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Sample records for absorption photometer psap

  1. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  2. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; ...

    2016-12-02

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  3. Absorption/Transmission Measurements of PSAP Particle-Laden Filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Field Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M.

    2017-01-01

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) non-reacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques). Advantages of the LDTR approach include 1) direct estimation of material absorption from temperature measurements (as opposed to resolving the difference between the measured reflection/scattering and transmission), 2) information on the filter optical properties, and 3) identification of the filter material effects on particle absorption (e.g., leading to particle absorption enhancement or shadowing). For measurements carried out under ambient conditions, the particle absorptivity is obtained with a thermocouple placed flush with the filter back surface and the laser probe beam impinging normal to the filter particle-laden surface. Thus, in principle one can employ a simple experimental arrangement to measure simultaneously both the transmissivity and absorptivity (at different discrete wavelengths) and ascertain the particle absorption coefficient. For this investigation, LDTR measurements were carried out with PSAP filters (pairs with both blank and exposed filters) from eight different days during the campaign, having relatively light but different particle loadings. The observed particles coating the filters were found to be carbonaceous (having broadband absorption characteristics). The LDTR absorption coefficient compared well with results from the PSAP. The

  4. Absorption/Transmission Measurements of PSAP Particle-Laden Filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Field Campaign.

    PubMed

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M

    2017-01-01

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) non-reacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). The particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques). Advantages of the LDTR approach include 1) direct estimation of material absorption from temperature measurements (as opposed to resolving the difference between the measured reflection/scattering and transmission), 2) information on the filter optical properties, and 3) identification of the filter material effects on particle absorption (e.g., leading to particle absorption enhancement or shadowing). For measurements carried out under ambient conditions, the particle absorptivity is obtained with a thermocouple placed flush with the filter back surface and the laser probe beam impinging normal to the filter particle-laden surface. Thus, in principle one can employ a simple experimental arrangement to measure simultaneously both the transmissivity and absorptivity (at different discrete wavelengths) and ascertain the particle absorption coefficient. For this investigation, LDTR measurements were carried out with PSAP filters (pairs with both blank and exposed filters) from eight different days during the campaign, having relatively light but different particle loadings. The observed particles coating the filters were found to be carbonaceous (having broadband absorption characteristics). The LDTR absorption coefficient compared well with results from the PSAP. The

  5. Radiance Research Particle Soot/Absorption Photometer Instrument Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Springston, S. R.

    2016-03-01

    Radiance Research PSAPs as described in this Handbook are deployed in the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) Aerosol Observing System (AOS), the third ARM Mobile Facility (AMF3) AOS, ENA AOS and Mobile Aerosol Observing System (MAOS)-A. An earlier version of the PSAP is currently operated in the ARM Aerial Facility and at SGP. The older SGP instrument is covered in a separate Handbook.

  6. Continuous light absorption photometer for long-term studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogren, John A.; Wendell, Jim; Andrews, Elisabeth; Sheridan, Patrick J.

    2017-12-01

    A new photometer is described for continuous determination of the aerosol light absorption coefficient, optimized for long-term studies of the climate-forcing properties of aerosols. Measurements of the light attenuation coefficient are made at blue, green, and red wavelengths, with a detection limit of 0.02 Mm-1 and a precision of 4 % for hourly averages. The uncertainty of the light absorption coefficient is primarily determined by the uncertainty of the correction scheme commonly used to convert the measured light attenuation to light absorption coefficient and ranges from about 20 % at sites with high loadings of strongly absorbing aerosols up to 100 % or more at sites with low loadings of weakly absorbing aerosols. Much lower uncertainties (ca. 40 %) for the latter case can be achieved with an advanced correction scheme.

  7. Mutation Update of ARSA and PSAP Genes Causing Metachromatic Leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cesani, Martina; Lorioli, Laura; Grossi, Serena; Amico, Giulia; Fumagalli, Francesca; Spiga, Ivana; Filocamo, Mirella; Biffi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive demyelination. The disease is caused by variants in the ARSA gene, which codes for the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase A, or, more rarely, in the PSAP gene, which codes for the activator protein saposin B. In this Mutation Update, an extensive review of all the ARSA- and PSAP-causative variants published in the literature to date, accounting for a total of 200 ARSA and 10 PSAP allele types, is presented. The detailed ARSA and PSAP variant lists are freely available on the Leiden Online Variation Database (LOVD) platform at http://www.LOVD.nl/ARSA and http://www.LOVD.nl/PSAP, respectively. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Photometer Tracks The Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Tak; Mina, Cesar; Russell, Philip; Van Ark, William

    1988-01-01

    Airborne Sun-tracking photometer enables observations of Sun during much greater portion of flights than previously possible, without special maneuvers of airplane. Instrument occupies dome atop airplane. Fiberglass dome protects photometer and rotates to aim photometer in azimuth and elevation to track Sun. Provides controlled environment for instrument, including mechanical and electronic parts. Instrument calibrated without removing it from airplane.

  9. Promoting Interoperability: The Case for Discipline-Specific PSAPS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    incidents for two reasons: first, numerous steel and concrete floors that affected signal penetration; and second, so many different companies were...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited PROMOTING...INTEROPERABILITY: THE CASE FOR DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC PSAPS by Thomas Michael Walsh December 2014 Thesis Advisor: Fathali Moghaddam Second Reader

  10. Sensitive Small Area Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levenson, M. D.

    1970-01-01

    Describes a simple photometer capable of measuring small light intensities over small areas. The inexpensive, easy-to- construct instrument is intended for use in a student laboratory to measure the light intensities in a diffraction experiment from single or multiple slits. Typical experimental results are presented along with the theoretical…

  11. Camera/Photometer Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifton, K. S.; Owens, J. K.

    1983-04-01

    Efforts continue regarding the analysis of particulate contamination recorded by the Camera/Photometers on STS-2. These systems were constructed by Epsilon Laboratories, Inc. and consisted of two 16-mm photographic cameras, using Kodak Double X film, Type 7222, to make stereoscopic observations of contaminant particles and background. Each was housed within a pressurized canister and operated automatically throughout the mission, making simultaneous exposures on a continuous basis every 150 sec. The cameras were equipped with 18-mm f/0.9 lenses and subtended overlapping 20° fields-of-view. An integrating photometer was used to inhibit the exposure sequences during periods of excessive illumination and to terminate the exposures at preset light levels. During the exposures, a camera shutter operated in a chopping mode in order to isolate the movement of particles for velocity determinations. Calculations based on the preflight film calibration indicate that particles as small as 25 μm can be detected from ideal observing conditions. Current emphasis is placed on the digitization of the photographic data frames and the determination of particle distances, sizes, and velocities. It has been concluded that background bright-ness measurements cannot be established with any reliability on the STS-2 mission, due to the preponderance of Earth-directed attitudes and the incidence of light reflected from nearby surfaces.

  12. Absorption Ångström exponents of aerosols and light absorbing carbon (LAC) obtained from in situ data in Covilhã, central Portugal.

    PubMed

    Mogo, S; Cachorro, V E; de Frutos, A; Rodrigues, A

    2012-12-01

    A field campaign was conducted from October 2009 to July 2010 at Covilhã, a small town located in the region of Beira Interior (Portugal) in the interior of the Iberian Peninsula. The ambient light-absorption coefficient, σ(a) (522 nm), obtained from a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), presented a daily mean value of 12.1 Mm⁻¹ (StD = 7.3 Mm⁻¹). The wavelength dependence of aerosol light absorption is investigated through the Ångström parameter, α(a). The α(a) values for the pair of wavelengths 470-660 nm ranged from 0.86 to 1.47 during the period of measurements. The PSAP data were used to infer the mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC) and the daily mean varied from 0.1 to 6.8 μg m⁻³. A detailed study of special events with different aerosol characteristics is carried out and, to support data interpretation, air masses trajectory analysis is performed.

  13. Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Program (ASAP & PSAP) WWW Sites http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/asap http://nepp.nasa.gov/imd/psap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brusse, Jay

    2000-01-01

    The Active and Passive Supplier Assessment Programs (ASAP and PSAP) WWW Sites provide general information to the electronic parts community regarding the availability of electronic parts. They also provide information to NASA regarding modifications to commonly used procurement specifications and test methods. The ASAP and PSAP www sites are ongoing resources produced by Code 562 in support of the NASA HQ funded NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program. These WWW sites do not provide information pertaining to patented or proprietary information. All of the information contained in these www sites is available through various other public domain resources such as US Military Qualified Producers Listings (QPLs) and Qualified Manufacturer Listings (QMLs) and industry working groups such as the Electronics Industry Alliance (EIA) and the Space Parts Working Group (SPWG).

  14. A Simple Photometer to Study Skylight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh Gordon

    2006-01-01

    A simple photometer constructed from an LED and an op amp can be used to measure light in a number of physical situations. A variety of LEDs exist to investigate different wavelength ranges. Combined with an inexpensive transit, the LED photometer can be used to carry out skylight studies and atmospheric optical depth measurements. The activities…

  15. Simple photometer circuits using modular electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wampler, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Operational and peak holding amplifiers are discussed as useful circuits for bioluminescence assays. Circuit diagrams are provided. While analog methods can give a good integration on short time scales, digital methods were found best for long term integration in bioluminescence assays. Power supplies, a general photometer circuit with ratio capability, and variations in the basic photometer design are also considered.

  16. A Photometer for Measuring Population Growth in Yeast.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatina, Robert; Hartley, Tamela; Thomas, Danita

    1999-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, portable photometer designed specifically for estimating population sizes in yeast cultures. Suggests activities for use with the photometer. (WRM)

  17. The Pierce-Blitzstein Photometer - The PBPHOT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambruster, Carol; Hull, A. B.; Koch, R. H.; Mitchell, R. J.; Smith, R. E.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the inception, development and extensive use (over 50 years) of the simultaneous 2-source, pulse-counting photometer named after the two astronomers in this paper's title. These men are not, however, the only personalities associated with the lifetime of the photometer from 1952 to 2007 and the contributions of other people are explicitly recognized. The embellishments and upgrades over time of the original conceptions are detailed for both the optical/mechanical/electrical hardware and the software. The opportunities and limitations of the three observing stations where this photometer and its prototypes were tested and functioned and the telescopes upon which they were mounted are also discussed and compared.

  18. The Hubble Space Telescope high speed photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vancitters, G. W., Jr.; Bless, R. C.; Dolan, J. F.; Elliot, J. L.; Robinson, E. L.; White, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope will provide the opportunity to perform precise astronomical photometry above the disturbing effects of the atmosphere. The High Speed Photometer is designed to provide the observatory with a stable, precise photometer with wide dynamic range, broad wavelenth coverage, time resolution in the microsecond region, and polarimetric capability. Here, the scientific requirements for the instrument are examined, the unique design features of the photometer are explored, and the improvements to be expected over the performance of ground-based instruments are projected.

  19. Cytopathogenesis of vesicular stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Irie, Takashi; Liu, Yuliang; Drolet, Barbara S; Carnero, Elena; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Harty, Ronald N

    2012-09-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our previous findings indicated that mutations of residues flanking the (37)PSAP(40) motif within the M protein resulted in VSV recombinants having attenuated phenotypes in mice. In this report, we characterize the phenotype of VSV recombinant PS > A4 (which harbors four alanines (AAAA) in place of the PSAP motif without disruption of flanking residues) in both mice, and in Aedes albopictus C6/36 mosquito and Culicoides sonorensis KC cell lines. The PS > A4 recombinant displayed an attenuated phenotype in infected mice as judged by weight loss, mortality, and viral titers measured from lung and brain samples of infected animals. However, unexpectedly, the PS > A4 recombinant displayed a robust cytopathic phenotype in insect C6/36 cells compared to that observed with control viruses. Notably, titers of recombinant PS > A4 were approximately 10-fold greater than those of control viruses in infected C6/36 cells and in KC cells from Culicoides sonorensis, a known VSV vector species. In addition, recombinant PS > A4 induced a 25-fold increase in the level of C3 caspase activity in infected C6/36 cells. These findings indicate that the PSAP motif plays a direct role in regulating cytopathogenicity in a species-dependent manner, and suggest that the intact PSAP motif may be important for maintaining persistence of VSV in an insect host.

  20. Filter type rotor for multistation photometer

    DOEpatents

    Shumate, II, Starling E.

    1977-07-12

    A filter type rotor for a multistation photometer is provided. The rotor design combines the principle of cross-flow filtration with centrifugal sedimentation so that these occur simultaneously as a first stage of processing for suspension type fluids in an analytical type instrument. The rotor is particularly useful in whole-blood analysis.

  1. Photometer for detection of sodium day airglow.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, D. J.; Manring, E. R.; Patty, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a photometer for daytime ground-based measurements of sodium airglow emission. The photometer described can be characterized by the following principal features: (1) a narrow (4.5-A) interference filter for initial discrimination; (2) cooled photomultiplier detector to reduce noise from dark current fluctuations and chopping to eliminate the average dark current; (3) a sodium vapor resonance cell to provide an effective bandpass comparable to the Doppler line width; (4) separate detection of all light transmitted by the interference filter to evaluate the Rayleigh and Mie components within the Doppler width of the resonance cell; and (5) temperature quenching of the resonance cell to evaluate and account for instrumental imperfections.

  2. A fibre optic, four channel comparative photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, E. N.

    1988-01-01

    Development of a four channel comparative photometer is described. Tests have shown that it is stable from night to night and is capable of working in very poor sky conditions. Even when the sky conditions are so poor that stars are barely visible, light curves can still be obtained with an r.m.s. value of 0.0016 mag., provided that integration times that are long compared with the transparancy changes are possible.

  3. Demonstrating Basic Properties of Spectroscopy Using a Self-Constructed Combined Fluorimeter and UV-Photometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kvittingen, Eivind V.; Kvittingen, Lise; Melø, Thor Bernt; Sjursnes, Birte Johanne; Verley, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a combined UV-photometer and fluorimeter constructed from 3 LEDs and a few wires, all held in place with Lego bricks. The instrument has a flexible design. In its simplest version, two UV-LEDs (355 nm) are used as light source and to detect absorption, and a third LED, in the visible spectrum (e.g., 525 nm), is used to…

  4. MIPS - The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C.; Lebofsky, M.; Low, F.; Strittmatter, P.; Young, E.; Beichman, C.; Gautier, T. N.; Mould, J.; Werner, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer System (MIPS) for SIRTF is to be designed to reach as closely as possible the fundamental sensitivity and angular resolution limits for SIRTF over the 3 to 700 microns spectral region. It will use high performance photoconductive detectors from 3 to 200 microns with integrating JFET amplifiers. From 200 to 700 microns, the MIPS will use a bolometer cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Over much of its operating range, the MIPS will make possible observations at and beyond the conventional Rayleigh diffraction limit of angular resolution.

  5. Rotating wedge filter photometer for high altitude sounding rocket application.

    PubMed

    Holm, C; Maehlum, B N; Narheim, B T

    1972-02-01

    A scanning photometer is described, utilizing a rotating wedge interference filter as the wavelength scanning element around 6300 A. A detailed description of the filter production is given, emphasizing the procedure for in situ wavelength control during fabrication. Subsequently, the complete photometer is briefly described, and some results from its applications on an auroral sounding rocket flight are presented.

  6. A Tracking Sun Photometer Without Moving Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is small, lightweight, and consumes very little electricity as it measures the solar energy attenuated by gases and aerosol particles in the atmosphere. A Sun photometer is commonly used on the Earth's surface, as well as on aircraft, to determine the solar energy attenuated by aerosol particles in the atmosphere and their distribution of sizes. This information is used to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, as well as their distribution sizes. The design for this Sun photometer uses a combination of unique optics and a charge coupled device (CCD) array to eliminate moving parts and make the instrument more reliable. It could be selfcalibrating throughout the year. Data products would be down-welling flux, the direct-diffuse flux ratio, column abundance of gas phase constituents, aerosol optical depth at multiple-wavelengths, phase functions, cloud statistics, and an estimate of the representative size of atmospheric particles. These measurements can be used to obtain an estimate of aerosol size distribution, refractive index, and particle shape. Incident light is received at a light-reflecting (inner) surface, which is a truncated paraboloid. Light arriving from a hemispheric field of view (solid angle 2 steradians) enters the reflecting optic at an entrance aperture at, or adjacent to, the focus of the paraboloid, and is captured by the optic. Most of this light is reflected from an inner surface. The light proceeds substantially parallel to the paraboloid axis, and is detected by an array detector located near an exit aperture. Each of the entrance and exit apertures is formed by the intersection of the paraboloid with a plane substantially perpendicular to the paraboloid axis. Incident (non-reflected) light from a source of limited extent (the Sun) illuminates a limited area on the detector array. Both direct and diffuse illumination may be reflected, or not reflected, before being received on

  7. Photometer Performance Assessment in TESS SPOC Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon Michael; Twicken, Joseph D.; Wohler, Bill; Chen, Xiaolan; Rose, Mark; TESS Science Processing Operations Center

    2018-06-01

    This poster describes the Photometer Performance Assessment (PPA) software component in the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) Science Processing Operations Center (SPOC) pipeline, which is developed based on the Kepler science pipeline. The PPA component performs two tasks: the first task is to assess the health and performance of the instrument based on the science data sets collected during each observation sector, identifying out of bounds conditions and generating alerts. The second is to combine the astrometric data collected for each CCD readout channel to construct a high fidelity record of the pointing history for each of the 4 cameras and an attitude solution for the TESS spacecraft for each 2-min data collection interval. PPA is implemented with multiple pipeline modules: PPA Metrics Determination (PMD), PMD Aggregator (PAG), and PPA Attitude Determination (PAD). The TESS Mission is funded by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. The SPOC is managed and operated by NASA Ames Research Center.

  8. Photographic photometry with Iris diaphragm photometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.

    1981-01-01

    A general method is presented for solving problems encountered in the analysis of Iris diaphragm photometer (IDP) data. The method is used to derive the general shape of the calibration curve, allowing both a more accurate fit to the IDP data for comparison stars and extrapolation to magnitude ranges for which no comparison stars are measured. The profile of starlight incident and the characteristic curve of the plate are both assumed and then used to derive the profile of the star image. An IDP reading is then determined for each star image. A procedure for correcting the effects of a nonconstant background fog level on the plate is also demonstrated. Additional applications of the method are made in the appendix to determine the relation between the radius of a photographic star image and the star's magnitude, and to predict the IDP reading of the 'point of optimum density'.

  9. A rocket-borne airglow photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paarmann, L. D.; Smith, L. G.

    1977-01-01

    The design of a rocket-borne photometer to measure the airglow emission of ionized molecular nitrogen in the 391.4 nm band is presented. This airglow is a well known and often observed phenomenon of auroras, where the principal source of ionization is energetic electrons. It is believed that at some midlatitude locations energetic electrons are also a source of nighttime ionization in the E region of the ionosphere. If this is so, then significant levels of 391.4 nm airglow should be present. The intensity of this airglow will be measured in a rocket payload which also contains instrumentation to measured in a rocket payload which also contains instrumentation to measure energetic electron differential flux and the ambient electron density. An intercomparison of the 3 experiments in a nightime launch will allow a test of the importance of energetic electrons as a nighttime source of ionization in the upper E region.

  10. Error analysis of integrated water vapor measured by CIMEL photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, I. A.; Timofeyev, Yu. M.; Virolainen, Ya. A.; Frantsuzova, I. S.; Volkova, K. A.; Poberovsky, A. V.; Holben, B. N.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.

    2017-01-01

    Water vapor plays a key role in weather and climate forming, which leads to the need for continuous monitoring of its content in different parts of the Earth. Intercomparison and validation of different methods for integrated water vapor (IWV) measurements are essential for determining the real accuracies of these methods. CIMEL photometers measure IWV at hundreds of ground-based stations of the AERONET network. We analyze simultaneous IWV measurements performed by a CIMEL photometer, an RPG-HATPRO MW radiometer, and a FTIR Bruker 125-HR spectrometer at the Peterhof station of St. Petersburg State University. We show that the CIMEL photometer calibrated by the manufacturer significantly underestimates the IWV obtained by other devices. We may conclude from this intercomparison that it is necessary to perform an additional calibration of the CIMEL photometer, as well as a possible correction of the interpretation technique for CIMEL measurements at the Peterhof site.

  11. The High Speed Photometer for the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bless, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    An overview of the high speed photometer (HSP), its optics and detectors, its electronics, its mechanical structure, and some observational considerations are presented. The capabilities and limitations of the HSP are outlined.

  12. MIPS - The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF. [Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lada, C.; Lebofsky, M.; Low, F.; Strittmatter, P.; Young, E.; Arens, J.; Beichman, C.; Gautier, T. N.; Werner, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Multiband Imaging Photometer for SIRTF (MIPS) is to be designed to reach as closely as possible the fundamental sensitivity and angular resolution limits for SIRTF over the 3 to 700 micron spectral region. It will use high performance photoconductive detectors from 3 to 200 micron with integrating JFET amplifiers. From 200 to 700 microns, the MIPS will use a bolometer cooled by an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. Over much of its operating range, the MIPS will make possible observations at and beyond the conventional Rayleigh diffraction limit of angular resolution.

  13. A multichannel fiber optic photometer present performance and future developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barwig, H.; Schoembs, R.; Huber, G.

    1988-01-01

    A three channel photometer for simultaneous multicolor observations was designed with the aim of making possible highly efficient photometry of fast variable objects like cataclysmic variables. Experiences with this instrument over a period of three years are presented. Aspects of the special techniques applied are discussed with respect to high precision photometry. In particular, the use of fiber optics is critically analyzed. Finally, the development of a new photometer concept is discussed.

  14. Developing a Stand Alone Sun Photometer for Ships and Buoys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porter, John N.

    1997-01-01

    During November and December 1995 the first Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE 1) was carried to characterize the aerosol physical and optical properties in the clean marine atmosphere near Tasmania in the South Pacific. As part of this effort, and with funding from this proposal, we installed a sun photometer on the R/V Discoverer and a spectro-photometer on the NOAA C-130 aircraft.

  15. CCD Photometer Installed on the Telescope - 600 OF the Shamakhy Astrophysical Observatory: I. Adjustment of CCD Photometer with Optics - 600

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyuty, V. M.; Abdullayev, B. I.; Alekberov, I. A.; Gulmaliyev, N. I.; Mikayilov, Kh. M.; Rustamov, B. N.

    2009-12-01

    Short description of optical and electric scheme of CCD photometer with camera U-47 installed on the Cassegrain focus of ZEISS-600 telescope of the ShAO NAS Azerbaijan is provided. The reducer of focus with factor of reduction 1.7 is applied. It is calculated equivalent focal distances of a telescope with a focus reducer. General calculations of optimum distance from focal plane and t sizes of optical filters of photometer are presented.

  16. Hyperspectral Sun Photometer for Atmospheric Characterization and Vicarious Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert; Holekamp, Kara

    2008-01-01

    A hyperspectral sun photometer and associated methods have been developed and demonstrated. Accurate sun photometer calibration is critical to properly measure the solar irradiance and characterize the atmosphere. Traditional sun photometer calibration requires solar observations over several hours. In contrast, the procedures for operating this photometer entail less data acquisition time and embody a more direct approach to calibration. The scientific value of the measurement data produced by this instrument is not adversely affected by atmospheric instability. In addition, this instrument yields hyperspectral data covering a large spectral range (350-2,500 nm) not available from most traditional sun photometers. The hyperspectral sun photometer components include (1) a commercially available spectroradiometer that has been laboratory-calibrated and (2) a commercially available reflectance standard panel that exhibits nearly Lambertian 99% reflectance. The spectroradiometer is positioned above, and aimed downward at, the panel. The procedure for operating this instrument calls for a series of measurements: one in which the panel is fully illuminated by the sun, one in which a shade is positioned between the panel and the sun, and two in which the shade is positioned to cast a shadow to either side of the panel. The total sequence of measurements can be performed in less than a minute. From these measurements, the total radiance, the diffuse radiance, and the direct solar radiance are calculated. The direct solar irradiance is calculated from the direct solar radiance and the known reflectance factor of the panel as a function of the solar zenith angle. Atmospheric characteristics are estimated from the optical depth at various wavelengths calculated from (1) the direct solar irradiance obtained as described above, (2) the air mass along a column from the measurement position to the Sun, and (3) the top-of-atmosphere solar irradiance. The instrumentation used to

  17. Photometer Performance Assessment in Kepler Science Data Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jie; Allen, Christopher; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Clarke, Bruce D.; Gunter, Jay P.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Klaus, Todd C.; Quintana, Elisa V.; hide

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the algorithms of the Photometer Performance Assessment (PPA) software component in the science data processing pipeline of the Kepler mission. The PPA performs two tasks: One is to analyze the health and performance of the Kepler photometer based on the long cadence science data down-linked via Ka band approximately every 30 days. The second is to determine the attitude of the Kepler spacecraft with high precision at each long cadence. The PPA component is demonstrated to work effectively with the Kepler flight data.

  18. Rapid and precise determination of ATP using a modified photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shultz, David J.; Stephens, Doyle W.

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive delay timer was designed to modify a commercially available ATP photometer which allows a disposable tip pipette to be used for injecting either enzyme or sample into the reaction cuvette. The disposable tip pipette is as precise and accurate as a fixed-needle syringe but eliminates the problem of sample contamination and decreases analytical time. (USGS)

  19. Ten-color Gegenschein-zodiacal light photometer. [onboard Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, J. G.; Weinberg, J. L.; Hahn, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A ten-color Fabry photometer was used during Skylab missions SL-2 and SL-3 to measure sky brightness and polarization associated with zodiacal light, background starlight, F region airglow, and spacecraft corona. A brief description is given of the design, calibration, and performance of the instrument.

  20. A pulse-mode two channel rocket photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkov, N. P.

    Benefits of vertical profile measurements of nighttime emission in the upper atmosphere are discussed. The block diagram of a two-channel rocket photometer with a common pulse operating mode for both channels is described. The requirements and features of the basic units are determined.

  1. A Performance Comparison for Two Versions of the Vulcan Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, W. J.; Caldwell, D. A.; Koch, D. G.; Jenkins, J. M.; Showen, R. L.

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the images produced by the first version (V1) of the Vulcan photometer indicated that two major sources of noise were sky brightness and image motion. To reduce the effect of the sky brightness, a second version (V2) with a longer focal length and a larger format detector was developed and tested. The first version consisted of 15-centimeter (cm) focal length, F/1.5 Aerojet Delft reconnaissance lens, and a 2048 x 2048 format front-illuminated charged coupled device (CCD) with 9 microns micropixels (Mpixels). The second version used a 30-cm focal length, F/2.5 Kodak AeroEktar lens, and a 4096 x 4096 format CCD with 9 micro pixels. Both have a 49-square-degree field of view (FOV) but the area of the sky subtended by each pixel in the V2 version is one-fourth that of the V1 version. This modification substantially reduces the shot noise due to the sky background and allows fainter stars to be monitored for planetary transits. To remove the data gap and consequent signal-level change caused by flipping the photometer around the declination axis and to reduce image movement on the detector, several other modifications were incorporated. These include modifying the mount and stiffening the photometer and autoguider structures to reduce flexure. This paper compares the performance characteristics of each photometer and discusses tests to identify sources of systematic noise.

  2. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  3. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for... Clinical Laboratory Instruments § 862.2300 Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. (a) Identification. A colorimeter, a photometer, or a spectrophotometer for clinical use is an...

  4. Development of KRISS standard reference photometer (SRP) for ambient ozone measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Lee, J.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ozone has adverse impacts on human health and ecosystem. Accurate measurement of ambient ozone concentration is essential for developing effective mitigation strategies and understanding atmospheric chemistry. Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS) has developed new ozone standard reference photometers (SRPs) for the calibration of ambient ozone instruments. The basic principle of the KRISS ozone SRPs is to determine the absorption of ultraviolet radiation at a specific wavelength, 253.7 nm, by ozone in the atmosphere. Ozone concentration is calculated by converting UV transmittance through the Beer-Lambert Law. This study introduces the newly developed ozone SRPs and characterizes their performance through uncertainty analysis and comparison with BIPM (International Bureau of Weights and Measures) SRP.

  5. A solar infrared photometer for space flight application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Deming, Drake

    1991-01-01

    A photometer concept which is capable of nearly simultaneous measurements of solar radiation from 1.6 to 200 microns in seven wavelength bands is described. This range of wavelengths can probe the solar photosphere from below the level of unit optical depth in the visible to the temperature minimum, about 500 km above it. An instrument package including a 20-cm Gregorian telescope and a filter wheel photometer utilizing noncryogenic pyroelectric infrared detectors is described. Approaches to the rejection of the visible solar spectrum in the instrument, the availability of optical and mechanical components, and the expected instrumental sensitivity are discussed. For wavelengths below 35 microns, the projected instrumental sensitivity is found to be adequate to detect the intensity signature of solar p-mode oscillations during 5 min of integration. For longer wavelengths, clear detection is expected through Fourier analysis of modest data sets.

  6. SiFAP: a Simple Sub-Millisecond Astronomical Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Meddi, F.; Nesci, R.; Rossi, C.; Sclavi, S.; Bruni, I.

    2013-09-01

    A new fast photometer based on SiPM technology was developed at the University of Rome "La Sapienza" starting from 2009. A first prototype was successfully tested observing the Crab pulsar at the Loiano telescope of the Bologna Observatory. In this paper we illustrate the improvements we applied to our instrument, concerning new cooled commercial sensors, a new version of our custom dedicated electronics and an upgraded control timing software. Finally we report the results obtained with this instrument on December 2012 on the Crab pulsar at the Loiano telescope to show its goodness and capabilities.

  7. Sky type discrimination using a ground-based sun photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2001-01-01

    A 2-year feasibility study was conducted at the USGS EROS Data Center, South Dakota (43.733°N, 96.6167°W) to assess whether a four-band, ground-based, sun photometer could be used to discriminate sky types. The results indicate that unique spectral signatures do exist between sunny skies (including clear and hazy skies) and cirrus, and cirrostratus, altocumulus or fair-weather cumulus, and thin stratocumulus or altostratus, and fog/fractostratus skies. There were insufficient data points to represent other cloud types at a statistically significant level.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope high speed photometer orbital verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Evan E.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the results of the HSP (High Speed Photometer) Orbital Verification (OV) tests and to report conclusions and lessons learned from the initial operations of the HSP. The HSP OV plan covered the activities through fine (phase 3) alignment. This report covers all activities (OV, SV, and SAO) from launch to the completion of phase 3 alignment. Those activities in this period that are not OV tests are described to the extent that they relate to OV activities.

  9. Space telescope phase B definition study. Volume 2A: Science instruments, high speed point/area photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The analysis and preliminary design of a high speed point/area photometer for the space telescope are summarized. The scientific objectives, photometer requirements, and design concepts are presented.

  10. Observation and Study of Proton Aurora by using Scanning Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, T.; Ono, T.; Kadokura, A.; Sato, N.

    2009-12-01

    The proton auroras have significant differences from electron auroras in their spectral shape. They show Doppler-shifted and broadened spectra: the spectra have Doppler-shifted (~0.5 nm shorter) peak and both bluewing (~2-4 nm) and redwing (~1.5 nm) extending. Energy spectra of precipitating protons have been estimated from this shape. Recently it is found that the intensity in the extent of the blue wing reflects more effectively by the change of the mean energy of precipitating protons than the shift of peak wavelength [Lanchester et al., 2003]. Another character of the H-beta aurora is that it is diffuse form because a proton becomes hydrogen atom due to a charge-exchange reaction with atmospheric constituent and then possible to move across the magnetic field line. By using a scanning photometer, the movement of the proton auroral belt and change of a spectrum shape associated with the variation of proton source region due to storm and substorm were reported, however, not discussed in detail yet [Deehr and Lummerzheim, 2001]. The purpose of this study is to obtain the detail characteristics of H-beta aurora for understanding of source region of energetic protons in the magnetosphere. For this purpose, a new meridian-scanning photometer (SPM) was installed at Husafell station in Iceland in last summer season and Syowa Station, Antarctica. It will contribute to investigate the distribution of energetic protons and plasma waves which cause the pitch angle scattering in the magnetosphere. The meridian-scanning photometer is able to observe at five wavelengths for H-beta emission. One channel is to measure the background level. By analyzing the data obtained by the SPM, the H-beta spectrum can be estimated by fitting a model function with it. Then it is possible to obtain distribution of precipitating protons in north-south direction. It is also possible to estimate an energy spectrum of precipitating proton, simultaneously. The instrumental parameters of the SPM is

  11. A compact, fast UV photometer for measurement of ozone from research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R. S.; Ballard, J.; Watts, L. A.; Thornberry, T. D.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2012-09-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric ozone (O3) are performed routinely from many research aircraft platforms. The most common technique depends on the strong absorption of ultraviolet (UV) light by ozone. As atmospheric science advances to the widespread use of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), there is an increasing requirement for minimizing instrument space, weight, and power while maintaining instrument accuracy, precision and time response. The design and use of a new, dual-beam, UV photometer instrument for in situ O3 measurements is described. A polarization optical-isolator configuration is utilized to fold the UV beam inside the absorption cells, yielding a 60-cm absorption length with a 30-cm cell. The instrument has a fast sampling rate (2 Hz at <200 hPa, 1 Hz at 200-500 hPa, and 0.5 Hz at ≥ 500 hPa), high accuracy (3% excluding operation in the 300-450 hPa range, where the accuracy may be degraded to about 5%), and excellent precision (1.1 × 1010 O3 molecules cm-3 at 2 Hz, which corresponds to 3.0 ppb at 200 K and 100 hPa, or 0.41 ppb at 273 K and 1013 hPa). The size (36 l), weight (18 kg), and power (50-200 W) make the instrument suitable for many UASs and other airborne platforms. Inlet and exhaust configurations are also described for ambient sampling in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (1000-50 hPa) that control the sample flow rate to maximize time response while minimizing loss of precision due to induced turbulence in the sample cell. In-flight and laboratory intercomparisons with existing O3 instruments show that measurement accuracy is maintained in flight.

  12. A compact, fast ozone UV photometer and sampling inlet for research aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R. S.; Ballard, J.; Watts, L. A.; Thornberry, T. D.; Ciciora, S. J.; McLaughlin, R. J.; Fahey, D. W.

    2012-05-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric ozone (O3) are performed routinely from many research aircraft platforms. The most common technique depends on the strong absorption of ultraviolet (UV) light by ozone. As atmospheric science advances to the widespread use of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs), there is an increasing requirement for minimizing instrument space, weight, and power while maintaining instrument accuracy, precision and time response. The design and use of a new, dual-beam, polarized, UV photometer instrument for in situ O3 measurements is described. The instrument has a fast sampling rate (2 Hz), high accuracy (3%), and precision (1.1 × 1010 O3 molecules cm-3). The size (36 l), weight (18 kg), and power (50-200 W) make the instrument suitable for many UAS and other airborne platforms. Inlet and exhaust configurations are also described for ambient sampling in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (1000-50 mb) that optimize the sample flow rate to increase time response while minimizing loss of precision due to induced turbulence in the sample cell. In-flight and laboratory intercomparisons with existing O3 instruments show that measurement accuracy is maintained in flight.

  13. Near-infrared extension of a visible spectrum airborne Sun photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starace, Marco; von Bismarck, Jonas; Hollstein, André; Ruhtz, Thomas; Preusker, René; Fischer, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    The continuously-measuring, multispectral airborne Sun and aureole photometers FUBISS-ASA and FUBISSASA2 were developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin in 2002 and 2006 respectively, for the retrieval of aerosol optical and microphysical parameters at wavelengths ranging from 400 to 900 nm. A multispectral near-infrared direct sun radiometer measuring in a spectral range of 1000 to 1700 nm has now been added to FUBISS-ASA2. The main objective of this NIR extension is to enhance the characterization of larger aerosol particles, as Mie scattering theory offers a more accurate approximation for their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, if both the VIS and NIR parts of the spectrum are considered, than it does for the VIS part only. The spectral transmissivity of atmospheric models was computed using the HITRAN2008 database in order to determine local absorption minima suitable for aerosol retrieval. Measurements were first carried out aboard the research vessel FS Polarstern on its transatlantic voyage ANT-XXVI/1. Additional measurements were performed from the Sphinx High Altitude Research Station on the Jungfraujoch and in the nearby Kleine Scheidegg locality during the CLACE2010 measurement campaign. Aerosol optical parameters derived from VIS aureole and direct sun measurements were compared to those of simulated aerosol mixtures in order to estimate the composition of the measured aerosol.

  14. FIREX-Related Biomass Burning Research Using ARM Single-Particle Soot Photometer Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Onasch, Timothy B; Sedlacek, Arthur J

    The scientific focus of this study was to investigate and quantify the mass loadings, chemical compositions, and optical properties of biomass burning particulate emissions generated in the laboratory from Western U.S. fuels using a similar instrument suite to the one deployed on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during the 2013 Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field study (Kleinman and Sedlacek, 2013). We deployed the single-particle soot photometer (SP2) to make measurements of biomass burning refractory black carbon (rBC) mass loadings and size distributions to correlate with non-refractory particulate mattermore » (NR-PM; i.e., HR-AMS) and rBC (SP-AMS) measurements as a function of photo-oxidation processes in an environmental chamber. With these measurements, we will address the following scientific questions: 1. What are the emission indices (g/kg fuel) of rBC from various wildland fuels from the Pacific Northwest (i.e., relevant to BBOP analysis) as a function of combustion conditions and simulated atmospheric processing in an environmental chamber? 2. What are the optical properties (e.g., mass-specific absorption cross-section [MAC], single-scattering albedo [SSA], and absorption Angstrom exponent [AAE)] of rBC emitted from various wildland fuels and how are they impacted by atmospheric processing? 3. How does the mixing state of rBC in biomass-burning plumes relate to the optical properties? 4. How does the emitted rBC affect radiative forcing?« less

  15. Design and Characterization of a Photometer-Colorimeter Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, George P.; Rácz, Miklós

    2004-05-01

    A photometer and tristimulus colorimeter has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to realize a color scale. A novel construction was developed to implement the spectral-responsivity-based scale with small uncertainty. The new device can be used as a reference illuminance and luminance meter as well. Temperature-controlled filter combinations, with 5-8 layers in one package, are used to match the responsivity of a silicon tunnel-trap detector to the CIE color-matching functions with small spectral mismatch values (f1'). Design considerations to extend the tunnel-trap detector with replaceable single and double apertures and changeable filter combinations are described. The design and fabrication of the filter packages and the dependence of the f1' values on the thickness of the filter layers are discussed. The colorimeter was characterized for angular, spatial, and spectral responsivity. An improved preamplifier can convert current to voltage in an 11-decade dynamic range with 0.01% uncertainty.

  16. Design and characterization of a photometer-colorimeter standard.

    PubMed

    Eppeldauer, George P; Rácz, Miklós

    2004-05-01

    A photometer and tristimulus colorimeter has been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to realize a color scale. A novel construction was developed to implement the spectral-responsivity-based scale with small uncertainty. The new device can be used as a reference illuminance and luminance meter as well. Temperature-controlled filter combinations, with 5-8 layers in one package, are used to match the responsivity of a silicon tunnel-trap detector to the CIE color-matching functions with small spectral mismatch values (f1'). Design considerations to extend the tunnel-trap detector with replaceable single and double apertures and changeable filter combinations are described. The design and fabrication of the filter packages and the dependence of the f1' values on the thickness of the filter layers are discussed. The colorimeter was characterized for angular, spatial, and spectral responsivity. An improved preamplifier can convert current to voltage in an 11-decade dynamic range with 0.01% uncertainty.

  17. SphinX: The Solar Photometer in X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gburek, Szymon; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Kordylewski, Zbigniew; Podgorski, Piotr; Plocieniak, Stefan; Siarkowski, Marek; Sylwester, Barbara; Trzebinski, Witold; Kuzin, Sergey V.; Pertsov, Andrey A.; Kotov, Yurij D.; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2013-04-01

    Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was a spectrophotometer developed to observe the Sun in soft X-rays. The instrument observed in the energy range ≈ 1 - 15 keV with resolution ≈ 0.4 keV. SphinX was flown on the Russian CORONAS-PHOTON satellite placed inside the TESIS EUV and X telescope assembly. The spacecraft launch took place on 30 January 2009 at 13:30 UT at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Russia. The SphinX experiment mission began a couple of weeks later on 20 February 2009 when the first telemetry dumps were received. The mission ended nine months later on 29 November 2009 when data transmission was terminated. SphinX provided an excellent set of observations during very low solar activity. This was indeed the period in which solar activity dropped to the lowest level observed in X-rays ever. The SphinX instrument design, construction, and operation principle are described. Information on SphinX data repositories, dissemination methods, format, and calibration is given together with general recommendations for data users. Scientific research areas in which SphinX data find application are reviewed.

  18. A new, low-cost sun photometer for student use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, A.; Pérez-Álvarez, H.; Parra-Vilchis, J. I.; Fauchey-López, E.; Fernando-González, L.; Faus-Landeros, G. E.; Celarier, E. A.; Robinson, D. Q.; Zepeda-Galbez, R.

    2011-12-01

    We have designed a sun photometer for the measurement of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 505 nm and 620 nm, using custom-made glass filters (9.5 nm bandpass, FWHM) and photodiodes. The recommended price-point (US150 - US200) allowed us to incorporate technologies such as microcontrollers, a sun target, a USB port for data uploading, nonvolatile memory to contain tables of up to 127 geolocation profiles, extensive calibration data, and a log of up to 2,000 measurements. The instrument is designed to be easy to use, and to provide instant display of AOT estimates. A diffuser in the fore-optics limits the sensitivity to pointing error. We have developed postprocessing software to refine the AOT estimates, format a spreadsheet file, and upload the data to the GLOBE website. We are currently finalizing hardware and firmware, and conducting extensive calibration/validation experiments. These instruments will soon be in production and available to the K-12 education community, including and especially the GLOBE program.

  19. Evaluation of a Portable Photometer for Estimating Diesel Particulate Matter Concentrations in an Underground Limestone Mine

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Winthrop F.; Gladis, David D.; Schumacher, Matthew F.; Ragatz, Adam C.; Kittelson, David B.

    2010-01-01

    A low cost, battery-operated, portable, real-time aerosol analyzer is not available for monitoring diesel particulate matter (DPM) concentrations in underground mines. This study summarizes a field evaluation conducted at an underground limestone mine to evaluate the potential of the TSI AM 510 portable photometer (equipped with a Dorr-Oliver cyclone and 1.0-μm impactor) to qualitatively track time-weighted average mass and elemental, organic, and total carbon (TC) measurements associated with diesel emissions. The calibration factor corrected correlation coefficient (R2) between the underground TC and photometer measurements was 0.93. The main issues holding back the use of a photometer for real-time estimation of DPM in an underground mine are the removal of non-DPM-associated particulate matter from the aerosol stream using devices, such as a cyclone and/or impactor and calibration of the photometer to mine-specific aerosol. PMID:20410071

  20. Novel Hyperspectral Sun Photometer for Satellite Remote Sensing Data Radiometric Calibration and Atmospheric Aerosol Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; Harrington, Gary; Frisbie, Troy

    2006-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective, hyperspectral sun photometer for radiometric vicarious remote sensing system calibration, air quality monitoring, and potentially in-situ planetary climatological studies, was developed. The device was constructed solely from off the shelf components and was designed to be easily deployable for support of short-term verification and validation data collects. This sun photometer not only provides the same data products as existing multi-band sun photometers, this device requires a simpler setup, less data acquisition time and allows for a more direct calibration approach. Fielding this instrument has also enabled Stennis Space Center (SSC) Applied Sciences Directorate personnel to cross calibrate existing sun photometers. This innovative research will position SSC personnel to perform air quality assessments in support of the NASA Applied Sciences Program's National Applications program element as well as to develop techniques to evaluate aerosols in a Martian or other planetary atmosphere.

  1. Spectral responsivity-based calibration of photometer and colorimeter standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppeldauer, George P.

    2013-08-01

    Several new generation transfer- and working-standard illuminance meters and tristimulus colorimeters have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) [1] to measure all kinds of light sources with low uncertainty. The spectral and broad-band (illuminance) responsivities of the photometer (Y) channels of two tristimulus meters were determined at both the Spectral Irradiance and Radiance Responsivity Calibrations using Uniform Sources (SIRCUS) facility and the Spectral Comparator Facility (SCF) [2]. The two illuminance responsivities agreed within 0.1% with an overall uncertainty of 0.2% (k = 2), which is a factor of two improvement over the present NIST photometric scale. The first detector-based tristimulus color scale [3] was realized. All channels of the reference tristimulus colorimeter were calibrated at the SIRCUS. The other tristimulus meters were calibrated at the SCF and also against the reference meter on the photometry bench in broad-band measurement mode. The agreement between detector- and source-based calibrations was within 3 K when a tungsten lamp-standard was measured at 2856 K and 3100 K [4]. The color-temperature uncertainty of tungsten lamp measurements was 4 K (k = 2) between 2300 K and 3200 K, which is a factor of two improvement over the presently used NIST source-based color temperature scale. One colorimeter was extended with an additional (fifth) channel to apply software implemented matrix corrections. With this correction, the spectral mismatch caused color difference errors were decreased by a factor of 20 for single-color LEDs.

  2. An inexpensive and stable LED Sun photometer for measuring the water vapor column over South Texas from 1990 to 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mims, Forrest M.

    2002-07-01

    A Sun photometer that uses near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as spectrally-selective photodetectors has measured total column water vapor in South Texas since February 1990. The 12 years of solar noon observations to date are correlated with upper air soundings at Del Rio, Texas (r2 = 0.75), and highly correlated with measurements by a Microtops II filter Sun photometer (r2 = 0.94). LEDs are inexpensive and have far better long term stability than the interference filters in conventional Sun photometers. The LED Sun photometer therefore provides an inexpensive, stable and portable means for measuring column water vapor.

  3. Influence of the spectral power distribution of a LED on the illuminance responsivity of a photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sametoglu, Ferhat

    2008-09-01

    The measurement accuracy in the photometric quantities measured through photometer head is determined by the value of the spectral mismatch correction factor ( c( St, Ss)), which is defined as a function of spectral power distribution of light sources, besides illuminance responsivity of the photometer head used. This factor is more important when photometric quantities of the light-emitting diode (LED) style optical sources, which radiate within relatively narrow spectral bands as compared with that of other optical sources, are being measured. Variations of the illuminance responsivities of various V( λ)-adopted photometer heads are discussed. High-power-colored LEDs, manufactured by Lumileds Lighting Co., were used as light sources and their relative spectral power distributions (RSPDs) were measured using a spectrometer-based optical setup. Dependences of the c( St, Ss) factors of three types of photometer heads ( f1'=1.4%, f1'=0.8% and f1'=0.5%) with wavelength and influences of the factors on the illuminance responsivities of photometer heads are presented.

  4. Novel Hyperspectral Sun Photometer for Satellite Remote Sensing Data Radiometeic Calibration and Atmospheric Aerosol Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; Harrington, Gary; Frisbie, Troy

    2006-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective, hyperspectral sun photometer for radiometric vicarious remote sensing system calibration, air quality monitoring, and potentially in-situ planetary climatological studies, was developed. The device was constructed solely from off the shelf components and was designed to be easily deployable for support of short-term verification and validation data collects. This sun photometer not only provides the same data products as existing multi-band sun photometers but also the potential of hyperspectral optical depth and diffuse-to-global products. As compared to traditional sun photometers, this device requires a simpler setup, less data acquisition time and allows for a more direct calibration approach. Fielding this instrument has also enabled Stennis Space Center (SSC) Applied Sciences Directorate personnel to cross-calibrate existing sun photometers. This innovative research will position SSC personnel to perform air quality assessments in support of the NASA Applied Sciences Program's National Applications program element as well as to develop techniques to evaluate aerosols in a Martian or other planetary atmosphere.

  5. Characteristics of CMEs observed in the heliosphere using Helios photometer data. [coronal mass ejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, D. F.; Jackson, B. V.

    1992-01-01

    The zodiacal light photometers on the two Helios spacecraft have been used to detect and study mass ejections and other phenomena emanating from the sun and traversing the heliosphere within 1 AU. We have recently compiled a complete list of all of the significant white light transient events detected from the 90-deg photometers on both Helios spacecraft. This is a preliminary report on the long-term frequency of occurrence of these events; it emphasizes newly processed data from Helios-l from 1975 through 1982 and viewed south of the ecliptic. With the large Helios photometer data base, we will be able to identify the fraction of the 90 deg events which are heliospheric CMEs and determine their characteristics.

  6. Characteristics of an aerosol photometer while automatically controlling chamber dilution-air flow rate.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, P T; Hemenway, D R

    2000-10-01

    Trials were conducted to determine those factors that affect the accuracy of a direct-reading aerosol photometer when automatically controlling airflow rate within an exposure chamber to regulate airborne dust concentrations. Photometer response was affected by a shift in the aerosol size distribution caused by changes in chamber flow rate. In addition to a dilution effect, flow rate also determined the relative amount of aerosol lost to sedimentation within the chamber. Additional calculations were added to a computer control algorithm to compensate for these effects when attempting to automatically regulate flow based on a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) feedback control algorithm. A comparison between PID-controlled trials and those performed with a constant generator output rate and dilution-air flow rate demonstrated that there was no significant decrease in photometer accuracy despite the many changes in flow rate produced when using PID control. Likewise, the PID-controlled trials produced chamber aerosol concentrations within 1% of a desired level.

  7. A white super-stable source for the metrology of astronomical photometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildi, F. P.; Deline, A.; Chazelas, B.

    2015-09-01

    The testing of photometers and in particular the testing of high precision photometers for the detection of planetary transits requires a light source which photometric stability is to par or better than the goal stability of the photometer to be tested. In the frame of the CHEOPS mission, a comprehensive calibration bench has been developed. Aside from measuring the sensibility of the CHEOPS payload to the different environmental conditions, this bench will also be used to test the relative accuracy of the payload. A key element of this bench is an extremely stable light source that is used to create an artificial star which is then projected into the payload's telescope. We present here the development of this payload and the performance achieved.

  8. Determination of nocturnal aerosol properties from a combination of lunar photometer and lidar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Donghui; Li, Zhengqiang; Lv, Yang; Zhang, Ying; Li, Kaitao; Xu, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Aerosol plays a key role in the assessment of global climate change and environmental health, while observation is one of important way to deepen the understanding of aerosol properties. In this study, the newly instrument - lunar photometer is used to measure moonlight and nocturnal column aerosol optical depth (AOD, τ) is retrieved. The AOD algorithm is test and verified with sun photometer both in high and low aerosol loading. Ångström exponent (α) and fine/coarse mode AOD (τf, τc) 1 is derived from spectral AOD. The column aerosol properties (τ, α, τf, τc) inferred from the lunar photometer is analyzed based on two month measurement in Beijing. Micro-pulse lidar has advantages in retrieval of aerosol vertical distribution, especially in night. However, the typical solution of lidar equation needs lidar ratio(ratio of aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficient) assumed in advance(Fernald method), or constrained by AOD2. Yet lidar ratio is varied with aerosol type and not easy to fixed, and AOD is used of daylight measurement, which is not authentic when aerosol loading is different from day and night. In this paper, the nocturnal AOD measurement from lunar photometer combined with mie scattering lidar observations to inverse aerosol extinction coefficient(σ) profile in Beijing is discussed.

  9. Build Your Own Photometer: A Guided-Inquiry Experiment to Introduce Analytical Instrumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Jessie J.; Nun´ez, Jose´ R. Rodríguez; Maxwell, E. Jane; Algar, W. Russ

    2016-01-01

    A guided-inquiry project designed to teach students the basics of spectrophotometric instrumentation at the second year level is presented. Students design, build, program, and test their own single-wavelength, submersible photometer using low-cost light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and inexpensive household items. A series of structured prelaboratory…

  10. GOES Satellite Data Validation Via Hand-held 4 LED Sun Photometer at Norfolk State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Arthur, Jr.; Jackson, Tyrone; Reynolds, Kevin; Davidson, Cassy; Coope-Pabis, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Sun photometry is a passive means of measuring a quantity of light radiation. The GIFTS- IOMI/GLOBE Water Vapor/Haze Sun photometer contains four light emitting diodes (LEDs), which are used to convert photocurrent to voltage. The intensity of the incoming and outgoing radiation as detected on the Earth s surface can be affected by aerosols and gases in the atmosphere. The focus of this research is primarily on aerosol and water vapor particles that absorb and reemit energy. Two LEDs in the photometer correspond to light scattered at 530 nm (green spectrum) and 620 nm (red spectrum). They collect data pertaining to aerosols that scatter light. The other two LEDs detect the light scattered by water vapor at wavelengths of 820 nm and 920 nm. The water vapor measurements will be compared to data collected by the Geostationary Observation Environmental Satellite (GOES). Before a comparison can be made, the extraterrestrial constant (ET), which is intrinsic to each sun photometer, must be measured. This paper will present determination of the ET constant, from which the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) can be computed for comparison to the GOES satellite to ascertain the reliability of the sun photometer.

  11. Using a Homemade Flame Photometer to Measure Sodium Concentration in a Sports Drink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFratta, Christopher N.; Jain, Swapan; Pelse, Ian; Simoska, Olja; Elvy, Karina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to create a simple and inexpensive flame photometer to measure the concentration of sodium in beverages, such as Gatorade. We created a nebulizer using small tubing and sprayed the sample into the base of a Bunsen burner. Adjacent to the flame was a photodiode with a filter specific for the emission of the sodium…

  12. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. 862.2300 Section 862.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES...

  13. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. 862.2300 Section 862.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES...

  14. 21 CFR 862.2300 - Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Colorimeter, photometer, or spectrophotometer for clinical use. 862.2300 Section 862.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES...

  15. Quantification of online removal of refractory black carbon using laser-induced incandescence in the single particle soot photometer

    DOE PAGES

    Aiken, Allison C.; McMeeking, Gavin R.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; ...

    2016-04-05

    Refractory black carbon (rBC) is an aerosol that has important impacts on climate and human health. rBC is often mixed with other species, making it difficult to isolate and quantify its important effects on physical and optical properties of ambient aerosol. To solve this measurement challenge, a new method to remove rBC was developed using laser-induced incandescence (LII) by Levin et al. in 2014. Application of the method with the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is used to determine the effects of rBC on ice nucleating particles (INP). Here, we quantify the efficacy of the method in the laboratory usingmore » the rBC surrogate Aquadag. Polydisperse and mobility-selected samples (100–500 nm diameter, 0.44–36.05 fg), are quantified by a second SP2. Removal rates are reported by mass and number. For the mobility-selected samples, the average percentages removed by mass and number of the original size are 88.9 ± 18.6% and 87.3 ± 21.9%, respectively. Removal of Aquadag is efficient for particles >100 nm mass-equivalent diameter (d me), enabling application for microphysical studies. However, the removal of particles ≤100 nm d me is less efficient. Absorption and scattering measurements are reported to assess its use to isolate brown carbon (BrC) absorption. Scattering removal rates for the mobility-selected samples are >90% on average, yet absorption rates are 53% on average across all wavelengths. Therefore, application to isolate effects of microphysical properties determined by larger sizes is promising, but will be challenging for optical properties. Lastly, the results reported also have implications for other instruments employing internal LII, e.g., the Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS).« less

  16. AERONET derived (BC) aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, S.

    2015-12-01

    AERONET is a ground-based sun-/sky-photometer network with good annual statistics at more than 400 sites worldwide. Inversion methods applied to these data define all relevant column aerosol optical properties and reveal even microphysical detail. The extracted data include estimates for aerosol size-distributions and for aerosol refractive indices at four different solar wavelengths. Hereby, the imaginary parts of the refractive indices define the aerosol column absorption. For regional and global averages and radiative impact assessment with off-line radiative transfer, these local data have been extended with distribution patterns offered by AeroCom modeling experiments. Annual and seasonal absorption distributions for total aerosol and estimates for component contributions (such as BC) are presented and associated direct forcing impacts are quantified.

  17. Compact light-emitting-diode sun photometer for atmospheric optical depth measurements.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Y B; Jayaraman, A; Ramachandran, S; Subbaraya, B H

    1995-03-01

    A new compact light-emitting diode (LED) sun photometer, in which a LED is used as a spectrally selective photodetector as well as a nonlinear feedback element in the operational amplifier, has been developed. The output voltage that is proportional to the logarithm of the incident solar intensity permits the direct measurement of atmospheric optical depths in selected spectral bands. Measurements made over Ahmedabad, India, show good agreement, within a few percent, of optical depths derived with a LED as a photodetector in a linear mode and with a LED as both a photodetector and a feedback element in an operational amplifier in log mode. The optical depths are also found to compare well with those obtained simultaneously with a conventional filter photometer.

  18. AOT Retrieval Procedure for Distributed Measurements With Low-Cost Sun Photometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, F.; Garrido, C.; Díaz, M.; Rondanelli, R.; Jorquera, S.; Valdivieso, P.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a new application of inexpensive light-emitting diode (LED)-based Sun photometers, consisting of measuring the aerosol optical thickness (AOT) with high resolution within metropolitan scales. Previously, these instruments have been used at continental scales by the GLOBE program, but this extension is already covered by more expensive and higher-precision instruments of the AERONET global network. For this we built an open source two-channeled LED-based Sun photometer based on previous developments, with improvements in the hardware, software, and modifications on the calibration procedure. Among these we highlight the use of MODTRAN to characterize the effect introduced by using LED sensors in the AOT retrieval, an open design available for the scientific community and a calibration procedure that takes advantage of a CIMEL Sun photometer located within the city, enables the intercomparison of several LED Sun photometers with a common reference. We estimated the root-mean-square error in the AOT retrieved by the prototypes as 0.006 at the 564 nm and 0.009 at the 408 nm. This error is way under the magnitude of the AOT daily cycle variability measured by us in our campaigns, even for distances closer than 15 km. In addition to inner city campaigns, we also show aerosol-tracing applications by measuring AOT variations from the city of Santiago to the Andes glaciers. Measuring AOT at high spatial resolution in urban areas can improve our understanding of urban scale aerosol circulation, providing information for solar energy planning, health policies, and climatological studies, among others.

  19. Method of Reproduction of the Luminous Flux of the LED Light Sources by a Spherical Photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huriev, M.; Neyezhmakov, P.

    2018-02-01

    In connection with transition to energy-efficient temporally stable light-emitting diodes (LEDs) lighting, a problem of ensuring the traceability of results of measurement of characteristics of light sources arises. The problem is related to existing measurement standards of luminous flux based on spherical photometers optimized for the reference incandescent lamps with a relative spectral characteristic different from the spectrum of the LEDs. We propose a method for reproduction of the luminous flux, which solves this problem.

  20. Input-output Transfer Function Analysis of a Photometer Circuit Based on an Operational Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Wilmar

    2008-01-09

    In this paper an input-output transfer function analysis based on the frequencyresponse of a photometer circuit based on operational amplifier (op amp) is carried out. Opamps are universally used in monitoring photodetectors and there are a variety of amplifierconnections for this purpose. However, the electronic circuits that are usually used to carryout the signal treatment in photometer circuits introduce some limitations in theperformance of the photometers that influence the selection of the op amps and otherelectronic devices. For example, the bandwidth, slew-rate, noise, input impedance and gain,among other characteristics of the op amp, are often the performance limiting factors ofphotometer circuits. For this reason, in this paper a comparative analysis between twophotodiode amplifier circuits is carried out. One circuit is based on a conventional currentto-voltage converter connection and the other circuit is based on a robust current-to-voltageconverter connection. The results are satisfactory and show that the photodiode amplifierperformance can be improved by using robust control techniques.

  1. Hand-Held Photometer for Instant On-Spot Quantification of Nucleic Acids, Proteins, and Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shi-Hao; Jain, Abhinav; Tscharntke, Timo; Arnold, Tobias; Trau, Dieter W

    2018-02-20

    This paper presents a novel hand-held photometer, termed "Photopette", for on-spot absorbance measurements of biochemical analytes. The Photopette is a multicomponent, highly portable device with an overall weight of 160 g, which fits within 202 mm × 47 mm × 42 mm. Designed in the form factor of a micropipette, Photopette integrates a photodiode detector with light emitting diodes (LEDs) to form a highly customizable photometer which supports a wide variety of applications within the wavelengths between 260 and 1050 nm. A dual-purpose disposable reflective tip was designed to act as a sample holder and a light-reflecting system, which is in stark contrast to the operation of mainstream spectrophotometers and photometers. Small volume analytes may be measured with low sample loss using this proprietary CuveTip. A user-friendly software application running on smart devices was developed to control and read the values from Photopette via a low-energy Bluetooth link. This one-step strategy allows measurements on-spot without sample transfer, minimizing cross-contamination and human error. The results reported in this paper demonstrate Photopette's great potential to quantify DNA, direct protein, and cell density directly within the laminar flow hood. Results are compared with a Nanodrop 2000c spectrophotometer, a mainstream spectrophotometer for small-volume measurements.

  2. Evaluation of an aerosol photometer for monitoring welding fume levels in a shipyard.

    PubMed

    Glinsmann, P W; Rosenthal, F S

    1985-07-01

    A direct reading aerosol photometer (Sibata P-5 Digital Dust Indicator) was used to assess fume levels from welding and burning operations in a shipyard. The photometer was calibrated with gravimetric analysis of filter samples collected simultaneously with instrument readings. A six-fold difference between calibration factors for personal and area samples was found. This difference can be explained by expected changes in particle size distributions in welding fume. Monitoring of various work situations was performed in order to assess the value of the photometer for the measurement of fume. Measurements categorized by enclosure of space and quality of ventilation indicated the presence of high fume levels in semi-enclosed and enclosed spaces. The build up of welding fume in an enclosed space occurred over several minutes after the arc was struck. Decay likewise required several minutes. During welding, wide fluctuations of fume concentrations were found. Thus a single reading was not adequate to characterize average fume levels. Although this type of instrument is useful for locating areas with high fume levels and monitoring the effectiveness of ventilation, the uncertainty in calibration factors makes accurate determinations of fume levels difficult.

  3. Folded tubular photometer for atmospheric measurements of NO2 and NO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birks, John W.; Andersen, Peter C.; Williford, Craig J.; Turnipseed, Andrew A.; Strunk, Stanley E.; Ennis, Christine A.; Mattson, Erick

    2018-05-01

    We describe and characterize a modular folded tubular photometer for making direct measurements of the concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and specify how this method could be extended to measure other pollutants such as sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), and black carbon particulate matter. Direct absorbance measurements using this photometer can be made across the spectral range from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared. The absorbance cell makes use of modular components (tubular detection cells and mirror cubes) that allow construction of path lengths of up to 2 m or more while maintaining low cell volumes. The long path lengths and low cell volumes enable sensitive detection of ambient air pollutants down to low part-per-billion levels for gas species and aerosol extinctions down to 1 Mm-1, corresponding to ˜ 0.1 µg m-3 for black carbon particulates. Pressure equalization throughout the stages of the absorbance measurement is shown to be critical to accurate measurements of analyte concentrations. The present paper describes the application of this photometer to direct measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the incorporation of design features that also enable measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in the same instrument. Excellent agreement for ambient measurements along an urban roadside was found for both NO2 and NO measured by the folded tubular photometer compared to existing standard techniques. Compared to commonly used methods for measurements of NOx species, the advantages of this approach include (1) an absolute quantification for NO2 based on the Beer-Lambert law, thereby greatly reducing the frequency at which calibrations are required; (2) the direct measurement of NO2 concentration without prior conversion to NO as is required for the commonly used chemiluminescence method; (3) the use of modular components that allow construction of absorbance detection cells of varying lengths for extending the dynamic range of concentrations that can

  4. Biomass Burning Research Using DOE ARM Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Onasch, Timothy B; Sedlacek, Arthur J; Lewis, Ernie

    The focus of this laboratory study was to investigate the chemical and optical properties, and the detection efficiencies, of tar balls generated in the laboratory using the same instruments deployed on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during the 2013 Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field study, during which tar balls were observed in wildland biomass burning particulate emissions. Key goals of this laboratory study were: (a) measuring the chemical composition of tar balls to provide insights into the atmospheric processes that form (evaporation/oxidation) and modify them in biomass burningmore » plumes, (b) identifying whether tar balls contain refractory black carbon, (c) determining the collection efficiencies of tar balls impacting on the 600oC heated tungsten vaporizer in the Aerodyne Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS) (i.e., given the observed low volatilities, AMS measurements might underestimate organic biomass burning plume loadings), and (d) measuring the wavelength-dependent, mass-specific absorption cross-sections of brown carbon components of tar balls. This project was funded primarily by the DOE Atmospheric System Research (ASR) program, and the ARM Facility made their single-particle soot photometer (SP2) available for September 1-September 31, 2016 in the Aerodyne laboratories. The ARM mentor (Dr. Sedlacek) requested no funds for mentorship or data reduction. All ARM SP2 data collected as part of this project are archived in the ARM Data Archive in accordance with established protocols. The main objectives of the ARM Biomass Burning Observation Period (BBOP, July-October, 2013) field campaign were to (1) assess the impact of wildland fires in the Pacific Northwest on climate, through near-field and regional intensive measurement campaigns, and (2) investigate agricultural burns to determine how those biomass burn plumes differ

  5. Switched integration amplifier-based photocurrent meter for accurate spectral responsivity measurement of photometers.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongchong; Hong, Kee-Suk; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2016-03-20

    This work introduces a switched integration amplifier (SIA)-based photocurrent meter for femtoampere (fA)-level current measurement, which enables us to measure a 107 dynamic range of spectral responsivity of photometers even with a common lamp-based monochromatic light source. We described design considerations and practices about operational amplifiers (op-amps), switches, readout methods, etc., to compose a stable SIA of low offset current in terms of leakage current and gain peaking in detail. According to the design, we made six SIAs of different integration capacitance and different op-amps and evaluated their offset currents. They showed an offset current of (1.5-85) fA with a slow variation of (0.5-10) fA for an hour under opened input. Applying a detector to the SIA input, the offset current and its variation were increased and the SIA readout became noisier due to finite shunt resistance and nonzero shunt capacitance of the detector. One of the SIAs with 10 pF nominal capacitance was calibrated using a calibrated current source at the current level of 10 nA to 1 fA and at the integration time of 2 to 65,536 ms. As a result, we obtained a calibration formula for integration capacitance as a function of integration time rather than a single capacitance value because the SIA readout showed a distinct dependence on integration time at a given current level. Finally, we applied it to spectral responsivity measurement of a photometer. It is demonstrated that the home-made SIA of 10 pF was capable of measuring a 107 dynamic range of spectral responsivity of a photometer.

  6. Hubble Space Telescope: High speed photometer instrument handbook. Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Richard L. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    This manual is a guide for astronomers who intend to use the High Speed Photometer (HSP), one of the scientific instruments onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). All the information needed for ordinary uses of the HSP is presented, including: (1) an overview of the instrument; (2) a detailed description of some details of the HSP-ST system that may be important for some observations; (3) tables and figures describing the sensitivity and limitations of the HSP; (4) how to go about planning an observation with the HSP; and (5) a description of the standard calibration to be applied to HSP data and the resulting data products.

  7. AMPS definition study on Optical Band Imager and Photometer System (OBIPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, T. N.; Deehr, C. S.; Hallinan, T. J.; Wescott, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to define the characteristics of a modular optical diagnostic system (OBIPS) for AMPS, to provide input to Phase B studies, and to give information useful for experiment planning and design of other instrumentation. The system described consists of visual and UV-band imagers and visual and UV-band photometers; of these the imagers are most important because of their ability to measure intensity as a function of two spatial dimensions and time with high resolution. The various subsystems of OBIPS are in themselves modular with modules having a high degree of interchangeability for versatility, economy, and redundancy.

  8. MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) on board the TARANIS satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farges, T.; Hébert, P.; Le Mer-Dachard, F.; Ravel, K.; Gaillac, S.

    2017-12-01

    TARANIS (Tool for the Analysis of Radiations from lightNing and Sprites) is a CNES micro satellite. Its main objective is to study impulsive transfers of energy between the Earth atmosphere and the space environment. It will be sun-synchronous at an altitude of 700 km. It will be launched in 2019 for at least 2 years. Its payload is composed of several electromagnetic instruments in different wavelengths (from gamma-rays to radio waves including optical). TARANIS instruments are currently in calibration and qualification phase. The purpose is to present the MicroCameras and Photometers (MCP) design, to show its performances after its recent characterization and at last to discuss the scientific objectives and how we want to answer it with the MCP observations. The MicroCameras, developed by Sodern, are dedicated to the spatial description of TLEs and their parent lightning. They are able to differentiate sprite and lightning thanks to two narrow bands ([757-767 nm] and [772-782 nm]) that provide simultaneous pairs of images of an Event. Simulation results of the differentiation method will be shown. After calibration and tests, the MicroCameras are now delivered to the CNES for integration on the payload. The Photometers, developed by Bertin Technologies, will provide temporal measurements and spectral characteristics of TLEs and lightning. There are key instrument because of their capability to detect on-board TLEs and then switch all the instruments of the scientific payload in their high resolution acquisition mode. Photometers use four spectral bands in the [170-260 nm], [332-342 nm], [757-767 nm] and [600-900 nm] and have the same field of view as cameras. The on-board TLE detection algorithm remote-controlled parameters have been tuned before launch using the electronic board and simulated or real events waveforms. After calibration, the Photometers are now going through the environmental tests. They will be delivered to the CNES for integration on the

  9. Remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth using a smartphone sun photometer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tingting; Thompson, Jonathan E

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, smart phones have been explored for making a variety of mobile measurements. Smart phones feature many advanced sensors such as cameras, GPS capability, and accelerometers within a handheld device that is portable, inexpensive, and consistently located with an end user. In this work, a smartphone was used as a sun photometer for the remote sensing of atmospheric optical depth. The top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) irradiance was estimated through the construction of Langley plots on days when the sky was cloudless and clear. Changes in optical depth were monitored on a different day when clouds intermittently blocked the sun. The device demonstrated a measurement precision of 1.2% relative standard deviation for replicate photograph measurements (38 trials, 134 datum). However, when the accuracy of the method was assessed through using optical filters of known transmittance, a more substantial uncertainty was apparent in the data. Roughly 95% of replicate smart phone measured transmittances are expected to lie within ±11.6% of the true transmittance value. This uncertainty in transmission corresponds to an optical depth of approx. ±0.12-0.13 suggesting the smartphone sun photometer would be useful only in polluted areas that experience significant optical depths. The device can be used as a tool in the classroom to present how aerosols and gases effect atmospheric transmission. If improvements in measurement precision can be achieved, future work may allow monitoring networks to be developed in which citizen scientists submit acquired data from a variety of locations.

  10. Nighttime Aerosol Optical Depth Measurements Using a Ground-based Lunar Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkoff, Tim; Omar, Ali; Haggard, Charles; Pippin, Margaret; Tasaddaq, Aasam; Stone, Tom; Rodriguez, Jon; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Tom; Holben, Brent; hide

    2015-01-01

    In recent years it was proposed to combine AERONET network photometer capabilities with a high precision lunar model used for satellite calibration to retrieve columnar nighttime AODs. The USGS lunar model can continuously provide pre-atmosphere high precision lunar irradiance determinations for multiple wavelengths at ground sensor locations. When combined with measured irradiances from a ground-based AERONET photometer, atmospheric column transmissions can determined yielding nighttime column aerosol AOD and Angstrom coefficients. Additional demonstrations have utilized this approach to further develop calibration methods and to obtain data in polar regions where extended periods of darkness occur. This new capability enables more complete studies of the diurnal behavior of aerosols, and feedback for models and satellite retrievals for the nighttime behavior of aerosols. It is anticipated that the nighttime capability of these sensors will be useful for comparisons with satellite lidars such as CALIOP and CATS in additional to ground-based lidars in MPLNET at night, when the signal-to-noise ratio is higher than daytime and more precise AOD comparisons can be made.

  11. High aerosol load over the Pearl River Delta, China, observed with Raman lidar and Sun photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansmann, Albert; Engelmann, Ronny; Althausen, Dietrich; Wandinger, Ulla; Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuanghang; He, Qianshan

    2005-07-01

    Height-resolved data of the particle optical properties, the vertical extend of the haze layer, aerosol stratification, and the diurnal cycle of vertical mixing over the Pearl River Delta in southern China are presented. The observations were performed with Raman lidar and Sun photometer at Xinken (22.6°N, 113.6°E) near the south coast of China throughout October 2004. The lidar run almost full time on 21 days. Sun photometer data were taken on 23 days, from about 0800 to 1700 local time. The particle optical depth (at about 533-nm wavelength) ranged from 0.3-1.7 and was, on average, 0.92. Ångström exponents varied from 0.65-1.35 (for wavelengths 380 to 502 nm) and from 0.75-1.6 (for 502 to 1044 nm), mean values were 0.97 and 1.22. The haze-layer mean extinction-to-backscatter ratio ranged from 35-59 sr, and was, on average, 46.7 sr. The top of the haze layer reached to heights of 1.5-3 km in most cases.

  12. Fast multichannel astronomical photometer based on silicon photo multipliers mounted at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, Filippo; Meddi, Franco; Rossi, Corinne; Sclavi, Silvia; Nesci, Roberto; Bruni, Ivan; Ghedina, Adriano; Riverol, Luis; Di Fabrizio, Luca

    2014-07-01

    The realization of low-cost instruments with high technical performance is a goal that deserves efforts in an epoch of fast technological developments. Such instruments can be easily reproduced and therefore allow new research programs to be opened in several observatories. We realized a fast optical photometer based on the SiPM (Silicon Photo Multiplier) technology, using commercially available modules. Using low-cost components, we developed a custom electronic chain to extract the signal produced by a commercial MPPC (Multi Pixel Photon Counter) module produced by Hamamatsu Photonics to obtain sub-millisecond sampling of the light curve of astronomical sources (typically pulsars). We built a compact mechanical interface to mount the MPPC at the focal plane of the TNG (Telescopio Nazionale Galileo), using the space available for the slits of the LRS (Low Resolution Spectrograph). On February 2014 we observed the Crab pulsar with the TNG with our prototype photometer, deriving its period and the shape of its light curve, in very good agreement with the results obtained in the past with other much more expensive instruments. After the successful run at the telescope we describe here the lessons learned and the ideas that burst to optimize this instrument and make it more versatile.

  13. Concerning the use of multifunctional photometer - polarimeter for studying the invasion of cosmic bodies into the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraimchuk, M. D.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Nevodovskyi, P. V.; Steklov, O. F.

    2018-05-01

    Main astronomical observatory of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine together with the National Technical University of Ukraine "KPI" for many years working on the development of photometers-polarimeters for the study of cosmic bodies and Earth's atmosphere. We proposed an option of the development of a multipurpose panoramic photometer-polarimeter, which takes into account the shortcomings of the previous versions of the instrument and also allows for the registration of tracks of bolides, and study of their tails, and weak meteor phenomena.

  14. Implementation of a Low-Cost Automated LED Photometer for Enzymatic Reaction Detection to Teach Basic Bioelectronics Technologies in Vocational High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Huai-Yi; Nieh, Hwa-Ming; Yang, Ming-Feng; Chou, Yu-Kung; Chung, Jui-Hsu; Liou, Je-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a home-assembled, low-cost blue light-emitting diode (LED) photometer that uses simple and low-cost hardware and software, costing about US $150. This 425-nm wavelength photometer is controlled by an 89C51 microcontroller chip. Glucose concentration detection experiments involving enzyme coupling reactions were carried out to…

  15. Aerosol absorption profiling from the synergy of lidar and sun-photometry: the ACTRIS-2 campaigns in Germany, Greece and Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Lopatin, Anton; Marinou, Eleni; Giannakaki, Eleni; Pikridas, Michael; Sciare, Jean; Liakakou, Eleni; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Duesing, Sebastian; Corbin, Joel C.; Gysel, Martin; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Wehner, Birgit; Kottas, Michael; Mamali, Dimitra; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Raptis, Panagiotis I.; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Keleshis, Christos; Müller, Detlef; Solomos, Stavros; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Igloffstein, Julia; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert; Dubovik, Oleg; Goloub, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Aerosol absorption profiling is crucial for radiative transfer calculations and climate modelling. Here, we utilize the synergy of lidar with sun-photometer measurements to derive the absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo profiles during the ACTRIS-2 campaigns held in Germany, Greece and Cyprus. The remote sensing techniques are compared with in situ measurements in order to harmonize and validate the different methodologies and reduce the absorption profiling uncertainties.

  16. A consideration of the use of optical fibers to remotely couple photometers to telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heacox, William D.

    1988-01-01

    The possible use of optical fibers to remotely couple photometers to telescopes is considered. Such an application offers the apparent prospect of enhancing photometric stability as a consequence of the benefits of remote operation and decreased sensitivity to image details. A properly designed fiber optic coupler will probably show no significant changes in optical transmisssion due to normal variations in the fiber configuration. It may be more difficult to eliminate configuration-dependent effects on the pupil of the transmitted beam, and thus achieve photometric stability to guiding and seeing errors. In addition, there is some evidence for significant changes in the optical throughputs of fibers over the temperature range normally encountered in astronomical observatories.

  17. Determination of gravity wave parameters in the airglow combining photometer and imager data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyassor, Prosper K.; Arlen Buriti, Ricardo; Paulino, Igo; Medeiros, Amauri F.; Takahashi, Hisao; Wrasse, Cristiano M.; Gobbi, Delano

    2018-05-01

    Mesospheric airglow measurements of two or three layers were used to characterize both vertical and horizontal parameters of gravity waves. The data set was acquired coincidentally from a multi-channel filter (Multi-3) photometer and an all-sky imager located at São João do Cariri (7.4° S, 36.5° W) in the equatorial region from 2001 to 2007. Using a least-square fitting and wavelet analysis technique, the phase and amplitude of each observed wave were determined, as well as the amplitude growth. Using the dispersion relation of gravity waves, the vertical and horizontal wavelengths were estimated and compared to the horizontal wavelength obtained from the keogram analysis of the images observed by an all-sky imager. The results show that both horizontal and vertical wavelengths, obtained from the dispersion relation and keogram analysis, agree very well for the waves observed on the nights of 14 October and 18 December 2006. The determined parameters showed that the observed wave on the night of 18 December 2006 had a period of ˜ 43.8 ± 2.19 min, with the horizontal wavelength of 235.66 ± 11.78 km having a downward phase propagation, whereas that of 14 October 2006 propagated with a period of ˜ 36.00 ± 1.80 min with a horizontal wavelength of ˜ 195 ± 9.80 km, and with an upward phase propagation. The observation of a wave taken by a photometer and an all-sky imager allowed us to conclude that the same wave could be observed by both instruments, permitting the investigation of the two-dimensional wave parameter.

  18. TIMED solar EUV experiment: preflight calibration results for the XUV photometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rodgers, Erica M.; Bailey, Scott M.; Eparvier, Francis G.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1999-10-01

    The Solar EUV Experiment (SEE) on the NASA Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) mission will measure the solar vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral irradiance from 0.1 to 200 nm. To cover this wide spectral range two different types of instruments are used: a grating spectrograph for spectra between 25 and 200 nm with a spectral resolution of 0.4 nm and a set of silicon soft x-ray (XUV) photodiodes with thin film filters as broadband photometers between 0.1 and 35 nm with individual bandpasses of about 5 nm. The grating spectrograph is called the EUV Grating Spectrograph (EGS), and it consists of a normal- incidence, concave diffraction grating used in a Rowland spectrograph configuration with a 64 X 1024 array CODACON detector. The primary calibrations for the EGS are done using the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF-III) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. In addition, detector sensitivity and image quality, the grating scattered light, the grating higher order contributions, and the sun sensor field of view are characterized in the LASP calibration laboratory. The XUV photodiodes are called the XUV Photometer System (XPS), and the XPS includes 12 photodiodes with thin film filters deposited directly on the silicon photodiodes' top surface. The sensitivities of the XUV photodiodes are calibrated at both the NIST SURF-III and the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) electron storage ring called BESSY. The other XPS calibrations, namely the electronics linearity and field of view maps, are performed in the LASP calibration laboratory. The XPS and solar sensor pre-flight calibration results are primarily discussed as the EGS calibrations at SURF-III have not yet been performed.

  19. Terahertz photometers to observe solar flares from space (SOLAR-T project)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Raulin, Jean-Pierre

    The space experiment SOLAR-T designed to observe solar flares at THz frequencies was completed. We present the concept, fabrication and performance of a double THz photometers system. An innovative optical setup allows observations of the full solar disk and the detection of small burst transients at the same time. It is the first detecting system conceived to observe solar flare THz emissions on board of stratospheric balloons. The system has been integrated to data acquisition and telemetry modules for this application. SOLAR-T uses two Golay cell detectors preceded by low-pass filters made of rough surface primary mirrors and membranes, 3 and 7 THz band-pass filters, and choppers. Its photometers can detect small solar bursts (tens of solar flux units) with sub second time resolution. One artificial Sun setup was developed to simulate actual observations. Tests comprised the whole system performance, on ambient and low pressure and temperature conditions. It is intended to provide data on the still unrevealed spectral shape of the mysterious THz solar flares emissions. The experiment is planned to be on board of two long-duration stratospheric balloon flights over Antarctica and Russia in 2014-2016. The SOLAR-T development, fabrication and tests has been accomplished by engineering and research teams from Mackenzie, Unicamp and Bernard Lyot Solar Observatory; Propertech Ltda.; Neuron Ltda.; and Samsung, Brazil; Tydex LCC, Russia; CONICET, Argentina; the stratospheric balloon missions will be carried in cooperation with teams from University of California, Berkeley, USA (flight over Antarctica), and Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow, Russia (flight over Russia).

  20. Aerosol Absorption and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Philip; Seinfeld, J. H.; Kinne, Stefan; Boucher, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006) significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the shortwave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing clear-sky from -0.79 to -0.53 W m(sup -2) (33%) and all-sky from -0.47 to -0.13W m(sup -2 (72%). Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19W m(sup -2) (36%) clear-sky and of 0.12W m(sup -2) (92%) all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05W m(sup -2) and a positive TOA forcing perturbation of 0

  1. Arctic Black Carbon Loading and Profile Using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sedlacek, Arthur J

    One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic cryospheres is the lack of detailed data on the vertical and spatial distribution of aerosols with which to test these models. This is due, in part, to the inherent difficulty of conducting such measurements in extreme environments. However given the pronounced sensitivity of the polar regions to radiative balance perturbations, it is incumbent upon our community to better understand and quantify these perturbations, and their unique feedbacks, so that robust model predictions of this region can be realized. One class of under-measured radiative forcing agents inmore » the polar region is the absorbing aerosol—black carbon and brown carbon. Black carbon (BC; also referred to as light-absorbing carbon [LAC], refractory black carbon [rBC], and soot) is second only to CO2 as a positive forcing agent. Roughly 60% of BC emissions can be attributed to anthropogenic sources (fossil fuel combustion and open-pit cooking), with the remaining fraction being due to biomass burning. Brown carbon (BrC), a major component of biomass burning, collectively refers to non-BC carbonaceous aerosols that typically possess minimal light absorption at visible wavelengths but exhibit pronounced light absorption in the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectrum. Both species can be sourced locally or be remotely transported to the Arctic region and are expected to perturb the radiative balance. The work conducted in this field campaign addresses one of the more glaring deficiencies currently limiting improved quantification of the impact of BC radiative forcing in the cryosphere: the paucity of data on the vertical and spatial distributions of BC. By expanding the Gulfstream aircraft (G-1) payload for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility-sponsored ACME-V campaign to include the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)) and leveraging the ACME

  2. A combined Settling Tube-Photometer for rapid measurement of effective sediment particle size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Kuhn, Brigitte; Rüegg, Hans-Rudolf; Zimmermann, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Sediment and its movement in water is commonly described based on the size distribution of the mineral particles forming the sediment. While this approach works for coarse sand, pebbles and gravel, smaller particles often form aggregates, creating material of larger diameters than the mineral grain size distribution indicates, but lower densities than often assumed 2.65 g cm-3 of quartz. The measurement of the actual size and density of such aggregated sediment is difficult. For the assessment of sediment movement an effective particle size for the use in mathematical can be derived based on the settling velocity of sediment. Settling velocity of commonly measured in settling tubes which fractionate the sample in settling velocity classes by sampling material at the base in selected time intervals. This process takes up to several hours, requires a laboratory setting and carries the risk of either destruction of aggregates during transport or coagulation while sitting in rather still water. Measuring the velocity of settling particles in situ, or at least a rapidly after collection, could avoids these problems. In this study, a settling tube equipped with four photometers used to measure the darkening of a settling particle cloud is presented and the potential to improve the measurement of settling velocities are discussed.

  3. Low-cost, high-performance and efficiency computational photometer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewert, Sam B.; Shihadeh, Jeries; Myers, Randall; Khandhar, Jay; Ivanov, Vitaly

    2014-05-01

    Researchers at the University of Alaska Anchorage and University of Colorado Boulder have built a low cost high performance and efficiency drop-in-place Computational Photometer (CP) to test in field applications ranging from port security and safety monitoring to environmental compliance monitoring and surveying. The CP integrates off-the-shelf visible spectrum cameras with near to long wavelength infrared detectors and high resolution digital snapshots in a single device. The proof of concept combines three or more detectors into a single multichannel imaging system that can time correlate read-out, capture, and image process all of the channels concurrently with high performance and energy efficiency. The dual-channel continuous read-out is combined with a third high definition digital snapshot capability and has been designed using an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) to capture, decimate, down-convert, re-encode, and transform images from two standard definition CCD (Charge Coupled Device) cameras at 30Hz. The continuous stereo vision can be time correlated to megapixel high definition snapshots. This proof of concept has been fabricated as a fourlayer PCB (Printed Circuit Board) suitable for use in education and research for low cost high efficiency field monitoring applications that need multispectral and three dimensional imaging capabilities. Initial testing is in progress and includes field testing in ports, potential test flights in un-manned aerial systems, and future planned missions to image harsh environments in the arctic including volcanic plumes, ice formation, and arctic marine life.

  4. XUV Photometer System (XPS): New Dark-Count Corrections Model and Improved Data Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, J. P.; Vanier, B.; Woods, T. N.

    2017-12-01

    We present newly updated dark-count calibrations for the SORCE XUV Photometer System (XPS) and the resultant improved data products released in March of 2017. The SORCE mission has provided a 14-year solar spectral irradiance record, and the XPS contributes to this record in the 0.1 nm to 40 nm range. The SORCE spacecraft has been operating in what is known as Day-Only Operations (DO-Op) mode since February of 2014. In this mode it is not possible to collect data, including dark-counts, when the spacecraft is in eclipse as we did prior to DO-Op. Instead, we take advantage of the position of the XPS filter-wheel, and collect these data when the wheel position is in a "dark" position. Further, in this mode dark data are not always available for all observations, requiring an extrapolation in order to calibrate data at these times. To extrapolate, we model this with a piece-wise 2D nonlinear least squares surface fit in the time and temperature dimensions. Our model allows us to calibrate XPS data into the DO-Op phase of the mission by extrapolating along this surface. The XPS version 11 data product release benefits from this new calibration. We present comparisons of the previous and current calibration methods in addition to planned future upgrades of our data products.

  5. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  6. Detecting Close-In Extrasolar Giant Planets with the Kepler Photometer via Scattered Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Doyle, L. R.; Kepler Discovery Mission Team

    2003-05-01

    NASA's Kepler Mission will be launched in 2007 primarily to search for transiting Earth-sized planets in the habitable zones of solar-like stars. In addition, it will be poised to detect the reflected light component from close-in extrasolar giant planets (CEGPs) similar to 51 Peg b. Here we use the DIARAD/SOHO time series along with models for the reflected light signatures of CEGPs to evaluate Kepler's ability to detect such planets. We examine the detectability as a function of stellar brightness, stellar rotation period, planetary orbital inclination angle, and planetary orbital period, and then estimate the total number of CEGPs that Kepler will detect over its four year mission. The analysis shows that intrinsic stellar variability of solar-like stars is a major obstacle to detecting the reflected light from CEGPs. Monte Carlo trials are used to estimate the detection threshold required to limit the total number of expected false alarms to no more than one for a survey of 100,000 stellar light curves. Kepler will likely detect 100-760 51 Peg b-like planets by reflected light with orbital periods up to 7 days. LRD was supported by the Carl Sagan Chair at the Center for the Study of Life in the Universe, a division of the SETI Institute. JMJ received support from the Kepler Mission Photometer and Science Office at NASA Ames Research Center.

  7. Synoptic maps for the heliospheric Thomson scattering brightness as observed by the Helios photometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Schwenn, R.

    1991-01-01

    A method for displaying the electron Thomson scattering intensity in the inner heliosphere as observed by the zodiacal light photometers on board the Helios spacecraft in the form of synoptic maps is presented. The method is based on the assumption that the bulk of the scattering electrons along the line of sight is located near the point closest to the sun. Inner-heliospheric structures will generally be represented properly in these synoptic maps only if they are sufficiently long-lived (that is, a significant fraction of a solar rotation period). The examples of Helios synoptic maps discussed (from data in April 1976 and November 1978), indicate that it is possible to identify large-scale, long-lived density enhancements in the inner heliosphere. It is expected that the Helios synoptic maps will be particularly useful in the study of corotating structures (e.g., streamers), and the maps will be most reliable during periods when few transient featurs are present in the corona, i.e., during solar minimum.

  8. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and sun photometers during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment. Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA Goddard Space Flight Center scanning Raman lidar system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W); are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and root-mean-square differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a) = 60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements. The lidar measurements of AOT are found to be generally within 25% of the AOT measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-6). However, during certain periods the lidar and Sun photometer measurements of AOT differed significantly, possibly because of variations in the aerosol physical characteristics (e.g., size, composition) which affect S(sub a). Estimates of PWV, derived from water vapor mixing ratio profiles measured by LASE, are within 5-10% of PWV derived from the airborne Sun photometer. Aerosol extinction profiles measured by both lidars show that aerosols were generally concentrated in the lowest 2-3 km.

  9. Synoptic maps of heliospheric Thomson scattering brightness from 1974-1985 as observed by the Helios photometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hick, P.; Jackson, B. V.; Schwenn, R.

    1992-01-01

    We display the electron Thomson scattering intensity of the inner heliosphere as observed by the zodiacal light photometers on board the Helios spacecraft in the form of synoptic maps. The technique extrapolates the brightness information from each photometer sector near the Sun and constructs a latitude/longitude map at a given solar height. These data are unique in that they give a determination of heliospheric structures out of the ecliptic above the primary region of solar wind acceleration. The spatial extent of bright, co-rotating heliospheric structures is readily observed in the data north and south of the ecliptic plane where the Helios photometer coverage is most complete. Because the technique has been used on the complete Helios data set from 1974 to 1985, we observe the change in our synoptic maps with solar cycle. Bright structures are concentrated near the heliospheric equator at solar minimum, while at solar maximum bright structures are found at far higher heliographic latitudes. A comparison of these maps with other forms of synoptic data are shown for two available intervals.

  10. Final Project Report - ARM CLASIC CIRPAS Twin Otter Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Ogren

    2010-04-05

    The NOAA/ESRL/GMD aerosol group made three types of contributions related to airborne measurements of aerosol light scattering and absorption for the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) in June 2007 on the Twin Otter research airplane operated by the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS). GMD scientists served as the instrument mentor for the integrating nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) on the Twin Otter during CLASIC, and were responsible for (1) instrument checks/comparisons; (2) instrument trouble shooting/repair; and (3) data quality control (QC) and submittal to the archive.

  11. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  12. The New Sun-Sky-Lunar Cimel CE318-T Multiband Photometer - A Comprehensive Performance Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barreto, Africa; Cuevas, Emilio; Granados-Munoz, Maria-Jose; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Romero, Pedro M.; Grobner, Julian; Kouremeti, Natalia; Almansa, Antonio F.; Stone, Tom; Toledano, Carlos; hide

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the new photometer CE318-T, able to perform daytime and night-time photometric measurements using the sun and the moon as light source. Therefore,this new device permits a complete cycle of diurnal aerosol and water vapour measurements valuable to enhance atmospheric monitoring to be extracted. In this study wehave found significantly higher precision of triplets when comparing the CE318-T master instrument and the Cimel AErosol RObotic NET work (AERONET) master (CE318-AERONET) triplets as a result of the new CE318-T tracking system. Regarding the instrument calibration, two new methodologies to transfer the calibration from a reference instrument using only daytime measurements (Sun Ratio and Sun-Moon gain factor techniques) are presented and discussed. These methods allow the reduction of the previous complexities inherent to nocturnal calibration. A quantitative estimation of CE318-T AOD uncertainty by means of error propagation theory during daytime revealed AOD uncertainties (u(sup D)(sub AOD)) for Langley-calibrated instruments similar to the expected values for other reference instruments (0.002-0.009). We have also found u(sup D)(sub AOD) values similar to the values reported in sun photometry for field instruments (approximately 0.015). In the case of the night-time period, the CE318-T-estimated standard combined uncertainty (u(sup N)(sub AOD)) is dependent not only on the calibration technique but also on illumination conditions and the instrumental noise. These values range from 0.011-0.018 for Lunar Langley-calibrated instruments to 0.012-0.021 for instruments calibrated using the Sun Ratio technique. In the case of moon-calibrated instruments using the Sun-Moon gain factor method and sun calibrated using the Langley technique, we found u(sup N)(sub AOD) ranging from 0.016 to 0.017 (up to 0.019 in 440 nm channel), not dependent on any lunar irradiance model. A subsequent performance evaluation including CE318-T and collocated

  13. First Look at the 3-channel Photometer Data from RENU2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, J. H.; Brinkman, D. G.; Clemmons, J. H.; Walterscheid, R. L.; Evans, J. S.; Fritz, B.; Lessard, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Rocket Experiment for Neutral Upwelling-2 (RENU2) rocket launched north towards the cusp region from Andoya, Norway at 735 UT on December 12th 2015. It included a 3-channel forward looking photometer which included narrow-band interference filters at the following wavelengths: (1) 391.4 nm to measure the relatively bright N2+(0,0) band, primarily excited in cusp aurora via resonant scattering of solar light, (2) 557.7 nm, the auroral green line, which is seen in both dayglow emission (very weakly) and when auroral precipitation is present, and (3) 630.0 nm, the auroral redline, which is also excited in the dayglow and by low energy auroral electrons typically present in the cusp. Averaging over the 2 seconds, to minimize out the rocket spin modulation, revealed a volume emission rate profile as a function of altitude that showed dayglow and resonant scattering emission from all three features on the up leg before the cusp aurora region was entered, and a combination of this and auroral emission on the down leg. Noteworthy on the down leg was a sudden increase in the 391.4 nm emission strongly suggestive of an increase in N2+ ions above the rocket. The data are compared to results of AURIC and B3C model runs where electron data from the EPLAS instrument were used to provide the electron spectra. This comparison revealed information not only about the N2+ ion and atomic oxygen density but also showed, via the effects of the different lifetime of the red and green emissions, that there were many short timescale bursts of precipitation lasting much less than 1 second.

  14. A dedicated H-beta meridian scanning photometer for proton aurora measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unick, Craig W.; Donovan, Eric; Connors, Martin; Jackel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    An instrument designed to measure the location and brightness of auroral emissions from energetic proton precipitation is described. This photometer scans from the north to south horizon with a stepper motor and mirror. The scans are configured in software for a 30 s cadence with equally spaced samples along a meridian at constant altitude. Broadband light is separated into two channels with a novel optical splitter. This splitter uses a filter that has high transmission for the signal channel and high reflection on both the long- and short-wavelength sides to reflect the combined background passbands, directing each channel to its respective detector. The half-cone angle and angle of incidence of this splitter filter allow for an overall compact optical design that also provides superior sensitivity in both signal and background channels. The signal channel is 3 nm wide full width at half maximum (FWHM) at 486.1 nm, and the background channel comprises two 3 nm wide FWHM passbands at 480 nm and 495 nm created by a single filter. Both of these channels are measured with photomultiplier tubes in photon-counting mode. Calibrations indicate a response of around 1000 c/s per rayleigh. Data are currently acquired in 5 ms bins with a Nyquist frequency of 100 Hz. The first system (Forty-Eight Sixty-One (FESO)-1) has been operating at Athabasca University since February 2014, and the second system (FESO-2) was deployed at Lucky Lake, Saskatchewan, in October 2015. The improved sensitivity over legacy instruments and the simultaneous measurement of signal and background enable operation during intervals with dynamic electron aurora and scattered moonlight.

  15. Retrieval of atmospheric optical parameters from ground-based sun-photometer measurements for Zanjan, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayat, A.; Masoumi, A.; Khalesifard, H. R.

    2010-06-01

    We are reporting the results of ground-based spectroradiometric measurements on aerosols and water vapor in the atmosphere of Zanjan for the period of October 2006 to September 2008 using a Cimel CE318-2 sun-photometer. Zanjan is a city in Northwest Iran, located at 36.70° N, 48.51° E, and at an altitude of 1800 above m.s.l. The spectral aerosol optical depth, Ångström exponent, and columnar water vapor have been calculated using the data recorded by the sunphotometer through direct-beam irradiance measurements of sunlight (sun mode). The average values of aerosol optical depth at 440 nm, columnar water vapor, and the Ångström exponent, α, during the mentioned period are measured as, 0.27±0.16, 0.53±0.37 cm and 0.75±0.46, respectively. The maximum (minimum) value of the aerosol optical depth was recorded in May 2007 (January 2007), and that of columnar water vapor, in July 2007 (January 2008). Using the least-squares method, the Ångström exponent was calculated in the spectral interval 440-870 nm along with the coefficients of a second order polynomial fit (α1 and α2) to the log-log plot of aerosol optical depth versus the wavelength. The coefficient α2 shows that most of the aerosols in the Zanjan area have dimensions larger than 1 μm. The values calculated for α2-α1 indicate that 70% of the aerosols are in the coarse-mode (>1 μm) and 30% of them are in the fine-mode (<1 μm). Comparison of α2-α1 for the atmosphere over Zanjan with other regions indicates dust and anthropogenic aerosols are the most dominant aerosols in the region.

  16. Design and Characterization of the 4STAR Sun-Sky Spectrometer with Results from 4- Way Intercomparison of 4STAR, AATS-14, Prede, and Cimel Photometers at Mauna Loa Observatory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, C. J.; Dunagan, S. E.; Johnson, R. R.; Schmid, B.; Shinozuka, Y.; Ramachandran, S.; Livingston, J. M.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Tran, A. K.; Holben, B. N.

    2008-12-01

    Uncertainties in radiative forcing of climate are still dominated by uncertainties in forcing by aerosols. Aerosols impact the radiation balance in three primary ways: the direct effect through scattering and absorption of radiation, the indirect effect by acting as cloud condensation nuclei affecting cloud optical depth and longevity, and the semi-direct effect affecting cloud formation and longevity through heating and thermodynamics. An active collaboration between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center (ARC), and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is advancing new instrument concepts with application to reducing these aerosol uncertainties. The concept of 4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research) combines airborne sun tracking capabilities of the Ames Airborne Tracking Sun Photometer (AATS-14) and Aeronet-like sky scanning capability with state-of-the-art monolithic spectrometry. The overall science goal for the new instruments is to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to climate. The high-resolution spectral capability will improve retrievals of gas constituents (e.g., H2O, O3, and NO2) and thereby improve determination of aerosol properties as residual components of the total optical depth. The sky scanning capability will enable retrievals of aerosol type (via complex refractive index and shape) and aerosol size distribution extending to larger sizes than attainable by direct-beam sun photometry alone. Additional technical goals are to reduce instrument size, weight, and power requirements while increasing autonomy and component modularity to permit operation on a wide range of aircraft including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). To investigate techniques to accomplish these goals, we developed a ground-based prototype, 4STAR-Ground. The 4STAR-Ground operating performance has been characterized in many tests

  17. Evaluation of the Applicability of Solar and Lamp Radiometric Calibrations of a Precision Sun Photometer Operating Between 300 and 1025 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Beat; Spyak, Paul R.; Biggar, Stuart F.; Joerg, Sekler; Ingold, Thomas; Maetzler, Christian; Kaempfer, Niklaus

    2000-01-01

    Over a period of 3 year a precision Sun photometer (SPM) operating between 300 and 1025 nm was calibrated four times at three different high-mountain sites in Switzerland, Germany, and the United States by means of the Langley-plot technique. We found that for atmospheric window wavelengths the total error (2 sigma-statistical plus systematic errors) of the calibration constants V(sub 0)(lambda), the SPM voltage in the absence of any attenuating atmosphere, can be kept below 1.60% in the UV-A and blue, 0.9% in the mid-visible, and 0.6% in the near-infra red spectral region. For SPM channels within strong water-vapor or ozone absorption bands a modified Langley-plot technique was used to determine V(sub 0)(lambda) with a lower accuracy. Within the same period of time, we calibrated the SPM five times using irradiance standard lamps in the optical labs of the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos and World Radiation Center, Switzerland, and of the Remote Sensing Group of the Optical Sciences Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. The lab calibration method requires knowledge of the extraterrestrial spectral irradiance. When we refer the standard lamp results to the World Radiation Center extraterrestrial solar irradiance spectrum, they agree with the Langley results within 2% at 6 or 13 SPM wavelengths. The largest disagreement (4.4%) is found for the channel centered at 610 nm. The results of these intercomparisons change significantly when the lamp results are referred to two different extraterrestrial solar irradiance spectra that have become recently available.

  18. Preliminary design report, Large Space Telescope OTA/SI Phase B study: High speed area photometer. [systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A photometer is examined which combines several features from separate instruments into a single package. The design presented has both point and area photometry capability with provision for inserting filters to provide spectral discrimination. The electronics provide for photon counting mode for the point detectors and both photon counting and analog modes for the area detector. The area detector also serves as a target locating device for the point detectors. Topics discussed include: (1) electronic equipment requirements, (2) optical properties, (3) structural housing for the instrument, (4) motors and other mechanical components, (5) ground support equipment, and (6) environment control for the instrument. Engineering drawings and block diagrams are shown.

  19. Calibration of Raman lidar water vapor profiles by means of AERONET photometer observations and GDAS meteorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Guangyao; Althausen, Dietrich; Hofer, Julian; Engelmann, Ronny; Seifert, Patric; Bühl, Johannes; Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Wu, Songhua; Ansmann, Albert

    2018-05-01

    We present a practical method to continuously calibrate Raman lidar observations of water vapor mixing ratio profiles. The water vapor profile measured with the multiwavelength polarization Raman lidar PollyXT is calibrated by means of co-located AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) sun photometer observations and Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) temperature and pressure profiles. This method is applied to lidar observations conducted during the Cyprus Cloud Aerosol and Rain Experiment (CyCARE) in Limassol, Cyprus. We use the GDAS temperature and pressure profiles to retrieve the water vapor density. In the next step, the precipitable water vapor from the lidar observations is used for the calibration of the lidar measurements with the sun photometer measurements. The retrieved calibrated water vapor mixing ratio from the lidar measurements has a relative uncertainty of 11 % in which the error is mainly caused by the error of the sun photometer measurements. During CyCARE, nine measurement cases with cloud-free and stable meteorological conditions are selected to calculate the precipitable water vapor from the lidar and the sun photometer observations. The ratio of these two precipitable water vapor values yields the water vapor calibration constant. The calibration constant for the PollyXT Raman lidar is 6.56 g kg-1 ± 0.72 g kg-1 (with a statistical uncertainty of 0.08 g kg-1 and an instrumental uncertainty of 0.72 g kg-1). To check the quality of the water vapor calibration, the water vapor mixing ratio profiles from the simultaneous nighttime observations with Raman lidar and Vaisala radiosonde sounding are compared. The correlation of the water vapor mixing ratios from these two instruments is determined by using all of the 19 simultaneous nighttime measurements during CyCARE. Excellent agreement with the slope of 1.01 and the R2 of 0.99 is found. One example is presented to demonstrate the full

  20. Percutaneous absorption

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Clinical effectiveness of topically applied medications depends on the ability of the active ingredient to leave its vehicle and penetrate into the epidermis. The stratum corneum is that layer of the epidermis which functionally is the most important in limiting percutaneous absorption, showing the characteristics of a composite semipermeable membrane. A mathematical expression of transepidermal diffusion may be derived from Fick's Law of mass transport; factors altering the rate of diffusion are discussed. PMID:4597976

  1. Estimating surface visibility at Hong Kong from ground-based LIDAR, sun photometer and operational MODIS products.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, Muhammad I; Nichol, Janet E; Wang, Jun; Campbell, James R; Chan, Pak W

    2013-09-01

    Hong Kong's surface visibility has decreased in recent years due to air pollution from rapid social and economic development in the region. In addition to deteriorating health standards, reduced visibility disrupts routine civil and public operations, most notably transportation and aviation. Regional estimates of visibility solved operationally using available ground and satellite-based estimates of aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution may prove more effective than standard reliance on a few existing surface visibility monitoring stations. Previous studies have demonstrated that such satellite measurements correlate well with near-surface optical properties, despite these sensors do not consider range-resolved information and indirect parameterizations necessary to solve relevant parameters. By expanding such analysis to include vertically resolved aerosol profile information from an autonomous ground-based lidar instrument, this work develops six models for automated assessment of surface visibility. Regional visibility is estimated using co-incident ground-based lidar, sun photometer visibility meter and MODerate-resolution maging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aerosol optical depth data sets. Using a 355 nm extinction coefficient profile solved from the lidar MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) is scaled down to the surface to generate a regional composite depiction of surface visibility. These results demonstrate the potential for applying passive satellite depictions of broad-scale aerosol optical properties together with a ground-based surface lidar and zenith-viewing sun photometer for improving quantitative assessments of visibility in a city such as Hong Kong.

  2. Estimation of 557.7 nm Emission Altitude using Co-located Lidars and Photometers over Arecibo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, E.; Raizada, S.; Lautenbach, J.; Brum, C. G. M.

    2017-12-01

    Airglow at 557.7 nm (green line emission) is generated through the Barth mechanism in the E-region altitude and is sometimes associated with red line (630.0 nm) originating at F-region altitudes. Photons at 557.7 nm are produced through the quenching of excited atomic oxygen atoms, O(1S), while 630.0 nm results through the de-excitation of O(1D) atoms. Even though, the contribution of the green line from F-region is negligible and the significant component comes from the mesosphere, this uncertainty gives rise to a question related to its precise altitude. Previous studies have shown that perturbations generated by atmospheric gravity Waves (GWs) alter the airglow intensity and can be used for studying dynamics of the region where it originates. The uncertainty in the emission altitude of green line can be resolved by using co-located lidars, which provide altitude resolved metal densities. At Arecibo, the resonance lidars tuned to Na and K resonance wavelengths at 589 nm and 770 nm can be used in conjunction with simultaneous measurements from green line photometer to resolve this issue. Both photometer and lidars have narrow field of view as compared to airglow imagers, and hence provide an added advantage that these instruments sample same GW spectrum. Hence, correlation between density perturbations inferred from lidars and airglow intensity perturbations can shed light on the exact altitude of green line emission.

  3. Portable light-emitting diode-based photometer with one-shot optochemical sensors for measurement in the field.

    PubMed

    Palma, A J; Ortigosa, J M; Lapresta-Fernández, A; Fernández-Ramos, M D; Carvajal, M A; Capitán-Vallvey, L F

    2008-10-01

    This report describes the electronics of a portable, low-cost, light-emitting diode (LED)-based photometer dedicated to one-shot optochemical sensors. Optical detection is made through a monolithic photodiode with an on-chip single-supply transimpedance amplifier that reduces some drawbacks such as leakage currents, interferences, and parasitic capacitances. The main instrument characteristics are its high light source stability and thermal correction. The former is obtained by means of the optical feedback from the LED polarization circuit, implementing a pseudo-two light beam scheme from a unique light source with a built-in beam splitter. The feedback loop has also been used to adjust the LED power in several ranges. Moreover, the low-thermal coefficient achieved (-90 ppm/degrees C) is compensated by thermal monitoring and calibration function compensation in the digital processing. The hand-held instrument directly gives the absorbance ratio used as the analytical parameter and the analyte concentration after programming the calibration function in the microcontroller. The application of this photometer for the determination of potassium and nitrate, using one-shot sensors with ionophore-based chemistries is also demonstrated, with a simple analytical methodology that shortens the analysis time, eliminating some calibrating solutions (HCl, NaOH, and buffer). Therefore, this compact instrument is suitable for real-time analyte determination and operation in the field.

  4. Test of the MarsSedEx Settling Tube Photometer during the 2nd Swiss Parabolic Flight Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Kuhn, Brigitte; Rüegg, Hans-Rudolf; Zimmermann, Lukas

    2017-04-01

    Gravity affects flow hydraulics and thus limits the application of simple models for sediment transport developed for Earth on Mars. The significance of the differences in sediment settling has been demonstrated for sand-sized particles by measuring settling velocities using video-imaging during parabolic flights. This approach does not work for finer particles because they cannot be distinguished individually on a video. Tracking of fine sediment clouds is also difficult using videos because changes in density are not captured. Photometers, on the other hand, are able to capture differences in turbidity and offer the potential to measure the settling behaviour of clouds of fine and differently-sized sediment particles. In this study, the feasibility of using a settling-tube photometer used for the rapid assessment of settling velocities developed by the University of Basel during a parabolic flight with reduced gravity is presented. In addition, the potential of the results generated in this Martian-analogue environment to support the identification sediments containing traces of life on Mars is discussed.

  5. Nocturnal aerosol optical depth measurements with a small-aperture automated photometer using the moon as a light source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkoff, T.A.; Sorokin, M.; Stone, T.; Eck, T.F.; Hoff, R.; Welton, E.; Holben, B.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described that enables the use of lunar irradiance to obtain nighttime aerosol optical depth (AOD) measurements using a small-aperture photometer. In this approach, the U.S. Geological Survey lunar calibration system was utilized to provide high-precision lunar exoatmospheric spectral irradiance predictions for a ground-based sensor location, and when combined with ground measurement viewing geometry, provided the column optical transmittance for retrievals of AOD. Automated multiwavelength lunar measurements were obtained using an unmodified Cimel-318 sunphotometer sensor to assess existing capabilities and enhancements needed for day/night operation in NASA's Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). Results show that even existing photometers can provide the ability for retrievals of aerosol optical depths at night near full moon. With an additional photodetector signal-to-noise improvement of 10-100, routine use over the bright half of the lunar phase and a much wider range of wavelengths and conditions can be achieved. Although the lunar cycle is expected to limit the frequency of observations to 30%-40% compared to solar measurements, nevertheless this is an attractive extension of AERONET capabilities. ?? 2011 American Meteorological Society.

  6. Cloud Screening and Quality Control Algorithm for Star Photometer Data: Assessment with Lidar Measurements and with All-sky Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramirez, Daniel Perez; Lyamani, H.; Olmo, F. J.; Whiteman, D. N.; Navas-Guzman, F.; Alados-Arboledas, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development and set up of a cloud screening and data quality control algorithm for a star photometer based on CCD camera as detector. These algorithms are necessary for passive remote sensing techniques to retrieve the columnar aerosol optical depth, delta Ae(lambda), and precipitable water vapor content, W, at nighttime. This cloud screening procedure consists of calculating moving averages of delta Ae() and W under different time-windows combined with a procedure for detecting outliers. Additionally, to avoid undesirable Ae(lambda) and W fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence, the data are averaged on 30 min. The algorithm is applied to the star photometer deployed in the city of Granada (37.16 N, 3.60 W, 680 ma.s.l.; South-East of Spain) for the measurements acquired between March 2007 and September 2009. The algorithm is evaluated with correlative measurements registered by a lidar system and also with all-sky images obtained at the sunset and sunrise of the previous and following days. Promising results are obtained detecting cloud-affected data. Additionally, the cloud screening algorithm has been evaluated under different aerosol conditions including Saharan dust intrusion, biomass burning and pollution events.

  7. Precipitable Water Vapor Characterization In The Gulf Of Cadiz Region (Southwestern Spain) Based On Sun Photometer, GPS And Radiosonde Data

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, B.; Cachorro, V. E.; Toledano, C.

    2010-09-16

    Column integrated water vapor (IWV) data in the Gulf of Cádiz area (Southwestern Spain) are analyzed during the period 2001 to 2005 with two aims: 1) to establish the climatology over this area using three different techniques, such as Sun-Photometer (SP), Global Position System (GPS) and Radiosondes, and 2) to take advantage of this comparative process to assess the quality of radiometric IWV data collected at the RIMA-AERONET station. The 5 years of climatological series gives a mean value of about 2 cm (STD=0.72) and a clear seasonal behavior as a general feature, with the highest values in summer andmore » the lowest in winter. In the multi-annual monthly means basis, the highest values are reached in August-September, with a mean value of 2.5-2.6 cm, whereas the lowest are obtained in January-February, with an average of 1.4-24 1.5. However the most relevant results for this area is the observed local minimum in July, occurring during the maximum of desert dust intrusions in the southern Iberian Peninsula. A comparison process allows us to evaluate the agreement of IWV data sets between these three different techniques at different temporal scales because of different time sampling. On a daily basis and taking GPS as the reference value we have a bias or difference between Radiosonde and GPS measurements for the entire data base of 0.07 cm (relative bias of 3%) and RMSE of 0.33. For SP-GPS we have a bias of 0.14 cm (about 7%) and RMSE of 0.37. On a monthly basis the differences between Radiosonde and GPS values varies from summer with 2% to winter with -8% and between SP and GPS values from 3% in summer to -14% in winter. The observed bias between GPS and SP varies during each SP operational period, with lower values at the beginning of the measurements and increasing until the end of its measurement term and with the bias values being quite dependent on each individual SP. The observed differences highlight the importance of drift in each Sun-Photometer

  8. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  9. Rocket-borne instrumentation using the resonant absorption technique to study the geocoronal and interplanetary helium emissions.

    PubMed

    Crifo, J F; Fahr, H J; Seidi, P; Wulf-Mathies, C

    1979-09-01

    A rocket payload able to perform a thorough and independent analysis of the He I 58.43340-nm geocoronal and interplanetary emissions is presented. It includes a sun-pointed resonant absorption spectrometer and a sky-scanning resonant absorption photometer. Both incorporate a similar helium resonance cell of original design featuring a most flexible pressure scanning capability and an accurate pressure measuring device, so that scanning by wavelength bandpasses from 20 down to 1 pm can be achieved. A description of the design and calibration of the instrument is given, followed by an indication of its successful operation in flight.

  10. Comparison of aerosol optical depth from satellite (MODIS), sun photometer and broadband pyrheliometer ground-based observations in Cuba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antuña-Marrero, Juan Carlos; Cachorro Revilla, Victoria; García Parrado, Frank; de Frutos Baraja, Ángel; Rodríguez Vega, Albeth; Mateos, David; Estevan Arredondo, René; Toledano, Carlos

    2018-04-01

    In the present study, we report the first comparison between the aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Ångström exponent (AE) of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments on the Terra (AODt) and Aqua (AODa) satellites and those measured using a sun photometer (AODSP) at Camagüey, Cuba, for the period 2008 to 2014. The comparison of Terra and Aqua data includes AOD derived with both deep blue (DB) and dark target (DT) algorithms from MODIS Collection 6. Combined Terra and Aqua (AODta) data were also considered. Assuming an interval of ±30 min around the overpass time and an area of 25 km around the sun photometer site, two coincidence criteria were considered: individual pairs of observations and both spatial and temporal mean values, which we call collocated daily means. The usual statistics (root mean square error, RMSE; mean absolute error, MAE; median bias, BIAS), together with linear regression analysis, are used for this comparison. Results show very similar values for both coincidence criteria: the DT algorithm generally displays better statistics and higher homogeneity than the DB algorithm in the behaviour of AODt, AODa, AODta compared to AODSP. For collocated daily means, (a) RMSEs of 0.060 and 0.062 were obtained for Terra and Aqua with the DT algorithm and 0.084 and 0.065 for the DB algorithm, (b) MAE follows the same patterns, (c) BIAS for both Terra and Aqua presents positive and negative values but its absolute values are lower for the DT algorithm; (d) combined AODta data also give lower values of these three statistical indicators for the DT algorithm; (e) both algorithms present good correlations for comparing AODt, AODa, AODta vs. AODSP, with a slight overestimation of satellite data compared to AODSP, (f). The DT algorithm yields better figures with slopes of 0.96 (Terra), 0.96 (Aqua) and 0.96 (Terra + Aqua) compared to the DB algorithm (1.07, 0.90, 0.99), which displays greater variability. Multi-annual monthly means of

  11. A Combined HIPPARCOS and Multichannel Astrometric Photometer Study of the Proposed Planetary System of Rho Coronae Borealis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George; Han, Inwoo; Black, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Hipparcos and Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) observations of rho Coronae Borealis independently display astrometric motion at the period of the proposed extrasolar planetary companion to the star. Individual least-squares fits to each astrometric data set yield independent estimates of the semimajor axis, inclination, and node angle that are in excellent agreement. A combined solution of the Hipparcos and MAP data yields an inclination of 0.5 deg, a node at 30.5 +/- 12.4, and a semimajor axis of 1.66 +/- 0.35 mas, indicating a companion mass of 0.14 +/- 0.05 solar masses over two orders of magnitude greater than the minimum mass for the companion as determined by radial velocity studies. This mass is approximately that of an M dwarf star, the companion cannot be a planetary object.

  12. Using Project-Based Learning to Design, Build, and Test Student-Made Photometer by Measuring the Unknown Concentration of Colored Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diawati, Chansyanah; Liliasari; Setiabudi, Agus; Buchari

    2018-01-01

    Students learned the principles and practice of photometry through project-based learning. They addressed the challenge of measuring the unknown concentration of a colored substance using a photometer they were required to design, build, and test. Then, they used that instrument to carry out the experiment and fulfill the challenge. A photometer…

  13. Skylab experiment performance evaluation manual. Appendix T: Experiment T027/S073 contamination measurement, photometer and Gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A series of analyses for Experiment T027/S073, contamination measurement, photometer and gegenschein/zodiacal light (MSFC), to be used for evaluating the performance of the Skylab corollary experiments under preflight, inflight, and post-flight conditons is presented. Experiment contingency plan workaround procedure and malfunction analyses are presented in order to assist in making the experiment operationally successful.

  14. Black carbon aerosol properties measured by a single particle soot photometer in emissions from biomass burning in the laboratory and field

    Treesearch

    G. R. McMeeking; J. W. Taylor; A. P. Sullivan; M. J. Flynn; S. K. Akagi; C. M. Carrico; J. L. Collett; E. Fortner; T. B. Onasch; S. M. Kreidenweis; R. J. Yokelson; C. Hennigan; A. L. Robinson; H. Coe

    2010-01-01

    We present SP2 observations of BC mass, size distributions and mixing state in emissions from laboratory and field biomass fires in California, USA. Biomass burning is the primary global black carbon (BC) source, but understanding of the amount emitted and its physical properties at and following emission are limited. The single particle soot photometer (SP2) uses a...

  15. Characteristics of columnar aerosol optical and microphysical properties retrieved from the sun photometer and its impact on radiative forcing over Skukuza (South Africa) during 1999-2010.

    PubMed

    Adesina, Ayodele Joseph; Piketh, Stuart; Kanike, Raghavendra Kumar; Venkataraman, Sivakumar

    2017-07-01

    The detailed analysis of columnar optical and microphysical properties of aerosols obtained from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) Cimel sun photometer operated at Skukuza (24.98° S, 31.60° E, 150 m above sea level), South Africa was carried out using the level 2.0 direct sun and inversion products measured during 1999-2010. The observed aerosol optical depth (AOD) was generally low over the region, with high values noted in late winter (August) and mid-spring (September and October) seasons. The major aerosol types found during the study period were made of 3.74, 69.63, 9.34, 8.83, and 8.41% for polluted dust (PD), polluted continental (PC), non-absorbing (NA), slightly absorbing (SA), and moderately absorbing (MA) aerosols, respectively. Much attention was given to the aerosol fine- and coarse-modes deduced from the particle volume concentration, effective radius, and fine-mode volume fraction. The aerosol volume size distribution pattern was found to be bimodal with the fine-mode showing predominance relative to coarse-mode during the winter and spring seasons, owing to the onset of the biomass burning season. The mean values of total, fine-, and coarse-mode volume particle concentrations were 0.07 ± 0.04, 0.03 ± 0.03, and 0.04 ± 0.02 μm 3  μm -2 , respectively, whereas the mean respective effective radii observed at Skukuza for the abovementioned modes were 0.35 ± 0.17, 0.14 ± 0.02, and 2.08 ± 0.02 μm. The averaged shortwave direct aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) observed within the atmosphere was found to be positive (absorption or heating effect), whereas the negative forcing in the surface and TOA depicted significant cooling effect due to more scattering type particles.

  16. A long Saharan dust event over the western Mediterranean: Lidar, Sun photometer observations, and regional dust modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRez, C.; Nickovic, S.; Baldasano, J. M.; Sicard, M.; Rocadenbosch, F.; Cachorro, V. E.

    2006-08-01

    A long Saharan dust event affected the western Mediterranean in the period 12-28 June 2002. Dust was present mainly between 1- and 5-km height affecting most parts of the Iberian Peninsula and reaching western/central Europe. Intensive backscatter lidar observations over Barcelona (Spain) and Sun photometer data from two stations (El Arenosillo, Spain, and Avignon, France) are used to evaluate different configurations the Dust Regional Atmospheric Modeling (DREAM) system. DREAM currently operates dust forecasts over the Mediterranean region (http://www.bsc.es/projects/earthscience/DREAM/) considering four particle size bins while only the first two are relevant for long-range transport analysis since their life time is larger than 12 hours. A more detailed bin method is implemented, and two different dust distributions at sources are compared to the operational version. Evaluations are performed at two wavelengths (532 and 1064 nm). The dust horizontal and vertical structure simulated by DREAM shows very good qualitative agreement when compared to SeaWIFS satellite images and lidar height-time displays over Barcelona. When evaluating the modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD) against Sun photometer data, significant improvements are achieved with the use of the new detailed bin method. In general, the model underpredicts the AOD for increasing Ångström exponents because of the influence of anthropogenic pollution in the boundary layer. In fact, the modeled AOD is highly anticorrelated with the observed Ångström exponents. Avignon shows higher influence of small anthropogenic aerosols which explains the better results of the model at the wavelength of 1064 nm over this location. The uncertainties of backscatter lidar inversions (20-30%) are in the same order of magnitude as the differences between the model experiments. Better model results are obtained when comparing to lidar because most of the anthropogenic effect is removed.

  17. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Torres, Omar; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET, satellite retrievals from the TOMS instrument, and field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption. and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  18. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine what are the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  19. Aerosol Absorption in the Atmosphere: Perspectives from Global Model, Ground-Based Measurements, and Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Main; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia; Duncan, Bryan; Ginoux, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol absorption in the atmosphere poses a major uncertainty in assessing the aerosol climate effects. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, and our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt. We compare the model calculated total aerosol optical thickness, extinction, and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia. We will examine the most sensitive factors in determining the aerosol absorption, and the consequences of assessing the aerosol radiative forcing and atmospheric heating associated with those factors.

  20. Construction of a photometer to detect stellar occultations by outer solar system bodies for the Whipple mission concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Ralph P.; Kenter, Almus T.; Alcock, Charles; Murray, Stephen S.; Loose, Markus; Gauron, Thomas; Germain, Gregg; Peregrim, Lawrence

    2014-08-01

    The Whipple mission was a proposal submitted to the NASA Discovery AO in 2010 to study the solid bodies of the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud via a blind occultation survey. Though not accepted for flight, the proposal was awarded funding for technology development. Detecting a significant number of Trans Neptunian Objects (TNOs) via a blind occultation survey requires a low noise, wide field of view, multi object differential photometer. The light curve decrement is typically a few percent over timescales of tenths of seconds or seconds for Kuiper Belt and Oort cloud objects, respectively. To obtain a statistically interesting number of detections, this photometer needs to observe many thousands of stars over several years since the rate of occultation for a single star given the space density of the TNOs is low. The light curves from these stars must be monitored with a sensor with a temporal resolution of rv 25-50 ms and with a read noise of< 20 e- rms. Since these requirements are outside the capability of CCDs, the Whipple mission intends to use Teledyne H2RG HyViSI Silicon Hybrid CMOS detectors operating in "window" read mode. The full Whipple focal plane consists of a 3x3 array of these sensors, with each sensor comprised of 1024x 1024 36/μm pixels. Combined with the telescope optic, the Whipple focal plane provides a FOV of rv36 deg2 . In operation, each HyViSI detector, coupled to a Teledyne SIDECAR ASIC, monitors the flux from 650 stars at 40 Hz. The ASIC digitizes the data at the required cadence and an FPGA provides preliminary occultation event selection. The proposed 2010 Whipple mission utilized a spacecraft in a a "drift-away" orbit which signifi­ cantly limited the available telemetry data rate. Most of the light curve processing is required to be on-board the satellite so only candidate occultation events are telemetered to the ground. Occul­ tation light curves must be processed in real time on the satellite by an Field Programmable Gate Array

  1. Construction of an Inexpensive Sun Photometer for Measuring Aerosols Optical Depth (AOD) and Comparison Between the Ground Based and Satellite Based Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamun, M.; Mondol, P.

    2012-12-01

    Aerosols influence our weather and climate because they affect the amount of sunlight reaching Earth's surface. An important way of probing the atmosphere from the ground is to measure the effects of the atmosphere on sunlight transmitted through the atmosphere to Earth's surface. These indirect techniques provide information about the entire atmosphere above the observer, not just the atmosphere that can be sampled directly. In response to global issues of air quality and climate change, and to the need to improve the quality of science education, inexpensive atmosphere monitoring instruments have been developed. This paper describes a new kind of inexpensive two channels LED Sun Photometer for monitoring aerosols that provide much better long-term stability than instruments that use expensive interference filters. Here HAZE-SPAN TERC VHS-1 model has been used for constructing sun photometer with light emitting diode as detector. Monitoring Earth's atmosphere is a challenging task. As there is no facility in our country (Bangladesh) for ground based measurement for monitoring aerosol so, this type of study is very essential. This study compares the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from the Terra and Aqua MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) with ground-based measurements from a handheld sun photometer over the region of Rajshahi, Bangladesh for The 15 days duration of June 2012. The results indicate that the Terra and Aqua MODIS AOD retrievals at 550 nm have good correlations with the measurements from the handheld sun photometer. The correlation coefficients r = 0.88 for Terra and r = 0.55 for Aqua where as r = 0.65 for Terra and Aqua themselves. AOD for another wavelength at 625 nm is documented in this study for finding out the relation of AOD at different wavelengths. In this paper it has been described and summarized briefly investigations for four important topics: LEDs used as light detectors, construction of sun photometer and its

  2. Investigation of refractory black carbon-containing particle morphologies using the single-particle soot photometer (SP2)

    DOE PAGES

    Sedlacek, III, Arthur J.; Lewis, Ernie R.; Onasch, Timothy B.; ...

    2015-07-24

    An important source of uncertainty in radiative forcing by absorbing aerosol particles is the uncertainty in their morphologies (i.e., the location of the absorbing substance on/in the particles). To examine the effects of particle morphology on the response of an individual black carbon-containing particle in a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), a series of experiments was conducted to investigate black carbon-containing particles of known morphology using Regal black (RB), a proxy for collapsed soot, as the light-absorbing substance. Particles were formed by coagulation of RB with either a solid substance (sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate) or a liquid substance (dioctyl sebacate),more » and by condensation with dioctyl sebacate, the latter experiment forming particles in a core-shell configuration. Each particle type experienced fragmentation (observed as negative lagtimes), and each yielded similar lagtime responses in some instances, confounding attempts to differentiate particle morphology using current SP2 lagtime analysis. SP2 operating conditions, specifically laser power and sample flow rate, which in turn affect the particle heating and dissipation rates, play an important role in the behavior of particles in the SP2, including probability of fragmentation. This behavior also depended on the morphology of the particles and on the thermo-chemical properties of the non-RB substance. Although these influences cannot currently be unambiguously separated, the SP2 analysis may still provide useful information on particle mixing states and black carbon particle sources.« less

  3. Observing the Edge of the Inner Radiation Belt: the South Atlantic Anomaly Seen with Photometers in Low Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, R. K.; Wolven, B. C.; Paxton, L.; Romeo, G.; Selby, C.; Hsieh, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    The South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) is a region where the Earth's inner radiation belt dips down and bathes low earth orbit satellites with energetic charged particles sometimes causing problems for satellite operations. We will describe data from a series of UV spectrographic imagers (DMSP/SSUSI) that remain on through 4 daily SAA passages. Using spectrographic information, we are able to separate, study, and remove the detector counts due to energetic (~ 1 MeV and above) particle hits. We have made a model of the SAA at Defense Meteorological Satellite Program altitudes (~850 km), and we are able to monitor the intensity of the SAA over the long term (> a decade). Using this window into the inner radiation belt, we are able to see seasonal and solar cycle variations in intensity. In this talk we will describe the techniques, the model, and show results of our study, and and indicate directions for future development and usefulness of using SSUSI as an inner radiation belt particle intensity monitor. Nighttime 427 nm Photometer count rates as seen by SSUSI binned onto a 3 x 3 degree grid and accumulated over the year 2006. The classic shape of the South Atlantic Anomaly is clearly traced by the data.

  4. Comparison of Aerosol Optical Properties and Water Vapor Among Ground and Airborne Lidars and Sun Photometers During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrare, R.; Ismail, S.; Browell, E.; Brackett, V.; Clayton, M.; Kooi, S.; Melfi, S. H.; Whiteman, D.; Schwemmer, G.; Evans, K.; hide

    2000-01-01

    We compare aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and precipitable water vapor (PWV) measurements derived from ground and airborne lidars and Sun photometers during TARFOX (Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment). Such comparisons are important to verify the consistency between various remote sensing measurements before employing them in any assessment of the impact of aerosols on the global radiation balance. Total scattering ratio and extinction profiles measured by the ground-based NASA/GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) system, which operated from Wallops Island, Virginia (37.86 deg N, 75.51 deg W), are compared with those measured by the Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE) airborne lidar system aboard the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Bias and rms differences indicate that these measurements generally agreed within about 10%. Aerosol extinction profiles and estimates of AOT are derived from both lidar measurements using a value for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio S(sub a)=60 sr for the aerosol extinction/backscattering ratio, which was determined from the Raman lidar measurements.

  5. Design and performances of microcameras and photometers instruments on TARANIS satellite for an advanced characterization of Transient Luminous Event in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mer-Dachard, Fanny; Cansot, Elodie; Hébert, Philippe; Farges, Thomas; Ravel, Karen; Gaillac, Stéphanie

    2015-10-01

    The TARANIS mission aims at studying upper atmosphere coupling with a scientific nadir-pointing microsatellite - CNES Myriade family - at a low-altitude orbit (700 km). The main objectives are to measure the occurrence of Transient Luminous Event (TLE), impulsive energetic optical phenomena generated by storms according to recently discovered process, and Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF), their emissions and trigger factors. TARANIS instruments are currently in manufacturing, assembly, integration and testing phase. The MicroCameras and Photometers instruments (MCP) are in charge of the remote sensing of the sprites and the lightning in optical wavelengths. MicroCameras instrument [MCP-MC] is an imager in the visible and Photometers instrument [MCP-PH] is a radiometer with four bands from UV to NIR, able to detect TLEs on-board and to trigger the whole payload. The satellite will provide a complete survey of the atmosphere in low resolution together with a high resolution data of sites of interest automatically detected on board. For MC and PH instruments, CEA defined scientific needs and is in charge of processing data and providing scientific results. CNES described the technical requirements of these two instruments and will run in-flight commissioning. Design, manufacturing and testing is under responsibility of Sodern for MicroCameras and Bertin Technologies for Photometers. This article shortly describes physical characteristics of TLEs and presents the final design of these instruments and first measured performances.

  6. Performance of a newly designed continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS).

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuzo; Kondo, Yutaka; Sahu, Lokesh K; Imaru, Junichi; Fukushima, Nobuhiko; Kano, Minoru

    2008-10-01

    We designed a continuous soot monitoring system (COSMOS) for fully automated, high-sensitivity, continuous measurement of light absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosols. The instrument monitors changes in transmittance across an automatically advancing quartz fiber filter tape using an LED at a 565 nm wavelength. To achieve measurements with high sensitivity and a lower detectable light absorption coefficient, COSMOS uses a double-convex lens and optical bundle pipes to maintain high light intensity and signal data are obtained at 1000 Hz. In addition, sampling flow rate and optical unit temperature are actively controlled. The inlet line for COSMOS is heated to 400 degrees C to effectively volatilize non-refractory aerosol components that are internally mixed with BC. In its current form, COSMOS provides BC light absorption measurements with a detection limit of 0.45 Mm(-1) (0.045 microg m(-3) for soot) for 10 min. The unit-to-unit variability is estimated to be within +/- 1%, demonstrating its high reproducibility. The absorption coefficients determined by COSMOS agreed with those by a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) to within 1% (r2 = 0.97). The precision (+/- 0.60 Mm(-1)) for 10 min integrated data was better than that of PSAP and an aethalometer under our operating conditions. These results showed that COSMOS achieved both an improved detection limit and higher precision for the filter-based light absorption measurements of BC compared to the existing methods.

  7. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: the Absorption and Broadband Correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-05-01

    measurement input of a nearby sun photometer is used to enhance on-site atmospheric assumptions for description of the atmosphere in the algorithm. Comparing both uncorrected and spectral- and absorption-corrected extinction data from one year measurements at the Plataforma Solar de Almería, the mean difference between the scatterometer and the transmissometer is reduced from 4.4 to 0.6%. Applying the ABC procedure without the usage of additional input data from a sun photometer still reduces the difference between both sensors to about 0.8%. Applying an expert guess assuming a standard aerosol profile for continental regions instead of additional sun photometer input results in a mean difference of 0.81%. Therefore, applying this new correction method, both instruments can now be utilized to determine the solar broadband extinction in tower plants sufficiently accurate.

  8. On-board data processing for the near infrared spectrograph and photometer instrument (NISP) of the EUCLID mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, Carlotta; Balestra, Andrea; Bortoletto, Favio; D'Alessandro, Maurizio; Farinelli, Ruben; Medinaceli, Eduardo; Stephen, John; Borsato, Enrico; Dusini, Stefano; Laudisio, Fulvio; Sirignano, Chiara; Ventura, Sandro; Auricchio, Natalia; Corcione, Leonardo; Franceschi, Enrico; Ligori, Sebastiano; Morgante, Gianluca; Patrizii, Laura; Sirri, Gabriele; Trifoglio, Massimo; Valenziano, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The Near Infrared Spectrograph and Photometer (NISP) is one of the two instruments on board the EUCLID mission now under implementation phase; VIS, the Visible Imager is the second instrument working on the same shared optical beam. The NISP focal plane is based on a detector mosaic deploying 16x, 2048x2048 pixels^2 HAWAII-II HgCdTe detectors, now in advanced delivery phase from Teledyne Imaging Scientific (TIS), and will provide NIR imaging in three bands (Y, J, H) plus slit-less spectroscopy in the range 0.9÷2.0 micron. All the NISP observational modes will be supported by different parametrization of the classic multi-accumulation IR detector readout mode covering the specific needs for spectroscopic, photometric and calibration exposures. Due to the large number of deployed detectors and to the limited satellite telemetry available to ground, a consistent part of the data processing, conventionally performed off-line, will be accomplished on board, in parallel with the flow of data acquisitions. This has led to the development of a specific on-board, HW/SW, data processing pipeline, and to the design of computationally performing control electronics, suited to cope with the time constraints of the NISP acquisition sequences during the sky survey. In this paper we present the architecture of the NISP on-board processing system, directly interfaced to the SIDECAR ASICs system managing the detector focal plane, and the implementation of the on-board pipe-line allowing all the basic operations of input frame averaging, final frame interpolation and data-volume compression before ground down-link.

  9. Technical note: Aerosol light absorption measurements with a carbon analyser - Calibration and precision estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammerlaan, B. A. J.; Holzinger, R.; Jedynska, A. D.; Henzing, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are different mass metrics to quantify the amount of combustion aerosol. Both metrics have their own measurement technique. In state-of-the-art carbon analysers, optical measurements are used to correct for organic carbon that is not evolving because of pyrolysis. These optical measurements are sometimes used to apply the technique of absorption photometers. Here, we use the transmission measurements of our carbon analyser for simultaneous determination of the elemental carbon concentration and the absorption coefficient. We use MAAP data from the CESAR observatory, the Netherlands, to correct for aerosol-filter interactions by linking the attenuation coefficient from the carbon analyser to the absorption coefficient measured by the MAAP. Application of the calibration to an independent data set of MAAP and OC/EC observations for the same location shows that the calibration is applicable to other observation periods. Because of simultaneous measurements of light absorption properties of the aerosol and elemental carbon, variation in the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) can be studied. We further show that the absorption coefficients and MAE in this set-up are determined within a precision of 10% and 12%, respectively. The precisions could be improved to 4% and 8% when the light transmission signal in the carbon analyser is very stable.

  10. Dynamic multistation photometer

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Martin L.; Johnson, Wayne F.; Lakomy, Dale G.

    1977-01-01

    A portable fast analyzer is provided that uses a magnetic clutch/brake to rapidly accelerate the analyzer rotor, and employs a microprocessor for automatic analyzer operation. The rotor is held stationary while the drive motor is run up to speed. When it is desired to mix the sample(s) and reagent(s), the brake is deenergized and the clutch is energized wherein the rotor is very rapidly accelerated to the running speed. The parallel path rotor that is used allows the samples and reagents to be mixed the moment they are spun out into the rotor cuvetes and data acquisition begins immediately. The analyzer will thus have special utility for fast reactions.

  11. MAP determinations of the parallaxes of stars in the regions of HD 2665, BD +68.946 deg, and Lambda Ophiuchi. [Multichannel Astrometric Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George

    1989-01-01

    The Multichannel Astrometic Photometer and new optical system of the Allegheny Observatory have been used to obtain parallaxes of stars in the regions of HD 2665, BD +68.946 deg, and Lambda Ophiuchi. HD 2665 is found to have an absolute visual magnitude of 1.6 + or - 0.4 and a distance of 149 + or - 28 pc. It is shown that the Lambda Ophiuchi system has a parallax of 23.5 + or - 2.1 mas and that its A0 V and A4 V components have masses of 2.7 + or - 0.7 and 1.5 + or - 0.4 solar masses, respectively.

  12. Analysis of the Performance Characteristics of the Five-Channel Microtops II Sun Photometer for Measuring Aerosol Optical Thickness and Precipitable Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Levy, Robert; Kaufman, Yoram; Remer, Lorraine A.; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Vanderlei J.; Holben, Brent N.; Abuhassan, Nader; Slutsker, Ilya; Eck, Thomas F.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Five Microtops II sun photometers were studied in detail at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to determine their performance in measuring aerosol optical thickness (AOT or Tau(sub alphalambda) and precipitable column water vapor (W). Each derives Tau(sub alphalambda) from measured signals at four wavelengths lambda (340, 440, 675, and 870 nm), and W from the 936 nm signal measurements. Accuracy of Tau(sub alphalambda) and W determination depends on the reliability of the relevant channel calibration coefficient (V(sub 0)). Relative calibration by transfer of parameters from a more accurate sun photometer (such as the Mauna-Loa-calibrated AERONET master sun photometer at GSFC) is more reliable than Langley calibration performed at GSFC. It was found that the factory-determined value of the instrument constant for the 936 nm filter (k= 0.7847) used in the Microtops' internal algorithm is unrealistic, causing large errors in V(sub 0(936)), Tau(sub alpha936), and W. Thus, when applied for transfer calibration at GSFC, whereas the random variation of V(aub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is quite small, with coefficients of variation (CV) in the range of 0 to 2.4%, at 936 nm the CV goes up to 19%. Also, the systematic temporal variation of V(sub 0) at 340 to 870 nm is very slow, while at 936 nm it is large and exhibits a very high dependence on W. The algorithm also computes Tau(sub alpha936) as 0.91Tau(sub alpha870), which is highly simplistic. Therefore, it is recommended to determine Tau(sub alpha936) by logarithmic extrapolation from Tau(sub alpha675) and Tau(sub alpha 870. From the operational standpoint of the Microtops, apart from errors that may result from unperceived cloud contamination, the main sources of error include inaccurate pointing to the Sun, neglecting to clean the front quartz window, and neglecting to calibrate correctly. If these three issues are adequately taken care of, the Microtops can be quite accurate and stable, with root mean square (rms

  13. Light Absorption of Biogenic Aerosol Particles in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, B. A.; Artaxo, P.; Ferreira De Brito, J.; Barbosa, H. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Saturno, J.; Pöhlker, C.; Holben, B. N.; Schafer, J.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol absorption is a key issue in proper calculation of aerosol radiative forcing. Especially in the tropics with the dominance of natural biogenic aerosol and brown carbon, the so called anomalous absorption is of particular interest. A special experiment was designed to study the wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption for PM2.5 as well as for PM10 particles in the wet season in Central Amazonia. Aerosol analysis occurred from May to August 2014, in the ZF2 ecological reservation, situated at about 55 km North of Manaus in very pristine conditions Two 7 wavelengths AE33 Aethalometers were deployed measuring in parallel, but with a PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Two MAAP (Multiangle Aerosol Absorption Photometer) were operated in parallel with the AE33 exactly at the same PM2.5 and PM10 inlets. Organic and elemental carbon was analyzed using collection with quartz filters and analysis using a Sunset OC/EC analyzer. Aerosol light scattering for 3 wavelengths was measured using Air Photon and TSI Nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution was measured with one TSI SMPS and a GRIMM OPC to have the size range from 10 nm to 10 micrometers. Particles were measured under dry conditions using diffusion dryers. Aerosol optical depth and absorption was also measured with an AERONET sunphotometer operated close to the site. As the experiment was run in the wet season, very low equivalent black carbon (EBC) were measured, with average concentrations around 50 ng/m³ during May, increasing to 130 ng/m³ in June and July. The measurements adjusted for similar wavelengths shows excellent agreement between the MAAP and AE33 for both inlets (PM2.5 and PM10). It was not possible statistically infer absorption from the coarse mode biogenic particles, since the absorption was completely dominated by fine mode particles. AERONET measurements shows very low values of AOD, at 0.17 at 500 nm and 0.13 at 870 nm, with very low absorption AOD values at 0.00086 at 676 nm and 0.0068 at 872 nm

  14. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  15. Measurements of Soot Mass Absorption Coefficients from 300 to 660 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Fisher, Al; Helgestad, Taylor; Lambe, Andrew; Sedlacek, Arthur; Smith, Geoffrey; Cappa, Christopher; Davidovits, Paul; Onasch, Timothy; Freedman, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Soot, a product of incomplete combustion, plays an important role in the earth's climate system through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. In particular, the assumed mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot and its variation with wavelength presents a significant uncertainty in the calculation of radiative forcing in global climate change models. As part of the fourth Boston College/Aerodyne soot properties measurement campaign, we have measured the mass absorption coefficient of soot produced by an inverted methane diffusion flame over a spectral range of 300-660 nm using a variety of optical absorption techniques. Extinction and absorption were measured using a dual cavity ringdown photoacoustic spectrometer (CRD-PAS, UC Davis) at 405 nm and 532 nm. Scattering and extinction were measured using a CAPS PMssa single scattering albedo monitor (Aerodyne) at 630 nm; the absorption coefficient was determined by subtraction. In addition, the absorption coefficients in 8 wavelength bands from 300 to 660 nm were measured using a new broadband photoacoustic absorption monitor (UGA). Soot particle mass was quantified using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA, Cambustion), mobility size with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS, TSI) and soot concentration with a CPC (Brechtel). The contribution of doubly charged particles to the sample mass was determined using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (DMT). Over a mass range of 1-8 fg, corresponding to differential mobility diameters of ~150 nm to 550 nm, the value of the soot MAC proved to be independent of mass for all wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the MAC was best fit to a power law with an Absorption Ångstrom Coefficient slightly greater than 1.

  16. Education and Public Outreach for the PICASSO-CENA Satellite-Based Research Mission: K-12 Students Use Sun Photometers to Assist Scientists in Validating Atmospheric Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, D. Q.

    2001-05-01

    Hampton University, a historically black university, is leading the Education and Public Outreach (EPO) portion of the PICASSO-CENA satellite-based research mission. Currently scheduled for launch in 2004, PICASSO-CENA will use LIDAR (LIght Detection and Ranging), to study earth's atmosphere. The PICASSO-CENA Outreach program works with scientists, teachers, and students to better understand the effects of clouds and aerosols on earth's atmosphere. This program actively involves students nationwide in NASA research by having them obtain sun photometer measurements from their schools and homes for comparison with data collected by the PICASSO-CENA mission. Students collect data from their classroom ground observations and report the data via the Internet. Scientists will use the data from the PICASSO-CENA research and the student ground-truthing observations to improve predications about climatic change. The two-band passive remote sensing sun photometer is designed for student use as a stand alone instrument to study atmospheric turbidity or in conjunction with satellite data to provide ground-truthing. The instrument will collect measurements of column optical depth from the ground level. These measurements will not only give the students an appreciation for atmospheric turbidity, but will also provide quantitative correlative information to the PICASSO-CENA mission on ground-level optical depth. Student data obtained in this manner will be sufficiently accurate for scientists to use as ground truthing. Thus, students will have the opportunity to be involved with a NASA satellite-based research mission.

  17. Retrievals of aerosol optical depth and Angström exponent from ground-based Sun-photometer data of Singapore.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Santo V; Chew, Boon N; Liew, Soo C

    2009-03-10

    The role of aerosols in climate and climate change is one of the factors that is least understood at the present. Aerosols' direct interaction with solar radiation is a well understood mechanism that affects Earth's net radiative forcing. However, quantifying its magnitude is more problematic because of the temporal and spatial variability of aerosol particles. To enhance our understanding of the radiative effects of aerosols on the global climate, Singapore has joined the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network) worldwide network by contributing ground-based direct Sun measurements performed by means of a multiwavelength Sun-photometer instrument. Data are collected on an hourly basis, then are uploaded to be fully screened and quality assured by AERONET. We use a one year data record (level 1.5/2.0) of measured columnar atmospheric optical depth, spanning from November 2006 to October 2007, to study the monthly and seasonal variability of the aerosol optical depth and the Angström exponent. We performed independent retrievals of these parameters (aerosol optical depth and Angström exponent) by using the photometer's six available bands covering the near-UV to near-IR (380-1080 nm). As a validation, our independent retrievals were compared with AERONET 1.5/2.0 level direct Sun product.

  18. SeaWIFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 13; The SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurement (SeaPRISM) Field Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Bailey, Sean W.; Pietras, Christophe M.; Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities that took place at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea off the coast of Italy from 2-6 August 1999. The ultimate objective of the field campaign was to evaluate the capabilities of a new instrument called the SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM). SeaPRISM is based on a CE-318 sun photometer made by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France). The CE-318 is an automated, robotic system which measures the direct sun irradiance plus the sky radiance in the sun plane and in the almucantar plane. The data are transmitted over a satellite link, and this remote operation capability has made the device very useful for atmospheric measurements. The revision to the CE-318 that makes the instrument potentially useful for SeaWiFS calibration and validation activities is to include a capability for measuring the radiance leaving the sea surface in wavelengths suitable for the determination of chlorophyll a concentration. The initial evaluation of this new capability involved above- and in-water measurement protocols. An intercomparison of the water-leaving radiances derived from SeaPRISM and an in-water system showed the overall spectral agreement was approximately 8.6%, but the blue-green channels intercompared at the 5% level. A blue-green band ratio comparison was at the 4% level.

  19. Gluing interface qualification test results and gluing process development of the EUCLID near-infrared spectro-photometer optical assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mottaghibonab, A.; Thiele, H.; Gubbini, E.; Dubowy, M.; Gal, C.; Mecsaci, A.; Gawlik, K.; Vongehr, M.; Grupp, F.; Penka, D.; Wimmer, C.; Bender, R.

    2016-07-01

    The Near Infrared Spectro-Photometer Optical assembly (NIOA) of EUCLID satellite requires high precision large lens holders with different lens materials, shapes and diameters. The aspherical lenses are glued into their separate CTE matched lens holder. The gluing of the lenses in their holder with 2K epoxy is selected as bonding process to minimize the stress in the lenses to achieve the required surface form error (SFE) performance (32nm) and lens position stability (+/-10μm) due to glue shrinkage. Adhesive shrinkage stress occurs during the glue curing at room temperature and operation in cryogenic temperatures, which might overstress the lens, cause performance loss, lens breakage or failure of the gluing interface. The selection of the suitable glue and required bonding parameters, design and qualification of the gluing interface, development and verification of the gluing process was a great challenge because of the low TRL and heritage of the bonding technology. The different material combinations (CaF2 to SS316L, LF5G15 and S-FTM16 to Titanium, SUPRASIL3001 to Invar M93), large diameter (168mm) and thin edge of the lenses, cryogenic nonoperational temperature (100K) and high performance accuracy of the lenses were the main design driver of the development. The different coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between lens and lens holder produce large local mechanical stress. As hygroscopic crystal calcium fluoride (CaF2) is very sensitive to moisture therefore an additional surface treatment of the gluing area is necessary. Extensive tests e.g glue handling and single lap shear tests are performed to select the suitable adhesive. Interface connection tests are performed to verify the feasibility of selected design (double pad design), injection channel, the roughness and treatment of the metal and lens interfaces, glue thickness, glue pad diameter and the gluing process. CTE and dynamic measurements of the glue, thermal cycling, damp- heat, connection

  20. Comparison of different Aethalometer correction schemes and a reference multi-wavelength absorption technique for ambient aerosol data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturno, Jorge; Pöhlker, Christopher; Massabò, Dario; Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Cheng, Yafang; Chi, Xuguang; Ditas, Florian; Hrabě de Angelis, Isabella; Morán-Zuloaga, Daniel; Pöhlker, Mira L.; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Walter, David; Wang, Qiaoqiao; Artaxo, Paulo; Prati, Paolo; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-08-01

    Deriving absorption coefficients from Aethalometer attenuation data requires different corrections to compensate for artifacts related to filter-loading effects, scattering by filter fibers, and scattering by aerosol particles. In this study, two different correction schemes were applied to seven-wavelength Aethalometer data, using multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) data as a reference absorption measurement at 637 nm. The compensation algorithms were compared to five-wavelength offline absorption measurements obtained with a multi-wavelength absorbance analyzer (MWAA), which serves as a multiple-wavelength reference measurement. The online measurements took place in the Amazon rainforest, from the wet-to-dry transition season to the dry season (June-September 2014). The mean absorption coefficient (at 637 nm) during this period was 1.8 ± 2.1 Mm-1, with a maximum of 15.9 Mm-1. Under these conditions, the filter-loading compensation was negligible. One of the correction schemes was found to artificially increase the short-wavelength absorption coefficients. It was found that accounting for the aerosol optical properties in the scattering compensation significantly affects the absorption Ångström exponent (åABS) retrievals. Proper Aethalometer data compensation schemes are crucial to retrieve the correct åABS, which is commonly implemented in brown carbon contribution calculations. Additionally, we found that the wavelength dependence of uncompensated Aethalometer attenuation data significantly correlates with the åABS retrieved from offline MWAA measurements.

  1. Atmospheric extinction in solar tower plants: absorption and broadband correction for MOR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanrieder, N.; Wilbert, S.; Pitz-Paal, R.; Emde, C.; Gasteiger, J.; Mayer, B.; Polo, J.

    2015-08-01

    measurement input of a nearby sun photometer is used to enhance on-site atmospheric assumptions for description of the atmosphere in the algorithm. Comparing both uncorrected and spectral- and absorption-corrected extinction data from 1-year measurements at the Plataforma Solar de Almería, the mean difference between the scatterometer and the transmissometer is reduced from 4.4 to 0.57 %. Applying the ABC procedure without the usage of additional input data from a sun photometer still reduces the difference between both sensors to about 0.8 %. Applying an expert guess assuming a standard aerosol profile for continental regions instead of additional sun photometer input results in a mean difference of 0.8 %. Additionally, a simulation approach which just uses sun photometer and common meteorological data to determine the on-site atmospheric extinction at surface is presented and corrected FS11 and LPV4 measurements are validated with the simulation results. For T1 km equal to 0.9 and a 10 min time resolution, an uncertainty analysis showed that an absolute uncertainty of about 0.038 is expected for the FS11 and about 0.057 for the LPV4. Combining both uncertainties results in an overall absolute uncertainty of 0.068 which justifies quite well the mean RMSE between both corrected data sets. For yearly averages several error influences average out and absolute uncertainties of 0.020 and 0.054 can be expected for the FS11 and the LPV4, respectively. Therefore, applying this new correction method, both instruments can now be utilized to sufficiently accurately determine the solar broadband extinction in tower plants.

  2. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  3. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  4. Black Carbon Emissions from Associated Natural Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Weyant, Cheryl L; Shepson, Paul B; Subramanian, R; Cambaliza, Maria O L; Heimburger, Alexie; McCabe, David; Baum, Ellen; Stirm, Brian H; Bond, Tami C

    2016-02-16

    Approximately 150 billion cubic meters (BCM) of natural gas is flared and vented in the world annually, emitting greenhouse gases and other pollutants with no energy benefit. About 7 BCM per year is flared in the United States, and half is from North Dakota alone. There are few emission measurements from associated gas flares and limited black carbon (BC) emission factors have been previously reported from the field. Emission plumes from 26 individual flares in the Bakken formation in North Dakota were sampled. Methane, carbon dioxide, and BC were measured simultaneously, allowing the calculation of BC mass emission factors using the carbon balance method. Particle optical absorption was measured using a three-wavelength particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) and BC particle number and mass concentrations were measured with a single particle soot photometer. The BC emission factors varied over 2 orders of magnitude, with an average and uncertainty range of 0.14 ± 0.12 g/kg hydrocarbons in associated gas and a median of 0.07 g/kg which represents a lower bound on these measurements. An estimation of the BC emission factor derived from PSAP absorption provides an upper bound at 3.1 g/kg. These results are lower than previous estimations and laboratory measurements. The BC mass absorption cross section was 16 ± 12 m(2)/g BC at 530 nm. The average absorption Ångström exponent was 1.2 ± 0.8, suggesting that most of the light absorbing aerosol measured was black carbon and the contribution of light absorbing organic carbon was small.

  5. Distribution of photon absorption rates across the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Williams, T P; Webbers, J P; Giordano, L; Henderson, R P

    1998-04-15

    1. An investigation into the distribution of light intensity across the rat retina was carried out on excised, intact rat eyes exposed to Ganzfeld illumination from a helium-neon laser (543 nm). 2. Some of the light entering the eyes exits through the sclera where its intensity can be monitored with an optical 'pick-up' that samples the intensity coming from a small region of external sclera and underlying retina. The spatial resolution of the pick-up is such that it samples light that has passed through ca 2 % of the rods in the rat eye. 3. Some of the laser light is absorbed by the rod pigment, rhodopsin, which gradually bleaches. Bleaching in the retina, in turn, causes an exponential increase in intensity emanating from the sclera. By monitoring this intensity increase, we are able to measure two important parameters in a single bleaching run: the local rhodopsin concentration and the local intensity falling on the rods. 4. With an ocular transmission photometer, we have measured both the local intensity and the local rhodopsin concentration across wide regions of rat retina. Both pigmented and albino rats were studied. 5. The distributions of rhodopsin and intensity were both nearly uniform; consequently, the product, (rhodopsin concentration) x (intensity), was similarly nearly equal across the retina. This means that the initial rate of photon absorption is about the same at all retinal locations. 6. Interpreted in terms of photostasis (the regulation of daily photon catch), this means that the rate of photon absorption is about the same in each rod, viz. 14 400 photons absorbed per rod per second. Since this rate of absorption is sufficient to saturate the rod, one possible purpose of photostasis is to maintain the rod system in a saturated state during daylight hours.

  6. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  7. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  8. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  9. Sun photometer and lidar measurements of the plume from the Hawaii Kilauea Volcano Pu'u O'o vent: Aerosol flux and SO2 lifetime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, J.N.; Horton, K.A.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Lienert, B.; Sharma, S.K.; Lau, E.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths and lidar measurements were obtained under the plume of Hawaii Kilauea Volcano on August 17, 2001, ???9 km downwind from the erupting Pu'u O'o vent. Measured aerosol optical depths (at 500 nm) were between 0.2-0.4. Aerosol size distributions inverted from the spectral sun photometer measurements suggest the volcanic aerosol is present in the accumulation mode (0.1-0.5 micron diameter), which is consistent with past in situ optical counter measurements. The aerosol dry mass flux rate was calculated to be 53 Mg d-1. The estimated SO2 emission rate during the aerosol measurements was ???1450 Mg d-1. Assuming the sulfur emissions at Pu'u O'o vent are mainly SO2 (not aerosol), this corresponds to a SO2 half-life of 6.0 hours in the atmosphere.

  10. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor); Hua, Duy H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  11. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  13. Laser Atmospheric Absorption Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    A. Modification of Commercial C09 Laser 50 B. CW HF/DF Laser System * 53 C. Microcomputer Data Link 55 D . Fourier Transform...improved accuracy are used [5]. c. The absorption coefficient is listed for each absorbing species separately which some codes require. d . A super...series of water vapor absorption measurements was planned. The results of the first four lines studied are presented here in Figures 33a- d . Figure

  14. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  15. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  16. Absorption fluids data survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  17. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  18. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  20. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  1. Measurements and Modeling of Aerosol Absorption and Single Scattering Albedo at Ambient Relative Hum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Hamill, P.

    2000-01-01

    Uncertainties in the aerosol single scattering albedo have been identified to be an important source of errors in current large-scale model estimates of the direct aerosol radiative forcing of climate. A number of investigators have obtained estimates of the single scattering albedo from a variety of remote sensing and in situ measurements during aerosol field experiments. During the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX, 1996) for example, estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo were obtained (1) as a best-fit parameter in comparing radiative flux changes measured by airborne pyranometer to those computed from independently measured aerosol properties; (2) from estimates of the aerosol complex index of refraction derived using a combination of airborne sunphotometer, lidar backscatter and in situ size distribution measurements; and (3) from airborne measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption using nephelometers and absorption photometers. In this paper, we briefly compare the results of the latter two methods for two TARFOX case studies, since those techniques provide height-resolved information about the aerosol single scattering albedo. Estimates of the aerosol single scattering albedo from nephelometer and absorption photometer measurements require knowledge of the scattering and absorption humidification (i.e., the increase in these properties in response to an increase in ambient relative humidity), since both measurements are usually carried out at a relative humidity different from the ambient atmosphere. In principle, the scattering humidification factor can be measured, but there is currently no technique widely available to measure the absorption of an aerosol sample as a function of relative humidity. Frequently, for lack of better knowledge, the absorption humidification is assumed to be unity (meaning that there is no change in aerosol absorption due to an increase in ambient relative humidity). This

  2. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  3. Temperature-Dependent Refractive Index Measurements of Caf2, Suprasil 3001, and S-FTM16 for the Euclid Near Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Miller, Kevin H.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Grupp, Frank D.

    2015-01-01

    Using the Cryogenic High Accuracy Refraction Measuring System (CHARMS) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, we measured absolute refractive indices at temperatures from 100 to 310 K at wavelengths from 0.42 to 3.6 microns for CaF2, Suprasil 3001 fused silica, and S-FTM16 glass in support of lens designs for the Near Infrared Spectrometer and Photometer (NISP) for ESA's Euclid dark energy mission. We report absolute refractive index, dispersion (dn/d?), and thermo-optic coefficient (dn/dT) for these materials. In this study, materials from different melts were procured to understand index variability in each material. We provide temperature-dependent Sellmeier coefficients based on our data to allow accurate interpolation of index to other wavelengths and temperatures. For calcium fluoride (CaF2) and S-FTM16, we compare our current measurements with CHARMS measurements of these materials made in the recent past for other programs. We also compare Suprasil 3001's indices to those of other forms of fused silica we have measured in CHARMS.

  4. Comparison of the Changes in the Visible and Infrared Irradiance Observed by the SunPhotometers on EURECA to the UARS Total Solar and UV Irradiances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, Judit

    1995-01-01

    Solar irradiance in the near-UV (335 nm), visible (500 nm) and infrared (778 nm) spectral bands has been measured by the SunPhotometers developed at the World Radiation Center, Davos, Switzerland on board the European Retrievable Carrier between August 1992 and May 1993. Study of the variations in the visible and infrared irradiance is important for both solar and atmospheric physics. The purpose of this paper is to examine the temporal variations observed in the visible and infrared spectral bands after eliminating the trend in the data mainly related to instrument degradation. The effect of active regions in these spectral irradiances is clearly resolved. Variations in the visible and infrared irradiances are compared to total solar irradiance observed by the SOVA2 radiometer on the EURECA platform and by the ACRIMII radiometer on UARS as well as to UV observations of the UARS and NOAA9 satellites. The space-borne spectral irradiance observations are compared to the photometric sunspot deficit and CaII K irradiance measured at the San Fernando Observatory, California State University at Northridge in order to study the effect of active regions in detail.

  5. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  6. Linear absorptive dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tip, A.

    1998-06-01

    Starting from Maxwell's equations for a linear, nonconducting, absorptive, and dispersive medium, characterized by the constitutive equations D(x,t)=ɛ1(x)E(x,t)+∫t-∞dsχ(x,t-s)E(x,s) and H(x,t)=B(x,t), a unitary time evolution and canonical formalism is obtained. Given the complex, coordinate, and frequency-dependent, electric permeability ɛ(x,ω), no further assumptions are made. The procedure leads to a proper definition of band gaps in the periodic case and a new continuity equation for energy flow. An S-matrix formalism for scattering from lossy objects is presented in full detail. A quantized version of the formalism is derived and applied to the generation of Čerenkov and transition radiation as well as atomic decay. The last case suggests a useful generalization of the density of states to the absorptive situation.

  7. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  8. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  9. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  10. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  11. New in situ Aerosol Spectral Optical Measurements over 300-700 nm, Extinction and Total Absorption, Paired with Absorption from Water- and Methanol-soluble Aerosol Extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, C. E.; Stauffer, R. M.; Lamb, B.; Novak, M. G.; Mannino, A.; Hudgins, C.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Crosbie, E.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B.; Martin, R.; Shook, M.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Corr, C.

    2017-12-01

    A new in situ spectral aerosol extinction instrument (custom built, SpEx) built to cover the 300-700 nm range at 1 nm spectral resolution and temporal resolution of 4 minutes was deployed on the top deck ( 10 m above the water surface) of the R/V Onnuri during the KORUS-OC research cruise around South Korea in spring 2016. This new instrument was one component of a suite of in situ aerosol optical measurements that included 3-visible-wavelength scattering (Airphoton IN101 Nephelometer, at 450, 532, & 632 nm) and absorption (Brechtel Tricolor Absorption Photometer Model 2901, at 467, 528, & 652 nm) with sub-minute temporal resolution; two sets of filters (Teflon and glass fiber, both collected over 3 hour daytime and 12 hour overnight intervals) to provide aerosol absorption spectra over the same wavelength range as SpEx. The glass fiber filters were placed in the center of an integrating sphere (Labsphere DRA-CA-30) attached to a dual beam spectrophotometer (Cary 100 Bio UV-Visible Spectrophotometer) to measure total aerosol absorption spectra via an established method used by the ocean color community to obtain absorption spectra from particles suspended in sea water. Adapting this methodology for atmospheric aerosol measurements provides a new avenue to obtain spectral total aerosol absorption, particularly useful for expanding in situ measurement capabilities into the UV range. The Teflon filters were cut in half with one half extracted in deionized water and the other half extracted in methanol. The solutions were filtered and injected into a liquid waveguide capillary cell (World Precision Instruments LWCC-3100, 100 cm pathlength) to measure the absorption spectra for each solution. In addition, the water extracts were measured via ion chromatography (Dionex ICS-3000 Ion Chromatography System) to obtain water-soluble inorganic ion concentrations, as well as via aerosol mass spectrometry (Aerodyne Research, Inc. HR-ToF High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

  12. Kepler Mission: A Wide-FOV Photometer Designed to Determine the Frequency of Earth-Size and Larger Planets Around Solar-like stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borucki, William; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack; Basri, Gibor; Caldwell, John; Cochran, William; Dunham, Edward W.; Gilliland, Ronald; Jenkins, Jon M.; Caldwell, Douglas; hide

    2002-01-01

    The first step in discovering the extent of life in our galaxy is to determine the number of terrestrial planets in the habitable zone (HZ). The Kepler Mission is designed around a 0.95 m aperture Schmidt-type telescope with an array of 42 CCDs designed to continuously monitor the brightness of 100,000 solar-like stars to detect the transits of Earth-size and larger planets. The photometer is scheduled to be launched into heliocentric orbit in 2007. Measurements of the depth and repetition time of transits provide the size of the planet relative to the star and its orbital period. When combined with ground-based spectroscopy of these stars to fix the stellar parameters, the true planet radius and orbit scale, hence the position relative to the HZ are determined. These spectra are also used to discover the relationships between the characteristics of planets and the stars they orbit. In particular, the association of planet size and occurrence frequency with stellar mass and metallicity will be investigated. At the end of the four year mission, hundreds of terrestrial planets should be discovered in and near the HZ of their stars if such planets are common. A null result would imply that terrestrial planets in the HZ occur in less than 1% of the stars and that life might be quite rare. Based on the results of the current doppler-velocity discoveries, detection of a thousand giant planets is expected. Information on their albedos and densities of those giants showing transits will be obtained.

  13. Enhanced light absorptivity of black carbon with air pollution development in urban Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Q.; Cheng, Y.; Su, H.; He, K.

    2017-12-01

    The impacts of black carbon (BC) aerosols on air quality and climate are dependent on BC light absorptivity. However, the light absorptivity of ambient BC-containing particles remains conflicting. In this work, we investigated the evolution of BC light absorptivity with pollution development in urban Beijing, China. We found that the mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of ambient BC-containing particles measured during the campaign increased with BC mass concentration, which can be attributed to more coating materials on BC surface with pollution development. A single-particle soot photometer (SP2) measurement showed that the coating thickness (CT) of BC-containing particles increased by 48% with PM1 and BC mass concentration increasing from 10 μg m-3 and 0.3 μg m-3 to 230 μg m-3 and 12 μg m-3. Based on Mie calculation, the CT increase could led to light absorption enhancement (Eab) of BC-containing particles increasing by 22%, consistent with the increase of measured MAC. The relationship between growth rate of BC light absorptivity (kEab) and that of PM1 or rBC concentration (kPM1 or krBC) showed that kEab ≈ 4.8% kPM1 or kEab ≈ 2.5% krBC. The analysis of effective emission intensity (EEI) for BC revealed that the enhancement of BC light absorptivity with increasing pollution levels was dominated by regional transport. During the pollution period, 63% of BC over Beijing originated from regional sources. The aging of these regional BC during atmospheric transport controlled the increase of coating materials for BC-containing particles observed in Beijing. As a result of enhanced light absorptivity with pollution development, BC forcing efficiency could increase by 20% during polluted period. Our work identified the importance of BC on radiative forcing under polluted environment, which is determined by not only the increase of BC mass concentration, but also the enhancement of BC forcing efficiency due to more coating materials.

  14. MULTIMAGNON ABSORPTION IN MNF2-OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTRUM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The absorption spectrum of MnF2 at 4.2K in the 3900A region was measured in zero external fields and in high fields. Exciton lines with magnon ...sidebands are observed, accompanied by a large number of weak satellite lines. Results on the exciton and magnon absorptions are similar to those of...McClure et al. The satellite lines are interpreted as being multi- magnon absorptions, and it is possible to fit the energy of all the absorptions with

  15. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  16. Triple effect absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.; Potnis, S.V.; Tang, J.

    1996-12-31

    Triple effect absorption chillers can achieve 50% COP improvement over double-effect systems. However, to translate this potential into cost-effective hardware, the most promising embodiments must be identified. In this study, 12 generic triple effect cycles and 76 possible hermetic loop arrangements of those 12 generic cycles were identified. The generic triple effect cycles were screened based on their pressure and solubility field requirements, generic COPs, risk involved in the component design, and number of components in a high corrosive environment. This screening identified four promising arrangements: Alkitrate Topping cycle, Pressure Staged Envelope cycle, High Pressure Overlap cycle, and Dual Loopmore » cycle. All of these arrangements have a very high COP ({approximately} 1.8), however the development risk and cost involved is different for each arrangement. Therefore, the selection of a particular arrangement will depend upon the specific situation under consideration.« less

  17. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  18. Nonequilibrium quantum absorption refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Fu-Lin

    2018-06-01

    We study a quantum absorption refrigerator, in which a target qubit is cooled by two machine qubits in a nonequilibrium steady-state. It is realized by a strong internal coupling in the two-qubit fridge and a vanishing tripartite interaction among the whole system. The coherence of a machine virtual qubit is investigated as quantumness of the fridge. A necessary condition for cooling shows that the quantum coherence is beneficial to the nonequilibrium fridge, while it is detrimental as far as the maximum coefficient of performance (COP) and the COP at maximum power are concerned. Here, the COP is defined only in terms of heat currents caused by the tripartite interaction, with the one maintaining the two-qubit nonequilibrium state being excluded. The later can be considered to have no direct involvement in extracting heat from the target, as it is not affected by the tripartite interaction.

  19. A contribution of black and brown carbon to the aerosol light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Cho, Chaeyoon; Jo, Duseong; Park, Rokjin

    2017-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is functionally defined as the absorbing component of atmospheric total carbonaceous aerosols and is typically dominated by soot-like elemental carbon (EC). Organic carbon (OC) has also been shown to absorb strongly at visible to UV wavelengths and the absorbing organics are referred to as brown carbon (BrC; Alexander et al., 2008). These two aerosols contribute to solar radiative forcing through absorption of solar radiation and heating of the absorbing aerosol layer, but most optical instruments that quantify light absorption are unable to distinguish one type of absorbing aerosol from another (Moosmüller et al. 2009). In this study, we separate total aerosol absorption from these two different light absorbers from co-located simultaneous in-situ measurements, such as Continuous Soot Monitoring System (COSMOS), Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP) and Sunset EC/OC analyzer, at Gosan climate observatory, Korea. We determine the mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of BC, and then estimate the contribution of BC and BrC on aerosol light absorption, together with a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) simulation. At 565 nm wavelength, BC MAC is found to be about 5.4±2.8 m2 g-1 from COSMOS and Sunset EC/OC analyzer measurements during January-May 2012. This value is similar to those from Alexander et al. (2008; 4.3 ˜ 4.8 m2 g-1 at 550 nm) and Chung et al. (2012; 5.1 m2 g-1 at 520 nm), but slightly lower than Bond and Bergstrom (2006; 7.5±1.2 m2 g-1 at 550 nm). The COMOS BC mass concentration calculated with 5.4 m2 g-1 of BC MAC shows a good agreement with thermal EC concentration, with a good slope (1.1). Aerosol absorption coefficient and BC mass concentration from COSMOS, meanwhile, are approximately 25 ˜ 30 % lower than those of CLAP. This difference can be attributable to the contribution of volatile light-absorbing aerosols (i.e., BrC). The absorption coefficient of BrC, which is determined by the difference of

  20. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  1. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  2. PACS photometer calibration block analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moór, A.; Müller, T. G.; Kiss, C.; Balog, Z.; Billot, N.; Marton, G.

    2014-07-01

    The absolute stability of the PACS bolometer response over the entire mission lifetime without applying any corrections is about 0.5 % (standard deviation) or about 8 % peak-to-peak. This fantastic stability allows us to calibrate all scientific measurements by a fixed and time-independent response file, without using any information from the PACS internal calibration sources. However, the analysis of calibration block observations revealed clear correlations of the internal source signals with the evaporator temperature and a signal drift during the first half hour after the cooler recycling. These effects are small, but can be seen in repeated measurements of standard stars. From our analysis we established corrections for both effects which push the stability of the PACS bolometer response to about 0.2 % (stdev) or 2 % in the blue, 3 % in the green and 5 % in the red channel (peak-to-peak). After both corrections we still see a correlation of the signals with PACS FPU temperatures, possibly caused by parasitic heat influences via the Kevlar wires which connect the bolometers with the PACS Focal Plane Unit. No aging effect or degradation of the photometric system during the mission lifetime has been found.

  3. Comparison of Water Vapor Measurements by Airborne Sun Photometer and Near-Coincident in Situ and Satellite Sensors during INTEX/ITCT 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Redemann, J.; Russell, P. B.; Ramirez, S. A.; Eilers, J.; Gore, W.; Howard, S.; Pommier, J.; Fetzer, E. J.; hide

    2007-01-01

    We have retrieved columnar water vapor (CWV) from measurements acquired by the 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sun photometer (AATS-14) during 19 Jetstream 31 (J31) flights over the Gulf of Maine in summer 2004 in support of the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment (INTEX)/Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) experiments. In this paper we compare AATS-14 water vapor retrievals during aircraft vertical profiles with measurements by an onboard Vaisala HMP243 humidity sensor and by ship radiosondes and with water vapor profiles retrieved from AIRS measurements during eight Aqua overpasses. We also compare AATS CWV and MODIS infrared CWV retrievals during five Aqua and five Terra overpasses. For 35 J31 vertical profiles, mean (bias) and RMS AATS-minus-Vaisala layer-integrated water vapor (LWV) differences are -7.1 percent and 8.8 percent, respectively. For 22 aircraft profiles within 1 hour and 130 km of radiosonde soundings, AATS-minus-sonde bias and RMS LWV differences are -5.4 percent and 10.7 percent, respectively, and corresponding J31 Vaisala-minus-sonde differences are 2.3 percent and 8.4 percent, respectively. AIRS LWV retrievals within 80 lan of J31 profiles yield lower bias and RMS differences compared to AATS or Vaisala retrievals than do AIRS retrievals within 150 km of the J31. In particular, for AIRS-minus-AATS LWV differences, the bias decreases from 8.8 percent to 5.8 percent, and the RMS difference decreases from 2 1.5 percent to 16.4 percent. Comparison of vertically resolved AIRS water vapor retrievals (LWVA) to AATS values in fixed pressure layers yields biases of -2 percent to +6 percent and RMS differences of -20 percent below 700 hPa. Variability and magnitude of these differences increase significantly above 700 hPa. MODIS IR retrievals of CWV in 205 grid cells (5 x 5 km at nadir) are biased wet by 10.4 percent compared to AATS over-ocean near-surface retrievals. The MODIS-Aqua subset (79 grid cells

  4. A novel inversion method to calculate the mass fraction of coated refractory black carbon using a centrifugal particle mass analyzer and single particle soot photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, M.; Broda, K.; Olfert, J. S.; Schill, G. P.; McMeeking, G. R.; Schnitzler, E.; Jäger, W.

    2016-12-01

    Refractory black carbon (rBC) has important atmospheric impacts due to its ability to absorb light, and its interactions with light are partly governed by the acquisition of coatings or other mixing processes. Here, a novel inversion method is presented which derives the mass fraction of coated rBC using a coupled centrifugal particle mass analyzer (CPMA) and single particle soot photometer (SP2). The CPMA selects particles of a known mass-­to-­charge ratio, and the SP2 detects the mass of rBC in each individual particle. The results of the inversion are the simultaneous number distributions of both rBC mass and total particle mass. Practically, the distribution can be integrated to find properties of the total aerosol population, for example, i) mass fraction of coating and ii) mass of coating on a particle of known total mass. This was demonstrated via smog chamber experiments. Initially, particles in the chamber were pure rBC, produced from a methane burner and passed through a diffusion dryer and thermal denuder. An organic (non-rBC) coating was then grown onto the aerosol over several hours via photooxidation with p-xylene. The CPMA-SP2 coupled system sampled the aerosol over the reaction period as the coating grew. The CPMA was sequentially stepped over a mass range from 0.3 to 28 fg and the SP2 measured the mass of rBC in each individual CPMA-classified particle. The number and mass distributions were constructed using the inversion. As expected, the mass and number distributions of rBC and total mass were equivalent for uncoated particles. As the non-rBC coating thickness increased over time, a shift in the number distribution towards higher total mass was observed. At the end of the experiment, fresh rBC (i.e. uncoated, bare particles) was injected into the chamber, creating an external mixture of coated and uncoated particles. This external mixture was clearly resolved in the number distribution of rBC and total particle mass. It is expected that the

  5. Biomass burning plumes and the aging of black carbon aerosols in the tropopause region observed with the CARIBIC single particle soot photometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditas, J.; Ma, N.; Zhang, Y.; Assmann, D. N.; Neumaier, M.; Wang, S.; Wang, J.; Zahn, A.; Hermann, M.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Poeschl, U.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) events can release large amounts of refractory black carbon (rBC) into the upper troposphere and lowermost stratosphere (UT/LMS) (Dahlkötter et al., 2014). To explore this effect, a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) was added to the scientific payload of the instrumented CARIBIC container that is installed monthly in the cargo bay of a passenger aircraft (the IAGOS-CARIBIC atmospheric observatory, www.iagos.org). Regular measurement flights with different destinations are performed, covering an area of about 120°W to 120°E and 75°N to 30°S. A wide range of in situ measurements (CO, O3, greenhouse gases, aerosol particles and volatile organic compounds) is combined with a collection of air and aerosol samples for laboratory analyses. Since August 2014, the SP2 measures BC number and mass concentration at altitudes between 8 and 12 km. More than 600 BC measurement hours show a strong impact of BB emissions on the lowermost stratosphere. The BB plumes are identified with the help of concurrent carbon monoxide and acetonitrile measurements showing substantially increased concentrations compared to their background level. Transported into the lowermost stratosphere, BB smoke can be transported over long distances and the BC particles can stay in the atmosphere up to one year. The monthly missions of four consecutive CARIBIC flights sometimes enable to revisit a certain air mass, as was the case during a measurement flight to San Francisco in August 2014, with a stopover time of 2h. The revisited biomass burning plume located over the Altlantic ocean near Greenland was traced back by backward and forward trajectories to open fires in Canada (upper Fig.). The transit time of the smoke plume was estimated to 16 - 19h which perfectly matches our flight time difference ( 18h). Based on the LEO-fit method (Leading Edge Only fit) from Gao et al. (2007), the mixing state of the BC particles within the BB plume was calculated. Our unique data set

  6. Development of the Small Package Single Particle Soot Photometer with extended range (SP2-XR) and black carbon detection efficiency compared to its predecessor, the SP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H.; Kok, G. L.; Zanatta, M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Herber, A. B.

    2016-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol is an important contributor to climate change due to its ability to very efficiently absorb solar radiation. The Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) is an instrument that quantifies the refractory mass of individual BC-containing particles with a laser-induced incandescence method. The SP2 has been deployed on ships, at ground based sites, and on research aircraft to quantify BC's mass loadings and microphysical properties. However, the SP2's particle detection range is generally limited to 70-700 nm volume-equivalent diameter for ambient BC. Ambient air typically contains substantial number concentrations below and mass concentrations above the limits of this range. To account for the unquantified particles, it is common to fit a log-normal distribution to the measured size distributions — an approach that leaves the BC community with uncertain results, and a need to learn about the occurrence of very small particles or very large BC aggregates. The SP2 is also large and heavy enough to limit its usability for aircraft and unmanned or towed airborne vehicles. We have developed a miniaturized SP2 to dramatically extend the range of applications for which the SP2 technique can be used. This new instrument, with the additional target of an extended measurement range, has been named the SP2-XR, and incorporates a newly designed optical block with updated electronics for signal recording and on-the-fly processing (gain stitching and peak analysis). The optical block improves the light-collection of both scattered and incandescent light from sampled particles. The target measurement range is 40-1000 nm. At the same time, the SP2-XR weighs less than half of an SP2 (15 kg for the complete system), and about 1/4 the volume ( 20 cm x 20 cm x 40 cm). The instrument software is designed to produce ready to use particle mass and binned size distributions or full particle trace records, according to different scientific needs. Thus, an SP2-XR may

  7. Investigating the Spectral Dependence of Biomass Burning Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odwuor, A.; Corr, C.; Pusede, S.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties, such as light absorption and scattering, are important for understanding how aerosols affect the global radiation budget and for comparison with data gathered from remote sensing. It has been established that the optical properties of aerosols are wavelength dependent, although some remote sensing measurements do not consider this. Airborne measurements of these optical properties were used to calculate the absorption Angstrom exponent, a parameter that characterizes the wavelength dependence of light absorption by aerosols, and single scattering albedo, which measures the relative magnitude of light scattering to total extinction (scattering and absorption combined). Aerosols produced by biomass burning in Saskatchewan, Canada in July 2008 and a forest fire in Southern California, U.S. in June 2016 were included in this analysis. These wildfires were sampled by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) and NASA Student Airborne Research Program (SARP) missions, respectively. Aerosol absorption was measured using a particle soot photometer (PSAP) at 470, 532 and 660 nm. Scattering was measured using a 3-wavelength (450, 550 and 700 nm) nephelometer. Absorption Angstrom exponents were calculated at 470 and 660 nm and single scattering albedos were calculated at 450 and 550 nm. Results of this study indicate that disregarding the wavelength dependence of organic aerosol can understate the positive radiative forcing (warming) associated with aerosol absorption.

  8. Differential-optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    Two-cell spectrophone detects trace amounts of atmospheric pollutants by measuring absorption coefficients of gases with various laser sources. Device measures pressure difference between two tapered cells with differential manometer. Background signal is reduced by balanced window heating and balanced carrier gas absorption in two cells.

  9. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  10. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  11. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  12. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  13. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Sayako; Nakayama, Tomoki; Taketani, Fumikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Yoko; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD) maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30) were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30) of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly coated

  14. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Nakayama, T.; Taketani, F.; Adachi, K.; Matsuki, A.; Iwamoto, Y.; Sadanaga, Y.; Matsumi, Y.

    2015-09-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory-BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a heater maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the heater and was found to be 22-23 %. The largest enhancements (> 30 %) were observed under high absorption coefficient conditions when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption coefficient events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with spherical sulfate or as clusters of sulfate spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 30 %) of BC light absorption, TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be embedded into the sulfate. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly-coated soot was

  15. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  16. Broadband absorption with gradient metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hoyeong; Chalabi, Hamidreza; Alù, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    A metasurface with appropriately designed transverse spatial inhomogeneities can provide the desired phase redistribution in response to an incident wave with arbitrary incident angle. This property of gradient metasurfaces has been used to modify light propagation in unusual manners, to transform the impinging optical wavefront with large flexibility. In this work, we show how gradient metasurfaces can be tailored to offer high absorption in thin absorptive layers, and how to design realistic metasurfaces for this purpose using dielectric materials.

  17. [Determination of soil exchangeable base cations by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and extraction with ammonium acetate].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-ge; Xiao, Min; Dong, Yi-hua; Jiang, Yong

    2012-08-01

    A method to determine soil exchangeable calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), and sodium (Na) by using atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) and extraction with ammonium acetate was developed. Results showed that the accuracy of exchangeable base cation data with AAS method fits well with the national standard referential soil data. The relative errors for parallel samples of exchangeable Ca and Mg with 66 pair samples ranged from 0.02%-3.14% and 0.06%-4.06%, and averaged to be 1.22% and 1.25%, respectively. The relative errors for exchangeable K and Na with AAS and flame photometer (FP) ranged from 0.06%-8.39% and 0.06-1.54, and averaged to be 3.72% and 0.56%, respectively. A case study showed that the determination method for exchangeable base cations by using AAS was proven to be reliable and trustable, which could reflect the real situation of soil cation exchange properties in farmlands.

  18. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Airborne Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Extinction and Scattering During the Aerosol IOP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Ricci, K.; Provencal, R.; Schmid, B.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Arnott, P.

    2003-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300 Mm-1 with an estimated precision of 0.1 Min-1 for 1550 nm light and 0.2 Mm-1 for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects.= We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those friom a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  20. Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties During the Asian Dust Above Monterey Experiment and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Provencal, R.; Castaneda, R.; Bucholtz, A.; Schmid, B.

    2003-12-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300 Mm-1 with an estimated precision of 0.1 Mm-1 for 1550 nm light and 0.2 Mm-1 for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects. We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those from a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  1. Cavity Ring-Down Measurement of Aerosol Optical Properties During the Asian Dust Above Monterey Experiment and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, K.; Strawa, A. W.; Provencal, R.; Castaneda, R.; Bucholtz, A.; Schmid, B.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties in the effects of aerosols on climate require improved in-situ measurements of extinction coefficient and single-scattering albedo. This paper describes preliminary results from Cadenza, a new continuous wave cavity ring-down (CW-CRD) instrument designed to address these uncertainties. Cadenza measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. In the past year Cadenza was deployed in the Asian Dust Above Monterey (ADAM) and DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) field projects. During these flights Cadenza produced measurements of aerosol extinction in the range from 0.2 to 300/Mm with an estimated precision of 0.1/Mm for 1550 nm light and 0.2/Mm for 675 nm light. Cadenza data from the ADAM and Aerosol IOP missions compared favorably with data from the other instruments aboard the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and participating in those projects. We present comparisons between the Cadenza measurements and those from a TSI nephelometer, Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), and the AATS 14 sun-photometer. Measurements of the optical properties of smoke and dust plumes sampled during these campaigns are presented and estimates of heating rates due to these plumes are made.

  2. Architecture for Absorption Based Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Moghaddam, Saeed; Chugh, Devesh

    An absorption based heater is constructed on a fluid barrier heat exchanging plate such that it requires little space in a structure. The absorption based heater has a desorber, heat exchanger, and absorber sequentially placed on the fluid barrier heat exchanging plate. The vapor exchange faces of the desorber and the absorber are covered by a vapor permeable membrane that is permeable to a refrigerant vapor but impermeable to an absorbent. A process fluid flows on the side of the fluid barrier heat exchanging plate opposite the vapor exchange face through the absorber and subsequently through the heat exchanger. Themore » absorption based heater can include a second plate with a condenser situated parallel to the fluid barrier heat exchanging plate and opposing the desorber for condensation of the refrigerant for additional heating of the process fluid.« less

  3. Absorption of Orally Administered Hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mamoru; Maeshima, Takuya; Kubota, Takumi; Kurihara, Hitoshi; Masuda, Yasunobu; Nomura, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been utilized as a supplement. However, the absorption of orally administrated HA remains controversial. The degradation and absorption of HA in the intestine were investigated in this study. HA excretion into the feces, degradation in the intestinal tract, absorption through the large intestine, and translocation to the blood and skin were examined. HA administered orally was not detected in rat feces. HA was degraded by cecal content, but not by artificial gastric juice and intestinal juice. Oligosaccharide HA passed through excised large intestine sacs. Furthermore, disaccharides, tetrasaccharides, and polysaccharides HA were distributed to the skin of rats following oral administration of high molecular weight HA (300 kDa). The results of the study suggest that orally administered HA is degraded to oligosaccharides by intestinal bacteria, and oligosaccharide HA is absorbed in the large intestine and is subsequently distributed throughout the tissues, including the skin.

  4. Thermodynamic derivatives of infrared absorptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broersma, S.; Walls, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the concentration, pressure, and temperature dependence of the spectral absorptance of a vibrational absorption band. A smooth thermodynamic dependence was found for wavelength intervals where the average absorptance is less than 0.65. Individual rotational lines, whose parameters are often well known, were used as bases in the calculation of medium resolution spectra. Two modes of calculation were combined: well-separated rotational lines plus interaction terms, or strongly overlapping lines that were represented by a compound line of similar shape plus corrections. The 1.9- and 6.3-micron bands of H2O and the 4.3-micron band of CO2 were examined in detail and compared with experiment.

  5. Black carbon's contribution to aerosol absorption optical depth over S. Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamb, K.; Perring, A. E.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Anderson, B. E.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.; Redemann, J.; Holben, B. N.; Schwarz, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) monitored by ground-based sites (AERONET, SKYNET, etc.) is used to constrain climate radiative forcing from black carbon (BC) and other absorbing aerosols in global models, but few validation studies between in situ aerosol measurements and ground-based AAOD exist. AAOD is affected by aerosol size distributions, composition, mixing state, and morphology. Megacities provide appealing test cases for this type of study due to their association with very high concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols. During the KORUS-AQ campaign in S. Korea, which took place in late spring and early summer of 2016, in situ aircraft measurements over the Seoul Metropolitan Area and Taehwa Research Forest (downwind of Seoul) were repeated three times per flight over a 6 week period, providing significant temporal coverage of vertically resolved aerosol properties influenced by different meteorological conditions and sources. Measurements aboard the NASA DC-8 by the NOAA Humidified Dual Single Particle Soot Photometers (HD-SP2) quantified BC mass, size distributions, mixing state, and the hygroscopicity of BC containing aerosols. The in situ BC mass vertical profiles are combined with estimated absorption enhancement calculated from observed optical size and hygroscopicity using Mie theory, and then integrated over the depth of the profile to calculate BC's contribution to AAOD. Along with bulk aerosol size distributions and hygroscopicity, bulk absorbing aerosol optical properties, and on-board sky radiance measurements, these measurements are compared with ground-based AERONET site measurements of AAOD to evaluate closure between in situ vertical profiles of BC and AAOD measurements. This study will provide constraints on the relative importance of BC (including lensing and hygroscopicity effects) and non-BC components to AAOD over S. Korea.

  6. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  7. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  8. An Inexpensive Optical Absorption Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenslade, Thomas B.

    2006-09-01

    This optical absorption experiment can be put together in only a few minutes with materials found in most secondary or undergraduate stockrooms. The absorption material is the partly transparent flexible anti-static plastic material used to package solid-state devices. The detector is a hand-held photographic exposure meter of the type that was in common use before the advent of point-and-shoot cameras. A graph of the intensity of the transmitted light as a function of the number of sheets of the material is a decreasing exponential. The emphasis of the experiment is on the mathematical form.

  9. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE) data set is composed of daily averaged AERONET level 2 data from a total of 22 Mediterranean stations having long time series, mainly under the influence of urban-industrial aerosols and/or soil dust. This data set covers the 17 yr period 1996-2012 with most data being from 2003-2011 (approximately 89 percent of level-2 AAOD data). Since AERONET level-2 absorption products require a high aerosol load (AOD at 440 nm greater than 0.4), which is most often related to the presence of desert dust, we also consider level-1.5 SSA data, despite their higher uncertainty, and filter out data with an Angstrom exponent less than 1.0 in order to study absorption by carbonaceous aerosols. The SSA data set includes both AERONET level-2 and satellite level-3 products. Satellite-derived SSA data considered are monthly level 3 products mapped at the regional scale for the spring and summer seasons that exhibit the largest aerosol loads. The satellite SSA dataset includes the following products: (i) Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) over 2000-2011, (ii) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) near-UV algorithm over 2004-2010, and (iii) MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Deep-Blue algorithm over 2005-2011, derived only over land in dusty conditions. Sun-photometer observations show that values of AAOD at 440 nm vary between 0.024 +/- 0.01 (resp. 0.040 +/- 0.01) and 0.050 +/- 0.01 (0.055 +/- 0.01) for urban (dusty) sites. Analysis shows that the Mediterranean urban-industrial aerosols appear "moderately

  10. Metal powder absorptivity: Modeling and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Boley, C. D.; Mitchell, S. C.; Rubenchik, A. M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Here, we present results of numerical modeling and direct calorimetric measurements of the powder absorptivity for a number of metals. The modeling results generally correlate well with experiment. We show that the powder absorptivity is determined, to a great extent, by the absorptivity of a flat surface at normal incidence. Our results allow the prediction of the powder absorptivity from normal flat-surface absorptivity measurements.

  11. Metal powder absorptivity: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C. D.; Mitchell, S. C.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    Here, we present results of numerical modeling and direct calorimetric measurements of the powder absorptivity for a number of metals. The modeling results generally correlate well with experiment. We show that the powder absorptivity is determined, to a great extent, by the absorptivity of a flat surface at normal incidence. Our results allow the prediction of the powder absorptivity from normal flat-surface absorptivity measurements.

  12. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-06

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions' spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches).

  13. Ultraviolet absorption experiment MA-059

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, T. M.; Hudson, R. D.; Anderson, J.; Kaufman, F.; Mcelroy, M. B.

    1976-01-01

    The ultraviolet absorption experiment performed during the Apollo Soyuz mission involved sending a beam of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen resonance radiation, strong unabsorbable oxygen and nitrogen radiation, and visual radiation, all filling the same 3 deg-wide field of view from the Apollo to the Soyuz. The radiation struck a retroreflector array on the Soyuz and was returned to a spectrometer onboard the Apollo. The density of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen between the two spacecraft was measured by observing the amount of resonance radiation absorbed when the line joining Apollo and Soyuz was perpendicular to their velocity with respect to the ambient atmosphere. Information concerning oxygen densities was also obtained by observation of resonantly fluorescent light. The absorption experiments for atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were successfully performed at a range of 500 meters, and abundant resonance fluorescence data were obtained.

  14. Landing gear energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Christopher P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A landing pad system is described for absorbing horizontal and vertical impact forces upon engagement with a landing surface where circumferentially arranged landing struts respectively have a clevis which receives a slidable rod member and where the upper portion of a slidable rod member is coupled to the clevis by friction washers which are force fit onto the rod member to provide for controlled constant force energy absorption when the rod member moves relative to the clevis. The lower end of the friction rod is pivotally attached by a ball and socket to a support plate where the support plate is arranged to slide in a transverse direction relative to a housing which contains an energy absorption material for absorbing energy in a transverse direction.

  15. Photodetector with enhanced light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Kane, James

    1985-01-01

    A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the absorption of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.

  16. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  17. Absorption characteristics of forest fire particulate matter

    Treesearch

    E.M. Patterson; Charles K. McMahon

    1984-01-01

    Abstract. Absorption properties of smokes from laboratory fires that represent prescription hums in the Southern states have been quantified to relate variations in measured absorption parameters to variation in fire conditions and to estimate emission factors for elemental carbon. Results showed significant differences in absorption of the smoke...

  18. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  19. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  20. Microwave Absorption Characteristics of Tire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuzhe; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Peng, Zhiwei; Andriese, Matthew; Li, Bowen; Huang, Xiaodi; Wang, Xinli

    The recycling of waste tires has been a big environmental problem. About 280 million waste tires are produced annually in the United States and more than 2 billion tires are stockpiled, which cause fire hazards and health issues. Tire rubbers are insoluble elastic high polymer materials. They are not biodegradable and may take hundreds of years to decompose in the natural environment. Microwave irradiation can be a thermal processing method for the decomposition of tire rubbers. In this study, the microwave absorption properties of waste tire at various temperatures are characterized to determine the conditions favorable for the microwave heating of waste tires.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  2. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility. PMID:27958303

  3. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-12-13

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility.

  4. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  5. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Bast, Radovan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-05-20

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process.

  6. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  7. Percutaneous absorption of selenium sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.; Skelly, E.M.; Weber, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine selenium levels in the urine of Tinea patients before and after overnight application of a 2.5% selenium sulfide lotion. Selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Hydride generation and carbon rod atomization were studied. It was concluded from this study that selenium is absorbed through intact skin. Selenium is then excreted, at least partially, in urine, for at least a week following treatment. The data show that absorption and excretion of selenium vary on an individual basis. Selenium levels in urine following a single application of selenium sulfide lotion do notmore » indicate that toxic amounts of selenium are being absorbed. Repeated treatments with SeS/sub 2/ result in selenium concentrations in urine which are significantly higher than normal. Significant matrix effects are observed in the carbon rod atomization of urine samples for selenium determinations, even in the presence of a matrix modifier such as nickel. The method of standard additions is required to obtain accurate results in the direct determination of selenium in urine by carbon rod AAS.« less

  8. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions’ spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches). PMID:28067834

  9. QED-driven laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Blackburn, T.; Ratan, N.; Sadler, J.; Ridgers, C.; Kasim, M.; Ceurvorst, L.; Holloway, J.; Baring, M.; Bell, A.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.; Tabak, M.; Wilks, S.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Absorption covers the physical processes which convert intense photon flux into energetic particles when a high-power laser (I >1018 W cm-2 where I is intensity at 1 μm wavelength) illuminates optically-thick matter. It underpins important applications of petawatt laser systems today, e.g., in isochoric heating of materials. Next-generation lasers such as ELI are anticipated to produce quantum electrodynamical (QED) bursts of γ-rays and anti-matter via the multiphoton Breit-Wheeler process which could enable scaled laboratory probes, e.g., of black hole winds. Here, applying strong-field QED to advances in plasma kinematic theory, we present a model elucidating absorption limited only by an avalanche of self-created electron-positron pairs at ultra-high-field. The model, confirmed by multidimensional QED-PIC simulations, works over six orders of magnitude in optical intensity and reveals this cascade is initiated at 1.8 x 1025 W cm-2 using a realistic linearly-polarized laser pulse. Here the laser couples its energy into highly-collimated electrons, ions, γ-rays, and positrons at 12%, 6%, 58% and 13% efficiency, respectively. We remark on attributes of the QED plasma state and possible applications.

  10. Sulphate absorption across biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2016-01-01

    1. Sulphonation is unusual amongst the common Phase II (condensation; synthetic) reactions experienced by xenobiotics, in that the availability of the conjugating agent, sulphate, may become a rate-limiting factor. This sulphate is derived within the body via the oxygenation of sulphur moieties liberated from numerous ingested compounds including the sulphur-containing amino acids. Preformed inorganic sulphate also makes a considerable contribution to this pool. 2. There has been a divergence of opinion as to whether or not inorganic sulphate may be readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and this controversy still continues in some quarters. Even more so, is the vexing question of potential absorption of inorganic sulphate via the lungs and through the skin. 3. This review examines the relevant diverse literature and concludes that sulphate ions may move across biological membranes by means of specific transporters and, although the gastrointestinal tract is by far the major portal of entry, some absorption across the lungs and the skin may take place under appropriate circumstances.

  11. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators. PMID:24492860

  12. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  13. Sound absorption with green materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trematerra, Amelia; Lombardi, Ilaria

    2017-07-01

    Green materials are a valid alternative to traditional materials that are by-products of processing oil. At the end of their useful life, green materials can be disposed of without polluting the environment. They are now being used in the construction and automotive industries. While, studies are currently being carried out in the aviation sector on the use of green materials for non-structural components of airplanes. Green materials can be used to improve the acoustic comfort inside buildings as well as mitigate reverberation, echoes effects and reduce the transmission of noise between rooms. In this paper, the acoustic measurements of the properties of green materials are reported. The absorption coefficient of samples of the materials were measured in the frequency range from 200 Hz to 2,000 Hz with an impedance tube, with the flow resistance being measured.

  14. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  15. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  16. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  17. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  18. Vitamin B12 absorption from eggs.

    PubMed

    Doscherholmen, A; McMahon, J; Ripley, D

    1975-09-01

    The assimilation of 57Co B12 from in vivo labeled eggs was much inferior to that of a comparable amount of crystalline 57Co B12. Furthermore, the absorption varied with the form in which the eggs were served. Judged by the urinary excretion test and the plasma absorption of radioactivity the average absorption from boiled and fried eggs was more than twice that from scrambled whole eggs, but less than half that absorbed from crystalline 57Co B12.

  19. On pulsating cosmic /radio/ noise absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1981-01-01

    It has been proposed that some absorption events measured on riometers are actually due to backscatter of cosmic radio noise by E-region plasma waves (D'Angelo, 1976, 1978; D'Angelo and Mehta, 1980). Assuming that DC or nearly DC absorption is a viable process, it is shown that it may also be operative in producing pulsations in cosmic noise absorption on riometers, with periods ranging from a few seconds to several minutes.

  20. Absorption Coefficient of Alkaline Earth Halides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    not observed at low energy level , are developed at high power levels . No matter how low the absorption is. the effect is objectionable at high-energy... levels . As a natural consequence, the magnitude of the absorption coefficient is the key parameter in selecting laser window materials. Over the past...Presence of impurities can complicate the exponential tail. particularly at low absorption levels . The impurities may enter 12 the lattice singly or

  1. NARROW LINE ABSORPTION IN CACO3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CARBONATES), (*CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, (*ABSORPTION SPECTRA, CALCITE), (*CALCITE, RADIATION EFFECTS), ELECTRON PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE, SINGLE CRYSTALS , NEUTRONS, X RAYS, GAMMA RAYS, IONS, CRYSTAL DEFECTS, PARAMAGNETIC RESONANCE.

  2. Modeled and Empirical Approaches for Retrieving Columnar Water Vapor from Solar Transmittance Measurements in the 0.72, 0.82, and 0.94 Micrometer Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingold, T.; Schmid, B.; Maetzler, C.; Demoulin, P.; Kaempfer, N.

    2000-01-01

    A Sun photometer (18 channels between 300 and 1024 nm) has been used for measuring the columnar content of atmospheric water vapor (CWV) by solar transmittance measurements in absorption bands with channels centered at 719, 817, and 946 nm. The observable is the band-weighted transmittance function defined by the spectral absorption of water vapor and the spectral features of solar irradiance and system response. The transmittance function is approximated by a three-parameter model. Its parameters are determined from MODTRAN and LBLRTM simulations or empirical approaches using CWV data of a dual-channel microwave radiometer (MWR) or a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). Data acquired over a 2-year period during 1996-1998 at two different sites in Switzerland, Bern (560 m above sea level (asl)) and Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl) were compared to MWR, radiosonde (RS), and FTS retrievals. At the low-altitude station with an average CWV amount of 15 mm the LBLRTM approach (based on recently corrected line intensities) leads to negligible biases at 719 and 946 nm if compared to an average of MWR, RS, and GPS retrievals. However, at 817 nm an overestimate of 2.7 to 4.3 mm (18-29%) remains. At the high-altitude station with an average CWV amount of 1.4 mm the LBLRTM approaches overestimate the CWV by 1.0, 1.4. and 0.1 mm (58, 76, and 3%) at 719, 817, and 946 nm, compared to the ITS instrument. At the low-altitude station, CWV estimates, based on empirical approaches, agree with the MWR within 0.4 mm (2.5% of the mean); at the high-altitude site with a factor of 10 less water vapor the agreement of the sun photometers (SPM) with the ITS is 0.0 to 0.2 mm (1 to 9% of the mean CWV there). Sensitivity analyses show that for the conditions met at the two stations with CWV ranging from 0.2 to 30 mm, the retrieval errors are smallest if the 946 nm channel is used.

  3. Organic Aerosols from SÃO Paulo and its Relationship with Aerosol Absorption and Scattering Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, P.; Brito, J. F.; Rizzo, L. V.

    2012-12-01

    The megacity of São Paulo with its 19 million people and 7 million cars is a challenge from the point of view of air pollution. High levels of organic aerosols, PM10, black carbon and ozone and the peculiar situation of the large scale use of ethanol fuel makes it a special case. Little is known about the impact of ethanol on air quality and human health and the increase of ethanol as vehicle fuel is rising worldwide An experiment was designed to physico-chemical properties of aerosols in São Paulo, as well as their optical properties. Aerosol size distribution in the size range of 1nm to 10 micrometers is being measured with a Helsinki University SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer), an NAIS (Neutral ion Spectrometer) and a GRIMM OPC (Optical Particle Counter). Optical properties are being measured with a TSI Nephelometer and a Thermo MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometer). A CIMEL sunphotometer from the AERONET network measure the aerosol optical depth. Furthermore, a Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) and an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) are used to real-time VOC analysis and aerosol composition, respectively. The ACSM was operated for 3 months continuosly during teh wintertime of 2012. The measured total particle concentration typically varies between 10,000 and 30,000 cm-3 being the lowest late in the night and highest around noon and frequently exceeding 50,000 cm-3. Clear diurnal patterns in aerosol optical properties were observed. Scattering and absorption coefficients typically range between 20 and 100 Mm-1 at 450 nm, and between 10 to 40 Mm-1 at 637 nm, respectively, both of them peaking at 7:00 local time, the morning rush hour. The corresponding single scattering albedo varies between 0.50 and 0.85, indicating a significant contribution of primary absorbing particles to the aerosol population. During the first month a total of seven new particle formation events were observed with growth rates ranging from 9 to 25

  4. Fluid absorption solar energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A conventional solar dynamic system transmits solar energy to the flowing fluid of a thermodynamic cycle through structures which contain the gas and thermal energy storage material. Such a heat transfer mechanism dictates that the structure operate at a higher temperature than the fluid. This investigation reports on a fluid absorption receiver where only a part of the solar energy is transmitted to the structure. The other part is absorbed directly by the fluid. By proportioning these two heat transfer paths the energy to the structure can preheat the fluid, while the energy absorbed directly by the fluid raises the fluid to its final working temperature. The surface temperatures need not exceed the output temperature of the fluid. This makes the output temperature of the gas the maximum temperature in the system. The gas can have local maximum temperatures higher than the output working temperature. However local high temperatures are quickly equilibrated, and since the gas does not emit radiation, local high temperatures do not result in a radiative heat loss. Thermal radiation, thermal conductivity, and heat exchange with the gas all help equilibrate the surface temperature.

  5. A Low-Cost Quantitative Absorption Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Daniel R.; Todt, Michael A.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to make absorption spectrophotometry available to high school chemistry and physics classes, we have designed an inexpensive visible light absorption spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer was constructed using LEGO blocks, a light emitting diode, optical elements (including a lens), a slide-mounted diffraction grating, and a…

  6. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  7. Absorption of sound by tree bark

    Treesearch

    G. Reethof; L. D. Frank; O. H. McDaniel

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted with a standing wave tube to measure the acoustic absorption of normally incident sound by the bark of six species of trees. Twelve bark samples, 10 cm in diameter, were tested. Sound of seven frequencies between 400 and 1600 Hz was used in the measurements. Absorption was generally about 5 percent; it exceeded 10 percent for only three...

  8. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  9. Low absorptance porcelain-on-aluminum coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, H.

    1979-01-01

    Porcelain thermal-control coating for aluminum sheet and foil has solar absorptance of 0.22. Specially formulated coating absorptance is highly stable, changing only 0.03 after 1,000 hours of exposure to simulated sunlight and can be applied by standard commercial methods.

  10. Iron absorption from intrinsically-labeled lentils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Low iron (Fe) absorption from important staple foods may contribute to Fe deficiency in developing countries. To date, there are few studies examining the Fe bioavailability of pulse crops as commonly prepared and consumed by humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the Fe absorpt...

  11. Nonlinear Absorption and Heating of Dense Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    plasma focus both illuminated by a high intensity CO2 laser. Results indicate the previously noted increases in absorption due to the inclusion of the nonlinear saturation mechanism. The previously obtained increases in absorption with increasing density scale height and decreasing temperatures are also recovered. The

  12. High-Absorptance Radiative Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cafferty, T.

    1983-01-01

    Absorptance of black-painted open-cell aluminum honeycomb improved by cutting honeycomb at angle or bias rather than straight across. This ensures honeycomb cavities escapes. At each reflection radiation attenuated by absorption. Applications include space-background simulators, space radiators, solar absorbers, and passive coolers for terrestrial use.

  13. Food Ingredients That Inhibit Cholesterol Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Jesch, Elliot D.; Carr, Timothy P.

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol is a vital component of the human body. It stabilizes cell membranes and is the precursor of bile acids, vitamin D and steroid hormones. However, cholesterol accumulation in the bloodstream (hypercholesterolemia) can cause atherosclerotic plaques within artery walls, leading to heart attacks and strokes. The efficiency of cholesterol absorption in the small intestine is of great interest because human and animal studies have linked cholesterol absorption with plasma concentration of total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol. Cholesterol absorption is highly regulated and influenced by particular compounds in the food supply. Therefore, it is desirable to learn more about natural food components that inhibit cholesterol absorption so that food ingredients and dietary supplements can be developed for consumers who wish to manage their plasma cholesterol levels by non-pharmacological means. Food components thus far identified as inhibitors of cholesterol absorption include phytosterols, soluble fibers, phospholipids, and stearic acid. PMID:28702423

  14. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  15. Monitoring Telluric Absorption with CAMAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ashley D.; Blake, Cullen H.; Sliski, David H.

    2017-08-01

    Ground-based astronomical observations may be limited by telluric water vapor absorption, which is highly variable in time and significantly complicates both spectroscopy and photometry in the near-infrared (NIR). To achieve the sensitivity required to detect Earth-sized exoplanets in the NIR, simultaneous monitoring of precipitable water vapor (PWV) becomes necessary to mitigate the impact of variable telluric lines on radial velocity measurements and transit light curves. To address this issue, we present the Camera for the Automatic Monitoring of Atmospheric Lines (CAMAL), a stand-alone, inexpensive six-inch aperture telescope dedicated to measuring PWV at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory on Mount Hopkins. CAMAL utilizes three narrowband NIR filters to trace the amount of atmospheric water vapor affecting simultaneous observations with the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) and MINERVA-Red telescopes. Here, we present the current design of CAMAL, discuss our data analysis methods, and show results from 11 nights of PWV measurements taken with CAMAL. For seven nights of data we have independent PWV measurements extracted from high-resolution stellar spectra taken with the Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrometer (TRES) also located on Mount Hopkins. We use the TRES spectra to calibrate the CAMAL absolute PWV scale. Comparisons between CAMAL and TRES PWV estimates show excellent agreement, matching to within 1 mm over a 10 mm range in PWV. Analysis of CAMAL’s photometric precision propagates to PWV measurements precise to better than 0.5 mm in dry (PWV < 4 mm) conditions. We also find that CAMAL-derived PWVs are highly correlated with those from a GPS-based water vapor monitor located approximately 90 km away at Kitt Peak National Observatory, with a root mean square PWV difference of 0.8 mm.

  16. A Comparison of Aerosol Optical Property Measurements Made During the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period and Their Effects on Regional Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, Anthony W.; Hallar, A. G.; Arnott, W. P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ogren, J.; Schmid, B.; Luu, A.

    2004-01-01

    The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult to measure aerosol properties. One of the main purposes of the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP) flown in May, 2003 was to assess our ability to measure absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of aerosol optical properties made during the IOP. Measurements of aerosol absorption coefficient were made by Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter (U. Washington) and on the DOE Cessna 172 (NOAA-C,MDL). Aerosol absorption coefficient was also measured by a photoacoustic instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the IOP. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-AkC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Measurements of absorption coefficient from all of these instruments during appropriate periods are compared. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model.

  17. Variance of transionospheric VLF wave power absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, X.; Bortnik, J.; Friedrich, M.

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the effects of D-region electron-density variance on wave power absorption, we calculate the power reduction of very low frequency (VLF) waves propagating through the ionosphere with a full wave method using the standard ionospheric model IRI and in situ observational data. We first verify the classic absorption curves of Helliwell's using our full wave code. Then we show that the IRI model gives overall smaller wave absorption compared with Helliwell's. Using D-region electron densities measured by rockets during the past 60 years, we demonstrate that the power absorption of VLF waves is subject to large variance, even though Helliwell's absorption curves are within ±1 standard deviation of absorption values calculated from data. Finally, we use a subset of the rocket data that are more representative of the D region of middle- and low-latitude VLF wave transmitters and show that the average quiet time wave absorption is smaller than that of Helliwell's by up to 100 dB at 20 kHz and 60 dB at 2 kHz, which would make the model-observation discrepancy shown by previous work even larger. This result suggests that additional processes may be needed to explain the discrepancy.

  18. The effect of volatility on percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Rouse, Nicole C; Maibach, Howard I

    2016-01-01

    Topically applied chemicals may volatilize, or evaporate, from skin leaving behind a chemical residue with new percutaneous absorptive capabilities. Understanding volatilization of topical medications, such as sunscreens, fragrances, insect repellants, cosmetics and other commonly applied topicals may have implications for their safety and efficacy. A systematic review of English language articles from 1979 to 2014 was performed using key search terms. Articles were evaluated to assess the relationship between volatility and percutaneous absorption. A total of 12 articles were selected and reviewed. Key findings were that absorption is enhanced when coupled with a volatile substance, occlusion prevents evaporation and increases absorption, high ventilation increases volatilization and reduces absorption, and pH of skin has an affect on a chemical's volatility. The articles also brought to light that different methods may have an affect on volatility: different body regions; in vivo vs. in vitro; human vs. Data suggest that volatility is crucial for determining safety and efficacy of cutaneous exposures and therapies. Few articles have been documented reporting evaporation in the context of percutaneous absorption, and of those published, great variability exists in methods. Further investigation of volatility is needed to properly evaluate its role in percutaneous absorption.

  19. Glucose absorption in acute peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Podel, J; Hodelin-Wetzel, R; Saha, D C; Burns, G

    2000-04-01

    During acute peritoneal dialysis (APD), it is known that glucose found in the dialysate solution contributes to the provision of significant calories. It has been well documented in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) that glucose absorption occurs. In APD, however, it remains unclear how much glucose absorption actually does occur. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether it is appropriate to use the formula used to calculate glucose absorption in CAPD (Grodstein et al) among patients undergoing APD. Actual measurements of glucose absorption (Method I) were calculated in 9 patients undergoing APD treatment for >24 hours who were admitted to the intensive care unit. Glucose absorption using the Grodstein et al formula (Method II) was also determined and compared with the results of actual measurements. The data was then further analyzed based on the factors that influence glucose absorption, specifically dwell time and concentration. The mean total amount of glucose absorbed was 43% +/- 15%. However, when dwell time and concentration were further examined, significant differences were noted. Method I showed a cumulative increase over time. Method II showed that absorption was fixed. This suggests that with the variation in dwell time commonly seen in the acute care setting, the use of Method II may not be accurate. In each of the 2 methods, a significant difference in glucose absorption was noted when comparing the use of 1.5% and 4.25% dialysate concentrations. The established formula designed for CAPD should not be used for calculating glucose absorption in patients receiving APD because variation in dwell time and concentration should be taken into account. Because of the time constraints and staffing required to calculate each exchange individually, combined with the results of the study, we recommend the use of the percentage estimate of 40% to 50%.

  20. Psychological absorption. Affect investment in marijuana intoxication.

    PubMed

    Fabian, W D; Fishkin, S M

    1991-01-01

    Absorption (a trait capacity for total attentional involvement) was reported to increase during episodes of marijuana intoxication. Several subsets of the absorption scale items specifically characterized marijuana intoxication, and groups of users and nonusers showed differential affective involvement with these experiences. Additionally, within the drug-using group, a positive correlation between frequency of marijuana use and affective ratings of these experiences was found. The findings support the hypothesis that a specific type of alteration in consciousness that enhances capacity for total attentional involvement (absorption) characterizes marijuana intoxication, and that this enhancement may act as a reinforcer, possibly influencing future use.

  1. The effect of tea on iron absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Disler, P B; Lynch, S R; Charlton, R W; Torrance, J D; Bothwell, T H; Walker, R B; Mayet, F

    1975-01-01

    The effect of tea on iron absorption was studied in human volunteers. Absorption from solutions of FeCl3 and FeSO4, bread, a meal of rice with potato and onion soup, and uncooked haemoglobin was inhibited whether ascorbic acid was present or not. No inhibition was noted if the haemoglobin was cooked. The effect on the absorption of non-haem iron was ascribed to the formation of insoluble iron tannate complexes. Drinking tannin-containing beverages such as tea with meals may contribute to the pathogenesis of iron deficiency if the diet consists largely of vegetable foodstuffs. PMID:1168162

  2. Nonlinear absorption properties of silicene nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Mengxia; Wang, Zhengping; Han, Kezhen; Liu, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xinguang

    2018-06-01

    As the cousins of graphene, i.e. same group IVA element, the nonlinear absorption (NLA) properties of silicene nanosheets were rarely studied. In this paper, we successfully exfoliated the two-dimensional silicene nanosheets from bulk silicon crystal using liquid phase exfoliation method. The NLA properties of silicene nanosheets were systemically investigated for the first time, as we have known. Silicene performed exciting saturable absorption and two photon absorption (2PA) behavior. The lower saturable intensity and larger 2PA coefficient at 532 nm excitation indicates that silicene has potential application in ultrafast lasers and optical limiting devices, especially in visible waveband.

  3. Selective coherent perfect absorption in metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng

    2014-11-17

    We show multi-band coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in simple bilayered asymmetrically split ring metamaterials. The selectivity of absorption can be accomplished by separately excited electric and magnetic modes in a standing wave formed by two coherent counterpropagating beams. In particular, each CPA can be completely switched on/off by the phase of a second coherent wave. We propose a practical scheme for realizing multi-band coherent perfect absorption of 100% that is allowed to work from microwave to optical frequency.

  4. Nonlinear absorption properties of silicene nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Mengxia; Wang, Zhengping; Han, Kezhen; Liu, Xiaojuan; Xu, Xinguang

    2018-06-01

    As the cousins of graphene, i.e. same group IVA element, the nonlinear absorption (NLA) properties of silicene nanosheets were rarely studied. In this paper, we successfully exfoliated the two-dimensional silicene nanosheets from bulk silicon crystal using liquid phase exfoliation method. The NLA properties of silicene nanosheets were systemically investigated for the first time, as we have known. Silicene performed exciting saturable absorption and two photon absorption (2PA) behavior. The lower saturable intensity and larger 2PA coefficient at 532 nm excitation indicates that silicene has potential application in ultrafast lasers and optical limiting devices, especially in visible waveband.

  5. Sound absorption by a Helmholtz resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komkin, A. I.; Mironov, M. A.; Bykov, A. I.

    2017-07-01

    Absorption characteristics of a Helmholtz resonator positioned at the end wall of a circular duct are considered. The absorption coefficient of the resonator is experimentally investigated as a function of the diameter and length of the resonator neck and the depth of the resonator cavity. Based on experimental data, the linear analytic model of a Helmholtz resonator is verified, and the results of verification are used to determine the dissipative attached length of the resonator neck so as to provide the agreement between experimental and calculated data. Dependences of sound absorption by a Helmholtz resonator on its geometric parameters are obtained.

  6. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  7. Detection of bacterial growth by gas absorption.

    PubMed

    Waters, J R

    1992-05-01

    When 24 different aerobic organisms were grown in a shaken culture, all were found to first absorb gas from the headspace. In a rudimentary medium, such as tryptic soy broth, 16 of the 24 organisms did not produce gas following the initial gas absorption. We have developed a simple, noninvasive method for detecting both gas absorption and production in multiple culture vials. The time to positivity was compared with that obtained by the BACTEC 460 blood culture system. For nearly all of these organisms, there was no difference. For some of those organisms that did not produce gas, e.g. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Moraxella osloensis, and Neisseria meningitidis, detection by gas absorption was a few hours faster. Gas absorption appears to be a promising technique for a new automated blood culture system because of its simplicity and because medium without special additives can be used to detect organisms that do not produce gas.

  8. Insulin analogues with improved absorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Brange, J; Hansen, J F; Langkjaer, L; Markussen, J; Ribel, U; Sørensen, A R

    1992-01-01

    The insulin preparations available today are not ideal for therapy as s.c. injection does not provide a physiological insulin profile. With the aim to improve the absorption properties recombinant DNA technology has been utilized to design novel insulin molecules with changed physico-chemical characteristics and hence altered subcutaneous absorption kinetics. Soluble, long-acting human insulin analogues in which the isoelectric point has been increased from 5.4 to approx. 7 are absorbed very slowly, providing a more constant basal insulin delivery with lower day-to-day variation than present protracted preparations. In addition they have better storage stability. Rapid-acting human insulin analogues with largely reduced self-association are absorbed substantially faster from subcutaneous tissue than current regular insulin and thus are better suited for bolus injection. The absorption kinetics of these analogues have been able to explain the mechanism behind the dose effect on insulin absorption rate.

  9. Solar flare induced cosmic noise absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunmodimu, Olugbenga; Honary, Farideh; Rogers, Neil; Falayi, E. O.; Bolaji, O. S.

    2018-06-01

    Solar flare events are a major observing emphasis for space weather because they affect the ionosphere and can eject high-energy particles that can adversely affect Earth's technologies. In this study we model 38.2 MHz cosmic noise absorption (CNA) by utilising measurements from the Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (IRIS) at Kilpisjärvi, Finland obtained during solar cycle 23 (1996-2009). We utilised X-ray archive for the same period from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) to study solar flare induced cosmic noise absorption. We identified the threshold of flare (M4 class) that could bear significant influence on CNA. Through epoch analysis, we show the magnitude of absorption that each class of flare could produce. Using the parameters of flare and absorption we present a model that could provide the basis for nowcast of CNA induced by M and X-class solar flares.

  10. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  11. Seasonal Solar Thermal Absorption Energy Storage Development.

    PubMed

    Daguenet-Frick, Xavier; Gantenbein, Paul; Rommel, Mathias; Fumey, Benjamin; Weber, Robert; Gooneseker, Kanishka; Williamson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a thermochemical seasonal storage with emphasis on the development of a reaction zone for an absorption/desorption unit. The heat and mass exchanges are modelled and the design of a suitable reaction zone is explained. A tube bundle concept is retained for the heat and mass exchangers and the units are manufactured and commissioned. Furthermore, experimental results of both absorption and desorption processes are presented and the exchanged power is compared to the results of the simulations.

  12. Morphology of Southern Hemisphere Riometer Auroral Absorption

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Departamento de Geofísica Universidad de Concepción, Concepción CHILE foppiano@udec.cl ABSTRACT A morphology of riometer auroral absorption is...PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Departamento de Geofísica Universidad de ...range of frequencies used an inverse -square frequency dependence approximately holds. Morphology of Southern Hemisphere Riometer Auroral Absorption

  13. Light Absorption of Black Carbon Aerosol and Its Radiative Forcing Effect in an Megacity Atmosphere in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Zijuan

    2013-04-01

    The effects of black carbon (BC) aerosol on climate warming have been the study focus in the recent decade, the regional effect of BC light absorption is more significant. The reduction of BC is now expected to have significant near-term climate change mitigation. Mass absorption efficient (MAE) was one of the important optical properties of BC aerosol for evaluating the BC on its radiative forcing effect, while BC mixing state is one main influencing factor for MAE. Models have estimated that BC radiative forcing can be increased by a factor of ~2 for internally versus externally mixed BC. On the other hand, some organic carbon had been found to significantly absorb light at UV or shorter wavelengths in the most recent studies, with strong spectral dependence. But large uncertainties still remain in determining the positive forcing effect of BC on global clime change due to the technical limitations. In this study, advanced instrumentation (a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer (PASS-3) and a single particle soot photometer (SP2)) were used to measure black carbon aerosol and analyze its optical properties in a megacity in South China, Shenzhen, during the summer of 2011. It is in the southeast corner of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, neighboring Hong Kong to the south. During the campaign, the average BC mass concentration was 4.0±3.1 μg m-3, accounting for about 11% of PM2.5 mass concentration, which mainly came from fossil fuel combustion rather than biomass burning. The MAE of BC ranged from 5.0 to 8.5 m2 g-1, with an average value of 6.5±0.5 m2 g-1. The percentage of internally mixed BC was averagely 24.3±7.9% and positively correlated with the MAE. It is estimated that the internally mixed BC amplified MAE by about 7% during the campaign, suggesting that the BC absorption enhancement due to internal mixing in the real atmosphere is relatively low in comparison with the predictions by theoretical models, which stands in accordance with

  14. Absorption Spectra of Gold Nanoparticle Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'eva, M. V.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Zverev, A. S.; Nelyubina, N. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Russakov, D. M.; Kalenskii, A. V.; Eremenko, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    Three gold nanoparticle suspensions are obtained, and mean radii in distributions - (6.1 ± 0.2), (11.9 ± 0.3), and (17.3 ± 0.7) nm - are determined by the transmission electron microscopy method. The optical absorption spectra of suspensions are obtained and studied. Calculation of spectral dependences of the absorption index of suspensions at values of the gold complex refractive index taken from the literature showed a significant deviation of experimental and calculated data in the region of 450-800 nm. Spectral dependences of the absorption of suspensions are simulated within the framework of the Mie-Drude theory taking into account the interband absorption in the form of an additional term in the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of the Gaussian type. It is shown that to quantify the spectral dependences in the region of the plasmon absorption band of nanoparticles, correction of the parameters of the interband absorption is necessary in addition to the increase of the relaxation parameter of the Drude theory. Spectral dependences of the dielectric permittivity of gold in nanodimensional state are refined from the solution of the inverse problem. The results of the present work are important for predicting the special features of operation of photonic devices and optical detonators based on gold nanoparticles.

  15. A search for intervening HI absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Sarah N.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Allison, James R.; Koribalski, Baerbel S.; Curran, Stephen J.

    2013-03-01

    HI absorption-line studies provide a unique probe of the gas distribution and kinematics in galaxies well beyond the local universe (z ≳ 0.3). HI absorption-line surveys with next-generation radio telescopes will provide the first large-scale studies of HI in a redshift regime which is poorly understood. However, we currently lack the understanding to infer galaxy properties from absorption-line observations alone. To address this issue, we are conducting a search for intervening HI absorption in a sample of 20 nearby galaxies. Our aim is to investigate how the detection rate varies with distance from the galaxy. We target sight-lines to bright continuum sources, which intercept known gas-rich galaxies, selected from the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (Koribalski et al. 2004). In our pilot sample, six galaxies with impact parameters < 20 kpc, we do not detect any absorption lines - although all are detected in 21cm emission. This indicates that an absorption non-detection cannot simply be interpreted as an absence of neutral gas - see Fig. 1. Our detection rate is low compared to previous surveys e.g. Gupta et al. (2010). This is, at least partially, due to the high resolution of the observations reducing the flux of the background source, which will also be an issue in future surveys, such as ASKAP-FLASH.

  16. Spectral Absorption Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Bond, T. C.; Quinn, P. K.; Sierau, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the solar spectral absorption optical depth of atmospheric aerosols for specific case studies during several field programs (three cases have been reported previously; two are new results). We combined airborne measurements of the solar net radiant flux density and the aerosol optical depth with a detailed radiative transfer model for all but one of the cases. The field programs (SAFARI 2000, ACE Asia, PRIDE, TARFOX, INTEX-A) contained aerosols representing the major absorbing aerosol types: pollution, biomass burning, desert dust and mixtures. In all cases the spectral absorption optical depth decreases with wavelength and can be approximated with a power-law wavelength dependence (Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE). We compare our results with other recent spectral absorption measurements and attempt to briefly summarize the state of knowledge of aerosol absorption spectra in the atmosphere. We discuss the limitations in using the AAE for calculating the solar absorption. We also discuss the resulting spectral single scattering albedo for these cases.

  17. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  18. Is a scaling factor required to obtain closure between measured and modelled O4 absorptions? - A case study for two days during the MADCAT campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Measurements of the oxygen dimer O4 are often used in remote sensing applications to infer information on the atmospheric light path distribution. Such information is interesting in itself, but can also be used to retrieve properties of clouds and aerosols, e.g. from ground based Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) observations. In recent years, a scaling factor (between about 0.7 and 1) was applied by several groups to the retrieved O4 slant column densities in order to obtain meaningful aerosol profiles from MAX-DOAS observations. However, other groups did not report the need for such a scaling factor. Up to now, this discrepancy is neither understood nor resolved. Here we compare measured and modelled O4 slant column densities for two days during the MADCAT campaign (http://joseba.mpch-mainz.mpg.de/mad_cat.htm). Clouds were mostly absent during both days, and the aerosol profiles are constrained by simultaneous sun photometer and ceilometer measurements. One important difference between both days is the amount of aerosol in the lowest atmospheric layer. Our comparison study addresses several important steps of the O4 data analysis, such as the spectral retrieval and the radiative transfer simulations. We also investigate the effects of temperature and pressure variations on the calculation of the O4 vertical column density. Preliminary results are are not conclusive but indicate that a scaling factor is needed to bring measurements and simulations into agreement at least for one of the two selected days.

  19. Internally mixed black carbon in the Indo-Gangetic Plain and its effect on absorption enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamban, Navaneeth M.; Tripathi, S. N.; Moosakutty, Shamjad P.; Kuntamukkala, Pavan; Kanawade, V. P.

    2017-11-01

    We present the systematic analysis of individual black carbon (BC) mixing state and its impact on radiative forcing from an urban Indian city, Kanpur, located in Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Simultaneous measurements using Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Photo-Acoustic Soot Spectrometer (PASS-3) and High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) were conducted from 8 January 2015 to 28 February 2015 at Kanpur. BC mass and number concentrations varied between 0.7 and 17 μg/m3 and 277-5866 #/cm3 with a mean of 4.06 μg/m3 and 1314 #/cm3, respectively. The diurnal variation of BC mass concentration showed a traffic hour peak during both the morning and late night. The mean fraction of "thickly coated BC" particles (fTCBC) was found to be 61.6%, indicating that a large fraction of BC particles was internally mixed. The fTCBC increased after sunrise with a peak at about noontime, indicating that the formation of secondary organic aerosol under active photochemistry can enhance organic coating on a core of black carbon. High-resolution positive matrix factorization (HR-PMF) factors showed distinct characteristics with fTCBC. While primary organic aerosols like cooking organic aerosols (COA) and biomass burning organic aerosols (BBOA) were negatively correlated with fTCBC (r = - 0.78 and - 0.51, respectively), aged low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LVOOA) was forming a coating over BC (r = 0.6). Similar positive correlation of fTCBC with inorganic species like ammonium (r = 0.58) and nitrate (r = 0.47) further suggested that BC appears to be largely coated with LVOOA, ammonium, and nitrate. A positive correlation between the fTCBC and the mass absorption cross-section at 781 nm (MAC781) was also observed (r = 0.58). Our results suggest that the observed fTCBC could amplify the MAC781 approximately by a factor of 1.8, which may catalyze the positive radiative forcing in the IGP.

  20. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  1. Phytosterol glycosides reduce cholesterol absorption in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B.; Anderson Spearie, Catherine L.; Ostlund, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Dietary phytosterols inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption and regulate whole body cholesterol excretion and balance. However, they are biochemically heterogeneous and a portion is glycosylated in some foods with unknown effects on biological activity. We tested the hypothesis that phytosterol glycosides reduce cholesterol absorption in humans. Phytosterol glycosides were extracted and purified from soy lecithin in a novel two-step process. Cholesterol absorption was measured in a series of three single-meal tests given at intervals of 2 wk to each of 11 healthy subjects. In a randomized crossover design, participants received ∼300 mg of added phytosterols in the form of phytosterol glycosides or phytosterol esters, or placebo in a test breakfast also containing 30 mg cholesterol-d7. Cholesterol absorption was estimated by mass spectrometry of plasma cholesterol-d7 enrichment 4–5 days after each test. Compared with the placebo test, phytosterol glycosides reduced cholesterol absorption by 37.6 ± 4.8% (P < 0.0001) and phytosterol esters 30.6 ± 3.9% (P = 0.0001). These results suggest that natural phytosterol glycosides purified from lecithin are bioactive in humans and should be included in methods of phytosterol analysis and tables of food phytosterol content. PMID:19246636

  2. Optical absorption in recycled waste plastic polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aji, M. P.; Rahmawati, I.; Priyanto, A.; Karunawan, J.; Wati, A. L.; Aryani, N. P.; Susanto; Wibowo, E.; Sulhadi

    2018-03-01

    We investigated the optical properties of UV spectrum absorption in recycled waste plastic from polyethylene polymer type. Waste plastic polyethylene showed an optical spectrum absorption after it’s recycling process. Spectrum absorption is determined using spectrophotometer UV-Nir Ocean Optics type USB 4000. Recycling method has been processed using heating treatment around the melting point temperature of the polyethylene polymer that are 200°C, 220°C, 240°C, 260°C, and 280°C. In addition, the recycling process was carried out with time variations as well, which are 1h, 1.5h, 2h, and 2.5h. The result of this experiment shows that recycled waste plastic polyethylene has a spectrum absorption in the ∼ 340-550 nm wavelength range. The absorbance spectrum obtained from UV light which is absorbed in the orbital n → π* and the orbital π → π*. This process indicates the existence of electron transition phenomena. This mechanism is affected by the temperature and the heating time where the intensity of absorption increases and widens with the increase of temperature and heating time. Furthermore this study resulted that the higher temperature affected the enhancement of the band gap energy of waste plastic polyethylene. These results show that recycled waste plastic polyethylene has a huge potential to be absorber materials for solar cell.

  3. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate thatmore » near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.« less

  4. Absorption coefficients of silicon: A theoretical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chin-Yi

    2018-05-01

    A theoretical model with explicit formulas for calculating the optical absorption and gain coefficients of silicon is presented. It incorporates direct and indirect interband transitions and considers the effects of occupied/unoccupied carrier states. The indirect interband transition is calculated from the second-order time-independent perturbation theory of quantum mechanics by incorporating all eight possible routes of absorption or emission of photons and phonons. Absorption coefficients of silicon are calculated from these formulas. The agreements and discrepancies among the calculated results, the Rajkanan-Singh-Shewchun (RSS) formula, and Green's data are investigated and discussed. For example, the RSS formula tends to overestimate the contributions of indirect transitions for cases with high photon energy. The results show that the state occupied/unoccupied effect is almost negligible for silicon absorption coefficients up to the onset of the optical gain condition where the energy separation of Quasi-Femi levels between electrons and holes is larger than the band-gap energy. The usefulness of using the physics-based formulas, rather than semi-empirical fitting ones, for absorption coefficients in theoretical studies of photovoltaic devices is also discussed.

  5. Dynamics of water absorption through superabsorbent polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sooyoung; Kim, Wonjung

    2017-11-01

    Superabsorbent polymers (SAPs) consist of hydrophilic cross-linked polymer networks that can absorb and retain a great amount of water relative to their own mass, so that they are widely used for disposable diapers and holding soil moisture in agriculture. SAPs are typically available in the form of submillimeter-sized particles, and the water absorption is driven by capillary flows between particles as well as diffusion that entail swelling. Although the control of water absorption of SAPs is important in engineering applications, but the dynamics of water absorption in SAP particles has not been fully understood. We examine the dynamics of the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate, one of the most common SAP. We experimentally measured the water absorption of sodium polyacrylate particles in one-dimensional confined channel. The water flows through the particles were analyzed by capillarity dominant at the early stage and by diffusion involving volume expansion critical at a later stage. The results provide a quantitative basis of the hydrodynamic analysis of the water flow through SAP particles from a macroscopic point of view, facilitating the prediction of water uptake of SAPs in hygienic and agricultural applications. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korea government (MSIP) (No.2015R1A2A2A04006181).

  6. Aerosol Absorption Measurements from LANDSAT and CIMEL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Karnieli, A.; Remer, L.; Holben, B.

    1999-01-01

    Spectral remote observations of dust properties from space and from the ground create a powerful tool for determination of dust absorption of solar radiation with an unprecedented accuracy. Absorption is a key component in understanding dust impact on climate. We use Landsat space-borne measurements at 0.47 to 2.2 micrometer over Senegal with ground-based sunphotometers to find that Saharan dust absorption of solar radiation is two to four times smaller than in models. Though dust absorbs in the blue, almost no absorption was found for wavelengths greater than 0.6 micrometer. The new finding increases by 50% recent estimated solar radiative forcing by dust and decreases the estimated dust heating of the lower troposphere. Dust transported from Asia shows slightly higher absorption probably due to the presence of black carbon from populated regions. Large-scale application of this method to satellite data from the Earth Observing System can reduce significantly the uncertainty in the dust radiative effects.

  7. Controlling enhanced absorption in graphene metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qihui; Liu, Peiguo; Bian, Li-an; Liu, Hanqing; Liu, Chenxi; Chen, Genghui

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a controllable terahertz (THz) metamaterial absorber (MA) is designed with the circuit analog method. Taking advantage of the patterned graphene on SiO2/doped Si/polyimide substrates with a gold reflector, the controllable MA achieves perfect absorption at 0.75 THz. The chemical potential of graphene is regulated by controlling the voltage between graphene and doped Si layers. As the chemical potential varies from 0 eV to 0.5 eV, the MA is changed from reflection (<0.37) to absorption (>0.99). The distributions of surface current and electric field are illustrated to analyze the resonant characteristic of patterned graphene. According to the resonant characteristic, we introduce patterned graphene elements with different dimension in a unit cell, which effectively extends the effective absorption bandwidth (absorption > 0 . 9) from 0.67-0.93 THz to 0.52-0.95 THz. Moreover, replacing part of the graphene structure with gold, the switchable MA is turned into a frequency tunable MA. The absorption peak moves from 0.62 THz to 0.92 THz as the chemical potential increases from 0.1 eV to 0.5 eV. These designs overcome limitation of traditional absorbers and exhibit great potentials in many practical applications.

  8. Identifying the perfect absorption of metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, G.; Schalch, J.; Zhao, X.; Zhang, J.; Averitt, R. D.; Zhang, X.

    2018-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the conditions that result in unity absorption in metamaterial absorbers to guide the design and optimization of this important class of functional electromagnetic composites. Multilayer absorbers consisting of a metamaterial layer, dielectric spacer, and ground plane are specifically considered. Using interference theory, the dielectric spacer thickness and resonant frequency for unity absorption can be numerically determined from the functional dependence of the relative phase shift of the total reflection. Further, using transmission line theory in combination with interference theory we obtain analytical expressions for the unity absorption resonance frequency and corresponding spacer layer thickness in terms of the bare resonant frequency of the metamaterial layer and metallic and dielectric losses within the absorber structure. These simple expressions reveal a redshift of the unity absorption frequency with increasing loss that, in turn, necessitates an increase in the thickness of the dielectric spacer. The results of our analysis are experimentally confirmed by performing reflection-based terahertz time-domain spectroscopy on fabricated absorber structures covering a range of dielectric spacer thicknesses with careful control of the loss accomplished through water absorption in a semiporous polyimide dielectric spacer. Our findings can be widely applied to guide the design and optimization of the metamaterial absorbers and sensors.

  9. Evaluation of AirMSPI photopolarimetric retrievals of smoke properties with in-situ observations collected during the ImPACT-PM field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalashnikova, O. V.; Garay, M. J.; Xu, F.; Seidel, F.; Diner, D. J.; Seinfeld, J.; Bates, K. H.; Kong, W.; Kenseth, C.; Cappa, C. D.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce and evaluate an approach for obtaining closure between in situ and polarimetric remote sensing observations of smoke properties obtained during the collocated CIRPAS Twin Otter and ER-2 aircraft measurements of the Lebec fire event on July 8, 2016. We investigate the utility of multi-angle, spectropolarimetric remote sensing imagery to evaluate the relative contribution of organics, non-organic and black carbon particles to smoke particulate composition. The remote sensing data were collected during the Imaging Polarimetric and Characterization of Tropospheric Particular Matter (ImPACT-PM) field campaign by the Airborne Multiangle SpectroPolarimetric Imager (AirMSPI), which flew on NASA's high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. The ImPACT-PM field campaign was a joint JPL/Caltech effort to combine measurements from the Terra Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), AirMSPI, in situ airborne measurements, and a chemical transport model to validate remote sensing retrievals of different types of airborne particulate matter with a particular emphasis on carbonaceous aerosols. The in-situ aerosol data were collected with a suite of Caltech instruments on board the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft and included the Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS), the Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA), and the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP-2). The CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft was also equipped with the Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), nephelometer, a particle counter, and meteorological sensors. We found that the multi-angle polarimetric observations are capable of fire particulate emission monitoring by particle type as inferred from the in-situ airborne measurements. Modeling of retrieval sensitivities show that the characterization of black carbon is the most challenging. The work aims at evaluating multi-angle, spectropolarimetric capabilities for particulate matter characterization in support of the Multi-Angle Imager for Aerosols (MAIA) satellite investigation

  10. Aerosol optical properties in the Marine Environment during the TCAP-I campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chand, D.; Berg, L. K.; Barnard, J.; Berkowitz, C. M.; Burton, S. P.; Chapman, E. G.; Comstock, J. M.; Fast, J. D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Connor, F. J.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Mei, F.; Pekour, M. S.; Sedlacek, A. J.; Schmid, B.; Shilling, J. E.; Shinozuka, Y.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk-Imre, A.

    2013-12-01

    The role of direct radiative forcing by atmospheric aerosol is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in predicting climate change. Much of this uncertainty comes from the limited knowledge of observed aerosol optical properties. In this presentation we discuss derived aerosol optical properties based on measurements made during the summer 2012 Two-Column Aerosol Project-I (TCAP) campaign and relate these properties to the corresponding chemical and physical properties of the aerosol. TCAP was designed to provide simultaneous, in-situ observations of the size distribution, chemical properties, and optical properties of aerosol within and between two atmospheric columns over the Atlantic Ocean near the eastern seaboard of the United States. These columns are separated by 200-300 km and were sampled in July 2012 during a summer intensive operation period (IOP) using the U.S. Department of Energy's Gulfstream-1 (G-1) and NASA's B200 aircraft, winter IOP using G-1 aircraft in February 2013, and the surface-based DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) located on Cape Cod. In this presentation we examine the spectral dependence of the aerosol optical properties measured from the aircraft over the TCAP-I domain, with an emphasis on in-situ derived intensive properties measured by a 3-λ Nephelometer, a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP), a humidograph (f(RH)), and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Preliminary results indicate that the aerosol are more light-absorbing as well as more hygroscopic at higher altitudes (2-4 km) compared to the corresponding values made within residual layers near the surface (0-2 km altitude). The average column (0-4 km) single scattering albedo (ω) and hygroscopic scattering factor (F) are found to be ~0.96 and 1.25, respectively. Additional results on key aerosol intensive properties such as the angstrom exponent (å), asymmetry parameter (g), backscattering fraction (b), and gamma parameter (

  11. Iron absorption from Southeast Asian diets. II. Role of various factors that might explain low absorption.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L; Björn-Rasmussen, E; Rossander, L; Suwanik, R

    1977-04-01

    Previously reported levels of iron absorption from common Southeast Asian meals composed of rice, vegetables, and spices were too low to be consistent with the known prevalence of iron deficiency. In the present paper the cause of the low absorption was systematically sought. Variables investigated comprised methodological errors, factors in the diet such as certain foodstuffs, or contaminants inhibiting the absorption and characteristics of the subjects accompanied by malabsorption of dietary iron. The latter was excluded by comparing the absorption from both wheat rolls and a composit rice meal in Thai and Swedish women using the absorption of a small dose of ferrous ascorbate as a common basis of comparison. Two main factors were identified as causing the low absorption in the previous studies: the homogenization of the labeled meals before serving and the use of rice flour instead of rice. Iron absorption from nonhomogenized meals of identical composition as studied previously was many times higher (on an average 0.16 mg) and was consistent with the actual prevalence of iron deficiency in lower socioeconomic groups of Thais mainly consuming the simple meals studied. Recent modifications of the method to measure nonheme iron absorption from composite meals have thus not only made the determination simpler but also more accurate.

  12. Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Kekatpure, Rohan Deodatta; Davids, Paul

    2014-07-15

    Plasmon absorption modulator systems and methods are disclosed. A plasmon absorption modulator system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and a metal layer formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers. A method for modulating plasmonic current includes enabling propagation of the plasmonic current along a metal layer, and applying a voltage across the stack of quantum well layers to cause absorption of a portion of energy of the plasmonic current by the stack of quantum well layers. A metamaterial switching system includes a semiconductor substrate, a plurality of quantum well layers stacked on a top surface of the semiconductor substrate, and at least one metamaterial structure formed on a top surface of the stack of quantum well layers.

  13. Nanofibrous membrane-based absorption refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Isfahani, RN; Sampath, K; Moghaddam, S

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study on the efficacy of highly porous nanofibrous membranes for application in membrane-based absorbers and desorbers. Permeability studies showed that membranes with a pore size greater than about one micron have a sufficient permeability for application in the absorber heat exchanger. Membranes with smaller pores were found to be adequate for the desorber heat exchanger. The membranes were implemented in experimental membrane-based absorber and desorber modules and successfully tested. Parametric studies were conducted on both absorber and desorber processes. Studies on the absorption process were focused on the effects of water vapor pressure, cooling water temperature,more » and the solution velocity on the absorption rate. Desorption studies were conducted on the effects of wall temperature, vapor and solution pressures, and the solution velocity on the desorption rate. Significantly higher absorption and desorption rates than in the falling film absorbers and desorbers were achieved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.« less

  14. Outskirts of Distant Galaxies in Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    QSO absorption spectroscopy provides a sensitive probe of both the neutral medium and diffuse ionized gas in the distant Universe. It extends 21 cm maps of gaseous structures around low-redshift galaxies both to lower gas column densities and to higher redshifts. Combining galaxy surveys with absorption-line observations of gas around galaxies enables comprehensive studies of baryon cycles in galaxy outskirts over cosmic time. This chapter presents a review of the empirical understanding of the cosmic neutral gas reservoir from studies of damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs). It describes the constraints on the star formation relation and chemical enrichment history in the outskirts of distant galaxies from DLA studies. A brief discussion of available constraints on the ionized circumgalactic gas from studies of lower column density Lyα absorbers and associated ionic absorption transitions is presented at the end.

  15. Laser absorption phenomena in flowing gas devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. K.; Otis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is presented of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of CW CO2 laser radiation in flowing gases seeded with alkali metals. In order to motivate this development, some simple models are described of several space missions which could use laser powered rocket vehicles. Design considerations are given for a test call to be used with a welding laser, using a diamond window for admission of laser radiation at power levels in excess of 10 kW. A detailed analysis of absorption conditions in the test cell is included. The experimental apparatus and test setup are described and the results of experiments presented. Injection of alkali seedant and steady state absorption of the laser radiation were successfully demonstrated, but problems with the durability of the diamond windows at higher powers prevented operation of the test cell as an effective laser powered thruster.

  16. Tunable electromagnetically induced absorption based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Maoyong; Wang, Tongling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhang, Yuping

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an electronically induced absorption (EIA) structure based on graphene at the infrared frequency is proposed. A pair of nanorods is coupled to a ring resonator, resulting in electronically induced transparency (EIT), and then, Babinet's principle is applied to transform the EIT structure into an EIA structure. Based on the bright and dark modes of the coupling schemes, the adjustment of the coupling strength between the dark and bright modes can be achieved by changing the asymmetry degree. In addition, the transparency window and the absorption peak can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy of graphene. This graphene-based EIA structure can develop the path in narrow-band filtering and, absorptive switching in the future.

  17. A Review: Characteristics of Noise Absorption Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amares, S.; Sujatmika, E.; Hong, T. W.; Durairaj, R.; Hamid, H. S. H. B.

    2017-10-01

    Noise is always treated as a nuisance to human and even noise pollution appears in the environmental causing discomfort. This also concerns the engineering design that tends to cultivate this noise propagation. Solution such as using material to absorb the sound have been widely used. The fundamental of the sound absorbing propagation, sound absorbing characteristics and its factors are minimally debated. Furthermore, the method in order to pertain sound absorbing related to the sound absorption coefficient is also limited, as many studies only contributes in result basis and very little in literature aspect. This paper revolves in providing better insight on the importance of sound absorption and the materials factors in obtaining the sound absorption coefficient.

  18. Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Coefficient Comparisons during MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marley, N. A.; Marchany-Rivera, A.; Kelley, K. L.; Mangu, A.; Gaffney, J. S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol absorption were obtained as part of the MAX-Mex component of the MILAGRO field campaign at site T0 (Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City) by using a 7-channel aethalometer (Thermo- Anderson) during the month of March, 2006. The absorption measurements obtained in the field at 370, 470, 520, 590, 660, 880, and 950 nm were used to determine the aerosol Angstrom absorption exponents by linear regression. Since, unlike other absorbing aerosol species (e.g. humic like substances, nitrated PAHs), black carbon absorption is relatively constant from the ultraviolet to the infrared with an Angstrom absorption exponent of -1 (1), a comparison of the Angstrom exponents can indicate the presence of aerosol components with an enhanced UV absorption over that expected from BC content alone. The Angstrom exponents determined from the aerosol absorption measurements obtained in the field varied from - 0.7 to - 1.3 during the study and was generally lower in the afternoon than the morning hours, indicating an increase in secondary aerosol formation and photochemically generated UV absorbing species in the afternoon. Twelve-hour integrated samples of fine atmospheric aerosols (<0.1micron) were also collected at site T0 and T1 (Universidad Technologica de Tecamac, State of Mexico) from 5 am to 5 pm (day) and from 5 pm to 5 am (night) during the month of March 2006. Samples were collected on quartz fiber filters with high volume impactor samplers. Continuous absorption spectra of these aerosol samples have been obtained in the laboratory from 280 to 900nm with the use of an integrating sphere coupled to a UV spectrometer (Beckman DU with a Labsphere accessory). The integrating sphere allows the detector to collect and spatially integrate the total radiant flux reflected from the sample and therefore allows for the measurement of absorption on highly reflective or diffusely scattering samples. These continuous spectra have also been used to obtain the

  19. Intestinal fluid absorption in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dorey, P G; King, J; Munday, K A; Parsons, B J; Poat, J A

    1983-01-01

    A comparison has been made of intestinal fluid absorption between male Okamoto spontaneously hypertensive rats (s.h.r.) and normotensive male Wistar controls. S.h.r. show enhanced fluid absorption both in hypertensive adults and in young s.h.r. before hypertension has developed. Several potential causes for increased fluid transport in s.h.r. were tested using pharmacological antagonists. It is unlikely that enhanced fluid absorption is due to high sympathetic nervous activity, the renin-angiotensin system or is secondary to hypertension. Intestine from s.h.r. have a high short-circuit current indicating a change in ion pump activity. These results are discussed in relation to the possible causes of increased fluid (ion) transport by the intestine of s.h.r. PMID:6361232

  20. Subwavelength total acoustic absorption with degenerate resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental realization of perfect sound absorption by sub-wavelength monopole and dipole resonators that exhibit degenerate resonant frequencies. This is achieved through the destructive interference of two resonators' transmission responses, while the matching of their averaged impedances to that of air implies no backscattering, thereby leading to total absorption. Two examples, both using decorated membrane resonators (DMRs) as the basic units, are presented. The first is a flat panel comprising a DMR and a pair of coupled DMRs, while the second one is a ventilated short tube containing a DMR in conjunction with a sidewall DMR backed by a cavity. In both examples, near perfect absorption, up to 99.7%, has been observed with the airborne wavelength up to 1.2 m, which is at least an order of magnitude larger than the composite absorber. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  1. Resonant indirect optical absorption in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, José; Noël, Mario; Zwinkels, Joanne C.; Lockwood, David J.

    2017-09-01

    The optical absorption coefficient of pure Ge has been determined from high-accuracy, high-precision optical measurements at photon energies covering the spectral range between the indirect and direct gaps. The results are compared with a theoretical model that fully accounts for the resonant nature of the energy denominators that appear in perturbation-theory expansions of the absorption coefficient. The model generalizes the classic Elliott approach to indirect excitons, and leads to a predicted optical absorption that is in excellent agreement with the experimental values using just a single adjustable parameter: the average deformation potential DΓ L coupling electrons at the bottom of the direct and indirect valleys in the conduction band. Remarkably, the fitted value, DΓ L=4.3 ×108eV /cm , is in nearly perfect agreement with independent measurements and ab initio predictions of this parameter, confirming the validity of the proposed theory, which has general applicability.

  2. Absorption of acoustic waves by sunspots. II - Resonance absorption in axisymmetric fibril models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenthal, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Analytical calculations of acoustic waves scattered by sunspots which concentrate on the absorption at the magnetohydrodynamic Alfven resonance are extended to the case of a flux-tube embedded in a uniform atmosphere. The model is based on a flux-tubes of varying radius that are highly structured, translationally invariant, and axisymmetric. The absorbed fractional energy is determined for different flux-densities and subphotospheric locations with attention given to the effects of twist. When the flux is highly concentrated into annuli efficient absorption is possible even when the mean magnetic flux density is low. The model demonstrates low absorption at low azimuthal orders even in the presence of twist which generally increases the range of wave numbers over which efficient absorption can occur. Resonance absorption is concluded to be an efficient mechanism in monolithic sunspots, fibril sunspots, and plage fields.

  3. Intestinal absorption of copper: influence of carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Wapnir, R A; Balkman, C

    1992-02-01

    Macronutrients can modulate the intestinal absorption of trace elements by binding the metal or altering mucosal function. We investigated whether certain simple and complex carbohydrates modify copper (Cu) absorption, using an in vivo perfusion technique in the rat. Corn syrup solids, which contain a mixture of glucose polymers of diverse length, added at either 20 or 50 mosm/kg enhanced Cu absorption from a 31.5 microM (2 mg/liter) Cu solution (128 +/- 11 and 130 +/- 11 pmol/min x cm, respectively, vs 101 +/- 4 pmol/min x cm, P less than 0.05, in the absence of carbohydrate). This was concomitant with a stimulation of net water absorption (1.05 +/- 0.08 and 0.84 +/- 0.08 microliter/min x cm, respectively, vs 0.63 +/- 0.02 microliter/min x cm with no carbohydrate, P less than 0.05). Glucose, fructose, lactose, or sucrose had no influence on Cu absorption, although they altered water exchanges, an effect attributable to a reduction of the outflow component of fluid recirculation. Low concentrations of lactose resulted in a greater accumulation of Cu in the intestinal mucosa (8.75 +/- 0.71 micrograms/g vs 5.77 +/- 0.68 micrograms/g for controls, P less than 0.05). Hence, solutes that moderately stimulate mucosa-to-serosa fluid influx in a progressive manner, such as glucose polymers, may contribute to functionally increase Cu absorption. Conversely, conditions which tend to reduce water inflow or increase water outflow across the small intestinal mucosa, as may occur with high lactose diets or in cases of chronic diarrhea, may have negative effects.

  4. Calcium absorption is not increased by caseinophosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Teucher, Birgit; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Dainty, Jack R; McDonagh, David; FitzGerald, Richard J; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2006-07-01

    One of the suggested health benefits of caseinophosphopeptides (CPPs) is their ability to enhance calcium absorption. This possibility is based on the assumption that they resist proteolysis in the upper gastrointestinal tract and maintain calcium in a soluble form at alkaline pH in the distal ileum. The effects of CPP-enriched preparations (containing candidate functional food ingredients) on calcium absorption from a calcium lactate drink were tested. A randomized crossover trial was undertaken in 15 adults in whom we measured the absorption of calcium from a calcium lactate drink (drink A: 400 mg Ca as lactate) and 2 preparations enriched with forms of CPP (1.7 g each; drinks B and C). Both drinks B and C contained 400 mg Ca as calcium lactate plus approximately 100 mg CPP-derived calcium). Each volunteer received the 3 drinks in random order. Absorption was measured by the dual-label calcium stable-isotope technique. The quantity of calcium absorbed was significantly lower from drink A (103 mg) than from drink B (117 mg; P = 0.012) or drink C (121 mg; P = 0.002), which indicated a positive effect of the CPPs. However, because the CPP preparations contributed additional calcium besides that found in the calcium lactate (drink A), fractional absorption of calcium from drink B (23%) was slightly but significantly (P = 0.015) lower than that from drink A (26%). The differences in calcium absorption are unlikely to have any biological significance. CPPs are unsuitable as candidate ingredients for functional foods that are designed to deliver improved calcium nutrition.

  5. Vertical Profiles of Light-Absorbing Aerosol: A Combination of In-situ and AERONET Observations during NASA DISCOVER-AQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Giles, D. M.; Holben, B. N.; Hudgins, C.; Martin, R.; Moore, R.; Shook, M.; Thornhill, K. L., II; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the vertical profile of atmospheric aerosols plays a vital role in utilizing spaceborne, column-integrated satellite observations. The properties and distribution of light-absorbing aerosol are particularly uncertain despite significant air quality and climate ramifications. Advanced retrieval algorithms are able to derive complex aerosol properties (e.g., wavelength-dependent absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo) from remote-sensing measurements, but quantitative relationships to surface conditions remain a challenge. Highly systematic atmospheric profiling during four unique deployments for the NASA DISCOVER-AQ project (Baltimore, MD, 2011; San Joaquin Valley, CA, 2013; Houston, TX, 2013; Denver, CO, 2014) allow statistical assessment of spatial, temporal, and source-related variability for light-absorbing aerosol properties in these distinct regions. In-situ sampling in conjunction with a dense network of AERONET sensors also allows evaluation of the sensitivity, limitations, and advantages of remote-sensing data products over a wide range of conditions. In-situ aerosol and gas-phase observations were made during DISCOVER-AQ aboard the NASA P-3B aircraft. Aerosol absorption coefficients were measured by a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). Approximately 200 profiles for each of the four deployments were obtained, from the surface (25-300m altitude) to 5 km, and are used to calculate absorption aerosol optical depths (AAODs). These are quantitatively compared to AAOD derived from AERONET Level 1.5 retrievals to 1) explore discrepancies between measurements, 2) quantify the fraction of AAOD that exists directly at the surface and is often missed by airborne sampling, and 3) evaluate the potential for deriving ground-level black carbon (BC) concentrations for air quality prediction. Aerosol size distributions are used to assess absorption contributions from mineral dust, both at the surface and aloft. SP2 (Single Particle Soot

  6. Use of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) as a pre-filter for ice nucleation measurements: effect of particle mixing state and determination of SP2 conditions to fully vaporize refractory black carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schill, Gregory P.; DeMott, Paul J.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2018-05-01

    Ice nucleation is a fundamental atmospheric process that impacts precipitation, cloud lifetimes, and climate. Challenges remain to identify and quantify the compositions and sources of ice-nucleating particles (INPs). Assessment of the role of black carbon (BC) as an INP is particularly important due to its anthropogenic sources and abundance at upper-tropospheric cloud levels. The role of BC as an INP, however, is unclear. This is, in part, driven by a lack of techniques that directly determine the contribution of refractory BC (rBC) to INP concentrations. One previously developed technique to measure this contribution uses the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) as a pre-filter to an online ice-nucleating particle counter. In this technique, rBC particles are selectively heated to their vaporization temperature in the SP2 cavity by a 1064 nm laser. From previous work, however, it is unclear under what SP2 conditions, if any, the original rBC particles were fully vaporized. Furthermore, previous work also left questions about the effect of the SP2 laser on the ice-nucleating properties of several INP proxies and their mixtures with rBC.To answer these questions, we sampled the exhaust of an SP2 with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer and a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber. Using Aquadag® as an rBC proxy, the effect of several SP2 instrument parameters on the size distribution and physical properties of particles in rBC SP2 exhaust were explored. We found that a high SP2 laser power (930 nW/(220 nm PSL)) is required to fully vaporize a ˜ 0.76 fg rBC particle. We also found that the exhaust particle size distribution is minimally affected by the SP2 sheath-to-sample ratio; the size of the original rBC particle, however, greatly influences the size distribution of the SP2 exhaust. The effect of the SP2 laser on the ice nucleation efficiency of Snomax

  7. Inventory of African desert dust events in the north-central Iberian Peninsula in 2003-2014 based on sun-photometer-AERONET and particulate-mass-EMEP data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cachorro, Victoria E.; Burgos, Maria A.; Mateos, David; Toledano, Carlos; Bennouna, Yasmine; Torres, Benjamín; de Frutos, Ángel M.; Herguedas, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    A reliable identification of desert dust (DD) episodes over north-central Spain is carried out based on the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) columnar aerosol sun photometer (aerosol optical depth, AOD, and Ångström exponent, α) and European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) surface particulate-mass concentration (PMx, x = 10, 2.5, and 2.5-10 µm) as the main core data. The impact of DD on background aerosol conditions is detectable by means of aerosol load thresholds and complementary information provided by HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) air mass back trajectories, MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) images, forecast aerosol models, and synoptic maps, which have been carefully reviewed by a human observer for each day included in the DD inventory. This identification method allows the detection of low and moderate DD intrusions and also of mixtures of mineral dust with other aerosol types by means of the analysis of α. During the period studied (2003-2014), a total of 152 DD episodes composed of 418 days are identified. Overall, this means ˜ 13 episodes and ˜ 35 days per year with DD intrusion, representing 9.5 % days year-1. During the identified DD intrusions, 19 daily exceedances over 50 µg m-3 are reported at the surface. The occurrence of DD event days during the year peaks in March and June, with a marked minimum in April and lowest occurrence in winter. A large interannual variability is observed showing a statistically significant temporal decreasing trend of ˜ 3 days year-1. The DD impact on the aerosol climatology is addressed by evaluating the DD contribution in magnitude and percent (in brackets) for AOD, PM10, PM2.5, and PM2.5 - 10, obtaining mean values of 0.015 (11.5 %), 1.3 µg m-3 (11.8 %), 0.55 µg m-3 (8.5 %) and 0.79 µg m-3 (16.1 %), respectively. Annual cycles of the DD contribution for AOD and PM10 present two maxima - one in summer (0.03 and 2.4 µg m-3 for AOD in

  8. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Jeffrey S.; Kamili, Alvin; Wat, Elaine; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Tandy, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the ability of PLs to inhibit cholesterol absorption is of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22254012

  9. Subbarrier absorption in a stationary superlattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arutyunyan, G. M.; Nerkararyan, K. V.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation of the interband absorption coefficient was carried out in the classical case, when the frequency of light was assumed to bind two miniband subbarrier states of different bands. The influence of two dimensional Mott excitons on this absorption was studied and a comparison was made with the experiment. All of these considerations were done taking into account the photon wave vector (the phase spatial heterogeneity). The basic traits of the energy spectra of superlattice semiconductors, their kinetic and optical properties, and possible means of electromagnetic wave intensification were examined. By the density matrix method, a theory of electrical and electromagnetic properties of superlattices was suggested.

  10. Intestinal absorption and biomagnification of organochlorines

    SciTech Connect

    Gobas, F.A.P.C.; McCorquodale, J.R.; Haffner, G.D.

    1993-03-01

    Dietary uptake rates of several organochlorines from diets with different lipid contents were measured in goldfish (Carassius auratus) to investigate the mechanism of intestinal absorption and biomagnification of organic chemical. The results suggest that intestinal absorption is predominantly controlled by chemical diffusion rather than lipid cotransport. Data for chemical uptake in human infants are presented to illustrate that biomagnification is caused by the digestion of food in the gastrointestinal tract. The findings are discussed in the context of two conflicting theories for the mechanism of biomagnification, and a mechanistic model is presented for the dietary uptake and biomagnification of organicmore » chemicals in fish and mammals.« less

  11. Energy absorption of composite material and structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented from a joint research program on helicopter crashworthiness conducted by the U.S. Army Aerostructures Directorate and NASA Langley. Through the ongoing research program an in-depth understanding has been developed on the cause/effect relationships between material and architectural variables and the energy-absorption capability of composite material and structure. Composite materials were found to be efficient energy absorbers. Graphite/epoxy subfloor structures were more efficient energy absorbers than comparable structures fabricated from Kevlar or aluminum. An accurate method of predicting the energy-absorption capability of beams was developed.

  12. Simultaneous optimization method for absorption spectroscopy postprocessing.

    PubMed

    Simms, Jean M; An, Xinliang; Brittelle, Mack S; Ramesh, Varun; Ghandhi, Jaal B; Sanders, Scott T

    2015-05-10

    A simultaneous optimization method is proposed for absorption spectroscopy postprocessing. This method is particularly useful for thermometry measurements based on congested spectra, as commonly encountered in combustion applications of H2O absorption spectroscopy. A comparison test demonstrated that the simultaneous optimization method had greater accuracy, greater precision, and was more user-independent than the common step-wise postprocessing method previously used by the authors. The simultaneous optimization method was also used to process experimental data from an environmental chamber and a constant volume combustion chamber, producing results with errors on the order of only 1%.

  13. New Parameterization of Neutron Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, Ram K.; Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent parameterization of absorption cross sections for any system of charged ion collisions, including proton-nucleus collisions, is extended for neutron-nucleus collisions valid from approx. 1 MeV to a few GeV, thus providing a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for any system of collision pairs (charged or uncharged). The parameters are associated with the physics of the problem. At lower energies, optical potential at the surface is important, and the Pauli operator plays an increasingly important role at intermediate energies. The agreement between the calculated and experimental data is better than earlier published results.

  14. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

    1987-04-07

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

  15. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  16. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  17. Thin structured rigid body for acoustic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, T. A.; Smith, J. D.; Hibbins, A. P.; Sambles, J. R.; Rance, H. J.

    2017-01-01

    We present a thin acoustic metamaterial absorber, comprised of only rigid metal and air, that gives rise to near unity absorption of airborne sound on resonance. This simple, easily fabricated, robust structure comprising a perforated metal plate separated from a rigid wall by a deeply subwavelength channel of air is an ideal candidate for a sound absorbing panel. The strong absorption in the system is attributed to the thermo-viscous losses arising from a sound wave guided between the plate and the wall, defining the subwavelength channel.

  18. High sensitivity background absorption measurements in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, Nathan; Silva, Junior R.; Wang, Chengao; Albrecht, Alexander R.; Melgaard, Seth D.; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2015-03-01

    Laser cooling in InGaP|GaAs double heterostructures (DHS) has been a sought after goal. Even though very high external quantum efficiency (EQE) has been achieved, background absorption has remained a bottleneck in achieving net cooling. The purpose of this study is to gain more insight into the source of the background absorption for InGaP|GaAs DHS as well as GaAs|AlGaAs DBRs by employing an excite-probe thermal Z-scan measurement.

  19. Universal Parameterization of Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Our prior nuclear absorption cross sections model is extended for light systems (A less than or equal to 4) where either both projectile and target are light particles or one is a light particle and the other is a medium or heavy nucleus. The agreement with experiment is excellent for these cases as well. Present work in combination with our original model provides a comprehensive picture of absorption cross sections for light, medium, and heavy systems, a very valuable input for radiation protection studies.

  20. [Improvement and prediction of intestinal drug absorption].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru

    2013-01-01

    The suppository preparation, which can improve the absorption of poorly absorbable drugs safer than commercially available suppositories, was developed by utilizing sodium laurate and taurine. Additionally, the novel oral absorption-improving system was also established by utilizing polyamines and bile acids. Furthermore, to evaluate the efficacy of these new formulations and estimate the absorbability of new drug candidates in humans, the in vitro prediction system utilizing an isolated human intestinal tissues was developed and successfully predicted the fraction of dose absorbed for several model drugs. These findings would contribute to the development of new dosage forms and new drugs for oral administration.

  1. [Shock absorption of mouthguard materials--influence of temperature conditions and shore hardness on shock absorption].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Takashi; Tsukimura, Naoki; Ohno, Shigeru; Umekawa, Yoshitada; Sawano, Muneyuki; Fujimoto, Toshiki; Takamura, Masaaki; Majima, Aiko; Katakura, Yuusuke; Kurata, Akemi; Ohyama, Tetsuo; Ishigami, Tomohiko

    2006-04-01

    To consider changes in the physical properties of mouthguard materials with the change of temperature, shock-absorbing examination and Shore hardness measurement of existing MG materials and other elastic materials were carried out. Both examinations were done under two temperature conditions: at room temperature (25 degrees C) and simulated intraoral temperature (37 degrees C). In addition, a comparative study of the relation between Shore hardness and shock absorption of the materials was made. A self-made drop impact machine was used for the shock-absorbing examination. The thickness of a sample was assumed to be 3 mm. The loading was applied by dropping 3 kinds of steel ball, phi 10 mm (4.0 g), phi 15 mm (13.7 g), and phi 20 mm (32.6 g) from a height of 60 cm. The shock absorption of all materials was compared by the maximum impact force. Shore hardness was measured based on the JIS standard. The shock absorption of each material showed a different tendency depending on the loading condition. Furthermore, the shock absorption of the same material showed different results depending on the temperature condition. Shore hardness measurements tended to show low values with the condition of 37 degrees C for all materials. From the relation between shock absorption and Shore hardness, it was confirmed that there is a correlation between hardness and the maximum impact force in the materials that showed shock absorption by elastic deformation. Some materials showed high shock absorption compared with existing MG materials.

  2. [The study of CO2 cavity enhanced absorption and highly sensitive absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Pei, Shi-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ming; Cui, Fen-Ping; Huang, Wei; Shao, Jie; Fan, Hong; Zhang, Wei-Jun

    2005-12-01

    Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a new spectral technology that is based on the cavity ring down absorption spectroscopy. In the present paper, a DFB encapsulation narrow line width tunable diode laser (TDL) was used as the light source. At the center output, the TDL radiation wavelength was 1.573 microm, and an optical cavity, which consisted of two high reflectivity mirrors (near 1.573 microm, the mirror reflectivity was about 0.994%), was used as a sample cell. A wavemeter was used to record the accurate frequency of the laser radiation. In the experiment, the method of scanning the optical cavity to change the cavity mode was used, when the laser frequency was coincident with one of the cavity mode; the laser radiation was coupled into the optical cavity and the detector could receive the light signals that escaped the optical cavity. As a result, the absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide weak absorption at low pressure was obtained with an absorption intensity of 1.816 x 10(-23) cm(-1) x (molecule x cm(-2)(-1) in a sample cell with a length of only 33.5 cm. An absorption sensitivity of about 3.62 x 10(-7) cm(-1) has been achieved. The experiment result indicated that the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy has the advantage of high sensivity, simple experimental setup, and easy operation.

  3. Examination of the Measurement of Absorption Using the Reverberant Room Method for Highly Absorptive Acoustic Foam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, William O.; McNelis, Anne M.; Chris Nottoli; Eric Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    The absorption coefficient for material specimens are needed to quantify the expected acoustic performance of that material in its actual usage and environment. The ASTM C423-09a standard, "Standard Test Method for Sound Absorption and Sound Absorption Coefficients by the Reverberant Room Method" is often used to measure the absorption coefficient of material test specimens. This method has its basics in the Sabine formula. Although widely used, the interpretation of these measurements are a topic of interest. For example, in certain cases the measured Sabine absorption coefficients are greater than 1.0 for highly absorptive materials. This is often attributed to the diffraction edge effect phenomenon. An investigative test program to measure the absorption properties of highly absorbent melamine foam has been performed at the Riverbank Acoustical Laboratories. This paper will present and discuss the test results relating to the effect of the test materials' surface area, thickness and edge sealing conditions. A follow-on paper is envisioned that will present and discuss the results relating to the spacing between multiple piece specimens, and the mounting condition of the test specimen.

  4. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Leland V.; Krebs, Nancy F.; Hambidge, K. Michael

    2013-01-01

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption. PMID:22617116

  5. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leland V; Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2013-02-28

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption.

  6. Water absorption characteristic of interlocking compressed earth brick units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, B. H. Abu; Saari, S.; Surip, N. A.

    2017-10-01

    This study aims to investigate the water absorption characteristic of interlocking compressed earth brick (ICEB) units. Apart from compressive strength, water absorption is an important property in masonry. This property can affect the quality of the brick itself and the bond strength between the brick and mortar in masonry structures and can result in reducing its strength properties. The units were tested for 24 h water absorption and 5 h boiling water absorption. A total of 170 ICEB units from four ICEB types underwent both tests. For the 24 h water absorption, the ICEB units were dried in the oven for 24 h and then cooled before being weighed. Thereafter, each brick was immersed in water for 24 h and weighed. The same specimens used for the 24 h water absorption test were re-used for the 5 h boiling water absorption test. After completing the 24 h water absorption test, the brick was boiled for 5-hours and weighed. The highest water absorption for the ICEBs in the 24-hour water absorption and 5 h boiling water absorption tests are 15.09% and 17.18%, respectively. The half brick has the highest water absorption (15.87%), whereas the beam brick has the lowest (13.20%). The water absorption of an ICEB unit is higher than that of normal bricks, although the water absorption of the former remains below the maximum rate of the brick water absorption (21%).

  7. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  8. Gamma ray astrophysics. [emphasizing processes and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    Gamma ray production processes are reviewed, including Compton scattering, synchrotron radiation, bremsstrahlung interactions, meson decay, nucleon-antinucleon annihilations, and pion production. Gamma ray absorption mechanisms through interactions with radiation and with matter are discussed, along with redshifts and gamma ray fluxes.

  9. Direct fired absorption machine flue gas recuperator

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.; Root, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    A recuperator which recovers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine. The recuperator includes a housing with liquid flowing therethrough, the liquid being in direct contact with the combustion gas for increasing the effectiveness of the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid.

  10. Coupled dual loop absorption heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Sarkisian, Paul H.; Reimann, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    A coupled dual loop absorption system which utilizes two separate complete loops. Each individual loop operates at three temperatures and two pressures. This low temperature loop absorber and condenser are thermally coupled to the high temperature loop evaporator, and the high temperature loop condenser and absorber are thermally coupled to the low temperature generator.

  11. Realistic absorption coefficient of ultrathin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesaria, M.; Caricato, A. P.; Martino, M.

    2012-10-01

    Both a theoretical algorithm and an experimental procedure are discussed of a new route to determine the absorption/scattering properties of thin films deposited on transparent substrates. Notably, the non-measurable contribution of the film-substrate interface is inherently accounted for. While the experimental procedure exploits only measurable spectra combined according to a very simple algorithm, the theoretical derivation does not require numerical handling of the acquired spectra or any assumption on the film homogeneity and substrate thickness. The film absorption response is estimated by subtracting the measured absorption spectrum of the bare substrate from that of the film on the substrate structure but in a non-straightforward way. In fact, an assumption about the absorption profile of the overall structure is introduced and a corrective factor accounting for the relative film-to-substrate thickness. The method is tested on films of a well known material (ITO) as a function of the film structural quality and influence of the film-substrate interface, both deliberately changed by thickness tuning and doping. Results are found fully consistent with information obtained by standard optical analysis and band gap values reported in the literature. Additionally, comparison with a conventional method demonstrates that our route is generally more accurate even if particularly suited for very thin films.

  12. The facilitated component of intestinal glucose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Kellett, George L

    2001-01-01

    Over the last decade, a debate has developed about the mechanism of the passive or ‘diffusive’ component of intestinal glucose absorption and, indeed, whether it even exists. Pappenheimer and colleagues have proposed that paracellular solvent drag contributes a passive component, which, at high concentrations of sugars similar to those in the jejunal lumen immediately after a meal, is severalfold greater than the active component mediated by the Na+-glucose cotransporter SGLT1. On the other hand, Ferraris & Diamond maintain that the kinetics of glucose absorption can be explained solely in terms of SGLT1 and that a passive or paracellular component plays little, if any, part. Recently, we have provided new evidence that the passive component of glucose absorption exists, but is in fact facilitated since it is mediated by the rapid, glucose-dependent activation and recruitment of the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT2 to the brush-border membrane; regulation involves a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway activated by glucose transport through SGLT1 and also involves mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signalling pathways. This topical review seeks to highlight the significant points of the debate, to show how our proposals on GLUT2 impact on different aspects of the debate and to look at the regulatory events that are likely to be involved in the short-term regulation of sugar absorption during the assimilation of a meal. PMID:11251042

  13. Terahertz absorption of lysozyme in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2017-08-01

    Absorption of radiation by solution is described by its frequency-dependent dielectric function and can be viewed as a specific application of the dielectric theory of solutions. For ideal solutions, the dielectric boundary-value problem separates the polar response into the polarization of the void in the liquid, created by the solute, and the response of the solute dipole. In the case of a protein as a solute, protein nuclear dynamics do not project on significant fluctuations of the dipole moment in the terahertz domain of frequencies and the protein dipole can be viewed as dynamically frozen. Absorption of radiation then reflects the interfacial polarization. Here we apply an analytical theory and computer simulations to absorption of radiation by an ideal solution of lysozyme. Comparison with the experiment shows that Maxwell electrostatics fails to describe the polarization of the protein-water interface and the "Lorentz void," which does not anticipate polarization of the interface by the external field (no surface charges), better represents the data. An analytical theory for the slope of the solution absorption against the volume fraction of the solute is formulated in terms of the cavity field response function. It is calculated from molecular dynamics simulations in good agreement with the experiment. The protein hydration shell emerges as a separate sub-ensemble, which, collectively, is not described by the standard electrostatics of dielectrics.

  14. The Absorption Refrigerator as a Thermal Transformer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, F.

    2009-01-01

    The absorption refrigerator can be considered a thermal transformer, that is, a device that is analogous to the electric transformer. The analogy is based on the correspondence between the extensive quantities, entropy and electric charge and the intensive variables, temperature and electric potential. (Contains 1 footnote and 6 figures.)

  15. Oral Exposure and Absorption of Toxicants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides an overview of the toxicokinetics of orally absorbed xenobiotics. This includes a description of the basic anatomy and physiology of the digestive tract most relevant to the absorption process. In addition, differences in anatomy and physiology between human...

  16. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  17. CHLORINE ABSORPTION IN S(IV) SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of measurements of the rate of Chlorine (Cl2) absorption into aqueous sulfite/bisulfite -- S(IV) -- solutions at ambient temperature using a highly characterized stirred-cell reactor. The reactor media were 0 to 10 mM S(IV) with pHs of 3.5-8.5. Experiment...

  18. Absorption machine with desorber-resorber

    DOEpatents

    Biermann, Wendell J.

    1985-01-01

    An absorption refrigeration system utilizing a low temperature desorber and intermediate temperature resorber. The system operates at three temperatures and three pressures to increase the efficiency of the system and is capable of utilizing a lower generator temperature than previously used.

  19. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  20. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  1. Sound absorption by clamped poroelastic plates.

    PubMed

    Aygun, H; Attenborough, K

    2008-09-01

    Measurements and predictions have been made of the absorption coefficient and the surface acoustic impedance of poroelastic plates clamped in a large impedance tube and separated from the rigid termination by an air gap. The measured and predicted absorption coefficient and surface impedance spectra exhibit low frequency peaks. The peak frequencies observed in the absorption coefficient are close to those predicted and measured in the deflection spectra of the clamped poroelastic plates. The influences of the rigidity of the clamping conditions and the width of the air gap have been investigated. Both influences are found to be important. Increasing the rigidity of clamping reduces the low frequency absorption peaks compared with those measured for simply supported plates or plates in an intermediate clamping condition. Results for a closed cell foam plate and for two open cell foam plates made from recycled materials are presented. For identical clamping conditions and width of air gap, the results for the different materials differ as a consequence mainly of their different elasticity, thickness, and cell structure.

  2. Peculiarities of light absorption by spherical microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yurii E.; Panina, Ekaterina K.; Zemlyanov, Alexander A.

    2018-04-01

    Optical radiation absorption in the poly-layer spherical microparticles simulating the inorganic/organic polyshell absorbing microcapsules is considered. With the aim of the finite-difference time-domain technique, the spatial distribution of the absorbed light power in microcapsules of various sizes and internal structure is numerically calculated. For the purpose of light absorption enhancement, we have engineered the optimal structure of a capsule consisting of a strong-refracting transparent outer coating and an absorbing layer which covers a liquid core. The proposed microcapsule prototype provides for a manifold increase in the absorbed light power density in comparison with the usual single-layer absorbing capsule. We show that for light-wavelengths-scaled microcapsules it is optimal to use a material with the refractive index larger than two as an outer shell, for example, titanium dioxide (TiO2). The highest values of the absorbed power density can be obtained in microcapsules with absorbing shell thickness of approximately a tenth of a laser wavelength. When laser radiation is scattered by a dimer constituted by two identical absorbing microcapsules the absorbed power density can be maximized by the choosing of proper dimer spatial configuration. In the case of strongly absorbing particles, the absorption maximum corresponds to a shift of the capsules to a distance of about their diameter, and in the case of weakly absorbing particles the absorption is maximal when particles are in geometrical shades of each other.

  3. Laser Absorption by Over-Critical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    Absorption of high intensity laser light by matter has important applications to emerging sciences and technology, such as Fast Ignition ICF and ion acceleration. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of this absorption is key to developing these technologies. Critical features which distinguish the interaction of high intensity light - defined here as a laser field having a normalized vector potential greater than unity - are that the reaction of the material to the fields results in sharp high-density interfaces; and that the movement of the electrons is in general relativistic, both in a fluid and a thermal sense. The results of these features are that the absorption mechanisms are qualitatively distinct from those at lower intensities. We will review previous work, by our group and others, on the absorption mechanisms, and highlight current research. We will show that the standing wave structure of the reflected laser light is key to particle dynamics for normally incident lasers. The authors acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy under contract DE-NA 0001833 and the National Science Foundation under contract ACI 1339893.

  4. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  5. Iodine absorption cells quality evaluation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Holá, Miroslava; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Du-Burck, Frédéric; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    The absorption cells represent an unique tool for the laser frequency stabilization. They serve as irreplaceable optical frequency references in realization of high-stable laser standards and laser sources for different brands of optical measurements, including the most precise frequency and dimensional measurement systems. One of the most often used absorption media covering visible and near IR spectral range is molecular iodine. It offers rich atlas of very strong and narrow spectral transitions which allow realization of laser systems with ultimate frequency stabilities in or below 10-14 order level. One of the most often disccussed disadvantage of the iodine cells is iodine's corrosivity and sensitivity to presence of foreign substances. The impurities react with absorption media and cause spectral shifts of absorption spectra, spectral broadening of the transitions and decrease achievable signal-to-noise ratio of the detected spectra. All of these unwanted effects directly influence frequency stability of the realized laser standard and due to this fact, the quality of iodine cells must be precisely controlled. We present a comparison of traditionally used method of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) with novel technique based on hyperfine transitions linewidths measurement. The results summarize advantages and drawbacks of these techniques and give a recommendation for their practical usage.

  6. Absorption of light dark matter in semiconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Hochberg, Yonit; Lin, Tongyan; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors are by now well-established targets for direct detection of MeV to GeV dark matter via scattering off electrons. We show that semiconductor targets can also detect significantly lighter dark matter via an absorption process. When the dark matter mass is above the band gap of the semiconductor (around an eV), absorption proceeds by excitation of an electron into the conduction band. Below the band gap, multiphonon excitations enable absorption of dark matter in the 0.01 eV to eV mass range. Energetic dark matter particles emitted from the sun can also be probed for masses below an eV. We derivemore » the reach for absorption of a relic kinetically mixed dark photon or pseudoscalar in germanium and silicon, and show that existing direct detection results already probe new parameter space. Finally, with only a moderate exposure, low-threshold semiconductor target experiments can exceed current astrophysical and terrestrial constraints on sub-keV bosonic dark matter.« less

  7. The saturable absorption and reverse saturable absorption properties of Cu doped zinc oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cheng-Bao; Wen, Xin; Li, Qiang-Hua; Yan, Xiao-Yan; Li, Jin; Zhang, Ke-Xin; Sun, Wen-Jun; Bai, Li-Na; Yang, Shou-Bin

    2017-03-01

    We present the structure and nonlinear absorption (NLA) properties of Cu-doped ZnO (CZO) films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The films were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. The results show that the CZO films can maintain a wurtzite structure. Furthermore, the open-aperture (OA) Z-scan measurements of the film were carried out by nanosecond laser pulse. A transition from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA) was observed as the excitation intensity increasing. With good excellent nonlinear optical coefficient, the samples were expected to be the potential applications in optical devices.

  8. Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Kojima, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Entanglement Molecular Absorption Spectrum Simulator (QE-MASS) is a computer program for simulating two photon molecular-absorption spectroscopy using quantum-entangled photons. More specifically, QE-MASS simulates the molecular absorption of two quantum-entangled photons generated by the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of a fixed-frequency photon from a laser. The two-photon absorption process is modeled via a combination of rovibrational and electronic single-photon transitions, using a wave-function formalism. A two-photon absorption cross section as a function of the entanglement delay time between the two photons is computed, then subjected to a fast Fourier transform to produce an energy spectrum. The program then detects peaks in the Fourier spectrum and displays the energy levels of very short-lived intermediate quantum states (or virtual states) of the molecule. Such virtual states were only previously accessible using ultra-fast (femtosecond) laser systems. However, with the use of a single-frequency continuous wave laser to produce SPDC photons, and QEMASS program, these short-lived molecular states can now be studied using much simpler laser systems. QE-MASS can also show the dependence of the Fourier spectrum on the tuning range of the entanglement time of any externally introduced optical-path delay time. QE-MASS can be extended to any molecule for which an appropriate spectroscopic database is available. It is a means of performing an a priori parametric analysis of entangled photon spectroscopy for development and implementation of emerging quantum-spectroscopic sensing techniques. QE-MASS is currently implemented using the Mathcad software package.

  9. Assessing the measurement of aerosol single scattering albedo by Cavity Attenuated Phase-Shift Single Scattering Monitor (CAPS PMssa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim de Faria, Julia; Bundke, Ulrich; Onasch, Timothy B.; Freedman, Andrew; Petzold, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The necessity to quantify the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate forcing is already well known; assessing this impact requires continuous and systematic measurements of the aerosol optical properties. Two of the main parameters that need to be accurately measured are the aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo (SSA, defined as the ratio of particulate scattering to extinction). The measurement of single scattering albedo commonly involves the measurement of two optical parameters, the scattering and the absorption coefficients. Although there are well established technologies to measure both of these parameters, the use of two separate instruments with different principles and uncertainties represents potential sources of significant errors and biases. Based on the recently developed cavity attenuated phase shift particle extinction monitor (CAPS PM_{ex) instrument, the CAPS PM_{ssa instrument combines the CAPS technology to measure particle extinction with an integrating sphere capable of simultaneously measuring the scattering coefficient of the same sample. The scattering channel is calibrated to the extinction channel, such that the accuracy of the single scattering albedo measurement is only a function of the accuracy of the extinction measurement and the nephelometer truncation losses. This gives the instrument an accurate and direct measurement of the single scattering albedo. In this study, we assess the measurements of both the extinction and scattering channels of the CAPS PM_{ssa through intercomparisons with Mie theory, as a fundamental comparison, and with proven technologies, such as integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption monitors. For comparison, we use two nephelometers, a TSI 3563 and an Aurora 4000, and two measurements of the absorption coefficient, using a Particulate Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). We also assess the indirect absorption coefficient

  10. In-Situ Measurements of Aerosol Optical Properties using New Cavity Ring-Down and Photoacoustics Instruments and Comparison with more Traditional Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strawa, A. W.; Arnott, P.; Covert, D.; Elleman, R.; Ferrare, R.; Hallar, A. G.; Jonsson, H.; Kirchstetter, T. W.; Luu, A. P.; Ogren, J.

    2004-01-01

    Carbonaceous species (BC and OC) are responsible for most of the absorption associated with aerosol particles. The amount of radiant energy an aerosol absorbs has profound effects on climate and air quality. It is ironic that aerosol absorption coefficient is one of the most difficult aerosol properties to measure. A new cavity ring-down (CRD) instrument, called Cadenza (NASA-ARC), measures the aerosol extinction coefficient for 675 nm and 1550 nm light, and simultaneously measures the scattering coefficient at 675 nm. Absorption coefficient is obtained from the difference of measured extinction and scattering within the instrument. Aerosol absorption coefficient is also measured by a photoacoustic (PA) instrument (DRI) that was operated on an aircraft for the first time during the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period (IOP). This paper will report on measurements made with this new instrument and other in-situ instruments during two field recent field studies. The first field study was an airborne cam;oaign, the DOE Aerosol Intensive Operating Period flown in May, 2003 over northern Oklahoma. One of the main purposes of the IOP was to assess our ability to measure extinction and absorption coefficient in situ. This paper compares measurements of these aerosol optical properties made by the CRD, PA, nephelometer, and Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) aboard the CIRPAS Twin-Otter. During the IOP, several significant aerosol layers were sampled aloft. These layers are identified in the remote (AATS-14) as well as in situ measurements. Extinction profiles measured by Cadenza are compared to those derived from the Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14, NASA-ARC). The regional radiative impact of these layers is assessed by using the measured aerosol optical properties in a radiative transfer model. The second study was conducted in the Caldecott Tunnel, a heavily-used tunnel located north of San Francisco, Ca. The aerosol sampled in this study was

  11. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: Observations Versus Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Minnis, P.; Corsetti, L.; Dutton, E. G.; Forgan, B. W.; Garber, D. P.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Harrison, E. F.; hide

    1995-01-01

    There has been a long history of unexplained anomalous absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Collocated satellite and surface measurements of solar radiation at five geographically diverse locations showed significant solar absorption by clouds, resulting in about 25 watts per square meter more global-mean absorption by the cloudy atmosphere than predicted by theoretical models. It has often been suggested that tropospheric aerosols could increase cloud absorption. But these aerosols are temporally and spatially heterogeneous, whereas the observed cloud absorption is remarkably invariant with respect to season and location. Although its physical cause is unknown, enhanced cloud absorption substantially alters our understanding of the atmosphere's energy budget.

  12. Synopsis of Mid-latitude Radio Wave Absorption in Europe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torkar, K. M.; Friedrich, M.

    1984-01-01

    Radio wave absorption data covering almost two years from Europe to Central Asia are presented. They are normalized by relating them to a reference absorption. Every day these normalized data are fitted to a mathematical function of geographical location in order to obtain a daily synopsis of radio wave absorption. A film of these absorption charts was made which is intended to reveal movements of absorption or absorption anomaly. In addition, radiance (temperature) data from the lower D-region are also plotted onto these charts.

  13. Optical absorption and disorder in delafossites

    DOE PAGES

    Senty, Tess R.; Haycock, Barry; Lekse, Jonathan; ...

    2017-07-06

    Here, we present compelling experimental results of the optical characteristics of transparent oxide CuGaO 2 and related CuGa 1-xFe xO 2 (with 0.00 ≤ x ≤ 0.05) alloys, whereby the forbidden electronic transitions for CuGaO 2 become permissible in the presence of B-site (Ga sites) alloying with Fe. Our computational structural results imply a correlation between the global strain on the system and a decreased optical absorption edge. However, herein, we show that the relatively ordered CuGa 1-xFe xO 2 (for 0.00 ≤ x ≤ 0.04) structures exhibit much weaker vis-absorption compared to the relatively disordered CuGa 0.95Fe 0.05O 2.

  14. Spectrophotometry of six broad absorption line QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Smith, Harding E.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of six broad absorption-line QSOs (BALQSOs) are presented. The continua and emission lines are compared with those in the spectra of QSOs without BALs. A statistically significant difference is found in the emission-line intensity ratio for (N V 1240-A)/(C IV 1549-A). The median value of (N V)/(C IV) for the BALQSOs is two to three times the median for QSOs without BALs. The absorption features of the BALQSOs are described, and the column densities and limits on the ionization structure of the BAL region are discussed. If the dominant ionization mechanism is photoionization, then it is likely that either the ionizing spectrum is steep or the abundances are considerably different from solar. Collisional ionization may be a significant factor, but it cannot totally dominate the ionization rate.

  15. A survey of ultraviolet interstellar absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohlin, R. C.; Jenkins, E. B.; Spitzer, L., Jr.; York, D. G.; Hill, J. K.; Savage, B. D.; Snow, T. P., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A telescope-spectrometer on the Copernicus spacecraft made possible the measurement of many ultraviolet absorption lines produced by the interstellar gas. The present survey provides data on ultraviolet absorption lines in the spectra of 88 early-type stars. The stars observed are divided into four classes, including reddened stars, unreddened bright stars, moderately reddened bright stars, and unreddened and moderately reddened faint stars. Data are presented for equivalent width, W, radial velocity V, and rms line width, D, taking into account some 10 to 20 lines of N I, O I, Si II, P II, S II, Cl I, Cl II, Mn II, Fe II, Ni II, Cu II, and H2. The data are based on multiple scans for each line. Attention is given to details of observations, the data reduction procedure, and the computation of equivalent width, mean velocity, and velocity dispersion.

  16. Current fluctuations in quantum absorption refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, Dvira

    2018-05-01

    Absorption refrigerators transfer thermal energy from a cold bath to a hot bath without input power by utilizing heat from an additional "work" reservoir. Particularly interesting is a three-level design for a quantum absorption refrigerator, which can be optimized to reach the maximal (Carnot) cooling efficiency. Previous studies of three-level chillers focused on the behavior of the averaged cooling current. Here, we go beyond that and study the full counting statistics of heat exchange in a three-level chiller model. We explain how to obtain the complete cumulant generating function of the refrigerator in a steady state, then derive a partial cumulant generating function, which yields closed-form expressions for both the averaged cooling current and its noise. Our analytical results and simulations are beneficial for the design of nanoscale engines and cooling systems far from equilibrium, with their performance optimized according to different criteria, efficiency, power, fluctuations, and dissipation.

  17. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Shiaguo [Champaign, IL; Lu, Yonggi [Urbana, IL; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  18. Broad Absorption Line Quasars with Polar Outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junxian

    2005-10-01

    It is widely accepted that the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow exists in most (if not all) quasars with a small covering factor. Various evidences show that equatorial outflows are responsible for the BALs in most BAL QSOs. By searching for radio variable quasars in SDSS, we built the first sample of 6 BAL QSOs with polar BAL outflows. It is very likely that polar outflows are associated with relativistic jets, and their origins should be different from the equatorial outflows in the majority of BAL QSOs. We propose an XMM snapshot survey to a) check whether strong X-ray absorption, one of the most prominent characteristics of most BAL QSOs, also exist in the polar outflows b) check whether face-on BAL QSOs are otherwise X-ray normal c) provide a baseline for future extensive X-ray studies.

  19. Absorption of Thermal Neutrons in Uranium

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Creutz, E. C.; Wilson, R. R.; Wigner, E. P.

    1941-09-26

    A knowledge of the absorption processes for neutrons in uranium is important for planning a chain reaction experiment. The absorption of thermal neutrons in uranium and uranium oxide has been studied. Neutrons from the cyclotron were slowed down by passage through a graphite block. A uranium or uranium oxide sphere was placed at various positions in the block. The neutron intensity at different points in the sphere and in the graphite was measured by observing the activity induced in detectors or uranium oxide or manganese. It was found that both the fission activity in the uranium oxide and the activity induced in manganese was affected by non-thermal neutrons. An experimental correction for such effects was made by making measurements with the detectors surrounded by cadmium. After such corrections the results from three methods of procedure with the uranium oxide detectors and from the manganese detectors were consistent to within a few per cent.

  20. The absorption of sound by perforated linings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, I. J.; Dowling, A. P.

    1990-09-01

    This paper describes a practical application for sound-absorbent perforated screen with a bias flow through the screen. It is postulated that, if a perforated liner with a bias flow of cooling air through the liner is inserted in the afterburner section of a jet engine, all the incident sound may be absorbed at a particular frequency. Experimental results are presented on the absorptive properties of plane liners with circular apertures, showing an agreement with the theoretical model.

  1. Energy Absorption Behaviors of Nanoporous Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER U. S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211... Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 _HLAL1 I - ( 1I. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of...words) In this exploratory research program we investigated the energy absorption behaviors of systems consisting of hydrophobic nanoporous silica

  2. Rectal absorption of diazepam in epileptic children.

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, S; Ngwane, E; Richens, A

    1982-01-01

    The absorption of diazepam after rectal administration was studied in children with epilepsy. When given as a solution, diazepam was rapidly absorbed and produced serum diazepam concentrations above 200 ng/ml within 10 minutes in most children. However, a commercial suppository formulation was absorbed slowly and cannot be recommended for urgent treatment of fits. There is a need in the UK for a rapidly absorbed preparation of diazepam which is approved for rectal use. PMID:7082038

  3. Remote laser evaporative molecular absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Gary B.; Lubin, Philip; Cohen, Alexander; Madajian, Jonathan; Kulkarni, Neeraj; Zhang, Qicheng; Griswold, Janelle; Brashears, Travis

    2016-09-01

    We describe a novel method for probing bulk molecular and atomic composition of solid targets from a distant vantage. A laser is used to melt and vaporize a spot on the target. With sufficient flux, the spot temperature rises rapidly, and evaporation of surface materials occurs. The melted spot creates a high-temperature blackbody source, and ejected material creates a plume of surface materials in front of the spot. Molecular and atomic absorption occurs as the blackbody radiation passes through the ejected plume. Bulk molecular and atomic composition of the surface material is investigated by using a spectrometer to view the heated spot through the ejected plume. The proposed method is distinct from current stand-off approaches to composition analysis, such as Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which atomizes and ionizes target material and observes emission spectra to determine bulk atomic composition. Initial simulations of absorption profiles with laser heating show great promise for Remote Laser-Evaporative Molecular Absorption (R-LEMA) spectroscopy. The method is well-suited for exploration of cold solar system targets—asteroids, comets, planets, moons—such as from a spacecraft orbiting the target. Spatial composition maps could be created by scanning the surface. Applying the beam to a single spot continuously produces a borehole or trench, and shallow subsurface composition profiling is possible. This paper describes system concepts for implementing the proposed method to probe the bulk molecular composition of an asteroid from an orbiting spacecraft, including laser array, photovoltaic power, heating and ablation, plume characteristics, absorption, spectrometry and data management.

  4. Scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, John P.; Chance, Kelly V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY is an instrument which measures backscattered, reflected, and transmitted light from the earth's atmosphere and surface. SCIAMACHY has eight spectral channels which observe simultaneously the spectral region between 240 and 1700 nm and selected windows between 1940 and 2400 nm. Each spectral channel contains a grating and linear diode array detector. SCIAMACHY observes the atmosphere in nadir, limb, and solar and lunar occultation viewing geometries.

  5. Detector absorptivity measuring method and apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheets, R. E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the absorptivity of a radiation detector by making the detector an integral part of a cavity radiometer are described. By substituting the detector for the surface of the cavity upon which the radiation first impinges a comparison is made between the quantity of radiation incident upon the detector and the quantity reflected from the detector. The difference between the two is a measurement of the amount of radiation absorbed by the detector.

  6. Tailoring perovskite compounds for broadband light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hengchang; Guo, Xiaowei; Yang, Cheng; Li, Shaorong

    2018-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells have experienced an outstanding advance in power conversion efficiency (PCE) by optimizing the perovskite layer morphology, composition, interfaces, and charge collection efficiency. To enhance PCE, the mixed perovskites were proposed in recent years. In this study, optoelectronic performance of pure perovskites and mixed ones were investigated. It was demonstrated that the mixed perovskites exhibit superior to the pure ones. The mixed material can absorb broadband light absorption and result in increased short circuit current density and power conversion efficiency.

  7. Physicochemical patterns of ozone absorption by wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamleeva, N. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    Results from studying aspen and pine wood ozonation are presented. The effect the concentration of ozone, the reagent residence time, and the content of water in a sample of wood has on ozone consumption rate and ozone demand are analyzed. The residence time is shown to determine the degree of ozone conversion degree and the depth of substrate destruction. The main patterns of ozone absorption by wood with different moisture content are found. Ways of optimizing the ozonation of plant biomass are outlined.

  8. Liquid for absorption of solar heat

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Kadotani, K.

    A liquid for the absorption of solar heat, useful as an heat-absorbing medium in water heaters and heat collectors comprises: a dispersing medium selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol, mixture of propylene glycol with water, mixture of propylene glycol with water and glycerin, and mixture of glycerin with water, a dispersant selected from the group consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone, caramel, and mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone with caramel, and a powdered activated carbon as a black coloring material.

  9. Understanding Energy Absorption Behaviors of Nanoporous Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-23

    induced liquid infiltration in nanopores. J. Appl. Phys. 100, 014308.1-3 (2006). 26. Surani, F. B. and Qiao, Y. Energy absorption of a polyacrylic ...that the infiltration pressure decreases as the cation size increases (Fig.K-2). The ionic radii of cesium, potassium , sodium and lithium are...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB NO. 0704-0188 Public Reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour

  10. Nonequilibrium gas absorption in rotating permeable media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baev, V. K.; Bazhaikin, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    The absorption of ammonia, sulfur dioxide, and carbon dioxide by water and aqueous solutions in rotating permeable media, a cellular porous disk, and a set of spaced-apart thin disks has been considered. The efficiency of cleaning air to remove these impurities is determined, and their anomalously high solubility (higher than equilibrium value) has been discovered. The results demonstrate the feasibility of designing cheap efficient rotor-type absorbers to clean gases of harmful impurities.

  11. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  12. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  13. Moisture Absorption in Certain Tropical American Woods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1949-08-01

    surface area was in unobstructed contact with the salt water. Similar wire mesh racks were weighted and placed on top of the specimens to keep them...Oak (Quercus alba)" Br. Guiana Honduras United States (control) II II Total absorption by 2 x 2 x 6-inch uncoated specimens. Probably sapwood ...only. /2 ~~ Probably sapwood Table 3 (Continued) Species Source Increase over 40 percent Fiddlewood (Vit ex Gaumeri) Roble Blanco (Tabebuia

  14. Electromagnetic-radiation absorption by water.

    PubMed

    Lunkenheimer, P; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Köhler, M; Wolf, M; Schwab, M; Loidl, A

    2017-12-01

    Why does a microwave oven work? How does biological tissue absorb electromagnetic radiation? Astonishingly, we do not have a definite answer to these simple questions because the microscopic processes governing the absorption of electromagnetic waves by water are largely unclarified. This absorption can be quantified by dielectric loss spectra, which reveal a huge peak at a frequency of the exciting electric field of about 20 GHz and a gradual tailing off toward higher frequencies. The microscopic interpretation of such spectra is highly controversial and various superpositions of relaxation and resonance processes ascribed to single-molecule or molecule-cluster motions have been proposed for their analysis. By combining dielectric, microwave, THz, and far-infrared spectroscopy, here we provide nearly continuous temperature-dependent broadband spectra of water. Moreover, we find that corresponding spectra for aqueous solutions reveal the same features as pure water. However, in contrast to the latter, crystallization in these solutions can be avoided by supercooling. As different spectral contributions tend to disentangle at low temperatures, this enables us to deconvolute them when approaching the glass transition under cooling. We find that the overall spectral development, including the 20 GHz feature (employed for microwave heating), closely resembles the behavior known for common supercooled liquids. Thus water's absorption of electromagnetic waves at room temperature is not unusual but very similar to that of glass-forming liquids at elevated temperatures, deep in the low-viscosity liquid regime, and should be interpreted along similar lines.

  15. New medications which decrease levothyroxine absorption.

    PubMed

    John-Kalarickal, Jennifer; Pearlman, Gwen; Carlson, Harold E

    2007-08-01

    Medications may sometimes interfere with the intestinal absorption of levothyroxine, primarily by forming an insoluble complex with the thyroid hormone in the intestinal lumen. The goal of this study was to examine the acute effects of three previously unstudied medications on levothyroxine absorption. We studied the effects of three medications on thyroxine absorption in seven normal volunteers. On each study day, the subjects ingested 1 mg levothyroxine sodium, either taken separately or co-administered with sevelamer hydrochloride (Renagel, a phosphate-binding medication used in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia), chromium picolinate (an over-the-counter nutritional supplement), or ezetimibe (Zetia, a drug used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia). Serum thyroxine was measured at intervals over a 6-hour period following drug ingestion. Sevelamer hydrochloride and chromium picolinate each significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the area under the serum thyroxine concentration curve, while ezetimibe had no effect. Hypothyroid patients taking sevelamer hydrochloride or chromium picolinate should be advised to separate the time of ingestion of these drugs from their thyroid hormone preparation by several hours.

  16. Endovascular vein harvest: systemic carbon dioxide absorption.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Andrew M; Schwartz, Carl S; Bert, Arthur; Hurlburt, Peter; Gough, Jeffrey; Stearns, Gary; Singh, Arun K

    2006-06-01

    Endovascular vein harvest (EDVH) requires CO(2) insufflation to expand the subcutaneous space, allowing visualization and dissection of the saphenous vein. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of CO(2) absorption during EDVH. Prospective observational study. Single tertiary care hospital. Sixty patients (30 EDVH and 30 open-vein harvest) undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Hemodynamic, procedural, and laboratory data were collected prior to (baseline), during, and at it the conclusion (final) of vein harvesting. Data were also collected during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Data were compared by using t tests, analysis of variance, and correlation statistics when needed. There were significant increases in arterial CO(2) (PaCO(2), 35%) and decreases in pH (1.35%) during EDVH. These were associated with increases in heart rate, mean blood pressure, and cardiac output. Within the EDVH group, greater elevations (>10 mmHg) in PaCO2 were more likely during difficult harvest procedures, and these patients exhibited greater increase in heart rate. Elevated CO(2) persisted during CPB, requiring higher systemic gas flows and greater use of phenylephrine to maintain desired hemodynamics. EDVH was associated with systemic absorption of CO(2). Greater absorption was more likely in difficult procedures and was associated with greater hemodynamic changes requiring medical therapy.

  17. Optical absorption in disordered monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekuma, C. E.; Gunlycke, D.

    2018-05-01

    We explore the combined impact of sulfur vacancies and electronic interactions on the optical properties of monolayer MoS2. First, we present a generalized Anderson-Hubbard Hamiltonian that accounts for both randomly distributed sulfur vacancies and the presence of dielectric screening within the material. Second, we parametrize this energy-dependent Hamiltonian from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the Green's function and screened Coulomb (GW) method. Third, we apply a first-principles-based many-body typical medium method to determine the single-particle electronic structure. Fourth, we solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation to obtain the charge susceptibility χ with its imaginary part being related to the absorbance A . Our results show that an increased vacancy concentration leads to decreased absorption both in the band continuum and from exciton states within the band gap. We also observe increased absorption below the band-gap threshold and present an expression, which describes Lifshitz tails, in excellent qualitative agreement with our numerical calculations. This latter increased absorption in the 1.0 -2.5 eV range makes defect engineering of potential interest for solar cell applications.

  18. Properties of seismic absorption induced reflections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haixia; Gao, Jinghuai; Peng, Jigen

    2018-05-01

    Seismic reflections at an interface are often regarded as the variation of the acoustic impedance (product of seismic velocity and density) in a medium. In fact, they can also be generated due to the difference in absorption of the seismic energy. In this paper, we investigate the properties of such reflections. Based on the diffusive-viscous wave equation and elastic diffusive-viscous wave equation, we investigate the dependency of the reflection coefficients on frequency, and their variations with incident angles. Numerical results at a boundary due to absorption contrasts are compared with those resulted from acoustic impedance variation. It is found that, the reflection coefficients resulted from absorption depend significantly on the frequency especially at lower frequencies, but vary very slowly at small incident angles. At the higher frequencies, the reflection coefficients of diffusive-viscous wave and elastic diffusive-viscous wave are close to those of acoustic and elastic cases, respectively. On the other hand, the reflections caused by acoustic impedance variation are independent of frequency but vary distinctly with incident angles before the critical angle. We also investigate the difference between the seismograms generated in the two different media. The numerical results show that the amplitudes of these reflected waves are attenuated and their phases are shifted. However, the reflections obtained by acoustic impedance contrast, show no significant amplitude attenuation and phase shift.

  19. Gas in scattering media absorption spectroscopy - GASMAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svanberg, Sune

    2008-09-01

    An overview of the new field of Gas in Scattering Media Absorption Spectroscopy (GASMAS) is presented. GASMAS combines narrow-band diode-laser spectroscopy with diffuse media optical propagation. While solids and liquids have broad absorption features, free gas in pores and cavities in the material is characterized by sharp spectral signatures, typically 10,000 times sharper than those of the host material. Many applications in materials science, food packaging, pharmaceutics and medicine have been demonstrated. So far molecular oxygen and water vapour have been studied around 760 and 935 nm, respectively. Liquid water, an important constituent in many natural materials, such as tissue, has a low absorption at such wavelengths, allowing propagation. Polystyrene foam, wood, fruits, food-stuffs, pharmaceutical tablets, and human sinus cavities have been studied. Transport of gas in porous media can readily be studied by first immersing the material in, e.g., pure nitrogen, and then observing the rate at which normal air, containing oxygen, reinvades the material. The conductance of the sinus connective passages can be measured in this way by flushing the nasal cavity with nitrogen. Also other dynamic processes such as drying of materials can be studied. The techniques have also been extended to remote-sensing applications (LIDAR-GASMAS).

  20. Electromagnetic-radiation absorption by water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunkenheimer, P.; Emmert, S.; Gulich, R.; Köhler, M.; Wolf, M.; Schwab, M.; Loidl, A.

    2017-12-01

    Why does a microwave oven work? How does biological tissue absorb electromagnetic radiation? Astonishingly, we do not have a definite answer to these simple questions because the microscopic processes governing the absorption of electromagnetic waves by water are largely unclarified. This absorption can be quantified by dielectric loss spectra, which reveal a huge peak at a frequency of the exciting electric field of about 20 GHz and a gradual tailing off toward higher frequencies. The microscopic interpretation of such spectra is highly controversial and various superpositions of relaxation and resonance processes ascribed to single-molecule or molecule-cluster motions have been proposed for their analysis. By combining dielectric, microwave, THz, and far-infrared spectroscopy, here we provide nearly continuous temperature-dependent broadband spectra of water. Moreover, we find that corresponding spectra for aqueous solutions reveal the same features as pure water. However, in contrast to the latter, crystallization in these solutions can be avoided by supercooling. As different spectral contributions tend to disentangle at low temperatures, this enables us to deconvolute them when approaching the glass transition under cooling. We find that the overall spectral development, including the 20 GHz feature (employed for microwave heating), closely resembles the behavior known for common supercooled liquids. Thus water's absorption of electromagnetic waves at room temperature is not unusual but very similar to that of glass-forming liquids at elevated temperatures, deep in the low-viscosity liquid regime, and should be interpreted along similar lines.

  1. 14 CFR 25.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... absorption tests. (a) The analytical representation of the landing gear dynamic characteristics that is used... previous tests conducted on the same basic landing gear system that has similar energy absorption...

  2. An analytic formula for heating due to ozone absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Will, D. I.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt was made to devise a simple expression or formula to describe radiative heating in the atmosphere by ozone absorption. Such absorption occurs in the Hartley, Huggins, and Chappuis bands and is only slightly temperature and pressure dependent.

  3. Two-photon absorption in arsenic sulfide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunaev, D. S.; Snopatin, G. E.; Plotnichenko, V. G.; Karasik, A. Ya.

    2016-10-01

    The two-photon absorption coefficient of 1047-{\\text{nm}} light in {\\text{As}}35{\\text{S}}65 chalcogenide glass has been measured. CW probe radiation has been used to observe the linear absorption in glass induced by two-photon excitation. The induced absorption lifetime was found to be ∼ 2 {\\text{ms}}.

  4. Low-Absorption Liquid Crystals for Infrared Beam Steering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-22

    Low absorption, MWIR, chlorinated liquid crystals, fluorination, FTIR, eutectic mixture, deuteration, nematic phase, birefringence, overtone...absorption compounds for LWIR and SWIR are also investigated. Key words: Low absorption, MWIR, chlorinated liquid crystals, fluorination, FTIR, eutectic ...the melting point significantly. We did careful investigation and formed a eutectic mixture consisting of five fluorinated compounds without any

  5. Sound absorption characteristics of tree bark and forest floor

    Treesearch

    G. Reethof; O. H. McDaniel; G. M. Heisler

    1977-01-01

    Results of basic research on absorption of sound by tree bark and forest floors are presented. Amount of sound absorption by tree bark was determined by laboratory experiments with bark samples in a standing-wave tube. A modified portable standing-wave tube was used to measure absorption of sound by forest floors with different moisture contents, with and without leaf...

  6. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs.

  7. Split-flow regeneration in absorptive air separation

    DOEpatents

    Weimer, R.F.

    1987-11-24

    A chemical absorptive separation of air in multiple stage of absorption and desorption is performed with partial recycle of absorbent between stages of desorption necessary to match equilibrium conditions in the various stages of absorption. This allows reduced absorbent flow, reduced energy demand and reduced capital costs. 4 figs.

  8. Temperature dependence of the HNO3 UV absorption cross sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.; Talukdar, Ranajit K.; Ravishankara, A. R.; Solomon, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the HNO3 absorption cross sections between 240 and 360 K over the wavelength range 195 to 350 nm has been measured using a diode array spectrometer. Absorption cross sections were determined using both (1) absolute pressure measurements at 298 K and (2) a dual absorption cell arrangement in which the absorption spectrum at various temperatures is measured relative to the room temperature absorption spectrum. The HNO3 absorption spectrum showed a temperature dependence which is weak at short wavelengths but stronger at longer wavelengths which are important for photolysis in the lower stratosphere. The 298 K absorption cross sections were found to be larger than the values currently recommended for atmospheric modeling (DeMore et al., 1992). Our absorption cross section data are critically compared with the previous measurements of both room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption cross sections. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections of HNO3 are recommended for use in atmospheric modeling. These temperature dependent HNO3 absorption cross sections were used in a two-dimensional dynamical-photochemical model to demonstrate the effects of the revised absorption cross sections on loss rate of HNO3 and the abundance of NO2 in the stratosphere.

  9. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  10. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as follows...

  11. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as follows...

  12. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as follows...

  13. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  14. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be less...

  15. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as follows...

  16. 14 CFR 27.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 27.727 Section 27.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as follows...

  17. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  18. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  19. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be less...

  20. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be less...

  1. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be less...

  2. 14 CFR 23.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 23.727... Construction Landing Gear § 23.727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. (a) If compliance with the reserve energy absorption requirement in § 23.723(b) is shown by free drop tests, the drop height may not be less...

  3. 14 CFR 29.727 - Reserve energy absorption drop test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reserve energy absorption drop test. 29.727 Section 29.727 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION....727 Reserve energy absorption drop test. The reserve energy absorption drop test must be conducted as...

  4. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I.more » Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has

  5. Nitrogen dioxide absorption in aqueous sodium sulfite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chen Hua

    The Clean Air Act of 1990 requires additional reduction of acid gases, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides released into the atmosphere from coal-fired electric power plants. In the case of older existing power plants, a possible retrofit strategy is to oxidize nitric oxide (NO, the major constituent of NOsbX in flue gas) to nitrogen dioxide (NOsb2) by the addition of methanol or other hydrocarbons into the duct at an optimum temperature regime. NOsb2 can then be removed by either modifying existing SOsb2 control equipment or by adding a limestone (CaCOsb3) slurry scrubbing process. Limestone reacts with SOsb2 to from CaSOsb3, and the free sulfite (SO{sb3sp{=}}) in the solution is reactive toward NOsb2. The focus of this research is to study the reaction between NOsb2 and aqueous sulfite at elevated temperature and in the presence of gas phase Osb2. The removal of NOsb2 by limestone slurry scrubbing involves the reaction between NOsb2 and SO{sb3sp{=}}, bisulfite (HSO{sb3sp{-}}) and water. The reactions between NOsb2 and SO{sb3sp{=}}/HSO{sb3sp{-}} are first order in both reactants, while the NOsb2-water reaction is second order in NOsb2 concentration. The rate constants of the above reactions and the NOsb2-thiosulfate (Ssb2O{sb3sp{=}}) reaction were determined at 55sp°C. SO{sb3sp{=}} was found to be the most reactive toward NOsb2, while the contribution of chemical reaction still dominated in the absorption of NOsb2 into water. The effect of gas phase SOsb2 and Osb2, and liquid phase additives such as Ssb2O{sb3sp{=}}, Casp{++}, Mgsp{++}, and Clsp{-} on NOsb2 absorption was also investigated. The absorption of NOsb2 catalyzes free radical reactions that lead to sulfite oxidation. A semi-empirical model was proposed to relate the rate of sulfite oxidation to the rate of NOsb2 absorption. Thiosulfate inhibits sulfite oxidation by providing an alternative route for the termination of the free radical reactions, and a fundamental model was derived to quantify the effect

  6. Cosmological Evolution of QSO Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stengler-Larrea, Erik

    1995-08-01

    First, the evolution with cosmic time of the hydrogen clouds which produce the Lyman-alpha absorption lines is studied in dependence on the strength of these lines. From the analysis it is concluded that the results show no evidence of a dependence in the sense of stronger lines evolving faster, although for the resolution at which the used observations were done, it can not be ruled out. Within the same analysis, a distribution of the Doppler parameter of the lines was obtained, with large values and a wide spread. This parameter being an indicator of the gas temperature, this result is in accordance with high temperatures and, consequently, large ionised fractions and a large fraction of the baryonic matter of the universe being associated with these clouds. However, recent high resolution studies seem to reveal that much lower temperatures are characteristic of the clouds. The main content of this thesis, however, focuses on the redshift evolution of the absorbing systems producing absorption at the Lyman limit and of the amount of CIV producing CIV absorption lines. Regarding the CIV absorbers, previous predictions on the effects underlying their redshift distribution pointed to an increase with redshift of the absorbing column densities. In this thesis the first direct measurements of such column densities by profile fitting of a large number of absorption systems (73) are presented, confirming the predictions of a decrease of at least a factor of 3 between z=1.5 and z=3.0. The study on the evolution of Lyman limit absorption systems (LLSs) puts an end to previous discrepancies between the results of different groups. Both a smooth single power law dependence of the LLS number density on redshift indicating no evolution in number density for 0.4 <= z <= 4.1, and a broken power law with a rapid increase above z ~ 2.5 had been obtained with different data sets. A detailed analysis reveals here the reasons for these discrepancies and obtains the most reliable

  7. Recoilless Nuclear Resonance Absorption of Gamma Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mössbauer, Rudolf L.

    It is a high distinction to be permitted to address you on the subject of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption of gamma radiation. The methods used in this special branch of experimental physics have recently found acceptance in many areas of science. I take the liberty to confine myself essentially to the work which I was able to carry out in the years 1955-1958 at the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg, and which finally led to establishment of the field of recoilless nuclear resonance absorption. Many investigators shared in the preparations of the basis for the research we are concerned with in this lecture. As early as the middle of the last century Stokes observed, in the case of fluorite, the phenomenon now known as fluorescence - namely, that solids, liquids, and gases under certain conditions partially absorb incident electromagnetic radiation which immediately is reradiated. A special case is the so-called resonance fluorescence, a phenomenon in which the re-emitted and the incident radiation both are of the same wavelength. The resonance fluorescence of the yellow D lines of sodium in sodium vapour is a particularly notable and exhaustively studied example. In this optical type of resonance fluorescence, light sources are used in which the atoms undergo transitions from excited states to their ground states (Fig. 1.1). The light quanta emitted in these transitions (A → B) are used to initiate the inverse process of resonance absorption in the atoms of an absorber which are identical with the radiating atoms. The atoms of the absorber undergo a transition here from the ground state (B) to the excited state (A), from which they again return to the ground state, after a certain time delay, by emission of fluorescent light.

  8. Intestinal Water Absorption Varies with Expected Dietary Water Load among Bats but Does Not Drive Paracellular Nutrient Absorption.

    PubMed

    Price, Edwin R; Brun, Antonio; Gontero-Fourcade, Manuel; Fernández-Marinone, Guido; Cruz-Neto, Ariovaldo P; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Rapid absorption and elimination of dietary water should be particularly important to flying species and were predicted to vary with the water content of the natural diet. Additionally, high water absorption capacity was predicted to be associated with high paracellular nutrient absorption due to solvent drag. We compared the water absorption rates of sanguivorous, nectarivorous, frugivorous, and insectivorous bats in intestinal luminal perfusions. High water absorption rates were associated with high expected dietary water load but were not highly correlated with previously measured rates of (paracellular) arabinose clearance. In conjunction with these tests, we measured water absorption and the paracellular absorption of nutrients in the intestine and stomach of vampire bats using luminal perfusions to test the hypothesis that the unique elongated vampire stomach is a critical site of water absorption. Vampire bats' gastric water absorption was high compared to mice but not compared to their intestines. We therefore conclude that (1) dietary water content has influenced the evolution of intestinal water absorption capacity in bats, (2) solvent drag is not the only driver of paracellular nutrient absorption, and (3) the vampire stomach is a capable but not critical location for water absorption.

  9. An inulin-type fructan enhances calcium absorption primarily via an effect on colonic absorption in humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Calcium absorption efficiency and bone mineral mass are increased in adolescents who regularly consume inulin-type fructans (ITF). The mechanism of action in increasing absorption is unknown but may be related to increased colonic calcium absorption. We conducted a study in young adults designed to ...

  10. Nickel absorption and kinetics in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Sunderman, F W; Hopfer, S M; Sweeney, K R; Marcus, A H; Most, B M; Creason, J

    1989-05-01

    Mathematical modeling of the kinetics of nickel absorption, distribution, and elimination was performed in healthy human volunteers who ingested NiSO4 drinking water (Experiment 1) or added to food (Experiment 2). Nickel was analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry in serum, urine, and feces collected during 2 days before and 4 days after a specified NiSO4 dose (12 micrograms of nickel/kg, n = 4; 18 micrograms of nickel/kg, n = 4; or 50 micrograms of nickel/kg, n = 1). In Experiment 1, each of the subjects fasted 12 hr before and 3 hr after drinking one of the specified NiSO4 doses dissolved in water; in Experiment 2, the respective subjects fasted 12 hr before consuming a standard American breakfast that contained the identical dose of NiSO4 added to scrambled eggs. Kinetic analyses, using a compartmental model, provided excellent goodness-of-fit for paired data sets from all subjects. Absorbed nickel averaged 27 +/- 17% (mean +/- SD) of the dose ingested in water vs 0.7 +/- 0.4% of the same dose ingested in food (a 40-fold difference); rate constants for nickel absorption, transfer, and elimination were not significantly influenced by the oral vehicle. The elimination half-time for absorbed nickel averaged 28 +/- 9 hr. Renal clearance of nickel averaged 8.3 +/- 2.0 ml/min/1.73 m2 in Experiment 1 and 5.8 +/- 4.3 ml/min/1.73 m2 in Experiment 2. This study confirms that dietary constituents profoundly reduce the bioavailability of Ni2+ for alimentary absorption; approximately one-quarter of nickel ingested in drinking water after an over-night fast is absorbed from the human intestine and excreted in urine, compared with only 1% of nickel ingested in food. The compartmental model and kinetic parameters provided by this study will reduce the uncertainty of toxicologic risk assessments of human exposures to nickel in drinking water and food.

  11. The 5-day wave and ionospheric absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    In a previous paper, Fraser and Thorpe (1976) indicated that the average partial-coherence spectra for three summers and the average for three winters at a southern mid-latitude site had a dominant peak at a period of about six days. This peak in coherence between absorption and temperature is anomalous, and the present paper explains how some of the unexpected coherence features can be explained by the five-day wave described by Geisler and Dickinson (1976) and whose existence in the upper stratosphere was discussed by Rodgers (1976).

  12. Transport suction apparatus and absorption materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives were as follows. The effectiveness and function was evaluated of the hand held, manually powered v-vac for suction during microgravity. The function was evaluated of the battery powered laerdal suction unit in microgravity. The two units in control of various types of simulated bodily fluids were compared. Various types of tubing and attachments were evaluated which are required to control the collection of bodily fluids during transport. Various materials were evaluated for absorption of simulated bodily fluids. And potential problems were identified for waste management and containment of secretions and fluids during transport. Test procedures, results, and conclusions are briefly discussed.

  13. Laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Kondrashov, V. V.

    1987-07-01

    The propagation of laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries was studied experimentally and numerically during pulsed exposure to CO2 laser radiation. The dependence of the plasma front propagation rate on the initial air pressure in the capillary is determined. In a broad range of parameters, the formation time of the optically opaque plasma layer is governed by the total laser pulse energy from the beginning of the exposure to the instant screening appears, and is weakly dependent on the pulse shape and gas pressure.

  14. Infrared absorption cross sections of alternative CFCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clerbaux, Cathy; Colin, Reginald; Simon, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption cross sections have obtained in the infrared atmospheric window, between 600 and 1500 cm(exp -1), for 10 alternative hydrohalocarbons: HCFC-22, HCFC-123, HCFC-124, HCFC-141b, HCFC-142b, HCFC-225ca, HCFC-225cb, HFC-125, HFC-134a, and HFC-152a. The measurements were made at three temperatures (287K, 270K and 253K) with a Fourier transform spectrometer operating at 0.03 cm(exp -1) apodized resolution. Integrated cross sections are also derived for use in radiative models to calculate the global warming potentials.

  15. Absorption spectrometer balloon flight and iodine investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A high altitude balloon flight experiment to determine the technical feasibility of employing absorption spectroscopy to measure SO2 and NO2 gases in the earth's atmosphere from above the atmospheric ozone layer is discussed. In addition to the balloon experiment the contract includes a ground-based survey of natural I emissions from geological sources and studies of the feasibility of mapping I2 from spacecraft. This report is divided into three major sections as follows: (1) the planning engineering and execution of the balloon experiment, (2) data reduction and analysis of the balloon data, and (3) the results of the I2 phase of the contract.

  16. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  17. Enhanced absorption of light by charged nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Etai; Arnon, Shlomi

    2010-04-15

    We found that various charged nanoparticles (NPs) can raise the attenuation of electromagnetic (EM) radiation over 30 times more efficiently during resonance in comparison to equivalent noncharged particles for a given set of parameters. A condition that indicates a state of resonance between the incident EM radiation and the NP surface excitations is mathematically derived. Our results shed light on the mechanism responsible for the strong absorption of light by such charged NPs. The outcome of this research could help to design a new generation of communication devices as well as a new technique for biological cell imaging.

  18. Microwave absorption in substances that form hydration layers with water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, H. R.; Ohkawa, T.; Tuason, O.; Lee, R. L.

    1990-12-01

    The microwave absorption of certain water soluble polymers (polyethylene glycol, polyvinyl pyrrolidone, proteins, and DNA) in solution is composed of three parts: absorption in the free water, absorption in the substance, and absorption in the hydration layer. Ethanol, sucrose, glycerol, and sodium acetate, which form weak hydrogen bonds or have an ionic nature in aqueous solutions, also have microwave absorption signatures similar to polymers that form hydration layers. The frequency-dependent absorption of the free water and of the hydration layer water is described by a simple Debye relaxation model. The absorption per unit sample volume attributable to the hydration layer is solute concentration dependent, and a simple model is used to describe the dependence. The hydration-layer relaxation time was found to vary from substance to substance and with solute concentration. The relaxation time was also found to be independent of solute length.

  19. Dilution cycle control for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A dilution cycle control system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The control system includes a time delay relay for sensing shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system and for generating a control signal only after expiration of a preselected time period measured from the sensed shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system, during which the absorption refrigeration system is not restarted. A dilution cycle for the absorption refrigeration system is initiated in response to generation of a control signal by the time delay relay. This control system is particularly suitable for use with an absorption refrigeration system which is frequently cycled on and off since the time delay provided by the control system prevents needless dilution of the absorption refrigeration system when the system is turned off for only a short period of time and then is turned back on.

  20. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  1. Precision saturated absorption spectroscopy of H3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu-Chan; Chang, Yung-Hsiang; Liao, Yi-Chieh; Peng, Jin-Long; Wang, Li-Bang; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2018-03-01

    In our previous work on the Lamb-dips of the ν2 fundamental band transitions of H3+, the saturated absorption spectrum was obtained by third-derivative spectroscopy using frequency modulation with an optical parametric oscillator (OPO). However, frequency modulation also caused errors in the absolute frequency determination. To solve this problem, we built a tunable offset locking system to lock the pump frequency of the OPO to an iodine-stabilized Nd:YAG laser. With this improvement, we were able to scan the OPO idler frequency precisely and obtain the saturated absorption profile using intensity modulation. Furthermore, ion concentration modulation was employed to subtract the background noise and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. To determine the absolute frequency of the idler wave, the OPO signal frequency was locked to an optical frequency comb. The absolute frequency accuracy of our spectrometer was better than 7 kHz, demonstrated by measuring the wavelength standard transition of methane at 3.39 μm. Finally, we measured 16 transitions of H3+ and our results agree very well with other precision measurements. This work successfully resolved the discrepancies between our previous measurements and other precision measurements.

  2. Nonlinear Terahertz Absorption of Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; König-Otto, Jacob C; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-04-13

    Subwavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, subwavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a terahertz pump-terahertz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results. The model shows that the observed strong linearity is caused by an unexpected red shift of plasmon resonance together with a broadening and weakening of the resonance caused by the transient increase in electron temperature. The model further predicts that even greater resonant enhancement of the nonlinear response can be expected in high-mobility graphene, suggesting that nonlinear graphene plasmonic devices could be promising candidates for nonlinear optical processing.

  3. Laser engines operating by resonance absorption.

    PubMed

    Garbuny, M; Pechersky, M J

    1976-05-01

    The coherence properties and power levels of lasers available at present lend themselves to the remote operation of mechanical engines by resonance absorption in a working gas. Laser radiation is capable of producing extremely high temperatures in a gas. Limits to the achievable temperatures in the working gas of an engine are imposed by the solid walls and by loss of resonance absorption due to thermal saturation, bleaching, and dissociation. However, it is shown that by proper control of the laser beam in space, time, and frequency, as well as by choice of the absorbing gas, these limits are to a great extent removed so that very high temperatures are indeed attainable. The working gas is largely monatomic, preferably helium with the addition of a few volume percent of an absorber. Such a gas mixture, internally heated, permits an optimization of the expansion ratio, with resulting thermal efficiencies and work ratios, not achievable in conventional engines. A relationship between thermal efficiency and work ratio is derived that is quite general for the optimization condition. The performance of laser piston engines, turbines, and the Stirling cycle based on these principles is discussed and compared with conventional engine operation. Finally, a brief discussion is devoted to the possibility and concepts for the direct conversion of selective vibrational or electronic excitation into mechanical work, bypassing the translational degrees of freedom.

  4. Absorption atelectasis: incidence and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jennifer

    2013-06-01

    General anesthesia is known to cause pulmonary atelectasis; in turn, atelectasis increases shunt, decreases compliance, and may lead to perioperative hypoxemia. One mechanism for the formation of atelectasis intraoperatively is ventilation with 100% oxygen. The goal of this review is to determine if research suggests that intraoperative ventilation with 100% oxygen leads to clinically significant pulmonary side effects. An initial literature search included electronic databases (Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature [CINAHL], PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and The GeneraCochrane Library) using the following search terms: oxygen (administration and dosage), atelectasis, pulmonary complications, and anesthesia. Results were limited to research studies, human subjects, and English-language publications between 1965 and 2011. From this body of research, it appears that absorption atelectasis does occur in healthy anesthetized adults breathing 100% oxygen. Data reviewed suggest that absorption atelectasis does not have significant clinical implications in healthy adults. However, further research is warranted in populations at increased risk of postoperative hypoxemia, including obese or elderly patients and those with preexisting cardiopulmonary disease.

  5. QSO absorption spectroscopy and baryonic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirković, Milan M.

    2005-04-01

    The present book should serve a double purpose: first, as an introduction into the host of tightly related topics in astrophysics and cosmology all dealing with the history and evolution of the baryonic matter in the universe. Secondly, it gives argument for still somewhat controversial view that large baryonic reservoirs are present (at least in the low-redshift regime) in form of huge gaseous galactic haloes surrounding normal luminous galaxies, and manifesting through the Lyman-α absorption lines in spectra of background sources. If accepted, this view would profoundly impact our understanding of the galactic structure and evolution, and will deeply influence our views of the future evolution of galactic systems. After an introduction into cosmological jargon and symbols used throughout, and other important introductory material given in Chapter 1, the bulk of the argumentation is given in Chapter 2, which exposes phenomenology of Lyα absorption systems and various theories advanced to account for their physical origin. Chapter 3 deals with models of absorbing gas in the extended haloes of normal galaxies, and Chapter 4 gives a global discussion of main candidates for the reservoirs of the still elusive baryonic dark matter. A set of closely related technical issues which are used at several places in the main narrative are given in the appendices.

  6. ABSORPTION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION IN Mrk 509

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Sobolewska, M.

    2015-12-20

    In this paper we model the observed absorption measure distribution (AMD) in Mrk 509, which spans three orders of magnitude in ionization level with a single-zone absorber in pressure equilibrium. AMD is usually constructed from observations of narrow absorption lines in radio-quiet active galaxies with warm absorbers. We study the properties of the warm absorber in Mrk 509 using recently published broadband spectral energy distribution observed with different instruments. This spectrum is an input in radiative transfer computations with full photoionization treatment using the titan code. We show that the simplest way to fully reproduce the shape of AMD is tomore » assume that the warm absorber is a single zone under constant total pressure. With this assumption, we found theoretical AMD that matches the observed AMD determined on the basis of the 600 ks reflection grating spectrometer XMM-Newton spectrum of Mrk 509. The softness of the source spectrum and the important role of the free–free emission breaks the usual degeneracy in the ionization state calculations, and the explicit dependence of the depths of AMD dips on density open a new path to the density diagnostic for the warm absorber. In Mrk 509, the implied density is of the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3}.« less

  7. Absorption heat pump for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan; Simon, William E.; Warrier, Gopinath R.; Woramontri, Woranun

    1993-01-01

    In the first part, the performance of the Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) with water-sulfuric acid and water-magnesium chloride as two new refrigerant-absorbent fluid pairs was investigated. A model was proposed for the analysis of the new working pairs in a heat pump system, subject to different temperature lifts. Computer codes were developed to calculate the Coefficient of Performance (COP) of the system with the thermodynamic properties of the working fluids obtained from the literature. The study shows the potential of water-sulfuric acid as a satisfactory replacement for water-lithium bromide in the targeted temperature range. The performance of the AHP using water-magnesium chloride as refrigerant-absorbent pair does not compare well with those obtained using water-lithium bromide. The second part concentrated on the design and testing of a simple ElectroHydrodynamic (EHD) Pump. A theoretical design model based on continuum electromechanics was analyzed to predict the performance characteristics of the EHD pump to circulate the fluid in the absorption heat pump. A numerical method of solving the governing equations was established to predict the velocity profile, pressure - flow rate relationship and efficiency of the pump. The predicted operational characteristics of the EHD pump is comparable to that of turbomachinery hardware; however, the overall efficiency of the electromagnetic pump is much lower. An experimental investigation to verify the numerical results was conducted. The pressure - flow rate performance characteristics and overall efficiency of the pump obtained experimentally agree well with the theoretical model.

  8. Water Absorption Behavior of Hemp Hurds Composites

    PubMed Central

    Stevulova, Nadezda; Cigasova, Julia; Purcz, Pavol; Schwarzova, Ivana; Kacik, Frantisek; Geffert, Anton

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, water sorption behavior of 28 days hardened composites based on hemp hurds and inorganic binder was studied. Two kinds of absorption tests on dried cube specimens in deionized water bath at laboratory temperature were performed. Short-term (after one hour water immersion) and long-term (up to 180 days) water absorption tests were carried out to study their durability. Short-term water sorption behavior of original hemp hurds composites depends on mean particle length of hemp and on binder nature. The comparative study of long-term water sorption behavior of composites reinforced with original and chemically modified hemp hurds in three reagents confirmed that surface treatment of filler influences sorption process. Based on evaluation of sorption curves using a model for composites based on natural fibers, diffusion of water molecules in composite reinforced with original and chemically modified hemp hurds is anomalous in terms of the Fickian behavior. The most significant decrease in hydrophility of hemp hurds was found in case of hemp hurds modified by NaOH and it relates to change in the chemical composition of hemp hurds, especially to a decrease in average degree of cellulose polymerization as well as hemicellulose content.

  9. Light-Absorbing Aerosol during NASA GRIP: Overview of Observations in the Free Troposphere and Associated with Tropical Storm Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Chen, G.; Corr, C. A.; Craig, L.; Dhaniyala, S.; Dibb, J. E.; Hudgins, C. H.; Ismail, S.; Latham, T.; Nenes, A.; Thornhill, K. L.; Winstead, E.; Anderson, B. E.

    2010-12-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in regulating Earth’s climate. Absorbing aerosols typically constitute a small fraction of ambient particle mass but can contribute significantly to direct and indirect climate forcing depending on size, mixing state, concentration, chemical composition, and vertical and spatial distribution. Aerosols may also significantly affect tropical storm/hurricane dynamics through direct light absorption and activation as cloud nuclei. An extensive suite of instrumentation measuring aerosol chemical, physical, and optical properties was deployed aboard the NASA DC-8 to characterize aerosol during the NASA GRIP (Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes; August-September 2010) mission. The majority of flight time was spent at high altitude (greater than 9 km) and thus much of the sampling was done in the free troposphere, including extensive sampling in the vicinity of tropical storm systems and more diffuse cirrus clouds. With operations based in Fort Lauderdale, FL and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands, a large geographic region was sampled including much of the Gulf of Mexico and tropical Atlantic Ocean. Observations are reported for light-absorbing carbon aerosol (mainly black carbon, BC) primarily using a single particle soot photometer (SP2). The SP2 employs single-particle laser-induced incandescence to provide a mass-specific measurement not subject to scattering interference that is optimal for the low concentration environments like those encountered during GRIP. BC mass concentrations, 100-500 nm size distributions, and mixing state (i.e. coating thickness of scattering material) are presented. Total and sub-micron aerosol absorption coefficients (principally from BC and dust aerosol) are reported using a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) along with comparisons with calculated absorption coefficients derived from SP2 observations in various conditions. In addition, dust aerosol is specifically identified using optical and

  10. Absorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by a highly absorptive polymeric medium.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Olga; Idowu, Ifeoluwa; Friesen, Kelsey L; McDougall, Matthew; Choi, Sara Seoin; Bolluch, Patrique; Daramola, Oluwadamilola; Johnson, Wesley; Palace, Vince; Stetefeld, Jörg; Tomy, Gregg T

    2018-06-01

    The efficacy of a lightly cross-linked polymeric bead to absorb polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the surface of fresh- and salt-water in a simulated oil-spill scenario was assessed in this study. A layer of PAHs at the water surface was created by first preparing the PAHs in hexane and then carefully spiking this mixture onto the surface of water. Beads were then applied to the surface of the organic phase and the amount of hydrocarbons absorbed by the beads was examined at prescribed time intervals and at different temperatures. Absorption of PAHs into the beads was exhaustive with ∼86 ± 4% being selectively removed from the organic phase by 120 s. First order reaction rates best described the uptake kinetics and absorption rates ranged from 0.0085 (naphthalene) to 0.0325 s- 1 (dibenzo[a,h]anthracene). Absorption of PAHs into the beads was driven by molecular volume (A 3 ). Uptake rates increased markedly for PAHs with molecular volumes between 130 A 3 and 190 A 3 . Beyond this molecular volume there was no apparent change in the rate of uptake. This study shows that these polymeric beads have a high affinity for PAHs and can be used under various environmental conditions with negligible difference in absorptive efficacy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cytopathogenesis of Vesicular Stomatitis virus is regulated by the PSAP motif of M protein in a species-dependent manner

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an important vector-borne pathogen of bovine and equine species, causing a reportable vesicular disease. The matrix (M) protein of VSV is multifunctional and plays a key role in cytopathogenesis, apoptosis, host protein shut-off, and virion assembly/budding. Our ...

  12. Photoionization-driven Absorption-line Variability in Balmer Absorption Line Quasar LBQS 1206+1052

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Luming; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo

    In this paper we present an analysis of absorption-line variability in mini-BAL quasar LBQS 1206+1052. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum demonstrates that the absorption troughs can be divided into two components of blueshift velocities of ∼700 and ∼1400 km s{sup −1} relative to the quasar rest frame. The former component shows rare Balmer absorption, which is an indicator of high-density absorbing gas; thus, the quasar is worth follow-up spectroscopic observations. Our follow-up optical and near-infrared spectra using MMT, YFOSC, TSpec, and DBSP reveal that the strengths of the absorption lines vary for both components, while the velocities do notmore » change. We reproduce all of the spectral data by assuming that only the ionization state of the absorbing gas is variable and that all other physical properties are invariable. The variation of ionization is consistent with the variation of optical continuum from the V -band light curve. Additionally, we cannot interpret the data by assuming that the variability is due to a movement of the absorbing gas. Therefore, our analysis strongly indicates that the absorption-line variability in LBQS 1206+1052 is photoionization driven. As shown from photoionization simulations, the absorbing gas with blueshift velocity of ∼700 km s{sup −1} has a density in the range of 10{sup 9} to 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3} and a distance of ∼1 pc, and the gas with blueshift velocity of ∼1400 km s{sup −1} has a density of 10{sup 3} cm{sup −3} and a distance of ∼1 kpc.« less

  13. Photoionization-driven Absorption-line Variability in Balmer Absorption Line Quasar LBQS 1206+1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Luming; Zhou, Hongyan; Ji, Tuo; Jiang, Peng; Liu, Bo; Liu, Wenjuan; Pan, Xiang; Shi, Xiheng; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Zhang, Shaohua; Miller, Lauren P.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we present an analysis of absorption-line variability in mini-BAL quasar LBQS 1206+1052. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum demonstrates that the absorption troughs can be divided into two components of blueshift velocities of ˜700 and ˜1400 km s-1 relative to the quasar rest frame. The former component shows rare Balmer absorption, which is an indicator of high-density absorbing gas; thus, the quasar is worth follow-up spectroscopic observations. Our follow-up optical and near-infrared spectra using MMT, YFOSC, TSpec, and DBSP reveal that the strengths of the absorption lines vary for both components, while the velocities do not change. We reproduce all of the spectral data by assuming that only the ionization state of the absorbing gas is variable and that all other physical properties are invariable. The variation of ionization is consistent with the variation of optical continuum from the V-band light curve. Additionally, we cannot interpret the data by assuming that the variability is due to a movement of the absorbing gas. Therefore, our analysis strongly indicates that the absorption-line variability in LBQS 1206+1052 is photoionization driven. As shown from photoionization simulations, the absorbing gas with blueshift velocity of ˜700 km s-1 has a density in the range of 109 to 1010 cm-3 and a distance of ˜1 pc, and the gas with blueshift velocity of ˜1400 km s-1 has a density of 103 cm-3 and a distance of ˜1 kpc.

  14. Retrieval of Ozone Column Content from Airborne Sun Photometer Measurements During SOLVE II: Comparison with SAGE III, POAM III,THOMAS and GOME Measurements. Comparison with SAGE 111, POAM 111, TOMS and GOME Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, J.; Schmid, B.; Russell, P.; Eilers, J.; Kolyer, R.; Redemann, J.; Yee, J.-H.; Trepte, C.; Thomason, L.; Pitts, M.

    2003-01-01

    During the Second SAGE 111 Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II), the 14- channel NASA Ames Airborne Trackmg Sunphotometer (AATS-14) was mounted on the NASA DC-8 and successfully measured spectra of total and aerosol optical depth (TOD and AOD) during the sunlit portions of eight science flights. Values of ozone column content above the aircraft have been derived from the AATS-14 data by using a linear least squares method. For each AATS-14 measured TOD spectrum, this method iteratively finds the ozone column content that yields the best match between measured and calculated TOD. The calculations assume the known Chappuis ozone band shape and a three-parameter AOD shape (quadratic in log-log space). Seven of the AATS-14 channels (each employing an interference filter with a nominal full-width at half maximum bandpass of -5 nm) are within the Chappuis band, with center wavelengths between 452.9 nm and 864.5 nm. One channel (604.4 nm) is near the peak, and three channels (499.4, 519.4 and 675.1 nm) have ozone absorption within 30-40% of that at the peak. For the typical DC-8 SOLVE II cruising altitudes of approx. 8-12 km and the background stratospheric aerosol conditions that prevailed during SOLVE 11, absorption of incoming solar radiation by ozone comprised a significant fraction of the aerosol-plus-ozone optical depth measured in the four AATS-14 channels centered between 499.4 and 675.1 nm. Typical AODs above the DC-8 ranged from 0.003-0.008 in these channels. For comparison, an ozone overburden of 0.3 atm-cm (300 DU) translates to ozone optical depths of 0.009,0.014, 0.041, and 0.012, respectively, at these same wavelengths. In this paper, we compare AATS-14 values of ozone column content with temporally and spatially near-coincident values derived from measurements acquired by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) and the Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement 111 (POAM III) satellite sensors. We also compare AATS-14 ozone

  15. Coupling between absorption and scattering in disordered colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Anna; Hwang, Victoria; Park, Jin-Gyu; Manoharan, Vinothan N.

    We aim to understand how scattering and absorption are coupled in disordered colloidal suspensions containing absorbing molecules (dyes). When the absorption length is shorter than the transport length, absorption dominates, and absorption and scattering can be seen as two additive effects. However, when the transport length is shorter than the absorption length, the scattering and absorption become coupled, as multiple scattering increases the path length of the light in the sample, leading to a higher probability of absorption. To quantify this synergistic effect, we measure the diffuse reflectance spectra of colloidal samples of varying dye concentrations, thicknesses, and particle concentrations, and we calculate the transport length and absorption length from our measurements, using a radiative transfer model. At particle concentrations so high that the particles form disordered packings, we find a minimum in the transport length. We show that selecting a dye where the absorption peak matches the location of the minimum in the transport length allows for enhanced absorption. Kraft-Heinz Corporation, NSF GRFP 2015200426.

  16. Dissociative absorption: An empirically unique, clinically relevant, dissociative factor.

    PubMed

    Soffer-Dudek, Nirit; Lassri, Dana; Soffer-Dudek, Nir; Shahar, Golan

    2015-11-01

    Research of dissociative absorption has raised two questions: (a) Is absorption a unique dissociative factor within a three-factor structure, or a part of one general dissociative factor? Even when three factors are found, the specificity of the absorption factor is questionable. (b) Is absorption implicated in psychopathology? Although commonly viewed as "non-clinical" dissociation, absorption was recently hypothesized to be specifically associated with obsessive-compulsive symptoms. To address these questions, we conducted exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses on 679 undergraduates. Analyses supported the three-factor model, and a "purified" absorption scale was extracted from the original inclusive absorption factor. The purified scale predicted several psychopathology scales. As hypothesized, absorption was a stronger predictor of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than of general psychopathology. In addition, absorption was the only dissociative scale that longitudinally predicted obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We conclude that absorption is a unique and clinically relevant dissociative tendency that is particularly meaningful to obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reducing microwave absorption with fast frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Juehang; Hubler, A

    2017-05-01

    We study the response of a two-level quantum system to a chirp signal, using both numerical and analytical methods. The numerical method is based on numerical solutions of the Schrödinger solution of the two-level system, while the analytical method is based on an approximate solution of the same equations. We find that when two-level systems are perturbed by a chirp signal, the peak population of the initially unpopulated state exhibits a high sensitivity to frequency modulation rate. We also find that the aforementioned sensitivity depends on the strength of the forcing, and weaker forcings result in a higher sensitivity, where the frequency modulation rate required to produce the same reduction in peak population would be lower. We discuss potential applications of this result in the field of microwave power transmission, as it shows applying fast frequency modulation to transmitted microwaves used for power transmission could decrease unintended absorption of microwaves by organic tissue.

  18. Solar Absorptance of Cermet Coatings Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of solar Stirling convertors. In this application, the key role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. To achieve this objective, the cermet coating has a high solar absorptance value. Cermet coatings are manufactured utilizing sputter deposition, and many different metal and ceramic combinations can be created. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition, and hence, the optical properties of these coatings. The NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared and characterized a wide variety of cermet coatings utilizing different metals deposited in an aluminum oxide ceramic matrix. In addition, the atomic oxygen durability of these coatings has been evaluated.

  19. Continuum Absorption Coefficient of Atoms and Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armaly, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of heat transfer to the heat shield of a Jupiter probe has been estimated to be one order of magnitude higher than any previously experienced in an outer space exploration program. More than one-third of this heat load is due to an emission of continuum radiation from atoms and ions. The existing computer code for calculating the continuum contribution to the total load utilizes a modified version of Biberman's approximate method. The continuum radiation absorption cross sections of a C - H - O - N ablation system were examined in detail. The present computer code was evaluated and updated by being compared with available exact and approximate calculations and correlations of experimental data. A detailed calculation procedure, which can be applied to other atomic species, is presented. The approximate correlations can be made to agree with the available exact and experimental data.

  20. High Absorptance Coatings for THz Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    High absorptance materials find application throughout the electromagnetic spectrum as radiation terminations, calibration standards, and glint reduction coatings. Successful use of materials at millimeter through submillimeter wavelengths requires an accurate knowledge and control over their thermal, mechanical, and electromagnetic properties in order to achieve the desired response while minimizing mass and volume. In practice, the achieved blackness is intimately linked to the material properties and geometry. Here, we summarize the characteristics of a variety of tunable artificial dielectric mixtures appropriate for THz applications at room and cryogenic temperatures. Theoretical guidelines for their application will be provided in the context of the effective-medium mean-field-approximation. The performance of these coatings as elements of reflectance standards, radiometric flux calibrators, passive thermal radiators, and stray light suppression baffles for imaging systems will be reviewed.

  1. Counterflow absorber for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    An air-cooled, vertical tube absorber for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. Strong absorbent solution is supplied to the top of the absorber and refrigerant vapor is supplied to the bottom of the absorber to create a direct counterflow of refrigerant vapor and absorbent solution in the absorber. The refrigeration system is designed so that the volume flow rate of refrigerant vapor in the tubes of the absorber is sufficient to create a substantially direct counterflow along the entire length of each tube in the absorber. This provides several advantages for the absorber such as higher efficiency and improved heat transfer characteristics, and allows improved purging of non-condensibles from the absorber.

  2. Spray generators for absorption refrigeration systems

    DOEpatents

    Sibley, Howard W.

    1979-06-19

    A spray generator for an absorption refrigeration system that includes a heat exchanger comprised of a multiplicity of variably spaced heat exchange tubes. The tubes are spaced close together near the top of the heat exchanger and spaced more widely apart near the bottom of the heat exchanger. Dilute absorbent solution is sprayed down through the heat exchanger. The close nesting of the tubes in the top portion of the heat exchanger retards liquid flow and aids heating of the solution. The wide spacing of the tubes in the lower section of the heat exchanger facilitate vapor flow out of the heat exchanger and eliminates liquid "blow-off". The top tubes are covered by a baffle to prevent the liquid solution from splashing out of the heat exchanger off of these top tubes.

  3. Broadband high sound absorption from labyrinthine metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Huiting; Liu, Liu; Zhang, Chi; Hu, Xinhua

    2018-04-01

    Metamaterials are artificial structures which exhibit fascinating properties unreachable by traditional materials. Here, we report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of acoustic metasurfaces consisting of dead-end channels coiled in a 2D plane. It is found that when the area of the channel's cross section is about 1/10 of the area (4.3 cm × 4.3 cm) of the upper surface of the building block, the sound loss in channels approaches to a critical value, resulting in near-perfect absorption (A > 99%) at resonant frequency. When the building block contains ten channels with specially designed lengths, sound waves can be highly absorbed above a cutoff frequency fc (A > 90% for fc < f < 3fc). The wavelength at the cutoff frequency can be 7.1 times of the thickness of the metasurface. Our results could find applications in noise reduction and sound detection.

  4. Coherent virtual absorption for discretized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2018-05-01

    Coherent virtual absorption (CVA) is a recently-introduced phenomenon for which exponentially growing waves incident onto a conservative optical medium are neither reflected nor transmitted, at least transiently. CVA has been associated to complex zeros of the scattering matrix and can be regarded as the time reversal of the decay process of a quasi-mode sustained by the optical medium. Here we consider CVA for discretized light transport in coupled resonator optical waveguides or waveguide arrays and show that a distinct kind of CVA, which is not related to complex zero excitation of quasi-modes, can be observed. This result suggests that scattering matrix analysis can not fully capture CVA phenomena.

  5. Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kiela, Pawel R.; Ghishan, Fayez K.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all nutrients from the diet are absorbed into blood across the highly polarized epithelial cell layer forming the small and large intestinal mucosa. Anatomical, histological, and functional specializations along the gastrointestinal tract are responsible for the effective and regulated nutrient transport via both passive and active mechanisms. In this chapter, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism of intestinal absorption of key nutrients such as sodium, anions (chloride, sulfate, oxalate), carbohydrates, amino acids and peptides, lipids, lipidand water-soluble vitamins, as well as the major minerals and micronutrients. This outline, including the molecular identity, specificity, and coordinated activities of key transport proteins and genes involved, serves as the background for the following chapters focused on the pathophysiology of acquired and congenital intestinal malabsorption, as well as clinical tools to test and treat malabsorptive symptoms. PMID:27086882

  6. Two-photon absorption in diazobenzene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, A. A.; Yamaki, S. B.; Misoguti, L.; Zilio, S. C.; Atvars, Teresa D. Z.; Oliveira, O. N.; Mendonça, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    An investigation is made into molecular design strategies to enhance the two-photon absorption (2PA) of organic materials by measuring the 2PA cross-section of diazoaromatic compounds with the femtosecond pulses Z-scan technique at 775 nm. These diazo dyes exhibit a moderate 2PA cross-section, of the order of 300 GM, comparable to those of regular azoaromatic compounds. The increase in the π-electron bridge in the diazoaromatic compounds does not bring, therefore, substantial increase to the measured 2PA intensities, while the main factor to enhance the 2PA cross-section is the presence of charge donor and acceptor groups. It is concluded that current molecular design strategies are unlikely to produce azoaromatic compounds that are useful for applications requiring very high 2PA coefficients.

  7. Monitoring Telluric Water Absorption with CAMAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ashley; Blake, Cullen; Sliski, David

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based observations are severely limited by telluric water vapor absorption features, which are highly variable in time and significantly complicate both spectroscopy and photometry in the near-infrared (NIR). To achieve the stability required to study Earth-sized exoplanets, monitoring the precipitable water vapor (PWV) becomes necessary to mitigate the impact of telluric lines on radial velocity measurements and transit light curves. To address this issue, we present the Camera for the Automatic Monitoring of Atmospheric Lines (CAMAL), a stand-alone, inexpensive 6-inch aperture telescope dedicated to measuring PWV at the Whipple Observatory. CAMAL utilizes three NIR narrowband filters to trace the amount of atmospheric water vapor affecting simultaneous observations with the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) and MINERVA-Red telescopes. We present the current design of CAMAL, discuss our calibration methods, and show PWV measurements taken with CAMAL compared to those of a nearby GPS water vapor monitor.

  8. Gas separation using ultrasound and light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Sinha, Dipen N [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-07-31

    An apparatus and method for separating a chosen gas from a mixture of gases having no moving parts and utilizing no chemical processing is described. The separation of particulates from fluid carriers thereof has been observed using ultrasound. In a similar manner, molecular species may be separated from carrier species. It is also known that light-induced drift may separate light-absorbing species from carrier species. Therefore, the combination of temporally pulsed absorption of light with ultrasonic concentration is expected to significantly increase the efficiency of separation by ultrasonic concentration alone. Additionally, breaking the spatial symmetry of a cylindrical acoustic concentrator decreases the spatial distribution of the concentrated particles, and increases the concentration efficiency.

  9. Absorption band Q model for the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Given, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Attenuation in solids and liquids, as measured by the quality factor Q, is typically frequency dependent. In seismology, however, Q is usually assumed to be independent of frequency. Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. Specific features of the absorption band model are: low-Q in the seismic band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low-Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q sub s that increases with period, and low Q sub p/Q sub s at short periods in the middle mantle.

  10. Using Methane Absorption to Probe Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mosaics of a belt-zone boundary near Jupiter's equator in near-infrared light moderately absorbed by atmospheric methane (top panel), and strongly absorbed by atmospheric methane (bottom panel). The four images that make up each of these mosaics were taken within a few minutes of each other. Methane in Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light at specific wavelengths called absorption bands. By detecting light close and far from these absorption bands, Galileo can probe to different depths in Jupiter's atmosphere. Sunlight near 732 nanometers (top panel) is moderately absorbed by methane. Some of the light reflected from clouds deep in Jupiter's troposphere is absorbed, enhancing the higher features. Sunlight at 886 nanometers (bottom panel) is strongly absorbed by methane. Most of the light reflected from the deeper clouds is absorbed, making these clouds invisible. Features in the diffuse cloud layer higher in Jupiter's atmosphere are greatly enhanced.

    North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes -13 to +3 degrees and is centered at longitude 282 degrees West. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on November 5th, 1996, at a range of 1.2 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  11. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  12. Study of moisture absorption by an organoplastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniskevich, A. N.; Yanson, Yu. O.

    1991-07-01

    A complex experimental study of the state of sorbed moisture in a unidirectionally reinforced organoplastic was conducted. The methods of TG, DSC, DTA, and NMR showed that moisture absorption in OP is reversible up to 8%, the sorbed moisture does not crystallize in the temperature range from -70 to 0 °C, it is finely dispersely distributed and is in the strongly and weakly bound state, and there is almost no free moisture. The results of the sorption experiments conducted on OP and its structural components: microplastic and EDT-10 binder, in a wide range of temperature-humidity conditions and the data from physical studies showed that moisture absorption in the materials basically takes place by diffusion and is satisfactorily described by a phenomenological model based on the Fick equation. A method of accelerated determination of the sorption characteristics of anisotropic composite materials was developed, using the introduced concept of the fictitious diffusion coefficient and the extrapolation method of determining the limiting moisture content. The features of migration of moisture on the interface in a multiphase system were investigated, and the possibility of successive calculation estimation of the sorption characteristics of an organoplastic at different structural levels was demonstrated: components—unidirectionally reinforced composite—model laminated article. The tested phenomenological model of the sorption process and the experimentally obtained values of the characteristics of the material were the basis for a method of calculation determination of the resource of moisture-proofing properties of a model multilayer article of CM in nonstationary external conditions.

  13. Absorption enhancement in non-coplanar silver nanowire networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhihui; Zhou, Zhiping; Ren, Xincheng; Bai, Shaomin; Li, Hongjian; Cao, Dongmei; Li, Gang; Cao, Guangtao

    2018-07-01

    We propose non-coplanar silver nanowire (AgNW) networks placed on a SiO2 layer. A notable absorption peak is observed in our proposed structure, and compared with the absorption of coplanar periodic AgNW networks and periodic AgNW gratings, the absorption performance of the non-coplanar AgNW networks demonstrates obvious advantages. It could be determined that the absorption ratio in this non-coplanar AgNW networks can reach 95%. In addition, several parameters that have important effects on the absorption of the non-coplanar AgNW networks are discussed in detail. Our research may provide guidance for the fundamental exploration of plasmonic absorption device applications.

  14. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  15. Triple-band metamaterial absorption utilizing single rectangular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Jik; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, YoungPak

    2017-01-01

    In the general metamaterial absorber, the single absorption band is made by the single meta-pattern. Here, we introduce the triple-band metamaterial absorber only utilizing single rectangular hole. We also demonstrate the absorption mechanism of the triple absorption. The first absorption peak was caused by the fundamental magnetic resonance in the metallic part between rectangular holes. The second absorption was generated by induced tornado magnetic field. The process of realizing the second band is also presented. The third absorption was induced by the third-harmonic magnetic resonance in the metallic region between rectangular holes. In addition, the visible-range triple-band absorber was also realized by using similar but smaller single rectangular-hole structure. These results render the simple metamaterials for high frequency in large scale, which can be useful in the fabrication of metamaterials operating in the optical range.

  16. Numerical study of surface plasmon enhanced nonlinear absorption and refraction.

    PubMed

    Kohlgraf-Owens, Dana C; Kik, Pieter G

    2008-07-07

    Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory is used to study the influence of silver nanoparticle induced field enhancement on the nonlinear response of a Kerr-type nonlinear host. We show that the composite nonlinear absorption coefficient, beta(c), can be enhanced relative to the host nonlinear absorption coefficient near the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. This enhancement is not due to a resonant enhancement of the host nonlinear absorption, but rather due to a phase shifted enhancement of the host nonlinear refractive response. The enhancement occurs at the expense of introducing linear absorption, alpha(c), which leads to an overall reduced figure of merit beta(c)/alpha(c) for nonlinear absorption. For thin (< 1 microm) composites, the use of surface plasmons is found to result in an increased nonlinear absorption response compared to that of the host material.

  17. Geometrical dependence of spin current absorption into a ferromagnetic nanodot

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kohei; Kimura, Takashi, E-mail: t-kimu@phys.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    We have investigated the absorption property of the diffusive pure spin current due to a ferromagnetic nanodot in a laterally configured ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic hybrid nanostructure. The spin absorption in a nano-pillar-based lateral-spin-valve structure was confirmed to increase with increasing the lateral dimension of the ferromagnetic dot. However, the absorption efficiency was smaller than that in a conventional lateral spin valve based on nanowire junctions because the large effective cross section of the two dimensional nonmagnetic film reduces the spin absorption selectivity. We also found that the absorption efficiency of the spin current is significantly enhanced by using a thick ferromagnetic nanodot.more » This can be understood by taking into account the spin absorption through the side surface of the ferromagnetic dot quantitatively.« less

  18. CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION BY PHASE ENHANCED GAS-LIQUID ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    A new process called phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption has been developed in its early stage. It was found that adding another phase into the absorption system of gas/aqueous phase could enhance the absorption rate. A system with three phases was studied. In the system, gas phase was carbon dioxide. Two liquid phases were used. One was organic phase. Another was aqueous phase. By addition of organic phase into the absorption system of CO{sub 2}-aqueous phase, the absorption rate of CO{sub 2} was increased significantly. CO{sub 2} finally accumulated into aqueous phase. The experimental results proved that (1) Absorption rate ofmore » carbon dioxide was enhanced by adding organic phase into gas aqueous phase system; (2) Organic phase played the role of transportation of gas solute (CO{sub 2}). Carbon dioxide finally accumulated into aqueous phase.« less

  19. A Study of the Skin Absorption of Ethylbenzene in Man

    PubMed Central

    Dutkiewicz, Tadeusz; Tyras, Halina

    1967-01-01

    The absorption of ethylbenzene through the skin of the hand and the forearm in men was investigated experimentally. Both the absorption of liquid ethylbenzene and the absorption from aqueous solutions were studied. The rate of absorption of liquid ethylbenzene was 22 to 33 mg./cm.2/hr, and the rates from aqueous solutions were 118 and 215 μg./cm.2/hr from mean concentrations of 112 and 156 mg./litre. The mandelic acid excreted in urine was equivalent to about 4·6% of the absorbed dose—much less than after lung absorption. Urinary mandelic acid does not provide a reliable index of absorption when there is simultaneous skin and lung exposure. PMID:6073092

  20. Intrinsic defect oriented visible region absorption in zinc oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhesh, V.; Shankar, Balakrishnan

    2018-05-01

    Zinc Oxide films were deposited on the glass substrate using vacuum arc sputtering technology. Films were prepared in oxygen ambience for 10mA and 15 mA deposition current separately. The UV-Visible spectroscopy of the samples showed that both samples possess sharp absorption near 3.5eV which is the characteristic band gap absorption energy of ZnO films. The absorption coefficient were calculated for the samples and the (αℎϑ)2 vs energy plot is drawn. The plot suggested that in addition to the sharp band edge absorption, the sample prepared at 10mA deposition current showed sharp absorption edge near 1.51eV and that at 15 mA showed absorption edge near 1.47eV. This refers to the presence of an intrinsic defect level which is likely to be deep in the band gap.

  1. Photothermal measurement of optical surface absorption using strain transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leslie, D. H.; Trusty, G. L.

    1981-09-01

    We discuss the measurement of small optical surface absorption coefficients. A demonstration experiment was performed using a metallurgical strain gauge to measure 488 nm absorption on the surface of a glass plate. A strain of 10 to the minus 8th power resulted from absorption of 0.3 watts. The results are interpreted and the sensitivity of a proposed fiber optic strain gauge is discussed.

  2. Statistical Fine Structure in Inhomogeneously Broadened Absorption Lines in Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-22

    the inhomogeneously broadened zero-phonon SijSo (0-0) absorption of pentacene molecules in crystals of p-terphenyl at liquid helium temperatures. SFS...structure (SFS) in the inhomogeneously broadened zero-phonon S, +- So (0-0) absorption of pentacene molecules in crystals of p-terphenyl at liquid helium...tile large multiplicity of local environments. Inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines are usually treated as smooth, Gaussian profiles. In recent

  3. Statistical Fine Structure of Inhomogeneously Broadened Absorption Lines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption of pentacene n p-terphenyl at liquid helium temperatures... SFS is the actual frequency- ependent, time...statistical fine structure (SFS) in the inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption of pentacene in p-terphenyl at liquid helium temperatures. SFS is the...quite difficult . -2- We have observed for the first time statistical fine structure in the inhomogeneously broadened optical absorption of pentacene

  4. Effect of idler absorption in pulsed optical parametric oscillators.

    PubMed

    Rustad, Gunnar; Arisholm, Gunnar; Farsund, Øystein

    2011-01-31

    Absorption at the idler wavelength in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) is often considered detrimental. We show through simulations that pulsed OPOs with significant idler absorption can perform better than OPOs with low idler absorption both in terms of conversion efficiency and beam quality. The main reason for this is reduced back conversion. We also show how the beam quality depends on the beam width and pump pulse length, and present scaling relations to use the example simulations for other pulsed nanosecond OPOs.

  5. Blackbody absorption efficiencies for six lamp pumped Nd laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Barnes, Norman P.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Utilizing high resolution spectra, the absorption efficiencies for six Nd laser materials were calculated as functions of the effective blackbody temperature of the lamp and laser crystal size. The six materials were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:Q-98 Glass, Nd:YVO4, Nd:BEL, and Nd:Cr:GSGG. Under the guidelines of this study, Nd:Cr:GSGG's absorption efficiency is twice the absorption efficiency of any of the other laser materials.

  6. Single-shot measurement of nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction.

    PubMed

    Jayabalan, J; Singh, Asha; Oak, Shrikant M

    2006-06-01

    A single-shot method for measurement of nonlinear optical absorption and refraction is described and analyzed. A spatial intensity variation of an elliptical Gaussian beam in conjugation with an array detector is the key element of this method. The advantages of this single-shot technique were demonstrated by measuring the two-photon absorption and free-carrier absorption in GaAs as well as the nonlinear refractive index of CS2 using a modified optical Kerr setup.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) and XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure)

    SciTech Connect

    Alp, E.E.; Mini, S.M.; Ramanathan, M.

    1990-04-01

    The x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) had been an essential tool to gather spectroscopic information about atomic energy level structure in the early decades of this century. It has also played an important role in the discovery and systematization of rare-earth elements. The discovery of synchrotron radiation in 1952, and later the availability of broadly tunable synchrotron based x-ray sources have revitalized this technique since the 1970's. The correct interpretation of the oscillatory structure in the x-ray absorption cross-section above the absorption edge by Sayers et. al. has transformed XAS from a spectroscopic tool to a structural technique. EXAFS (Extended X-raymore » Absorption Fine Structure) yields information about the interatomic distances, near neighbor coordination numbers, and lattice dynamics. An excellent description of the principles and data analysis techniques of EXAFS is given by Teo. XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure), on the other hand, gives information about the valence state, energy bandwidth and bond angles. Today, there are about 50 experimental stations in various synchrotrons around the world dedicated to collecting x-ray absorption data from the bulk and surfaces of solids and liquids. In this chapter, we will give the basic principles of XAS, explain the information content of essentially two different aspects of the absorption process leading to EXAFS and XANES, and discuss the source and samples limitations.« less

  8. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  9. Absorption from iron tablets given with different types of meals.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L; Björn-Rasmussen, E; Ekenved, G; Garby, L; Rossander, L; Pleehachinda, R; Suwanik, R; Arvidsson, B

    1978-09-01

    The absorption of iron from tablets given with 5 types of meals was studied in 153 subjects. The meals were: a hamburger meal with beans and potatoes, a simple breakfast meal, a Latin American meal composed of black beans, rice and maize and two Southeast Asian meals composed of rice, vegetables and spices served with and without fish. The groups were directly compared by relating the absorption from the iron tablets to the absorption from a standardized reference dose of iron given on an empty stomach. The composition of meals with respect to content of meat or fish or the presence of large amounts of phytates seemed to have no influence on the absorption of iron from tablets. The absorption from iron tablets was about 40% higher when they were given with rice meals than when they were given with the other meals studied. The average decrease in absorption by meals was about 50-60% based on a comparison when tablets were given on an empty stomach. When tablets from which the iron was released more slowly were used, the absorption increased by about 30% except when they were given with rice meals, where the absorption was unchanged. The differences among the meals in their effect on the absorption of iron from tablets thus disappeared when the slow-release tablets were given.

  10. Thomson Thick X-Ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar, PG 0946+301.

    PubMed

    Mathur; Green; Arav; Brotherton; Crenshaw; deKool; Elvis; Goodrich; Hamann; Hines; Kashyap; Korista; Peterson; Shields; Shlosman; van Breugel W; Voit

    2000-04-20

    We present a deep ASCA observation of a broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) PG 0946+301. The source was clearly detected in one of the gas imaging spectrometers, but not in any other detector. If BALQSOs have intrinsic X-ray spectra similar to normal radio-quiet quasars, our observations imply that there is Thomson thick X-ray absorption (NH greater, similar1024 cm-2) toward PG 0946+301. This is the largest column density estimated so far toward a BALQSO. The absorber must be at least partially ionized and may be responsible for attenuation in the optical and UV. If the Thomson optical depth toward BALQSOs is close to 1, as inferred here, then spectroscopy in hard X-rays with large telescopes like XMM would be feasible.

  11. Calcium Absorption from Fortified Ice Cream Formulations Compared with Calcium Absorption from Milk

    PubMed Central

    van der Hee, Regine M.; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S.M.J.E.; Rietveld, Anton G.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Quail, Patricia J.; Berry, Mark J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Subjects/setting Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Statistical analysis Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Results Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%±8%, 28%±5%, and 31%±9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Conclusions Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium. PMID:19394469

  12. Bicarbonate absorption stimulates active calcium absorption in the rat proximal tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Bomsztyk, K; Calalb, M B

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of luminal bicarbonate on calcium reabsorption, rat proximal tubules were perfused in vivo. Perfusion solution contained mannitol to reduce water flux to zero. Total Ca concentration was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry, Ca ion concentration in the tubule lumen (CaL2+) and the peritubular capillary (CaP2+), and luminal pH (pHL) with ion-selective microelectrodes and transepithelial voltage (VTE) with conventional microelectrodes. When tubules were perfused with buffer-free Cl-containing solution, net Ca absorption (JCa) averaged 3.33 pmol/min. Even though VTE was 1.64 mV lumen-positive, CaL2+, 1.05 mM, did not fall below the concentration in the capillary blood, 1.07 mM. When 27 mM of Cl was replaced with HCO3, there was luminal fluid acidification. Despite a decrease in VTE and CaL2+, JCa increased to 7.13 pmol/min, indicating that the enhanced JCa could not be accounted for by the reduced electrochemical gradient, delta CCa. When acetazolamide or an analogue of amiloride was added to the HCO3 solution, JCa was not different from the buffer-free solution, suggesting that HCO3-stimulated JCa may be linked to acidification. To further test this hypothesis, we used 27 mM Hepes as the luminal buffer. With Hepes there was luminal fluid acidification and JCa was not different from the buffer-free solution but delta CCa was significantly reduced, indicating enhanced active calcium transport. We conclude from the results of the present study that HCO3 stimulates active Ca absorption, a process that may be linked to acidification-mediated HCO3 absorption. PMID:3366902

  13. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    PubMed

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  14. Black carbon measurements during winter 2013-2014 in Athens and intercomparison between different techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liakakou, Eleni; Stravroulas, Jason; Roukounakis, Nikolaos; Paraskevopoulou, Despina; Fourtziou, Luciana; Psiloglou, Vassilis; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    Black carbon (BC) is a particulate pollutant species emitted from the combustion of fuels, biomass burning for agricultural purposes and forest fires, with the first two anthropogenic sources being the major contributors to the atmospheric burden of BC. The presence of BC is important due to its direct and indirect physicochemical effects and its use as a tracer of burning and subsequent transport processes. Black carbon measurements took place during winter 2013 -2014 in the frame of a pollution monitoring experiment conducted at the urban site of Thissio, Athens (city center) at the premises of the National Observatory of Athens. The economic crisis in Greece and the resulting turn of Athens inhabitants to wood burning for domestic heating, has led to increased daily concentrations of BC in the range of 2-6 μg m-3, peaking at night time (15-20 μg m-3). Three different optical methods were used for the determination of BC. A Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP; Radiance Research) commercial instrument was used to monitor the light absorption coefficient (σap) at 565 nm of ambient aerosols, with 1 minute resolution. During parts of the campaign, a portable Aethalometer (AE-42; Magee Scientific) was also used to provide measurement of the aerosol BC content at 7 wavelengths over 5 minutes intervals. Exploiting the measurements at different wavelengths is was feasible to separate wood burning BC from BC related to fossil fuel. Two Multi Angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP; Thermo) were also operated as reference. Finally, aerosol samples were collected on 12-hour basis using a sequential dichotomous sampler for the sampling of PM2.5, PM2.5-10and PM10 fractions of aerosols on quartz filters, and the filters were analyzed for elemental carbon (EC) by a thermal - optical transmission technique. The main objective of the study is the intercomparison of the different BC monitoring techniques under a large range of ambient concentrations achieved due to the special

  15. Temporal Relationships Between African Dust and Chlorophyll-a in the Eastern Caribbean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Andujar, N. X.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Torres-Delgado, E.

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal African Dust (AD) transports soluble iron to oligotrophic Caribbean waters, and when bioavailable, it could increase marine primary productivity (PP). Recently, the region has experienced the proliferation of unusually high quantities of Sargassum, an iron-absorbing macroalgae inhabiting the air-sea interface, which possess ecological and economic challenges and whose driving factors are still uncertain. AD events reach Puerto Rico (PR) mostly during boreal summer months. This is also the season when chlorophyll-α (CHL) concentrations are highest, when the algae starts to bloom, and when sediment plumes from the Orinoco River (ORP) also reach nutrient discharge maxima.This study seeks to better understand the temporal relationships between increases in chlorophyll-α and the presence of african dust events in the region. Aerosol data collected at the Cabezas de San Juan Atmospheric Observatory was used to identify AD events between January 2005 and December 2015. Light scattering coefficients were measured with an integrating Nephelometer, while light absorption coefficients were obtained from either the Particle Soot/Absorption Photometer (PSAP) or the Continuous Light Absorption Photometer (CLAP). Spectral properties suggesting AD events were cross-referenced with surface dust concentration image models and source-attributed air masses corresponding to dusty periods using Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectories (HYSPLIT). For all years with spectral data, modeled monthly wet dust deposition was correlated (r=0.64) with mean CHL concentrations from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Daily dust mass column densities from NASA's MERRA-2 model were also correlated (r2= 0.53) to sea surface iron concentrations from NASA's Ocean Biogeochemical Model. We present the 2010 case study, which coincides with the start of the Sargassum bloom and shows CHL peaks occurring a month before ORPs but during the AD season

  16. How do the optical properties of Asian aerosols change when they cross the Pacific?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, E. V.; Jaffe, D. A.

    2009-12-01

    Primary and secondary aerosols from Asia may have important climate implications. These aerosols are emitted locally, but can then be lofted into the free troposphere and advected across the Pacific. In this analysis we used observations from the Mount Bachelor Observatory (MBO) in conjunction with satellite data to identify the dominant aerosol types in specific Asian plumes that crossed the Pacific. In situ data from MBO is used to understand the observed changes in radiative properties. A suite of gas phase and aerosol measurements were made during spring 2008 and spring 2009 at MBO (2763 masl), located in central Oregon. Here we focus on observations of dry sub-μm aerosol scattering (σsp) and absorption (σap), made with an integrating nephelometer and a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Using a combination of backward trajectory calculations and satellite observations, we identified 7 well defined plumes of Asian origin. These plumes included the highest σsp (34.8 Mm-1 hourly average) and σap (4.8 Mm-1 hourly average) observed at MBO over the 2008 and 2009 spring campaigns. Of interest in this analysis is 1) whether the intensive optical properties differ between these 7 Asian events, 2) whether these differences can be linked to differences in composition, and 3) whether the intensive optical properties differ from those observed closer to the Asian source region. Preliminary results show that the plumes clustered in terms of their optical properties; plumes hypothesized to contain a large fraction of mineral dust were the most distinct. We also observed larger variability in the average scattering Ångstrom exponent of the plumes and a higher average single scatter albedo than observations closer to the Asian coast. This work will be extended to compare observations at MBO with the most recent observations from Asia as they become available.

  17. Optical properties, morphology and elemental composition of atmospheric particles at T1 supersite on MILAGRO campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carabali, G.; Mamani-Paco, R.; Castro, T.; Peralta, O.; Herrera, E.; Trujillo, B.

    2012-03-01

    Atmospheric particles were sampled at T1 supersite during MILAGRO campaign, in March 2006. T1 was located at the north of Mexico City (MC). Aerosol sampling was done by placing copper grids for Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) on the last five of an 8-stage MOUDI cascade impactor. Samples were obtained at different periods to observe possible variations on morphology. Absorption and scattering coefficients, as well as particle concentrations (0.01-3 μm aerodynamic diameter) were measured simultaneously using a PSAP absorption photometer, a portable integrating nephelometer, and a CPC particle counter. Particle images were acquired at different magnifications using a CM 200 Phillips TEM-EDAX system, and then calculated the border-based fractal dimension. Also, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) was used to determine the elemental composition of particles. The morphology of atmospheric particles for two aerodynamic diameters (0.18 and 1.8 μm) was compared using border-based fractal dimension to relate it to the other particle properties, because T1-generated particles have optical, morphological and chemical properties different from those transported by the MC plume. Particles sampled under MC pollution influence showed not much variability, suggesting that more spherical particles (border-based fractal dimension close to 1.0) are more common in larger sizes (d50 = 1.8 μm), which may be attributed to aerosol aging and secondary aerosol formation. Between 06:00 and 09:00 a.m., smaller particles (d50 = 0.18 μm) had more irregular shapes resulting in higher border-based fractal dimensions (1.2-1.3) for samples with more local influence. EDS analysis in d50 = 0.18 μm particles showed high contents of carbonaceous material, Si, Fe, K, and Co. Perhaps, this indicates an impact from industrial and vehicle emissions on atmospheric particles at T1.

  18. Unusual continuous dual absorption peaks in Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanostructures for broadened microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhong-Jun; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Song, Wei-Li; Liu, Xing-Da; Cao, Wen-Qiang; Shao, Xiao-Hong; Cao, Mao-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3 nanoparticles via Ca doping, with the purpose of tailoring the phase boundary. Upon Ca-substitution, the co-existence of both R3c and P4mm phases has been confirmed to massively enhance both dielectric and magnetic properties via manipulating the phase boundary and the destruction of the spiral spin structure. Unlike the commonly reported magnetic/dielectric hybrid microwave absorption composites, Bi0.95Ca0.05FeO3 has been found to deliver unusual continuous dual absorption peaks at a small thickness (1.56 mm), which has remarkably broadened the effective absorption bandwidth (8.7-12.1 GHz). The fundamental mechanisms based on the phase boundary engineering have been discussed, suggesting a novel platform for designing advanced multiferroic materials with wide applications.Electromagnetic absorption materials have received increasing attention owing to their wide applications in aerospace, communication and the electronics industry, and multiferroic materials with both polarization and magnetic properties are considered promising ceramics for microwave absorption application. However, the insufficient absorption intensity coupled with the narrow effective absorption bandwidth has limited the development of high-performance multiferroic materials for practical microwave absorption. To address such issues, in the present work, we utilize interfacial engineering in BiFeO3

  19. Vehicle effects on human stratum corneum absorption and skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Alissa; Jung, Eui-Chang; Zhu, Hanjiang; Zou, Ying; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2017-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of three vehicles-ethanol (EtOH), isopropyl alcohol (IPA), and isopropyl myristate (IPM)-on stratum corneum (SC) absorption and diffusion of the [ 14 C]-model compounds benzoic acid and butenafine hydrochloride to better understand the transport pathways of chemicals passing through and resident in SC. Following application of topical formulations to human dermatomed skin for 30 min, penetration flux was observed for 24 h post dosing, using an in vitro flow-through skin diffusion system. Skin absorption and penetration was compared to the chemical-SC (intact, delipidized, or SC lipid film) binding levels. A significant vehicle effect was observed for chemical skin penetration and SC absorption. IPA resulted in the greatest levels of intact SC/SC lipid absorption, skin penetration, and total skin absorption/penetration of benzoic acid, followed by IPM and EtOH, respectively. For intact SC absorption and total skin absorption/penetration of butenafine, the vehicle that demonstrated the highest level of sorption/penetration was EtOH, followed by IPA and IPM, respectively. The percent doses of butenafine that were absorbed in SC lipid film and penetrated through skin in 24 h were greatest for IPA, followed by EtOH and IPM, respectively. The vehicle effect was consistent between intact SC absorption and total chemical skin absorption and penetration, as well as SC lipid absorption and chemical penetration through skin, suggesting intercellular transport as a main pathway of skin penetration for model chemicals. These results suggest the potential to predict vehicle effects on skin permeability with simple SC absorption assays. As decontamination was applied 30 min after chemical exposure, significant vehicle effects on chemical SC partitioning and percutaneous penetration also suggest that skin decontamination efficiency is vehicle dependent, and an effective decontamination method should act on chemical solutes in the lipid domain.

  20. Optimal design of porous structures for the fastest liquid absorption.

    PubMed

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu; Fu, Kunkun

    2014-01-14

    Porous materials engineered for rapid liquid absorption are useful in many applications, including oil recovery, spacecraft life-support systems, moisture management fabrics, medical wound dressings, and microfluidic devices. Dynamic absorption in capillary tubes and porous media is driven by the capillary pressure, which is inversely proportional to the pore size. On the other hand, the permeability of porous materials scales with the square of the pore size. The dynamic competition between these two superimposed mechanisms for liquid absorption through a heterogeneous porous structure may lead to an overall minimum absorption time. In this work, we explore liquid absorption in two different heterogeneous porous structures [three-dimensional (3D) circular tubes and porous layers], which are composed of two sections with variations in radius/porosity and height. The absorption time to fill the voids of porous constructs is expressed as a function of radius/porosity and height of local sections, and the absorption process does not follow the classic Washburn's law. Under given height and void volume, these two-section structures with a negative gradient of radius/porosity against the absorption direction are shown to have faster absorption rates than control samples with uniform radius/porosity. In particular, optimal structural parameters, including radius/porosity and height, are found that account for the minimum absorption time. The liquid absorption in the optimized porous structure is up to 38% faster than in a control sample. The results obtained can be used a priori for the design of porous structures with excellent liquid management property in various fields.