithm. We found that the Dingle model gave the best performance, with 72 % accuracy in the analysis of real EEG data. Statistical analysis conferred that the Dingle model afforded significantly better mean testing accuracy than did the Acir and Liu models, which were in the range 37-52 %. Meanwhile, the Dingle model has no significant difference compared to Dumpala model.

  8. Derived Equivalence Relations of Geometry Skills in Students with Autism: An Application of the PEAK-E Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Mark R.; Belisle, Jordan; Stanley, Caleb R.; Daar, Jacob H.; Williams, Leigh Anne

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the efficacy of equivalence-based instruction (EBI) as described in the PEAK-E curriculum (Dixon, 2015) for promoting the emergence of derived geometry skills in two children with high-functioning autism. The results suggested that direct training of shape name (A) to shape property (B) (i.e., A-B relations) was…

  9. Using Methane Absorption to Probe Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mosaics of a belt-zone boundary near Jupiter's equator in near-infrared light moderately absorbed by atmospheric methane (top panel), and strongly absorbed by atmospheric methane (bottom panel). The four images that make up each of these mosaics were taken within a few minutes of each other. Methane in Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light at specific wavelengths called absorption bands. By detecting light close and far from these absorption bands, Galileo can probe to different depths in Jupiter's atmosphere. Sunlight near 732 nanometers (top panel) is moderately absorbed by methane. Some of the light reflected from clouds deep in Jupiter's troposphere is absorbed, enhancing the higher features. Sunlight at 886 nanometers (bottom panel) is strongly absorbed by methane. Most of the light reflected from the deeper clouds is absorbed, making these clouds invisible. Features in the diffuse cloud layer higher in Jupiter's atmosphere are greatly enhanced.

    North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes -13 to +3 degrees and is centered at longitude 282 degrees West. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on November 5th, 1996, at a range of 1.2 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  10. Luminescence and photoinduced absorption in ytterbium-doped optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Rybaltovsky, A A; Aleshkina, S S; Likhachev, M E

    2011-12-31

    Photochemical reactions induced in the glass network of an ytterbium-doped fibre core by IR laser pumping and UV irradiation have been investigated by analysing absorption and luminescence spectra. We have performed comparative studies of the photoinduced absorption and luminescence spectra of fibre preforms differing in core glass composition: Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} : SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} : Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} : SiO{sub 2}, and P{sub 2}O{sub 5} : Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3} : SiO{sub 2}. The UV absorption spectra of unirradiated preform core samples show strong bands peaking at 5.1 and 6.5 eV, whose excitation plays a key role inmore » photoinduced colour centre generation in the glass network. 'Direct' UV excitation of the 5.1- and 6.5-eV absorption bands at 244 and 193 nm leads to the reduction of some of the Yb{sup 3+} ions to Yb{sup 2+}. The photodarkening of ytterbium-doped fibres by IR pumping is shown to result from oxygen hole centre generation. A phenomenological model is proposed for the IR-pumping-induced photodarkening of ytterbium-doped fibres. The model predicts that colour centre generation in the core glass network and the associated absorption in the visible range result from a cooperative effect involving simultaneous excitation of a cluster composed of several closely spaced Yb{sup 3+} ions.« less

  11. Altered intestinal absorption of L-thyroxine caused by coffee.

    PubMed

    Benvenga, Salvatore; Bartolone, Luigi; Pappalardo, Maria Angela; Russo, Antonia; Lapa, Daniela; Giorgianni, Grazia; Saraceno, Giovanna; Trimarchi, Francesco

    2008-03-01

    To report eight case histories, and in vivo and in vitro studies showing coffee's potential to impair thyroxine (T4) intestinal absorption. Of eight women with inappropriately high or nonsuppressed thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) when T4 was swallowed with coffee/espresso, six consented to the evaluation of their T4 intestinal absorption. This in vivo test was also administered to nine volunteers. In three separate tests, two 100 microg T4 tablets were swallowed with coffee, water, or water followed, 60 minutes later, by coffee. Serum T4 was assayed over the 4-hour period of the test. Two patients and two volunteers also agreed on having tested the intestinal absorption of T4 swallowed with solubilized dietary fibers. In the in vitro studies, classical recovery tests on known concentrations of T4 were performed in the presence of saline, coffee, or known T4 sequestrants (dietary fibers, aluminium hydroxide, and sucralfate). For the in vivo test, average and peak incremental rise of serum T4 (AIRST4 and PIRST4), time of maximal incremental rise of serum T4 (TMIRST4), and area under the curve (AUC) were determined. In patients and volunteers, the four outcome measures were similar in the water and water + coffee tests. In patients and volunteers, compared to water, coffee lowered AIRST4 (by 36% and 29%), PIRST4 (by 30% and 19%), and AUC (by 36% and 27%) and delayed TMIRST4 (by 38 and 43 minutes); bran was a superior interferer. In the in vitro studies, coffee was weaker than known T4 sequestrants. Coffee should be added to the list of interferers of T4 intestinal absorption, and T4 to the list of compounds whose absorption is affected by coffee.

  12. National Health Information Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... About ODPHP National Health Information Center National Health Information Center The National Health Information Center (NHIC) is ... of interest View the NHO calendar . Federal Health Information Centers and Clearinghouses Federal Health Information Centers and ...

  13. Probabilistic peak detection for first-order chromatographic data.

    PubMed

    Lopatka, M; Vivó-Truyols, G; Sjerps, M J

    2014-03-19

    We present a novel algorithm for probabilistic peak detection in first-order chromatographic data. Unlike conventional methods that deliver a binary answer pertaining to the expected presence or absence of a chromatographic peak, our method calculates the probability of a point being affected by such a peak. The algorithm makes use of chromatographic information (i.e. the expected width of a single peak and the standard deviation of baseline noise). As prior information of the existence of a peak in a chromatographic run, we make use of the statistical overlap theory. We formulate an exhaustive set of mutually exclusive hypotheses concerning presence or absence of different peak configurations. These models are evaluated by fitting a segment of chromatographic data by least-squares. The evaluation of these competing hypotheses can be performed as a Bayesian inferential task. We outline the potential advantages of adopting this approach for peak detection and provide several examples of both improved performance and increased flexibility afforded by our approach. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeled future peak streamflows in four coastal Maine rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    To safely and economically design bridges and culverts, it is necessary to compute the magnitude of peak streamflows that have specified annual exceedance probabilities (AEPs). Annual precipitation and air temperature in the northeastern United States are, in general, projected to increase during the 21st century. It is therefore important for engineers and resource managers to understand how peak flows may change in the future. This report, prepared in cooperation with the Maine Department of Transportation (MaineDOT), presents modeled changes in peak flows at four basins in coastal Maine on the basis of projected changes in air temperature and precipitation. To estimate future peak streamflows at the four basins in this study, historical values for climate (temperature and precipitation) in the basins were adjusted by different amounts and input to a hydrologic model of each study basin. To encompass the projected changes in climate in coastal Maine by the end of the 21st century, air temperatures were adjusted by four different amounts, from -3.6 degrees Fahrenheit (ºF) (-2 degrees Celsius (ºC)) to +10.8 ºF (+6 ºC) of observed temperatures. Precipitation was adjusted by three different percentage values from -15 percent to +30 percent of observed precipitation. The resulting 20 combinations of temperature and precipitation changes (includes the no-change scenarios) were input to Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) watershed models, and annual daily maximum peak flows were calculated for each combination. Modeled peak flows from the adjusted changes in temperature and precipitation were compared to unadjusted (historical) modeled peak flows. Annual daily maximum peak flows increase or decrease, depending on whether temperature or precipitation is adjusted; increases in air temperature (with no change in precipitation) lead to decreases in peak flows, whereas increases in precipitation (with no change in temperature) lead to increases in peak flows. As

  15. Reduction in peak oxygen uptake after prolonged bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Kozlowski, S.

    1982-01-01

    The hypothesis that the magnitude of the reduction in peak oxygen uptake (VO2) after bed rest is directly proportional to the level of pre-bed rest peak VO2 is tested. Complete pre and post-bed rest working capacity and body weight data were obtained from studies involving 24 men (19-24 years old) and 8 women (23-34 years old) who underwent bed rest for 14-20 days with no remedial treatments. Results of regression analyses of the present change in post-bed rest peak VO2 on pre-bed rest peak VO2 with 32 subjects show correlation coefficients of -0.03 (NS) for data expressed in 1/min and -0.17 for data expressed in ml/min-kg. In addition, significant correlations are found that support the hypothesis only when peak VO2 data are analyzed separately from studies that utilized the cycle ergometer, particularly with subjects in the supine position, as opposed to data obtained from treadmill peak VO2 tests. It is concluded that orthostatic factors, associated with the upright body position and relatively high levels of physical fitness from endurance training, appear to increase the variability of pre and particularly post-bed rest peak VO2 data, which would lead to rejection of the hypothesis.

  16. Peak-Seeking Optimization of Trim for Reduced Fuel Consumption: Architecture and Performance Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Jacob; Brown, Nelson

    2013-01-01

    A peak-seeking control approach for real-time trim configuration optimization for reduced fuel consumption has been developed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center to address the goals of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project to reduce fuel burn and emissions. The peak-seeking control approach is based on a steepest-descent algorithm using a time-varying Kalman filter to estimate the gradient of a performance function of fuel flow versus control surface positions. In real-time operation, deflections of symmetric ailerons, trailing-edge flaps, and leading-edge flaps of an FA-18 airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) are controlled for optimization of fuel flow. This presentation presents the design and integration of this peak-seeking controller on a modified NASA FA-18 airplane with research flight control computers. A research flight was performed to collect data to build a realistic model of the performance function and characterize measurement noise. This model was then implemented into a nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom FA-18 simulation along with the peak-seeking control algorithm. With the goal of eventual flight tests, the algorithm was first evaluated in the improved simulation environment. Results from the simulation predict good convergence on minimum fuel flow with a 2.5-percent reduction in fuel flow relative to the baseline trim of the aircraft.

  17. Peak-Seeking Optimization of Trim for Reduced Fuel Consumption: Architecture and Performance Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, Jacob; Brown, Nelson A.

    2013-01-01

    A peak-seeking control approach for real-time trim configuration optimization for reduced fuel consumption has been developed by researchers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center to address the goals of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation project to reduce fuel burn and emissions. The peak-seeking control approach is based on a steepest-descent algorithm using a time-varying Kalman filter to estimate the gradient of a performance function of fuel flow versus control surface positions. In real-time operation, deflections of symmetric ailerons, trailing-edge flaps, and leading-edge flaps of an F/A-18 airplane (McDonnell Douglas, now The Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) are controlled for optimization of fuel flow. This paper presents the design and integration of this peak-seeking controller on a modified NASA F/A-18 airplane with research flight control computers. A research flight was performed to collect data to build a realistic model of the performance function and characterize measurement noise. This model was then implemented into a nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom F/A-18 simulation along with the peak-seeking control algorithm. With the goal of eventual flight tests, the algorithm was first evaluated in the improved simulation environment. Results from the simulation predict good convergence on minimum fuel flow with a 2.5-percent reduction in fuel flow relative to the baseline trim of the aircraft.

  18. Visual stimulus eccentricity affects human gamma peak frequency.

    PubMed

    van Pelt, Stan; Fries, Pascal

    2013-09-01

    The peak frequency of neuronal gamma-band synchronization has received much attention in recent years. Gamma peak frequency shifts to higher frequency values for higher contrast, faster moving, and attended stimuli. In monkey V1, gamma peak frequency for a drifting grating is higher for a parafoveal as compared to an eccentric stimulus (Lima et al., 2010). This effect might be due to the cortical magnification factor: the higher cortical magnification for parafoveal stimuli increases the velocity with which the cortical representations of the moving grating stripes move across the cortical surface. Since faster moving stimuli lead to higher gamma frequency, a faster moving cortical representation might do the same. This explanation predicts that the eccentricity effect on gamma peak frequency is absent for stationary stimuli. To test this, we investigated the effect of eccentricity on gamma peak frequency by recording magnetoencephalography in human subjects while they viewed moving or stationary gratings. We found that both the moving and the stationary stimuli induced lower peak frequencies for larger eccentricities, arguing against an explanation based on the cortical magnification factor. We further investigated whether this eccentricity effect was explained by differences in the size or the spatial frequency of the expected cortical activation. Neither of those explained the eccentricity effect. We propose that the different stimulus and top-down factors leading to higher gamma peak frequency all result in higher stimulus salience, that salience is translated into gamma peak frequency, and that gamma peak frequency might subserve the preferential processing of neuronal activity induced by salient stimuli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Understanding Human Motion Skill with Peak Timing Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ken; Furukawa, Koichi

    The careful observation of motion phenomena is important in understanding the skillful human motion. However, this is a difficult task due to the complexities in timing when dealing with the skilful control of anatomical structures. To investigate the dexterity of human motion, we decided to concentrate on timing with respect to motion, and we have proposed a method to extract the peak timing synergy from multivariate motion data. The peak timing synergy is defined as a frequent ordered graph with time stamps, which has nodes consisting of turning points in motion waveforms. A proposed algorithm, PRESTO automatically extracts the peak timing synergy. PRESTO comprises the following 3 processes: (1) detecting peak sequences with polygonal approximation; (2) generating peak-event sequences; and (3) finding frequent peak-event sequences using a sequential pattern mining method, generalized sequential patterns (GSP). Here, we measured right arm motion during the task of cello bowing and prepared a data set of the right shoulder and arm motion. We successfully extracted the peak timing synergy on cello bowing data set using the PRESTO algorithm, which consisted of common skills among cellists and personal skill differences. To evaluate the sequential pattern mining algorithm GSP in PRESTO, we compared the peak timing synergy by using GSP algorithm and the one by using filtering by reciprocal voting (FRV) algorithm as a non time-series method. We found that the support is 95 - 100% in GSP, while 83 - 96% in FRV and that the results by GSP are better than the one by FRV in the reproducibility of human motion. Therefore we show that sequential pattern mining approach is more effective to extract the peak timing synergy than non-time series analysis approach.

  20. Peak Oil, Urban Form, and Public Health: Exploring the Connections

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Nikhil; Knaap, Gerrit-Jan; Knaap, Isolde

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the relationships between peak oil and urban form, travel behavior, and public health. Peak oil will affect the general economy, travel behavior, and urban form through income and substitution effects; however, because of the wide range of substitution possibilities, the impacts are likely to be gradual and relatively small. Furthermore, we suggest that changes in travel behavior and increases in urban density will have both favorable and unfavorable effects on public health. To mitigate the adverse impacts and to maximize the positive effects of peak oil, we recommend that careful attention should be paid to urban design and public health responses for a range of urbanization patterns. PMID:21778494

  1. Relaxation peak near 200 K in NiTi alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J. S.; Schaller, R.; Benoit, W.

    1989-10-01

    Internal friction (IF), frequency ( f), electrical resistance ( R) and zero point movement of the torsion pendulum (ɛ) have been measured in near equi-atomic NiTi alloy in order to clarify the mechanism for the relaxation peak near 200 K. The height of the relaxation peak decreases successively with thermal cycling and settles down to a lower stable value in running 15 cycles. However, the electrical resistance of the sample shows a variation in contrast with the internal friction. Both of them will return to the initial state after a single annealing at 773 K for 1 h. The probable mechanism of this relaxation peak was discussed.

  2. Evaluation of peak-picking algorithms for protein mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Chris; Cramer, Rainer; Schuchhardt, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Peak picking is an early key step in MS data analysis. We compare three commonly used approaches to peak picking and discuss their merits by means of statistical analysis. Methods investigated encompass signal-to-noise ratio, continuous wavelet transform, and a correlation-based approach using a Gaussian template. Functionality of the three methods is illustrated and discussed in a practical context using a mass spectral data set created with MALDI-TOF technology. Sensitivity and specificity are investigated using a manually defined reference set of peaks. As an additional criterion, the robustness of the three methods is assessed by a perturbation analysis and illustrated using ROC curves.

  3. Chasing the peak: optimal statistics for weak shear analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Merijn; Kuijken, Konrad

    2018-01-01

    Context. Weak gravitational lensing analyses are fundamentally limited by the intrinsic distribution of galaxy shapes. It is well known that this distribution of galaxy ellipticity is non-Gaussian, and the traditional estimation methods, explicitly or implicitly assuming Gaussianity, are not necessarily optimal. Aims: We aim to explore alternative statistics for samples of ellipticity measurements. An optimal estimator needs to be asymptotically unbiased, efficient, and robust in retaining these properties for various possible sample distributions. We take the non-linear mapping of gravitational shear and the effect of noise into account. We then discuss how the distribution of individual galaxy shapes in the observed field of view can be modeled by fitting Fourier modes to the shear pattern directly. This allows scientific analyses using statistical information of the whole field of view, instead of locally sparse and poorly constrained estimates. Methods: We simulated samples of galaxy ellipticities, using both theoretical distributions and data for ellipticities and noise. We determined the possible bias Δe, the efficiency η and the robustness of the least absolute deviations, the biweight, and the convex hull peeling (CHP) estimators, compared to the canonical weighted mean. Using these statistics for regression, we have shown the applicability of direct Fourier mode fitting. Results: We find an improved performance of all estimators, when iteratively reducing the residuals after de-shearing the ellipticity samples by the estimated shear, which removes the asymmetry in the ellipticity distributions. We show that these estimators are then unbiased in the absence of noise, and decrease noise bias by more than 30%. Our results show that the CHP estimator distribution is skewed, but still centered around the underlying shear, and its bias least affected by noise. We find the least absolute deviations estimator to be the most efficient estimator in almost all

  4. Two-photon absorption in oxazole derivatives: An experimental and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. L.; De Boni, L.; Correa, D. S.; Costa, S. C. S.; Hidalgo, A. A.; Zilio, S. C.; Canuto, S.; Mendonca, C. R.

    2012-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the two-photon absorption properties of two oxazole derivatives: 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) are presented. The two-photon absorption cross-section spectra were determined by means of the Z-scan technique, from 460 up to 650 nm, and reached peak values of 84 GM for PBD and 27 GM for PPO. Density Functional Theory and response function formalism are used to determine the molecular structures and the one- and two-photon absorption properties and to assist in the interpretation of the experimental results. The Polarizable Continuum Model in one-photon absorption calculations is used to estimate solvent effects.

  5. First-principles C band absorption spectra of SO2 and its isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Kumar, Praveen; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Poirier, Bill; Guo, Hua

    2017-04-01

    The low-energy wing of the C ˜ B12 ←X˜ 1A1 absorption spectra for SO2 in the ultraviolet region is computed for the 32S,33S,34S and 36S isotopes, using the recently developed ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the two electronic states and the corresponding transition dipole surface. The state-resolved absorption spectra from various ro-vibrational states of SO2(X˜ 1A1 ) are computed. When contributions of these excited ro-vibrational states are included, the thermally averaged spectra are broadened but maintain their key characters. Excellent agreement with experimental absorption spectra is found, validating the accuracy of the PESs. The isotope shifts of the absorption peaks are found to increase linearly with energy, in good agreement with experiment.

  6. Optical absorption properties of Ge 2–44 and P-doped Ge nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Zhao, Li-Zhen

    The optical absorption properties of non-crystalline and crystalline Ge nanoparticles with the sizes from ~ 2.5 to 15 Å have been studied at the B3LYP/6-31G level using time-dependent density functional theory. Hydrogen passivation and phosphorus doping on some selected Ge nanoparticles were also calculated. With the increase of cluster size, the optical absorption spectra of the non-crystalline Ge nanoparticles change from many peaks to a continuous broad band and at the same time exhibit a systematic red-shift. Doping phosphorus also causes the absorption spectra to shift toward the lower energy region for both non-crystalline and crystalline Ge nanoparticles. The non-crystallinemore » Ge nanoparticles are found to have stronger absorption in the visible region in comparison with the crystalline ones, regardless phosphorus doping.« less

  7. Optical absorption properties of Ge 2–44 and P-doped Ge nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Qin, Wei; Lu, Wen-Cai; Zhao, Li-Zhen; ...

    2017-09-15

    The optical absorption properties of non-crystalline and crystalline Ge nanoparticles with the sizes from ~ 2.5 to 15 Å have been studied at the B3LYP/6-31G level using time-dependent density functional theory. Hydrogen passivation and phosphorus doping on some selected Ge nanoparticles were also calculated. With the increase of cluster size, the optical absorption spectra of the non-crystalline Ge nanoparticles change from many peaks to a continuous broad band and at the same time exhibit a systematic red-shift. Doping phosphorus also causes the absorption spectra to shift toward the lower energy region for both non-crystalline and crystalline Ge nanoparticles. The non-crystallinemore » Ge nanoparticles are found to have stronger absorption in the visible region in comparison with the crystalline ones, regardless phosphorus doping.« less

  8. Metaporous layer to overcome the thickness constraint for broadband sound absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young, E-mail: yykim@snu.ac.kr

    The sound absorption of a porous layer is affected by its thickness, especially in a low-frequency range. If a hard-backed porous layer contains periodical arrangements of rigid partitions that are coordinated parallel and perpendicular to the direction of incoming sound waves, the lower bound of the effective sound absorption can be lowered much more and the overall absorption performance enhanced. The consequence of rigid partitioning in a porous layer is to make the first thickness resonance mode in the layer appear at much lower frequencies compared to that in the original homogeneous porous layer with the same thickness. Moreover, appropriatemore » partitioning yields multiple thickness resonances with higher absorption peaks through impedance matching. The physics of the partitioned porous layer, or the metaporous layer, is theoretically investigated in this study.« less

  9. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER: Photoinduced absorption in chalcogenide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomar', V. V.

    1990-08-01

    A dependence of the absorption coefficient on the optical radiation intensity in the range 10 - 5 - 1 W/cm2 was observed for chalcogenide glasses at a photon energy less than the band gap of the material. The absorption coefficient depended on the irradiation time. In the case of arsenic sulfide in the range 1.6-1.7 eV an absorption peak was observed at intensities of the order of 10 - 3 W/cm2. In this part of the spectrum the absorption probably involved metastable As-As, S-Se, and Se-Se "defect" bonds and was similar to the photoinduced degradation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  10. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  11. Temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, Stanley P.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of the gas-phase NO3 radical has been studied between 220 and 700 nm by using both flash photolysis and discharge flow reactors for the production of NO3. In the flash photolysis method, cross sections at the peak of the (0,0) band at 661.9 nm were measured relative to the cross section of ClONO2 at several different wavelengths. From the best current measurements of the ClONO2 spectrum, the NO3 cross section at 661.9 nm was determined to be (2.28 + or 0.34) x 10 to the -17th sq cm/molecule at 298 K. Measurements at 230 K indicated that the cross section increases by a factor of 1.18 at the peak of the (0,0) band. The discharge flow method was used both to obtain absolute cross sections at 661.9 nm and to obtain relative absorption spectra between 300 and 700 nm at 298 and 230 K. A value of (1.83 + or - 0.27) x 10 to the -17th sq cm/molecule was obtained for sigma NO3 at 661.9 nm at 298 K. Upper limits to the NO3 cross sections were also measured between 220 and 260 nm with the discharge flow method.

  12. Two-photon absorption in conjugated energetic molecule

    DOE PAGES

    Bjorgaard, Josiah August; Sifain, Andrew; Nelson, Tammie Renee; ...

    2016-06-03

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is used to investigate the relationship between molecular structure and one- and two-photon absorption (OPA and TPA, respectively) properties in novel and recently synthesized conjugated energetic molecules (CEMs). The molecular structure of CEMs can be strategically altered to influence the heat of formation and oxygen balance, two factors that can contribute to the sensitivity and strength of an explosive material. OPA and TPA are sensitive to changes in molecular structure as well, influencing optical range of excitation. We find calculated vertical excitation energies in good agreement with experiment for most molecules. Peak TPA intensities aremore » significant and on the order of 102 GM. Natural transition orbitals for essential electronic states defining TPA peaks of relatively large intensity to examine the character of relevant transitions. Minor modification of molecular substituents, such as additional oxygen and other functional groups, produces significant changes in electronic structure, OPA, TPA, and improves the oxygen balance. Results show that select molecules are apt to nonlinear absorption, opening the possibility for controlled, direct optical initiation of CEMs through photochemical pathways.« less

  13. Absorption characteristics of forest fire particulate matter

    Treesearch

    E.M. Patterson; Charles K. McMahon

    1984-01-01

    Abstract. Absorption properties of smokes from laboratory fires that represent prescription hums in the Southern states have been quantified to relate variations in measured absorption parameters to variation in fire conditions and to estimate emission factors for elemental carbon. Results showed significant differences in absorption of the smoke...

  14. Synthesis of New Organic Semiconducting Polymer Materials Having High Radiowave Absorption Rate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-01

    ISTC Project No. #1571P Synthesis of New Organic Semiconducting Polymer Materials Having High Radiowave Absorption Rate Final Project Technical...Technology Center ( ISTC ), Moscow. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information...polymer materials having high radiowave absorption rate 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER ISTC Registration No: A-1571p 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  15. PolyaPeak: Detecting Transcription Factor Binding Sites from ChIP-seq Using Peak Shape Information

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Ji, Hongkai

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-seq is a powerful technology for detecting genomic regions where a protein of interest interacts with DNA. ChIP-seq data for mapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have a characteristic pattern: around each binding site, sequence reads aligned to the forward and reverse strands of the reference genome form two separate peaks shifted away from each other, and the true binding site is located in between these two peaks. While it has been shown previously that the accuracy and resolution of binding site detection can be improved by modeling the pattern, efficient methods are unavailable to fully utilize that information in TFBS detection procedure. We present PolyaPeak, a new method to improve TFBS detection by incorporating the peak shape information. PolyaPeak describes peak shapes using a flexible Pólya model. The shapes are automatically learnt from the data using Minorization-Maximization (MM) algorithm, then integrated with the read count information via a hierarchical model to distinguish true binding sites from background noises. Extensive real data analyses show that PolyaPeak is capable of robustly improving TFBS detection compared with existing methods. An R package is freely available. PMID:24608116

  16. Advancements of ultra-high peak power laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, D.; Thiagarajan, P.; Goings, J.; Caliva, B.; Smith, S.; Walker, R.

    2018-02-01

    Enhancements of laser diode epitaxy in conjunction with process and packaging improvements have led to the availability of 1cm bars capable of over 500W peak power at near-infrared wavelengths (770nm to 1100nm). Advances in cooler design allow for multi-bar stacks with bar-to-bar pitches as low as 350μm and a scalable package architecture enabled a single diode assembly with total peak powers of over 1MegaWatt of peak power. With the addition of micro-optics, overall array brightness greater than 10kW/cm2 was achieved. Performance metrics of barbased diode lasers specifically engineered for high peak power and high brightness at wavelengths and pulse conditions commonly used to pump a variety of fiber and solid-state materials are presented.

  17. FHWA operations support : port peak pricing program evaluation

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-01-01

    This report evaluates the applicability, Federal policy implications, and possible public and private sector roles related to peak pricing strategies at ports and intermodal facilities in the U.S. A number of ports and intermodal terminals are consid...

  18. The Calculation of Adsorption Isotherms from Chromatographic Peak Shapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, M. G.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between adsorption isotherms and elution peak shapes in gas chromatography, and describes a laboratory experiment which involves the adsorption of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene on alumina at different temperatures. (MLH)

  19. Peak Doctor v 1.0.0 Labview Version

    SciTech Connect

    Garner, Scott

    2014-05-29

    PeakDoctor software works interactively with its user to analyze raw gamma-ray spectroscopic data. The goal of the software is to produce a list of energies and areas of all of the peaks in the spectrum, as accurately as possible. It starts by performing an energy calibration, creating a function that describes how energy can be related to channel number. Next, the software determines which channels in the raw histogram are in the Compton continuum and which channels are parts of a peak. Then the software fits the Compton continuum with cubic polynomials. The last step is to fit all ofmore » the peaks with Gaussian functions, thus producing the list.« less

  20. Madison Peak-Period Parking Pricing Demonstration Project

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the impacts of instituting a peak-period parking surcharge along with introducing a park-ride shuttle bus system in Madison, Wisconsin. the objective of the demonstration, which was funded through the UMTA Service & Methods Demo...

  1. Desert Peak East Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Zemach, Ezra; Drakos, Peter; Spielman, Paul

    2013-09-30

    This manuscript is a draft to replaced with a final version at a later date TBD. A summary of activities pertaining to the Desert Peak EGS project including the planning and resulting stimulation activities.

  2. Stress-induced modification of the boson peak scaling behavior.

    PubMed

    Corezzi, Silvia; Caponi, Silvia; Rossi, Flavio; Fioretto, Daniele

    2013-11-21

    The scaling behavior of the so-called boson peak in glass-formers and its relation to the elastic properties of the system remains a source of controversy. Here the boson peak in a binary reactive mixture is measured by Raman scattering (i) on cooling the unreacted mixture well below its glass-transition temperature and (ii) after quenching to very low temperature the mixture at different times during isothermal polymerization. We find that the scaling behavior of the boson peak with the properties of the elastic medium - as measured by the Debye frequency - holds for states in which the elastic moduli follow a generalized Cauchy-like relationship, and breaks down in coincidence with the departure from this relation. A possible explanation is given in terms of the development of long-range stresses in glasses. The present study provides new insight into the boson peak behavior and is able to reconcile the apparently conflicting results presented in literature.

  3. Corona discharge ionization of paracetamol molecule: peak assignment.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, H; Farrokhpour, H

    2015-01-25

    Ionization of paracetamol was investigated using ion mobility spectrometry equipped with a corona discharge ionization source. The measurements were performed in the positive ion mode and three peaks were observed in the ion mobility spectrum. Experimental evidence and theoretical calculations were used to correlate the peaks to related ionic species of paracetamol. Two peaks were attributed to protonated isomers of paracetamol and the other peak was attributed to paracetamol fragment ions formed by dissociation of the N-C bond after protonation of the nitrogen atom. It was observed that three sites of paracetamol compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depending on the sample concentration. The ratio of ion products could be predicted from the internal proton affinity of the protonation sites at each concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeled future peak streamflows in four coastal Maine rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    To safely and economically design bridges and culverts, it is necessary to compute the magnitude of peak streamflows that have specified annual exceedance probabilities (AEPs). These peak flows are also needed for effective floodplain management. Annual precipitation and air temperature in the northeastern United States are in general projected to increase during the 21st century (Hayhoe and other, 2007). It is therefore important for engineers and resource managers to understand how peak flows may change in the future. This Fact Sheet, prepared in cooperation with the Maine Department of Transportation, presents a summary of modeled changes in peak flows at four basins in coastal Maine on the basis of projected changes in air temperature and precipitation. The full Scientific Investigations Report (Hodgkins and Dudley, 2013) is available at http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2013/5080/.

  5. 48. VIEW OF SKYLINE DRIVE FROM THE ROCKY PEAK OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. VIEW OF SKYLINE DRIVE FROM THE ROCKY PEAK OF STONY MAN MOUNTAIN (EL. 4,011). LOOKING NORTHEAST. STONY MAN OVERLOOK VISIBLE IN THE DISTANCE. - Skyline Drive, From Front Royal, VA to Rockfish Gap, VA , Luray, Page County, VA

  6. On the likelihood of single-peaked preferences.

    PubMed

    Lackner, Marie-Louise; Lackner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper contains an extensive combinatorial analysis of the single-peaked domain restriction and investigates the likelihood that an election is single-peaked. We provide a very general upper bound result for domain restrictions that can be defined by certain forbidden configurations. This upper bound implies that many domain restrictions (including the single-peaked restriction) are very unlikely to appear in a random election chosen according to the Impartial Culture assumption. For single-peaked elections, this upper bound can be refined and complemented by a lower bound that is asymptotically tight. In addition, we provide exact results for elections with few voters or candidates. Moreover, we consider the Pólya urn model and the Mallows model and obtain lower bounds showing that single-peakedness is considerably more likely to appear for certain parameterizations.

  7. Corona discharge ionization of paracetamol molecule: Peak assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami, H.; Farrokhpour, H.

    2015-01-01

    Ionization of paracetamol was investigated using ion mobility spectrometry equipped with a corona discharge ionization source. The measurements were performed in the positive ion mode and three peaks were observed in the ion mobility spectrum. Experimental evidence and theoretical calculations were used to correlate the peaks to related ionic species of paracetamol. Two peaks were attributed to protonated isomers of paracetamol and the other peak was attributed to paracetamol fragment ions formed by dissociation of the N-C bond after protonation of the nitrogen atom. It was observed that three sites of paracetamol compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depending on the sample concentration. The ratio of ion products could be predicted from the internal proton affinity of the protonation sites at each concentration.

  8. Heavy Ion Testing at the Galactic Cosmic Ray Energy Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Xapsos, M. A.; LaBel, K. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Heidel, D. F.; Rodbell, K. P.; Hakey, M. C.; Dodd, P. E.; Shaneyfelt, M. R.; Schwank, J. R.; hide

    2009-01-01

    A 1 GeV/u Fe-56 Ion beam allows for true 90 deg. tilt irradiations of various microelectronic components and reveals relevant upset trends for an abundant element at the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) flux-energy peak.

  9. Energy and public health: the challenge of peak petroleum.

    PubMed

    Frumkin, Howard; Hess, Jeremy; Vindigni, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum is a unique and essential energy source, used as the principal fuel for transportation, in producing many chemicals, and for numerous other purposes. Global petroleum production is expected to reach a maximum in the near future and to decline thereafter, a phenomenon known as "peak petroleum." This article reviews petroleum geology and uses, describes the phenomenon of peak petroleum, and reviews the scientific literature on the timing of this transition. It then discusses how peak petroleum may affect public health and health care, by reference to four areas: medical supplies and equipment, transportation, energy generation, and food production. Finally, it suggests strategies for anticipating and preparing for peak petroleum, both general public health preparedness strategies and actions specific to the four expected health system impacts.

  10. Roof structural system, similar in design to peaked roofs of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Roof structural system, similar in design to peaked roofs of rolling mill, yet note abandonment of phoenix columns for compression members. - Phoenix Iron Company, Girder Shop No. 6, North of French Creek, west of Gay Street, Phoenixville, Chester County, PA

  11. Multi-peaks scattering of light in glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, V. A.; Vostrikova, L. I.

    2018-04-01

    Investigations of the multi-peaks scattering of the laser light on the micro-scale susceptibility gratings with small periodicities photo-induced in the various glass materials are presented. The observed pictures of the multi-peaks scattering of light in oxide samples show that the efficiencies of the processes of scattering can vary for the different chemical compositions. Experimental results are in agreement with the proposed theory of light scattering.

  12. Peak-dip-hump lineshape from holographic superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.-W.; Kao, Y.-J.; Wen, W.-Y.

    2010-07-15

    We study the fermionic spectral function in a holographic superconductor model. At zero temperature, there is no horizon and hence the entropy of the system is zero after the backreaction of the condensate is taken into account. We find the system exhibits the famous peak-dip-hump lineshape with a sharp low-energy peak followed by a dip and then a hump at higher energies. This feature is widely observed in the spectrum of several high-T{sub c} superconductors.

  13. General Merrill A. McPeak: An Effective Change Agent?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-04-01

    McPeak, 115-121. 18 Interview with General McPeak, 21 March 1997. 24 Chapter 7 Managing Change Wallace and Szilagyi in Managing Behavior in...Andrew D. Szilagyi , Jr., Managing Behavior in Organizations, (Glenview, Illinois, Scott, Foesman and Company, 1982), 387. 2 Jaques and Clement, 274. 3...Airman. Nov ‘93. Wallace, Marc J. and Szilagyi , Andrew D. Managing Behavior in Organizations. Glenview, IL., Scott, Foesman and Company, 1982

  14. Technique for simulating peak-flow hydrographs in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillow, Jonathan J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The efficient design and management of many bridges, culverts, embankments, and flood-protection structures may require the estimation of time-of-inundation and (or) storage of floodwater relating to such structures. These estimates can be made on the basis of information derived from the peak-flow hydrograph. Average peak-flow hydrographs corresponding to a peak discharge of specific recurrence interval can be simulated for drainage basins having drainage areas less than 500 square miles in Maryland, using a direct technique of known accuracy. The technique uses dimensionless hydrographs in conjunction with estimates of basin lagtime and instantaneous peak flow. Ordinary least-squares regression analysis was used to develop an equation for estimating basin lagtime in Maryland. Drainage area, main channel slope, forest cover, and impervious area were determined to be the significant explanatory variables necessary to estimate average basin lagtime at the 95-percent confidence interval. Qualitative variables included in the equation adequately correct for geographic bias across the State. The average standard error of prediction associated with the equation is approximated as plus or minus (+/-) 37.6 percent. Volume correction factors may be applied to the basin lagtime on the basis of a comparison between actual and estimated hydrograph volumes prior to hydrograph simulation. Three dimensionless hydrographs were developed and tested using data collected during 278 significant rainfall-runoff events at 81 stream-gaging stations distributed throughout Maryland and Delaware. The data represent a range of drainage area sizes and basin conditions. The technique was verified by applying it to the simulation of 20 peak-flow events and comparing actual and simulated hydrograph widths at 50 and 75 percent of the observed peak-flow levels. The events chosen are considered extreme in that the average recurrence interval of the selected peak flows is 130 years. The average

  15. Predicting durations of online collective actions based on Peaks' heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng; Nie, Shizhao; Wang, Zheng; Jing, Ziwei; Yang, Jianwu; Qi, Zhongxiang; Pujia, Wangmo

    2018-02-01

    Capturing the whole process of collective actions, the peak model contains four stages, including Prepare, Outbreak, Peak, and Vanish. Based on the peak model, one of the key variables, factors and parameters are further investigated in this paper, which is the rate between peaks and spans. Although the durations or spans and peaks' heights are highly diversified, it seems that the ratio between them is quite stable. If the rate's regularity is discovered, we can predict how long the collective action lasts and when it ends based on the peak's height. In this work, we combined mathematical simulations and empirical big data of 148 cases to explore the regularity of ratio's distribution. It is indicated by results of simulations that the rate has some regularities of distribution, which is not normal distribution. The big data has been collected from the 148 online collective actions and the whole processes of participation are recorded. The outcomes of empirical big data indicate that the rate seems to be closer to being log-normally distributed. This rule holds true for both the total cases and subgroups of 148 online collective actions. The Q-Q plot is applied to check the normal distribution of the rate's logarithm, and the rate's logarithm does follow the normal distribution.

  16. Vibrational dynamics and boson peak in a supercooled polydisperse liquid.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Sneha Elizabeth; Bagchi, Biman

    2010-03-01

    Vibrational density of states (VDOS) in a supercooled polydisperse liquid is computed by diagonalizing the Hessian matrix evaluated at the potential energy minima for systems with different values of polydispersity. An increase in polydispersity leads to an increase in the relative population of localized high-frequency modes. At low frequencies, the density of states shows an excess compared to the Debye squared-frequency law, which has been identified with the boson peak. The height of the boson peak increases with polydispersity and shows a rather narrow sensitivity to changes in temperature. While the modes comprising the boson peak appear to be largely delocalized, there is a sharp drop in the participation ratio of the modes that exist just below the boson peak indicative of the quasilocalized nature of the low-frequency vibrations. Study of the difference spectrum at two different polydispersity reveals that the increase in the height of boson peak is due to a population shift from modes with frequencies above the maximum in the VDOS to that below the maximum, indicating an increase in the fraction of the unstable modes in the system. The latter is further supported by the facilitation of the observed dynamics by polydispersity. Since the strength of the liquid increases with polydispersity, the present result provides an evidence that the intensity of boson peak correlates positively with the strength of the liquid, as observed earlier in many experimental systems.

  17. Modeling the probability distribution of peak discharge for infiltrating hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baiamonte, Giorgio; Singh, Vijay P.

    2017-07-01

    Hillslope response plays a fundamental role in the prediction of peak discharge at the basin outlet. The peak discharge for the critical duration of rainfall and its probability distribution are needed for designing urban infrastructure facilities. This study derives the probability distribution, denoted as GABS model, by coupling three models: (1) the Green-Ampt model for computing infiltration, (2) the kinematic wave model for computing discharge hydrograph from the hillslope, and (3) the intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) model for computing design rainfall intensity. The Hortonian mechanism for runoff generation is employed for computing the surface runoff hydrograph. Since the antecedent soil moisture condition (ASMC) significantly affects the rate of infiltration, its effect on the probability distribution of peak discharge is investigated. Application to a watershed in Sicily, Italy, shows that with the increase of probability, the expected effect of ASMC to increase the maximum discharge diminishes. Only for low values of probability, the critical duration of rainfall is influenced by ASMC, whereas its effect on the peak discharge seems to be less for any probability. For a set of parameters, the derived probability distribution of peak discharge seems to be fitted by the gamma distribution well. Finally, an application to a small watershed, with the aim to test the possibility to arrange in advance the rational runoff coefficient tables to be used for the rational method, and a comparison between peak discharges obtained by the GABS model with those measured in an experimental flume for a loamy-sand soil were carried out.

  18. Terahertz absorption and emission upon the photoionization of acceptors in uniaxially stressed silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukavin, R. Kh., E-mail: zhur@ipmras.ru; Kovalevsky, K. A.; Orlov, M. L.

    2016-11-15

    Experimental data on the spontaneous emission and absorption modulation in boron-doped silicon under CO{sub 2} laser excitation depending on the uniaxial stress applied along the [001] and [011] crystallographic directions are presented. Room-temperature radiation is used as the probe radiation. Low stress (less than 0.5 kbar) is shown to reduce losses in the terahertz region by 20%. The main contribution to absorption modulation at zero and low stress is made by A{sup +} centers. Intersubband free hole transitions additionally contribute to terahertz absorption at higher stress. These contributions can be minimized by compensation.

  19. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  20. PFReports: A program for systematic checking of annual peaks in NWISWeb

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.

    2008-01-01

    The accuracy, characterization, and completeness of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) peak-flow data drive the determination of flood-frequency estimates that are used daily to design water and transportation infrastructure, delineate flood-plain boundaries, and regulate development and utilization of lands throughout the Nation and are essential to understanding the implications of climate change on flooding. Indeed, this high-profile database reflects and highlights the quality of USGS water-data collection programs. Its extension and improvement are essential to efforts to strengthen USGS networks and science leadership and is worthy of the attention of Water Science Center (WSC) hydrographers. This document describes a computer program, PFReports, and its output that facilitates efficient and robust review and correction of data in the USGS Peak Flow File (PFF) hosted as part of NWISWeb (the USGS public Web interface to much of the data stored and managed within the National Water Information System or NWIS). Checks embedded in the program are recommended as part of a more comprehensive assessment of peak flow data that will eventually include examination of possible regional changes, seasonal changes, and decadal variations in magnitude, timing, and frequency. Just as important as the comprehensive assessment, cleaning up the database will increase the likelihood of improved WSC regional flood-frequency equations. As an example of the value of cleaning up the PFF, data for 26,921 sites in the PFF were obtained. Of those sites, 17,542 sites had peak streamflow values and daily values. For the 17,542 sites, 1,097 peaks were identified that were less than the daily value for the day on which the peak occurred. Of the 26,921 sites, 11,643 had peak streamflow values, concurrent daily values, and at least 10 peaks. At the 11,643 sites, 2,205 peaks were identified as potential outliers in a regression of peak streamflows on daily values. Previous efforts to identify