Science.gov

Sample records for absorption profile spectrograph

  1. Interstellar Medium Absorption Profile Spectrograph (IMAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1985-01-01

    The design and fabrication of an objective-grating echelle spectrograph to fly on sounding rockets and record spectra of stars from approximately 920 to 1120A with a resolving power lambda/delta lambda = 200,000 is discussed. The scientific purpose of the program is to observe, with ten times better velocity resolution than before, the plentiful absorption lines in this spectral region produced by atoms, ions and molecules in the interstellar medium. In addition, an important technical goal is to develop and flight-quality a new ultraviolet, photon-counting image sensor which has a windowless, opaque photocathode and a CCD bombarded directly by the accelerated photoelectrons. Except for some initial difficulties with the performance of CCDs, the development of the payload instrument is relatively straightforward and our overall design goals are satisfied. The first flight occurred in late 1984, but no data were obtained because of an inrush of air degraded the instrument's vacuum and caused the detector's high voltage to arc. A second flight in early 1985 was a complete success and obtained a spectrum of pi Sco. Data from this mission are currently being reduced; quick-look versions of the spectra indicate that excellent results will be obtained. Currently, the payload is being reconfigured to fly on a Spartan mission in 1988.

  2. Stability of MINERVA Spectrograph's Instrumental Profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Maurice; Eastman, Jason; Johnson, John Asher

    2018-01-01

    For most Earth-like exoplanets, their physical properties cannot be determined without high precision photometry and radial velocities. For this reason, the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) was designed to obtain photometric and radial velocity measurements with precision sufficient for finding, confirming, and characterizing rocky planets around our nearest stars. MINERVA is an array of four robotic telescopes located on Mt. Hopkins in Arizona. We aim to improve our radial velocity precision with MINERVA by analyzing the stability of our spectrograph’s instrumental profile. We have taken several spectra of the daytime sky each month and have checked for variability over a span of six months. We investigate the variation over time to see if it correlates with temperature and pressure changes in the spectrograph. We discuss the implications of our daytime sky spectra and how the instrumental profile’s stability may be improved.

  3. Investigating Langmuir films at the air-water interface using a planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Shin

    In this work, a new planar array infrared reflection-absorption spectrograph (PA-IRRAS) was developed to investigate a broad range of Langmuir films at the air-water interface. This instrument is capable of recording sample and reference spectra simultaneously with an optical setup that is the same as that of a single-beam instrument but splits the incident infrared beam into two sections on a plane mirror (H) or a water trough. With this design, the instrument could accommodate large infrared accessories, such as a water trough. In addition, water bands were subtracted to obtain a high quality spectrum for a poly(lactic acid) (PLA) Langmuir film on the water subphase with a resolution of about 8 cm-1 in 10.8 sec. With this instrument, two types of monolayer systems were studied; polymeric and lipid Langmuir films at the air-water interface. For the polymeric monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was used as a probe to follow the real-time conformational changes associated with intermolecular interactions of the polymer chains during the compression of the monolayers. It was found that the mixture of poly(D-lactic acid) (PDLA) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) (D/L) formed a stereocomplex when the mixed solution developed the two-dimensional monolayer at the air-water interface. The stereocomplexation occurred before film compression, indicating that there is no direct correlation between film compression and stereocomplexation. For the lipid monolayer system, PA-IRRAS was also used as a probe to investigate the origin of the disruption of a lipid monolayer upon protein adsorption at the air-water interface. Analysis of the time-resolved PA-IRRAS spectra revealed that Cu(II) ion-chelated DSIDA lipid monolayer (Cu 2+-DSIDA) was readily disrupted by myoglobin adsorption as demonstrated by a blue shift of 1.7 cm-1 and a lower intensity in the vas(CH2) stretch mode of the lipid monolayer over a period of five hours. To find the origin of the disruption of the lipid monolayer, a

  4. FIRST ULTRAVIOLET REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF PLUTO AND CHARON BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: DETECTION OF ABSORPTION FEATURES AND EVIDENCE FOR TEMPORAL CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Shinn, A.

    We have observed the mid-UV spectra of both Pluto and its large satellite, Charon, at two rotational epochs using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) in 2010. These are the first HST/COS measurements of Pluto and Charon. Here we describe the observations and our reduction of them, and present the albedo spectra, average mid-UV albedos, and albedo slopes we derive from these data. These data reveal evidence for a strong absorption feature in the mid-UV spectrum of Pluto; evidence for temporal change in Pluto's spectrum since the 1990s is reported, and indirect evidence for a near-UV spectralmore » absorption on Charon is also reported.« less

  5. Retrieval of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide profiles from Odin Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System (OSIRIS) limb-scattered sunlight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Craig Stuart

    2009-12-01

    Key to understanding and predicting the effects of global environmental problems such as ozone depletion and global warming is a detailed understanding of the atmospheric processes, both dynamical and chemical. Essential to this understanding are accurate global data sets of atmospheric constituents with adequate temporal and spatial (vertical and horizontal) resolutions. For this purpose the Canadian satellite instrument OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph and Infrared Imager System) was launched on the Odin satellite in 2001. OSIRIS is primarily designed to measure minor stratospheric constituents, including ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), employing the novel limb-scattered sunlight technique, which can provide both good vertical resolution and near global coverage. This dissertation presents a method to retrieve stratospheric O 3 and NO2 from the OSIRIS limb-scatter observations. The retrieval method incorporates an a posteriori optimal estimator combined with an intermediate spectral analysis, specifically differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). A detailed description of the retrieval method is presented along with the results of a thorough error analysis and a geophysical validation exercise. It is shown that OSIRIS limb-scatter observations successfully produce accurate stratospheric O3 and NO2 number density profiles throughout the stratosphere, clearly demonstrating the strength of the limb-scatter technique. The OSIRIS observations provide an extremely useful data set that is of particular importance for studies of the chemistry of the middle atmosphere. The long OSIRIS record of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen dioxide may also prove useful for investigating variability and trends.

  6. Non-Maxwellian Analysis of the Transition-region Line Profiles Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Dzifčáková, Elena; Polito, Vanessa

    2017-06-10

    We investigate the nature of the spectral line profiles for transition-region (TR) ions observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) . In this context, we analyzed an active-region observation performed by IRIS in its 1400 Å spectral window. The TR lines are found to exhibit significant wings in their spectral profiles, which can be well fitted with a non-Maxwellian κ distribution. The fit with a κ distribution can perform better than a double-Gaussian fit, especially for the strongest line, Si iv 1402.8 Å. Typical values of κ found are about 2, occurring in a majority of spatial pixels wheremore » the TR lines are symmetric, i.e., the fit can be performed. Furthermore, all five spectral lines studied (from Si iv, O iv, and S iv) appear to have the same full-width at half-maximum irrespective of whether the line is an allowed or an intercombination transition. A similar value of κ is obtained for the electron distribution by the fitting of the line intensities relative to Si iv 1402.8 Å, if photospheric abundances are assumed. The κ distributions, however, do not remove the presence of non-thermal broadening. Instead, they actually increase the non-thermal width. This is because, for κ distributions, TR ions are formed at lower temperatures. The large observed non-thermal width lowers the opacity of the Si iv line sufficiently enough for this line to become optically thin.« less

  7. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  8. Discovery of Associated Absorption Lines in an X-Ray Warm Absorber: Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph Observations of MR 2251-178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monier, Eric M.; Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda; Elvis, Martin

    2001-01-01

    The presence of a 'warm absorber' was first suggested to explain spectral variability in an X-ray spectrum of the radio-quiet quasi-stellar object (QSO) MR 2251-178. A unified picture, in which X-ray warm absorbers and 'intrinsic' UV absorbers are the same, offers the opportunity to probe the nuclear environment of active galactic nuclei. To test this scenario and understand the physical properties of the absorber, we obtained a UV spectrum of MR 2251-178 with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The HST spectrum clearly shows absorption due to Lyalpha, N v, and C IV, blueshifted by 300 km s(exp -1) from the emission redshift of the QSO. The rarity of both X-ray and UV absorbers in radio-quiet QSOs suggests these absorbers are physically related, if not identical. Assuming the unified scenario, we place constraints on the physical parameters of the absorber and conclude the mass outflow rate is essentially the same as the accretion rate in MR 2251-178.

  9. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Snow, Theodore P.; Spencer, John; Stern, S. Alan; Stocke, John; Welsh, Barry; Béland, Stéphane; Burgh, Eric B.; Danforth, Charles; France, Kevin; Keeney, Brian; McPhate, Jason; Penton, Steven V.; Andrews, John; Brownsberger, Kenneth; Morse, Jon; Wilkinson, Erik

    2012-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in 2009 May, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F λ ≈ 1.0 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 Å-1, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph echelle modes) in 1%-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (2009 September-2011 June) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is nine times than sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of 2011 June. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lyα absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the He II reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  10. Lhires III High Resolution Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thizy, O.

    2007-05-01

    By spreading the light from celestial objects by wavelength, spectroscopists are like detectives looking for clues and identifying guilty phenomena that shape their spectra. We will review some basic principles in spectroscopy that will help, at our amateur level, to understand how spectra are shaped. We will review the Lhires III highresolution spectrograph Mark Three that was designed to reveal line profile details and subtle changes. Then, we will do an overview of educational and scientific projects that are conducted with the Lhires III and detail the COROT Be star program and the BeSS database for which the spectrograph is a key instrument.

  11. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James C.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Osterman, Steve; Ebbets, Dennis; Heap, Sara H.; Leitherer, Claus; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth; Shull, J. Michael; hide

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a moderate-resolution spectrograph with unprecedented sensitivity that was installed into the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in May 2009, during HST Servicing Mission 4 (STS-125). We present the design philosophy and summarize the key characteristics of the instrument that will be of interest to potential observers. For faint targets, with flux F(sub lambda) approximates 1.0 X 10(exp -14) ergs/s/cm2/Angstrom, COS can achieve comparable signal to noise (when compared to STIS echelle modes) in 1-2% of the observing time. This has led to a significant increase in the total data volume and data quality available to the community. For example, in the first 20 months of science operation (September 2009 - June 2011) the cumulative redshift pathlength of extragalactic sight lines sampled by COS is 9 times that sampled at moderate resolution in 19 previous years of Hubble observations. COS programs have observed 214 distinct lines of sight suitable for study of the intergalactic medium as of June 2011. COS has measured, for the first time with high reliability, broad Lya absorbers and Ne VIII in the intergalactic medium, and observed the HeII reionization epoch along multiple sightlines. COS has detected the first CO emission and absorption in the UV spectra of low-mass circumstellar disks at the epoch of giant planet formation, and detected multiple ionization states of metals in extra-solar planetary atmospheres. In the coming years, COS will continue its census of intergalactic gas, probe galactic and cosmic structure, and explore physics in our solar system and Galaxy.

  12. The absorption profile of pregabalin in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anne E; Olofsen, Erik; Olesen, Søren S; Staahl, Camilla; Andresen, Trine; Dahan, Albert; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2012-12-01

    It was recently shown that pregabalin decreased pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. It is well known that pancreatitis patients suffer from fat malabsorption with accompanying diarrhoea because of loss of exocrine pancreatic enzyme production. This may lead to changes in the mucosal surface in the small intestine and possibly affect the absorption of pregabalin. The pharmacokinetics of pregabalin has never been investigated in patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to develop a population pharmacokinetic model of pregabalin administered to patients with chronic pancreatitis. The pregabalin population pharmacokinetic analysis was conducted on data from fifteen patients with chronic pancreatitis. Each patient received 75 mg of pregabalin (oral capsule). Pregabalin concentrations were measured using a validated liquid chromatographic method. Data analysis was performed using non-linear mixed effects modelling methodology as implemented by NONMEM. A one-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination adequately described pregabalin pharmacokinetics. Time to maximum observed plasma concentration (T(max) ) was 1.53 (95% CI 1.09-2.05). The maximum plasma concentration (C(max) ) was 1.98 μg/ml (95% CI 1.69-2.34), and area under the plasma concentration-time profile (area under the curve) was 18.2 μg*hr/ml (95% CI 14.7-26.3). Pregabalin is well absorbed in patients with chronic pancreatitis, and the pharmacokinetic profile of pregabalin is not extensively affected by chronic pancreatitis. © 2012 The Authors Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology © 2012 Nordic Pharmacological Society.

  13. The SALT HRS Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyas, Luke Martin Graham

    2012-05-01

    SALT HRS (Southern African Large Telescope High Resolution Échelle Spectrograph) is a high-resolution, high-efficiency spectrograph for the 11m SALT telescope in Sutherland, South Africa. The initial optical design work was performed at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. Revisions to the concept, the mechanical design, manufacture, assembly and testing have been handled by the Centre for Advanced Instrumentation, at Durham University in the United Kingdom. SALT HRS is a fibre-fed échelle grating spectrograph with four operational modes: low-, medium- and high-resolution and high-stability modes, having spectral resolutions of R≈16000, 37000, 67000 and 67000 respectively over a wavelength range of 370-890nm. The instrument is of a dual channel, 'white pupil' design, in which the primary mirror acts to collimate light onto a single R4 échelle grating, and also to focus dispersed light to an intermediate focus. A dichroic beam-splitter separates the dispersed light into two separate spectral channels. Spherical pupil mirrors transfer the separated beams via a fold mirror to two wavelength-specific volume-phase holographic gratings (VPHGs) used as cross-dispersers. Cross-dispersed spectra are then imaged by two fully dioptric camera systems onto optimized CCD detectors. This thesis presents the results of the laboratory testing and specification of several critical sub-systems of SALT HRS, as well as the development of key software tools for the design verification and operation at the telescope. In Chapter 1 we first review the technical development of high-resolution spectroscopy and its specific implementation in SALT HRS. In Chapter 2 we develop a comprehensive throughput model of the entire system based on a combination of as-built performance and specific throughput measurements in the laboratory. This is used to make some specific predictions for the on-sky performance of SALT HRS and the magnitude limits for science targets. We also present a

  14. A study of ultraviolet absorption lines through the complete Galactic halo by the analysis of HST faint object spectrograph spectra of active Galactic nuclei, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burks, Geoffrey S.; Bartko, Frank; Shull, J. Michael; Stocke, John T.; Sachs, Elise R.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Harms, Richard J.; Massa, Derck

    1994-01-01

    The ultraviolet (1150 - 2850 A) spectra of a number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) observed with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) have been used to study the properties of the Galactic halo. The objects that served as probes are 3C 273, PKS 0454-220, Pg 1211+143, CSO 251, Ton 951, and PG 1351+640. The equivalent widths of certain interstellar ions have been measured, with special attention paid to the C IV/C II and Si IV/Si II ratios. These ratios have been intercompared, and the highest values are found in the direction of 3C 273, where C IV/C II = 1.2 and Si IV/Si II greater than 1. These high ratios may be due to a nearby supernova remnant, rather than to ionized gas higher up in the Galactic halo. Our data give some support to the notion that QSO metal-line systems may arise from intervening galaxies which contain high supernova rates, galactic fountains, and turbulent mixing layers.

  15. A transform from absorption to Raman excitation profile. A time-dependent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Y.; Yeo, Robert C. K.

    1994-04-01

    An alternative time-frame approach, which is canonically conjugate to the energy-frame approach, for implementing the transform relations for calculating Raman excitation profiles directly from the optical absorption spectrum is presented. Practical and efficient fast Fourier transformation in the time frame replaces the widely used Chan and Page algorithm for evaluating the Hilbert transform in the energy frame. The time-frame approach is applied to: (a) a two-mode model which illustrates the missing mode effect in both absorption and Raman excitation profiles, (b) carotene, in which both the absorption spectrum and the Raman excitation profile show vibrational structure and (c) hexamethylbenzene: TCNE electron donor—acceptor complex where the same spectra are structureless and the Raman excitation profile for the 168 cm -1 mode poses a problem for the energy-frame approach. A similar time-frame approach can be used for the inverse transform from the Raman excitation profile to the optical absorption spectrum.

  16. Immersion echelle spectrograph

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A small spectrograph containing no moving components and capable of providing high resolution spectra of the mid-infrared region from 2 microns to 4 microns in wavelength. The resolving power of the spectrograph exceeds 20,000 throughout this region and at an optical throughput of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.2 sr. The spectrograph incorporates a silicon immersion echelle grating operating in high spectral order combined with a first order transmission grating in a cross-dispersing configuration to provide a two-dimensional (2-D) spectral format that is focused onto a two-dimensional infrared detector array. The spectrometer incorporates a common collimating and condensing lens assembly in a near aberration-free axially symmetric design. The spectrometer has wide use potential in addition to general research, such as monitoring atmospheric constituents for air quality, climate change, global warming, as well as monitoring exhaust fumes for smog sources or exhaust plumes for evidence of illicit drug manufacture.

  17. PRISM Spectrograph Optical Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, Russell A.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this contract is to explore optical design concepts for the PRISM spectrograph and produce a preliminary optical design. An exciting optical configuration has been developed which will allow both wavelength bands to be imaged onto the same detector array. At present the optical design is only partially complete because PRISM will require a fairly elaborate optical system to meet its specification for throughput (area*solid angle). The most complex part of the design, the spectrograph camera, is complete, providing proof of principle that a feasible design is attainable. This camera requires 3 aspheric mirrors to fit inside the 20x60 cm cross-section package. A complete design with reduced throughput (1/9th) has been prepared. The design documents the optical configuration concept. A suitable dispersing prism material, CdTe, has been identified for the prism spectrograph, after a comparison of many materials.

  18. MEGARA spectrograph optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, E.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; García-Vargas, M. L.; Gil de Paz, A.; Páez, G.; Gallego, J.; Sánchez, F. M.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2012-09-01

    MEGARA is the next optical Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) for Gran Telescopio Canarias. The instrument offers two IFUs plus a Multi-Object Spectroscopy (MOS) mode: a large compact bundle covering 12.5 arcsec x 11.3 arcsec on sky with 100 μm fiber-core; a small compact bundle, of 8.5 arcsec x 6.7 arcsec with 70 μm fiber-core and a fiber MOS positioner that allows to place up to 100 mini-bundles, 7 fibers each, with 100 μm fiber-core, within a 3.5 arcmin x 3.5 arcmin field of view, around the two IFUs. The fibers, organized in bundles, end in the pseudo-slit plate, which will be placed at the entrance focal plane of the MEGARA spectrograph. The large IFU and MOS modes will provide intermediate to high spectral resolutions, R=6800-17000. The small IFU mode will provide R=8000-20000. All these resolutions are possible thanks to a spectrograph design based in the used of volume phase holographic gratings in combination with prisms to keep fixed the collimator and camera angle. The MEGARA optics is composed by a total of 53 large optical elements per spectrograph: the field lens, the collimator and the camera lenses plus the complete set of pupil elements including holograms, windows and prisms. INAOE, a partner of the GTC and a partner of MEGARA consortium, is responsible of the optics manufacturing and tests. INAOE will carry out this project working in an alliance with CIO. This paper summarizes the status of MEGARA spectrograph optics at the Preliminary Design Review, held on March 2012.

  19. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  20. Spectrographs for astrophotonics.

    PubMed

    Blind, N; Le Coarer, E; Kern, P; Gousset, S

    2017-10-30

    The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELT), with diameters up to 39 meters, is planned to begin operation in the next decade and promises new challenges in the development of instruments since the instrument size increases in proportion to the telescope diameter D, and the cost as D 2 or faster. The growing field of astrophotonics (the use of photonic technologies in astronomy) could solve this problem by allowing mass production of fully integrated and robust instruments combining various optical functions, with the potential to reduce the size, complexity and cost of instruments. Astrophotonics allows for a broad range of new optical functions, with applications ranging from sky background filtering, high spatial and spectral resolution imaging and spectroscopy. In this paper, we want to provide astronomers with valuable keys to understand how photonics solutions can be implemented (or not) according to the foreseen applications. The paper introduces first key concepts linked to the characteristics of photonics technologies, placed in the framework of astronomy and spectroscopy. We then describe a series of merit criteria that help us determine the potential of a given micro-spectrograph technology for astronomy applications, and then take an inventory of the recent developments in integrated micro-spectrographs with potential for astronomy. We finally compare their performance, to finally draw a map of typical science requirements and pin the identified integrated technologies on it. We finally emphasize the necessary developments that must support micro-spectrograph in the coming years.

  1. The FIREBall fiber-fed UV spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Sarah E.; Schiminovich, David; Milliard, Bruno; Grange, Robert; Martin, D. Christopher; Rahman, Shahinur; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; McLean, Ryan; Tajiri, Gordon; Matuszewski, M.

    2008-07-01

    FIREBall (Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon) had a successful first engineering flight in July of 2007 from Palestine, Texas. Here we detail the design and construction of the spectrograph. FIREBall consists of a 1m telescope coupled to a fiber-fed ultraviolet spectrograph flown on a short duration balloon. The spectrograph is designed to map hydrogen and metal line emission from the intergalactic medium at several redshifts below z=1, exploiting a small window in atmospheric oxygen absorption at balloon altitudes. The instrument is a wide-field IFU fed by almost 400 fibers. The Offner mount spectrograph is designed to be sensitive in the 195-215nm window accessible at our altitudes of 35-40km. We are able to observe Lyα, as well as OVI and CIV doublets, from 0.3 < z < 0.9. Observations of UV bright B stars and background measurements allow characterization of throughput for the entire system and will inform future flights.

  2. Effects of surface roughness and absorption on light propagation in graded-profile waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Danilenko, S S; Osovitskii, A N

    2011-06-30

    This paper examines the effects of surface roughness and absorption on laser light propagation in graded-profile waveguiding structures. We derive analytical expressions for the scattering and absorption coefficients of guided waves and analyse these coefficients in relation to parameters of the waveguiding structure and the roughness of its boundary. A new approach is proposed to measuring roughness parameters of precision dielectric surfaces. Experimental evidence is presented which supports the main conclusions of the theory. (integraled-optical waweguides)

  3. Pioneer-Venus radio occultation (ORO) data reduction: Profiles of 13 cm absorptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffes, Paul G.

    1990-01-01

    In order to characterize possible variations in the abundance and distribution of subcloud sulfuric acid vapor, 13 cm radio occultation signals from 23 orbits that occurred in late 1986 and 1987 (Season 10) and 7 orbits that occurred in 1979 (Season 1) were processed. The data were inverted via inverse Abel transform to produce 13 cm absorptivity profiles. Pressure and temperature profiles obtained with the Pioneer-Venus night probe and the northern probe were used along with the absorptivity profiles to infer upper limits for vertical profiles of the abundance of gaseous H2SO4. In addition to inverting the data, error bars were placed on the absorptivity profiles and H2SO4 abundance profiles using the standard propagation of errors. These error bars were developed by considering the effects of statistical errors only. The profiles show a distinct pattern with regard to latitude which is consistent with latitude variations observed in data obtained during the occultation seasons nos. 1 and 2. However, when compared with the earlier data, the recent occultation studies suggest that the amount of sulfuric acid vapor occurring at and below the main cloud layer may have decreased between early 1979 and late 1986.

  4. The BUSS spectrum of Beta Lyrae. [Balloon-borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hack, M.; Sahade, J.; De Jager, C.; Kondo, Y.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrum of Beta Lyrae from about 1975 to 3010 A taken with the Balloon-borne ultraviolet Stellar Spectrograph experiment in May 1976 at phase 0.61 P is analyzed. Results show the presence of N II semi-forbidden emission and provide evidence for about the same location, in the outer envelope of the system, of the layers responsible for the resonance Mg II doublet emissions and for the "narrow" H-alpha emission. In addition, three sets of absorption lines, P Cygni profiles of Fe III and broad Beals Type III emissions of Mg II, are found to be present.

  5. Spectrographic imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Michael D.; Treado, Patrick J.

    1991-01-01

    An imaging system for providing spectrographically resolved images. The system incorporates a one-dimensional spatial encoding mask which enables an image to be projected onto a two-dimensional image detector after spectral dispersion of the image. The dimension of the image which is lost due to spectral dispersion on the two-dimensional detector is recovered through employing a reverse transform based on presenting a multiplicity of different spatial encoding patterns to the image. The system is especially adapted for detecting Raman scattering of monochromatic light transmitted through or reflected from physical samples. Preferably, spatial encoding is achieved through the use of Hadamard mask which selectively transmits or blocks portions of the image from the sample being evaluated.

  6. Solvent effects on the vibronic one-photon absorption profiles of dioxaborine heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Hua; Halik, Marcus; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Marder, Seth R.; Luo, Yi

    2005-11-01

    The vibronic profiles of one-photon absorption spectra of dioxaborine heterocycles in gas phase and solution have been calculated at the Hartree-Fock and density-functional-theory levels. The polarizable continuum model has been applied to simulate the solvent effect, while the linear coupling model is used to compute the Franck-Condon and Herzberg-Teller contributions. It is found that a good agreement between theory and experiment can be achieved when the solvent effect and electron correlation are taken into account simultaneously. For the first excited charge-transfer state, the maximum of its Herzberg-Teller profile is blueshifted from that of the Franck-Condon profile. The shifted energy is found to be around 0.2eV, which agrees well with the measured energy difference between two- and one-photon absorptions of the first excited state.

  7. Measurement of temperature profiles in flames by emission-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simmons, F. S.; Arnold, C. B.; Lindquist, G. H.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to explore the use of infrared and ultraviolet emission-absorption spectroscopy for determination of temperature profiles in flames. Spectral radiances and absorptances were measured in the 2.7-micron H2O band and the 3064-A OH band in H2/O2 flames for several temperature profiles which were directly measured by a sodium line-reversal technique. The temperature profiles, determined by inversion of the infrared and ultraviolet spectra, showed an average disagreement with line-reversal measurements of 50 K for the infrared and 200 K for the ultraviolet at a temperature of 2600 K. The reasons for these discrepancies are discussed in some detail.

  8. Goodman High Throughput Spectrograph | SOAR

    Science.gov Websites

    SPARTAN Near-IR Camera Ohio State Infrared Imager/Spectrograph (OSIRIS) - NO LONGER AVAILABLE SOAR 320-850 nm wavelength range. The paper describing the instrument is Clemens et al. (2004) Applying for IRAF. Publishing results based on Goodman data?: ADS link to 2004 SPIE Goodman Spectrograph paper

  9. Absorption line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10(exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  10. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  11. Early pharmaceutical profiling to predict oral drug absorption: current status and unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Christel A S; Holm, René; Jørgensen, Søren Astrup; Andersson, Sara B E; Artursson, Per; Beato, Stefania; Borde, Anders; Box, Karl; Brewster, Marcus; Dressman, Jennifer; Feng, Kung-I; Halbert, Gavin; Kostewicz, Edmund; McAllister, Mark; Muenster, Uwe; Thinnes, Julian; Taylor, Robert; Mullertz, Anette

    2014-06-16

    Preformulation measurements are used to estimate the fraction absorbed in vivo for orally administered compounds and thereby allow an early evaluation of the need for enabling formulations. As part of the Oral Biopharmaceutical Tools (OrBiTo) project, this review provides a summary of the pharmaceutical profiling methods available, with focus on in silico and in vitro models typically used to forecast active pharmaceutical ingredient's (APIs) in vivo performance after oral administration. An overview of the composition of human, animal and simulated gastrointestinal (GI) fluids is provided and state-of-the art methodologies to study API properties impacting on oral absorption are reviewed. Assays performed during early development, i.e. physicochemical characterization, dissolution profiles under physiological conditions, permeability assays and the impact of excipients on these properties are discussed in detail and future demands on pharmaceutical profiling are identified. It is expected that innovative computational and experimental methods that better describe molecular processes involved in vivo during dissolution and absorption of APIs will be developed in the OrBiTo. These methods will provide early insights into successful pathways (medicinal chemistry or formulation strategy) and are anticipated to increase the number of new APIs with good oral absorption being discovered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The BigBOSS spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinsky, Patrick; Bebek, Chris; Besuner, Robert; Carton, Pierre-Henri; Edelstein, Jerry; Lampton, Michael; Levi, Michael E.; Poppett, Claire; Prieto, Eric; Schlegel, David; Sholl, Michael

    2012-09-01

    BigBOSS is a proposed ground-based dark energy experiment to study baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and the growth of structure with a 14,000 square degree galaxy and quasi-stellar object redshift survey. It consists of a 5,000- fiber-positioner focal plane feeding the spectrographs. The optical fibers are separated into ten 500 fiber slit heads at the entrance of ten identical spectrographs in a thermally insulated room. Each of the ten spectrographs has a spectral resolution (λ/Δλ) between 1500 and 4000 over a wavelength range from 360 - 980 nm. Each spectrograph uses two dichroic beam splitters to separate the spectrograph into three arms. It uses volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings for high efficiency and compactness. Each arm uses a 4096x4096 15 μm pixel charge coupled device (CCD) for the detector. We describe the requirements and current design of the BigBOSS spectrograph. Design trades (e.g. refractive versus reflective) and manufacturability are also discussed.

  13. Retrieval of profile information from airborne multiaxis UV-visible skylight absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Marco; Buehler, Stefan A; Burrows, John P; Heue, Klaus-Peter; Platt, Ulrich; Pundt, Irene; Richter, Andreas; Rozanov, Alexej; Wagner, Thomas; Wang, Ping

    2004-08-01

    A recent development in ground-based remote sensing of atmospheric constituents by UV-visible absorption measurements of scattered light is the simultaneous use of several horizon viewing directions in addition to the traditional zenith-sky pointing. The different light paths through the atmosphere enable the vertical distribution of some atmospheric absorbers, such as NO2, BrO, or O3, to be retrieved. This approach has recently been implemented on an airborne platform. This novel instrument, the airborne multiaxis differential optical absorption spectrometer (AMAXDOAS), has been flown for the first time. In this study, the amount of profile information that can be retrieved from such measurements is investigated for the trace gas NO2. Sensitivity studies on synthetic data are performed for a variety of representative measurement conditions including two wavelengths, one in the UV and one in the visible, two different surface spectral reflectances, various lines of sight (LOSs), and for two different flight altitudes. The results demonstrate that the AMAXDOAS measurements contain useful profile information, mainly at flight altitude and below the aircraft. Depending on wavelength and LOS used, the vertical resolution of the retrieved profiles is as good as 2 km near flight altitude. Above 14 km the profile information content of AMAXDOAS measurements is sparse. Airborne multiaxis measurements are thus a promising tool for atmospheric studies in the troposphere and the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere region.

  14. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; Persyn, S.; Eterno, J.; Slater, D. C.; Davis, M. W.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Siegmund, O. H.; Marquet, B.; Gerard, J.; Grodent, D. C.

    2008-12-01

    Juno, a NASA New Frontiers mission, plans for launch in August 2011, a 5-year cruise (including a flyby of Earth in October 2013 for a gravity boost), and 14 months around Jupiter after arriving in August 2016. The spinning (2 RPM), solar-powered Juno will study Jupiter from a highly elliptical orbit, in which the spacecraft (for about 6 hours once every 11 days) dives down over the north pole, skims the outermost atmosphere, and rises back up over the south pole. This orbit allows Juno avoid most of the intense particle radiation surrounding the planet and provides an excellent platform for investigating Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Part of the exploration of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere will involve remote sensing of the far-ultraviolet H and H2 auroral emissions, plus gases such as methane and acetylene which add their absorption signature to the H2 emissions. This hydrocarbon absorption can be used to estimate the energy of the precipitating electrons; since more energetic electrons penetrate deeper into the atmosphere and the UV emissions they produce will show more absorption. Juno will carry an Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) to make spectral images of Jupiter's aurora. UVS is a UV imaging spectrograph sensitive to both extreme and far ultraviolet emissions in the 70-205~nm range that will characterize the morphology and spectral nature of Jupiter's auroral emissions. Juno UVS consists of two separate sections: a dedicated telescope/spectrograph assembly and a vault electronics box. The telescope/spectrograph assembly contains a telescope which feeds a 0.15-m Rowland circle spectrograph. The telescope has an input aperture 40×40~mm2 and uses an off-axis parabolic primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated at the front end of the telescope (used to target specific auroral features at up to ±30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane) directs incoming light to the primary. The light is then focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a 'dog

  15. A comparative study of intervening and associated H I 21-cm absorption profiles in redshifted galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S. J.; Duchesne, S. W.; Divoli, A.; Allison, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The star-forming reservoir in the distant Universe can be detected through H I 21-cm absorption arising from either cool gas associated with a radio source or from within a galaxy intervening the sightline to the continuum source. In order to test whether the nature of the absorber can be predicted from the profile shape, we have compiled and analysed all of the known redshifted (z ≥ 0.1) H I 21-cm absorption profiles. Although between individual spectra there is too much variation to assign a typical spectral profile, we confirm that associated absorption profiles are, on average, wider than their intervening counterparts. It is widely hypothesized that this is due to high-velocity nuclear gas feeding the central engine, absent in the more quiescent intervening absorbers. Modelling the column density distribution of the mean associated and intervening spectra, we confirm that the additional low optical depth, wide dispersion component, typical of associated absorbers, arises from gas within the inner parsec. With regard to the potential of predicting the absorber type in the absence of optical spectroscopy, we have implemented machine learning techniques to the 55 associated and 43 intervening spectra, with each of the tested models giving a ≳ 80 per cent accuracy in the prediction of the absorber type. Given the impracticability of follow-up optical spectroscopy of the large number of 21-cm detections expected from the next generation of large radio telescopes, this could provide a powerful new technique with which to determine the nature of the absorbing galaxy.

  16. Absorption profiles of the potassium 4s-4p and 4p-5s lines perturbed by helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allard, N. F.

    2011-12-01

    An accurate determination of the complete profile including the extreme far wing is required to model the contribution of strong alkali resonance lines to brown dwarf spectra. A unified theory of collisional line profiles has been applied for the evaluation of the absorption coefficients of potassium perturbed by helium. Results are reported here from the optical range to the near-infrared.

  17. Vertical profiles of aerosol absorption coefficient from micro-Aethalometer data and Mie calculation over Milan.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, L; Mocnik, G; Ferrini, B S; Perrone, M G; Sangiorgi, G; Bolzacchini, E

    2011-06-15

    Vertical profiles of aerosol number-size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentration were measured between ground-level and 500m AGL over Milan. A tethered balloon was fitted with an instrumentation package consisting of the newly-developed micro-Aethalometer (microAeth® Model AE51, Magee Scientific, USA), an optical particle counter, and a portable meteorological station. At the same time, PM(2.5) samples were collected both at ground-level and at a high altitude sampling site, enabling particle chemical composition to be determined. Vertical profiles and PM(2.5) data were collected both within and above the mixing layer. Absorption coefficient (b(abs)) profiles were calculated from the Aethalometer data: in order to do so, an optical enhancement factor (C), accounting for multiple light-scattering within the filter of the new microAeth® Model AE51, was determined for the first time. The value of this parameter C (2.05±0.03 at λ=880nm) was calculated by comparing the Aethalometer attenuation coefficient and aerosol optical properties determined from OPC data along vertical profiles. Mie calculations were applied to the OPC number-size distribution data, and the aerosol refractive index was calculated using the effective medium approximation applied to aerosol chemical composition. The results compare well with AERONET data. The BC and b(abs) profiles showed a sharp decrease at the mixing height (MH), and fairly constant values of b(abs) and BC were found above the MH, representing 17±2% of those values measured within the mixing layer. The BC fraction of aerosol volume was found to be lower above the MH: 48±8% of the corresponding ground-level values. A statistical mean profile was calculated, both for BC and b(abs), to better describe their behaviour; the model enabled us to compute their average behaviour as a function of height, thus laying the foundations for valid parametrizations of vertical profile data which can be useful in both remote sensing

  18. An absorption profile centred at 78 megahertz in the sky-averaged spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Judd D.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Monsalve, Raul A.; Mozdzen, Thomas J.; Mahesh, Nivedita

    2018-03-01

    After stars formed in the early Universe, their ultraviolet light is expected, eventually, to have penetrated the primordial hydrogen gas and altered the excitation state of its 21-centimetre hyperfine line. This alteration would cause the gas to absorb photons from the cosmic microwave background, producing a spectral distortion that should be observable today at radio frequencies of less than 200 megahertz. Here we report the detection of a flattened absorption profile in the sky-averaged radio spectrum, which is centred at a frequency of 78 megahertz and has a best-fitting full-width at half-maximum of 19 megahertz and an amplitude of 0.5 kelvin. The profile is largely consistent with expectations for the 21-centimetre signal induced by early stars; however, the best-fitting amplitude of the profile is more than a factor of two greater than the largest predictions. This discrepancy suggests that either the primordial gas was much colder than expected or the background radiation temperature was hotter than expected. Astrophysical phenomena (such as radiation from stars and stellar remnants) are unlikely to account for this discrepancy; of the proposed extensions to the standard model of cosmology and particle physics, only cooling of the gas as a result of interactions between dark matter and baryons seems to explain the observed amplitude. The low-frequency edge of the observed profile indicates that stars existed and had produced a background of Lyman-α photons by 180 million years after the Big Bang. The high-frequency edge indicates that the gas was heated to above the radiation temperature less than 100 million years later.

  19. An absorption profile centred at 78 megahertz in the sky-averaged spectrum.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Judd D; Rogers, Alan E E; Monsalve, Raul A; Mozdzen, Thomas J; Mahesh, Nivedita

    2018-02-28

    After stars formed in the early Universe, their ultraviolet light is expected, eventually, to have penetrated the primordial hydrogen gas and altered the excitation state of its 21-centimetre hyperfine line. This alteration would cause the gas to absorb photons from the cosmic microwave background, producing a spectral distortion that should be observable today at radio frequencies of less than 200 megahertz. Here we report the detection of a flattened absorption profile in the sky-averaged radio spectrum, which is centred at a frequency of 78 megahertz and has a best-fitting full-width at half-maximum of 19 megahertz and an amplitude of 0.5 kelvin. The profile is largely consistent with expectations for the 21-centimetre signal induced by early stars; however, the best-fitting amplitude of the profile is more than a factor of two greater than the largest predictions. This discrepancy suggests that either the primordial gas was much colder than expected or the background radiation temperature was hotter than expected. Astrophysical phenomena (such as radiation from stars and stellar remnants) are unlikely to account for this discrepancy; of the proposed extensions to the standard model of cosmology and particle physics, only cooling of the gas as a result of interactions between dark matter and baryons seems to explain the observed amplitude. The low-frequency edge of the observed profile indicates that stars existed and had produced a background of Lyman-α photons by 180 million years after the Big Bang. The high-frequency edge indicates that the gas was heated to above the radiation temperature less than 100 million years later.

  20. High resolution spectrograph. [for LST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peacock, K.

    1975-01-01

    The high resolution spectrograph (HRS) is designed to be used with the Large Space Telescope (LST) for the study of spectra of point and extended targets in the spectral range 110 to 410 nm. It has spectral resolutions of 1,000; 30,000; and 100,000 and has a field of view as large as 10 arc sec. The spectral range and resolution are selectable using interchangeable optical components and an echelle spectrograph is used to display a cross dispersed spectrum on the photocathode of either of 2 SEC orthicon image tubes. Provisions are included for wavelength calibration, target identification and acquisition and thermal control. The system considerations of the instrument are described.

  1. EGRAM- ECHELLE SPECTROGRAPH DESIGN AID

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dantzler, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    EGRAM aids in the design of spectrographic systems that utilize an echelle-first order cross disperser combination. This optical combination causes a two dimensional echellogram to fall on a detector. EGRAM describes the echellogram with enough detail to allow the user to effectively judge the feasibility of the spectrograph's design. By iteratively altering system parameters, the desired echellogram can be achieved without making a physical model. EGRAM calculates system parameters which are accurate to the first order and compare favorably to results from ray tracing techniques. The spectrographic system modelled by EGRAM consists of an entrance aperture, collimator, echelle, cross dispersion grating, focusing options, and a detector. The system is assumed to be free of aberrations and the echelle, cross disperser, and detector should be planar. The EGRAM program is menu driven and has a HELP facility. The user is prompted for information such as minimum and maximum wavelengths, slit dimensions, ruling frequencies, detector geometry, and angle of incidence. EGRAM calculates the resolving power and range of order numbers covered by the echellogram. A numerical map is also produced. This tabulates the order number, slit bandpass, and high/middle/low wavelengths. EGRAM can also compute the centroid coordinates of a specific wavelength and order (or vice versa). EGRAM is written for interactive execution and is written in Microsoft BASIC A. It has been implemented on an IBM PC series computer operating under DOS. EGRAM was developed in 1985.

  2. Aerosol absorption profiling from the synergy of lidar and sun-photometry: the ACTRIS-2 campaigns in Germany, Greece and Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Lopatin, Anton; Marinou, Eleni; Giannakaki, Eleni; Pikridas, Michael; Sciare, Jean; Liakakou, Eleni; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Duesing, Sebastian; Corbin, Joel C.; Gysel, Martin; Bukowiecki, Nicolas; Baars, Holger; Engelmann, Ronny; Wehner, Birgit; Kottas, Michael; Mamali, Dimitra; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Raptis, Panagiotis I.; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Keleshis, Christos; Müller, Detlef; Solomos, Stavros; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Stachlewska, Iwona S.; Igloffstein, Julia; Wandinger, Ulla; Ansmann, Albert; Dubovik, Oleg; Goloub, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    Aerosol absorption profiling is crucial for radiative transfer calculations and climate modelling. Here, we utilize the synergy of lidar with sun-photometer measurements to derive the absorption coefficient and single scattering albedo profiles during the ACTRIS-2 campaigns held in Germany, Greece and Cyprus. The remote sensing techniques are compared with in situ measurements in order to harmonize and validate the different methodologies and reduce the absorption profiling uncertainties.

  3. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  4. Mass Spectrometry Imaging proves differential absorption profiles of well-characterised permeability markers along the crypt-villus axis.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Anna; Peric, Alexandra; Strimfors, Marie; Goodwin, Richard J A; Hayes, Martin A; Andrén, Per E; Hilgendorf, Constanze

    2017-07-25

    Knowledge about the region-specific absorption profiles from the gastrointestinal tract of orally administered drugs is a critical factor guiding dosage form selection in drug development. We have used a novel approach to study three well-characterized permeability and absorption marker drugs in the intestine. Propranolol and metoprolol (highly permeable compounds) and atenolol (low-moderate permeability compound) were orally co-administered to rats. The site of drug absorption was revealed by high spatial resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) and complemented by quantitative measurement of drug concentration in tissue homogenates. MALDI-MSI identified endogenous molecular markers that illustrated the villi structures and confirmed the different absorption sites assigned to histological landmarks for the three drugs. Propranolol and metoprolol showed a rapid absorption and shorter transit distance in contrast to atenolol, which was absorbed more slowly from more distal sites. This study provides novel insights into site specific absorption for each of the compounds along the crypt-villus axis, as well as confirming a proximal-distal absorption gradient along the intestine. The combined analytical approach allowed the quantification and spatial resolution of drug distribution in the intestine and provided experimental evidence for the suggested absorption behaviour of low and highly permeable compounds.

  5. Use of electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for size profiling of gold and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Panyabut, Teerawat; Sirirat, Natnicha; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2018-02-13

    Electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was applied to investigate the atomization behaviors of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in order to relate with particle size information. At various atomization temperatures from 1400 °C to 2200 °C, the time-dependent atomic absorption peak profiles of AuNPs and AgNPs with varying sizes from 5 nm to 100 nm were examined. With increasing particle size, the maximum absorbance was observed at the longer time. The time at maximum absorbance was found to linearly increase with increasing particle size, suggesting that ETAAS can be applied to provide the size information of nanoparticles. With the atomization temperature of 1600 °C, the mixtures of nanoparticles containing two particle sizes, i.e., 5 nm tannic stabilized AuNPs with 60, 80, 100 nm citrate stabilized AuNPs, were investigated and bimodal peaks were observed. The particle size dependent atomization behaviors of nanoparticles show potential application of ETAAS for providing size information of nanoparticles. The calibration plot between the time at maximum absorbance and the particle size was applied to estimate the particle size of in-house synthesized AuNPs and AgNPs and the results obtained were in good agreement with those from flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Furthermore, the linear relationship between the activation energy and the particle size was observed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. NONLINEAR-APPROXIMATION TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING VERTICAL OZONE-CONCENTRATION PROFILES WITH A DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone concentration profiles from backscattered signals obtained by a multi-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration...

  7. Influence of multiple scattering and absorption on the full scattering profile and the isobaric point in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duadi, Hamootal; Fixler, Dror

    2015-05-01

    Light reflectance and transmission from soft tissue has been utilized in noninvasive clinical measurement devices such as the photoplethysmograph (PPG) and reflectance pulse oximeter. Incident light on the skin travels into the underlying layers and is in part reflected back to the surface, in part transferred and in part absorbed. Most methods of near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy focus on the volume reflectance from a semi-infinite sample, while very few measure transmission. We have previously shown that examining the full scattering profile (angular distribution of exiting photons) provides more comprehensive information when measuring from a cylindrical tissue. Furthermore, an isobaric point was found which is not dependent on changes in the reduced scattering coefficient. The angle corresponding to this isobaric point depends on the tissue diameter. We investigated the role of multiple scattering and absorption on the full scattering profile of a cylindrical tissue. First, we define the range in which multiple scattering occurs for different tissue diameters. Next, we examine the role of the absorption coefficient in the attenuation of the full scattering profile. We demonstrate that the absorption linearly influences the intensity at each angle of the full scattering profile and, more importantly, the absorption does not change the position of the isobaric point. The findings of this work demonstrate a realistic model for optical tissue measurements such as NIR spectroscopy, PPG, and pulse oximetery.

  8. Wavelet based de-noising of breath air absorption spectra profiles for improved classification by principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yu. V.; Shapovalov, A. V.; Borisov, A. V.; Vrazhnov, D. A.; Nikolaev, V. V.; Nikiforova, O. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The comparison results of different mother wavelets used for de-noising of model and experimental data which were presented by profiles of absorption spectra of exhaled air are presented. The impact of wavelets de-noising on classification quality made by principal component analysis are also discussed.

  9. STELLAR SURFACE MAGNETO-CONVECTION AS A SOURCE OF ASTROPHYSICAL NOISE. I. MULTI-COMPONENT PARAMETERIZATION OF ABSORPTION LINE PROFILES

    SciTech Connect

    Cegla, H. M.; Shelyag, S.; Watson, C. A.

    2013-02-15

    We outline our techniques to characterize photospheric granulation as an astrophysical noise source. A four-component parameterization of granulation is developed that can be used to reconstruct stellar line asymmetries and radial velocity shifts due to photospheric convective motions. The four components are made up of absorption line profiles calculated for granules, magnetic intergranular lanes, non-magnetic intergranular lanes, and magnetic bright points at disk center. These components are constructed by averaging Fe I 6302 A magnetically sensitive absorption line profiles output from detailed radiative transport calculations of the solar photosphere. Each of the four categories adopted is based on magnetic fieldmore » and continuum intensity limits determined from examining three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations with an average magnetic flux of 200 G. Using these four-component line profiles we accurately reconstruct granulation profiles, produced from modeling 12 Multiplication-Sign 12 Mm{sup 2} areas on the solar surface, to within {approx} {+-}20 cm s{sup -1} on a {approx}100 m s{sup -1} granulation signal. We have also successfully reconstructed granulation profiles from a 50 G simulation using the parameterized line profiles from the 200 G average magnetic field simulation. This test demonstrates applicability of the characterization to a range of magnetic stellar activity levels.« less

  10. BELINDA: Broadband Emission Lidar with Narrowband Determination of Absorption. A new concept for measuring water vapor and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theopold, F. A.; Weitkamp, C.; Michaelis, W.

    1992-01-01

    We present a new concept for differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor and temperature profiles. The idea is to use one broadband emission laser and a narrowband filter system for separation of the 'online' and 'offline' return signals. It is shown that BELINDA offers improvements as to laser emission shape and stability requirements, background suppression, and last and most important a significant reduction of the influence of Rayleigh scattering. A suitably designed system based on this concept is presented, capable of measuring water vapor or temperature profiles throughout the planetary boundary layer.

  11. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    PubMed

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  12. Integration, commissioning, and performance of the UK FMOS spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, Gavin B.; Lewis, Ian J.; Tosh, Ian A. J.; Blackburn, Colin; Bonfield, David G.; Brooks, Charles B.; Holmes, Alan R.; Lee, Hanshin; Froud, Tim R.; Akiyama, Masayuki; Tamura, Naoyuki; Takato, Naruhisa

    2008-07-01

    The UK FMOS spectrograph forms part of Subaru's FMOS multi-object infrared spectroscopy facility. The spectrograph was shipped to Hilo in component form in August of 2007. We describe the integration sequence for the spectrograph, the results of cooldown tests using a new chiller unit fitted to the spectrograph at the telescope, and alignment tests of the spectrograph, gratings and OH-suppression masks. We present the first-light observations for the spectrograph from May 2008.

  13. Applications of principal component analysis to breath air absorption spectra profiles classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenev, Yu. V.; Shapovalov, A. V.; Borisov, A. V.; Vrazhnov, D. A.; Nikolaev, V. V.; Nikiforova, O. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The results of numerical simulation of application principal component analysis to absorption spectra of breath air of patients with pulmonary diseases are presented. Various methods of experimental data preprocessing are analyzed.

  14. Source Attribution of Observed Absorption Profiles During the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) Using a Regional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, J. D.; Berg, L. K.; Chand, D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Flynn, C. J.; Hostetler, C. A.; Redemann, J.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Shilling, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2015-12-01

    Relatively large uncertainties remain in climate model predictions of absorption resulting from black carbon (BC) and brown carbon (BrC). In this study, we focus on comparing simulated profiles of BC, biomass burning aerosols, absorption, and other aerosol optical properties obtained from the regional WRF-Chem model with in situ and remote sensing measurements made during the Department of Energy's Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). TCAP was designed to investigate changes in aerosol mixing state, aerosol radiative forcing, CCN concentration, and cloud-aerosol interactions in two atmospheric columns: one over Cape Cod, Massachusetts and another located approximately 200 km to the east over the ocean. Measurements from the NASA second-generation airborne High Resolution Spectral Lidar reveal the presence distinct aerosol layers associated with the marine boundary layer, residual layer transported over the ocean and in the free troposphere. Analyses of SP2 and aerosol optical measurements indicate that particles in the free troposphere were more 'aged' and had a lower single scattering albebo than for aerosol layers at lower altitudes; however, BC concentrations aloft were lower in the free troposphere. Instead, particle classes derived from the miniSPLAT single particle measurements suggest that the increased absorption aloft may be due biomass burning aerosols. The model suggests that ambient winds likely transported smoke from large wildfires in central Canada as well as smoke from other fires into the sampling domain. The simulated percentage of biomass burning aerosols was consistent with the miniSPLAT data, but the model currently treats all organic matter as non-absorbing. Therefore, we perform sensitivity simulations to examine how the model's absorption and AOD responds to assumptions used for BrC associated with biomass burning and whether the predicted profiles agree with absorption data and wavelength dependent AOD data from 4STAR.

  15. Absorption Profile of (Poly)Phenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries

    PubMed Central

    Bresciani, Letizia; Martini, Daniela; Mena, Pedro; Tassotti, Michele; Calani, Luca; Brigati, Giacomo; Brighenti, Furio; Holasek, Sandra; Malliga, Daniela-Eugenia; Lamprecht, Manfred; Del Rio, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    The market of plant-based nutraceuticals and food supplements is continuously growing due to the increased consumer demand. The introduction of new products with relevant nutritional characteristics represents a new way of providing bioactive compounds and (poly)phenols to consumers, becoming a strategy to ideally guarantee the health benefits attributed to plant foodstuffs and allowing the increase of daily bioactive compound intake. A paramount step in the study of nutraceuticals is the evaluation of the bioavailability and metabolism of their putatively active components. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the absorption profile of the (poly)phenolic compounds contained in three different plant-based food supplements, made of 36 different plant matrices, which were consumed by 20 subjects in an open one-arm study design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 2, 5, and 10 h after capsule intake. Twenty quantifiable metabolites deriving from different (poly)phenolic compounds were identified. Results showed that the consumption of the three capsules allowed the effective absorption of several (poly)phenolic compounds and metabolites appearing at different times in plasma, thereby indicating different absorption profiles. The capsules thus ensured potential health-promoting molecules to be potentially available to target tissues and organs. PMID:28245627

  16. Absorption Profile of (Poly)Phenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries.

    PubMed

    Bresciani, Letizia; Martini, Daniela; Mena, Pedro; Tassotti, Michele; Calani, Luca; Brigati, Giacomo; Brighenti, Furio; Holasek, Sandra; Malliga, Daniela-Eugenia; Lamprecht, Manfred; Del Rio, Daniele

    2017-02-26

    The market of plant-based nutraceuticals and food supplements is continuously growing due to the increased consumer demand. The introduction of new products with relevant nutritional characteristics represents a new way of providing bioactive compounds and (poly)phenols to consumers, becoming a strategy to ideally guarantee the health benefits attributed to plant foodstuffs and allowing the increase of daily bioactive compound intake. A paramount step in the study of nutraceuticals is the evaluation of the bioavailability and metabolism of their putatively active components. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the absorption profile of the (poly)phenolic compounds contained in three different plant-based food supplements, made of 36 different plant matrices, which were consumed by 20 subjects in an open one-arm study design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 2, 5, and 10 h after capsule intake. Twenty quantifiable metabolites deriving from different (poly)phenolic compounds were identified. Results showed that the consumption of the three capsules allowed the effective absorption of several (poly)phenolic compounds and metabolites appearing at different times in plasma, thereby indicating different absorption profiles. The capsules thus ensured potential health-promoting molecules to be potentially available to target tissues and organs.

  17. System selects framing rate for spectrograph camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Circuit using zero-order light is reflected to a photomultiplier in the incoming radiation of a spectrograph monitor to provide an error signal which controls the advancing and driving rate of the film through the camera.

  18. NRES: The Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siverd, Robert; Brown, Tim; Henderson, Todd; Hygelund, John; Barnes, Stuart; de Vera, Jon; Eastman, Jason; Kirby, Annie; Smith, Cary; Taylor, Brook; Tufts, Joseph; van Eyken, Julian

    2018-01-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) is building the Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs (NRES), which will consist of four (up to six in the future) identical, optical (390 - 860 nm) high-precision spectrographs, each fiber-fed simultaneously by up to two 1-meter telescopes and a Thorium-Argon calibration source. We plan to install one at up to 6 observatory sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, creating a single, globally-distributed, autonomous spectrograph facility using up to ten 1-m telescopes. Simulations suggest we will achieve long-term radial velocity precision of 3 m/s in less than an hour for stars brighter than V = 11 or 12 once the system reaches full capability. Acting in concert, these four spectrographs will provide a new, unique facility for stellar characterization and precise radial velocities.Following a few months of on-sky evaluation at our BPL test facility, the first spectrograph unit was shipped to CTIO in late 2016 and installed in March 2017. After several more months of additional testing and commissioning, regular science operations began with this node in September 2017. The second NRES spectrograph was installed at McDonald Observatory in September 2017 and released to the network after its own brief commissioning period, extending spectroscopic capability to the Northern hemisphere. The third NRES spectrograph was installed at SAAO in November 2017 and released to our science community just before year's end. The fourth NRES unit shipped in October and is currently en route to Wise Observatory in Israel with an expected release to the science community in early 2018.We will briefly overview the LCO telescope network, the NRES spectrograph design, the advantages it provides, and development challenges we encountered along the way. We will further discuss real-world performance from our first three units, initial science results, and the ongoing software development effort needed to automate such a facility for a wide array of

  19. NRES: The Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siverd, Robert; Brown, Timothy M.; Henderson, Todd; Hygelund, John; Barnes, Stuart; Bowman, Mark; De Vera, Jon; Eastman, Jason D.; Kirby, Annie; Norbury, Martin; Smith, Cary; Taylor, Brook; Tufts, Joseph; Van Eyken, Julian C.

    2017-06-01

    Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) is building the Network of Robotic Echelle Spectrographs (NRES), which will consist of four to six identical, optical (390 - 860 nm) high-precision spectrographs, each fiber-fed simultaneously by up to two 1-meter telescopes and a Thorium-Argon calibration source. We plan to install one at up to 6 observatory sites in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, creating a single, globally-distributed, autonomous spectrograph facility using up to ten 1-m telescopes. Simulations suggest we will achieve long-term radial velocity precision of 3 m/s in less than an hour for stars brighter than V = 11 or 12. Following a few months of on-sky evaluation at our BPL test facility, the first spectrograph unit was shipped to CTIO in late 2016 and installed in March 2017. Barring serious complications, we expect regular scheduled science observing to begin in mid-2017. Three additional units are in building or testing phases and slated for deployment in late 2017. Acting in concert, these four spectrographs will provide a new, unique facility for stellar characterization and precise radial velocities. We will briefly overview the LCO telescope network, the NRES spectrograph design, the advantages it provides, and development challenges we encountered along the way. We will further discuss real-world performance from our first unit, initial science results, and the ongoing software development effort needed to automate such a facility for a wide array of science cases.

  20. Informing the Selection of Screening Hit Series with in Silico Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Sanders, John M; Beshore, Douglas C; Culberson, J Christopher; Fells, James I; Imbriglio, Jason E; Gunaydin, Hakan; Haidle, Andrew M; Labroli, Marc; Mattioni, Brian E; Sciammetta, Nunzio; Shipe, William D; Sheridan, Robert P; Suen, Linda M; Verras, Andreas; Walji, Abbas; Joshi, Elizabeth M; Bueters, Tjerk

    2017-08-24

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has enabled millions of compounds to be assessed for biological activity, but challenges remain in the prioritization of hit series. While biological, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET), purity, and structural data are routinely used to select chemical matter for further follow-up, the scarcity of historical ADMET data for screening hits limits our understanding of early hit compounds. Herein, we describe a process that utilizes a battery of in-house quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to generate in silico ADMET profiles for hit series to enable more complete characterizations of HTS chemical matter. These profiles allow teams to quickly assess hit series for desirable ADMET properties or suspected liabilities that may require significant optimization. Accordingly, these in silico data can direct ADMET experimentation and profoundly impact the progression of hit series. Several prospective examples are presented to substantiate the value of this approach.

  1. Computer Program for Calculation of a Gas Temperature Profile by Infrared Emission: Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program to calculate the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas was presented in detail. Emphasis was on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing H2O or CO2 radiating gases. The temperature profile was assumed axisymmetric with an assumed functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters were calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared. The program also gave some information on the pressure profile. A method of selection of wavelengths was given that is likely to lead to an accurate determination of the parameters. The program is written in FORTRAN IV language and runs in less than 60 seconds on a Univac 1100 computer.

  2. SAMI: Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, J. T.; Green, A. W.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Sharp, R.; Nielsen, J.; Konstantopoulos, I.; Taylor, E. N.; Scott, N.; Cortese, L.; Richards, S. N.; Croom, S.; Owers, M. S.; Bauer, A. E.; Sweet, S. M.; Bryant, J. J.

    2014-07-01

    The SAMI (Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph) pipeline reduces data from the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI) for the SAMI Galaxy Survey. The python code organizes SAMI data and, along with the AAO 2dfdr package, carries out all steps in the data reduction, from raw data to fully calibrated datacubes. The principal steps are: data management, use of 2dfdr to produce row-stacked spectra, flux calibration, correction for telluric absorption, removal of atmospheric dispersion, alignment of dithered exposures, and drizzling onto a regular output grid. Variance and covariance information is tracked throughout the pipeline. Some quality control routines are also included.

  3. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  4. Modification of UV absorption profile of polymer film reflectors to increase solar-weighted reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Gary; Gee, Randall C.; White, David

    Provided are reflective thin film constructions including a reduced number of layers, which provides for increased solar-weighted hemispherical reflectance and durability. Reflective films include those comprising an ultraviolet absorbing abrasion resistant coating over a metal layer. Also provided are ultraviolet absorbing abrasion resistant coatings and methods for optimizing the ultraviolet absorption of an abrasion resistant coating. Reflective films disclosed herein are useful for solar reflecting, solar collecting, and solar concentrating applications, such as for the generation of electrical power.

  5. A Ground-Based Profiling Differential Absorption LIDAR System for Measuring CO2 in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.; Burris, John F.; Abshire, James B.; Krainak, Michael A.; Riris, Haris; Sun, Xiao-Li; Collatz, G. James

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR observations can potentially provide continuous profiles of CO2 through the planetary boundary layer and into the free troposphere. We will present initial atmospheric measurements from a prototype system that is based on components developed by the telecommunications industry. Preliminary measurements and instrument performance calculations indicate that an optimized differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system will be capable of providing continuous hourly averaged profiles with 250m vertical resolution and better than 1 ppm precision at 1 km. Precision increases (decreases) at lower (higher) altitudes and is directly proportional to altitude resolution and acquisition time. Thus, precision can be improved if temporal or vertical resolution is sacrificed. Our approach measures absorption by CO2 of pulsed laser light at 1.6 microns backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. Aerosol concentrations in the planetary boundary layer are relatively high and are expected to provide adequate signal returns for the desired resolution. The long-term goal of the project is to develop a rugged, autonomous system using only commercially available components that can be replicated inexpensively for deployment in a monitoring network.

  6. Preliminary evaluation of septic-system absorption-field architecture types in a profile-limited soil.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Amanda J; Brye, Kristofor R; Dunn, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Managing household wastewater is an issue that affects hundreds of thousands of people in rural communities nationwide, many of whom rely on septic systems as their primary means of household wastewater disposal. Septic system absorption field products with architectures quite different from traditional pipe-and-gravel systems are being installed in many states with variances from initial design specifications. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance, as measured by the in-product height of stored solution, of four differing absorption-field product architecture types in a profile-limited soil that was loaded at the maximum allowable rate based on soil morphology. Five chamber, two gravel-less pipe, two polystyrene aggregate, and four pipe-and-gravel systems were installed in a profile-limited, Captina silt loam soil (fine-silty, siliceous, active, mesic Typic Fragiudult) and dosed with raw effluent at rates determined by current State of Arkansas regulations via individual peristaltic pumps. Free-solution monitoring ports were installed within each product, where the depth to free solution was measured periodically and used to evaluate product performance. Data collected from January through August 2009 indicated that preliminary system performance was unaffected by product architecture type. All products performed similarly under dry soil conditions. However, differences among individual products were observed during periods of hydrologic stress (i.e., wet soil conditions). Surfacing of effluent was not observed atop any product, indicating that the current loading rate design method is functioning properly. Preliminary results indicate that some alternative absorption-field products perform similarly to the traditional pipe-and-gravel system, thus providing flexibility and options for homeowners. by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  7. Complex X-ray Absorption and the Fe K(alpha) Profile in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Botorff, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data from simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken during 2001 April and November. We have investigated the nature of the very flat observed X-ray spectrum. Chandra grating data show the presence of X-ray absorption lines, revealing two distinct components of the absorbing gas, one which is consistent with our previous model of the UV/X-ray absorber while the other, which is outflowing at a velocity of approximately 1100 kilometers per second, has a larger column density and is much more highly ionized. The broad-band spectral characteristics of the X-ray continuum observed with XMM during 2001 April, reveal the presence of a third layer of absorption consisting of a very large column (approximately 2.5 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) of highly ionized gas with a covering fraction approximately 50%. This low covering fraction suggests that the absorber lies within a few 1t-days of the X-ray source and/or is filamentary in structure. Interestingly, these absorbers are not in thermal equilibrium with one another. The two new components are too highly ionized to be radiatively accelerated, which we suggest is evidence for a hydromagnetic origin for the outflow. Applying our model to the November dataset, we can account for the spectral variability primarily by a drop in the ionization states of the absorbers, as expected by the change in the continuum flux. When this complex absorption is accounted for we find the underlying continuum to be typical of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The spectral curvature attributed to the high column absorber, in turn, reduces estimates of the flux and extent of any broad Fe emission line from the accretion disk.

  8. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  9. Differential absorption and Raman lidar for water vapor profile measurements - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar and Raman lidar have been applied to the range-resolved measurements of water vapor density for more than 20 years. Results have been obtained using both lidar techniques that have led to improved understanding of water vapor distributions in the atmosphere. This paper reviews the theory of the measurements, including the sources of systematic and random error; the progress in lidar technology and techniques during that period, including a brief look at some of the lidar systems in development or proposed; and the steps being taken to improve such lidar systems.

  10. The Diffuse Interstellar Cloud Experiment: a high-resolution far-ultraviolet spectrograph.

    PubMed

    Schindhelm, Eric; Beasley, Matthew; Burgh, Eric B; Green, James C

    2012-03-01

    We have designed, assembled, and launched a sounding rocket payload to perform high-resolution far-ultraviolet spectroscopy. The instrument is functionally a Cassegrain telescope followed by a modified Rowland spectrograph. The spectrograph was designed to achieve a resolving power (R=λ/δλ) of 60,000 in a compact package by adding a magnifying secondary optic. This is enabled by using a holographically ruled grating to minimize aberrations induced by the second optic. We designed the instrument to observe two stars on opposing sides of a nearby hot/cold gas interface. Obtaining spectra of the O VI doublet in absorption toward these stars can provide new insight into the processes governing hot gas in the local interstellar medium. Here we present the optical design and alignment of the telescope and spectrograph, as well as flight results. © 2012 Optical Society of America

  11. NASA multipurpose airborne DIAL system and measurements of ozone and aerosol profiles. [DIfferential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Carter, A. F.; Shipley, S. T.; Siviter, J. H., Jr.; Hall, W. M.; Allen, R. J.; Butler, C. F.; Mayo, M. N.

    1983-01-01

    The hardware, operational characteristics, data processing system, and applications of the NASA airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. DIAL functions by assessing the average gas concentration over a specified range interval by analyzing the difference in lidar backscatter signals for laser wavelengths tuned on and off of the molecular absorption line of a gas under investigation. The system comprises two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers pumping two high conversion efficiency tunable dye lasers emitting pulses separated by 100 microsec or less. The return signals are digitized and stored on magnetic tape. The signal collector consists of photomultiplier tubes implanted in a cassegrain telescope. Flight tests of the system involved on-measurements at 285.95 nm and off-measurements at 299.40 nm, which yielded a differential cross section of 1.74 x 10 to the -16th sq cm. In situ measurements with another plane at a nominal altitude of 3.2 km for comparison purposes showed accuracy to within 10% in and above the boundary layer. The system is considered as a test apparatus for more developed versions to be flown on the Shuttle

  12. Curved VPH gratings for novel spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clemens, J. Christopher; O'Donoghue, Darragh; Dunlap, Bart H.

    2014-07-01

    The introduction of volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings into astronomy over a decade ago opened new possibilities for instrument designers. In this paper we describe an extension of VPH grating technology that will have applications in astronomy and beyond: curved VPH gratings. These devices can disperse light while simultaneously correcting aberrations. We have designed and manufactured two different kinds of convex VPH grating prototypes for use in off-axis reflecting spectrographs. One type functions in transmission and the other in reflection, enabling Offnerstyle spectrographs with the high-efficiency and low-cost advantages of VPH gratings. We will discuss the design process and the tools required for modelling these gratings along with the recording layout and process steps required to fabricate them. We will present performance data for the first convex VPH grating produced for an astronomical spectrograph.

  13. Single Mode, Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christian; Leon-Saval, Sergio G.; Betters, Christopher H.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2014-04-01

    The `holy grail' of exoplanet research today is the detection of an earth-like planet: a rocky planet in the habitable zone around a main-sequence star. Extremely precise Doppler spectroscopy is an indispensable tool to find and characterize earth-like planets; however, to find these planets around solar-type stars, we need nearly one order of magnitude better radial velocity (RV) precision than the best current spectrographs provide. Recent developments in astrophotonics (Bland-Hawthorn & Horton 2006, Bland-Hawthorn et al. 2010) and adaptive optics (AO) enable single mode fiber (SMF) fed, high resolution spectrographs, which can realize the next step in precision. SMF feeds have intrinsic advantages over multimode fiber or slit coupled spectrographs: The intensity distribution at the fiber exit is extremely stable, and as a result the line spread function of a well-designed spectrograph is fully decoupled from input coupling conditions, like guiding or seeing variations (Ihle et al. 2010). Modal noise, a limiting factor in current multimode fiber fed instruments (Baudrand & Walker 2001), can be eliminated by proper design, and the diffraction limited input to the spectrograph allows for very compact instrument designs, which provide excellent optomechanical stability. A SMF is the ideal interface for new, very precise wavelength calibrators, like laser frequency combs (Steinmetz et al. 2008, Osterman et al. 2012), or SMF based Fabry-Perot Etalons (Halverson et al. 2013). At near infrared wavelengths, these technologies are ready to be implemented in on-sky instruments, or already in use. We discuss a novel concept for such a spectrograph.

  14. The Spartan-281 Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Dufour, Reginald J.; Opal, Chet B.; Raymond, John C.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Naval Research Laboratory's Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUVIS), currently under development for flight as a Spartan shuttle payload, is designed to perform spectroscopy of diffuse sources in the FUV with very high sensitivity and moderate spatial and spectral resolution. Diffuse nebulae, the general galactic background radiation, and artificially induced radiation associated with the Space Shuttle vehicle are sources of particular interest. The FUVIS instrument will cover the wavelength range of 970-2000 A with selectable resolutions of 5 and 30 A. It is a slit imaging spectrograph having 3 arcmin spatial resolution along its 2.7 deg long slit.

  15. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Characterize the Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Oral Extended Release Methylphenidate Products in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Duan, John; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A previously presented physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for immediate release (IR) methylphenidate (MPH) was extended to characterize the pharmacokinetic behaviors of oral extended release (ER) MPH formulations in adults for the first time. Information on the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, together with the biopharmaceutical properties of MPH, was integrated into the original model, with model parameters representing hepatic metabolism and intestinal non-specific loss recalibrated against in vitro and in vivo kinetic data sets with IR MPH. A Weibull function was implemented to describe the dissolution of different ER formulations. A variety of mathematical functions can be utilized to account for the engineered release/dissolution technologies to achieve better model performance. The physiological absorption model tracked well the plasma concentration profiles in adults receiving a multilayer-release MPH formulation or Metadate CD, while some degree of discrepancy was observed between predicted and observed plasma concentration profiles for Ritalin LA and Medikinet Retard. A local sensitivity analysis demonstrated that model parameters associated with the GI tract significantly influenced model predicted plasma MPH concentrations, albeit to varying degrees, suggesting the importance of better understanding the GI tract physiology, along with the intestinal non-specific loss of MPH. The model provides a quantitative tool to predict the biphasic plasma time course data for ER MPH, helping elucidate factors responsible for the diverse plasma MPH concentration profiles following oral dosing of different ER formulations. PMID:27723791

  16. The Global Ozone and Aerosol Profiles and Aerosol Hygroscopic Effect and Absorption Optical Depth (GOA2HEAD) Network Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R. S.; Elkins, J. W.; Frost, G. J.; McComiskey, A. C.; Murphy, D. M.; Ogren, J. A.; Petropavlovskikh, I. V.; Rosenlof, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Inverse modeling using measurements of ozone (O3) and aerosol is a powerful tool for deriving pollutant emissions. Because they have relatively long lifetimes, O3 and aerosol are transported over large distances. Frequent and globally spaced vertical profiles rather than ground-based measurements alone are therefore highly desired. Three requirements necessary for a successful global monitoring program are: Low equipment cost, low operation cost, and reliable measurements of known uncertainty. Conventional profiling using aircraft provides excellent data, but is cost prohibitive on a large scale. Here we describe a new platform and instruments meeting all three global monitoring requirements. The platform consists of a small balloon and an auto-homing glider. The glider is released from the balloon at about 5 km altitude, returning the light instrument package to the launch location, and allowing for consistent recovery of the payload. Atmospheric profiling can be performed either during ascent or descent (or both) depending on measurement requirements. We will present the specifications for two instrument packages currently under development. The first measures O3, RH, p, T, dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol optical depth. The second measures dry aerosol particle number and size distribution, and aerosol absorption coefficient. Other potential instrument packages and the desired spatial/temporal resolution for the GOA2HEAD monitoring initiative will also be discussed.

  17. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Subhourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar system, developed jointly by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min 17 temporal integration.

  18. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  19. Strong light absorption capability directed by structured profile of vertical Si nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaliyawala, Harsh A.; Ray, Abhijit; Pati, Ranjan K.; Mukhopadhyay, Indrajit

    2017-11-01

    Si nanowire arrays (SiNWAs) with random fractal geometry was fabricated using fast, mask-less, non-lithographic and facile approach by incorporating metal assisted electroless etching of n-type Si (111) substrates. The FESEM images demonstrate the formation of nano-porous surfaces that provide effective path for the incoming light to get trapped into the cavity of nanowires. The length of NWs increases from ∼1 to 10 μm with increase in the etching time having a diameter in the range of ∼25-82 nm. A transformation from zero to first order kinetics after a prolonged etching has been determined. The synthesized SiNWAs show high light trapping properties, including a maximum photon absorption across the entire visible and near IR range below the band gap of Si. The SiNWAs etched for 15 min exhibit extremely low specular and total reflectance of ∼0.2% and 4.5%, respectively over a broadband of wavelength. The reduction in the reflection loss is accompanied with the gradient of refractive index from air to Si substrate as well as due to the sub-wavelength structures, which manifests the light scattering effect. The COMSOL multiphysics simulation has been performed to study the high broadband light absorption capability in terms of the strong localized light field confinement by varying the length of the nanowire. Moreover, the SiNWs induces the dewetting ability at the solid/liquid interface and enhances the superhydrophobicity. Furthermore, a maximum length scale of 100-200 nm manifests a strong heterogeneity along the planar section of the surface of SiNWs. The study thus provides an insight on the light propagation into the random fractal geometries of Si nanowires. These outstanding properties should contribute to the structural optimization of various optoelectronic and photonic devices.

  20. Mauna Kea Spectrographic Explorer (MSE): a conceptual design for multi-object high resolution spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Yongtian; Hu, Zhongwen

    2016-08-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer (MSE) project will transform the CFHT 3.6m optical telescope into a 10m class dedicated multi-object spectroscopic facility, with an ability to simultaneously measure thousands of objects with a spectral resolution range spanning 2,000 to 40,000. MSE will develop two spectrographic facilities to meet the science requirements. These are respectively, the Low/Medium Resolution spectrographs (LMRS) and High Resolution spectrographs (HRS). Multi-object high resolution spectrographs with total of 1,156 fibers is a big challenge, one that has never been attempted for a 10m class telescope. To date, most spectral survey facilities work in single order low/medium resolution mode, and only a few Wide Field Spectrographs (WFS) provide a cross-dispersion high resolution mode with a limited number of orders. Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology (NIAOT) propose a conceptual design with the use of novel image slicer arrays and single order immersed Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) grating for the MSE multi-object high resolution spectrographs. The conceptual scheme contains six identical fiber-link spectrographs, each of which simultaneously covers three restricted bands (λ/30, λ/30, λ/15) in the optical regime, with spectral resolution of 40,000 in Blue/Visible bands (400nm / 490nm) and 20,000 in Red band (650nm). The details of the design is presented in this paper.

  1. CUBES: cassegrain U-band Brazil-ESO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbuy, B.; Bawden Macanhan, V.; Bristow, P.; Castilho, B.; Dekker, H.; Delabre, B.; Diaz, M.; Gneiding, C.; Kerber, F.; Kuntschner, H.; La Mura, G.; Maciel, W.; Meléndez, J.; Pasquini, L.; Pereira, C. B.; Petitjean, P.; Reiss, R.; Siqueira-Mello, C.; Smiljanic, R.; Vernet, J.

    2014-11-01

    CUBES is a high-efficiency, medium-resolution ( R˜20,000) ground based UV (300-400 nm) spectrograph, to be installed in the cassegrain focus of one of ESO's VLT unit telescopes in 2017/18. The CUBES project is a joint venture between ESO and IAG/USP, and LNA/MCTI. CUBES will provide access to a wealth of new and relevant information for stellar as well as extragalactic sources. Main science cases include the study of beryllium and heavy elements in metal-poor stars, the direct determination of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances by study of molecular bands in the UV range, as well as the study of active galactic nuclei and the quasar absorption lines. With a streamlined modern instrument design, high efficiency dispersing elements and UV-sensitive detectors, it will give a significant gain in sensitivity over existing ground based medium-high resolution spectrographs, enabling vastly increased sample sizes accessible to the astronomical community. We present here a brief overview of the project including the status, science cases and a discussion of the design options.

  2. Correlation between diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and interstellar extinction using data from Bosscha Compact Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puspitarini, L.; Malasan, H. L.; Aprilia; Arifyanto, M. I.; Lallement, R.; Irfan, M.; Puspitaningrum, E.

    2018-04-01

    A longstanding challenge in astronomical spectroscopy is to uncover the carriers of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). They are broad absorption features due to the interstellar matter (ISM). They are seen in stellar spectra of background stars or other astronomical objects. Although we do not know utterly the carriers of the DIBs, they can be a promising tracer of the ISM. One of the interesting properties is their correlations with the interstellar (IS) extinction. For each band, the correlation has considerable dispersion and differences that possibly due to the IS physical conditions. Some DIBs are sensitive to the stellar radiation field, and some are not. To study the effect, we measured the DIB observed in Be/B stars spectra. The stars were observed by using Bosscha Compact Spectrograph at the Bosscha Observatory, Lembang, Indonesia. We performed an automated fitting of a combination of a smooth stellar continuum, the DIB profile, and a synthetic telluric transmission to the spectrum. The DIB measurements were compared to the general DIBs-extinction relationship. The correlation is found to be in good agreement with previous determinations.

  3. EPIC/DSCOVR's Oxygen Absorption Channels: A Cloud Profiling Information Content Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, A. B.; Merlin, G.; Labonnote, L. C.; Cornet, C.; Dubuisson, P.; Ferlay, N.; Parol, F.; Riedi, J.; Yang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    EPIC/DSCOVR has several spectral channels dedicated to cloud characterization, most notably O2 A- and B-band. Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) ratios of in-band and reference channels are less prone to calibration error than the 4 individual signals. Using these ratios, we have replicated for mono-directional (quasi-backscattering) EPIC observations the recent cloud information content analysis by Merlin et al. (AMT-D,8:12709-12758,2015) that was focused on A-band-only but multi-angle observations by POLDER in the past, by AirMSPI in the present, and by 3MI and MAIA in the future. The methodology is based on extensive forward 1D radiative transfer (RT) computations using the ARTDECO model that implements a k-distribution technique for the absorbing (in-band) channels. These synthetic signals are combined into a Bayesian Rodgers-type framework for estimating posterior uncertainty on retrieved quantities. Recall that this formalism calls explicitly for: (1) estimates of instrument error, and (2) prior uncertainty on the retrieved quantities, to which we add (3) reasonable estimates of uncertainty in the non- or otherwise-retrieved properties. Wide ranges of cloud top heights (CTHs) and cloud geometrical thicknesses (CGTs) are examined for a representative selection of cloud optical thicknesses (COTs), solar angles, and surface reflectances. We found that CTH should be reliably retrieved from EPIC data under most circumstances as long as COT can be inferred from non-absorbing channels, and the bias from in-cloud absorption is removed. However, CGT will be hard to determine unless CTH is constrained by independent means. EPIC has several UV channels that could be brought to bear. These findings conflict those of Yang et al. (JQSRT,122:141-149,2013), so we also revisit that more preliminary study that did not account for a realistic level of residual instrument noise in the DOAS ratios. In conclusion, we believe that the present information content

  4. NOAO's next-generation optical spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.; Harmer, Charles F.; Blakley, Rick D.; Parks, Rachel J.

    2000-08-01

    The National Optical Astronomy Observatory is developing a new, wide-field, imaging spectrograph for use on its existing 4-meter telescopes. This Next Generation Optical Spectrograph (NGOS) will utilize volume-phase holographic grating technology and will have a mosaiced detector array to image the spectra over a field of view that will be something like 10.5 by 42 arc-minutes on the sky. The overall efficiency of the spectrograph should be quite high allowing it to outperform the current RC spectrograph by factors of 10 to 20 and the Hydra multi-fiber instrument by a facto of fiber to ten per object. The operational range of the instrument will allow observations within the optical and near-IR regions. Spectral resolutions will go from R equals 1000 to at least R equals 5000 with 1.4 arc-second slits. The large size of this instrument, with a beam diameter of 200 mm and an overall length of nearly 3 meters, presents a significant challenge in mounting it at the Cassegrain location of the telescope. Design trades and options that allow it to fit are discussed.

  5. Sky Subtraction with Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Myriam

    2017-09-01

    "Historically, fiber-fed spectrographs had been deemed inadequate for the observation of faint targets, mainly because of the difficulty to achieve high accuracy on the sky subtraction. The impossibility to sample the sky in the immediate vicinity of the target in fiber instruments has led to a commonly held view that a multi-object fibre spectrograph cannot achieve an accurate sky subtraction under 1% contrary to their slit counterpart. The next generation of multi-objects spectrograph at the VLT (MOONS) and the planed MOS for the E-ELT (MOSAIC) are fiber-fed instruments, and are aimed to observed targets fainter than the sky continuum level. In this talk, I will present the state-of-art on sky subtraction strategies and data reduction algorithm specifically developed for fiber-fed spectrographs. I will also present the main results of an observational campaign to better characterise the sky spatial and temporal variations ( in particular the continuum and faint sky lines)."

  6. Hubble Space Telescope, Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This drawing illustrates the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's), Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS). The HST's two spectrographs, the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph and the FOS, can detect a broader range of wavelengths than is possible from the Earth because there is no atmosphere to absorb certain wavelengths. Scientists can determine the chemical composition, temperature, pressure, and turbulence of the stellar atmosphere producing the light, all from spectral data. The FOC can detect detail in very faint objects, such as those at great distances, and light ranging from ultraviolet to red spectral bands. Both spectrographs operate in essentially the same way. The incoming light passes through a small entrance aperture, then passes through filters and diffraction gratings, that work like prisms. The filter or grating used determines what range of wavelength will be examined and in what detail. Then the spectrograph detectors record the strength of each wavelength band and sends it back to Earth. The purpose of the HST, the most complex and sensitive optical telescope ever made, is to study the cosmos from a low-Earth orbit. By placing the telescope in space, astronomers are able to collect data that is free of the Earth's atmosphere. The HST views galaxies, stars, planets, comets, possibly other solar systems, and even unusual phenomena such as quasars, with 10 times the clarity of ground-based telescopes. The HST was deployed from the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-31 mission) into Earth orbit in April 1990. The Marshall Space Flight Center had responsibility for design, development, and construction of the HST. The Perkin-Elmer Corporation, in Danbury, Cornecticut, developed the optical system and guidance sensors.

  7. ASYMMETRIC ABSORPTION PROFILES OF Ly{alpha} AND Ly{beta} IN DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee-Won, E-mail: hwlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2013-08-01

    Damped Ly{alpha} systems observed in the quasar spectra are characterized by a high neutral hydrogen column density, N{sub HI} > 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2}. The absorption wing profiles are often fitted using the Voigt function due to the fact that the scattering cross section near the resonant line center is approximately described by the Lorentzian function. Since a hydrogen atom has infinitely many p states that participate in the electric dipole interaction, the cross section starts to deviate from the Lorentzian in an asymmetric way in the line wing regions. We investigate this asymmetry in the absorption linemore » profiles around Ly{alpha} and Ly{beta} as a function of the neutral hydrogen column density N{sub HI}. In terms of {Delta}{lambda} {identical_to} {lambda} - {lambda}{sub {alpha}}, we expand the Kramers-Heisenberg formula around Ly{alpha} to find {sigma}({lambda}) {approx_equal} (0.5f{sub 12}){sup 2}{sigma}{sub T}({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}{sub {alpha}}){sup -2}[1 + 3.792({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}{sub {alpha}})], where f{sub 12} and {sigma}{sub T} are the oscillator strength of Ly{alpha} and the Thomson scattering cross section, respectively. In terms of {Delta}{lambda}{sub 2} {identical_to} {lambda} - {lambda}{sub {beta}} in the vicinity of Ly{beta}, the total scattering cross section, given as the sum of cross sections for Rayleigh and Raman scattering, is shown to be {sigma}({lambda}) {approx_equal} {sigma}{sub T}(0.5f{sub 13}){sup 2}(1 + R{sub 0})({Delta}{lambda}{sub 2}/{lambda}{sub {beta}}){sup -2}[1 - 24.68({Delta}{lambda}{sub 2}/{lambda}{sub {beta}})] with f{sub 13} and the factor R{sub 0} = 0.1342 being the oscillator strength for Ly{beta} and the ratio of the Raman cross section to Rayleigh cross section, respectively. A redward asymmetry develops around Ly{alpha}, whereas a blue asymmetry is obtained for Ly{beta}. The absorption center shifts are found to be almost proportional to the neutral hydrogen column density.« less

  8. New infrared spectrograph for the investigation of the mesopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltovskoi, I. I.; Ammosov, P. P.; Gavrilyeva, G. A.; Ammosova, A. M.; Sivseva, V. I.

    2017-11-01

    A new infrared spectrograph with high temporal resolution for observation of OH band (3-1) emission dynamics is described. For the automated work of the spectrograph, special software was created. Remote control over the device is also configured.

  9. The problem of scattering in fibre-fed VPH spectrographs and possible solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. C.; Saunders, Will; Betters, Chris; Croom, Scott

    2014-07-01

    All spectrographs unavoidably scatter light. Scattering in the spectral direction is problematic for sky subtraction, since atmospheric spectral lines are blurred. Scattering in the spatial direction is problematic for fibre fed spectrographs, since it limits how closely fibres can be packed together. We investigate the nature of this scattering and show that the scattering wings have both a Lorentzian component, and a shallower (1/r) component. We investigate the causes of this from a theoretical perspective, and argue that for the spectral PSF the Lorentzian wings are in part due to the profile of the illumination of the pupil of the spectrograph onto the diffraction grating, whereas the shallower component is from bulk scattering. We then investigate ways to mitigate the diffractive scattering by apodising the pupil. In the ideal case of a Gaussian apodised pupil, the scattering can be significantly improved. Finally we look at realistic models of the spectrograph pupils of fibre fed spectrographs with a centrally obstructed telescope, and show that it is possible to apodise the pupil through non-telecentric injection into the fibre.

  10. Simulated stellar kinematics studies of high-redshift galaxies with the HARMONI Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrew, S.; Zieleniewski, S.; Houghton, R. C. W.; Thatte, N.; Devriendt, J.; Tecza, M.; Clarke, F.; O'Brien, K.; Häußler, B.

    2016-05-01

    We present a study into the capabilities of integrated and spatially resolved integral field spectroscopy of galaxies at z = 2-4 with the future HARMONI spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) using the simulation pipeline, HSIM. We focus particularly on the instrument's capabilities in stellar absorption line integral field spectroscopy, which will allow us to study the stellar kinematics and stellar population characteristics. Such measurements for star-forming and passive galaxies around the peak star formation era will provide a critical insight into the star formation, quenching and mass assembly history of high-z, and thus present-day galaxies. First, we perform a signal-to-noise study for passive galaxies at a range of stellar masses for z = 2-4, assuming different light profiles; for this population, we estimate that integrated stellar absorption line spectroscopy with HARMONI will be limited to galaxies with M* ≳ 1010.7 M⊙. Secondly, we use HSIM to perform a mock observation of a typical star-forming 1010 M⊙ galaxy at z = 3 generated from the high-resolution cosmological simulation NUTFB. We demonstrate that the input stellar kinematics of the simulated galaxy can be accurately recovered from the integrated spectrum in a 15-h observation, using common analysis tools. Whilst spatially resolved spectroscopy is likely to remain out of reach for this particular galaxy, we estimate HARMONI's performance limits in this regime from our findings. This study demonstrates how instrument simulators such as HSIM can be used to quantify instrument performance and study observational biases on kinematics retrieval; and shows the potential of making observational predictions from cosmological simulation output data.

  11. Monte Carlo simulations of the detailed iron absorption line profiles from thermal winds in X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaru, Ryota; Done, Chris; Odaka, Hirokazu; Watanabe, Shin; Takahashi, Tadayuki

    2018-05-01

    Blueshifted absorption lines from highly ionized iron are seen in some high inclination X-ray binary systems, indicating the presence of an equatorial disc wind. This launch mechanism is under debate, but thermal driving should be ubiquitous. X-ray irradiation from the central source heats disc surface, forming a wind from the outer disc where the local escape velocity is lower than the sound speed. The mass-loss rate from each part of the disc is determined by the luminosity and spectral shape of the central source. We use these together with an assumed density and velocity structure of the wind to predict the column density and ionization state, then combine this with a Monte Carlo radiation transfer to predict the detailed shape of the absorption (and emission) line profiles. We test this on the persistent wind seen in the bright neutron star binary GX 13+1, with luminosity L/LEdd ˜ 0.5. We approximately include the effect of radiation pressure because of high luminosity, and compute line features. We compare these to the highest resolution data, the Chandra third-order grating spectra, which we show here for the first time. This is the first physical model for the wind in this system, and it succeeds in reproducing many of the features seen in the data, showing that the wind in GX13+1 is most likely a thermal-radiation driven wind. This approach, combined with better streamline structures derived from full radiation hydrodynamic simulations, will allow future calorimeter data to explore the detail wind structure.

  12. TAIPAN fibre feed and spectrograph: engineering overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staszak, Nicholas F.; Lawrence, Jon; Zhelem, Ross; Content, Robert; Churilov, Vladimir; Case, Scott; Brown, Rebecca; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Kuehn, Kyler; Pai, Naveen; Klauser, Urs; Nichani, Vijay; Waller, Lew

    2016-07-01

    TAIPAN will conduct a stellar and galaxy survey of the Southern sky. The TAIPAN positioner is being developed as a prototype for the MANIFEST instrument on the GMT. The TAIPAN Spectrograph is an AAO designed all-refractive 2-arm design that delivers a spectral resolution of R>2000 over the wavelength range 370-870 nm. It is fed by a custom fibre cable from the TAIPAN Starbugs positioner. The design for TAIPAN incorporates 150 optical fibres (with an upgrade path to 300). Presented is an engineering overview of the UKST Fibre Cable design used to support Starbugs, the custom slit design, and the overall design and build plan for the TAIPAN Spectrograph.

  13. Integrating TV/digital data spectrograph system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, B. J.; Fay, T. D.; Miller, E. R.; Wamsteker, W.; Brown, R. M.; Neely, P. L.

    1975-01-01

    A 25-mm vidicon camera was previously modified to allow operation in an integration mode for low-light-level astronomical work. The camera was then mated to a low-dispersion spectrograph for obtaining spectral information in the 400 to 750 nm range. A high speed digital video image system was utilized to digitize the analog video signal, place the information directly into computer-type memory, and record data on digital magnetic tape for permanent storage and subsequent analysis.

  14. Conversational high resolution mass spectrographic data reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romiez, M. P.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN 4 program is described which reduces the data obtained from a high resolution mass spectrograph. The program (1) calculates an accurate mass for each line on the photoplate, and (2) assigns elemental compositions to each accurate mass. The program is intended for use in a time-shared computing environment and makes use of the conversational aspects of time-sharing operating systems.

  15. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph on NASA's Juno Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall; Persyn, Steven C.; Eterno, John S.; Walther, Brandon C.; Slater, David C.; Davis, Michael W.; Versteeg, Maarten H.; Persson, Kristian B.; Young, Michael K.; Dirks, Gregory J.; Sawka, Anthony O.; Tumlinson, Jessica; Sykes, Henry; Beshears, John; Rhoad, Cherie L.; Cravens, James P.; Winters, Gregory S.; Klar, Robert A.; Lockhart, Walter; Piepgrass, Benjamin M.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Trantham, Bradley J.; Wilcox, Philip M.; Jackson, Matthew W.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Vallerga, John V.; Raffanti, Rick; Martin, Adrian; Gérard, J.-C.; Grodent, Denis C.; Bonfond, Bertrand; Marquet, Benoit; Denis, François

    2017-11-01

    The ultraviolet spectrograph instrument on the Juno mission (Juno-UVS) is a long-slit imaging spectrograph designed to observe and characterize Jupiter's far-ultraviolet (FUV) auroral emissions. These observations will be coordinated and correlated with those from Juno's other remote sensing instruments and used to place in situ measurements made by Juno's particles and fields instruments into a global context, relating the local data with events occurring in more distant regions of Jupiter's magnetosphere. Juno-UVS is based on a series of imaging FUV spectrographs currently in flight—the two Alice instruments on the Rosetta and New Horizons missions, and the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter mission. However, Juno-UVS has several important modifications, including (1) a scan mirror (for targeting specific auroral features), (2) extensive shielding (for mitigation of electronics and data quality degradation by energetic particles), and (3) a cross delay line microchannel plate detector (for both faster photon counting and improved spatial resolution). This paper describes the science objectives, design, and initial performance of the Juno-UVS.

  16. Simulating the WFIRST coronagraph integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Maxime J.; Groff, Tyler D.; Zimmermann, Neil T.; Gong, Qian; Mandell, Avi M.; Saxena, Prabal; McElwain, Michael W.; Roberge, Aki; Krist, John; Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Cady, Eric J.; Mejia Prada, Camilo; Brandt, Timothy; Douglas, Ewan; Cahoy, Kerri

    2017-09-01

    A primary goal of direct imaging techniques is to spectrally characterize the atmospheres of planets around other stars at extremely high contrast levels. To achieve this goal, coronagraphic instruments have favored integral field spectrographs (IFS) as the science cameras to disperse the entire search area at once and obtain spectra at each location, since the planet position is not known a priori. These spectrographs are useful against confusion from speckles and background objects, and can also help in the speckle subtraction and wavefront control stages of the coronagraphic observation. We present a software package, the Coronagraph and Rapid Imaging Spectrograph in Python (crispy) to simulate the IFS of the WFIRST Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). The software propagates input science cubes using spatially and spectrally resolved coronagraphic focal plane cubes, transforms them into IFS detector maps and ultimately reconstructs the spatio-spectral input scene as a 3D datacube. Simulated IFS cubes can be used to test data extraction techniques, refine sensitivity analyses and carry out design trade studies of the flight CGI-IFS instrument. crispy is a publicly available Python package and can be adapted to other IFS designs.

  17. The optical design of solar spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Pan, Wen-Qiang; Meng, Xiang-Yue; Lv, Xian-Kui; Feng, Jie; Zhu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Li, Lei; Yang, Wei-Ping

    2017-08-01

    At the beginning of this paper, we simply describe the theories of spectrograph and the operating principle of grating. Based on the Spectrometer theory and optical theory we design a solar spectrograph by analyzing and calculating. And the working waveband of this solar spectrograph is between 510nm and 540nm. Besides, according to the design data, we ensure the blaze level of grating and the focal length of collimate. Due to the presence of the collimate in the optical structure, astigmatism exists in the system. For this reason, we add a cylindrical lens to the structure to correct. The optical system is characterized by using white-pupil design and folding light path to make the whole system simple. In the end, according to the calculated design parameters, we use the Zemax software for simulation, then the result is RMS only has 4μm at the 520nm. It's worth nothing that the resolution merely near the reference wavelength (520nm)meets the design requirements.

  18. A Fundamental Test for Galaxy Formation Models: Matching the Lyman-α Absorption Profiles of Galactic Halos Over Three Decades in Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorini, Daniele; Oñorbe, José; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lukić, Zarija

    2018-06-01

    Galaxy formation depends critically on the physical state of gas in the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and its interface with the intergalactic medium (IGM), determined by the complex interplay between inflow from the IGM and outflows from supernovae and/or AGN feedback. The average Lyα absorption profile around galactic halos represents a powerful tool to probe their gaseous environments. We compare predictions from Illustris and Nyx hydrodynamical simulations with the observed absorption around foreground quasars, damped Lyα systems, and Lyman-break galaxies. We show how large-scale BOSS and small-scale quasar pair measurements can be combined to precisely constrain the absorption profile over three decades in transverse distance 20 {kpc}≲ b≲ 20 {Mpc}. Far from galaxies, ≳ 2 {Mpc}, the simulations converge to the same profile and provide a reasonable match to the observations. This asymptotic agreement arises because the ΛCDM model successfully describes the ambient IGM and represents a critical advantage of studying the mean absorption profile. However, significant differences between the simulations, and between simulations and observations, are present on scales 20 {kpc}≲ b≲ 2 {Mpc}, illustrating the challenges of accurately modeling and resolving galaxy formation physics. It is noteworthy that these differences are observed as far out as ∼ 2 {Mpc}, indicating that the “sphere of influence” of galaxies could extend to approximately ∼7 times the halo virial radius. Current observations are very precise on these scales and can thus strongly discriminate between different galaxy formation models. We demonstrate that the Lyα absorption profile is primarily sensitive to the underlying temperature–density relationship of diffuse gas around galaxies, and argue that it thus provides a fundamental test of galaxy formation models.

  19. Enhanced Exoplanet Biosignature from an Interferometer Addition to Low Resolution Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erskine, D. J.; Muirhead, P. S.; Vanderburg, A. M.; Szentgyorgyi, A.

    2017-12-01

    The absorption spectral signature of many atmospheric molecules consists of a group of 40 or so lines that are approximately periodic due to the physics of molecular vibration. This is fortuitous for detecting atmospheric features in an exoEarth, since it has a similar periodic nature as an interferometer's transmission, which is sinusoidal. The period (in wavenumbers) of the interferometer is selectable, being inversely proportional to the delay (in cm). We show that the addition of a small interferometer of 0.6 cm delay to an existing dispersive spectrograph can greatly enhance the detection of molecular features, by several orders of magnitude for initially low resolution spectrographs. We simulate the Gemini Planet Imager measuring a telluric spectrum having native resolution of 40 and 70 in the 1.65 micron and 2 micron bands. These low resolutions are insufficient to resolve the fine features of the molecular feature group. However, the addition of a 0.6 cm delay outside the spectrograph and in series with it increases the local amplitude of the signal to a level similar to a R=4400 (at 1.65 micron) or R=3900 (at 2 micron) classical spectrograph. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Spectra of Th/Ar and U/Ne hollow cathode lamps for spectrograph calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Shlosberg, Ariel; Kerber, Florian; Den Hartog, Elizabeth; Neureiter, Bianca

    2018-01-01

    Low-current Th/Ar hollow cathode lamps have long been used for calibration of astronomical spectrographs on ground-based telescopes. Thorium is an attractive element for calibration as it has a single isotope, has narrow spectral lines, and has a dense spectrum covering the whole of the visible region. However, the high density of the spectrum that makes it attractive for calibrating high-resolution spectrographs is a detriment for lower resolution spectrographs and this is not obvious by examination of existing linelists. In addition, recent changes in regulations regarding the handling of thorium have led to a degradation in the quality of Th/Ar calibration lamps, with contamination by molecular ThO lines that are strong enough to obscure the calibration lines of interest.We are pursuing two approaches to these problems. First, we have expanded and improved the NIST Standard Reference Database 161, "Spectrum of Th-Ar Hollow Cathode Lamps" to cover the region 272 nm to 5500 nm. Spectra of hollow cathode lamps at up to 3 different currents can now be displayed simultaneously. Interactive zooming and the ability to convolve any of the spectra with a Gaussian or uploaded instrument profile enable the user to see immediately what the spectrum would look like at the particular resolution of their spectrograph. Second, we have measured the spectrum of a recent, contaminated Th/Ar hollow cathode lamp using a high-resolution Echelle spectrograph (Madison Wisconsin) at a resolving power (R~ 250,000). This significantly exceeds the resolving power of most astronomical spectrographs and resolves many of the molecular lines of ThO. With these spectra we are measuring and calibrating the positions of these molecular lines in order to make them suitable for spectrograph calibration.In the near infrared region, U/Ne hollow cathode lamps give a higher density of calibration lines than Th/Ar lamps and will be implemented on the upgraded CRIRES+ spectrograph on ESO’s Very Large

  1. Exact optics - III. Schwarzschild's spectrograph camera revised

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willstrop, R. V.

    2004-03-01

    Karl Schwarzschild identified a system of two mirrors, each defined by conic sections, free of third-order spherical aberration, coma and astigmatism, and with a flat focal surface. He considered it impractical, because the field was too restricted. This system was rediscovered as a quadratic approximation to one of Lynden-Bell's `exact optics' designs which have wider fields. Thus the `exact optics' version has a moderate but useful field, with excellent definition, suitable for a spectrograph camera. The mirrors are strongly aspheric in both the Schwarzschild design and the exact optics version.

  2. Spectroscopic Characterization of GEO Satellites with Gunma LOW Resolution Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, T.; Ono, H.; Hosokawa, M.; Ando, T.; Takanezawa, T.; Hashimoto, O.

    The spectroscopic observation is potentially a powerful tool for understanding the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) objects. We present here the results of an investigation of energy spectra of GEO satellites obtained from a groundbased optical telescope. The spectroscopic observations were made from April to June 2016 with the Gunma LOW resolution Spectrograph and imager (GLOWS) at the Gunma Astronomical Observatory (GAO) in JAPAN. The observation targets consist of eleven different satellites: two weather satellites, four communications satellites, and five broadcasting satellites. All the spectra of those GEO satellites are inferred to be solar-like. A number of well-known absorption features such as H-alpha, H-beta, Na-D,water vapor and oxygen molecules are clearly seen in thewavelength range of 4,000 - 8,000 Å. For comparison, we calculated the intensity ratio of the spectra of GEO satellites to that of the Moon which is the natural satellite of the earth. As a result, the following characteristics were obtained. 1) Some variations are seen in the strength of absorption features of water vapor and oxygen originated by the telluric atmosphere, but any other characteristic absorption features were not found. 2) For all observed satellites, the intensity ratio of the spectrum of GEO satellites decrease as a function of wavelength or to be flat. It means that the spectral reflectance of satellite materials is bluer than that of the Moon. 3) A characteristic dip at around 4,800 Å is found in all observed spectra of a weather satellite. Based on these observations, it is indicated that the characteristics of the spectrum are mainly derived from the solar panels because the apparent area of the solar cell is probably larger than that of the satellite body.

  3. PRAXIS: low thermal emission high efficiency OH suppressed fibre spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Content, Robert; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Ellis, Simon; Gers, Luke; Haynes, Roger; Horton, Anthony; Lawrence, Jon; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Lindley, Emma; Min, Seong-Sik; Shortridge, Keith; Staszak, Nick; Trinh, Christopher; Xavier, Pascal; Zhelem, Ross

    2014-07-01

    PRAXIS is a second generation instrument that follows on from GNOSIS, which was the first instrument using fibre Bragg gratings for OH suppression to be deployed on a telescope. The Bragg gratings reflect the NIR OH lines while being transparent to the light between the lines. This gives in principle a much higher signal-noise ratio at low resolution spectroscopy but also at higher resolutions by removing the scattered wings of the OH lines. The specifications call for high throughput and very low thermal and detector noise so that PRAXIS will remain sky noise limited even with the low sky background levels remaining after OH suppression. The optical and mechanical designs are presented. The optical train starts with fore-optics that image the telescope focal plane on an IFU which has 19 hexagonal microlenses each feeding a multi-mode fibre. Seven of these fibres are attached to a fibre Bragg grating OH suppression system while the others are reference/acquisition fibres. The light from each of the seven OH suppression fibres is then split by a photonic lantern into many single mode fibres where the Bragg gratings are imprinted. Another lantern recombines the light from the single mode fibres into a multi-mode fibre. A trade-off was made in the design of the IFU between field of view and transmission to maximize the signal-noise ratio for observations of faint, compact objects under typical seeing. GNOSIS used the pre-existing IRIS2 spectrograph while PRAXIS will use a new spectrograph specifically designed for the fibre Bragg grating OH suppression and optimised for 1.47 μm to 1.7 μm (it can also be used in the 1.09 μm to 1.26 μm band by changing the grating and refocussing). This results in a significantly higher transmission due to high efficiency coatings, a VPH grating at low incident angle and optimized for our small bandwidth, and low absorption glasses. The detector noise will also be lower thanks to the use of a current generation HAWAII-2RG detector

  4. Laboratory investigation on the role of tubular shaped micro resonators phononic crystal insertion on the absorption coefficient of profiled sound absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahya, I.; Kusuma, J. I.; Harjana; Kristiani, R.; Hanina, R.

    2016-02-01

    This paper emphasizes the influence of tubular shaped microresonators phononic crystal insertion on the sound absorption coefficient of profiled sound absorber. A simple cubic and two different bodies centered cubic phononic crystal lattice model were analyzed in a laboratory test procedure. The experiment was conducted by using transfer function based two microphone impedance tube method refer to ASTM E-1050-98. The results show that sound absorption coefficient increase significantly at the mid and high-frequency band (600 - 700 Hz) and (1 - 1.6 kHz) when tubular shaped microresonator phononic crystal inserted into the tested sound absorber element. The increment phenomena related to multi-resonance effect that occurs when sound waves propagate through the phononic crystal lattice model that produce multiple reflections and scattering in mid and high-frequency band which increases the sound absorption coefficient accordingly

  5. Cosmological surveys with multi-object spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colless, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Multi-object spectroscopy has been a key technique contributing to the current era of `precision cosmology.' From the first exploratory surveys of the large-scale structure and evolution of the universe to the current generation of superbly detailed maps spanning a wide range of redshifts, multi-object spectroscopy has been a fundamentally important tool for mapping the rich structure of the cosmic web and extracting cosmological information of increasing variety and precision. This will continue to be true for the foreseeable future, as we seek to map the evolving geometry and structure of the universe over the full extent of cosmic history in order to obtain the most precise and comprehensive measurements of cosmological parameters. Here I briefly summarize the contributions that multi-object spectroscopy has made to cosmology so far, then review the major surveys and instruments currently in play and their prospects for pushing back the cosmological frontier. Finally, I examine some of the next generation of instruments and surveys to explore how the field will develop in coming years, with a particular focus on specialised multi-object spectrographs for cosmology and the capabilities of multi-object spectrographs on the new generation of extremely large telescopes.

  6. WIYN bench upgrade: a revitalized spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershady, M.; Barden, S.; Blanche, P.-A.; Blanco, D.; Corson, C.; Crawford, S.; Glaspey, J.; Habraken, S.; Jacoby, G.; Keyes, J.; Knezek, P.; Lemaire, P.; Liang, M.; McDougall, E.; Poczulp, G.; Sawyer, D.; Westfall, K.; Willmarth, D.

    2008-07-01

    We describe the redesign and upgrade of the versatile fiber-fed Bench Spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5m telescope. The spectrograph is fed by either the Hydra multi-object positioner or integral-field units (IFUs) at two other ports, and can be configured with an adjustable camera-collimator angle to use low-order and echelle gratings. The upgrade, including a new collimator, charge-coupled device (CCD) and modern controller, and volume-phase holographic gratings (VPHG), has high performance-to-cost ratio by combining new technology with a system reconfiguration that optimizes throughput while utilizing as much of the existing instrument as possible. A faster, all-refractive collimator enhances throughput by 60%, nearly eliminates the slit-function due to vignetting, and improves image quality to maintain instrumental resolution. Two VPH gratings deliver twice the diffraction efficiency of existing surface-relief gratings: A 740 l/mm grating (float-glass and post-polished) used in 1st and 2nd-order, and a large 3300 l/mm grating (spectral resolution comparable to the R2 echelle). The combination of collimator, high-quantum efficiency (QE) CCD, and VPH gratings yields throughput gain-factors of up to 3.5.

  7. LRS2: A New Integral Field Spectrograph for the HET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Sarah E.; Hill, Gary J.; Chonis, Taylor S.; Tonnesen, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Here we present LRS2 (Low Resolution Spectrograph) and highlight early science opportunities with the newly upgraded Hobby Eberly telescope (HET). LRS2 is a four-channel optical wavelength (370nm - 1micron) spectrograph based on two VIRUS unit spectrographs. This fiber-fed integral field spectrograph covers a 12" x 6" field of view, switched between the two units (one blue, and one red) at R~2000. We highlight design elements, including the fundamental modification to grisms (from VPH gratings in VIRUS) to access the higher resolution. We discuss early science opportunities, including investigating nearby "blue-bulge" spiral galaxies and their anomalous star formation distribution.

  8. The deterministic optical alignment of the HERMES spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gers, Luke; Staszak, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph (HERMES) is a four channel, VPH-grating spectrograph fed by two 400 fiber slit assemblies whose construction and commissioning has now been completed at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT). The size, weight, complexity, and scheduling constraints of the system necessitated that a fully integrated, deterministic, opto-mechanical alignment system be designed into the spectrograph before it was manufactured. This paper presents the principles about which the system was assembled and aligned, including the equipment and the metrology methods employed to complete the spectrograph integration.

  9. Solar XUV grazing incidence spectrograph on Skylab.

    PubMed

    Garrett, D L; Tousey, R

    1977-04-01

    The objective of Skylab corollary experiment S020 was to obtain through the availability of long exposure times more complete information than was then available on the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) and soft x-ray spectrum of the sun in the 10-200-A range. The instrument was a small grazing incidence spectrograph with photographic recording. Use was made of a novel split-ruled grating that combined 1200- and 2400-1/mm rulings to double the spectral coverage of the instrument and to aid in the measurement of wavelengths and order sorting. As it happened, there were many difficulties resulting from the major problems encountered by the Apollo and Skylab missions. Useful spectra were obtained, but the sensitivity of the instrument was greatly reduced, probably because of contamination resulting from leakage of the fluid used in the spacecraft cooling system.

  10. Aries x ray objective grating spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Catura, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    This investigation was initiated in June of 1983. An Aries payload involving a single Wolter 1 telescope was developed and flown under a previous contract and the objective of this work was to add two additional mirrors, nested inside of the then existing mirror and add 12 objective reflection gratings to convert the telescope into a spectrograph. A summary of major milestones in the investigation are given. Results of efforts under this contract prior to 1987 are presented in the form of four reprints of published papers attached to this report. Results of the gamma-ray research are also included in the form of an attached reprint. A summary of other work under the contract since 1987 is given.

  11. Fiber feed for the CFHT Gecko spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudrand, Jacques; Vitry, Rene

    2000-08-01

    Motivated by a strong concern to keep maintenance work as low as possible the direction of the CFHT had for some times contemplated the possibility to replace the original mirror train f/20 focus feeding their Gecko High Resolution Coude Spectrograph by a more convenient fiber link coupled to the f/8 Cassegrain focus. A decision supporting that idea was ultimately taken two years ago and our group at the OPM was contacted to build such a system according to precise specifications. This telescope facility, baptized CAFÉ for Cassegrain Fiber Environment, has now arrived to near completion and we are able to present here its main characteristics and the technical solutions that were adopted to meet the CFHT requirements and to provide the system with the best performances in terms of robustness and efficiency.

  12. A high resolution ultraviolet Shuttle glow spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruthers, George R.

    1993-01-01

    The High Resolution Shuttle Glow Spectrograph-B (HRSGS-B) is a small payload being developed by the Naval Research Laboratory. It is intended for study of shuttle surface glow in the 180-400 nm near- and middle-ultraviolet wavelength range, with a spectral resolution of 0.2 nm. It will search for, among other possible features, the band systems of excited NO which result from surface-catalyzed combination of N and O. It may also detect O2 Hertzberg bands and N2 Vegard-Kaplan bands resulting from surface recombination. This wavelength range also includes possible N2+ and OH emissions. The HRSGS-B will be housed in a Get Away Special canister, mounted in the shuttle orbiter payload bay, and will observe the glow on the tail of the orbiter.

  13. Fiber Scrambling for High Precision Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Zachary; Spronck, J. F. P.; Fischer, D.

    2011-05-01

    The detection of Earth-like exoplanets with the radial velocity method requires extreme Doppler precision and long-term stability in order to measure tiny reflex velocities in the host star. Recent planet searches have led to the detection of so called "super-Earths” (up to a few Earth masses) that induce radial velocity changes of about 1 m/s. However, the detection of true Earth analogs requires a precision of 10 cm/s. One of the largest factors limiting Doppler precision is variation in the Point Spread Function (PSF) from observation to observation due to changes in the illumination of the slit and spectrograph optics. Thus, this stability has become a focus of current instrumentation work. Fiber optics have been used since the 1980's to couple telescopes to high-precision spectrographs, initially for simpler mechanical design and control. However, fiber optics are also naturally efficient scramblers. Scrambling refers to a fiber's ability to produce an output beam independent of input. Our research is focused on characterizing the scrambling properties of several types of fibers, including circular, square and octagonal fibers. By measuring the intensity distribution after the fiber as a function of input beam position, we can simulate guiding errors that occur at an observatory. Through this, we can determine which fibers produce the most uniform outputs for the severest guiding errors, improving the PSF and allowing sub-m/s precision. However, extensive testing of fibers of supposedly identical core diameter, length and shape from the same manufacturer has revealed the "personality” of individual fibers. Personality describes differing intensity patterns for supposedly duplicate fibers illuminated identically. Here, we present our results on scrambling characterization as a function of fiber type, while studying individual fiber personality.

  14. Combined processing and mutual interpretation of radiometry and fluorometry from autonomous profiling Bio-Argo floats: 2. Colored dissolved organic matter absorption retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiaogang; Morel, André; Claustre, Hervé; D'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Poteau, Antoine

    2012-04-01

    Eight autonomous profiling "Bio-Argo" floats were deployed offshore during about 2 years (2008-2010) in Pacific, Atlantic, and Mediterranean zones. They were equipped with miniaturized bio-optical sensors, namely a radiometer measuring within the upper layer the downward irradiance at 412, 490, and 555 nm, and two fluorometers for detection of chlorophyll-a (Chla) and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM; profiles from 400 m to surface). A first study dealt with the interpretation of the Chla fluorescence signal in terms of concentration, using for this purpose the diffuse attenuation coefficient for irradiance at 490 nm, Kd(490), taken as a proxy for the Chla absorption. The present study examines the possibility of similarly using the Kd(412) values combined with retrieved Chla profiles to convert the CDOM fluorometric qualitative information into a CDOM absorption coefficient (ay). The rationale is to take advantage of the fact that Kd is more sensitive to CDOM presence at 412 nm than at 490 nm. A validation of this method is tested through its application to field data, collected from a ship over a wide range of trophic conditions (Biogeochemistry and Optics South Pacific Experiment (BIOSOPE) cruise); these data include both in situ fluorescence profiles and CDOM absorption as measured on discrete samples. In addition, near-surface ay values retrieved from the floats agree with those derivable from ocean color imagery (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS-A)). The low sensitivity of commercially available CDOM fluorometers presently raises difficulties when applying this technique to open ocean waters. It was nevertheless possible to derive from the floats records meaningful time series of CDOM vertical distribution.

  15. Achieving an Accurate Surface Profile of a Photonic Crystal for Near-Unity Solar Absorption in a Super Thin-Film Architecture.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ping; Eyderman, Sergey; Hsieh, Mei-Li; Post, Anthony; John, Sajeev; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2016-06-28

    In this work, a teepee-like photonic crystal (PC) structure on crystalline silicon (c-Si) is experimentally demonstrated, which fulfills two critical criteria in solar energy harvesting by (i) its Gaussian-type gradient-index profile for excellent antireflection and (ii) near-orthogonal energy flow and vortex-like field concentration via the parallel-to-interface refraction effect inside the structure for enhanced light trapping. For the PC structure on 500-μm-thick c-Si, the average reflection is only ∼0.7% for λ = 400-1000 nm. For the same structure on a much thinner c-Si ( t = 10 μm), the absorption is near unity (A ∼ 99%) for visible wavelengths, while the absorption in the weakly absorbing range (λ ∼ 1000 nm) is significantly increased to 79%, comparing to only 6% absorption for a 10-μm-thick planar c-Si. In addition, the average absorption (∼94.7%) of the PC structure on 10 μm c-Si for λ = 400-1000 nm is only ∼3.8% less than the average absorption (∼98.5%) of the PC structure on 500 μm c-Si, while the equivalent silicon solid content is reduced by 50 times. Furthermore, the angular dependence measurements show that the high absorption is sustained over a wide angle range (θinc = 0-60°) for teepee-like PC structure on both 500 and 10-μm-thick c-Si.

  16. Using an integral-field unit spectrograph to study radical species in cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna M.; Vaughan, Charles M.; Cochran, Anita

    2015-01-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Various coma enhancements were used to identify and characterize coma morphological features. The azimuthal average profiles and the Haser model were used to determine production rates and possible parent molecules. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419), NASA's Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G), and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  17. Using an integral-field unit spectrograph to study radical species in cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna; Cochran, Anita; Vaughan, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Various coma enhancements were used to identify and characterize coma morphological features. The azimuthal average profiles and the Haser model were used to determine production rates and possible parent molecules. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419), NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G), and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  18. Molecular hydrogen absorption systems in Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashev, S. A.; Klimenko, V. V.; Ivanchik, A. V.; Varshalovich, D. A.; Petitjean, P.; Noterdaeme, P.

    2014-05-01

    We present a systematic search for molecular hydrogen absorption systems at high redshift in quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-II Data Release 7 and SDSS-III Data Release 9. We have selected candidates using a modified profile fitting technique taking into account that the Lyα forest can effectively mimic H2 absorption systems at the resolution of SDSS data. To estimate the confidence level of the detections, we use two methods: a Monte Carlo sampling and an analysis of control samples. The analysis of control samples allows us to define regions of the spectral quality parameter space where H2 absorption systems can be confidently identified. We find that H2 absorption systems with column densities log NH2 > 19 can be detected in only less than 3 per cent of SDSS quasar spectra. We estimate the upper limit on the detection rate of saturated H2 absorption systems (NH2 > 19) in damped Lyα (DLA) systems to be about 7 per cent. We provide a sample of 23 confident H2 absorption system candidates that would be interesting to follow up with high-resolution spectrographs. There is a 1σ r - i colour excess and non-significant AV extinction excess in quasar spectra with an H2 candidate compared to standard DLA-bearing quasar spectra. The equivalent widths of C II, Si II and Al III (but not Fe II) absorptions associated with H2 candidate DLAs are larger compared to standard DLAs. This is probably related to a larger spread in velocity of the absorption lines in the H2-bearing sample.

  19. Mars Ozone Absorption Line Shapes from Infrared Heterodyne Spectra Applied to GCM-Predicted Ozone Profiles and to MEX/SPICAM Column Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, T.; Annen, J.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J.; Livengood, T. A.; Lefevre, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of infrared heterodyne line shapes of ozone on Mars to those produced by radiative transfer modeling of ozone profiles predicted by general circulation models (GCM), and to contemporaneous column abundances measured by Mars Express SPICAM. Ozone is an important tracer of photochemistry Mars' atmosphere, serving as an observable with which to test predictions of photochemistry-coupled GCMs. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at 9.5 microns with spectral resolving power >1,000,000 is the only technique that can directly measure fully-resolved line shapes of Martian ozone features from the surface of the Earth. Measurements were made with Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii on February 21-24 2008 UT at Ls=35deg on or near the MEX orbital path. The HIPWAC observations were used to test GCM predictions. For example, a GCM-generated ozone profile for 60degN 112degW was scaled so that a radiative transfer calculation of its absorption line shape matched an observed HIPWAC absorption feature at the same areographic position, local time, and season. The RMS deviation of the model from the data was slightly smaller for the GCM-generated profile than for a line shape produced by a constant-with-height profile, even though the total column abundances were the same, showing potential for testing and constraining GCM ozone-profiles. The resulting ozone column abundance from matching the model to the HIPWAC line shape was 60% higher than that observed by SPICAM at the same areographic position one day earlier and 2.5 hours earlier in local time. This could be due to day-to-day, diurnal, or north polar region variability, or to measurement sensitivity to the ozone column and its distribution, and these possibilities will be explored. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  20. THE MULTI-OBJECT, FIBER-FED SPECTROGRAPHS FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Smee, Stephen A.; Gunn, James E.; Uomoto, Alan

    2013-07-12

    We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measuremore » redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-alpha absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near ultraviolet to the near infrared, with a resolving power R = \\lambda/FWHM ~ 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 < \\lambda < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.« less

  1. Expression Profile of Drug and Nutrient Absorption Related Genes in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells Grown under Differentiation Conditions.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yong; Jin, Yisheng; Faria, Teresa N; Tilford, Charles A; He, Aiqing; Wall, Doris A; Smith, Ronald L; Vig, Balvinder S

    2012-06-18

    The expression levels of genes involved in drug and nutrient absorption were evaluated in the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) in vitro drug absorption model. MDCK cells were grown on plastic surfaces (for 3 days) or on Transwell® membranes (for 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). The expression profile of genes including ABC transporters, SLC transporters, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined using the Affymetrix® Canine GeneChip®. Expression of genes whose probe sets passed a stringent confirmation process was examined. Expression of a few transporter (MDR1, PEPT1 and PEPT2) genes in MDCK cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The overall gene expression profile was strongly influenced by the type of support the cells were grown on. After 3 days of growth, expression of 28% of the genes was statistically different (1.5-fold cutoff, p < 0.05) between the cells grown on plastic and Transwell® membranes. When cells were differentiated on Transwell® membranes, large changes in gene expression profile were observed during the early stages, which then stabilized after 5-7 days. Only a small number of genes encoding drug absorption related SLC, ABC, and CYP were detected in MDCK cells, and most of them exhibited low hybridization signals. Results from this study provide valuable reference information on endogenous gene expression in MDCK cells that could assist in design of drug-transporter and/or drug-enzyme interaction studies, and help interpret the contributions of various transporters and metabolic enzymes in studies with MDCK cells.

  2. Expression Profile of Drug and Nutrient Absorption Related Genes in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells Grown under Differentiation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Yong; Jin, Yisheng; Faria, Teresa N.; Tilford, Charles A.; He, Aiqing; Wall, Doris A.; Smith, Ronald L.; Vig, Balvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression levels of genes involved in drug and nutrient absorption were evaluated in the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) in vitro drug absorption model. MDCK cells were grown on plastic surfaces (for 3 days) or on Transwell® membranes (for 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). The expression profile of genes including ABC transporters, SLC transporters, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined using the Affymetrix® Canine GeneChip®. Expression of genes whose probe sets passed a stringent confirmation process was examined. Expression of a few transporter (MDR1, PEPT1 and PEPT2) genes in MDCK cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The overall gene expression profile was strongly influenced by the type of support the cells were grown on. After 3 days of growth, expression of 28% of the genes was statistically different (1.5-fold cutoff, p < 0.05) between the cells grown on plastic and Transwell® membranes. When cells were differentiated on Transwell® membranes, large changes in gene expression profile were observed during the early stages, which then stabilized after 5–7 days. Only a small number of genes encoding drug absorption related SLC, ABC, and CYP were detected in MDCK cells, and most of them exhibited low hybridization signals. Results from this study provide valuable reference information on endogenous gene expression in MDCK cells that could assist in design of drug-transporter and/or drug-enzyme interaction studies, and help interpret the contributions of various transporters and metabolic enzymes in studies with MDCK cells. PMID:24300234

  3. Two Solar Tornadoes Observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zihao; Tian, Hui; Peter, Hardi; Su, Yang; Samanta, Tanmoy; Zhang, Jingwen; Chen, Yajie

    2018-01-01

    The barbs or legs of some prominences show an apparent motion of rotation, which are often termed solar tornadoes. It is under debate whether the apparent motion is a real rotating motion, or caused by oscillations or counter-streaming flows. We present analysis results from spectroscopic observations of two tornadoes by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. Each tornado was observed for more than 2.5 hr. Doppler velocities are derived through a single Gaussian fit to the Mg II k 2796 Å and Si IV 1393 Å line profiles. We find coherent and stable redshifts and blueshifts adjacent to each other across the tornado axes, which appears to favor the interpretation of these tornadoes as rotating cool plasmas with temperatures of 104 K–105 K. This interpretation is further supported by simultaneous observations of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, which reveal periodic motions of dark structures in the tornadoes. Our results demonstrate that spectroscopic observations can provide key information to disentangle different physical processes in solar prominences.

  4. Physical properties of PNe: what IFU spectrographs can do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, R.; Lago, P. J. A.; Faes, D., M.

    2014-04-01

    Structure, kinematics and physical parameters of planetary nebulae are related to their progenitor stars. A better understanding of these properties is essential to improve the knowledge of the late stages of evolution of intermediate-mass stars, as well as to better understand the chemical enrichment mechanisms that feed the interstellar medium with the nucleosynthesis yields from such stars. Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectrographs can provide valuable information from these objects, mapping such properties point-to-point over the projected nebulae. In this communication we present the results of a survey of physical properties for southern PNe. We have used IFU spectroscopy in order to derive the angular distribution of electron densities and ionic abundances, and also to map the ionization profiles. The aim is to characterize their physical properties and structures, and results can be used in morpho-kinematical models (such as SHAPE) or in photoionization models (such as CLOUDY) to describe in detail the 3D structure and evolution of these objects.

  5. The Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Davies, Roger L.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design of the Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph, a dedicated I and z band instrument (0.65μm micron - 1.0μm micron at R~4000), designed to be used in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system (PALAO, and its planned upgrade PALM-3000). It builds on two recent developments (i) the improved ability of second generation adaptive optics systems to correct for atmospheric turbulence at wavelengths less than or equal to 1μm micron, and (ii) the availability of CCD array detectors with high quantum efficiency at very red wavelengths (close to the silicon band edge). Combining these with a state-of-the-art integral field unit design using an all-glass image slicer, SWIFT's design provides very high throughput and low scattered light. SWIFT simultaneously provides spectra of ~4000 spatial elements, arranged in a rectangular field-of-view of 44 × 89 pixels. It has three on-the-fly selectable pixel scales of 0.24", 0.16" and 0.08'. First light is expected in spring 2008.

  6. Fibre positioning algorithms for the WEAVE spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrett, David L.; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin; Abrams, Don Carlos; Aguerri, J. Alfonso L.; Bonifacio, Piercarlo; Middleton, Kevin; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-07-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field optical spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma, Canary Islands, Spain. It is a multi-object "pick and place" fibre fed spectrograph with more than one thousand fibres, similar in concept to the Australian Astronomical Observatory's 2dF1 instrument with two observing plates, one of which is observing the sky while other is being reconfigured by a robotic fibre positioner. It will be capable of acquiring more than 10000 star or galaxy spectra a night. The WEAVE positioner concept uses two robots working in tandem in order to reconfigure a fully populated field within the expected 1 hour dwell-time for the instrument (a good match between the required exposure times and the limit of validity for a given configuration due to the effects of differential refraction). This presents additional constraints and complications for the software that determines the optimal path from one configuration to the next, particularly given the large number of fibre crossings implied by the 1000 fibre multiplex. This paper describes the algorithms and programming techniques used in the prototype implementations of the field configuration tool and the fibre positioner robot controller developed to support the detailed design of WEAVE.

  7. The SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldering, Gregory S.; Supernova Factory, Nearby

    2007-05-01

    The SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) is operated at the University of Hawaii 2.2 meter telescope on Mauna Kea by the Nearby Supernova Factory. The IFU has a 6x6 arcsecond field of view, and the combined blue and red channels simultaneously cover the full optical (320-1000 nm) spectral range. SNIFS was designed to allow spectrophotometry of supernovae under both photometric and non-photometric conditions. SNIFS is operated entirely remotely, in a quasi-automated mode, from as nearby as Hilo, Hawaii and as far away as Paris, France. Being mounted at the south bent Cassegrain focus of the UH 2.2-m, SNIFS is always available, either for regular Nearby Supernova Factory observations, or any of a range of programs conducted by astronomers at the University of Hawaii Institute for Astronomy. We illustrate some of the unique features of SNIFS and some of the science programs that have been undertaken using it. This work is supported in part by the Director, Office of Science, Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contracts No. DE-FG0-92ER40704, by a grant from the Gordon & Betty Moore Foundation, and in France by CNRS/IN2P3, CNRS/INSU and PNC.

  8. Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru telescope: massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio Vital; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Shan; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; le Fèvre, Olivier; Mignant, David Le; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Souza Marrara, Lucas; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; Cesar de Oliveira, Antonio; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Souza de Oliveira, Ligia; Orndorff, Joe D.; de Paiva Vilaça, Rodrigo; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; dos Santos, Jesulino Bispo; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung

    2015-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multifiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers distributed across a 1.3-deg diameter field of view at the Subaru 8.2-m telescope. The wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 μm to 1.26 μm, with a resolving power of 3000, simultaneously strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, galactic archaeology and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with a resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 μm to 0.89 μm will also be available by simply exchanging dispersers. We highlight some of the technological aspects of the design. To transform the telescope focal ratio, a broad-band coated microlens is glued to each fiber tip. A higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of the cable system, optimizing overall throughput; a fiber with low focal ratio degradation is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, minimizing the effects of fiber movements and fiber bending. Fiber positioning will be performed by a positioner consisting of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. The positions of these motors are measured by taking an image of artificially back-illuminated fibers with the metrology camera located in the Cassegrain container; the fibers are placed in the proper location by iteratively measuring and then adjusting the positions of the motors. Target light reaches one of the four identical fast-Schmidt spectrograph modules, each with three arms. The PFS project has passed several project-wide design reviews and is now in the construction phase.

  9. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup

    SciTech Connect

    Teeguarden, Justin G., E-mail: jt@pnl.gov; Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 93771; Twaddle, Nathan C., E-mail: nathan.twaddle@fda.hhs.gov

    Extensive first-pass metabolism of ingested bisphenol A (BPA) in the gastro-intestinal tract and liver restricts blood concentrations of bioactive BPA to < 1% of total BPA in humans and non-human primates. Absorption of ingested BPA through non-metabolizing tissues of the oral cavity, recently demonstrated in dogs, could lead to the higher serum BPA concentrations reported in some human biomonitoring studies. We hypothesized that the extensive interaction with the oral mucosa by a liquid matrix, like soup, relative to solid food or capsules, might enhance absorption through non-metabolizing oral cavity tissues in humans, producing higher bioavailability and higher serum BPA concentrations.more » Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24 hour period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30 μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. Absorption of d6-BPA was rapid (t{sub 1/2} = 0.45 h) and elimination of the administered dose was complete 24 h post-ingestion, evidence against any tissue depot for BPA. The maximum serum d6-BPA concentration was 0.43 nM at 1.6 h after administration and represented < 0.3% of total d6-BPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacokinetic model simulations, and the significantly faster appearance half-life of d6-BPA-glucuronide compared to d6-BPA (0.29 h vs 0.45 h) were evidence against meaningful absorption of BPA in humans through any non-metabolizing tissue (< 1%). This study confirms that typical exposure to BPA in food produces picomolar to subpicomolar serum BPA concentrations in humans, not nM concentrations reported in some biomonitoring studies.« less

  10. 24-hour human urine and serum profiles of bisphenol A: Evidence against sublingual absorption following ingestion in soup.

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin G; Twaddle, Nathan C; Churchwell, Mona I; Yang, Xiaoxia; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Seryak, Liesel M; Doerge, Daniel R

    2015-10-15

    Extensive first-pass metabolism of ingested bisphenol A (BPA) in the gastro-intestinal tract and liver restricts blood concentrations of bioactive BPA to <1% of total BPA in humans and non-human primates. Absorption of ingested BPA through non-metabolizing tissues of the oral cavity, recently demonstrated in dogs, could lead to the higher serum BPA concentrations reported in some human biomonitoring studies. We hypothesized that the extensive interaction with the oral mucosa by a liquid matrix, like soup, relative to solid food or capsules, might enhance absorption through non-metabolizing oral cavity tissues in humans, producing higher bioavailability and higher serum BPA concentrations. Concurrent serum and urine concentrations of d6-BPA, and its glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, were measured over a 24hour period in 10 adult male volunteers following ingestion of 30μg d6-BPA/kg body weight in soup. Absorption of d6-BPA was rapid (t1/2=0.45h) and elimination of the administered dose was complete 24h post-ingestion, evidence against any tissue depot for BPA. The maximum serum d6-BPA concentration was 0.43nM at 1.6h after administration and represented <0.3% of total d6-BPA. Pharmacokinetic parameters, pharmacokinetic model simulations, and the significantly faster appearance half-life of d6-BPA-glucuronide compared to d6-BPA (0.29h vs 0.45h) were evidence against meaningful absorption of BPA in humans through any non-metabolizing tissue (<1%). This study confirms that typical exposure to BPA in food produces picomolar to subpicomolar serum BPA concentrations in humans, not nM concentrations reported in some biomonitoring studies. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Second generation spectrograph for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodgate, B. E.; Boggess, A.; Gull, T. R.; Heap, S. R.; Krueger, V. L.; Maran, S. P.; Melcher, R. W.; Rebar, F. J.; Vitagliano, H. D.; Green, R. F.; Wolff, S. C.; Hutchings, J. B.; Jenkins, E. B.; Linsky, J. L.; Moos, H. W.; Roesler, F.; Shine, R. A.; Timothy, J. G.; Weistrop, D. E.; Bottema, M.; Meyer, W.

    1986-01-01

    The preliminary design for the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), which has been selected by NASA for definition study for future flight as a second-generation instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is presented. STIS is a two-dimensional spectrograph that will operate from 1050 A to 11,000 A at the limiting HST resolution of 0.05 arcsec FWHM, with spectral resolutions of 100, 1200, 20,000, and 100,000 and a maximum field-of-view of 50 x 50 arcsec. Its basic operating modes include echelle model, long slit mode, slitless spectrograph mode, coronographic spectroscopy, photon time-tagging, and direct imaging. Research objectives are active galactic nuclei, the intergalactic medium, global properties of galaxies, the origin of stellar systems, stelalr spectral variability, and spectrographic mapping of solar system processes.

  12. An Ultraviolet Spectrograph Concept for Exploring Ocean Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindhelm, E. R.; Hendrix, A. R.; Fleming, B. T.

    2018-05-01

    UV spectroscopy can probe dust/ice composition of the surface or plumes via uniquely identifying features. We present a technology concept for a future planetary science UV multi-object imaging spectrograph.

  13. Vacuum Predisperser For A Large Plane-Grating Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engleman, R.; Palmer, B. A.; Steinhaus, D. W.

    1980-11-01

    A plane grating predisperser has been constructed which acts as an "order-sorter" for a large plane-grating spectrograph. This combination can photograph relatively wide regions of spectra in a single exposure with no loss of resolution.

  14. Artist Concept of MAVEN Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph at Work

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-07

    This artist concept depicts the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph IUVS on NASA MAVEN spacecraft scanning the upper atmosphere of Mars. IUVS uses limb scans to map the chemical makeup and vertical structure across Mars upper atmosphere.

  15. Exploring the Time Evolution of Cool Metallic Absorption Features in UV Burst Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmes, K.; Madsen, C. A.; DeLuca, E.

    2017-12-01

    UV bursts are compact brightenings in active regions that appear in UV images. They are identified through three spectroscopic features: (1) broadening and intensification of NUV/FUV emission lines, (2) the presence of optically thin Si IV emission, and (3) the presence of absorption features from cool metallic ions. Properties (2) and (3) imply that bursts exist at transition region temperatures (≥ 80,000 K) but are located in the cooler lower chromosphere ( 5,000 K). Their energetic and dynamical properties remain poorly constrained. Improving our understanding of this phenomena could help us further constrain the energetic and dynamical properties of the chromosphere, as well as give us insight into whether or not UV bursts contribute to chromospheric and/or coronal heating. We analyzed the time evolution of UV bursts using spectral data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). We inspected Si IV 1393.8 Å line profiles for Ni II 1393.3 Å absorption features to look for signs of heating. Weakening of absorption features over time could indicate heating of the cool ions above the burst, implying that thermal energy from the burst could rapidly conduct upward through the chromosphere. To detect the spectral profiles corresponding to bursts, we applied a four-parameter Gaussian fit to every profile in each observation and took cuts in parameter space to isolate the bursts. We then manually reviewed the remaining profiles by looking for a statistically significant appearance of Ni II 1393.3 Å absorption. We quantified these absorption features by normalizing the Si IV 1393.8 Å emission profiles and measuring the maximum fractional extinction in each. Our preliminary results indicate that Ni II 1393.3 Å absorption may undergo a cycle of strengthening and weakening throughout a burst's lifetime. However, further investigation is needed for confirmation. This work is supported by the NSF-REU solar physics program at SAO, grant number AGS-1560313.

  16. The Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph (EUNIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor); Rabin, D.; Davila, J.; Thomas, R. J.; Engler, C.; Irish, S.; Keski-Kuha, R.; Novello, J.; Nowak, M.; Payne, L.; hide

    2003-01-01

    EUNIS (Extreme Ultraviolet Normal Incidence Spectrograph) is a high-efficiency extreme ultraviolet spectrometer that is expected to fly for the first time in 2004 as a sounding rocket payload. Using two independent optical systems, EUNIS will probe the structure and dynamics of the inner solar corona high spectral resolution in two wavelength regions: 17-21 nm with 3.5 pm resolution and 30-37 nm with 7 pm resolution. The long wavelength channel includes He II 30.4 nm and strong lines from Fe XI-XVI; the short wavelength channel includes strong lines of Fe IX-XIII. Angular resolution of 2 arcsec is maintained along a slit covering a full solar radius. EUNIS will have 100 times the throughput of the highly successful SERTS payloads that have preceded it. There are only two reflections in each optical channel, from the superpolished, off-axis paraboloidal primary and the toroidal grating. Each optical element is coated with a high-efficiency multilayer coating optimized for its spectral bandpass. The detector in each channel is a microchannel plate image intensifier fiber- coupled to three 1K x 1K active pixel sensors. EUNIS will obtain spectra with a cadence as short as 1 sec, allowing unprecedented studies of the physical properties of evolving and transient structures. Diagnostics of wave heating and reconnection wil be studied at heights above 2 solar radii, in the wind acceleration region. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution will provide superior temperature and density diagnostics and will enable underflight calibration of several orbital instruments, including SOHO/CDS and EIT, TRACE, Solar-B/EIS, and STEREO/EUVI. EUNIS is supported by NASA through the Low Cost Access to Space Program in Solar and Heliospheric Physics.

  17. X-ray spectrographic determination of cesium and rubidium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Axelrod, J.M.; Adler, I.

    1957-01-01

    An x-ray spectrographic method for the determination of rubidium and cesium was developed, using the internal-standard method and a four-channel flat-crystal spectrograph. The sensitivity is within 0.1% for cesia and 0.02% for rubidia; the precision is within 10% of the amount present. Results agree well with those obtained by flame photometry and by radio-activation.

  18. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  19. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  20. Stratospheric NO and NO2 profiles at sunset from analysis of high-resolution balloon-borne infrared solar absorption spectra obtained at 33 deg N and calculations with a time-dependent photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Boughner, R. E.; Larsen, J. C.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    Simultaneous stratospheric vertical profiles of NO and NO2 at sunset were derived from an analysis of infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from a float altitude of 33 km with an interferometer system during a balloon flight. A nonlinear least squares procedure was used to analyze the spectral data in regions of absorption by NO and NO2 lines. Normalized factors, determined from calculations of time dependent altitude profiles with a detailed photochemical model, were included in the onion peeling analysis to correct for the rapid diurnal changes in NO and NO2 concentrations with time near sunset. The CO2 profile was also derived from the analysis and is reported.

  1. Successful "First Light" for VLT High-Resolution Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-10-01

    Great Research Prospects with UVES at KUEYEN A major new astronomical instrument for the ESO Very Large Telescope at Paranal (Chile), the UVES high-resolution spectrograph, has just made its first observations of astronomical objects. The astronomers are delighted with the quality of the spectra obtained at this moment of "First Light". Although much fine-tuning still has to be done, this early success promises well for new and exciting science projects with this large European research facility. Astronomical instruments at VLT KUEYEN The second VLT 8.2-m Unit Telescope, KUEYEN ("The Moon" in the Mapuche language), is in the process of being tuned to perfection before it will be "handed" over to the astronomers on April 1, 2000. The testing of the new giant telescope has been successfully completed. The latest pointing tests were very positive and, from real performance measurements covering the entire operating range of the telescope, the overall accuracy on the sky was found to be 0.85 arcsec (the RMS-value). This is an excellent result for any telescope and implies that KUEYEN (as is already the case for ANTU) will be able to acquire its future target objects securely and efficiently, thus saving precious observing time. This work has paved the way for the installation of large astronomical instruments at its three focal positions, all prototype facilities that are capable of catching the light from even very faint and distant celestial objects. The three instruments at KUEYEN are referred to by their acronyms UVES , FORS2 and FLAMES. They are all dedicated to the investigation of the spectroscopic properties of faint stars and galaxies in the Universe. The UVES instrument The first to be installed is the Ultraviolet Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) that was built by ESO, with the collaboration of the Trieste Observatory (Italy) for the control software. Complete tests of its optical and mechanical components, as well as of its CCD detectors and of the complex

  2. Impurity profiling of liothyronine sodium by means of reversed phase HPLC, high resolution mass spectrometry, on-line H/D exchange and UV/Vis absorption.

    PubMed

    Ruggenthaler, M; Grass, J; Schuh, W; Huber, C G; Reischl, R J

    2017-09-05

    For the first time, a comprehensive investigation of the impurity profile of the synthetic thyroid API (active pharmaceutical ingredient) liothyronine sodium (LT 3 Na) was performed by using reversed phase HPLC and advanced structural elucidation techniques including high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS) and on-line hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) exchange. Overall, 39 compounds were characterized and 25 of these related substances were previously unknown to literature. The impurity classification system recently developed for the closely related API levothyroxine sodium (LT 4 Na) could be applied to the newly characterized liothyronine sodium impurities resulting in a wholistic thyroid API impurity classification system. Furthermore, the mass-spectrometric CID-fragmentation of specific related substances was discussed and rationalized by detailed fragmentation pathways. Moreover, the UV/Vis absorption characteristics of the API and selected impurities were investigated to corroborate chemical structure assignments derived from MS data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Design and Construction of VUES: The Vilnius University Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgenson, Colby; Fischer, Debra; McCracken, Tyler; Sawyer, David; Giguere, Matt; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Santoro, Fernando; Muller, Gary

    2016-03-01

    In February 2014, the Yale Exoplanet Laboratory was commissioned to design, build, and deliver a high resolution (R=60,000) spectrograph for the 1.65m telescope at the Molėtai Astronomical Observatory. The observatory is operated by the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy at Vilnius University. The Vilnius University Echelle Spectrograph (VUES) is a white-pupil design that is fed via an octagonal fiber from the telescope and has an operational bandpass from 400nm to 880nm. VUES incorporates a novel modular optomechanical design that allows for quick assembly and alignment on commercial optical tables. This approach allowed the spectrograph to be assembled and commissioned at Yale using lab optical tables and then reassembled at the observatory on a different optical table with excellent repeatability. The assembly and alignment process for the spectrograph was reduced to a few days, allowing the spectrograph to be completely disassembled for shipment to Lithuania, and then installed at the observatory during a 10-day period in June of 2015.

  4. Development of an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Dioxide Profilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) is under development at Montana State University using commercially available parts. Two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, one at the on-line wavelength and one at the off-line wavelength are used to injection seed a fiber amplifier. The DIAL operates in the 1.57 micron carbon dioxide absorption band at an on-line wavelength of 1.5714060 microns. The laser transmitter produces 40 μJ pulses with a pulse duration of 1 μs and a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz. The scattered light from the laser transmitter is collected using a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The light collected by the telescope is collimated and then filtered using a 0.8 nm FWHM narrowband interference filter. After the optical filter, the light is coupled into a multimode optical fiber with a 1000 μm core diameter. The output from the optical fiber is coupled into a photomultiplier tube (PMT) used to monitor the return signal. The analog output from the PMT is next incident on a discriminator producing TTL logic pulses for photon counting. The output from the PMT and discriminator is monitored using a multichannel scalar card allowing the counting of the TTL pulses as a function of range. Data from the DIAL instrument is collected in the following manner. The fiber amplifier is injection seeded first with the on-line DFB laser. The return signal as a function of range is integrated using the multichannel scalar for a user defined time, typically set at 6 s. The off-line DFB laser is then used to injection seed the fiber amplifier and the process is repeated. This process is repeated for a user defined period. The CO2 concentration as a function of range is calculated using the on-line and off-line return signals with the DIAL equation. A comparison of the CO2 concentration measured using the DIAL instrument at 1.5 km and a Li-Cor LI-820 in situ sensor located at 1.5 km from the DIAL over a 2.5 hour period

  5. A mobile differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.), from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the DIAL technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm, with multiple receivers. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high-pressure hydrogen and deuterium, using helium as buffer gas. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range-resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone is shown, to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as to assess the validation and calibration of data. There was a low amount of aerosol aloft, and an iterative aerosol correction has been performed on the retrieved data, which resulted in less than a 3 ppb correction to the final ozone concentration. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0 to 1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5 to 3 km, and 11-25% from 3 to 12 km according to the relevant aerosol concentration aloft. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.

  6. The Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph Sounding Rocket Payload: Recent Modifications for Planetary Observations in the EUV/FUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, David C.; Stern, S. Alan; Scherrer, John; Cash, Webster; Green, James C.; Wilkinson, Erik

    1995-01-01

    We report on the status of modifications to an existing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) telescope/spectrograph sounding rocket payload for planetary observations in the 800 - 1200 A wavelength band. The instrument is composed of an existing Wolter Type 2 grazing incidence telescope, a newly built 0.4-m normal incidence Rowland Circle spectrograph, and an open-structure resistive-anode microchannel plate detector. The modified payload has successfully completed three NASA sounding rocket flights within 1994-1995. Future flights are anticipated for additional studies of planetary and cometary atmospheres and interstellar absorption. A detailed description of the payload, along with the performance characteristics of the integrated instrument are presented. In addition, some preliminary flight results from the above three missions are also presented.

  7. In vitro dissolution method fitted to in vivo absorption profile of rivaroxaban immediate-release tablets applying in silico data.

    PubMed

    Wingert, Nathalie R; Dos Santos, Natália O; Campanharo, Sarah C; Simon, Elisa S; Volpato, Nadia M; Steppe, Martin

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to develop and validate an in vitro dissolution method based on in silico-in vivo data to determine whether an in vitro-in vivo relationship could be established for rivaroxaban in immediate-release tablets. Oral drugs with high permeability but poorly soluble in aqueous media, such as the anticoagulant rivaroxaban, have a major potential to reach a high level of in vitro-in vivo relationship. Currently, there is no study on scientific literature approaching the development of RIV dissolution profile based on its in vivo performance. Drug plasma concentration values were modeled using computer simulation with adjustment of pharmacokinetic properties. Those values were converted into drug fractions absorbed by the Wagner-Nelson deconvolution approach. Gradual and continuous dissolution of RIV tablets was obtained with a 30 rpm basket on 50 mM sodium acetate +0.2% SDS, pH 6.5 medium. Dissolution was conducted for up to 180 min. The fraction absorbed was plotted against the drug fraction dissolved, and a linear point-to-point regression (R 2  = 0.9961) obtained. The in vitro dissolution method designed promoted a more convenient dissolution profile of RIV tablets, whereas it suggests a better relationship with in vivo performance.

  8. The retrieval of atmospheric constituent mixing-ratio profiles from solar absorption spectra. Ph.D. Thesis. Interim Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaffer, W. A.

    1983-01-01

    Methods used to determine various atmospheric gas distributions are summarized. The experimentally determined mixing ratio profiles (the mixing ratio of a gas is the ratio of the number of gas molecules to the number of air molecules) of some atmospheric gases are shown. In most in situ experiments stratospheric gas samples are collected at several altitudes by balloon, aircraft, or rocket. These samples are then analyzed by various methods. Mixing ratio profiles of Ci, ClO, and OH were determined by laser induced fluorescence of samples. Others have analyzed gas samples by gas chromatography in order to determine the molecular abundances of CCl2F2, CCl4, CCl3F, CFCl3, CF2Cl2, CHClF2, CH3CCl3, CH4, CO, C2Cl3F3, C2Cl4, C2HCl3, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H8, C6H6, C7H8, H2, and N2O.

  9. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  10. Initial observations of Jupiter's aurora from Juno's Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, R.; Versteeg, M.; Greathouse, T.; Hue, V.; Davis, M. W.; Gerard, J. C. M. C.; Grodent, D. C.; Bonfond, B.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S.; Bagenal, F.; Mauk, B.; Kurth, W. S.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Juno-UVS is an imaging spectrograph with a bandpass of 70<λ<205 nm. This wavelength range includes important far-ultraviolet (FUV) emissions from the H2 bands and the H Lyman series which are produced in Jupiter's auroras, and also the absorption signatures of aurorally-produced hydrocarbons. The Juno-UVS instrument telescope has a 4x4 cm2 input aperture and uses an off-axis parabolic primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated near the entrance of the telescope is used to observe at up to ±30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane. The light is focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a "dog-bone" shape, with three sections of 2.55°x0.2°, 2.0°x0.025°, and 2.55°x0.2° (as projected onto the sky). Light entering the slit is dispersed by a toroidal grating which focuses FUV light onto a curved microchannel plate (MCP) cross delay line (XDL) detector with a solar blind UV-sensitive CsI photocathode. The two mirrors and the grating are coated with MgF2 to improve FUV reflectivity. Tantalum surrounds the spectrograph assembly to shield the detector and its electronics from high-energy electrons. All other electronics are located in Juno's spacecraft vault, including redundant low-voltage and high-voltage power supplies, command and data handling electronics, heater/actuator electronics, scan mirror electronics, and event processing electronics. The purpose of Juno-UVS is to remotely sense Jupiter's auroral morphology and brightness to provide context for in situ measurements by Juno's particle instruments. Here we present the first near-Jupiter results from the UVS instrument following measurements made during PJ1, Juno's first perijove pass with its instruments powered on and taking data.

  11. Optical design of the SuMIRe/PFS spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Sandrine; Vives, Sébastien; Barkhouser, Robert; Gunn, James E.

    2014-07-01

    The SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS), developed for the 8-m class SUBARU telescope, will consist of four identical spectrographs, each receiving 600 fibers from a 2394 fiber robotic positioner at the telescope prime focus. Each spectrograph includes three spectral channels to cover the wavelength range [0.38-1.26] um with a resolving power ranging between 2000 and 4000. A medium resolution mode is also implemented to reach a resolving power of 5000 at 0.8 um. Each spectrograph is made of 4 optical units: the entrance unit which produces three corrected collimated beams and three camera units (one per spectral channel: "blue, "red", and "NIR"). The beam is split by using two large dichroics; and in each arm, the light is dispersed by large VPH gratings (about 280x280mm). The proposed optical design was optimized to achieve the requested image quality while simplifying the manufacturing of the whole optical system. The camera design consists in an innovative Schmidt camera observing a large field-of-view (10 degrees) with a very fast beam (F/1.09). To achieve such a performance, the classical spherical mirror is replaced by a catadioptric mirror (i.e meniscus lens with a reflective surface on the rear side of the glass, like a Mangin mirror). This article focuses on the optical architecture of the PFS spectrograph and the perfornance achieved. We will first described the global optical design of the spectrograph. Then, we will focus on the Mangin-Schmidt camera design. The analysis of the optical performance and the results obtained are presented in the last section.

  12. Using a new, free spectrograph program to critically investigate acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Edward; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed an online spectrograph program with a bank of over 30 audio clips to visualise a variety of sounds. Our audio library includes everyday sounds such as speech, singing, musical instruments, birds, a baby, cat, dog, sirens, a jet, thunder, and screaming. We provide a link to a video of the sound sources superimposed with their respective spectrograms in real time. Readers can use our spectrograph program to view our library, open their own desktop audio files, and use the program in real time with a computer microphone.

  13. A soft x-ray octadecyl hydrogen maleate crystal spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, P.Z.; Fill, E.E.; Tietang, G.

    1996-03-01

    A crystal spectrograph is described which can be used to investigate laser-produced plasmas in the region of soft x rays at wavelengths of up to 60 A. The spectrograph uses an octadecyl hydrogen maleate crystal with a 2{ital d} of 63.5 A, combined with a very thin carbon filter (3000 A thick). As examples of its application, soft x-ray spectra in the range of 43{endash}51 A from laser plasmas of Si and Cu are presented. A spectral resolution of {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda}=1100 is deduced from the spectra. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS) Observations of Jupiter during Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, Randy; Versteeg, Maarten; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Hue, Vincent; Davis, Michael; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Grodent, Denis; Bonfond, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    We present the initial results from Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS) observations of Jupiter obtained during approach in June 2016. Juno-UVS is an imaging spectrograph with a bandpass of 70<λ<205 nm. This wavelength range includes all important ultraviolet (UV) emissions from the H2 bands and the H Lyman series which are produced in Jupiter's auroras, and also the absorption signatures of aurorally-produced hydrocarbons. The Juno-UVS instrument telescope has a 4 x 4 cm2 input aperture and uses an off-axis parabolic primary mirror. A flat scan mirror situated near the entrance of the telescope is used to observe at up to ±30° perpendicular to the Juno spin plane. The light is focused onto the spectrograph entrance slit, which has a "dog-bone" shape 7.2° long, in three sections of 0.2°, 0.025°, and 0.2° width (as projected onto the sky). Light entering the slit is dispersed by a toroidal grating which focuses UV light onto a curved microchannel plate (MCP) cross delay line (XDL) detector with a solar blind UV-sensitive CsI photocathode. Tantalum surrounds the spectrograph assembly to shield the detector and its electronics from high-energy electrons. All other electronics are located in Juno's spacecraft vault, including redundant low-voltage and high-voltage power supplies, command and data handling electronics, heater/actuator electronics, scan mirror electronics, and event processing electronics. The purpose of Juno-UVS is to remotely sense Jupiter's auroral morphology and brightness to provide context for in situ measurements by Juno's particle instruments. Prior to Jupiter Orbit Insertion (JOI) on July 5, Juno approach observations provide a rare opportunity to correlate local solar wind conditions with Jovian auroral emissions. Some of Jupiter's auroral emissions (e.g., polar emissions) may be controlled or at least affected by the solar wind. Here we compare synoptic Juno-UVS observations of Jupiter's auroral emissions (~40 minutes per hour

  15. Laser continuum source atomic absorption spectroscopy: Measuring the ground state with nanosecond resolution in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merten, Jonathan; Johnson, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    A new dual-beam atomic absorption technique is applied to laser-induced plasmas. The technique uses an optical parametric oscillator pseudocontinuum, producing emission that is both wider than the absorption line profile, but narrow enough to allow the use of an echelle spectrograph without order sorting. The dual-beam-in space implementation makes the technique immune to nonspecific attenuation of the probe beam and the structure of the pseudocontinuum. The potential for plasma diagnostics is demonstrated with spatially and temporally resolved measurements of magnesium metastable and lithium ground state optical depths in a laser-induced plasma under reduced pressure conditions. The lithium measurements further demonstrate the technique's potential for isotope ratio measurements.

  16. Reconstructive correction of aberrations in nuclear particle spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Berz, M.; Joh, K.; Nolen, J.A.

    A method is presented that allows the reconstruction of trajectories in particle spectrographs and the reconstructive correction of residual aberrations that otherwise limit the resolution. Using a computed or fitted high order transfer map that describes the uncorrected aberrations of the spectrograph, it is possible to calculate a map via an analytic recursion relation that allows the computation of the corrected data of interest such as reaction energy and scattering angle as well as the reconstructed trajectories in terms of position measurements in two planes near the focal plane. The technique is only limited by the accuracy of the positionmore » measurements, the incoherent spot sizes, and the accuracy of the transfer map. In practice the method can be expressed as an inversion of a nonlinear map and implemented in the differential algebraic framework. The method is applied to correct residual aberrations in the S800 spectrograph which is under construction at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University and to two other high resolution spectrographs.« less

  17. Hectospec, the MMT's 300 Optical Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricant, Daniel; Fata, Robert; Roll, John; Hertz, Edward; Caldwell, Nelson; Gauron, Thomas; Geary, John; McLeod, Brian; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Zajac, Joseph; Kurtz, Michael; Barberis, Jack; Bergner, Henry; Brown, Warren; Conroy, Maureen; Eng, Roger; Geller, Margaret; Goddard, Richard; Honsa, Michael; Mueller, Mark; Mink, Douglas; Ordway, Mark; Tokarz, Susan; Woods, Deborah; Wyatt, William; Epps, Harland; Dell'Antonio, Ian

    2005-12-01

    The Hectospec is a 300 optical fiber fed spectrograph commissioned at the MMT in the spring of 2004. In the configuration pioneered by the Autofib instrument at the Anglo-Australian Telescope, Hectospec's fiber probes are arranged in a radial ``fisherman on the pond'' geometry and held in position with small magnets. A pair of high-speed, six-axis robots move the 300 fiber buttons between observing configurations within ~300 s, and to an accuracy of ~25 μm. The optical fibers run for 26 m between the MMT's focal surface and the bench spectrograph, operating at R~1000-2000. Hectochelle, another high-dispersion bench spectrograph offering R~35,000, is also available. The system throughput, including all losses in the telescope optics, fibers, and spectrograph, peaks at ~10% at the grating blaze in 1" FWHM seeing. Correcting for aperture losses at the 1.5" diameter fiber entrance aperture, the system throughput peaks at ~17%, close to our prediction of 20%. Hectospec has proven to be a workhorse instrument at the MMT. Together, Hectospec and Hectochelle have been scheduled for 1/3 of the available nights since its commissioning. Hectospec has returned approximately 60,000 reduced spectra for 16 scientific programs during its first year of operation.

  18. First light results from the HERMES spectrograph at the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinis, Andrew I.

    2016-08-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph, HERMES is a facility-class optical spectrograph for the AAT. It is designed primarily for Galactic Archeology, the first major attempt to create a detailed understanding of galaxy formation and evolution by studying the history of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. The goal of the Galactic Archeology with Hermes (GALAH) survey is to reconstruct the mass assembly history of the Milky Way, through a detailed spatially tagged abundance study of one million stars. The spectrograph is based at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) and is fed by the existing 2dF robotic fiber positioning system. The spectrograph uses VPH-gratings to achieve a spectral resolving power of 28,000 in standard mode and also provides a high-resolution mode ranging between 40,000 to 50,000 using a slit mask. The GALAH survey requires a SNR greater than 100 for a star brightness of V=14. The total spectral coverage of the four channels is about 100nm between 370 and 1000nm for up to 392 simultaneous targets within the 2- degree field of view. Hermes was commissioned in late 2013, with the GALAH Pilot starting in parallel with the commissioning. The GALAH survey started in early 2014 is currently about 33% complete. We present a description of the motivating science; an overview the instrument; and a status report on GALAH Survey.

  19. Emission spectrographic determination of volatile trace elements in geologic materials by a carrier distillation technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barton, H.N.

    1986-01-01

    Trace levels of chalcophile elements that form volatile sulfide minerals are determined in stream sediments and in the nonmagnetic fraction of a heavy-mineral concentrate of stream sediments by a carrier distillation emission spectrographic method. Photographically recorded spectra of samples are visually compared with those of synthetic standards for the two sample types. Rock and soil samples may also be analyzed by comparison with the stream-sediment standards. A gallium oxide spectrochemical carrier/buffer enhances the early emission of the volatile elements. Detection limits in parts per million attained are: Sb 5, As 20, Bi 0.1, Cd 1, Cu 1, Pb 2, Ag 0.1, Zn 2, and Sn 0.1. A comparison with other methods of analysis, total-burn emission and atomic absorption spectroscopy, shows good correlation for standard reference for materials and samples from a variety of geologic terranes. ?? 1986.

  20. The CO2 absorption spectrum in the 2.3 μm transparency window by high sensitivity CRDS: (II) Self-absorption continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondelain, D.; Vasilchenko, S.; Čermák, P.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    The CO2 absorption continuum near 2.3 μm is determined for a series of sub atmospheric pressures (250-750 Torr) by high sensitivity Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy. An experimental procedure consisting in injecting successively a gas flow of CO2 and synthetic air, keeping constant the gas pressure in the CRDS cell, has been developed. This procedure insures a high stability of the spectra baseline by avoiding changes of the optical alignment due to pressure changes. The CO2 continuum was obtained as the difference between the CO2 absorption coefficient and a local lines simulation using a Voigt profile truncated at ±25 cm-1. Following the results of the preceding analysis of the CO2 rovibrational lines (Vasilchenko S et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2016.07.002, a CO2 line list with intensities obtained by variational calculations and empirical line positions was preferred to the HITRAN line list. A quadratic pressure dependence of the absorption continuum is observed, with an average binary absorption coefficient increasing from 2 to 4×10-8 cm-1 amagat-2 between 4320 and 4380 cm-1. The obtained continuum is found in good agreement with a previous measurement using much higher densities (20 amagat) and a low resolution grating spectrograph and is consistent with values currently used in the analysis of Venus spectra.

  1. Ground-based eye-safe networkable micro-pulse differential absorption and high spectral resolution lidar for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Hayman, M. M.; Bunn, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor is a greenhouse gas that is known to be a significant driver of weather and climate. Several National Research Council (NRC) reports have highlighted the need for improved water vapor measurements that can capture its spatial and temporal variability as a means to improve weather predictions. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have developed an eye-safe diode laser based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (MP-DIAL) for water vapor profiling in the lower troposphere. The MP-DIAL is capable of long term unattended operation and is capable of monitoring water vapor in the lower troposphere in most weather conditions. Two MP-DIAL instruments are currently operational and have been deployed at the Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE), the Plains elevated Convection at Night (PECAN) experiment, the Perdigão experiment, and the Land Atmosphere Feedback Experiment (LAFE). For each of these field experiments, the MP-DIAL was run unattended and provided near-continuous water vapor profiles, including periods of bright daytime clouds, from 300 m above the ground level to 4 km (or the cloud base) with 150 m vertical resolution and 5 minute temporal resolution. Three additional MP-DIAL instruments are currently under construction and will result in a network of five eye-safe MP-DIAL instruments for ground based weather and climate research experiments. Taking advantage of the broad spectral coverage and modularity or the diode based architecture, a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) measurement capabilities was added to the second MP-DIAL instrument. The HSRL capabilities will be operational during the deployment at the LAFE field experiment. The instrument architecture will be presented along with examples of data collected during recent field experiments.

  2. Sets of spectral lines for spectrographic thermometry and manometry in d.c. arcs of geologic materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golightly, D.W.; Dorrzapf, A.F.; Thomas, C.P.

    1977-01-01

    Sets of 5 Fe(I) lines and 3 Ti(I)Ti(II) line pairs have been characterized for precise spectrographic thermometry and manometry, respectively, in d.c. arcs of geologic materials. The recommended lines are free of spectral interferences, exhibit minimal self absorption within defined concentration intervals, and are useful for chemically-unaltered silicate rocks, arced in an argon-oxygen stream. The functional character of these lines in thermometry and manometry of d.c. arcs for evaluations of electrical parameter effects, for temporal studies, and for matrix-effect investigations on real samples is illustrated. ?? 1977.

  3. Investigating the Lyman photon escape in local starburst galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Svea; Leitherer, Claus; Boquien, Médéric; Buat, Véronique; Burgarella, Denis; Calzetti, Daniela; Noll, Stefan

    2018-07-01

    We present a study of seven star-forming galaxies from the Cosmic Evolution Survey observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The galaxies are located at relatively low redshifts, z ˜ 0.3, with morphologies ranging from extended and disturbed to compact and smooth. To complement the HST observations, we also analyse observations taken with the Visible Multi-object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). In our galaxy sample, we identify three objects with double peak Lyman-α profiles similar to those seen in Green Pea compact galaxies and measure peak separations of 655, 374, and 275 km s-1. We measure Lyman-α escape fractions with values ranging between 5 per cent and 13 per cent. Given the low flux levels in the individual COS exposures, we apply a weighted stacking approach to obtain a single spectrum. From this COS combined spectrum, we infer upper limits for the absolute and relative Lyman continuum escape fractions of f_abs(LyC) = 0.4^{+10.1}_{-0.4} per cent and f_res(LyC) = 1.7^{+15.2}_{-1.7}per cent, respectively. Finally, we find that most of these galaxies have moderate ultraviolet and optical star formation rates (SFRs) (SFRs ≲10 M⊙ yr-1).

  4. Investigating the Lyman photon escape in local starburst galaxies with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Svea; Leitherer, Claus; Boquien, Médéric; Buat, Véronique; Burgarella, Denis; Calzetti, Daniela; Noll, Stefan

    2018-04-01

    We present a study of 7 star-forming galaxies from the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The galaxies are located at relatively low redshifts, z ˜0.3, with morphologies ranging from extended and disturbed to compact and smooth. To complement the HST observations we also analyze observations taken with the VIMOS spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). In our galaxy sample we identify three objects with double peak Lyman-α profiles similar to those seen in Green Pea compact galaxies and measure peak separations of 655, 374, and 275 km s-1. We measure Lyman-α escape fractions with values ranging between 5-13%. Given the low flux levels in the individual COS exposures we apply a weighted stacking approach to obtain a single spectrum. From this COS combined spectrum we infer upper limits for the absolute and relative Lyman continuum escape fractions of f_abs(LyC) = 0.4^{+10.1}_{-0.4}% and f_res(LyC) = 1.7^{+15.2}_{-1.7}%, respectively. Finally, we find that most of these galaxies have moderate UV and optical SFRs (SFRs ≲ 10 M⊙ yr-1).

  5. Center Finding Algorithm on slit mask point source for IGRINS (Immersion GRating INfrared Spectrograph)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye-In; Pak, Soojong; Lee, Jae-Joon; Mace, Gregory N.; Jaffe, Daniel Thomas

    2017-06-01

    We developed an observation control software for the IGRINS (Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrograph) silt-viewing camera module, which points the astronomical target onto the spectroscopy slit and sends tracking feedbacks to the telescope control system (TCS). The point spread function (PSF) image is not following symmetric Gaussian profile. In addition, bright targets are easily saturated and shown as a donut shape. It is not trivial to define and find the center of the asymmetric PSF especially when most of the stellar PSF falls inside the slit. We made a center balancing algorithm (CBA) which derives the expected center position along the slit-width axis by referencing the stray flux ratios of both upper and lower sides of the slit. We compared accuracies of the CBA and those of a two-dimensional Gaussian fitting (2DGA) through simulations in order to evaluate the center finding algorithms. These methods were then verified with observational data. In this poster, we present the results of our tests and suggest a new algorithm for centering targets in the slit image of a spectrograph.

  6. The infrared spectrograph during the SIRTF pre-definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, James R.

    1988-01-01

    A test facility was set up to evaluate back-illuminated impurity band detectors constructed for an infrared spectrograph to be used on the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). Equipment built to perform the tests on these arrays is described. Initial tests have been geared toward determining dark current and read noise for the array. Four prior progress reports are incorporated into this report. They describe the first efforts in the detector development and testing effort; testing details and a new spectrograph concept; a discussion of resolution issues raised by the new design; management activities; a review of computer software and testing facility hardware; and a review of the preamplifier constructed as well as a revised schematic of the detector evaluation facility.

  7. GMTIFS: The Giant Magellan Telescope integral fields spectrograph and imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Rob; Bloxham, G.; Boz, R.; Bundy, D.; Davies, J.; Espeland, B.; Fordham, B.; Hart, J.; Herrald, N.; Nielsen, J.; Vaccarella, A.; Vest, C.; Young, P.; McGregor, P.

    2016-08-01

    GMTIFS is the first-generation adaptive optics integral-field spectrograph for the GMT, having been selected through a competitive review process in 2011. The GMTIFS concept is for a workhorse single-object integral-field spectrograph, operating at intermediate resolution (R 5,000 and 10,000) with a parallel imaging channel. The IFS offers variable spaxel scales to Nyquist sample the diffraction limited GMT PSF from λ 1-2.5 μm as well as a 50 mas scale to provide high sensitivity for low surface brightness objects. The GMTIFS will operate with all AO modes of the GMT (Natural guide star - NGSAO, Laser Tomography - LTAO, and, Ground Layer - GLAO) with an emphasis on achieving high sky coverage for LTAO observations. We summarize the principle science drivers for GMTIFS and the major design concepts that allow these goals to be achieved.

  8. An echelle spectrograph for middle ultraviolet solar spectroscopy from rockets.

    PubMed

    Tousey, R; Purcell, J D; Garrett, D L

    1967-03-01

    An echelle grating spectrograph is ideal for use in a rocket when high resolution is required becaus itoccupies a minimum of space. The instrument described covers the range 4000-2000 A with a resolution of 0.03 A. It was designed to fit into the solar biaxial pointing-control section of an Aerobee-150 rocket. The characteristics of the spectrograph are illustrated with laboratory spectra of iron and carbon are sources and with solar spectra obtained during rocket flights in 1961 and 1964. Problems encountered in analyzing the spectra are discussed. The most difficult design problem was the elimination of stray light when used with the sun. Of the several methods investigated, the most effective was a predispersing system in the form of a zero-dispersion double monochromator. This was made compact by folding the beam four times.

  9. First light results from the Hermes spectrograph at the AAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinis, Andrew; Barden, Sam; Birchall, Michael; Carollo, Daniela; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Brzeski, Jurek; Case, Scott; Cannon, Russell; Churilov, Vladimir; Couch, Warrick; Dean, Robert; De Silva, Gayandhi; D'Orazi, Valentina; Farrell, Tony; Fiegert, Kristin; Freeman, Kenneth; Frost, Gabriella; Gers, Luke; Goodwin, Michael; Gray, Doug; Heald, Ron; Heijmans, Jeroen; Jones, Damien; Keller, Stephan; Klauser, Urs; Kondrat, Yuriy; Lawrence, Jon; Lee, Steve; Mali, Slavko; Martell, Sarah; Mathews, Darren; Mayfield, Don; Miziarski, Stan; Muller, Rolf; Pai, Naveen; Patterson, Robert; Penny, Ed; Orr, David; Shortridge, Keith; Simpson, Jeffrey; Smedley, Scott; Smith, Greg; Stafford, Darren; Staszak, Nicholas; Vuong, Minh; Waller, Lewis; Wylie de Boer, Elizabeth; Xavier, Pascal; Zheng, Jessica; Zhelem, Ross; Zucker, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    The High Efficiency and Resolution Multi Element Spectrograph, HERMES is an facility-class optical spectrograph for the AAT. It is designed primarily for Galactic Archeology [21], the first major attempt to create a detailed understanding of galaxy formation and evolution by studying the history of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. The goal of the GALAH survey is to reconstruct the mass assembly history of the of the Milky Way, through a detailed spatially tagged abundance study of one million stars. The spectrograph is based at the Anglo Australian Telescope (AAT) and is fed by the existing 2dF robotic fiber positioning system. The spectrograph uses VPH-gratings to achieve a spectral resolving power of 28,000 in standard mode and also provides a high-resolution mode ranging between 40,000 to 50,000 using a slit mask. The GALAH survey requires a SNR greater than 100 for a star brightness of V=14. The total spectral coverage of the four channels is about 100nm between 370 and 1000nm for up to 392 simultaneous targets within the 2 degree field of view. Hermes has been commissioned over 3 runs, during bright time in October, November and December 2013, in parallel with the beginning of the GALAH Pilot survey starting in November 2013. In this paper we present the first-light results from the commissioning run and the beginning of the GALAH Survey, including performance results such as throughput and resolution, as well as instrument reliability. We compare the abundance calculations from the pilot survey to those in the literature.

  10. Semi-quantitative spectrographic analysis and rank correlation in geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, F.J.

    1957-01-01

    The rank correlation coefficient, rs, which involves less computation than the product-moment correlation coefficient, r, can be used to indicate the degree of relationship between two elements. The method is applicable in situations where the assumptions underlying normal distribution correlation theory may not be satisfied. Semi-quantitative spectrographic analyses which are reported as grouped or partly ranked data can be used to calculate rank correlations between elements. ?? 1957.

  11. LAMOST Spectrograph Response Curves: Stability and Application to Flux Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Bing; Luo, A.-Li; Kong, Xiao; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Guo, Yan-Xin; Cook, Neil James; Hou, Wen; Yang, Hai-Feng; Li, Yin-Bi; Song, Yi-Han; Chen, Jian-Jun; Zuo, Fang; Wu, Ke-Fei; Wang, Meng-Xin; Wu, Yue; Wang, You-Fen; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2016-12-01

    The task of flux calibration for Large sky Area Multi-Object Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) spectra is difficult due to many factors, such as the lack of standard stars, flat-fielding for large field of view, and variation of reddening between different stars, especially at low Galactic latitudes. Poor selection, bad spectral quality, or extinction uncertainty of standard stars not only might induce errors to the calculated spectral response curve (SRC) but also might lead to failures in producing final 1D spectra. In this paper, we inspected spectra with Galactic latitude | b| ≥slant 60^\\circ and reliable stellar parameters, determined through the LAMOST Stellar Parameter Pipeline (LASP), to study the stability of the spectrograph. To guarantee that the selected stars had been observed by each fiber, we selected 37,931 high-quality exposures of 29,000 stars from LAMOST DR2, and more than seven exposures for each fiber. We calculated the SRCs for each fiber for each exposure and calculated the statistics of SRCs for spectrographs with both the fiber variations and time variations. The result shows that the average response curve of each spectrograph (henceforth ASPSRC) is relatively stable, with statistical errors ≤10%. From the comparison between each ASPSRC and the SRCs for the same spectrograph obtained by the 2D pipeline, we find that the ASPSRCs are good enough to use for the calibration. The ASPSRCs have been applied to spectra that were abandoned by the LAMOST 2D pipeline due to the lack of standard stars, increasing the number of LAMOST spectra by 52,181 in DR2. Comparing those same targets with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), the relative flux differences between SDSS spectra and LAMOST spectra with the ASPSRC method are less than 10%, which underlines that the ASPSRC method is feasible for LAMOST flux calibration.

  12. PRAXIS: a near infrared spectrograph optimised for OH suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. C.; Bauer, S.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Case, S.; Content, R.; Fechner, T.; Giannone, D.; Haynes, R.; Hernandez, E.; Horton, A. J.; Klauser, U.; Lawrence, J. S.; Leon-Saval, S. G.; Lindley, E.; Löhmannsröben, H.-G.; Min, S.-S.; Pai, N.; Roth, M.; Shortridge, K.; Staszak, Nicholas F.; Tims, Julia; Xavier, Pascal; Zhelem, Ross

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric emission from OH molecules is a long standing problem for near-infrared astronomy. PRAXIS is a unique spectrograph, currently in the build-phase, which is fed by a fibre array that removes the OH background. The OH suppression is achieved with fibre Bragg gratings, which were tested successfully on the GNOSIS instrument. PRAXIS will use the same fibre Bragg gratings as GNOSIS in the first implementation, and new, less expensive and more efficient, multicore fibre Bragg gratings in the second implementation. The OH lines are suppressed by a factor of 1000, and the expected increase in the signal-to-noise in the interline regions compared to GNOSIS is a factor of 9 with the GNOSIS gratings and a factor of 17 with the new gratings. PRAXIS will enable the full exploitation of OH suppression for the first time, which was not achieved by GNOSIS due to high thermal emission, low spectrograph transmission, and detector noise. PRAXIS will have extremely low thermal emission, through the cooling of all significantly emitting parts, including the fore-optics, the fibre Bragg gratings, a long length of fibre, and a fibre slit, and an optical design that minimises leaks of thermal emission from outside the spectrograph. PRAXIS will achieve low detector noise through the use of a Hawaii-2RG detector, and a high throughput through an efficient VPH based spectrograph. The scientific aims of the instrument are to determine the absolute level of the interline continuum and to enable observations of individual objects via an IFU. PRAXIS will first be installed on the AAT, then later on an 8m class telescope.

  13. Solar glint suppression in compact planetary ultraviolet spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Michael W.; Cook, Jason C.; Grava, Cesare; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Retherford, Kurt D.

    2015-08-01

    Solar glint suppression is an important consideration in the design of compact photon-counting ultraviolet spectrographs. Southwest Research Institute developed the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (launch in 2009), and the Ultraviolet Spectrograph on Juno (Juno-UVS, launch in 2011). Both of these compact spectrographs revealed minor solar glints in flight that did not appear in pre-launch analyses. These glints only appeared when their respective spacecraft were operating outside primary science mission parameters. Post-facto scattered light analysis verifies the geometries at which these glints occurred and why they were not caught during ground testing or nominal mission operations. The limitations of standard baffle design at near-grazing angles are discussed, as well as the importance of including surface scatter properties in standard stray light analyses when determining solar keep-out efficiency. In particular, the scattered light analysis of these two instruments shows that standard "one bounce" assumptions in baffle design are not always enough to prevent scattered sunlight from reaching the instrument focal plane. Future builds, such as JUICE-UVS, will implement improved scattered and stray light modeling early in the design phase to enhance capabilities in extended mission science phases, as well as optimize solar keep out volume.

  14. Fiber IFU unit for the second generation VLT spectrograph KMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomono, Daigo; Weisz, Harald; Hofmann, Reiner

    2003-03-01

    KMOS is a cryogenic multi-object near-infrared spectrograph for the VLT. It will be equipped with about 20 deployable integral field units (IFUs) which can be positioned anywhere in the 7.2 arcmin diameter field o the VLT Nasmyth focus by a cryogenic robot. We describe IFUs using micro lens arrays and optical fibers to arrange the two-dimensional fields from the IFUs on the spectrograph entrance slit. Each micro-lens array is mounted in a spider arm which also houses the pre-optics with a cold stop. The spider arms are positioned by a cryogenic robot which is built around the image plane. For the IFUs, two solutions are considered: monolithic mirco-lens arrays with fibers attached to the back where the entrance pupil is imaged, and tapered fibers with integrated lenses which are bundled together to form a lens array. The flexibility of optical fibers relaxes boundary conditions for integration of the instrument components. On the other hand, FRD and geometric characteristics of optical fibers leads to higher AΩ accepted by the spectrograph. Conceptual design of the instrument is presented as well as advantages and disadvantages of the fiber IFUs.

  15. SPRAT: Spectrograph for the Rapid Acquisition of Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piascik, A. S.; Steele, Iain A.; Bates, Stuart D.; Mottram, Christopher J.; Smith, R. J.; Barnsley, R. M.; Bolton, B.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the development of a low cost, low resolution (R ~ 350), high throughput, long slit spectrograph covering visible (4000-8000) wavelengths. The spectrograph has been developed for fully robotic operation with the Liverpool Telescope (La Palma). The primary aim is to provide rapid spectral classification of faint (V ˜ 20) transient objects detected by projects such as Gaia, iPTF (intermediate Palomar Transient Factory), LOFAR, and a variety of high energy satellites. The design employs a volume phase holographic (VPH) transmission grating as the dispersive element combined with a prism pair (grism) in a linear optical path. One of two peak spectral sensitivities are selectable by rotating the grism. The VPH and prism combination and entrance slit are deployable, and when removed from the beam allow the collimator/camera pair to re-image the target field onto the detector. This mode of operation provides automatic acquisition of the target onto the slit prior to spectrographic observation through World Coordinate System fitting. The selection and characterisation of optical components to maximise photon throughput is described together with performance predictions.

  16. Integration and testing of the DESI spectrograph prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perruchot, S.; Secroun, A.; Blanc, P.-E.; Ronayette, S.; Régal, X.; Castagnoli, G.; Le Van Suu, A.; Ealet, A.; Cuby, J.-G.; Elliot, A.; Honscheid, K.; Jelinsky, P.

    2016-08-01

    The Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) is under construction to measure the expansion history of the Universe using the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation probe. The KPNO Mayall telescope will deliver light to 5000 fibers feeding ten broadband spectrographs. A consortium of Aix-Marseille University (AMU) and CNRS laboratories (LAM, OHP and CPPM) together with the WINLIGHT Systems company (Pertuis-France) has committed to integrate and validate the performance requirements of the full spectrographs, equipped with their cryostats, shutters and other mechanisms. An AIT plan has been defined and dedicated test equipment has been designed and implemented. This equipment simulates the fiber input illumination from the telescope, and offers a variety of continuum and line sources. Flux levels are adjustable and can illuminate one or several fibers along the test slit. It is fully remotely controlled and interfaced to the Instrument Control System. Specific analysis tools have also been developed to verify and monitor the performance and stability of the spectrographs. All these developments are described in details.

  17. The SED Machine: A Robotic Spectrograph for Fast Transient Classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagorodnova, Nadejda; Neill, James D.; Walters, Richard; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Fremling, Christoffer; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Dekany, Richard G.; Fucik, Jason R.; Konidaris, Nick; Nash, Reston; Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Ofek, Eran O.; O’ Sullivan, Donal; Quimby, Robert; Ritter, Andreas; Vyhmeister, Karl E.

    2018-03-01

    Current time domain facilities are finding several hundreds of transient astronomical events a year. The discovery rate is expected to increase in the future as soon as new surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) and the Large Synoptic Sky Survey (LSST) come online. Presently, the rate at which transients are classified is approximately one order or magnitude lower than the discovery rate, leading to an increasing “follow-up drought”. Existing telescopes with moderate aperture can help address this deficit when equipped with spectrographs optimized for spectral classification. Here, we provide an overview of the design, operations and first results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Machine (SEDM), operating on the Palomar 60-inch telescope (P60). The instrument is optimized for classification and high observing efficiency. It combines a low-resolution (R ∼ 100) integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph with “Rainbow Camera” (RC), a multi-band field acquisition camera which also serves as multi-band (ugri) photometer. The SEDM was commissioned during the operation of the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) and has already lived up to its promise. The success of the SEDM demonstrates the value of spectrographs optimized for spectral classification.

  18. Research directed toward improved echelles for the ultraviolet. [large space teslescope spectrographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Low frequency gratings obtainable with present technology, can meet the grating-efficiency design goals for potential space telescope spectrographs. Gratings made with changes in the three specific parameters: the ruling tool profile, the coating material, and the lubricants used during the ruling process were compared. A series of coatings and test gratings were fabricated and were examined for surface smoothness with a Nomarski differential interference microscope and an electron microsocope. Photomicrographs were obtained to show the difference in smoothness of the various coatings and rulings. Efficiency measurements were made for those test rulings that showed good groove characteristics: smoothness, proper ruling depth, and absence of defects (e.g., streaks, feathered edges and rough sides). Higher grating efficiency should be correlated with the degree of smoothness of both the coating and the grating groove.

  19. The lick-index calibration of the Gemini multi-object spectrographs

    SciTech Connect

    Puzia, Thomas H.; Miller, Bryan W.; Trancho, Gelys

    2013-06-01

    We present the calibration of the spectroscopic Lick/IDS standard line-index system for measurements obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs known as GMOS-North and GMOS-South. We provide linear correction functions for each of the 25 standard Lick line indices for the B600 grism and two instrumental setups, one with 0.''5 slit width and 1 × 1 CCD pixel binning (corresponding to ∼2.5 Å spectral resolution) and the other with 0.''75 slit width and 2 × 2 binning (∼4 Å). We find small and well-defined correction terms for the set of Balmer indices Hβ, Hγ {sub A}, and Hδ {sub A} alongmore » with the metallicity sensitive indices Fe5015, Fe5270, Fe5335, Fe5406, Mg{sub 2}, and Mgb that are widely used for stellar population diagnostics of distant stellar systems. We find other indices that sample molecular absorption bands, such as TiO{sub 1} and TiO{sub 2}, with very wide wavelength coverage or indices that sample very weak molecular and atomic absorption features, such as Mg{sub 1}, as well as indices with particularly narrow passband definitions, such as Fe4384, Ca4455, Fe4531, Ca4227, and Fe5782, which are less robustly calibrated. These indices should be used with caution.« less

  20. CAFE: Calar Alto Fiber-fed Échelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceituno, J.; Sánchez, S. F.; Grupp, F.; Lillo, J.; Hernán-Obispo, M.; Benitez, D.; Montoya, L. M.; Thiele, U.; Pedraz, S.; Barrado, D.; Dreizler, S.; Bean, J.

    2013-04-01

    We present here CAFE, the Calar Alto Fiber-fed Échelle spectrograph, a new instrument built at the Centro Astronomico Hispano Alemán (CAHA). CAFE is a single-fiber, high-resolution (R ~ 70 000) spectrograph, covering the wavelength range between 3650-9800 Å. It was built on the basis of the common design for Échelle spectrographs. Its main aim is to measure radial velocities of stellar objects up to V ~ 13-14 mag with a precision as good as a few tens of m s-1. To achieve this goal the design was simplified at maximum, removing all possible movable components, the central wavelength is fixed, as is the wavelength coverage; there is no filter wheel, etc. Particular care was taken with the thermal and mechanical stability. The instrument is fully operational and publically accessible at the 2.2 m telescope of the Calar Alto Observatory. In this article we describe (i) the design, summarizing its manufacturing phase; (ii) characterize the main properties of the instrument; (iii) describe the reduction pipeline; and (iv) show the results from the first light and commissioning runs. The preliminar results indicate that the instrument fulfills the specifications and can achieve the planned goals. In particular, the results show that the instrument is more efficient than anticipated, reaching a signal-to-noise of ~20 for a stellar object as faint as V ~ 14.5 mag in ~2700 s integration time. The instrument is a wonderful machine for exoplanetary research (by studying large samples of possible systems cotaining massive planets), galactic dynamics (highly precise radial velocities in moving groups or stellar associations), or astrochemistry.

  1. The X-ray spectrographic telescope. [for solar corona observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaiana, G. S.; Krieger, A. S.; Petrasso, R.; Silk, J. K.; Timothy, A. F.

    1974-01-01

    The S-054 X-ray telescope, which operated successfully throughout the eight-month Skylab mission, is a grazing incidence instrument with a spatial resolution of the order of 2 arc sec on axis. The total wavelength range observed by the instrument is 2 to 60 A. Crude spectral resolution within this range is achieved by means of a series of six X-ray filter materials. A spectrographic mode of operation, employing an objective grating, is used to obtain spectra of flare events and selected coronal features.

  2. Design of the KOSMOS oil-coupled spectrograph camera lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Thomas P.; Derwent, Mark; Martini, Paul; Poczulp, Gary

    2014-07-01

    We present the design details of oil-coupled lens groups used in the KOSMOS spectrograph camera. The oil-coupled groups use silicone rubber O-rings in a unique way to accurately center lens elements with high radial and axial stiffness while also allowing easy assembly. The O-rings robustly seal the oil within the lens gaps to prevent oil migration. The design of an expansion diaphragm to compensate for differential expansion due to temperature changes is described. The issues of lens assembly, lens gap shimming, oil filling and draining, bubble mitigation, material compatibility, mechanical inspection, and optical testing are discussed.

  3. KECK ECHELLETTE SPECTROGRAPH AND IMAGER OBSERVATIONS OF METAL-POOR DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Penprase, Bryan E.; Toro-Martinez, Irene; Beeler, Daniel J.

    2010-09-20

    We present the first results from a survey of SDSS quasars selected for strong H I damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) absorption with corresponding low equivalent width absorption from strong low-ion transitions (e.g., C II {lambda}1334 and Si II {lambda}1260). These metal-poor DLA candidates were selected from the SDSS fifth release quasar spectroscopic database, and comprise a large new sample for probing low-metallicity galaxies. Medium-resolution echellette spectra from the Keck Echellette Spectrograph and Imager spectrograph for an initial sample of 35 systems were obtained to explore the metal-poor tail of the DLA distribution and to investigate the nucleosynthetic patterns at these metallicities.more » We have estimated saturation corrections for the moderately underresolved spectra, and systems with very narrow Doppler parameters (b {<=} 5 km s{sup -1}) will likely have underestimated abundances. For those systems with Doppler parameters b > 5 km s{sup -1}, we have measured low-metallicity DLA gas with [X/H] <-2.4 for at least one of C, O, Si, or Fe. Assuming non-saturated components, we estimate that several DLA systems have [X/H] <-2.8, including five DLA systems with both low equivalent widths and low metallicity in transitions of both C II and O I. All of the measured DLA metallicities, however, exceed or are consistent with a metallicity of at least 1/1000 of solar, regardless of the effects of saturation in our spectra. Our results indicate that the metal-poor tail of galaxies at z {approx} 3 drops exponentially at [X/H] {approx}<-3. If the distribution of metallicity is Gaussian, the probability of identifying interstellar medium gas with lower abundance is extremely small, and our results suggest that DLA systems with [X/H] < -4.0 are extremely rare, and could comprise only 8 x 10{sup -7} of DLA systems. The relative abundances of species within these low-metallicity DLA systems are compared with stellar nucleosynthesis models, and are consistent with stars

  4. SpecOp: Optimal Extraction Software for Integral Field Unit Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarron, Adam; Ciardullo, Robin; Eracleous, Michael

    2018-01-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Telescope’s new low resolution integral field spectrographs, LRS2-B and LRS2-R, each cover a 12”x6” area on the sky with 280 fibers and generate spectra with resolutions between R=1100 and R=1900. To extract 1-D spectra from the instrument’s 3D data cubes, a program is needed that is flexible enough to work for a wide variety of targets, including continuum point sources, emission line sources, and compact sources embedded in complex backgrounds. We therefore introduce SpecOp, a user-friendly python program for optimally extracting spectra from integral-field unit spectrographs. As input, SpecOp takes a sky-subtracted data cube consisting of images at each wavelength increment set by the instrument’s spectral resolution, and an error file for each count measurement. All of these files are generated by the current LRS2 reduction pipeline. The program then collapses the cube in the image plane using the optimal extraction algorithm detailed by Keith Horne (1986). The various user-selected options include the fraction of the total signal enclosed in a contour-defined region, the wavelength range to analyze, and the precision of the spatial profile calculation. SpecOp can output the weighted counts and errors at each wavelength in various table formats using python’s astropy package. We outline the algorithm used for extraction and explain how the software can be used to easily obtain high-quality 1-D spectra. We demonstrate the utility of the program by applying it to spectra of a variety of quasars and AGNs. In some of these targets, we extract the spectrum of a nuclear point source that is superposed on a spatially extended galaxy.

  5. Spectrographs and Large Telescopes: A Study of Instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fica, Haley Diane; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Uomoto, Alan K.; Hare, Tyson

    2017-01-01

    It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a telescope in possession of a large aperture, must be in want of a high resolution spectrograph. Subsystems of these instruments require testing and upgrading to ensure that they can continue to be scientifically productive and usher in a new era of astronomical research. The Planet Finder Spectrograph (PFS) and Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE), both on the Magellan II Clay telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, and the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) are examples of such instruments. Bluer flat field lamps were designed for PFS and MIKE to replace lamps no longer available in order to ensure continued, efficient functionality. These newly designed lamps will result in better flat fielding and calibration of data, and thus result in increased reduction of instrument noise. When it is built and installed in 2022, G-CLEF will be be fed by a tertiary mirror on the GMT. Stepper motors attached to the back of this mirror will be used to correct misalignments in the optical relay system. These motors were characterized to ensure that they function as expected to an accuracy of a few microns. These projects incorporate several key aspects of astronomical instrumentation: designing, building, and testing.

  6. The Use of Color Sensors for Spectrographic Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Neil B.

    2018-04-01

    The wavelength calibration of spectrographs is an essential but challenging task in many disciplines. Calibration is traditionally accomplished by imaging the spectrum of a light source containing features that are known to appear at certain wavelengths and mapping them to their location on the sensor. This is typically required in conjunction with each scientific observation to account for mechanical and optical variations of the instrument over time, which may span years for certain projects. The method presented here investigates the usage of color itself instead of spectral features to calibrate a spectrograph. The primary advantage of such a calibration is that any broad-spectrum light source such as the sky or an incandescent bulb is suitable. This method allows for calibration using the full optical pathway of the instrument instead of incorporating separate calibration equipment that may introduce errors. This paper focuses on the potential for color calibration in the field of radial velocity astronomy, in which instruments must be finely calibrated for long periods of time to detect tiny Doppler wavelength shifts. This method is not restricted to radial velocity, however, and may find application in any field requiring calibrated spectrometers such as sea water analysis, cellular biology, chemistry, atmospheric studies, and so on. This paper demonstrates that color sensors have the potential to provide calibration with greatly reduced complexity.

  7. Cosmic Origins Spectrograph : Target Acquisition Performance and Updated Guidelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, Steven V.; Keyes, C.; Osterman, S.; Sahnow, D.; Soderblom, D.; COS IDT Team; STScI COS Team

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is a slit-less spectrograph with a very small aperture (radius = 1.25"). To achieve the desired wavelength accuracy of <15 km/s, HST+COS must center the target to within 0.1” of the center of the aperture. This is the angle subtended by a typical AAS poster when viewed from over 1400 miles away. During SMOV we have fine-tuned the COS target acquisition (TA) procedures to exceed this accuracy for all three COS TA modes; NUV imaging, NUV spectroscopic, and FUV spectroscopic. We will compare all COS TA modes in terms of centering accuracy, efficiency (elapsed time), and required signal-to-noise for all targets suitable for use with COS. We will also provide updated recommendations for the options of all TA modes (e.g., SCAN-SIZE and NUM-POS of ACQ/PEAKD). We have observed in SMOV that HST is providing an excellent initial 1-σ blind pointing accuracy of ±0.4” in both the along-dispersion and cross-dispersion directions. We will discuss the implications of this, and other lessons learned in SMOV, on Cycle 17 and 18 HST+COS TAs.

  8. Fireball multi object spectrograph: as-built optic performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grange, R.; Milliard, B.; Lemaitre, G.; Quiret, S.; Pascal, S.; Origné, A.; Hamden, E.; Schiminovich, D.

    2016-07-01

    Fireball (Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon) is a NASA/CNES balloon-borne experiment to study the faint diffuse circumgalactic medium from the line emissions in the ultraviolet (200 nm) above 37 km flight altitude. Fireball relies on a Multi Object Spectrograph (MOS) that takes full advantage of the new high QE, low noise 13 μm pixels UV EMCCD. The MOS is fed by a 1 meter diameter parabola with an extended field (1000 arcmin2) using a highly aspherized two mirror corrector. All the optical train is working at F/2.5 to maintain a high signal to noise ratio. The spectrograph (R 2200 and 1.5 arcsec FWHM) is based on two identical Schmidt systems acting as collimator and camera sharing a 2400 g/mm aspherized reflective Schmidt grating. This grating is manufactured from active optics methods by double replication technique of a metal deformable matrix whose active clear aperture is built-in to a rigid elliptical contour. The payload and gondola are presently under integration at LAM. We will present the alignment procedure and the as-built optic performances of the Fireball instrument.

  9. MSE spectrograph optical design: a novel pupil slicing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanò, P.

    2014-07-01

    The Maunakea Spectroscopic Explorer shall be mainly devoted to perform deep, wide-field, spectroscopic surveys at spectral resolutions from ~2000 to ~20000, at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. Simultaneous spectral coverage at low resolution is required, while at high resolution only selected windows can be covered. Moreover, very high multiplexing (3200 objects) must be obtained at low resolution. At higher resolutions a decreased number of objects (~800) can be observed. To meet such high demanding requirements, a fiber-fed multi-object spectrograph concept has been designed by pupil-slicing the collimated beam, followed by multiple dispersive and camera optics. Different resolution modes are obtained by introducing anamorphic lenslets in front of the fiber arrays. The spectrograph is able to switch between three resolution modes (2000, 6500, 20000) by removing the anamorphic lenses and exchanging gratings. Camera lenses are fixed in place to increase stability. To enhance throughput, VPH first-order gratings has been preferred over echelle gratings. Moreover, throughput is kept high over all wavelength ranges by splitting light into more arms by dichroic beamsplitters and optimizing efficiency for each channel by proper selection of glass materials, coatings, and grating parameters.

  10. The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) Small Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pontieu, B.; Title, A. M.; Schryver, C. J.; Lemen, J. R.; Golub, L.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Carlsson, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) was recently selected as a small explorer mission by NASA. The primary goal of IRIS is to understand how the solar atmosphere is energized. The IRIS investigation combines advanced numerical modeling with a high resolution 20 cm UV imaging spectrograph that will obtain spectra covering temperatures from 4,500 to 10 MK in three wavelength ranges (1332-1358 Angstrom, 1390-1406 Angstrom and 2785-2835 Angstrom) and simultaneous images covering temperatures from 4,500 K to 65,000 K. IRIS will obtain UV spectra and images with high resolution in space (1/3 arcsec) and time (1s) focused on the chromosphere and transition region of the Sun, a complex dynamic interface region between the photosphere and corona. In this region, all but a few percent of the non-radiative energy leaving the Sun is converted into heat and radiation. IRIS fills a crucial gap in our ability to advance Sun-Earth connection studies by tracing the flow of energy and plasma through this foundation of the corona and heliosphere. The IRIS investigation is led by PI Alan Title (LMSAL) with major participation by the Harvard Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Montana State University, NASA Ames Research Center, Stanford University and the University of Oslo (Norway). IRIS is scheduled for launch in late 2012, and will have a nominal two year mission lifetime.

  11. The Radial Velocity Precision of Fiber-fed Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Gordon A. H.; Shkolnik, Evgenya; Bohlender, David A.; Yang, Stephenson

    2003-06-01

    We have measured the radial velocities of five 51 Peg-type stars and one star known to be constant in velocity. Our measurements, on 20 Å centered at 3947 Å, were conventional, using Th/Ar comparison spectra taken every 20 or 40 minutes between the stellar exposures. Existing IRAF routines were used for the reduction. We find σRV<=20 m s-1, provided that four measurements (out of 72) with residuals greater than 5 σRV are neglected. The observations were made on five nights with the CFHT Gecko spectrograph (R~110,000), fiber-fed by the CAFE system; σRV<=10 m s-1 seems possible with additional care. This study was incidental to the main observing program and is certainly not exhaustive, but the small value of σRV implies that the fiber feed/image slicer system on Gecko+CAFE essentially eliminates the long-standing problem of guiding errors in radial velocity measurements. We are not promoting this conventional approach for serious Doppler planet searches (especially with Gecko, which has such a small multiplex gain), but the precision is valuable for observations made in spectral regions remote from telluric lines or captive-gas fiducials. Instrument builders might consider the advantages of the CAFE optics, which incorporate agitation and invert the object and pupil to illuminate the slit and grating, respectively, in future spectrograph designs.

  12. Minor Distortions with Major Consequences: Correcting Distortions in Imaging Spectrographs

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Morris, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Projective transformation is a mathematical correction (implemented in software) used in the remote imaging field to produce distortion-free images. We present the application of projective transformation to correct minor alignment and astigmatism distortions that are inherent in dispersive spectrographs. Patterned white-light images and neon emission spectra were used to produce registration points for the transformation. Raman transects collected on microscopy and fiber-optic systems were corrected using established methods and compared with the same transects corrected using the projective transformation. Even minor distortions have a significant effect on reproducibility and apparent fluorescence background complexity. Simulated Raman spectra were used to optimize the projective transformation algorithm. We demonstrate that the projective transformation reduced the apparent fluorescent background complexity and improved reproducibility of measured parameters of Raman spectra. Distortion correction using a projective transformation provides a major advantage in reducing the background fluorescence complexity even in instrumentation where slit-image distortions and camera rotation were minimized using manual or mechanical means. We expect these advantages should be readily applicable to other spectroscopic modalities using dispersive imaging spectrographs. PMID:21211158

  13. Raman Spectrograph for Ocean Worlds: Integrating Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt D.; Moore, Thomas Z.; Davis, Michael W.; Howett, Carly; Soto, Alejandro; Raut, Ujjwal; Molyneux, Philippa M.; Nowicki, Keith; Mandt, Kathleen; E Schmidt, Britney; Mason, John; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Fry, Edward S.; RSO Team

    2017-10-01

    We present a new concept for a Raman spectrograph instrument designed to conduct high sensitivity measurements of biomarkers within Ocean Worlds environments. Our Raman Spectrograph for Ocean worlds (RSO) instrument is a UV+IR multi-laser enhanced Raman system capable of detecting complex, biologically-relevant molecular species mixed within icy surfaces in the outer Solar System. Incorporating two or more lasers with different excitation-emission pathways is crucial for thorough and definitive interpretation of the spectral fingerprints that identify unknown constituents within a sample. Our approach strives to remove fluorescence-driven ambiguities from degenerate, non-unique signatures expected for the most interesting trace constituents, i.e., those best revealed by UV excitation. Our design for deep-UV measurements is based on a novel high-reflectivity integrating cavity invented at Texas A&M University and further developed at SwRI. We report nanomole-range sensitivities of several complex organic molecules measured with our laboratory prototype cavities. Weak optical signals from Raman or fluorescence based instruments require sensitive low-noise detectors and long integration times, which by comparison are undesirable for the high radiation environment and limited battery power conditions anticipated for the Europa Lander mission. The two-to-five orders of magnitude enhanced sensitivity over standard Raman spectroscopy enabled by the integrating cavity enhanced spectroscopy technique makes it well suited for the Europa Lander payload and other future Ocean Worlds missions.

  14. A fast new cadioptric design for fiber-fed spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Will

    2012-09-01

    The next generation of massively multiplexed multi-object spectrographs (DESpec, SUMIRE, BigBOSS, 4MOST, HECTOR) demand fast, efficient and affordable spectrographs, with higher resolutions (R = 3000-5000) than current designs. Beam-size is a (relatively) free parameter in the design, but the properties of VPH gratings are such that, for fixed resolution and wavelength coverage, the effect on beam-size on overall VPH efficiency is very small. For alltransmissive cameras, this suggests modest beam-sizes (say 80-150mm) to minimize costs; while for cadioptric (Schmidt-type) cameras, much larger beam-sizes (say 250mm+) are preferred to improve image quality and to minimize obstruction losses. Schmidt designs have benefits in terms of image quality, camera speed and scattered light performance, and recent advances such as MRF technology mean that the required aspherics are no longer a prohibitive cost or risk. The main objections to traditional Schmidt designs are the inaccessibility of the detector package, and the loss in throughput caused by it being in the beam. With expected count rates and current read-noise technology, the gain in camera speed allowed by Schmidt optics largely compensates for the additional obstruction losses. However, future advances in readout technology may erase most of this compensation. A new Schmidt/Maksutov-derived design is presented, which differs from previous designs in having the detector package outside the camera, and adjacent to the spectrograph pupil. The telescope pupil already contains a hole at its center, because of the obstruction from the telescope top-end. With a 250mm beam, it is possible to largely hide a 6cm × 6cm detector package and its dewar within this hole. This means that the design achieves a very high efficiency, competitive with transmissive designs. The optics are excellent, as least as good as classic Schmidt designs, allowing F/1.25 or even faster cameras. The principal hardware has been costed at $300K per

  15. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph on the Europa Mission (Europa-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Steffl, A.; Davis, M. W.; Feldman, P. D.; McGrath, M. A.; Roth, L.; Saur, J.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Pope, S.; Freeman, M. A.; Persyn, S. C.; Araujo, M. F.; Cortinas, S. C.; Monreal, R. M.; Persson, K. B.; Trantham, B. J.; Versteeg, M. H.; Walther, B. C.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Europa multi-flyby mission is designed to provide a diversity of measurements suited to enrich our understanding of the potential habitability of this intriguing ocean world. The Europa mission's Ultraviolet Spectrograph, Europa-UVS, is the sixth in a series of successful ultraviolet imaging spectrographs (Rosetta-Alice, New Horizons Pluto-Alice, LRO-LAMP) and, like JUICE-UVS (now under Phase B development), is largely based on the most recent of these to fly, Juno-UVS. Europa-UVS observes photons in the 55-210 nm wavelength range, at moderate spectral and spatial resolution along a 7.5° slit. Three distinct apertures send light to the off-axis telescope mirror feeding the long-slit spectrograph: i) a main entrance airglow port is used for most observations (e.g., airglow, aurora, surface mapping, and stellar occultations); ii) a high-spatial-resolution port consists of a small hole in an additional aperture door, and is used for detailed observations of bright targets; and iii) a separate solar port allows for solar occultations, viewing at a 60° offset from the nominal payload boresight. Photon event time-tagging (pixel list mode) and programmable spectral imaging (histogram mode) allow for observational flexibility and optimal science data management. As on Juno-UVS, the effects of penetrating electron radiation on electronic parts and data quality are mitigated through contiguous shielding, filtering of pulse height amplitudes, management of high-voltage settings, and careful use of radiation-hard parts. The science goals of Europa-UVS are to: 1) Determine the composition & chemistry, source & sinks, and structure & variability of Europa's atmosphere, from equator to pole; 2) Search for and characterize active plumes in terms of global distribution, structure, composition, and variability; 3) Explore the surface composition & microphysics and their relation to endogenic & exogenic processes; and 4) Investigate how energy and mass flow in the Europa

  16. New Observations of Molecular Nitrogen by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph on MAVEN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Michael H.; Evans, J. S.; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal K.; Crismani, Matteo M. J.; Stiepen, Arnaud; Chaffin, Michael S.; McClintock, William E.; Holsclaw, Greg M.; Lefevre, Franck; Montmessin, Franck; Lo, Daniel Y.; Clarke, John T.; Bougher, Stephen W.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    2015-11-01

    The Martian ultraviolet dayglow provides information on the basic state of the Martian upper atmosphere. The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on NASA’s Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission has observed Mars at mid and far-UV wavelengths since its arrival in September 2014. In this work, we describe a linear regression method used to extract components of UV spectra from IUVS limb observations and focus in particular on molecular nitrogen (N2) photoelectron excited emissions. We identify N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) emissions for the first time at Mars and we also confirm the tentative identification of N2 Vegard-Kaplan (VK) emissions. We compare observed VK and LBH limb radiance profiles to model results between 90 and 210 km. Finally, we compare retrieved N2 density profiles to general circulation (GCM) model results. Contrary to earlier analyses using other satellite data that indicated N2 densities were a factor of three less than predictions, we find that N2 abundances exceed GCM results by about a factor of two at 130 km but are in agreement at 150 km.

  17. PSF modeling by spikes simulations and wings measurements for the MOONS multi fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li Causi, G.; Lee, D.; Vitali, F.; Royer, F.; Oliva, E.

    2016-08-01

    The optical design of MOONS, the next generation thousand-fiber NIR spectrograph for the VLT, involves both on-axis reflective collimators and on-axis very fast reflective cameras, which yields both beam obstruction, due to fiber slit and detector support, and image spread, due to propagation within detector substrate. The need to model and control i) the effect of the diffraction spikes produced by these obstructions, ii) the detector-induced shape variation of the Point Spread Function (PSF), and iii) the intensity profile of the PSF wings, leads us to perform both simulations and lab measurements, in order to optimize the spider design and built a reliable PSF model, useful for simulate realistic raw images for testing the data reduction. Starting from the unobstructed PSF variation, as computed with the ZEMAX software, we numerically computed the diffraction spikes for different spider shapes, to which we added the PSF wing profile, as measured on a sample of the MOONS VPH diffraction grating. Finally, we implemented the PSF defocusing due to the thick detector (for the visible channel), we convolved the PSF with the fiber core image, and we added the optical ghosts, so finally obtaining a detailed and realistic PSF model, that we use for spectral extraction testing, cross talk estimation, and sensitivity predictions.

  18. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikuła, K.; Heinzel, P.; Liu, W.; Berlicki, A.

    2017-08-01

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg II lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg II h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In this paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg II h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg II spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg II lines. Emission profiles of Mg II were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of Cool Flare Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Mikuła, K.; Berlicki, A.; Heinzel, P.

    Flare loops were well observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph ( IRIS ) during the gradual phase of two solar flares on 2014 March 29 and 2015 June 22. Cool flare loops are visible in various spectral lines formed at chromospheric and transition-region temperatures and exhibit large downflows which correspond to the standard scenario. The principal aim of this work is to analyze the structure and dynamics of cool flare loops observed in Mg ii lines. Synthetic profiles of the Mg ii h line are computed using the classical cloud model and assuming a uniform background intensity. In thismore » paper, we study novel IRIS NUV observations of such loops in Mg ii h and k lines and also show the behavior of hotter lines detected in the FUV channel. We obtained the spatial evolution of the velocities: near the loop top, the flow velocities are small and they are increasing toward the loop legs. Moreover, from slit-jaw image (SJI) movies, we observe some plasma upflows into the loops, which are also detectable in Mg ii spectra. The brightness of the loops systematically decreases with increasing flow velocity, and we ascribe this to the effect of Doppler dimming, which works for Mg ii lines. Emission profiles of Mg ii were found to be extremely broad, and we explain this through the large unresolved non-thermal motions.« less

  20. Two-dimensional temperature and carbon dioxide concentration profiles in atmospheric laminar diffusion flames measured by mid-infrared direct absorption spectroscopy at 4.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xunchen; Zhang, Guoyong; Huang, Yan; Wang, Yizun; Qi, Fei

    2018-04-01

    We present a multi-line flame thermometry technique based on mid-infrared direct absorption spectroscopy of carbon dioxide at its v_3 fundamental around 4.2 μm that is particularly suitable for sooting flames. Temperature and concentration profiles of gas phase molecules in a flame are important characteristics to understand its flame structure and combustion chemistry. One of the standard laboratory flames to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and soot formation is laminar non-premixed co-flow flame, but PAH and soot introduce artifact to most non-contact optical measurements. Here we report an accurate diagnostic method of the temperature and concentration profiles of CO2 in ethylene diffusion flames by measuring its v_3 vibrational fundamental. An interband cascade laser was used to probe the R-branch bandhead at 4.2 μm, which is highly sensitive to temperature change, free from soot interference and ambient background. Calibration measurement was carried out both in a low-pressure Herriott cell and an atmospheric pressure tube furnace up to 1550 K to obtain spectroscopic parameters for high-temperature spectra. In our co-flow flame measurement, two-dimensional line-of-sight optical depth of an ethylene/N2 laminar sooting flame was recorded by dual-beam absorption scheme. The axially symmetrical attenuation coefficient profile of CO2 in the co-flow flame was reconstructed from the optical depth by Abel inversion. Spatially resolved flame temperature and in situ CO2 volume fraction profiles were derived from the calibrated CO2 spectroscopic parameters and compared with temperature profiles measured by two-line atomic fluorescence.

  1. Modelling space-based integral-field spectrographs and their application to Type Ia supernova cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Hemant; Bonissent, Alain

    2017-04-01

    We present the parameterized simulation of an integral-field unit (IFU) slicer spectrograph and its applications in spectroscopic studies, namely, for probing dark energy with type Ia supernovae. The simulation suite is called the fast-slicer IFU simulator (FISim). The data flow of FISim realistically models the optics of the IFU along with the propagation effects, including cosmological, zodiacal, instrumentation and detector effects. FISim simulates the spectrum extraction by computing the error matrix on the extracted spectrum. The applications for Type Ia supernova spectroscopy are used to establish the efficacy of the simulator in exploring the wider parametric space, in order to optimize the science and mission requirements. The input spectral models utilize the observables such as the optical depth and velocity of the Si II absorption feature in the supernova spectrum as the measured parameters for various studies. Using FISim, we introduce a mechanism for preserving the complete state of a system, called the partial p/partial f matrix, which allows for compression, reconstruction and spectrum extraction, we introduce a novel and efficient method for spectrum extraction, called super-optimal spectrum extraction, and we conduct various studies such as the optimal point spread function, optimal resolution, parameter estimation, etc. We demonstrate that for space-based telescopes, the optimal resolution lies in the region near R ˜ 117 for read noise of 1 e- and 7 e- using a 400 km s-1 error threshold on the Si II velocity.

  2. Ultraviolet to optical diffuse sky emission as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawara, Kimiaki; Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Sano, Kei; Brandt, Timothy D.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Tsumura, Kohji; Oyabu, Shinki; Ienaka, Nobuyuki

    2017-04-01

    We present an analysis of the blank-sky spectra observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We study the diffuse sky emission from ultraviolet to optical wavelengths, which is composed of zodiacal light (ZL), diffuse Galactic light (DGL), and residual emission. The observations were performed towards 54 fields distributed widely over the sky, with spectral coverage from 0.2 to 0.7 μm. In order to avoid contaminating light from earthshine, we use the data collected only in orbital nighttime. The observed intensity is decomposed into the ZL, DGL, and residual emission, in eight photometric bands spanning our spectral coverage. We found that the derived ZL reflectance spectrum is flat in the optical, which indicates major contribution of C-type asteroids to the interplanetary dust (IPD). In addition, the ZL reflectance spectrum has an absorption feature at ∼0.3 μm. The shape of the DGL spectrum is consistent with those found in earlier measurements and model predictions. While the residual emission contains a contribution from the extragalactic background light, we found that the spectral shape of the residual looks similar to the ZL spectrum. Moreover, its optical intensity is much higher than that measured from beyond the IPD cloud by Pioneer 10/11, and also than that of the integrated galaxy light. These findings may indicate the presence of an isotropic ZL component, which is missed in the conventional ZL models.

  3. Calibration and operation of the Faint Object Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harms, R.; Beaver, E.; Burbidge, E.; Hier, R.; Allen, R.; Angel, R.; Bartko, F.; Bohlin, R.; Ford, H.; Davidson, A.

    1984-01-01

    The design and basic performance characteristics of the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS), one of five instruments built for use on the Space Telescope observatory, is summarized briefly. The results of the recently completed instrument-level calibration are presented with special emphasis on issues affecting plans for FOS astronomical observations. Examples include such fundamental characteristics as: limiting magnitudes (system sensitivity and noise figures), spectral coverage and resolution, scattered light properties, and instrumental polarization and modulation efficiencies. Also gated toward intended users, a rather detailed description of FOS operating modes is given. The discussion begins with the difficulties anticipated during target acquisition and their hoped-for resolution. Both the 'normal' spectroscopic operating modes of the FOS and its 'exotic' features (e.g. spectropolarimetric, time-tagged, and time-resolved modes) are presented. The paper concludes with an overview of the activities to assure proper alignment and operation of the FOS within the entire Space Telescope system (orbital and ground-based).

  4. Status and Performance Updates for the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Elaine M.; De Rosa, Gisella; Fischer, William J.; Fix, Mees; Fox, Andrew; Indriolo, Nick; James, Bethan; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Penton, Steven V.; Plesha, Rachel; Rafelski, Marc; Roman-Duval, Julia; Sahnow, David J.; Sankrit, Ravi; Taylor, Joanna M.; White, James

    2018-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) moved the spectra on the FUV detector from Lifetime Position 3 (LP3) to a new pristine location, LP4, in October 2017. The spectra were shifted in the cross-dispersion direction by -2.5" (roughly -31 pixels) from LP3, or -5" (roughly -62 pixels) from the original LP1. This move mitigates the adverse effects of gain sag on the spectral quality and accuracy of COS FUV observations. Here, we present updates regarding the calibration of FUV data at LP4, including the flat fields, flux calibrations, and spectral resolution. We also present updates on the time-dependent sensitivities and dark rates of both the NUV and FUV detectors.

  5. GNOSIS: an OH suppression unit for near-infrared spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, S. C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Lawrence, J. S.; Bryant, J.; Haynes, R.; Horton, A.; Lee, S.; Leon-Saval, S.; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Mladenoff, J.; O'Byrne, J.; Rambold, W.; Roth, M.; Trinh, C.

    2010-07-01

    GNOSIS is an OH suppression unit to be used in conjunction with existing spectrographs. The OH suppression is achieved using fibre Bragg gratings (FBGs), and will deliver the darkest near-infrared background of any ground-based instrument. Laboratory and on-sky tests demonstrate that FBGs can suppress OH lines by 30dB whilst maintaing > 90% throughput between the lines, resulting in a 4 mag decrease in the background. In the first implementation GNOSIS will feed IRIS2 on the AAT. It will consist of a seven element lenslet array, covering 1.4" on the sky, and will suppress the 103 brightest OH lines between 1.47 and 1.70 μm. Future upgrades will include J-band suppression and implementation on an 8m telescope.

  6. IRMS: Infrared Multi-Slit Spectrograph for TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Vivian; Mobasher, B.

    2014-07-01

    As one of the first-light instruments on the TMT, the IRMS is a near-infrared multi-slit spectrograph and imager designed to sample near the diffraction limit with the help of adaptive optics. Fed by the Narrow-Field Infrared Adaptive Optics Systems (NFIRAOS) on the TMT, the IRMS will provide near-infrared imaging and multi-object spectroscopy at Y, J, H, and K bands (0.9-2.5 microns) with moderate spectral resolution. With a field of view of ~2 arcmin on a side, it has a multiplex capability of up to 46 slits using a slit mask system on a cryogenic configurable slit unit. Here we present a preliminary version of the exposure time calculator for sensitivity comparison with Keck/MOSFIRE. Selected science cases are highlighted to demonstrate the need for IRMS in this upcoming thirty-meter class telescope era.

  7. The Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    The Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on the Spitzer Space Telescope covered the 5 to 38 micron wavelength range at low and medium spectral resolutions. The instrument was very popular during Spitzers 5.7 year-long cold mission. Every year it attracted the most proposals, and garnered more observing hours, of any of the science instruments. This success was the culmination of a very long development period, where the instrument design changed radically. When the instrument was first selected by NASA in 1984 it was very complicated. As part of the overall reduction of the size of the SIRTF Observatory following its recovery from the missions cancellation in 1991 the IRS became smaller and much, much simpler. The only aspect of the instrument that increased from the original design was the pixel count of the detectors.

  8. Performance of the CHIRON high-resolution Echelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Christian; Spronck, Julien F. P.; Tokovinin, Andrei; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Giguere, Matthew; Fischer, Debra A.

    2012-09-01

    CHIRON is a fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph with observing modes for resolutions from 28,000 to 120,000, built primarily for measuring precise radial velocities (RVs). We present the instrument performance as determined during integration and commissioning. We discuss the PSF, the effect of glass inhomogeneity on the cross-dispersion prism, temperature stabilization, stability of the spectrum on the CCD, and detector characteristics. The RV precision is characterized, with an iodine cell or a ThAr lamp as the wavelength reference. Including all losses from the sky to the detector, the overall efficiency is about 6%; the dominant limitation is coupling losses into the fiber due to poor guiding.

  9. Cosmic Origins Spectrograph: On-Orbit Performance of Target Acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penton, Steven V.

    2010-07-01

    COS is a slit-less spectrograph with a very small aperture (R=1.2500). To achieve the desired wavelength accuracies, HST+COS must center the target to within 0.100 of the center of the aperture for the FUV channel, and 0.0400 for NUV. During SMOV and early Cycle 17 we fine-tuned the COS target acquisition (TA) procedures to exceed this accuracy for all three COS TA modes; NUV imaging, NUV spectroscopic, and FUV spectroscopic. In Cycle 17, we also adjusted the COSto- FGS offsets in the SIAF file. This allows us to recommend skipping the time consuming ACQ/SEARCH in cases where the target coordinates are well known. Here we will compare the on-orbit performance of all COS TA modes in terms of centering accuracy, efficiency, and required signal-to-noise (S/N).

  10. Spectrographic Polarimeter and Method of Recording State of Polarity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, William B. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A single-shot real-time spectropolarimeter for use in astronomy and other sciences that captures and encodes some or all of the Stokes polarization parameters simultaneously using only static, robust optical components with no moving parts is described. The polarization information is encoded onto the spectrograph at each wavelength along the spatial dimension of the 2D output data array. The varying embodiments of the concept include both a two-Stokes implementation (in which any two of the three Stokes polarization parameters are measured) and a full Stokes implementation (in which all three of the Stokes polarization parameters are measured), each of which is provided in either single beam or dual beam forms.

  11. The CHARIS High-Contrast Integral-Field Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Brandt, Timothy; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Galvin, Michael; Loomis, Craig; Rizzo, Maxime; Knapp, Gillian; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; hide

    2017-01-01

    One of the leading direct Imaging techniques, particularly in ground-based imaging, uses a coronagraphic system and integral field spectrograph (IFS). The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an IFS that has been built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS has been delivered to the observatory and now sits behind the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system. CHARIS has 'high' and 'low' resolution operating modes. The "high-resolution" mode is used to characterize targets in J, H, and K bands at R70. The "low-resolution" prism is meant for discovery and spans J+H+K bands (1.15-2.37 microns) with a spectral resolution of R18. This discovery mode has already proven better than 15-sigma detections of HR8799c,d,e when combining ADI+SDI. Using SDI alone, planets c and d have been detected in a single 24 second image. The CHARIS team is optimizing instrument performance and refining ADI+SDI recombination to maximize our contrast detection limit. In addition to the new observing modes, CHARIS has demonstrated a design with high robustness to spectral crosstalk. CHARIS is in the final stages of commissioning, with the instrument open for science observations beginning February 2017. Here we review the science case, design, on-sky performance, engineering observations of exoplanet and disk targets, and specific lessons learned for extremely high contrast imagers. Key design aspects that will be demonstrated are crosstalk optimization, wavefront correction using the IFS image, lenslet tolerancing, the required spectral resolution to fit exoplanet atmospheres, and the utility of the spectrum in achieving higher contrast detection limits.

  12. DMD-based programmable wide field spectrograph for Earth observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamkotsian, Frédéric; Lanzoni, Patrick; Liotard, Arnaud; Viard, Thierry; Costes, Vincent; Hébert, Philippe-Jean

    2015-03-01

    In Earth Observation, Universe Observation and Planet Exploration, scientific return could be optimized in future missions using MOEMS devices. In Earth Observation, we propose an innovative reconfigurable instrument, a programmable wide-field spectrograph where both the FOV and the spectrum could be tailored thanks to a 2D micromirror array (MMA). For a linear 1D field of view (FOV), the principle is to use a MMA to select the wavelengths by acting on intensity. This component is placed in the focal plane of a first grating. On the MMA surface, the spatial dimension is along one side of the device and for each spatial point, its spectrum is displayed along the perpendicular direction: each spatial and spectral feature of the 1D FOV is then fully adjustable dynamically and/or programmable. A second stage with an identical grating recomposes the beam after wavelengths selection, leading to an output tailored 1D image. A mock-up has been designed, fabricated and tested. The micromirror array is the largest DMD in 2048 x 1080 mirrors format, with a pitch of 13.68μm. A synthetic linear FOV is generated and typical images have been recorded o at the output focal plane of the instrument. By tailoring the DMD, we could modify successfully each pixel of the input image: for example, it is possible to remove bright objects or, for each spatial pixel, modify the spectral signature. The very promising results obtained on the mock-up of the programmable wide-field spectrograph reveal the efficiency of this new instrument concept for Earth Observation.

  13. The effect of formulation additives on in vitro dissolution-absorption profile and in vivo bioavailability of telmisartan from brand and generic formulations.

    PubMed

    Borbás, Enikő; Nagy, Zsombor K; Nagy, Brigitta; Balogh, Attila; Farkas, Balázs; Tsinman, Oksana; Tsinman, Konstantin; Sinkó, Bálint

    2018-03-01

    In this study, brand and four generic formulations of telmisartan, an antihypertensive drug, were used in in vitro simultaneous dissolution-absorption, investigating the effect of different formulation additives on dissolution and on absorption through an artificial membrane. The in vitro test was found to be sensitive enough to show even small differences between brand and generic formulations caused by the use of different excipients. By only changing the type of filler from sorbitol to mannitol in the formulation, the flux through the membrane was reduced by approximately 10%. Changing the salt forming agent as well resulted in approximately 20% of flux reduction compared to the brand formulation. This significant difference was clearly shown in the published in vivo results as well. The use of additional lactose monohydrate in the formulation also leads to approximately 10% reduction in flux. The results show that by changing excipients, the dissolution of telmisartan was not altered significantly, but the flux through the membrane was found to be significantly changed. These results pointed out the limitations of traditional USP dissolution tests and emphasized the importance of simultaneously measuring dissolution and absorption, which allows the complex effect of formulation excipients on both processes to be measured. Moreover, the in vivo predictive power of the simultaneous dissolution-absorption test was demonstrated by comparing the in vitro fluxes to in vivo bioequivalence study results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Student Assembled Spectrograph with a CCD Detector to Assist with Students' Understanding of Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, T. T.; Masters, M. F.

    2007-01-01

    To help students develop an understanding of the proper use and function of spectrographs and monochromators we describe a student-assembled spectrograph using a "webcam" detector. The apparatus also works well as a low-cost demonstration, helping students make connections between an atomic spectrum observed by eye and a plot of the relative…

  15. Scientific Design of a High Contrast Integral Field Spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    Ground based telescopes equipped with adaptive optics systems and specialized science cameras are now capable of directly detecting extrasolar planets. We present the scientific design for a high contrast integral field spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope. This lenslet based integral field spectrograph will be implemented into the new extreme adaptive optics system at Subaru, called SCExAO.

  16. Prime Focus Spectrograph: A very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical & near-infrared spectrograph for Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Naoyuki

    This short article is about Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS), a very wide-field, massively-multiplexed, and optical & near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph as a next generation facility instrument on Subaru Telescope. More details and updates are available on the PFS official website (http://pfs.ipmu.jp), blog (http://pfs.ipmu.jp/blog/), and references therein. The project, instrument, & timeline PFS will position 2400 fibers to science targets or blank sky in the 1.3 degree field on the Subaru prime focus. These fibers will be quickly (~60sec) reconfigurable and feed the photons during exposures to the Spectrograph System (SpS). SpS consists of 4 modules each of which accommodate ~600 fibers and deliver spectral images ranging from 380nm to 1260nm simultaneously at one exposure via the 3 arms of blue, red, and NIR cameras. The instrument development has been undertaken by the international collaboration at the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at system integration and on-sky engineering observations in 2017-2018, and science operation in 2019. The survey design has also been under development envisioning a survey spanning ~300 nights over ~5 years in the framework of Subaru Strategic Program (SSP). The key science areas are: Cosmology, galaxy/AGN evolution, and Galactic Archaeology (GA) (Takada et al. 2014). The cosmology program will be to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies over a comoving volume of 10 Gpc3 at z=0.8-2.4. In the galaxy/AGN program, the wide wavelength coverage of PFS as well as the large field of view will be exploited to characterize the galaxy populations and its clustering properties over a wide redshift range. A survey of color-selected galaxies/AGN at z = 1-2 will be conducted over 20 square degrees yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses down to ~1010 M ⊙. In the GA program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky

  17. Prime Focus Spectrograph: A very wide-field, massively multiplexed, optical & near-infrared spectrograph for Subaru Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAMURA, NAOYUKI

    2015-08-01

    PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph), a next generation facility instrument on Subaru, is a very wide-field, massively-multiplexed, and optical & near-infrared spectrograph. Exploiting the Subaru prime focus, 2400 reconfigurable fibers will be distributed in the 1.3 degree field. The spectrograph will have 3 arms of blue, red, and near-infrared cameras to simultaneously observe spectra from 380nm to 1260nm at one exposure. The development of this instrument has been undertaken by the international collaboration at the initiative of Kavli IPMU. The project is now going into the construction phase aiming at system integration and on-sky commissioning in 2017-2018, and science operation in 2019. In parallel, the survey design has also been developed envisioning a Subaru Strategic Program (SSP) that spans roughly speaking 300 nights over 5 years. The major science areas are three-folds: Cosmology, galaxy/AGN evolution, and Galactic archaeology (GA). The cosmology program will be to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies over a comoving volume of ~10 Gpc^3 in the redshift range of 0.8 < z < 2.4. In the GA program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way, dwarf spheroidal galaxies, and M31 will be used to understand the past assembly histories of those galaxies and the structures of their dark matter halos. Spectra will be taken for ~1 million stars as faint as V = 22 therefore out to large distances from the Sun. For the extragalactic program, our simulations suggest the wide wavelength coverage of PFS will be particularly powerful in probing the galaxy populations and its clustering properties over a wide redshift range. We will conduct a survey of color-selected 1 < z < 2 galaxies and AGN over 20 square degrees down to J = 23.4, yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses above ˜10^10 solar masses. Further, PFS will also provide unique spectroscopic opportunities even in the era of Euclid, LSST

  18. Very Large Telescope/Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph and FORS2 spectroscopy of the GRB 081008 afterglow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Elia, V.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Piranomonte, S.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2011-11-01

    We aim at studying the gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 081008, environment by analysing the spectra of its optical afterglow. Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/Very Large Telescope (UVES/VLT) high-resolution spectroscopy of GRB 081008 was secured ˜5 h after the Swift-BAT trigger. Our data set also comprises three VLT/FORS2 nearly simultaneous spectra of the same source. The availability of nearly simultaneous high- and low-resolution spectra for a GRB afterglow is an extremely rare event. The GRB-damped Lyman α system at z= 1.9683 shows that the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy is constituted by at least three components which contribute to the line profiles. Component I is the redmost one, and is 20 and 78 km s-1 redward components II and III, respectively. We detect several ground state and excited absorption features in components I and II. These features have been used to compute the distances between the GRB and the absorbers. Component I is found to be 52 ± 6 pc away from the GRB, while component II presents few excited transitions and its distance is 200+60- 80 pc. Component III only features a few, low-ionization and saturated lines suggesting that it is even farther from the GRB. Component I represents the closest absorber ever detected near a GRB. This (relatively) low distance can possibly be a consequence of a dense GRB environment, which prevents the GRB prompt/afterglow emission to strongly affect the ISM up to higher distances. The hydrogen column density associated with GRB 081008 is log NH/cm-2= 21.11 ± 0.10, and the metallicity of the host galaxy is in the range of [X/H] =-1.29 to -0.52. In particular, we found [Fe/H] =-1.19 ± 0.11 and [Zn/H] =-0.52 ± 0.11 with respect to solar values. This discrepancy can be explained by the presence of dust in the GRB ISM, given the opposite refractory properties of iron and zinc. By deriving the depletion pattern for GRB 081008, we find the optical extinction in the visual band to be AV

  19. Optical Design And Performance Of A Dual-Grating, Direct-Reading Spectrograph For Spectrochemical Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhaus, David W.; Kline, John V.; Bieniewski, Thomas M.; Dow, Grove S.; Apel, Charles T.

    1980-11-01

    An all-mirror optical system is used to direct the light from a variety of spectroscopic sources to two 2-m spectrographs that are placed on either side of a sturdy vertical mounting plate. The gratings were chosen so that the first spectrograph covers the ultraviolet spectral region, and the second spectrograph covers the ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared regions. With the over 2.5 m of focal curves, each ultraviolet line is available at more than one place. Thus, problems with close lines can be overcome. The signals from a possible maximum of 256 photoelectric detectors go to a small computer for reading and calculation of the element abundances. To our knowledge, no other direct-reading spectrograph has more than about 100 fixed detectors. With an inductively-coupled-plasma source, our calibration curves, and detection limits, are similar to those of other workers using a direct-reading spectrograph.

  20. Progress with the Prime Focus Spectrograph for the Subaru Telescope: a massively multiplexed optical and near-infrared fiber spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugai, Hajime; Tamura, Naoyuki; Karoji, Hiroshi; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa; Kimura, Masahiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Ueda, Akitoshi; Aghazarian, Hrand; de Arruda, Marcio V.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Bennett, Charles L.; Bickerton, Steve; Bozier, Alexandre; Braun, David F.; Bui, Khanh; Capocasale, Christopher M.; Carr, Michael A.; Castilho, Bruno; Chang, Yin-Chang; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Dawson, Olivia R.; Dekany, Richard G.; Ek, Eric M.; Ellis, Richard S.; English, Robin J.; Ferrand, Didier; Ferreira, Décio; Fisher, Charles D.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hart, Murdock; Heckman, Timothy M.; Ho, Paul T. P.; Hope, Stephen; Hovland, Larry E.; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Hu, Yen-Sang; Huang, Pin Jie; Jaquet, Marc; Karr, Jennifer E.; Kempenaar, Jason G.; King, Matthew E.; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Le Mignant, David; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Loomis, Craig; Lupton, Robert H.; Madec, Fabrice; Mao, Peter; Marrara, Lucas S.; Ménard, Brice; Morantz, Chaz; Murayama, Hitoshi; Murray, Graham J.; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; de Oliveira, Claudia M.; de Oliveira, Ligia S.; Orndorff, Joe D.; de Paiva Vilaça, Rodrigo; Partos, Eamon J.; Pascal, Sandrine; Pegot-Ogier, Thomas; Reiley, Daniel J.; Riddle, Reed; Santos, Leandro; dos Santos, Jesulino B.; Schwochert, Mark A.; Seiffert, Michael D.; Smee, Stephen A.; Smith, Roger M.; Steinkraus, Ronald E.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Surace, Christian; Tresse, Laurence; Vidal, Clément; Vives, Sebastien; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Wen, Chih-Yi; Wu, Amy C.; Wyse, Rosie; Yan, Chi-Hung

    2014-07-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is an optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph with 2394 science fibers, which are distributed in 1.3 degree diameter field of view at Subaru 8.2-meter telescope. The simultaneous wide wavelength coverage from 0.38 μm to 1.26 μm, with the resolving power of 3000, strengthens its ability to target three main survey programs: cosmology, Galactic archaeology, and galaxy/AGN evolution. A medium resolution mode with resolving power of 5000 for 0.71 μm to 0.89 μm also will be available by simply exchanging dispersers. PFS takes the role for the spectroscopic part of the Subaru Measurement of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) project, while Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) works on the imaging part. HSC's excellent image qualities have proven the high quality of the Wide Field Corrector (WFC), which PFS shares with HSC. The PFS collaboration has succeeded in the project Preliminary Design Review and is now in a phase of subsystem Critical Design Reviews and construction. To transform the telescope plus WFC focal ratio, a 3-mm thick broad-band coated microlens is glued to each fiber tip. The microlenses are molded glass, providing uniform lens dimensions and a variety of refractive-index selection. After successful production of mechanical and optical samples, mass production is now complete. Following careful investigations including Focal Ratio Degradation (FRD) measurements, a higher transmission fiber is selected for the longest part of cable system, while one with a better FRD performance is selected for the fiber-positioner and fiber-slit components, given the more frequent fiber movements and tightly curved structure. Each Fiber positioner consists of two stages of piezo-electric rotary motors. Its engineering model has been produced and tested. After evaluating the statistics of positioning accuracies, collision avoidance software, and interferences (if any) within/between electronics boards, mass production will commence. Fiber

  1. Vertical Profiles of Light Scattering, Light Absorption, and Single Scattering Albedo during the Dry, Biomass Burning Season in Southern Africa and Comparisons of In Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magi, Brian I.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Schmid, Beat; Redermann, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of vertical profiles of aerosol light scattering, light absorption, and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0)) are presented for a number of locations in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season. Features of the profiles include haze layers, clean air slots, and marked decreases in light scattering in passing from the boundary layer into the free troposphere. Frequency distributions of omega (sub 0) reflect the strong influence of smoke from biomass burning. For example, during a period when heavy smoke was advected into the region from the north, the mean value of omega (sub 0) in the boundary layer was 0.81 +/- 0.02 compared to 0.89 +/- 0.03 prior to this intrusion. Comparisons of layer aerosol optical depths derived from the in situ measurements with those measured by a Sun photometer aboard the aircraft show excellent agreement.

  2. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  3. THE FIRST OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-REDSHIFT DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS WITH THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2011-05-01

    We report on the first Cosmic Origins Spectrograph observations of damped Ly{alpha} systems (DLAs) and sub-damped Ly{alpha} systems (sub-DLAs) discovered in a new survey of the gaseous halos of low-redshift galaxies. From observations of 37 sightlines, we have discovered three DLAs and four sub-DLAs. We measure the neutral gas density {Omega}{sub HI}, and redshift density d N/d z, of DLA and sub-DLA systems at z < 0.35. We find d N/dz = 0.25{sup +0.24}-{sub 0.14} and {Omega}{sub HI} = 1.4{sup +1.3}{sub -0.7} x 10{sup -3} for DLAs, and d N/d z = 0.08{sup +0.19}{sub -0.06} with {Omega}{sub HI} = 4.2{supmore » +9.6}{sub -3.5} x 10{sup -5} for sub-DLAs over a redshift path {Delta}z = 11.9. To demonstrate the scientific potential of such systems, we present a detailed analysis of the DLA at z{sub abs} = 0.1140 in the spectrum of SDSS J1009+0713. Profile fits to the absorption lines determine log N(H I) = 20.68 {+-} 0.10 with a metallicity determined from the undepleted element sulfur of [S/H] = -0.62 {+-} 0.18. The abundance pattern of this DLA is similar to that of higher z DLAs, showing mild depletion of the refractory elements Fe and Ti with [S/Fe] = +0.24 {+-} 0.22 and [S/Ti] = +0.28 {+-} 0.15. Nitrogen is underabundant in this system with [N/H] = -1.40 {+-} 0.14, placing this DLA below the plateau of the [N/{alpha}] measurements in the local universe at similar metallicities. This DLA has a simple kinematic structure with only two components required to fit the profiles and a kinematic width of {Delta}v{sub 90} = 52 km s{sup -1}. Imaging of the QSO field with the Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 reveals a spiral galaxy at very small impact parameter to the QSO and several galaxies within 10'', or 20 comoving kpc at the redshift of the DLA. Follow-up spectra with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer on the Keck telescope reveal that none of the nearby galaxies are at the redshift of the DLA. The spiral galaxy is identified as the host galaxy of the

  4. SPECTRO-POLARIMETRIC SIMULATIONS OF THE SOLAR LIMB: ABSORPTION-EMISSION Fe I 6301.5 Å AND 6302.5 Å LINE PROFILES AND TORSIONAL FLOWS IN THE INTERGRANULAR MAGNETIC FLUX CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Shelyag, S.

    2015-03-01

    Using radiative magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the magnetized solar photosphere and detailed spectro-polarimetric diagnostics with the Fe I 6301.5 Å and 6302.5 Å photospheric lines in the local thermodynamic equilibrium approximation, we model active solar granulation as if it was observed at the solar limb. We analyze general properties of the radiation across the solar limb, such as the continuum and the line core limb darkening and the granulation contrast. We demonstrate the presence of profiles with both emission and absorption features at the simulated solar limb, and pure emission profiles above the limb. These profiles are associated with the regionsmore » of strong linear polarization of the emergent radiation, indicating the influence of the intergranular magnetic fields on the line formation. We analyze physical origins of the emission wings in the Stokes profiles at the limb, and demonstrate that these features are produced by localized heating and torsional motions in the intergranular magnetic flux concentrations.« less

  5. The Behavior of Warm Molecules in Planet-forming Disks and CHESS: a Pathfinder UV Spectrograph for the LUVOIR Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Keri; France, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of gas over the lifetime of protoplanetary disks provides us with important clues about how planet formation mechanisms drive the diversity of exoplanetary systems observed to date. In the first part of my talk, I will discuss how we use emission line observations of molecular hydrogen (H2) in the far-ultraviolet (far-UV) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the warm molecular regions (a < 10 AU) of planet-forming disks. We compare the observations with analytic disk models that produce synthetic H2 profiles, and we statistically determine the disk representations that best replicate the data. I will discuss the results of our comparisons and how the modeled radial distributions of H2 in the disk help provide important constraints on the effective density of gas left in the inner disk of protoplanetary disks at various disk evolutionary stages. Finally, I will talk about follow-up studies that look to connect the warm, UV-pumped molecular populations of the inner disk to thermally-excited molecules observed in similar regions of the disk in the near- to mid-IR.In the second part of my talk, I will discuss the observational requirements in the UV and IR band passes to gain further insights into the behavior of the warm, gaseous protoplanetary disk, focusing specifically on a spectrograph concept for the next-generation LUVOIR Surveyor. I will discuss a testbed instrument, the Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS), built as a demonstration of one component of the LUVOIR spectrograph and new technological improvements to UV optical components for the next generation of near- to far-UV astrophysical observatories. CHESS is a far-UV sounding rocket experiment designed to probe the warm and cool atoms and molecules near sites of recent star formation in the local interstellar medium. I will talk about the science goals, design, research and development (R&D) components, and

  6. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on ESA’s JUICE Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, Randy; Retherford, K.; Steffl, A.; Eterno, J.; Davis, M.; Versteeg, M.; Greathouse, T.; Araujo, M.; Walther, B.; Persson, K.; Persyn, S.; Dirks, G.; McGrath, M.; Feldman, P.; Bagenal, F.; Spencer, J.; Schindhelm, E.; Fletcher, L.

    2013-10-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer (JUICE) was selected in May 2012 as the first L-class mission of ESA’s Cosmic Vision Program. JUICE will launch in 2022 on a 7.6-year journey to the Jovian system, including a Venus and multiple Earth gravity assists, before entering Jupiter orbit in January 2030. JUICE will study the entire Jovian system for 3.5 years, concentrating on Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, with the last 10 months spent in Ganymede orbit. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) on JUICE was jointly selected by NASA and ESA as part of its ~130 kg payload of 11 scientific instruments. UVS is the fifth in a series of successful ultraviolet imaging spectrographs (Rosetta-Alice, New Horizons Pluto-Alice, LRO-LAMP) and is largely based on the most recent of these, Juno-UVS. It observes photons in the 55-210 nm wavelength range, at moderate spectral and spatial resolution along a 7.5-degree slit. A main entrance “airglow port” (AP) is used for most observations (e.g., airglow, aurora, surface mapping, and stellar occultations), while a separate “solar port” (SP) allows for solar occultations. Another aperture door, with a small hole through the centre, is used as a “high-spatial-resolution port” (HP) for detailed observations of bright targets. Time-tagging (pixel list mode) and programmable spectral imaging (histogram mode) allow for observational flexibility and optimal data management. As on Juno-UVS, the effects of penetrating electron radiation on electronic parts and data quality are substantially mitigated through contiguous shielding, filtering of pulse height amplitudes, management of high voltage settings, and careful use of radiation-hard, flight-tested parts. The science goals of UVS are to: 1) explore the atmospheres, plasma interactions, and surfaces of the Galilean satellites; 2) determine the dynamics, chemistry, and vertical structure of Jupiter’s upper atmosphere from equator to pole; and 3) investigate the Jupiter-Io connection by

  7. Metrology camera system of prime focus spectrograph for Suburu telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiang-Yu; Chou, Richard C. Y.; Huang, Pin-Jie; Ling, Hung-Hsu; Karr, Jennifer; Chang, Yin-Chang; Hu, Yen-Sang; Hsu, Shu-Fu; Chen, Hsin-Yo; Gunn, James E.; Reiley, Dan J.; Tamura, Naoyuki; Takato, Naruhisa; Shimono, Atsushi

    2016-08-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a new optical/near-infrared multi-fiber spectrograph designed for the prime focus of the 8.2m Subaru telescope. PFS will cover a 1.3 degree diameter field with 2394 fibers to complement the imaging capabilities of Hyper SuprimeCam. To retain high throughput, the final positioning accuracy between the fibers and observing targets of PFS is required to be less than 10 microns. The metrology camera system (MCS) serves as the optical encoder of the fiber motors for the configuring of fibers. MCS provides the fiber positions within a 5 microns error over the 45 cm focal plane. The information from MCS will be fed into the fiber positioner control system for the closed loop control. MCS will be located at the Cassegrain focus of Subaru telescope in order to cover the whole focal plane with one 50M pixel Canon CMOS camera. It is a 380mm Schmidt type telescope which generates a uniform spot size with a 10 micron FWHM across the field for reasonable sampling of the point spread function. Carbon fiber tubes are used to provide a stable structure over the operating conditions without focus adjustments. The CMOS sensor can be read in 0.8s to reduce the overhead for the fiber configuration. The positions of all fibers can be obtained within 0.5s after the readout of the frame. This enables the overall fiber configuration to be less than 2 minutes. MCS will be installed inside a standard Subaru Cassgrain Box. All components that generate heat are located inside a glycol cooled cabinet to reduce the possible image motion due to heat. The optics and camera for MCS have been delivered and tested. The mechanical parts and supporting structure are ready as of spring 2016. The integration of MCS will start in the summer of 2016. In this report, the performance of the MCS components, the alignment and testing procedure as well as the status of the PFS MCS will be presented.

  8. Design and realization of the real-time spectrograph controller for LAMOST based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianing; Wu, Liyan; Zeng, Yizhong; Dai, Songxin; Hu, Zhongwen; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Lei; Wu, Zhen; Chen, Yi

    2008-08-01

    A large Schmitt reflector telescope, Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope(LAMOST), is being built in China, which has effective aperture of 4 meters and can observe the spectra of as many as 4000 objects simultaneously. To fit such a large amount of observational objects, the dispersion part is composed of a set of 16 multipurpose fiber-fed double-beam Schmidt spectrographs, of which each has about ten of moveable components realtimely accommodated and manipulated by a controller. An industrial Ethernet network connects those 16 spectrograph controllers. The light from stars is fed to the entrance slits of the spectrographs with optical fibers. In this paper, we mainly introduce the design and realization of our real-time controller for the spectrograph, our design using the technique of System On Programmable Chip (SOPC) based on Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and then realizing the control of the spectrographs through NIOSII Soft Core Embedded Processor. We seal the stepper motor controller as intellectual property (IP) cores and reuse it, greatly simplifying the design process and then shortening the development time. Under the embedded operating system μC/OS-II, a multi-tasks control program has been well written to realize the real-time control of the moveable parts of the spectrographs. At present, a number of such controllers have been applied in the spectrograph of LAMOST.

  9. PRAXIS: a low background NIR spectrograph for fibre Bragg grating OH suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Anthony; Ellis, Simon; Lawrence, Jon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    Fibre Bragg grating (FBG) OH suppression is capable of greatly reducing the bright sky background seen by near infrared spectrographs. By filtering out the airglow emission lines at high resolution before the light enters the spectrograph this technique prevents scattering from the emission lines into interline regions, thereby reducing the background at all wavelengths. In order to take full advantage of this sky background reduction the spectrograph must have very low instrumental backgrounds so that it remains sky noise limited. Both simulations and real world experience with the prototype GNOSIS system show that existing spectrographs, designed for higher sky background levels, will be unable to fully exploit the sky background reduction. We therefore propose PRAXIS, a spectrograph optimised specifically for this purpose. The PRAXIS concept is a fibre fed, fully cryogenic, fixed format spectrograph for the J and H-bands. Dark current will be minimised by using the best of the latest generation of NIR detectors while thermal backgrounds will be reduced by the use of a cryogenic fibre slit. Optimised spectral formats and the use of high throughput volume phase holographic gratings will further enhance sensitivity. Our proposal is for a modular system, incorporating exchangeable fore-optics units, integral field units and OH suppression units, to allow PRAXIS to operate as a visitor instrument on any large telescope and enable new developments in FBG OH suppression to be incorporated as they become available. As a high performance fibre fed spectrograph PRAXIS could also serve as a testbed for other astrophotonic technologies.

  10. Be Star Monitoring Using a Small Aperture Telescope and Fiber-fed Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, S. J.

    2003-12-01

    Initial results are reported from a Be star monitoring project developed for undergraduate student research involvement at a small undergraduate university using a small aperture telescope and a custom-built fiber-fed spectrograph. Beginning in 2003 June, 0.8 Angstrom/pixel resolution spectra of the H-alpha line for over forty Be stars (Omi Aqr, 4 Aql, V923 Aql, V1294 Aql, Nu 2 Boo, 24 CVn, Gamma Cas, 4 CrB, Beta Cyg, 11 Cyg, 28 Cyg, 55 Cyg, 59 Cyg, 66 Cyg, V2136 Cyg, 1 Del, CX Dra, Omi Her, Sigma Her, 4 Her, 11 Her, 88 Her, 48 Lib, Chi Oph, Zeta Oph, 51 Oph, 66 Oph, Eta PsA, V4024 Sgr, 64 Ser, Delta Sco, QR Vul, 12 Vul, 20 Vul, 25 Vul, HD142184, HD165174, HD169033, HD170235, HD174179, HD181615, HD184279, HD195554, HD201733) have been obtained. H-alpha line profile velocities and evolution are shown. Funding has been provided by the UCA University Research Council and the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium.

  11. Slit Function Measurement of An Imaging Spectrograph Using Fourier Transform Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hongwoo; Swimyard, Bruce; Jakobsen, Peter; Moseley, Harvey; Greenhouse, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of a spectrograph slit function is necessary to interpret the unresolved lines in an observed spectrum. A theoretical slit function can be calculated from the sizes of the entrance slit, the detector aperture when it functions as an exit slit, the dispersion characteristic of the disperser, and the point spread function of the spectrograph. A measured slit function is preferred to the theoretical one for the correct interpretation of the spectral data. In a scanning spectrometer with a single exit slit, the slit function is easily measured. In a fixed grating/or disperser spectrograph, illuminating the entrance slit with a near monochromatic light from a pre-monochrmator or a tunable laser and varying the wavelength of the incident light can measure the slit function. Even though the latter technique had been used successfully for the slit function measurements, it had been very laborious and it would be prohibitive to an imaging spectrograph or a multi-object spectrograph that has a large field of view. We explore an alternative technique that is manageable for the measurements. In the proposed technique, the imaging spectrograph is used as a detector of a Fourier transform spectrometer. This method can be applied not only to an IR spectrograph but also has a potential to a visible/UV spectrograph including a wedge filter spectrograph. This technique will require a blackbody source of known temperature and a bolometer to characterize the interferometer part of the Fourier Transform spectrometer. This pa?er will describe the alternative slit function measurement technique using a Fourier transform spectrometer.

  12. Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Observations of Variability in the RS Canum Venaticorum System V711 Tauri (HR 1099)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Neff, James E.; Thorpe, Marjorie J.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Brown, Alexander; Cutispoto, Giuseppe; Rodono, Marcello

    1996-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) observations of the RS CVn-type binary V711 Tau (Kl IV+G5 IV) were obtained at several phases over two consecutive stellar orbital cycles in order to study ultraviolet emission-line profile and flux variability. Spectra cover the Mg II h and k lines, C IV doublet, and Si IV region, as well as the density-sensitive lines of C III] (1909 A) and Si III] (1892 A). IUE spectra, Extreme Ultra Violet (EUV) data, and Ultraviolet, Blue, Visual (UBV) photometry were obtained contemporaneously with the GHRS data. Variable extended wings were detected in the Mg II lines. We discuss the Mg II line profile variability using various Gaussian emission profile models. No rotational modulation of the line profiles was observed, but there were several large flares. These flares produced enhanced emission in the extended line wings, radial velocity shifts, and asymmetries in some line profiles. Nearly continuous flaring for more than 24 hr, as indicated in the IUE data, represents the most energetic and long-lived chromospheric and transition region flare ever observed with a total energy much greater than 5 x 10(exp 35) ergs. The C III] to Si III] line ratio is used to estimate the plasma density during the flares.

  13. The SED Machine: a dedicated transient IFU spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Konidaris, Nick; Quimby, Robert; Davis, Jack T.; Ngeow, Chow Choong; Ritter, Andreas; Rudy, Alexander

    2012-09-01

    The Spectral Energy Distribution (SED) Machine is an Integral Field Unit (IFU) spectrograph designed specifically to classify transients. It is comprised of two subsystems. A lenselet based IFU, with a 26" × 26" Field of View (FoV) and ˜ 0.75" spaxels feeds a constant resolution (R˜100) triple-prism. The dispersed rays are than imaged onto an off-the-shelf CCD detector. The second subsystem, the Rainbow Camera (RC), is a 4-band seeing-limited imager with a 12.5' × 12.5' FoV around the IFU that will allow real time spectrophotometric calibrations with a ˜ 5% accuracy. Data from both subsystems will be processed in real time using a dedicated reduction pipeline. The SED Machine will be mounted on the Palomar 60-inch robotic telescope (P60), covers a wavelength range of 370 - 920nm at high throughput and will classify transients from on-going and future surveys at a high rate. This will provide good statistics for common types of transients, and a better ability to discover and study rare and exotic ones. We present the science cases, optical design, and data reduction strategy of the SED Machine. The SED machine is currently being constructed at the Calofornia Institute of Technology, and will be comissioned on the spring of 2013.

  14. WINERED: a warm near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Yasui, Chikako; Motohara, Kentaro; Minami, Atsushi

    2006-06-01

    We are developing a new near-infrared high-resolution (R max = 100,000) and high-sensitive spectrograph WINERED, which is specifically customized for short NIR bands at 0.9-1.35 μm. WINERED employs the following two novel approaches in the optical system: (1) portable design with a ZnSe immersion grating and (2) warm optics without any cold stops. These concepts result in several essential advantages as follows: easy to build, align, and maintain; these result in a short development time and low cost. WINERED employs a VIRGO HgCdTe 2k × 2k array by Raytheon as the detector. We are developing our own array control system that aims at a low readout noise (< 10 e -) with a readout time of about 3 sec. Our goal is to achieve a high sensitivity of R = 100,000 for a NIR spectroscopy of 15 mag and 17 mag point sources with 4 m and 10 m telescopes, respectively. We have just finalized the optical design and produced a prototype electronics, which are described in the companion papers by Yasui et al. and Kondo et al., respectively. We plan to complete this instrument by the end of 2008 and hope to attach it to various 4 to 10 m telescopes as a PI-type instrument.

  15. Calibrating the SNfactory Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS) with SCALA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küsters, Daniel; Lombardo, Simona; Kowalski, Marek; Aldering, Greg; Nordin, Jakob; Rigault, Mickael

    2016-08-01

    The SNIFS CALibration Apparatus (SCALA), a device to calibrate the Supernova Integral Field Spectrograph on the University Hawaii 2.2m telescope, was developed and installed in Spring 2014. SCALA produces an artificial planet with a diameter of 1° and a constant surface brightness. The wavelength of the beam can be tuned between 3200 Å and 10000 Å and has a bandwidth of 35 Å. The amount of light injected into the telescope is monitored with NIST calibrated photodiodes. SCALA was upgraded in 2015 with a mask installed at the entrance pupil of the UH88 telescope, ensuring that the illumination of the telescope by stars is similar to that of SCALA. With this setup, a first calibration run was performed in conjunction with the spectrophotometric observations of standard stars. We present first estimates for the expected systematic uncertainties of the in-situ calibration and discuss the results of tests that examine the influence of stray light produced in the optics.

  16. SCALA: In situ calibration for integral field spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, S.; Küsters, D.; Kowalski, M.; Aldering, G.; Antilogus, P.; Bailey, S.; Baltay, C.; Barbary, K.; Baugh, D.; Bongard, S.; Boone, K.; Buton, C.; Chen, J.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Dixon, S.; Fagrelius, P.; Feindt, U.; Fouchez, D.; Gangler, E.; Hayden, B.; Hillebrandt, W.; Hoffmann, A.; Kim, A. G.; Leget, P.-F.; McKay, L.; Nordin, J.; Pain, R.; Pécontal, E.; Pereira, R.; Perlmutter, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Reif, K.; Rigault, M.; Rubin, D.; Runge, K.; Saunders, C.; Smadja, G.; Suzuki, N.; Taubenberger, S.; Tao, C.; Thomas, R. C.; Nearby Supernova Factory

    2017-11-01

    Aims: The scientific yield of current and future optical surveys is increasingly limited by systematic uncertainties in the flux calibration. This is the case for type Ia supernova (SN Ia) cosmology programs, where an improved calibration directly translates into improved cosmological constraints. Current methodology rests on models of stars. Here we aim to obtain flux calibration that is traceable to state-of-the-art detector-based calibration. Methods: We present the SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a color (relative) flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova integral field spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m (UH 88) telescope. Results: By comparing the color trend of the illumination generated by SCALA during two commissioning runs, and to previous laboratory measurements, we show that we can determine the light emitted by SCALA with a long-term repeatability better than 1%. We describe the calibration procedure necessary to control for system aging. We present measurements of the SNIFS throughput as estimated by SCALA observations. Conclusions: The SCALA calibration unit is now fully deployed at the UH 88 telescope, and with it color-calibration between 4000 Å and 9000 Å is stable at the percent level over a one-year baseline.

  17. Fast Imaging Solar Spectrograph System in New Solar Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.-D.; Kim, Y. H.; Chae, J.; Goode, P. R.; Cho, K. S.; Park, H. M.; Nah, J. K.; Jang, B. H.

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, Big Bear Solar Observatory in California, USA launched a project for construction of the world's largest aperture solar telescope (D = 1.6m) called New Solar Telescope(NST). University of Hawaii (UH) and Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute(KASI) partly collaborate on the project. NST is a designed off-axis parabolic Gregorian reflector with very high spatial resolution(0.07 arcsec at 5000A) and is equipped with several scientific instruments such as Visible Imaging Magnetograph (VIM), InfraRed Imaging Magnetograph IRIM), and so on. Since these scientific instruments are focused on studies of the solar photosphere, we need a post-focus instrument for the NST to study the fine structures and dynamic patterns of the solar chromosphere and low Transition Region (TR) layer, including filaments/prominences, spicules, jets, micro flares, etc. For this reason, we developed and installed a fast imaging solar spectrograph(FISS) system on the NST withadvantages of achieving compact design with high spectral resolution and small aberration as well as recording many solar spectral lines in a single and/or dual band mode. FISS was installed in May, 2010 and now we carry out a test observation. In this talk, we introduce the FISS system and the results of the test observation after FISS installation.

  18. Performance of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph after SM4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, Charles R.; Alosi, A.; Bohlin, R. C.; Bostroen, K. A.; Cox, C. R.; Diaz, R. I.; Dixon, W. V.; Goudfrooij, P.; Hodge, P.; Kaiser, M. E.; hide

    2010-01-01

    On May 17, 2009, during the fourth EVA of SM4, astronauts Michael Good and Mike Massimino replaced the failed LVPS-2 circuit board on the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), restoring this HST instrument to operation after a nearly 6 year hiatus. STIS after this 2009 repair operates in much the same way as it did during the 2001-2004 period of operations with the Side-2 electronics. Internal and external alignments of the instrument are similar to what they had been in 2004, and most changes in performance are modest. The STIS CCD detector continued to experience radiation damage during the hiatus in operations, leading to decreased charge transfer efficiency (CTE) and an increased number of hot pixels. The sensitivities for most modes are surprisingly close to what was expected from simple extrapolation of the 2003-2004 trends, although the echelle modes show somewhat more complex behavior. The biggest surprise was that the dark count rate for the NUV MAMA detector after SM4 has been much larger than had been expected; it is currently about 2.5 times bigger than it was in 2004 and is only slowly decreasing. We discuss how these changes will affect science with STIS now and in the future.

  19. Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Co-Investigator Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weistrop, Donna

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this contract has been to support investigation of astronomical problems primarily using data from the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As a Co-investigator on STIS, I participated in several projects, which will be described below. The research resulted in 19 papers in refereed journals, 8 papers published in conference proceedings, and 27 papers presented at meetings. There are still at least four papers submitted or in press, as well as some additional research yet to be written up for publication. The research has also produced one master's thesis and two PhD dissertations currently underway, with one to be completed Spring 2003. Undergraduates have participated in the analysis of supporting observations. One student has published some of his results in a web- based refereed publication for undergraduate research (www.jyi.org). I have given several talks to the general public describing results from the HST as well as the results of my research. I have been named the UNLV Regents' Outstanding Faculty Member for 1995 and received the 2002 College of Science Distinguished Researcher's Award as a result of these activities.

  20. Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph SV/GTO Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebbets, Dennis

    1999-01-01

    Contract number NAS5-30433, known at Ball Aerospace as the GHRS SV/GTO project, supported our participation in the post-launch activities of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The period of performance was December 1988 through December 1998. The contract supported the involvement of Dr Dennis Ebbets in the work of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team, and several of the Ball people in the documentation and publication of results. Three main categories of tasks were covered by this contract; in-orbit calibration of the GHRS, guaranteed time observations, and education and public outreach. The nature and accomplishments of these tasks are described in the report. This summary makes many references to publications in the scientific and technical literature. Appendix A is extracted from a complete bibliography, and lists those papers that are directly related to work performed under this GHRS contract. The tasks related to the in-orbit calibration of the GHRS were by far the largest responsibility during the first six years of the project. During this period Dr. Ebbets was responsible for the definition of calibration requirements, design of experiments, preparation of observing proposals, tracking their implementation and execution, and coordinating the analysis and publication of the results. Prior to the launch of HST in 1990 the observing proposals were developed in cooperation with the scientists on the GHRS DDT, engineers at Ball Aerospace, the operations staff at the STScI, and project coordinators at GSFC.

  1. Thirty-Meter Telescope: A Technical Study of the InfraRed Multiobject Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    U, Vivian; Dekany, R.; Mobasher, B.

    2013-01-01

    The InfraRed Multiobject Spectrograph (IRMS) is an adaptive optics (AO)-fed, reconfigurable near-infrared multi-object spectrograph and imager on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Its design is based on the MOSFIRE spectrograph currently operating on the Keck Observatory. As one of the first three first-light instruments on the TMT, IRMS is in a mini-conceptual design phase. Here we motivate the science goals of the instrument and present the anticipated sensitivity estimates based on the combination of MOSFIRE with the AO system NFIRAOS on TMT. An assessment of the IRMS on-instrument wavefront sensor performance and vignetting issue will also be discussed.

  2. Data reductions and data quality for the high resolution spectrograph on the Southern African Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, S. M.; Crause, Lisa; Depagne, Éric; Ilkiewicz, Krystian; Schroeder, Anja; Kuhn, Rudolph; Hettlage, Christian; Romero Colmenaro, Encarni; Kniazev, Alexei; Väisänen, Petri

    2016-08-01

    The High Resolution Spectrograph (HRS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a dual beam, fiber-fed echelle spectrograph providing high resolution capabilities to the SALT observing community. We describe the available data reduction tools and the procedures put in place for regular monitoring of the data quality from the spectrograph. Data reductions are carried out through the pyhrs package. The data characteristics and instrument stability are reported as part of the SALT Dashboard to help monitor the performance of the instrument.

  3. Depth Profile of Induced Magnetic Polarization in Cu Layers of Co/Cu(111) Metallic Superlattices by Resonant X-ray Magnetic Scattering at the Cu K Absorption Edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uegaki, Shin; Yoshida, Akihiro; Hosoito, Nobuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    We investigated induced spin polarization of 4p conduction electrons in Cu layers of antiferromagnetically (AFM) and ferromagnetically (FM) coupled Co/Cu(111) metallic superlattices by resonant X-ray magnetic scattering at the Cu K absorption edge. Magnetic reflectivity profiles of the two superlattices were measured in the magnetic saturation state with circularly polarized synchrotron radiation X-rays at 8985 eV. Depth profiles of the resonant magnetic scattering length of Cu, which corresponds to the induced spin polarization of Cu, were evaluated in the two Co/Cu superlattices by analyzing the observed magnetic reflectivity profiles. We demonstrated that the spin polarization induced in the Cu layer was distributed around the Co/Cu interfaces with an attenuation length of several Å in both AFM and FM coupled superlattices. The uniform component, which exists in Au layers of Fe/Au(001) superlattices, was not found in the depth distribution of induced magnetic polarization in the Cu layers of Co/Cu(111) superlattices.

  4. Cool transition region loops observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Z.; Xia, L.; Li, B.; Madjarska, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    An important class of loops in the solar atmosphere, cool transition region loops, have received little attention mainly due to instrumental limitations. We analyze a cluster of these loops in the on-disk active region NOAA 11934 recorded in a Si IV 1402.8 Å spectral raster and 1400Å slit-jaw (SJ) images taken by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph. We divide these loops into three groups and study their dynamics, evolution and interaction.The first group comprises geometrically relatively stable loops, which are finely scaled with 382~626 km cross-sections. Siphon flows in these loops are suggested by the Doppler velocities gradually changing from -10 km/s (blue-shifts) in one end to 20 km/s (red-shifts) in the other. Nonthermal velocities from 15 to 25 km/s were determined. The obtained physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection occurring at the blue-shifted footpoints where magnetic cancellation with a rate of 1015 Mx/s is found. The released magnetic energy is redistributed by the siphon flows. The second group corresponds to two active footpoints rooted in mixed-magnetic-polarity regions. Magnetic reconnection in both footpoints is suggested by explosive-event line profiles with enhanced wings up to 200 km/s and magnetic cancellation with a rate of ~1015 Mx/s. In the third group, an interaction between two cool loop systems is observed. Mixed-magnetic polarities are seen in their conjunction area where explosive-event line profiles and magnetic cancellation with a rate of 3×1015 Mx/s are found. This is a clear indication that magnetic reconnection occurs between these two loop systems. Our observations suggest that the cool transition region loops are heated impulsively most likely by sequences of magnetic reconnection events.

  5. Cool Transition Region Loops Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhenghua; Xia, Lidong; Li, Bo; Madjarska, Maria S.

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) study of cool transition region loops, a class of loops that has received little attention in the literature. A cluster of such loops was observed on the solar disk in active region NOAA11934, in the Si iv 1402.8 Å spectral raster and 1400 Å slit-jaw images. We divide the loops into three groups and study their dynamics. The first group comprises relatively stable loops, with 382-626 km cross-sections. Observed Doppler velocities are suggestive of siphon flows, gradually changing from -10 km s-1 at one end to 20 km s-1 at the other end of the loops. Nonthermal velocities of 15 ˜ 25 km s-1 were determined. Magnetic cancellation with a rate of 1015 Mx s-1 is found at the blueshifted footpoints. These physical properties suggest that these loops are impulsively heated by magnetic reconnection, and the siphon flows play an important role in the energy redistribution. The second group corresponds to two footpoints rooted in mixed-magnetic-polarity regions, where magnetic cancellation with a rate of 1015 Mx s-1 and explosive-event line profiles with enhanced wings of up to 200 km s-1 were observed. In the third group, interaction between two cool loop systems is observed. Evidence for magnetic reconnection between the two loop systems is reflected in the explosive-event line profiles and magnetic cancellation with a rate of 3× {10}15 Mx s-1 observed in the corresponding area. The IRIS has provided opportunity for in-depth investigations of cool transition region loops. Further numerical experiments are crucial for understanding their physics and their roles in the coronal heating processes.

  6. Undercover EUV Solar Jets Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N.-H.; Innes, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions, dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJI), give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT to 17:04:07 UT. Collimated outflows with bright roots were present in SJI 1400 Å (transition region) and 2796 Å (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 304 Å (transition region) and AIA 171 Å (lower corona) images. The Si IV spectra show a strong blue wing enhancement, but no red wing, in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets, indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg II line profiles produced by the jets spires: reversed and non-reversed. Mg II lines remain optically thick, but turn optically thin in the highly Doppler shifted wings. The energy flux contained in each recurrent jet is estimated using a velocity differential emission measure technique that measures the emitting power of the plasma as a function of the line-of-sight velocity. We found that all the recurrent jets release similar energy (108 erg cm-2 s-1) toward the corona and the downward component is less than 3%.

  7. Preliminary Results on Mars and the Siding Spring Meteor Shower from MAVEN's Imaging UV Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    The MAVEN mission to Mars is designed to study the upper atmosphere and its response to external drivers, searching for clues to the cause of long-term atmospheric loss. MAVEN carries the Imaging UV Spectrograph (IUVS) for remote sensing studies of the atmosphere through vertical scans from the limb through the corona, UV imaging of the planet and stellar occultations. Each observational mode has successfully observed the spectral features and spatial distributions as intended, confirming and expanding our understanding of the Mars upper atmosphere as observed by the Mariner spacecraft and Mars Express. Furthermore, IUVS witnessed the aftermath of an intense meteor shower on Mars caused by Comet Siding Spring. For a period of many hours, the planet's UV spectrum was dominated by emission from ionized magnesium deposited by meteor ablation in the upper atmosphere. Initial results from the originally-planned Mars observations include: • Significant persistent structures in the thermospheric day glow emissions, dependent primarily on solar zenith angle, along with significant variability on daily timescales; • Nitric oxide nightglow and low-level auroral emissions of substantially greater nightside extent than previously seen; • Confirmation of N2 emission in the VK band, as first reported by MEX/SPICAM; • The first vertical profiles of the D/H ratio in the atmosphere and their evolution with Mars season; • The most complete maps and vertical profiles of H, C and O in the Mars corona; • The first global snapshot of the middle atmosphere obtained by a day-long stellar occultation campaign; • Global ozone maps spanning several months of seasonal evolution. Other results from the missions's preliminary phases will be included.

  8. UNDERCOVER EUV SOLAR JETS OBSERVED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.-H.; Innes, D. E.

    It is well-known that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission emitted at the solar surface is absorbed by overlying cool plasma. Especially in active regions, dark lanes in EUV images suggest that much of the surface activity is obscured. Simultaneous observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, consisting of UV spectra and slit-jaw images (SJI), give vital information with sub-arcsecond spatial resolution on the dynamics of jets not seen in EUV images. We studied a series of small jets from recently formed bipole pairs beside the trailing spot of active region 11991, which occurred on 2014 March 5 from 15:02:21 UT tomore » 17:04:07 UT. Collimated outflows with bright roots were present in SJI 1400 Å (transition region) and 2796 Å (upper chromosphere) that were mostly not seen in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) 304 Å (transition region) and AIA 171 Å (lower corona) images. The Si iv spectra show a strong blue wing enhancement, but no red wing, in the line profiles of the ejecta for all recurrent jets, indicating outward flows without twists. We see two types of Mg ii line profiles produced by the jets spires: reversed and non-reversed. Mg ii lines remain optically thick, but turn optically thin in the highly Doppler shifted wings. The energy flux contained in each recurrent jet is estimated using a velocity differential emission measure technique that measures the emitting power of the plasma as a function of the line-of-sight velocity. We found that all the recurrent jets release similar energy (10{sup 8} erg cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}) toward the corona and the downward component is less than 3%.« less

  9. Circumnuclear star formation in Mrk 42 mapped with Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Moiré G.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Dors, O. L.; Riffel, Rogerio; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Colina, Luis

    2018-06-01

    We present Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) observations of the inner 1.5 × 1.5 kpc2 of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy Mrk 42 at a spatial resolution of 60 pc and spectral resolution of 40 km s^{-1}. The emission-line flux and equivalent width maps clearly show a ring of circumnuclear star formation regions surrounding the nucleus with radius of ˜500 pc. The spectra of some of these regions show molecular absorption features which are probably of CN, TiO, or VO, indicating the presence of massive evolved stars in the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch phase. The gas kinematics of the ring is dominated by rotation in the plane of the galaxy, following the large-scale disc geometry, while at the nucleus an additional outflowing component is detected blueshifted by 300-500 km s^{-1}, relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. Based on the equivalent width of Br γ we find pieces of evidence of gradients in the age of H II regions along the ring of Mrk 42, favouring the pearls on a string scenario of star formation. The broad component of Pa β emission line presents a Full Width at Half Maximum of ˜1480 km s^{-1}, implying in a mass of ˜2.5 × 106 M⊙ for the central supermassive black hole. Based on emission-line ratios we conclude that besides the active galactic nucleus, Mrk 42 presents nuclear Starburst activity.

  10. GRACES, the Gemini remote access CFHT ESPaDOnS spectrograph: initial design and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollestrup, Eric V.; Pazder, John; Barrick, Gregory; Martioli, Eder; Schiavon, Ricardo; Anthony, André; Halman, Mark; Veillet, Christian

    2012-09-01

    The Gemini Remote Access CFHT ESPaDOnS Spectrograph (GRACES) is an innovative instrumentation experiment that will demonstrate if ESPaDOnS, a bench-mounted high-resolution optical spectrograph at CFHT, can be fed by a 270-m long fiber from the Gemini-North telescope with low enough losses to remain competitive with conventional spectrographs on other 8 to 10-m telescopes. Detailed simulations have shown that GRACES should be more sensitive than the HIRES spectrograph at Keck Observatory at wavelengths longer than about 600-700 nm. This result is possible by using FPB-type of optical fibers made by Polymicro Technologies and by keeping the critical focal ratio degradation (FRD) losses to less than 10%. Laboratory tests on these FPB optical fibers are underway and show that for 36-m lengths that the FRD losses are as low as 0.8% with a repeatability of 1%. Tests are currently underway on 280-m lengths.

  11. A spectrographic study of the aurora and the relation to solar wind pressure pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton-Chalk, A. B.; Lanchester, B. S.; Ivchenko, N.; Lummerzheim, D.; Throp, K.

    SIF (Spectrographic Imaging Facility) is a Southampton University / University College London collaboration. The platform consists of a High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph, HiTIES, two photometers and a narrow angle auroral imager. The spectrograph has a mosaic filter; each of the three spectral panels are centred over/near important spectral features: Hbeta (486.1nm), N2+(470.9nm), N2+(465.2nm), thus allowing studies of proton and electron aurorae. The platform has been successfully deployed in Svalbard since November 1999. The purpose of the experiment was to take spectrographic measurements to study the relationship between proton and electron precipitation and to understand the nature of the precipitating spectrum of protons, both in energy and angular distributions. We present a study of the aurora observed in relation to solar wind pressure pulses.

  12. High efficiency spectrographs for the EUV and soft X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cash, W.

    1983-01-01

    The use of grazing incidence optics and reflection grating designs is shown to be a method that improves the performance of spectrographs at wavelengths shorter than 1200 A. Emphasis is laid on spectroscopic designs for X ray and EUV astronomy, with sample designs for an objective reflection grating spectrograph (ORGS) and an echelle spectrograph for wavelengths longer than 100 A. Conical diffraction allows operations at grazing incidence in the echelle spectrograph. In ORGS, the extreme distance of X ray objects aids in collimating the source radiation, which encounters conical diffraction within the instrument, proceeds parallel to the optical axis, and arrives at the detector. A series of gratings is used to achieve the effect. A grazing echelle is employed for EUV observations, and offers a resolution of 20,000 over a 300 A bandpass.

  13. Visible camera cryostat design and performance for the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Gunn, James E.; Golebiowski, Mirek; Hope, Stephen C.; Madec, Fabrice; Gabriel, Jean-Francois; Loomis, Craig; Le fur, Arnaud; Dohlen, Kjetil; Le Mignant, David; Barkhouser, Robert; Carr, Michael; Hart, Murdock; Tamura, Naoyuki; Shimono, Atsushi; Takato, Naruhisa

    2016-08-01

    We describe the design and performance of the SuMIRe Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) visible camera cryostats. SuMIRe PFS is a massively multi-plexed ground-based spectrograph consisting of four identical spectrograph modules, each receiving roughly 600 fibers from a 2394 fiber robotic positioner at the prime focus. Each spectrograph module has three channels covering wavelength ranges 380 nm - 640 nm, 640 nm - 955 nm, and 955 nm - 1.26 um, with the dispersed light being imaged in each channel by a f/1.07 vacuum Schmidt camera. The cameras are very large, having a clear aperture of 300 mm at the entrance window, and a mass of 280 kg. In this paper we describe the design of the visible camera cryostats and discuss various aspects of cryostat performance.

  14. The micro-mirror technology applied to astronomy: ANIS adaptive-slit near Infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, Denis; Buat, Veronique; Bely, Pierre; Grange, Robert

    2018-04-01

    This paper, "The micro-mirror technology applied to astronomy: ANIS adaptive-slit near Infrared spectrograph," was presented as part of International Conference on Space Optics—ICSO 1997, held in Toulouse, France.

  15. High Resolution Spectrograph for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tull, R. G.; MacQueen, P. J.; Good, J.; Epps, H. W.; HET HRS Team

    1998-12-01

    A fiber fed high-resolution spectrograph (HRS) is under construction for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). The primary resolving power originally specified, from astrophysical considerations, was R = 60,000 with a fiber of diameter at least 1 arc-second, with full spectral coverage limited only by the combined band-pass of the HET, the optical fiber, and the image detector. This was achieved in the final design with a high blaze angle R-4 echelle mosaic, white pupil design, image slicing, and a large area CCD mosaic illuminated by an eight element refractive camera. Two back-to-back, user selectable first-order diffraction gratings are employed for cross dispersion, to separate echelle spectral orders; the entire spectral range (420 - 1,000 nm) can be covered in as few as two exposures. Critical issues addressed in the design are cross dispersion and order spacing, sky subtraction, echelle and CCD selection, fiber optic feed and scrambling, and image or pupil slicing. In the final design meeting the requirements we exploited the large-area 4096 square CCD, image slicing, and the optical performance of the white-pupil design to acquire a range of 30,000 < R < 120,000 with fibers of diameter 2 and 3 arc-seconds, without sacrificing full spectral coverage. Design details will be presented. Limiting magnitude is projected to be about V = 19 (for S/N = 10) at the nominal R = 60,000 resolving power. The poster display will outline performance characteristics expected in relation to projected astrophysical research capabilities outlined by Sneden et al., in this conference. HRS is supported by generous grants from NSF, NASA, the State of Texas, and private philanthropy, with matching funds granted by the University of Texas and by McDonald Observatory.

  16. The Background-Limited Infrared Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Charles; BLISS-SPICA Study Team

    2011-05-01

    The far-IR waveband carries half of the photon energy ever produced in galaxies and quasars, evidence of the major role of dust-obscured star formation and black-hole growth had in bringing about the modern Universe. The bulk of this dust-obscured activity appears to have occurred in the first half of the Universe's history (z>1). We are developing the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) to capitalize on SPICA's cold telescope and provide a breakthrough far-IR spectroscopy capability. BLISS-SPICA is 6 orders of magnitude faster than the spectrometers on Herschel and SOFIA in obtaining full-band spectra, and offer the capability to overcome the spatial confusion limit with spectroscopic capability. BLISS-SPICA will observe dust-obscured galaxies at all epochs back to the first billion years after the Big Bang (redshift 6), thereby probing the complete history of dust-obscured star formation and black-hole growth. It will also be extremely powerful for studying ice-giant planet formation in protoplanetary disks, with its sensitivity to very small amounts of gas. Given its enormous potential, BLISS has been recommended by Astro2010 as an example US contribution to SPICA. BLISS covers the 38-433 micron range in six grating-spectrometer bands, with two simultaneous sky positions. The baseline detector package is 4224 silicon-nitride micro-mesh leg-isolated bolometers with superconducting transition-edge-sensed (TES) thermistors, read out with a cryogenic time-domain multiplexer. All spectrometers and detector arrays are cooled to 50mK for optimal sensitivity. All technical elements of BLISS have heritage in mature scientific instruments, and many have flown. We present the science case for BLISS, as well as our progress in the key technical aspects: 1) detector and readout performance demonstration, 2) opto-mechanical instrument configuration, and 3) sub-K cooling and cryogenic system approach.

  17. The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Scientific Support Contract

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1988, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC) was selected as the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) Scientific Support Contractor (SSC). This was to have been a few months before the launch of NASA's first Great Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). As one of five scientific instruments on HST, the GHRS was designed to obtain spectra in the 1050-3300 A ultraviolet wavelength region with a resolving power, lambda/Delta(lambda) , of up to 100,000 and relative photometric accuracy to 1%. It was built by Ball AeroSpace Systems Group under the guidance of the GHRS Investigation Definition Team (IDT), comprised of 16 scientists from the US and Canada. After launch, the IDT was to perform the initial instrument calibration and execute a broad scientific program during a five-year Guaranteed Time Observation (GTO) period. After a year's delay, the launch of HST occurred in April 1990, and CSC participated in the in-orbit calibration and first four years of GTO observations with the IDT. The HST primary mirror suffered from spherical aberration, which reduced the spatial and spectral resolution of Large Science Aperture (LSA) observations and decreased the throughput of the Small Science Aperture (SSA) by a factor of two. Periodic problems with the Side 1 carrousel electronics and anomalies with the low-voltage power supply finally resulted in a suspension of the use of Side 1 less than two years after launch. At the outset, the GHRS SSC task involved work in four areas: 1) to manage and operate the GHRS Data Analysis Facility (DAF); 2) to support the second Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, as well as perform system engineering analysis of the GHRS as nesessary; 3) to assist the GHRS IDT with their scientific research programs, particularly the GSFC members of the team, and 4) to provide administrative and logistic support for GHRS public information and educational activities.

  18. A Post-AGB Star in the Small Magellanic Cloud Observed with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-23

    spectral features, MSX SMC 029, in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) usimg the low-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space ...029, in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) using the low-resolution modules of the Infrared Spectrograph on the Spitzer Space Telescope. A cool dust... outer atmosphere expands and pulsates, pushing gas away from the star where it can cool and condense into dust grains. The resulting circumstellar dust

  19. Compact high-resolution spectrographs for large and extremely large telescopes: using the diffraction limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, J. Gordon; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2012-09-01

    As telescopes get larger, the size of a seeing-limited spectrograph for a given resolving power becomes larger also, and for ELTs the size will be so great that high resolution instruments of simple design will be infeasible. Solutions include adaptive optics (but not providing full correction for short wavelengths) or image slicers (which give feasible but still large instruments). Here we develop the solution proposed by Bland-Hawthorn and Horton: the use of diffraction-limited spectrographs which are compact even for high resolving power. Their use is made possible by the photonic lantern, which splits a multi-mode optical fiber into a number of single-mode fibers. We describe preliminary designs for such spectrographs, at a resolving power of R ~ 50,000. While they are small and use relatively simple optics, the challenges are to accommodate the longest possible fiber slit (hence maximum number of single-mode fibers in one spectrograph) and to accept the beam from each fiber at a focal ratio considerably faster than for most spectrograph collimators, while maintaining diffraction-limited imaging quality. It is possible to obtain excellent performance despite these challenges. We also briefly consider the number of such spectrographs required, which can be reduced by full or partial adaptive optics correction, and/or moving towards longer wavelengths.

  20. Percutaneous absorption

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Clinical effectiveness of topically applied medications depends on the ability of the active ingredient to leave its vehicle and penetrate into the epidermis. The stratum corneum is that layer of the epidermis which functionally is the most important in limiting percutaneous absorption, showing the characteristics of a composite semipermeable membrane. A mathematical expression of transepidermal diffusion may be derived from Fick's Law of mass transport; factors altering the rate of diffusion are discussed. PMID:4597976

  1. A method for retrieving vertical ozone profiles from limb scattered measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zijun; Chen, Shengbo; Yang, Chunyan; Jin, Lihua

    2011-10-01

    A two-step method is employed in this study to retrieve vertical ozone profiles using scattered measurements from the limb of the atmosphere. The combination of the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) and the Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) is proposed. First, the limb radiance, measured over a range of tangent heights, is processed using the DOAS technique to recover the effective column densities of atmospheric ozone. Second, these effective column densities along the lines of sight (LOSs) are inverted using the MART coupled with a forward model SCIATRAN (radiative transfer model for SCIAMACHY) to derive the ozone profiles. This method is applied to Optical Spectrograph and Infra Red Imager System (OSIRIS) radiance, using the wavelength windows 571-617 nm. Vertical ozone profiles between 10 and 48 km are derived with a vertical resolution of 1 km. The results illustrate a good agreement with the cloud-free coincident SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY) ozone measurements, with deviations less than ±10% (±5% for altitudes from 17 to 47 km). Furthermore, sensitivities of retrieved ozone to aerosol, cloud parameters and NO2 concentration are also investigated.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MgII/FeII absorption profile for 0.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, K. H. R.; Prochaska, J. X.; Koo, D. C.; Phillips, A. C.; Martin, C. L.; Winstrom, L. O.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we use rest-frame near-UV spectroscopy of a sample of 105 galaxies at 0.3absorption. This sample, drawn from redshift surveys of the GOODS and EGS fields (e.g., Wirth et al. 2004, J/AJ/127/3121; Davis et al. 2003SPIE.4834..161D; Le Fevre et al. 2005A&A...439..845L; Szokoly et al. 2004, J/ApJS/155/271), fully covers the SFR-M* parameter space occupied by star-forming galaxies with logM*/Msun>~9.6 down to a SFR limit>~2 Msun/yr at z~0.5, permitting exploration of outflow properties over the entire breadth of the star-forming sequence at z>0.3 for the first time. Our galaxy sample is drawn from pre-existing photometric and spectroscopic redshift surveys in fields with deep imaging taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). (3 data files).

  3. CAFE: Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Aceituno, J.; Thiele, U.; Grupp, F.; Dreizler, S.; Bean, J.; Benitez, D.

    2011-11-01

    The Calar Alto Fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph (CAFE) is an instrument underconstruction at CAHA to replace FOCES, the high-resolution echellespectrograph at the 2.2 m telescope of the observatory. FOCES is a property ofthe Observatory of the Munich University, and it was recalled it from Calar Altoin 2009. The instrument comprised a substantial fraction of thetelescope time during its operational life-time, and it is due to that it wastaken the decision to build a replacement.CAFE shares its basic characteristics with those of FOCES. However, significantimprovements have been introduced in the original design, the quality of thematerials, and the overall stability of the system. In particular: (i) a newcalibration Iodine cell is foreseen to operate together with the standard ThArlamps; (ii) the optical quality of all the components has been selected to belambda/20, instead of the original lambda/10; (iii) an isolated room hasbeen selected to place the instrument, termalized and stabilized againstvibrations (extensive tests have been performed to grant the stability); (iv)most of the mobile parts in FOCES has been substituted by fixed elements, toincrease the stability of the system; and finally (v) a new more efficientCCD, with a smaller pixel has been acquired. It is expected that the overallefficiency and the quality of the data will be significantly improved withrespect to its precesor. In particular, CAFE is design and built to achieveresolutions of R ˜ 70000, which will be kept in the final acquired data,allowing it to compete with current operational extrasolar planets hunters.After two years of work all the components are in place. The instrument is nowfinally assembled, and we are performing the the first alignment tests. It isexpected that the commissioning on the laboratory will finish at the end of2010, followed by the commissioning on telescope along the first semester of2011. If everything goes well, we will offer the instrument in a shared

  4. Comparative study on intestinal metabolism and absorption in vivo of ginsenosides in sulphur-fumigated and non-fumigated ginseng by ultra performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry based chemical profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Shen, Hong; Xu, Jun; Xu, Jin-Di; Zhu, Ling-Ying; Wu, Jie; Chen, Hu-Biao; Li, Song-Lin

    2015-04-01

    Our previous study indicated that sulphur-fumigation of ginseng in post-harvest handling processes could induce chemical transformation of ginsenosides to generate multiple ginsenoside sulphur derivatives. In this study, the influence of sulphur-fumigation on intestinal metabolism and absorption in vivo of ginsenosides in ginseng was sequentially studied. The intestinal metabolic and absorbed profiles of ginsenosides in rats after intra-gastric (i.g.) administration of sulphur-fumigated ginseng (SFG) and non-fumigated ginseng (NFG) were comparatively characterized by a newly established ultra performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization negative (ESI-) mode. A novel strategy based on the characteristic product ions and fragmentation pathways of different types of aglycones (saponin skeletons) and glycosyl moieties was proposed and successfully applied to rapid structural identification of ginsenoside sulphur derivatives and relevant metabolites. In total, 18 ginsenoside sulphur derivatives and 26 ginsenoside sulphur derivative metabolites in the faeces together with six ginsenoside sulphur derivatives in the plasma were identified in the SFG-administrated group but not in the NFG-administrated group. The results clearly demonstrated that the intestinal metabolic and absorbed profiles of ginsenosides in sulphur-fumigated and non-fumigated ginseng were quite different, which inspired that sulphur-fumigation of ginseng should not be recommended before the bioactivity and toxicity of the ginsenoside sulphur derivatives were systematically evaluated. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. High sensitivity, wide coverage, and high-resolution NIR non-cryogenic spectrograph, WINERED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yuji; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kondo, Sohei; Otsubo, Shogo; Hamano, Satoshi; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Yoshikawa, Tomoshiro; Fukue, Kei; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya; Kinoshita, Masaomi; Kitano, Ayaka; Asano, Akira; Takenaka, Keiichi; Watase, Ayaka; Mito, Hiroyuki; Yasui, Chikako; Minami, Atsushi; Izumu, Natsuko; Yamamoto, Ryo; Mizumoto, Misaki; Arasaki, Takayuki; Arai, Akira; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-08-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) high-resolution spectroscopy is a fundamental observational method in astronomy. It provides significant information on the kinematics, the magnetic fields, and the chemical abundances, of astronomical objects embedded in or behind the highly extinctive clouds or at the cosmological distances. Scientific requirements have accelerated the development of the technology required for NIR high resolution spectrographs using 10 m telescopes. WINERED is a near-infrared (NIR) high-resolution spectrograph that is currently mounted on the 1.3 m Araki telescope of the Koyama Astronomical Observatory in Kyoto-Sangyo University, Japan, and has been successfully operated for three years. It covers a wide wavelength range from 0.90 to 1.35 μm (the z-, Y-, and J-bands) with a spectral resolution of R = 28,000 (Wide-mode) and R = 80,000 (Hires-Y and Hires-J modes). WINERED has three distinctive features: (i) optics with no cold stop, (ii) wide spectral coverage, and (iii) high sensitivity. The first feature, originating from the Joyce proposal, was first achieved by WINERED, with a short cutoff infrared array, cold baffles, and custom-made thermal blocking filters, and resulted in reducing the time for development, alignment, and maintenance, as well as the total cost. The second feature is realized with the spectral coverage of Δλ/λ 1/6 in a single exposure. This wide coverage is realized by a combination of a decent optical design with a cross-dispersed echelle and a large format array (2k x 2k HAWAII- 2RG). The Third feature, high sensitivity, is achieved via the high-throughput optics (>60 %) and the very low noise of the system. The major factors affecting the high throughput are the echelle grating and the VPH cross-disperser with high diffraction efficiencies of 83 % and 86 %, respectively, and the high QE of HAWAII-2RG (83 % at 1.23 μm). The readout noise of the electronics and the ambient thermal background radiation at longer wavelengths could be

  6. Geostationary Spectrograph (GeoSpec) for Earth and Atmospheric Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janz, Scott J.

    2003-01-01

    GeoSpec will support several possible future mission concepts in the Atmospheric Sciences and in Land and Ocean Sciences by measurement of both chemically linked atmospheric trace gas concentrations and profiles of important molecules such as OS, N02, CH20 and SO2 and at the same time coastal and ocean pollution events, tidal effects, and the origin and evolution of aerosol plumes. The instrument design concept we will describe is a dual spectrograph covering the WMS wavelength region of 310- 481 nm and the VIS/NIR wavelength region of 500-900 nm. A third channel in the short- wave infrared (SWIR) region between 2.2 p and 2.4 pn for total column measurements of CO, CH4, and N20 will also be described. The goal is to design a system capable of making moderate spatial resolution (750 meters at nadir) hyperspectral measurements (0.2 to 1.2 nm resolution) from a geostationary orbit. This would enable studies of time- varying pollution and coastal change processes with a temporal resolution of 5 minutes on a regional scale to 1 hour on a continental scale. Technological advances in the design and fabrication of convex holographic gratings and large format, high dynamic range PIN/CMOS detectors at the focal plane will be exploited. By simply changing the focal length of the front-end telescope GeoSpec can accommodate different orbital altitudes, including low Earth orbit, the Sun-side Lagrangian point L1, and/or different spatial resolutions.

  7. Radial Velocity Fiber-Fed Spectrographs Towards the Discovery of Compact Planets and Pulsations on M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiñas, Zaira M.

    2016-11-01

    This thesis is developed in the framework of the paradigm that seeks for the discovery of an Earth analog. Nowadays, low mass stars, and in particular M dwarf stars, are key targets towards achieving this goal. In this thesis, I focus on the study of the short-time domain of M dwarf stars with the aim of searching for short period planets, but also for the first detection of stellar pulsations on this spectral type. Both science goals are the primary objectives of the “Cool Tiny Beats” (CTB) survey, which has produced most of the data used in this thesis. CTB data consist in high resolution and high-cadence spectroscopic Doppler measurements taken either with HARPS or HARPS-N spectrographs. First of all, a thorough understanding of the spectrographs response in the short time domain was performed to characterize the sources of noise in our range of study. Our first approach to the goals of this thesis consisted in the design of an observational experiment to delve into the HARPS-N sub-night performance. Results unveiled variability of the spectra continuum correlated with instabilities of the spectrograph illumination associated to the airmass. Such distortions, which are wavelength and time dependent, are also present in at least one of the data-products given by the HARPS-N reduction software: the width of the mean-line profiles (i.e. the so-called FWHM index), an index commonly used as a proxy of the stellar activity. As a consequence, we searched for an alternative approach to measure the width index. In particular, we calculated the mean-line profile of the spectrum with a least-squares-deconvolution technique and we obtained the profile indices as the moments of the profile distribution. As part of this study, we also corroborated that the radial velocities calculated with our template matching algorithm TERRA are not affected by the illumination stability. This work unveiled a possible failure of the HARPS-N atmospheric dispersion corrector (or ADC) and

  8. A Cross-Dispersed Medium-Resolution Spectrograph for Appalachian State Univeristy's 32-inch Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluttz, K. A.; Gray, R. O.

    2003-12-01

    We have designed and constructed an economical medium-resolution spectrograph to be used on the 32-inch telescope of Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory (DSO). The primary function of this instrument will be to study shell and emission-line stars. However, we will also use this instrument for chemical abundance studies and radial velocities. The basic design is that of an Ebert spectrograph with a single 6-inch mirror acting as both the collimator and camera. The primary dispersion is accomplished by a reflection grating, and order separation is accomplished by a grism. The spectrograph has been designed so that three wavelength regions are simultaneously imaged on the CCD camera. When the Hα line is centered in the third order, Hβ and lines of Fe II multiplet 42 -- often enhanced in shell and emission-line stars -- appear in the fourth order and the fifth order contains both the Ca II K & H lines. To facilitate abundance measurements, a telluric-free region near 6400Å is available in the third order by tilting the main diffraction grating. Preliminary tests have shown that the resolution of the new spectrograph is 0.42Å in the third order (R ≈ 15,000). This relatively high resolution will allow studies to be conducted at DSO which have not previously been possible with the instrumentation currently in use. Several optical components for this spectrograph were purchased with grants from the Fund for Astrophysical Research and the University Research Council.

  9. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  10. Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph Observations of Procyon and HR1099

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Harper, Graham M.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Dempsey, Robert C.

    1996-01-01

    Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) observations have revealed the presence of broad wings in the transition-region lines of AU Mic and Capella. It has been proposed that these wings are signatures of microflares in the transition regions of these stars and that the solar analog for this phenomenon might be the 'transition region explosive events' discussed by Dere, Bartoe, & Brueckner. We have analyzed GHRS observations of Procyon (F5 IV-V) and HR 1099 (K1 IV + G5 IV) to search for broad wings in the UV emission lines of these stars. We find that the transition-region lines of HR 1099, which are emitted almost entirely by the K1 star, do indeed have broad wings that are even more prominent than those of AU Mic and Capella. This is consistent with the association of the broad wings with microflaring since HR 1099 is a very active binary system. In contrast, the transition-region lines of Procyon, a relatively inactive star, do not show evidence for broad wings, with the possible exception of N v lambda1239. However, Procyon's lines do appear to have excess emission in their blue wings. Linsky et al. found no evidence for broad wings in Capella's chromospheric lines, but we find that the Mg II resonance lines of HR 1099 do have broad wings. The striking resemblance between HR 1099's Mg II and C iv lines suggests that the Mg II line profiles may be regulated by turbulent processes similar to those that control the transition-region line profiles. If this is the case, microflaring may be occurring in the K1 star's chromosphere as well as in its transition region. However, radiative transfer calculations suggest that the broad wings of the Mg II lines can also result from normal chromospheric opacity effects rather than pure turbulence. The prominence of broad wings in the transition region and perhaps even chromospheric lines of active stars suggests that microflaring is very prevalent in the outer atmospheres of active stars.

  11. The optical design of the G-CLEF Spectrograph: the first light instrument for the GMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Ami, Sagi; Epps, Harland; Evans, Ian; Mueller, Mark; Podgorski, William; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF), the first major light instrument for the GMT, is a fiber-fed, high-resolution echelle spectrograph. In the following paper, we present the optical design of G-CLEF. We emphasize the unique solutions derived for the spectrograph fiber-feed: the Mangin mirror that corrects the cylindrical field curvature, the implementation of VPH grisms as cross dispersers, and our novel solution for a multi-colored exposure meter. We describe the spectrograph blue and red cameras comprised of 7 and 8 elements respectively, with one aspheric surface in each camera, and present the expected echellogram imaged on the instrument focal planes. Finally, we present ghost analysis and mitigation strategy that takes into account both single reflection and double reflection back scattering from various elements in the optical train.

  12. Performance of a laser frequency comb calibration system with a high-resolution solar echelle spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerr, H.-P.; Kentischer, T. J.; Steinmetz, T.; Probst, R. A.; Franz, M.; Holzwarth, R.; Udem, Th.; Hänsch, T. W.; Schmidt, W.

    2012-09-01

    Laser frequency combs (LFC) provide a direct link between the radio frequency (RF) and the optical frequency regime. The comb-like spectrum of an LFC is formed by exact equidistant laser modes, whose absolute optical frequencies are controlled by RF-references such as atomic clocks or GPS receivers. While nowadays LFCs are routinely used in metrological and spectroscopic fields, their application in astronomy was delayed until recently when systems became available with a mode spacing and wavelength coverage suitable for calibration of astronomical spectrographs. We developed a LFC based calibration system for the high-resolution echelle spectrograph at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), located at the Teide observatory, Tenerife, Canary Islands. To characterize the calibration performance of the instrument, we use an all-fiber setup where sunlight and calibration light are fed to the spectrograph by the same single-mode fiber, eliminating systematic effects related to variable grating illumination.

  13. Development of the MAMA Detectors for the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timothy, J. Gethyn

    1997-01-01

    The development of the Multi-Anode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector systems started in the early 1970's in order to produce multi-element detector arrays for use in spectrographs for solar studies from the Skylab-B mission. Development of the MAMA detectors for spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) began in the late 1970's, and reached its culmination with the successful installation of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the second HST servicing mission (STS-82 launched 11 February 1997). Under NASA Contract NAS5-29389 from December 1986 through June 1994 we supported the development of the MAMA detectors for STIS, including complementary sounding rocket and ground-based research programs. This final report describes the results of the MAMA detector development program for STIS.

  14. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mini-Spec: A Compact, Fiber-Coupled, VPH Grating Spectrograph for Small Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nations, H. L.; Haynes, P.; Brewer, P.

    2003-05-01

    We report on the development and testing of what we believe to be the first VPH grating based spectrograph developed primarily for use at telescopes of modest aperture. To date, the most common instrument suite for such observatories is typically that of a CCD camera with attached filter wheel. While there is no doubt that a wide range of interesting and good science has been done with such instrumentation, the addition of a robust and easy to operate spectrograph would greatly increase the utility of such installations. While some commercial spectrographs exist for use on small telescopes, the authors have found them to be, with few exceptions, either inefficient, difficult for inexperienced students or amateurs to use, or not remotely operable. Correcting these deficiencies is thus the primary motivation for Mini-Spec. The design of Mini-Spec has been influenced by previous work the authors have done on a full-sized fiber-coupled spectrograph (Nations and Pierce, 2002). Mini-Spec uses some of those original design features, only reduced drastically in size. This size reduction (the spectrograph fits within a 7 inch cube), along with a much more careful choice of some critical components, has resulted in a dramatic reduction in cost. The spectrograph uses a highly efficient 1200 l/mm, 40 mm diameter vph grating on loan from Richard Rallison. Focus, central wavelength selection, and comparison lamps are all controlled via an RS-232 link and a custom Visual Basic GUI. Sample spectra of stellar and non-stellar targets will be presented along with a discussion of research projects admirably suited for this instrument. Funding for equipment has been provided by a NASA EPSCoR grant to PI Ron Canterna. HLN has been partially funded by a Wyoming Space Grant Faculty Fellowship.

  16. MEGARA: the new multi-object and integral field spectrograph for GTC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, E.; Páez, G.; Izazaga-Pére, R.; Gil de Paz, A.; Gallego, J.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.

    2017-07-01

    MEGARA is an optical integral-field unit and multi-object spectrograph for the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias. Both observational modes will provide identical spectral resolutions Rfwhm ˜ 6,000, 12,000 and 18,700. The spectrograph is a collimator-camera system. The unique characteristics of MEGARA in terms of throughput and versatility make this instrument the most efficient tool to date to analyze astrophysical objects at intermediate spectral resolutions. The instrument is currently at the telescope for on-sky commissioning. Here we describe the as-built main characteristics the instrument.

  17. PISCES: An Integral Field Spectrograph Technology Demonstration for the WFIRST Coronagraph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Mandell, Avi M.; Gong, Qian; Llop-Sayson, Jorge; Brandt, Timothy; Chambers, Victor J.; Grammer, Bryan; Greeley, Bradford; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present the design, integration, and test of the Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) integral field spectrograph (IFS). The PISCES design meets the science requirements for the Wide-Field Infra Red Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). PISCES was integrated and tested in the integral field spectroscopy laboratory at NASA Goddard. In June 2016, PISCES was delivered to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) where it was integrated with the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). The SPC/PISCES configuration will demonstrate high contrast integral field spectroscopy as part of the WFIRST CGI technology development program.

  18. PISCES: an integral field spectrograph technology demonstration for the WFIRST coronagraph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElwain, Michael W.; Mandell, Avi M.; Gong, Qian; Llop-Sayson, Jorge; Brandt, Timothy; Chambers, Victor J.; Grammer, Bryan; Greeley, Bradford; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall D.; Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Demers, Richard; Tang, Hong; Cady, Eric

    2016-07-01

    We present the design, integration, and test of the Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) integral field spectrograph (IFS). The PISCES design meets the science requirements for the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Coronagraph Instrument (CGI). PISCES was integrated and tested in the integral field spectroscopy laboratory at NASA Goddard. In June 2016, PISCES was delivered to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) where it was integrated with the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). The SPC/PISCES configuration will demonstrate high contrast integral field spectroscopy as part of the WFIRST CGI technology development program.

  19. Performance testing of an off-plane reflection grating and silicon pore optic spectrograph at PANTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlowe, Hannah; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Allured, Ryan; DeRoo, Casey T.; Donovan, Benjamin D.; Miles, Drew M.; Tutt, James H.; Burwitz, Vadim; Menz, Benedikt; Hartner, Gisela D.; Smith, Randall K.; Cheimets, Peter; Hertz, Edward; Bookbinder, Jay A.; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Ackermann, Marcelo

    2015-10-01

    An x-ray spectrograph consisting of aligned, radially ruled off-plane reflection gratings and silicon pore optics (SPO) was tested at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics PANTER x-ray test facility. SPO is a test module for the proposed Arcus mission, which will also feature aligned off-plane reflection gratings. This test is the first time two off-plane gratings were actively aligned to each other and with an SPO to produce an overlapped spectrum. We report the performance of the complete spectrograph utilizing the aligned gratings module and plans for future development.

  20. The extreme ultraviolet spectrograph: A radial groove grating, sounding rocket-borne, astronomical instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Erik; Green, James C.; Cash, Webster

    1993-01-01

    The design, calibration, and sounding rocket flight performance of a novel spectrograph suitable for moderate-resolution EUV spectroscopy are presented. The sounding rocket-borne instrument uses a radial groove grating to maintain a high system efficiency while controlling the aberrations induced when doing spectroscopy in a converging beam. The instrument has a resolution of approximately 2 A across the 200-330 A bandpass with an average effective area of 2 sq cm. The instrument, called the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectrograph, acquired the first EUV spectra in this wavelength region of the hot white dwarf G191-B2B and the late-type star Capella.

  1. Through the Lens of History: The Unusual Circumstances Leading to the Acquisition of the Lowell Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, K. S.

    2013-04-01

    In 1900 Lowell Observatory assistant Andrew Douglass advised his employer Percival Lowell to purchase a state-of-the-art spectrograph from instrument maker John Brashear of Pennsylvania. Lowell agreed with Douglass's suggestion, realizing that such an instrument was critical for the Observatory staff's research. However, the purchase also fulfilled a little-known obligation between Percival Lowell and Brashear that dated back to an accident occurring in 1895. If not for this unusual incident that led to the purchase of the spectrograph, the future of Lowell Observatory and, on a larger scale, unmasking of the nature of the expanding universe, would likely have played out much differently.

  2. FIEStool: Automated data reduction for FIber-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stempels, Eric; Telting, John

    2017-08-01

    FIEStool automatically reduces data obtained with the FIber-fed Echelle Spectrograph (FIES) at the Nordic Optical Telescope, a high-resolution spectrograph available on a stand-by basis, while also allowing the basic properties of the reduction to be controlled in real time by the user. It provides a Graphical User Interface and offers bias subtraction, flat-fielding, scattered-light subtraction, and specialized reduction tasks from the external packages IRAF (ascl:9911.002) and NumArray. The core of FIEStool is instrument-independent; the software, written in Python, could with minor modifications also be used for automatic reduction of data from other instruments.

  3. Achieving the resolution of the spectrograph of the 6m large Azimuthal telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonenko, Dmitrii; Kukushkin, Dmitrii; Bakholdin, Alexey; Valyavin, Gennady

    2016-08-01

    Special Astrophysical Observatory of Russian Academy of Sciences (SAO RAS) creates a spectrograph with high spectral resolution for the 6-meter telescope. The spectrograph consists of a mobile unit located at the focus of the telescope's main mirror, a stationary part located under the telescope and optical fibers which transmit light from the mobile part to the stationary one. The spectral resolution of the stationary part should be R=100000. To achieve such a value, the scheme has two spectral elements, with cross-dispersion. The main spectral element is an echelle grating. The second spectral element is a prism with a diffraction grating on one facet.

  4. bHROS: A New High-Resolution Spectrograph Available on Gemini South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margheim, S. J.; Gemini bHROS Team

    2005-12-01

    The Gemini bench-mounted High-Resolution Spectrograph (bHROS) is available for science programs beginning in 2006A. bHROS is the highest resolution (R=150,000) optical echelle spectrograph optimized for use on an 8-meter telescope. bHROS is fiber-fed via GMOS-S from the Gemini South focal plane and is available in both a dual-fiber Object/Sky mode and a single (larger) Object-only mode. Instrument characteristics and sample data taken during commissioning will be presented.

  5. Preliminary Results on Mars and the Siding Spring Meteor Shower from MAVEN’s Imaging UV Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    The MAVEN mission to Mars is designed to study the upper atmosphere and its response to external drivers, searching for clues to the cause of long-term atmospheric loss. MAVEN carries the Imaging UV Spectrograph (IUVS) for remote sensing studies of the atmosphere through vertical scans from the limb through the corona, UV imaging of the planet and stellar occultations. Each observational mode has successfully observed the spectral features and spatial distributions as intended, confirming and expanding our understanding of the Mars upper atmosphere as observed by the Mariner spacecraft and Mars Express. Furthermore, IUVS witnessed the aftermath of an intense meteor shower on Mars caused by Comet Siding Spring. For a period of many hours, the planet’s UV spectrum was dominated by emission from ionized magnesium deposited by meteor ablation in the upper atmosphere. Initial results from the originally-planned Mars observations include:• Significant persistent structures in the thermospheric day glow emissions, dependent primarily on solar zenith angle, along with significant variability on daily timescales• Nitric oxide nightglow and low-level auroral emissions of substantially greater nightside extent than previously seen• The first vertical profiles of the D/H ratio in the atmosphere and their evolution with Mars season• The most complete maps and vertical profiles of H, C and O in the Mars corona• The first global snapshot of the middle atmosphere obtained by a day-long stellar occultation campaignOther results from the missions’s preliminary phases will be included.

  6. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  7. Shock tube measurements of the optical absorption of triatomic carbon, C3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The spectral absorption of C3 has been measured in a shock tube using a test gas mixture of acetylene diluted with argon. The absorption of a pulsed xenon light source was measured by means of eight photomultiplier channels to a spectrograph and an accompanying drum camera. The postshock test gas temperature and pressure were varied over the range 3300-4300 K and 0.36 to 2.13 atmospheres, respectively. The results showed appreciable absorption from C3 for the wavelength range 300 to 540 nanometers. The computed electronic oscillator strength varied from 0.12 to 0.06 as a function of temperature.

  8. Atomic Physics with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. III; Oscillator Strengths for Neutral Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zsargo, J.; Federman, S. R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1997-01-01

    High quality spectra of interstellar absorption from C I toward beta(sup 1) S(sub co), rho O(sub ph) A, and chi O(sub ph) were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on HST. Many weak lines were detected within the observed wavelength intervals: 1150-1200 A for beta(sup 1) S(sub co) and 1250-1290 A for rho O(sub ph) A and chi O(sub ph). Curve-of-growth analyses were performed in order to extract accurate column densities and Doppler parameters from lines with precise laboratory-based f-values. These column densities and b-values were used to obtain a self-consistent set of f-values for all the observed C I lines. A particularly important constraint was the need to reproduce data for more than one line of sight. For about 50% of the lines, the derived f-values differ appreciably from the values quoted by Morton.

  9. Most Efficient Spectrograph to Shoot the Southern Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    -shooter, for a total of 350 observing nights, making it the second most requested instrument at the Very Large Telescope in this period. More information ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) is the world's most advanced optical instrument. It is an ensemble of four 8.2-metre telescopes located at the Paranal Observatory on an isolated mountain peak in the Atacama Desert in North Chile. The four 8.2-metre telescopes have a total of 12 focal stations where different instruments for imaging and spectroscopic observations are installed and a special station where the light of the four telescopes is combined for interferometric observations. The first VLT instrument was installed in 1998 and has been followed by 12 more in the last 10 years, distributed at the different focal stations. X-shooter is the first of the second generation of VLT instruments and replaces the workhorse-instrument FORS1, which has been successfully used for more than ten years by hundreds of astronomers. X-shooter operates at the Cassegrain focus of the Kueyen telescope (UT2). In response to an ESO Call for Proposals for second generation VLT instrumentation, ESO received three proposals for an intermediate resolution, high efficiency spectrograph. These were eventually merged into a single proposal around the present concept of X-shooter, which was approved for construction in November 2003. The Final Design Review, at which the instrument design is finalised and declared ready for construction, took place in April 2006. The first observations with the instrument at the telescope in its full configuration were on 14 March 2009. X-shooter is a joint project by Denmark, France, Italy, the Netherlands and ESO. The collaborating institutes in Denmark are the Niels Bohr and the DARK Institutes of the University of Copenhagen and the National Space Institute (Technical University of Denmark); in France GEPI at the Observatoire de Paris and APC at the Université D. Diderot, with contributions from the CEA and the

  10. Effect of Acoustic Spectrographic Instruction on Production of English /i/ and /I/ by Spanish Pre-Service English Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quintana-Lara, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of Acoustic Spectrographic Instruction on the production of the English phonological contrast /i/ and / I /. Acoustic Spectrographic Instruction is based on the assumption that physical representations of speech sounds and spectrography allow learners to objectively see and modify those non-accurate features in…

  11. Effect of Training Japanese L1 Speakers in the Production of American English /r/ Using Spectrographic Visual Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Iomi; Edmonds, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of training native Japanese speakers in the production of American /r/ using spectrographic visual feedback. Within a modified single-subject design, two native Japanese participants produced single words containing /r/ in a variety of positions while viewing live spectrographic feedback with the aim of…

  12. The coude spectrograph and echelle scanner of the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tull, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of certain design aspects of the coude spectrograph, and description of the coude scanner that uses some of the spectrograph optics. The configuration of the large echelle grating used is reviewed along with the systems of computer scanner control and data handling.

  13. The Coude spectrograph and echelle scanner of the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tull, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    The design of the Coude spectrograph of the 2.7 m McDonald telescope is discussed. A description is given of the Coude scanner which uses the spectrograph optics, the configuration of the large echelle and the computer scanner control and data systems.

  14. Technical aspects of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Repair (STIS-R)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Domber, J.; Faulkner, T.; Gull, T.; Kimble, R.; Klappenberger, M.; Leckrone, D.; Niedner, M.; Proffitt, C.; Smith, H.; Woodgate, B.

    2008-07-01

    In August 2004, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) ceased operation due to a failure of the 5V mechanism power converter in the Side 2 Low Voltage Power Supply (LVPS2). The failure precluded movement of any STIS mechanism and, because of the earlier (2001) loss of the Side 1 electronics chain, left the instrument shuttered and in safe mode after 7.5 years of science operations. A team was assembled to analyze the fault and to determine if STIS repair (STIS-R) was feasible. The team conclusively pinpointed the Side 2 failure to the 5V mechanism converter, and began studying EVA techniques for opening STIS during Servicing Mission 4 (SM4) to replace the failed LVPS2 board. The restoration of STIS functionality via surgical repair by astronauts has by now reached a mature and final design state, and will, along with a similar repair procedure for the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), represent a first for Hubble servicing. STIS-R will restore full scientific functionality of the spectrograph on Side 2, while Side 1 will remain inoperative. Because of the high degree of complementarity between STIS and the new Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS, to be installed during SM4)), successful repair of the older spectrograph is an important scientific objective. In this presentation, we focus on the technical aspects associated with STIS-R.

  15. Experimental Study of an Advanced Concept of Moderate-resolution Holographic Spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muslimov, Eduard; Valyavin, Gennady; Fabrika, Sergei; Musaev, Faig; Galazutdinov, Gazinur; Pavlycheva, Nadezhda; Emelianov, Eduard

    2018-07-01

    We present the results of an experimental study of an advanced moderate-resolution spectrograph based on a cascade of narrow-band holographic gratings. The main goal of the project is to achieve a moderately high spectral resolution with R up to 5000 simultaneously in the 4300–6800 Å visible spectral range on a single standard CCD, together with an increased throughput. The experimental study consisted of (1) resolution and image quality tests performed using the solar spectrum, and (2) a total throughput test performed for a number of wavelengths using a calibrated lab monochromator. The measured spectral resolving power reaches values over R > 4000 while the experimental throughput is as high as 55%, which agrees well with the modeling results. Comparing the obtained characteristics of the spectrograph under consideration with the best existing spectrographs, we conclude that the used concept can be considered as a very competitive and cheap alternative to the existing spectrographs of the given class. We propose several astrophysical applications for the instrument and discuss the prospect of creating its full-scale version.

  16. Optomechanical design concept for the Giant Magellan Telescope Multi-object Astronomical and Cosmological Spectrograph (GMACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Travis; Sauseda, Marcus; Beck, James; Schmidt, Luke; Cook, Erika; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Ribeiro, Rafael; Taylor, Keith; Jones, Damien; Froning, Cynthia; Pak, Soojong; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Papovich, Casey; Ji, Tae-Geun; Lee, Hye-In

    2016-08-01

    We describe a preliminary conceptual optomechanical design for GMACS, a wide-field, multi-object, moderate resolution optical spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). This paper describes the details of the GMACS optomechanical conceptual design, including the requirements and considerations leading to the design, mechanisms, optical mounts, and predicted flexure performance.

  17. Conceptual design for an AIUC multi-purpose spectrograph camera using DMD technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rukdee, S.; Bauer, F.; Drass, H.; Vanzi, L.; Jordan, A.; Barrientos, F.

    2017-02-01

    Current and upcoming massive astronomical surveys are expected to discover a torrent of objects, which need groundbased follow-up observations to characterize their nature. For transient objects in particular, rapid early and efficient spectroscopic identification is needed. In particular, a small-field Integral Field Unit (IFU) would mitigate traditional slit losses and acquisition time. To this end, we present the design of a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) multi-purpose spectrograph camera capable of running in several modes: traditional longslit, small-field patrol IFU, multi-object and full-field IFU mode via Hadamard spectra reconstruction. AIUC Optical multi-purpose CAMera (AIUCOCAM) is a low-resolution spectrograph camera of R 1,600 covering the spectral range of 0.45-0.85 μm. We employ a VPH grating as a disperser, which is removable to allow an imaging mode. This spectrograph is envisioned for use on a 1-2 m class telescope in Chile to take advantage of good site conditions. We present design decisions and challenges for a costeffective robotized spectrograph. The resulting instrument is remarkably versatile, capable of addressing a wide range of scientific topics.

  18. Highly ionized gas absorption in the disk and halo toward HD 167756 at 3.5 kilometers per second resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Cardelli, Jason A.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of interstellar Si IV, C IV, and N V absorption lines along the 4 kpc path to the inner Galaxy star HD 167756 at z = -0.85 kpc are presented. The spectra were obtained with the echelle mode of Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and have signal-to-noise ratios ranging from 23 to 38. The high resolution of the measurements full width at half maximum (FWHM = 3.5 km/s) results in fully resolved line profiles for the highly ionized gas absorption. The measurements provide information on the column density per unit velocity, N(v), as a function of velocity for Si IV, C IV, and N V. The C IV and N V profiles extend from -70 to +70 km/s, while the Si IV profiles extend from -40 to +70 km/s. The integrated logarithmic column densities are long N(Si IV) = 13.09 +/- 0.02, log N(C IV) = 13.83 +/- 0.02, and log N(N V) = 13.56 +/- 0.03. The N V profile is broad, asymmetric, and featureless, while the Si IV profile contains narrow absorption components near V(sub LSR) = -19, 0, +20, and +52 km/s with Doppler spread parameters, b about = 10-12 km/s. The C IV profile contains both broad and narrow structure. The high ion feature near +52 km/s is also detected in the low-ionization lines of Ca II, O I, Si II, and Fe II. The other narrow Si IV and C IV components occur within several km/s of components seen in low-ionization species. The sight line contains at least two types of highly ionized gas. One type gives rise to a broad N V profile, and the other results in the more structured Si IV profile. The C IV profile contains contributions from both types of highly ionized gas. The broad but asymmetric N V profile is well represented by a large Galactic scale height gas which is participating in Galactic rotation and has a combination of thermal and turbulent broadening with b(sub tot) about = 42 km/s. The C IV to N V abundance ratio of 1.0 +/- 0.3 for the gas implies T about 1.6 x 10(exp 5) K or about 8 x 10

  19. Observations of Lunar Exospheric Helium with LAMP UV Spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, Cesare; Hurley, Dana M.; Retherford, Kurt D.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Feldman, Paul D.; Pryor, Wayne R.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Mandt, Kathleen E.

    2017-04-01

    Helium was one of the first elements discovered in the lunar exosphere, being detected by the mass spectrometer LACE (Lunar Atmosphere Composition Experiment) deployed at the lunar surface during the Apollo 17 mission. Most of it comes from neutralization of solar wind alpha particles impinging on the lunar surface, but there is increasing evidence that a non-negligible fraction of it diffuses from the interior of the Moon, as a result of radioactive decay of thorium and uranium. Therefore, pinpointing the amount of endogenic helium can constrain the abundance of these two elements in the crust, with implication for the formation of the Moon. The Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) far-UV spectrograph onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) carried out an atmospheric campaign to study the lunar exospheric helium. The spacecraft was pitched along the direction of motion to look through a longer illuminated column of gas, compared to the usual nadir-looking mode, and therefore enhancing the brightness of the emission line at 58.4 nm of helium atoms resonantly scattering solar photons. The lines of sight of the observations spanned a variety of local times, latitudes, longitudes, and altitudes, allowing us to reconstruct the temporal and spatial distribution of helium and its radial density profile with the help of an exospheric model. Moreover, correlating the helium density inferred by LAMP with the flux of solar wind alpha particles (the main source of lunar helium) measured from the twin ARTEMIS spacecraft, it is possible to constrain the amount of helium which comes from the interior of the Moon via outgassing. While most of the observations can be explained by the exospheric model, we have found discrepancies between the model and LAMP observations, with the former underestimating the latter, especially at northern selenographic latitudes, when LRO altitude is maximum. Such discrepancies suggest that the vertical distribution of helium differs from a

  20. Deriving Atmospheric Properties and Escape Rates from MAVEN's Imaging UV Spectrograph (IUVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.; IUVS Science Team

    2013-10-01

    MAVEN (Mars Volatile and Atmosphere EvolutioN) is a Mars Scout mission being readied for launch in November 2013. The key hardware and management partners are University of Colorado, Goddard Space Flight Center, University of California at Berkeley, Lockheed Martin, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. MAVEN carries a powerful suite of fields and particles instruments and a sophisticated remote sensing instrument, the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS). This presentation begins by describing IUVS' science goals, instrument design, operational approach and data analysis strategy. IUVS supports the top-level MAVEN science goals: measure the present state of the atmosphere, observe its response to varying solar stimuli, and use the information to estimate loss from Mars' atmosphere over time. The instrument operates at low spectral resolution spanning the FUV and MUV ranges in separate channels, and at high resolution around the hydrogen Lyman alpha line to measure the D/H ratio in the upper atmosphere. MAVEN carries the instrument on an Articulated Payload Platform which orients the instrument for optimal observations during four segments of its 4.5 hr elliptical orbit. During periapse passage, IUVS uses a scan mirror to obtain vertical profiles of emissions from the atmosphere and ionosphere. Around apoapse, the instrument builds up low-resolution images of the atmosphere at multiple wavelengths. In between, the instrument measures emissions from oxygen, hydrogen and deuterium in the corona. IUVS also undertakes day-long stellar occultation campaigns at 2 month intervals, to measure the state of the atmosphere at altitudes below the airglow layer and in situ sampling. All data will be pipeline-processed from line brightnesses to column abundances, local densities and global 3-D maps. The focus of the presentation is development of these automatic processing algorithms and the data products they will provide to the Mars community through the PDS Atmospheres Node

  1. Optical design of a versatile FIRST high-resolution near-IR spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bo; Ge, Jian

    2012-09-01

    We report the update optical design of a versatile FIRST high resolution near IR spectrograph, which is called Florida IR Silicon immersion grating spectromeTer (FIRST). This spectrograph uses cross-dispersed echelle design with white pupils and also takes advantage of the image slicing to increase the spectra resolution, while maintaining the instrument throughput. It is an extremely high dispersion R1.4 (blazed angle of 54.74°) silicon immersion grating with a 49 mm diameter pupil is used as the main disperser at 1.4μm -1.8μm to produce R=72,000 while an R4 echelle with the same pupil diameter produces R=60,000 at 0.8μm -1.35μm. Two cryogenic Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings are used as cross-dispersers to allow simultaneous wavelength coverage of 0.8μm -1.8μm. The butterfly mirrors and dichroic beamsplitters make a compact folding system to record these two wavelength bands with a 2kx2k H2RG array in a single exposure. By inserting a mirror before the grating disperser (the SIG and the echelle), this spectrograph becomes a very efficient integral field 3-D imaging spectrograph with R=2,000-4,000 at 0.8μm-1.8μm by coupling a 10x10 telescope fiber bundle with the spectrograph. Details about the optical design and performance are reported.

  2. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  3. Communication architecture system for fiber positioning of DESI spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaci, Karim; Glez-de-Rivera, Guillermo; Lopez-Colino, Fernando; Martinez-Garcia, M. Sofia; Masa, Jose L.; Garrido, Javier; Sanchez, Justo; Prada, Francisco

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a design proposal for controlling the five thousand fiber positioners within the focal plate of the DESI instrument. Each of these positioners is a robot which allows positioning its optic fiber with a resolution within the range of few microns. The high number and density of these robots poses a challenge for handling the communication from a central control device to each of these five thousand. Furthermore, an additional restriction applies as the required time to communicate to every robot of its position must be smaller than a second. Additionally. a low energy consumption profile is also desired. Both wireless and wired communication protocols have been evaluated, proposing single-technology-based architectures and hybrid ones (a combination of them). Among the wireless solutions, ZigBee and CyFi have been considered. Using simulation tools these wireless protocols have been discarded as they do not allow an efficient communication. The studied wired protocols comprise I2C, CAN and Ethernet. The best solution found is a hybrid multilayer architecture combining both Ethernet and I2C. A 100 Mbps Ethernet based network is used to communicate the central control unit with ten management boards. Each of these boards is a low-cost, low-power embedded device that manages a thirty six degrees sector of the sensing plate. Each of these boards receives the positioning data for five hundred robots and communicate with each one through a fast mode plus I2C bus. This proposal allows to communicate the positioning information for all five thousand robots in 350 ms total.

  4. A 21 Centimeter Absorber Identified with a Spiral Galaxy: Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph and Wide-Field Camera Observations of 3CR 196

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Ross D.; Beaver, E. A.; Diplas, Athanassios; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Lyons, Ronald W.

    1996-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of the quasar 3CR 196 (z(sub e) = 0.871), which has 21 cm and optical absorption at z(sub a) = 0.437. We observed the region of Ly alpha absorption in 3CR 196 at z(sub a) = 0.437 with the Faint Object Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. This region of the spectrum is complicated because of the presence of a Lyman limit and strong lines from a z(sub a) approx. z(sub e) system. We conclude that there is Ly alpha absorption with an H I column density greater than 2.7 x 10(exp 19) cm(exp -2) and most probably 1.5 x 10(exp 20) cm(exp -2). Based on the existence of the high H I column density along both the optical and radio lines of sight, separated by more than 15 kpc, we conclude that the Ly alpha absorption must arise in a system comparable in size to the gaseous disks of spiral galaxies. A barred spiral galaxy, previously reported as a diffuse object in the recent work of Boisse and Boulade, can be seen near the quasar in an image taken at 0.1 resolution with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the HST. If this galaxy is at the absorption redshift, the luminosity is approximately L(sub *) and any H I disk should extend in front of the optical quasar and radio lobes of 3CR 196, giving rise to both the Ly alpha and 21 cm absorption. In the z(sub a) approx. z(sub e) system we detect Lyman lines and the Lyman limit, as well as high ion absorption lines of C III, N V, S VI, and O VI. This absorption probably only partially covers the emission-line region. The ionization parameter is approximately 0.1. Conditions in this region may be similar to those in broad absorption line QSOs.

  5. An Integral-Field Spectrograph for a Terrestrial Planet Finding Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a conceptual design for an integral field spectrograph for characterizing exoplanets that we developed for NASA's Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C), although it is equally applicable to an external-occulter mission. The spectrograph fulfills all four scientific objectives of a terrestrial planet finding mission by: (1) Spectrally characterizing the atmospheres of detected planets in search of signatures of habitability or even biological activity; (2) Directly detecting terrestrial planets in the habitable zone around nearby stars; (3) Studying all constituents of a planetary system including terrestrial and giant planets, gas and dust around sun-like stars of different ages and metallicities; (4) Enabling simultaneous, high-spatial-resolution, spectroscopy of all astrophysical sources regardless of central source luminosity, such as AGN's, proplyds, etc.

  6. Sensitive far uv spectrograph with a multispectral element microchannel plate detector for rocket-borne astronomy.

    PubMed

    Weiser, H; Vitz, R C; Moos, H W; Weinstein, A

    1976-12-01

    An evacuated high transmission prism spectrograph using a microchannel plate detection system with resistive strip readout was flown behind a precision pointing telescope on a sounding rocket. The construction, preparation, flight performance, and calibration stability of the system are discussed. Despite the adverse environmental conditions associated with sounding rocket flights, the microchannel detector system performed well. Far uv spectra (1160-1750 A) of stellar and planetary objects were obtained; spectral features with fluxes as low as 0.06 photons cm(-2) sec(-1) were detectable. This was achieved by operating the plates at lower than normal gains, using sensitive pulse counting electronics with both upper and lower limit discriminators, and maintaining the spectrograph and detector at a pressure of ~10(-6) Torr until reaching altitude.

  7. Studying focal ratio degradation of optical fibers for Subaru's Prime Focus Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Jesulino Bispo; de Oliveira, Antonio Cesar; Gunn, James; de Oliveira, Ligia Souza; Vital de Arruda, Marcio; Castilho, Bruno; Gneiding, Clemens Darvin; Ribeiro, Flavio Felipe; Murray, Graham; Reiley, Daniel J.; Sodré Junior, Laerte; de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes

    2014-07-01

    Focal Ration Degradation (FRD) is a change in light's angular distribution caused by fiber optics. FRD is important to fiber-fed, spectroscopic astronomical systems because it can cause loss of signal, degradation in spectral resolution, or increased complexity in spectrograph design. Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA) has developed a system that can accurately and precisely measures FRD, using an absolute method that can also measure fiber throughput. This paper describes the metrology system and shows measurements of Polymicro's fiber FBP129168190, FBP127165190 and Fujikura fiber 128170190. Although the FRD of the two fibers are low and similar to one another, it is very important to know the exact characteristics of these fibers since both will be used in the construction of FOCCoS (Fiber Optical Cable and Connectors System) for PFS (Prime Focus Spectrograph) to be installed at the Subaru telescope.

  8. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope near-infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Giorgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.; Brambora, Clifford; Connelly, Joe; Derro, Rebecca; DiPirro, Michael J.; Doria-Warner, Christina; Ericsson, Aprille; Glazer, Stuart D.; Greene, Charles; Hall, Donald N.; Jacobson, Shane; Jakobsen, Peter; Johnson, Eric; Johnson, Scott D.; Krebs, Carolyn; Krebs, Danny J.; Lambros, Scott D.; Likins, Blake; Manthripragada, Sridhar; Martineau, Robert J.; Morse, Ernie C.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Mott, D. Brent; Muench, Theo; Park, Hongwoo; Parker, Susan; Polidan, Elizabeth J.; Rashford, Robert; Shakoorzadeh, Kamdin; Sharma, Rajeev; Strada, Paolo; Waczynski, Augustyn; Wen, Yiting; Wong, Selmer; Yagelowich, John; Zuray, Monica

    2004-10-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope"s primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted λco ~ 5 μm Rockwell HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  9. Detectors for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Figer, Donald F.; Regan, Michael W.; Boeker, Torsten; Garnett, James; Hill, Robert J.; Bagnasco, Georgio; Balleza, Jesus; Barney, Richard; Bergeron, Louis E.

    2004-01-01

    The Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) is the James Webb Space Telescope's primary near-infrared spectrograph. NASA is providing the NIRSpec detector subsystem, which consists of the focal plane array, focal plane electronics, cable harnesses, and software. The focal plane array comprises two closely-butted lambda (sub co) approximately 5 micrometer Rockwell HAWAII- 2RG sensor chip assemblies. After briefly describing the NIRSpec instrument, we summarize some of the driving requirements for the detector subsystem, discuss the baseline architecture (and alternatives), and presents some recent detector test results including a description of a newly identified noise component that we have found in some archival JWST test data. We dub this new noise component, which appears to be similar to classical two-state popcorn noise in many aspects, "popcorn mesa noise." We close with the current status of the detector subsystem development effort.

  10. PISCES High Contrast Integral Field Spectrograph Simulations and Data Reduction Pipeline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Llop Sayson, Jorge Domingo; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; McElwain, Michael W.; Gong, Qian; Perrin, Marshall; Brandt, Timothy; Grammer, Bryan; Greeley, Bradford; Hilton, George; Marx, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The PISCES (Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrograph (IFS) designed to advance the technology readiness of the WFIRST (Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope)-AFTA (Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets) high contrast Coronagraph Instrument. We present the end to end optical simulator and plans for the data reduction pipeline (DRP). The optical simulator was created with a combination of the IDL (Interactive Data Language)-based PROPER (optical propagation) library and Zemax (a MatLab script), while the data reduction pipeline is a modified version of the Gemini Planet Imager's (GPI) IDL pipeline. The simulations of the propagation of light through the instrument are based on Fourier transform algorithms. The DRP enables transformation of the PISCES IFS data to calibrated spectral data cubes.

  11. The Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS): optomechanical design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R. Elliot; Moon, Dae-Sik; Sivanandam, Suresh; Ma, Ke; Henderson, Chuck; Blank, Basil; Chou, Chueh-Yi; Jarvis, Miranda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-08-01

    We present the optomechanical design and development of the Wide Integral Field Infrared Spectrograph (WIFIS). WIFIS will provide an unrivalled integral field size of 20"×50" for a near-infrared (0.9-1.7 μm) integral-field spectrograph at the 2.3-meter Steward Bok telescope. Its main optomechanical system consists of two assemblies: a room-temperature bench housing the majority of the optical components and a cryostat for a field-flattening lens, thermal blocking filter, and detector. Two additional optical subsystems will provide calibration functionality, telescope guiding, and off-axis optical imaging. WIFIS will be a highly competitive instrument for seeing-limited astronomical investigations of the dynamics and chemistry of extended objects in the near-infrared wavebands. WIFIS is expected to be commissioned during the end of 2016 with scientific operations beginning in 2017.

  12. Rocket studies of solar corona and transition region. [X-Ray spectrometer/spectrograph telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. W.; Bruner, E. C., Jr.; Brown, W. A.; Nobles, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The XSST (X-Ray Spectrometer/Spectrograph Telescope) rocket payload launched by a Nike Boosted Black Brant was designed to provide high spectral resolution coronal soft X-ray line information on a spectrographic plate, as well as time resolved photo-electric records of pre-selected lines and spectral regions. This spectral data is obtained from a 1 x 10 arc second solar region defined by the paraboloidal telescope of the XSST. The transition region camera provided full disc images in selected spectral intervals originating in lower temperature zones than the emitting regions accessible to the XSST. A H-alpha camera system allowed referencing the measurements to the chromospheric temperatures and altitudes. Payload flight and recovery information is provided along with X-ray photoelectric and UV flight data, transition camera results and a summary of the anomalies encountered. Instrument mechanical stability and spectrometer pointing direction are also examined.

  13. EXPRES: a next generation RV spectrograph in the search for earth-like worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurgenson, C.; Fischer, D.; McCracken, T.; Sawyer, D.; Szymkowiak, A.; Davis, A.; Muller, G.; Santoro, F.

    2016-08-01

    The EXtreme PREcision Spectrograph (EXPRES) is an optical fiber fed echelle instrument being designed and built at the Yale Exoplanet Laboratory to be installed on the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope operated by Lowell Observatory. The primary science driver for EXPRES is to detect Earth-like worlds around Sun-like stars. With this in mind, we are designing the spectrograph to have an instrumental precision of 15 cm/s so that the on-sky measurement precision (that includes modeling for RV noise from the star) can reach to better than 30 cm/s. This goal places challenging requirements on every aspect of the instrument development, including optomechanical design, environmental control, image stabilization, wavelength calibration, and data analysis. In this paper we describe our error budget, and instrument optomechanical design.

  14. Variability in the vacuum-ultraviolet transmittance of magnesium fluoride windows. [for Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzig, Howard; Fleetwood, Charles M., Jr.; Toft, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Sample window materials tested during the development of a domed magnesium fluoride detector window for the Hubble Space Telescope's Imaging Spectrograph are noted to exhibit wide variability in VUV transmittance; a test program was accordingly instituted to maximize a prototype domed window's transmittance. It is found that VUV transmittance can be maximized if the boule from which the window is fashioned is sufficiently large to allow such a component to be cut from the purest available portion of the boule.

  15. Testing the Linearity of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph FUV Channel Thermal Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Mees B.; De Rosa, Gisella; Sahnow, David

    2018-05-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Cross Delay Line (FUV XDL) detector on the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) is subject to temperature-dependent distortions. The correction performed by the COS calibration pipeline (CalCOS) assumes that these changes are linear across the detector. In this report we evaluate the accuracy of the linear approximations using data obtained on orbit. Our results show that the thermal distortions are consistent with our current linear model.

  16. Current science requirements and planned implementation for the WFIRST-CGI Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Groff, Tyler D.; Gong, Qian; Rizzo, Maxime J.; Lupu, Roxana; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Saxena, Prabal; McElwain, Michael W.

    2017-09-01

    One of the key science goals of the Coronograph Instrument (CGI) on the WFIRST mission is to spectrally characterize the atmospheres of planets around other stars at extremely high contrast levels. To achieve this goal, the CGI instrument will include a integral field spectrograph (IFS) as one of the two science cameras. We present the current science requirements that pertain to the IFS design, describe how our design implementation flows from these requirements, and outline our current instrument design.

  17. Optical design concept for the Giant Magellan Telescope Multi-object Astronomical and Cosmological Spectrograph (GMACS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Luke M.; Ribeiro, Rafael; Taylor, Keith; Jones, Damien; Prochaska, Travis; DePoy, Darren L.; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Cook, Erika; Froning, Cynthia; Ji, Tae-Geun; Lee, Hye-In; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia; Pak, Soojong; Papovich, Casey

    2016-08-01

    We present a preliminary conceptual optical design for GMACS, a wide field, multi-object, optical spectrograph currently being developed for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). We include details of the optical design requirements derived from the instrument scientific and technical objectives and demonstrate how these requirements are met by the current design. Detector specifications, field acquisition/alignment optics, and optical considerations for the active flexure control system are also discussed.

  18. Spectroscopic classification of PS17chm with Double Spectrograph on Palomar 200-inch telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagorodnova, N.; Kupfer, T.; Burdge, K.; Kasliwal, M.; Adams, S.

    2017-04-01

    We report the classification of PS17chm, discovered by the by the Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (see Chambers et al. 2016, arXiv:1612.05560, and http://pswww.ifa.hawaii.edu ). The observations were performed on UT 2017-04-19 with the Double Spectrograph (DBSP; range 350-1000nm, spectral resolution R 4000) on Palomar 200-inch (P200) telescope.

  19. Designing the optimal semi-warm NIR spectrograph for SALT via detailed thermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, Marsha J.; Sheinis, Andrew I.; Mulligan, Mark P.; Wong, Jeffrey P.; Rogers, Allen

    2008-07-01

    The near infrared (NIR) upgrade to the Robert Stobie Spectrograph (RSS) on the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT), RSS/NIR, extends the spectral coverage of all modes of the optical spectrograph. The RSS/NIR is a low to medium resolution spectrograph with broadband, spectropolarimetric, and Fabry-Perot imaging capabilities. The optical and NIR arms can be used simultaneously to extend spectral coverage from 3200 Å to approximately 1.6 μm. Both arms utilize high efficiency volume phase holographic gratings via articulating gratings and cameras. The NIR camera incorporates a HAWAII-2RG detector with an Epps optical design consisting of 6 spherical elements and providing subpixel rms image sizes of 7.5 +/- 1.0 μm over all wavelengths and field angles. The NIR spectrograph is semi-warm, sharing a common slit plane and partial collimator with the optical arm. A pre-dewar, cooled to below ambient temperature, houses the final NIR collimator optic, the grating/Fabry-Perot etalon, the polarizing beam splitter, and the first three camera optics. The last three camera elements, blocking filters, and detector are housed in a cryogenically cooled dewar. The semi-warm design concept has long been proposed as an economical way to extend optical instruments into the NIR, however, success has been very limited. A major portion of our design effort entails a detailed thermal analysis using non-sequential ray tracing to interactively guide the mechanical design and determine a truly realizable long wavelength cutoff over which astronomical observations will be sky-limited. In this paper we describe our thermal analysis, design concepts for the staged cooling scheme, and results to be incorporated into the overall mechanical design and baffling.

  20. A Grazing Incidence Spectrograph as Applied to Vacuum Ultraviolet, Soft X-Ray, Pulsed Plasma Sources.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A 2.2-meter variable angle of incidence grazing incidence spectrograph is described for photographic recording of spectra down to 10A. Also a method for determining the absolute total fluence from a pulsed plasma source, knowing the absolute sensitivity of the instrument, is described. Spectra are presented from a low-inductance sliding spark gap and a 20-kj dense plasma focus . A program for spectram analysis is included. (Modified author abstract)

  1. Current Science Requirements and Planned Implementation for the WFIRST-CGI Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, Avi M.; Groff, Tyler D.; Gong, Qian; Rizzo, Maxime J.; Lupu, Roxana; Zimmerman, Neil T.; Saxena, Prabal; McElwain, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    One of the key science goals of the Coronograph Instrument (CGI) on the WFIRST mission is to spectrally characterize the atmospheres of planets around other stars at extremely high contrast levels. To achieve this goal, the CGI Instrument will include a integral field spectrograph (IFS) as one of the two science cameras. We present the current science requirements that pertain to the IFS design, describe how our design implementation flows from these requirements, and outline our current instrument design.

  2. Opto-mechanical design of an image slicer for the GRIS spectrograph at GREGOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega Reyes, N.; Esteves, M. A.; Sánchez-Capuchino, J.; Salaun, Y.; López, R. L.; Gracia, F.; Estrada Herrera, P.; Grivel, C.; Vaz Cedillo, J. J.; Collados, M.

    2016-07-01

    An image slicer has been proposed for the Integral Field Spectrograph [1] of the 4-m European Solar Telescope (EST) [2] The image slicer for EST is called MuSICa (Multi-Slit Image slicer based on collimator-Camera) [3] and it is a telecentric system with diffraction limited optical quality offering the possibility to obtain high resolution Integral Field Solar Spectroscopy or Spectro-polarimetry by coupling a polarimeter after the generated slit (or slits). Considering the technical complexity of the proposed Integral Field Unit (IFU), a prototype has been designed for the GRIS spectrograph at GREGOR telescope at Teide Observatory (Tenerife), composed by the optical elements of the image slicer itself, a scanning system (to cover a larger field of view with sequential adjacent measurements) and an appropriate re-imaging system. All these subsystems are placed in a bench, specially designed to facilitate their alignment, integration and verification, and their easy installation in front of the spectrograph. This communication describes the opto-mechanical solution adopted to upgrade GRIS while ensuring repeatability between the observational modes, IFU and long-slit. Results from several tests which have been performed to validate the opto-mechanical prototypes are also presented.

  3. The end-to-end simulator for the E-ELT HIRES high resolution spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genoni, M.; Landoni, M.; Riva, M.; Pariani, G.; Mason, E.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Disseau, K.; Di Varano, I.; Gonzalez, O.; Huke, P.; Korhonen, H.; Li Causi, Gianluca

    2017-06-01

    We present the design, architecture and results of the End-to-End simulator model of the high resolution spectrograph HIRES for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). This system can be used as a tool to characterize the spectrograph both by engineers and scientists. The model allows to simulate the behavior of photons starting from the scientific object (modeled bearing in mind the main science drivers) to the detector, considering also calibration light sources, and allowing to perform evaluation of the different parameters of the spectrograph design. In this paper, we will detail the architecture of the simulator and the computational model which are strongly characterized by modularity and flexibility that will be crucial in the next generation astronomical observation projects like E-ELT due to of the high complexity and long-time design and development. Finally, we present synthetic images obtained with the current version of the End-to-End simulator based on the E-ELT HIRES requirements (especially high radial velocity accuracy). Once ingested in the Data reduction Software (DRS), they will allow to verify that the instrument design can achieve the radial velocity accuracy needed by the HIRES science cases.

  4. Development of micro-mirror slicer integral field unit for space-borne solar spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suematsu, Yoshinori; Saito, Kosuke; Koyama, Masatsugu; Enokida, Yukiya; Okura, Yukinobu; Nakayasu, Tomoyasu; Sukegawa, Takashi

    2017-12-01

    We present an innovative optical design for image slicer integral field unit (IFU) and a manufacturing method that overcomes optical limitations of metallic mirrors. Our IFU consists of a micro-mirror slicer of 45 arrayed, highly narrow, flat metallic mirrors and a pseudo-pupil-mirror array of off-axis conic aspheres forming three pseudo slits of re-arranged slicer images. A prototype IFU demonstrates that the final optical quality is sufficiently high for a visible light spectrograph. Each slicer micro-mirror is 1.58 mm long and 30 μm wide with surface roughness ≤1 nm rms, and edge sharpness ≤ 0.1 μm, etc. This IFU is small size and can be implemented in a multi-slit spectrograph without any moving mechanism and fore optics, in which one slit is real and the others are pseudo slits from the IFU. The IFU mirrors were deposited by a space-qualified, protected silver coating for high reflectivity in visible and near IR wavelength regions. These properties are well suitable for space-borne spectrograph such as the future Japanese solar space mission SOLAR-C. We present the optical design, performance of prototype IFU, and space qualification tests of the silver coating.

  5. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: overview of innovative science programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Shelley A.; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Do, Tuan; Simard, Luc; Adamkovics, Maté; Armus, Lee; Barth, Aaron J.; Barton, Elizabeth; Boyce, Hope; Cooke, Jeffrey; Cote, Patrick; Davidge, Timothy; Ellerbroek, Brent; Ghez, Andrea M.; Liu, Michael C.; Lu, Jessica R.; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Mao, Shude; Marois, Christian; Schoeck, Matthias; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tan, Jonathan C.; Treu, Tommaso; Wang, Lianqi; Weiss, Jason

    2014-07-01

    IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is a first light near-infrared diffraction limited imager and integral field spectrograph being designed for the future Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is optimized to perform astronomical studies across a significant fraction of cosmic time, from our Solar System to distant newly formed galaxies (Barton et al. [1]). We present a selection of the innovative science cases that are unique to IRIS in the era of upcoming space and ground-based telescopes. We focus on integral field spectroscopy of directly imaged exoplanet atmospheres, probing fundamental physics in the Galactic Center, measuring 104 to 1010 M supermassive black hole masses, resolved spectroscopy of young star-forming galaxies (1 < z < 5) and first light galaxies (6 < z < 12), and resolved spectroscopy of strong gravitational lensed sources to measure dark matter substructure. For each of these science cases we use the IRIS simulator (Wright et al. [2], Do et al. [3]) to explore IRIS capabilities. To highlight the unique IRIS capabilities, we also update the point and resolved source sensitivities for the integral field spectrograph (IFS) in all five broadband filters (Z, Y, J, H, K) for the finest spatial scale of 0.004" per spaxel. We briefly discuss future development plans for the data reduction pipeline and quicklook software for the IRIS instrument suite.

  6. Ultraviolet micro-Raman spectrograph for the detection of small numbers of bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, S.; Nelson, W. H.; Sperry, J. F.

    1993-11-01

    The construction of a practical UV micro-Raman spectrograph capable of selective excitation of bacterial cells and other microscopic samples has been described. A reflective objective is used to focus cw laser light on a sample and at the same time collect the scattered light at 180°. With the aid of a quartz lens the image produced is focused on the slits of a spectrograph equipped with a single 2400 grooves/mm grating optimized for 250 nm. Spectra were detected by means of a blue-intensified diode array detector. Resonance Raman spectra of Bacillus subtilis and Flavobacterium capsulatum excited by the 257.2 nm output of a cw laser were recorded in the 900-1800 cm-1 region. Bacterial cells were immobilized on a quartz plate by means of polylysine and were counted visually. Cooling was required to retard sample degradation. Sample sizes ranged from 1 to 50 cells with excitation times varying from 15 to 180 s. Excellent spectra have been obtained from 20 cells in 15 s using a spectrograph having only 3% throughput.

  7. Mass production of volume phase holographic gratings for the VIRUS spectrograph array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chonis, Taylor S.; Frantz, Amy; Hill, Gary J.; Clemens, J. Christopher; Lee, Hanshin; Tuttle, Sarah E.; Adams, Joshua J.; Marshall, J. L.; DePoy, D. L.; Prochaska, Travis

    2014-07-01

    The Visible Integral-field Replicable Unit Spectrograph (VIRUS) is a baseline array of 150 copies of a simple, fiber-fed integral field spectrograph that will be deployed on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). VIRUS is the first optical astronomical instrument to be replicated on an industrial scale, and represents a relatively inexpensive solution for carrying out large-area spectroscopic surveys, such as the HET Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). Each spectrograph contains a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating with a 138 mm diameter clear aperture as its dispersing element. The instrument utilizes the grating in first-order for 350 < λ (nm) < 550. Including witness samples, a suite of 170 VPH gratings has been mass produced for VIRUS. Here, we present the design of the VIRUS VPH gratings and a discussion of their mass production. We additionally present the design and functionality of a custom apparatus that has been used to rapidly test the first-order diffraction efficiency of the gratings for various discrete wavelengths within the VIRUS spectral range. This device has been used to perform both in-situ tests to monitor the effects of adjustments to the production prescription as well as to carry out the final acceptance tests of the gratings' diffraction efficiency. Finally, we present the as-built performance results for the entire suite of VPH gratings.

  8. Using confidence intervals to evaluate the focus alignment of spectrograph detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Travis W; Hawkins, Kyle S; Damento, Michael

    2017-06-20

    High-resolution spectrographs extract detailed spectral information of a sample and are frequently used in astronomy, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. These instruments employ dispersive elements such as prisms and diffraction gratings to spatially separate different wavelengths of light, which are then detected by a charge-coupled device (CCD) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) detector array. Precise alignment along the optical axis (focus position) of the detector array is critical to maximize the instrumental resolution; however, traditional approaches of scanning the detector through focus lack a quantitative measure of precision, limiting the repeatability and relying on one's experience. Here we propose a method to evaluate the focus alignment of spectrograph detector arrays by establishing confidence intervals to measure the alignment precision. We show that propagation of uncertainty can be used to estimate the variance in an alignment, thus providing a quantitative and repeatable means to evaluate the precision and confidence of an alignment. We test the approach by aligning the detector array of a prototype miniature echelle spectrograph. The results indicate that the procedure effectively quantifies alignment precision, enabling one to objectively determine when an alignment has reached an acceptable level. This quantitative approach also provides a foundation for further optimization, including automated alignment. Furthermore, the procedure introduced here can be extended to other alignment techniques that rely on numerically fitting data to a model, providing a general framework for evaluating the precision of alignment methods.

  9. [Design and analysis of a novel light visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system].

    PubMed

    Shen, Man-de; Li, Fei; Zhou, Li-bing; Li, Cheng; Ren, Huan-huan; Jiang, Qing-xiu

    2015-02-01

    A novel visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system was proposed based on the negative dispersion, the arbitrary phase modulation characteristics of diffractive optical element and the aberration correction characteristics of freeform optical element. The double agglutination lens was substituted by a hybrid refractive/diffractive lens based on the negative dispersion of diffractive optical element. Two freeform optical elements were used in order to correct some aberration based on the aberration correction characteristics of freeform optical element. An example and frondose design process were presented. When the design parameters were uniform, compared with the traditional system, the novel visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system's weight was reduced by 22.9%, the total length was reduced by 26.6%, the maximal diameter was reduced by 30.6%, and the modulation transfer function (MTF) in 1.0 field-of-view was improved by 0.35 with field-of-view improved maximally. The maximal distortion was reduced by 1.6%, the maximal longitudinal aberration was reduced by 56.4%, and the lateral color aberration was reduced by 59. 3%. From these data, we know that the performance of the novel system was advanced quickly and it could be used to put forward a new idea for modern visible spectrum imaging spectrograph optical system design.

  10. Laboratory Testing and Performance Verification of the CHARIS Integral Field Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groff, Tyler D.; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Galvin, Michael; Loomis, Craig; Carr, Michael A.; Brandt, Timothy; Knapp, Gillian; Limbach, Mary Anne; Guyon, Olivier; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an integral field spectrograph (IFS) that has been built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS has two imaging modes; the high-resolution mode is R82, R69, and R82 in J, H, and K bands respectively while the low-resolution discovery mode uses a second low-resolution prism with R19 spanning 1.15-2.37 microns (J+H+K bands). The discovery mode is meant to augment the low inner working angle of the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) adaptive optics system, which feeds CHARIS a coronagraphic image. The goal is to detect and characterize brown dwarfs and hot Jovian planets down to contrasts five orders of magnitude dimmer than their parent star at an inner working angle as low as 80 milliarcseconds. CHARIS constrains spectral crosstalk through several key aspects of the optical design. Additionally, the repeatability of alignment of certain optical components is critical to the calibrations required for the data pipeline. Specifically the relative alignment of the lens let array, prism, and detector must be highly stable and repeatable between imaging modes. We report on the measured repeatability and stability of these mechanisms, measurements of spectral crosstalk in the instrument, and the propagation of these errors through the data pipeline. Another key design feature of CHARIS is the prism, which pairs Barium Fluoride with Ohara L-BBH2 high index glass. The dispersion of the prism is significantly more uniform than other glass choices, and the CHARIS prisms represent the first NIR astronomical instrument that uses L-BBH2as the high index material. This material choice was key to the utility of the discovery mode, so significant efforts were put into cryogenic characterization of the material. The final performance of the prism assemblies in their operating environment is described in detail. The spectrograph is going through final alignment, cryogenic cycling, and is being

  11. NIRPS: an adaptive-optics assisted radial velocity spectrograph to chase exoplanets around M-stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildi, F.; Blind, N.; Reshetov, V.; Hernandez, O.; Genolet, L.; Conod, U.; Sordet, M.; Segovilla, A.; Rasilla, J. L.; Brousseau, D.; Thibault, S.; Delabre, B.; Bandy, T.; Sarajlic, M.; Cabral, A.; Bovay, S.; Vallée, Ph.; Bouchy, F.; Doyon, R.; Artigau, E.; Pepe, F.; Hagelberg, J.; Melo, C.; Delfosse, X.; Figueira, P.; Santos, N. C.; González Hernández, J. I.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Rebolo, R.; Broeg, Ch.; Benz, W.; Boisse, I.; Malo, L.; Käufl, U.; Saddlemyer, L.

    2017-09-01

    Since 1st light in 2002, HARPS has been setting the standard in the exo-planet detection by radial velocity (RV) measurements[1]. Based on this experience, our consortium is developing a high accuracy near-infrared RV spectrograph covering YJH bands to detect and characterize low-mass planets in the habitable zone of M dwarfs. It will allow RV measurements at the 1-m/s level and will look for habitable planets around M- type stars by following up the candidates found by the upcoming space missions TESS, CHEOPS and later PLATO. NIRPS and HARPS, working simultaneously on the ESO 3.6m are bound to become a single powerful high-resolution, high-fidelity spectrograph covering from 0.4 to 1.8 micron. NIRPS will complement HARPS in validating earth-like planets found around G and K-type stars whose signal is at the same order of magnitude than the stellar noise. Because at equal resolving power the overall dimensions of a spectrograph vary linearly with the input beam étendue, spectrograph designed for seeing-limited observations are large and expensive. NIRPS will use a high order adaptive optics system to couple the starlight into a fiber corresponding to 0.4" on the sky as efficiently or better than HARPS or ESPRESSO couple the light 0.9" fiber. This allows the spectrograph to be very compact, more thermally stable and less costly. Using a custom tan(θ)=4 dispersion grating in combination with a start-of-the-art Hawaii4RG detector makes NIRPS very efficient with complete coverage of the YJH bands at 110'000 resolution. NIRPS works in a regime that is in-between the usual multi-mode (MM) where 1000's of modes propagates in the fiber and the single mode well suited for perfect optical systems. This regime called few-modes regime is prone to modal noise- Results from a significant R and D effort made to characterize and circumvent the modal noise show that this contribution to the performance budget shall not preclude the RV performance to be achieved.

  12. A survey of TiOλ567 nm absorption in solar-type stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, Fatemeh; Mirtorabi, Mohammad Taghi

    2018-04-01

    Molecular absorption bands are estimators of stellar activity and spot cycles on magnetically active stars. We have previously introduced a new colour index that compares absorption strength of the titanium oxide (TiO) at 567 nm with nearby continuum. In this paper, we implement this index to measure long-term activity variations and the statistical properties of the index in a sample of 302 solar-type stars from the High Accuracy Radial Velocity Planet search Spectrograph planet search programme. The results indicate a pattern of change in star's activity, covers a range of periods from 2 yr up to 17 yr.

  13. Cosmic Origins Spectrograph Observations of Warm Intervening Gas at z ~ 0.325 toward 3C 263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Anand; Savage, Blair D.; Wakker, Bart P.

    2012-06-01

    We present HST/COS high-S/N observations of the z = 0.32566 multiphase absorber toward 3C 263. The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) data show absorption from H I (Lyα to Lyθ), O VI, C III, N III, Si III, and C II. The Ne VIII in this absorber is detected in the FUSE spectrum along with O III, O IV, and N IV. The low and intermediate ions are kinematically aligned with each other and H I and display narrow line widths of b ~ 6-8 km s-1. The O VI λλ1031, 1037 lines are kinematically offset by Δv ~ 12 km s-1 from the low ions and are a factor of ~4 broader. All metal ions except O VI and Ne VIII are consistent with an origin in gas photoionized by the extragalactic background radiation. The bulk of the observed H I is also traced by this photoionized medium. The metallicity in this gas phase is Z >~ 0.15 Z ⊙ with carbon having near-solar abundances. The O VI and Ne VIII favor an origin in collisionally ionized gas at T = 5.2 × 105 K. The H I absorption associated with this warm absorber is a broad-Lyα absorber (BLA) marginally detected in the COS spectrum. This warm gas phase has a metallicity of [X/H] ~-0.12 dex, and a total hydrogen column density of N( H) ~ 3 × 1019 cm-2, which is ~2 dex higher than what is traced by the photoionized gas. Simultaneous detection of O VI, Ne VIII, and BLAs in an absorber can be a strong diagnostic of gas with T ~ 105-106 K corresponding to the warm phase of the warm-hot intergalactic medium or shock-heated gas in the extended halos of galaxies. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 05-26555, and the NASA-CNES/ESA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer mission, operated by the Johns Hopkins University, supported by NASA contract NAS 05-32985.

  14. Searching for Variability of NV Intrinsic Narrow Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Charlton, Jane; Ganguly, Rajib

    2018-01-01

    The majority of quasar absorption line systems with NV detected are found within the associated region (within 5000 km/s of the quasar redshift) and many/most are believed to be related to the quasar accretion disk wind or outflows. The most definite evidence that these NV absorbers are "intrinsic" is partial covering of the quasar continuum source and/or broad line region. Over 75 quasars containing NV narrow absorption lines have observations obtained at different times with the Keck/HIRES and the VLT/UVES spectrographs at high resolution. The interval between these observations range from months to a decade in the quasar rest frame. While variability is common for intrinsic broad and mini-broad absorption lines, intrinsic narrow absorption lines have been found to be less likely to vary, though systematic studies with large, high quality datasets have been limited. The variability timescales are useful for deriving gas densities and thus the distances from the central engines. This is important in mapping the quasar surroundings, understanding the accretion disk wind mechanism, and assessing the effect the wind has on the galaxy surroundings. We report on the results of a systematic study of variability of NV NALs, exploiting the overlap of targets for observations in the archives of Keck and VLT, and discuss the consequences for interpretation of the origin of intrinsic narrow absorption lines.

  15. Broad Balmer-Line Absorption in SDSS J172341.10+555340.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kentaro

    2010-10-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer-line absorption from Hα to H9 in an iron low-ionizaton broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar, SDSS J172341.10+555340.5, by near-infrared spectroscopy with the Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO) attached to the Subaru Telescope. The redshift of the Balmer-line absorption troughs is 2.0530±0.0003, and it is blueshifted by 5370 km s-1 from the Balmer emission lines. It is more than 4000 km s-1 blueshifted from the previously known UV absorption lines. We detected relatively strong (EWrest = 20 Å) [OIII] emission lines that are similar to those found in other broad absorption line quasars with Balmer-line absorption. We also derived the column density of neutral hydrogen of 5.2 × 1017 cm-2 by using the curve of growth and taking account of Lyα trapping. We searched for UV absorption lines that had the same redshift with Balmer-line absorption, and found Ali III and Fe III absorption lines at z = 2.053 that correspond to previously unidentified absorption lines, and the presence of other blended troughs that were difficult to identify.

  16. Performance results from in-flight commissioning of the Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greathouse, T. K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Walther, B. C.; Winters, G. S.; Persyn, S. C.; Eterno, J. S.

    2013-09-01

    We present a description of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS) and results from its in-flight commissioning performed between December 5th and 13th 2011 and its first periodic maintenance between October 10th and 12th 2012. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. However, unlike the other Alice spectrographs, Juno-UVS sits aboard a spin stabilized spacecraft. The Juno-UVS scan mirror allows for pointing of the slit approximately +/-30° from the spacecraft spin plane. This ability gives Juno-UVS access to half the sky at any given spacecraft orientation. The planned 2 rpm spin rate for the primary mission results in integration times per 0.2° spatial resolution element per spin of only ~17 ms. Thus, for calibration purposes, data were retrieved from many spins and then remapped and co-added to build up exposure times on bright stars to measure the effective area, spatial resolution, scan mirror pointing positions, etc. The primary job of Juno-UVS will be to characterize Jupiter's UV auroral emissions and relate them to in-situ particle measurements. The ability to point the slit will make operations more flexible, allowing Juno-UVS to observe the atmospheric footprints of magnetic field lines through which Juno flies, giving a direct connection between energetic particle measurements on the spacecraft and the far-ultraviolet emissions produced by Jupiter's atmosphere in response to those particles.

  17. Performance Results from In-Flight Commissioning of the Juno Ultraviolet Spectrograph (Juno-UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greathouse, Thomas K.; Gladstone, G. R.; Davis, M. W.; Slater, D. C.; Versteeg, M. H.; Persson, K. B.; Winters, G. S.; Persyn, S. C.; Eterno, J. S.

    2012-10-01

    We present a description of the Juno ultraviolet spectrograph (Juno-UVS), results from the successful in-flight commissioning performed between December 5th and 13th 2011, and some predictions of future Jupiter observations. Juno-UVS is a modest power (9.0 W) ultraviolet spectrograph based on the Alice instruments now in flight aboard the European Space Agency’s Rosetta spacecraft, NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, and the LAMP instrument aboard NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. However, unlike the other Alice spectrographs, Juno-UVS sits aboard a rotationally stabilized spacecraft. The planned 2 rpm rotation rate for the primary mission results in integration times per spatial resolution element per spin of only 17 ms. Thus, data was retrieved from many spins and then remapped and co-added to build up integration times on bright stars to measure the effective area, spatial resolution, map out scan mirror pointing positions, etc. The Juno-UVS scan mirror allows for pointing of the slit approximately ±30° from the spacecraft spin plane. This ability gives Juno-UVS access to half the sky at any given spacecraft orientation. We will describe our process for solving for the pointing of the scan mirror relative to the Juno spacecraft and present our initial half sky survey of UV bright stars complete with constellation overlays. The primary job of Juno-UVS will be to characterize Jupiter’s UV auroral emissions and relate them to in situ particle measurements. The ability to point the slit will facilitate these measurements, allowing Juno-UVS to observe the surface positions of magnetic field lines Juno is flying through giving a direct connection between the particle measurements on the spacecraft to the observed reaction of Jupiter’s atmosphere to those particles. Finally, we will describe planned observations to be made during Earth flyby in October 2013 that will complete the in-flight characterization.

  18. An All-reflective Integral Field Spectrograph for Far Ultraviolet Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Stephen; Ebbets, D.; Hardesty, C.; Sembach, K.; Beasley, M.; Woodgate, B.

    2010-01-01

    This paper overviews the supporting optical technologies for an ultraviolet integral field spectrograph (IFS) that will be used for future space astrophysics missions. The new technology is an all-reflective image slicer that directs light to an array of imaging diffraction gratings. Previous UV instruments recorded the spectra of point sources or spatially resolved elements along a long slit. Our IFS has only one reflection more than the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph for Hubble Space Telescope, which is the most sensitive UV spectrograph yet built, but is limited to point sources. An efficient UV IFS enables simultaneous spectroscopy of many spatially resolved elements within a contiguous two dimensional field of view in diagnostically important ultraviolet lines. The output is thus a data cube having one spectral and two spatial coordinates. This is the astrophysical analog to hyperspectral imaging in Earth sciences. The scientific benefits of such an instrument were developed during Vision Missions, Origins Probes, and Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept Studies between 2004 and 2009. Implementation can be scaled for a small payload such as a sounding rocket or Explorer-class mission, leading to a flight experiment within the next few years. Of particular interest would be the application of this technology for an instrument on a version of the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) which will have an 8+-m aperture. We will focus on the spectral region near Lyman alpha, but the all-reflective approach is applicable to other spectral regions when matched with wavelength appropriate gratings and detectors. Our project is a collaboration between Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., the University of Colorado, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Space Telescope Science Institute, all of which have extensive experience with the science and instrumentation for UV astrophysics.

  19. CARMENES-NIR channel spectrograph cooling system AIV: thermo-mechanical performance of the instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerril, S.; Mirabet, E.; Lizon, J. L.; Abril, M.; Cárdenas, C.; Ferro, I.; Morales, R.; Pérez, D.; Ramón, A.; Sánchez-Carrasco, M. A.; Quirrenbach, A.; Amado, P.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Seifert, W.; Herranz, J.

    2016-07-01

    CARMENES is the new high-resolution high-stability spectrograph built for the 3.5m telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory (CAHA, Almería, Spain) by a consortium formed by German and Spanish institutions. This instrument is composed by two separated spectrographs: VIS channel (550-1050 nm) and NIR channel (950- 1700 nm). The NIR-channel spectrograph's responsible is the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAACSIC). It has been manufactured, assembled, integrated and verified in the last two years, delivered in fall 2015 and commissioned in December 2015. One of the most challenging systems in this cryogenic channel involves the Cooling System. Due to the highly demanding requirements applicable in terms of stability, this system arises as one of the core systems to provide outstanding stability to the channel. Really at the edge of the state-of-the-art, the Cooling System is able to provide to the cold mass ( 1 Ton) better thermal stability than few hundredths of degree within 24 hours (goal: 0.01K/day). The present paper describes the Assembly, Integration and Verification phase (AIV) of the CARMENES-NIR channel Cooling System implemented at IAA-CSIC and later installation at CAHA 3.5m Telescope, thus the most relevant highlights being shown in terms of thermal performance. The CARMENES NIR-channel Cooling System has been implemented by the IAA-CSIC through very fruitful collaboration and involvement of the ESO (European Southern Observatory) cryo-vacuum department with Jean-Louis Lizon as its head and main collaborator. The present work sets an important trend in terms of cryogenic systems for future E-ELT (European Extremely Large Telescope) large-dimensioned instrumentation in astrophysics.

  20. The SLICE, CHESS, and SISTINE Ultraviolet Spectrographs: Rocket-Borne Instrumentation Supporting Future Astrophysics Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Hoadley, Keri; Fleming, Brian T.; Kane, Robert; Nell, Nicholas; Beasley, Matthew; Green, James C.

    2016-03-01

    NASA’s suborbital program provides an opportunity to conduct unique science experiments above Earth’s atmosphere and is a pipeline for the technology and personnel essential to future space astrophysics, heliophysics, and atmospheric science missions. In this paper, we describe three astronomy payloads developed (or in development) by the Ultraviolet Rocket Group at the University of Colorado. These far-ultraviolet (UV) (100-160nm) spectrographic instruments are used to study a range of scientific topics, from gas in the interstellar medium (accessing diagnostics of material spanning five orders of magnitude in temperature in a single observation) to the energetic radiation environment of nearby exoplanetary systems. The three instruments, Suborbital Local Interstellar Cloud Experiment (SLICE), Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS), and Suborbital Imaging Spectrograph for Transition region Irradiance from Nearby Exoplanet host stars (SISTINE) form a progression of instrument designs and component-level technology maturation. SLICE is a pathfinder instrument for the development of new data handling, storage, and telemetry techniques. CHESS and SISTINE are testbeds for technology and instrument design enabling high-resolution (R>105) point source spectroscopy and high throughput imaging spectroscopy, respectively, in support of future Explorer, Probe, and Flagship-class missions. The CHESS and SISTINE payloads support the development and flight testing of large-format photon-counting detectors and advanced optical coatings: NASA’s top two technology priorities for enabling a future flagship observatory (e.g. the LUVOIR Surveyor concept) that offers factors of ˜50-100 gain in UV spectroscopy capability over the Hubble Space Telescope. We present the design, component level laboratory characterization, and flight results for these instruments.

  1. MOSAIC: A Multi-Object Spectrograph for the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelz, A.; Hammer, F.; Jagourel, P.; MOSAIC Consortium

    2016-10-01

    The instrumentation plan for the European Extremely Large Telescope foresees a Multi-Object Spectrograph (E-ELT MOS). The MOSAIC project is proposed by a European-Brazilian consortium, to provide a unique MOS facility for astrophysics, studies of the inter-galactic medium and for cosmology. The science cases range from spectroscopy of the most distant galaxies, mass assembly and evolution of galaxies, via resolved stellar populations and galactic archaeology, to planet formation studies. A further strong driver is spectroscopic follow-up observations of targets that will be discovered with the James Webb Space Telescope.

  2. WUVS simulator: detectability of spectral lines with the WSO-UV spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcos-Arenal, Pablo; de Castro, Ana I. Gómez; Abarca, Belén Perea; Sachkov, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    The World Space Observatory Ultraviolet telescope is equipped with high dispersion (55,000) spectrographs working in the 1150 to 3100 Å spectral range. To evaluate the impact of the design on the scientific objectives of the mission, a simulation software tool has been developed. This simulator builds on the development made for the PLATO space mission and it is designed to generate synthetic time-series of images by including models of all important noise sources. We describe its design and performance. Moreover, its application to the detectability of important spectral features for star formation and exoplanetary research is addressed.

  3. PEPSI, the High-Resolution Optical-IR Spectrograph for the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Michael; Strassmeier, Klaus; Hoffman, Axel; Woche, Manfred; Spano, Paolo

    PEPSI is a high resolution fibre feed optical-IR polarimetric echelle spectrograph for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). PEPSI utilizes the two 8.4m LBT apertures to simultaneously record four polarization states at a resolution of 120.000. The extension of the coverage towards the IR is mainly motivated by the larger Zeeman splitting of IR lines, which would allow to study weaker/fainter magnetic structures on stars. The two optical arms, which also have an integral light mode with R up to 300.000, are under construction, while the IR arm is being designed.

  4. Performance, results, and prospects of the visible spectrograph VEGA on CHARA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourard, Denis; Challouf, Mounir; Ligi, Roxanne; Bério, Philippe; Clausse, Jean-Michel; Gerakis, Jérôme; Bourges, Laurent; Nardetto, Nicolas; Perraut, Karine; Tallon-Bosc, Isabelle; McAlister, H.; ten Brummelaar, T.; Ridgway, S.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Turner, N.; Farrington, C.; Goldfinger, P. J.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we review the current performance of the VEGA/CHARA visible spectrograph and make a review of the most recent astrophysical results. The science programs take benefit of the exceptional angular resolution, the unique spectral resolution and one of the main features of CHARA: Infrared and Visible parallel operation. We also discuss recent developments concerning the tools for the preparation of observations and important features of the data reduction software. A short discussion of the future developments will complete the presentation, directed towards new detectors and possible new beam combination scheme for improved sensitivity and imaging capabilities.

  5. Autonomous spectrographic system to analyse the main elements of fireballs and meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espartero, Francisco Ángel; Martínez, Germán; Frías, Marta; Montes Moya, Francisco Simón; Castro-Tirado, Alberto Javier

    2018-01-01

    We present a meteor observation system based on imaging CCD cameras, wide-field optics and a diffraction grating. This system is composed of two independent spectrographs with different configurations, which allows us to capture images of fireballs and meteors with several fields of view and sensitivities. The complete set forms a small autonomous observatory, comprised of a sealed box with a sliding roof, weather station and computers for data storing and reduction. Since 2014, several meteors have been studied using this facility, such as the Alcalá la Real fireball recorded on 30 September 2016.

  6. Detector Arrays for the James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Alexander, David; Brambora, Clifford K.; Derro, Rebecca; Engler, Chuck; Fox, Ori; Garrison, Matthew B.; Henegar, Greg; Hill, robert J.; Johnson, Thomas; hide

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope's (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) incorporates two 5 micron cutoff (lambda(sub co) = 5 microns) 2048x2048 pixel Teledyne HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG sensor chip assemblies. These detector arrays, and the two Teledyne SIDECAR application specific integrated circuits that control them, are operated in space at T approx. 37 K. In this article, we provide a brief introduction to NIRSpec, its detector subsystem (DS), detector readout in the space radiation environment, and present a snapshot of the developmental status of the NIRSpec DS as integration and testing of the engineering test unit begins.

  7. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of shock-heated carbon dioxide and water between 900 and 3050 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, C.; Koch, J. D.; Davidson, D. F.; Jeffries, J. B.; Hanson, R. K.

    2002-03-01

    Spectrally resolved UV absorption cross-sections between 190 and 320 nm were measured in shock-heated CO 2 between 880 and 3050 K and H 2O between 1230 and 2860 K. Absorption spectra were acquired with 10 μs time resolution using a unique kinetic spectrograph, thereby enabling comparisons with time-dependent chemical kinetic modeling of post-shock thermal decomposition and chemical reactions. Although room temperature CO 2 is transparent (σ<10 -22 cm2) at wavelengths longer than 200 nm, hot CO 2 has significant absorption (σ>10 -20 cm2) extending to wavelengths longer than 300 nm. The temperature dependence of CO 2 absorption strongly suggests sharply increased transition probabilities from excited vibrational levels.

  8. Discovery of Hα Absorption in the Unusual Broad Absorption Line Quasar SDSS J083942.11+380526.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kentaro; Iwata, Ikuru; Ohta, Kouji; Ando, Masataka; Akiyama, Masayuki; Tamura, Naoyuki

    2006-11-01

    We discovered Hα absorption in the broad Hα emission line of an unusual broad absorption line quasar, SDSS J083942.11+380526.3, at z=2.318, through near-infrared spectroscopy with the Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO) on the Subaru telescope. The presence of nonstellar Hα absorption is known only in the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 to date; thus, our discovery is the first case for quasars. The Hα absorption line is blueshifted by 520 km s-1 relative to the Hα emission line, and its redshift almost coincides with those of UV low-ionization metal absorption lines. The width of the Hα absorption (~340 km s-1) is similar to those of the UV low-ionization absorption lines. These facts suggest that the Hα and low-ionization metal absorption lines are produced by the same low-ionization gas, which has a substantial amount of neutral gas. The column density of the neutral hydrogen is estimated to be ~1018 cm-2 by assuming a gas temperature of 10,000 K from the analysis of the curve of growth. The continuum spectrum is reproduced by a reddened [E(B-V)~0.15 mag for the SMC-like reddening law] composite quasar spectrum. Furthermore, the UV spectrum of SDSS J083942.11+380526.3 shows a remarkable similarity to that of NGC 4151 in its low state, suggesting that the physical condition of the absorber in SDSS J083942.11+380526.3 is similar to that of NGC 4151 in the low state. As proposed for NGC 4151, SDSS J083942.11+380526.3 may also be seen through the edge of the obscuring torus. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  9. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  10. Metallic line profiles of the AOV star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. Murray; Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J.; Crowley, Charles R.

    1990-01-01

    High dispersion ultrahigh signal to noise Reticon spectra of Vega were obtained with the coude spectrograph of the 1.2 m telescope. A mean signal to noise ratio of 2500 over the spectral region lambdas from 3825 to 5435 was achieved. Examination of the line profiles confirmed the presence of two different types of profiles which were previously seen in IIIaJ and lower signal to noise Reticon spectra. The profiles of the strong lines are essentially classical rotational profiles with enhanced wings which are slightly stronger than expected while those of weak lines are clearly flat-bottomed resulting in a trapezoidal appearance. A few possible theoretical explanations are presented.

  11. Metallic line profiles of the AO V star Vega

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulliver, Austin F.; Adelman, Saul J.; Cowley, Charles R.; Fletcher, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    High dispersion ultrahigh signal to noise Reticon spectra of Vega were obtained with the coude spectrograph of the 1.2 m telescope. A mean signal to noise ratio of 2500 over the spectral region lambdas from 3825 to 5435 was achieved. Examination of the line profiles confirmed the presence of two different types of profiles which were previously seen in IIIaJ and lower signal to noise Reticon spectra. The profiles of the strong lines are essentially classical rotational profiles with enhanced wings which are slightly stronger than expected while those of weak lines are clearly flat-bottomed resulting in a trapezoidal appearance. A few possible theoretical explanations are presented.

  12. A solar radio dynamic spectrograph with flexible temporal-spectral resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Qing-Fu; Chen, Lei; Zhao, Yue-Chang; Li, Xin; Zhou, Yan; Zhang, Jun-Rui; Yan, Fa-Bao; Feng, Shi-Wei; Li, Chuan-Yang; Chen, Yao

    2017-09-01

    Observation and research on solar radio emission have unique scientific values in solar and space physics and related space weather forecasting applications, since the observed spectral structures may carry important information about energetic electrons and underlying physical mechanisms. In this study, we present the design of a novel dynamic spectrograph that has been installed at the Chashan Solar Radio Observatory operated by the Laboratory for Radio Technologies, Institute of Space Sciences at Shandong University. The spectrograph is characterized by real-time storage of digitized radio intensity data in the time domain and its capability to perform off-line spectral analysis of the radio spectra. The analog signals received via antennas and amplified with a low-noise amplifier are converted into digital data at a speed reaching up to 32 k data points per millisecond. The digital data are then saved into a high-speed electronic disk for further off-line spectral analysis. Using different word lengths (1-32 k) and time cadences (5 ms-10 s) for off-line fast Fourier transform analysis, we can obtain the dynamic spectrum of a radio burst with different (user-defined) temporal (5 ms-10 s) and spectral (3 kHz˜320 kHz) resolutions. This enables great flexibility and convenience in data analysis of solar radio bursts, especially when some specific fine spectral structures are under study.

  13. Design of FHiRE: the Fiber High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, Michael J.; McLane, Jacob N.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Kobulnicky, Henry; Jang-Condell, Hannah

    2018-01-01

    The enormous success of the Kepler mission in the discovery of transiting exoplanets implies that the majority of stars have planetary systems. NASA's upcomming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is designed to survey the brightest stars over the entire sky, systems that are accessible to spectroscopic follow-up with mid-sized telescopes. We have undertaken the development of a precision radial velocity spectrograph with the goal of providing ground-based suppoert for TESS. The instrument, known as FHiRE (Fiber High Resolution Echelle spectrograph), is being developed in collaboration with Indiana University and will deployed at the 2.3-meter telescope of the Wyoming InfraRed Observatory (WIRO). FHiRE features a traditional white pupil echelle design with R ~ 60,000 that is fed via two optical fibers from the telescope. Both the science fiber and a simultaneously sampled Thorium-Argon comparison fiber will make use of double mode scramblers. FHiRE itself will be housed within a vacuum enclosure in order to minimize any temperatue variations of the instrument and maximize its radial velocity precision. Together, these two features should enable FHiRE to reach a long-term velocity precision of < 1 m/s. We present the design of FHiRE and its expected performance. In a companion poster (Jang-Condell et al.) we will present the exoplanet science goals of the project.

  14. Introducing CUBES: the Cassegrain U-band Brazil-ESO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Paul; Barbuy, Beatriz; Macanhan, Vanessa B.; Castilho, Bruno; Dekker, Hans; Delabre, Bernard; Diaz, Marcos; Gneiding, Clemens; Kerber, Florian; Kuntschner, Harald; La Mura, Giovanni; Reiss, Roland; Vernet, J.

    2014-07-01

    CUBES is a high-efficiency, medium-resolution (R ≃ 20, 000) spectrograph dedicated to the "ground based UV" (approximately the wavelength range from 300 to 400nm) destined for the Cassegrain focus of one of ESO's VLT unit telescopes in 2018/19. The CUBES project is a joint venture between ESO and Instituto de Astronomia, Geofísica e Ciências Atmosféricas (IAG) at the Universidade de São Paulo and the Brazilian Laboratório Nacional de Astrofísica (LNA). CUBES will provide access to a wealth of new and relevant information for stellar as well as extra-galactic sources. Principle science cases include the study of heavy elements in metal-poor stars, the direct determination of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen abundances by study of molecular bands in the UV range and the determination of the Beryllium abundance as well as the study of active galactic nuclei and the inter-galactic medium. With a streamlined modern instrument design, high efficiency dispersing elements and UV-sensitive detectors, it will enable a significant gain in sensitivity over existing ground based medium-high resolution spectrographs enabling vastly increased sample sizes accessible to the astronomical community. We present here a brief overview of the project, introducing the science cases that drive the design and discussing the design options and technological challenges.

  15. MuSICa: the Multi-Slit Image Slicer for the est Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calcines, A.; López, R. L.; Collados, M.

    2013-09-01

    Integral field spectroscopy (IFS) is a technique that allows one to obtain the spectra of all the points of a bidimensional field of view simultaneously. It is being applied to the new generation of the largest night-time telescopes but it is also an innovative technique for solar physics. This paper presents the design of a new image slicer, MuSICa (Multi-Slit Image slicer based on collimator-Camera), for the integral field spectrograph of the 4-m aperture European Solar Telescope (EST). MuSICa is a multi-slit image slicer that decomposes an 80 arcsec2 field of view into slices of 50 μm and reorganizes it into eight slits of 0.05 arcsec width × 200 arcsec length. It is a telecentric system with an optical quality at diffraction limit compatible with the two modes of operation of the spectrograph: spectroscopic and spectro-polarimetric. This paper shows the requirements, technical characteristics and layout of MuSICa, as well as other studied design options.

  16. The Oxford SWIFT Spectrograph: first commissioning and on-sky results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Mathias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Fogarty, Lisa; Houghton, Ryan; Salter, Graeme; Scott, Nicholas; Davies, Roger L.; Bouchez, Antonin; Dekany, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The Oxford SWIFT spectrograph, an I & z band (6500-10500 A) integral field spectrograph, is designed to operate as a facility instrument at the 200 inch Hale Telescope on Palomar Mountain, in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system PALAO (and its upgrade to PALM3000). SWIFT provides spectra at R(≡λ/▵λ)~4000 of a contiguous two-dimensional field, 44 x 89 spatial pixels (spaxels) in size, at spatial scales of 0.235", 0.16", and 0.08" per spaxel. It employs two 250μm thick, fully depleted, extremely red sensitive 4k X 2k CCD detector arrays (manufactured by LBNL) that provide excellent quantum efficiency out to 1000 nm. We describe the commissioning observations and present the measured values of a number of instrument parameters. We also present some first science results that give a taste of the range of science programs where SWIFT can have a substantial impact.

  17. The design and performance of high resolution échelle spectrographs in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stuart

    The design and performance of several high resolution spectrographs for use in astronomy will be described. After a basic outline of the required theory, the design and performance of HERCULES will be presented. HERCULES is an R2 spectrograph fibre-fed from the MJUO 1-m telescope. The échelle grating has 31.6 grooves/mm and it uses a BK7 prism with a 50° apex angle in double-pass for cross-dispersion. A folded Schmidt camera is used for imaging. With a detector having an area 50 x 50 mm, and pixels less than 25 µm, HERCULES is capable of resolving powers of 40,000 to 80,000 and wavelength coverage from 380 to 880 nm. The total throughput (from the fibre entrance to the CCD) is expected to be nearly 20% (in 1" seeing). Measured efficiencies are only slightly less than this. HERCULES is also shown to be capable of excellent radial velocity precision with no apparent difference between long-term and short-term stability. Several significant upgrade options are also described. As part of the evolution of the design of a high resolution spectrograph for SALT, several instruments were developed for 10-metre class telescopes. Early designs, based in part on the successful HERCULES design, did not meet the requirements of a number of potential users, due in particular to the limited ability to inter-leave object and sky orders. This resulted in the design of SALT HRS R2 which uses a mosaic of two 308 x 413 mm R2 échelle gratings with 87 grooves/mm. Cross-dispersion is achieved with a pair of large 40° apex angle BK7 prisms used in double-pass. The échelle grating accepts a 365-mm collimated beam. The camera is a catadioptric system having a 1.2-m primary mirror and three lenses made of BK7 each around 850 mm in diameter. Complete unvignetted (except by the CCD obstruction) wavelength coverage from 370nm to 890nm is possible on a mosaic of three 2k by 4k CCDS with 15 µm pixels. A maximum resolving power of R ≈ 80,000 is possible. For immunity to atmospheric

  18. First light of the CHARIS high-contrast integral-field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groff, Tyler; Chilcote, Jeffrey; Brandt, Timothy; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Galvin, Michael; Loomis, Craig; Rizzo, Maxime; Knapp, Gillian; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Currie, Thayne; Takato, Naruhisa; Hayashi, Masahiko

    2017-09-01

    One of the leading direct Imaging techniques, particularly in ground-based imaging, uses a coronagraphic system and integral field spectrograph (IFS). The Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) is an IFS that has been built for the Subaru telescope. CHARIS has been delivered to the observatory and now sits behind the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system. CHARIS has `high' and `low' resolution operating modes. The high-resolution mode is used to characterize targets in J, H, and K bands at R70. The low-resolution prism is meant for discovery and spans J+H+K bands (1.15-2.37 microns) with a spectral resolution of R18. This discovery mode has already proven better than 15-sigma detections of HR8799c,d,e when combining ADI+SDI. Using SDI alone, planets c and d have been detected in a single 24 second image. The CHARIS team is optimizing instrument performance and refining ADI+SDI recombination to maximize our contrast detection limit. In addition to the new observing modes, CHARIS has demonstrated a design with high robustness to spectral crosstalk. CHARIS has completed commissioning and is open for science observations.

  19. Conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system for fluorescence measurements of individual airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachman, Paul; Pinnick, R. G.; Hill, Steven C.; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1996-03-01

    We report the design and operation of a prototype conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system that can record the fluorescence spectra of individual, micrometer-sized aerosols as they traverse an intense 488-nm intracavity laser beam. The instrument's image-intensified CCD detector is gated by elastic scattering or by undispersed fluorescence from particles that enter the spectrograph's field of view. It records spectra only from particles with preselected scattering-fluorescence levels (a fiber-optic-photomultiplier subsystem provides the gating signal). This conditional-sampling procedure reduces data-handling rates and increases the signal-to-noise ratio by restricting the system's exposures to brief periods when aerosols traverse the beam. We demonstrate these advantages by reliably capturing spectra from individual fluorescent microspheres dispersed in an airstream. The conditional-sampling procedure also permits some discrimination among different types of particles, so that spectra may be recorded from the few interesting particles present in a cloud of background aerosol. We demonstrate such discrimination by measuring spectra from selected fluorescent microspheres in a mixture of two types of microspheres, and from bacterial spores in a mixture of spores and nonfluorescent kaolin particles.

  20. Curved diamond-crystal spectrographs for x-ray free-electron laser noninvasive diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Kolodziej, Tomasz; Shvyd'ko, Yuri

    2016-12-01

    We report on the manufacturing and X-ray tests of bent diamond-crystal X-ray spectrographs, designed for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) spectra in the spectral range from 5 to 15 keV. The key component is a curved, 20-μm thin, single crystalline diamond triangular plate in the (110) orientation. The radius of curvature can be varied between R = 0.6 m and R = 0.1 m in a controlled fashion, ensuring imaging in a spectral window of up to 60 eV for ≃8 keV X-rays. All of the components of the bending mechanism (about 10 parts) are manufactured from diamond, thus ensuring safe operations in intense XFEL beams. The spectrograph is transparent to 88% for 5-keV photons and to 98% for 15-keV photons. Therefore, it can be used for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray spectra during XFEL operations.

  1. Development of a slicer integral field unit for the existing optical imaging spectrograph FOCAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shinobu; Tanaka, Yoko; Hattori, Takashi; Mitsui, Kenji; Fukusima, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Norio; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Yamashita, Takuya

    2012-09-01

    We are developing an integral field unit (IFU) with an image slicer for the existing optical imaging spectrograph, Faint Object Camera And Spectrograph (FOCAS), on the Subaru Telescope. Basic optical design has already finished. The slice width is 0.4 arcsec, slice number is 24, and field of view is 13.5x 9.6 arcsec. Sky spectra separated by about 3 arcmin from an object field can be simultaneously obtained, which allows us precise background subtraction. The IFU will be installed as a mask plate and set by the mask exchanger mechanism of FOCAS. Slice mirrors, pupil mirrors and slit mirrors are all made of glass, and their mirror surfaces are fabricated by polishing. Multilayer dielectric reflective coating with high reflectivity (< 98%) is made on each mirror surface. Slicer IFU consists of many mirrors which need to be arraigned with high accuracy. For such alignment, we will make alignment jigs and mirror holders made with high accuracy. Some pupil mirrors need off-axis ellipsoidal surfaces to reduce aberration. We are conducting some prototyping works including slice mirrors, an off-axis ellipsoidal surface, alignment jigs and a mirror support. In this paper, we will introduce our project and show those prototyping works.

  2. Development of a slicer integral field unit for the existing optical spectrograph FOCAS: progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shinobu; Tanaka, Yoko; Hattori, Takashi; Mitsui, Kenji; Fukushima, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Norio; Obuchi, Yoshiyuki; Tsuzuki, Toshihiro; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Yamashita, Takuya

    2014-07-01

    We are developing an integral field unit (IFU) with an image slicer for the existing optical spectrograph, Faint Object Camera And Spectrograph (FOCAS), on the Subaru Telescope. The slice width is 0.43 arcsec, the slice number is 23, and the field of view is 13.5 × 9.89 arcsec2. Sky spectrum separated by about 5.7 arcmin from an object field can be simultaneously obtained, which allows us precise background subtraction. Slice mirrors, pupil mirrors and slit mirrors are all glass, and their mirror surfaces are fabricated by polishing. Our IFU is about 200 mm × 300 mm × 80 mm in size and 1 kg in weight. It is installed into a mask storage in FOCAS along with one or two mask plates, and inserted into the optical path by using the existing mask exchange mechanism. This concept allow us flexible operation such as Targets of Opportunity observations. High reflectivity of multilayer dielectric coatings offers high throughput (>80%) of the IFU. In this paper, we will report a final optical layout, its performances, and results of prototyping works.

  3. Curved diamond-crystal spectrographs for x-ray free-electron laser noninvasive diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Kolodziej, Tomasz; ...

    2016-12-29

    Here, we report on the manufacturing and X-ray tests of bent diamond-crystal X-ray spectrographs, designed for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) spectra in the spectral range from 5 to 15 keV. The key component is a curved, 20-µm thin, single crystalline diamond triangular plate in the (110) orientation. The radius of curvature can be varied between R = 0.6 m and R = 0.1 m in a controlled fashion, ensuring imaging in a spectral window of up to 60 eV for ' 8 keV X-rays. All of the components of the bending mechanism (about 10 parts) aremore » manufactured from diamond, thus ensuring safe operations in intense XFEL beams. The spectrograph is transparent to 88% for 5-keV photons, and to 98% for 15-keV photons. Therefore, it can be used for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray spectra during XFEL operations.« less

  4. UVSTAR: An imaging spectrograph with telescope for the Shuttle Hitchhiker-M platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalio, Roberto; Sandel, Bill R.; Broadfoot, A. Lyle

    1993-01-01

    UVSTAR is an EUV spectral imager intended as a facility instrument devoted to solar system and astronomy studies. It covers the wavelength range of 500 to 1250 A, with sufficient spectral resolution to separate emission lines and to form spectrally resolved images of extended plasma sources. Targets include the Io plasma torus at Jupiter, hot stars, planetary nebulae and bright galaxies. UVSTAR consists of a pair of telescopes and concave grating spectrographs that cover the overlapping spectral ranges of 500-900 and 850-1250 A. The telescopes use two 30 cm diameter off-axis paraboloids having focal length of 1.5 m. An image of the target is formed at the entrance slits of the two concave grating spectrographs. The gratings provide dispersion and re-image the slits at the detectors, intensified CCD's. The readout format of the detectors can be chosen by computer, and three slit widths are selectable to adapt the instrument to specific tasks. UVSTAR has internal gimbals which allow rotation of plus or minus 3 deg about each of two axes. Dedicated finding and tracking telescopes will acquire and track the target after rough pointing is achieved by orienting the Orbiter. Responsibilities for implementation and utilization of UVSTAR are shared by groups in Italy and the U.S. UVSTAR is scheduled for flight in early 1995, timed for an opportunity to observe the Jovian system.

  5. Optimization and performance of the Robert Stobie Spectrograph Near-InfraRed detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Gregory; Indahl, Briana; Eggen, Nathan; Wolf, Marsha; Hooper, Eric; Jaehnig, Kurt; Thielman, Don; Burse, Mahesh

    2018-01-01

    At the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we are building and testing the near-infrared (NIR) spectrograph for the Southern African Large Telescope-RSS-NIR. RSS-NIR will be an enclosed cooled integral field spectrograph. The RSS-NIR detector system uses a HAWAII-2RG (H2RG) HgCdTe detector from Teledyne controlled by the SIDECAR ASIC and an Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCCA) ISDEC card. We have successfully characterized and optimized the detector system and report on the optimization steps and performance of the system. We have reduced the CDS read noise to ˜20 e- for 200 kHz operation by optimizing ASIC settings. We show an additional factor of 3 reduction of read noise using Fowler sampling techniques and a factor of 2 reduction using up-the-ramp group sampling techniques. We also provide calculations to quantify the conditions for sky-limited observations using these sampling techniques.

  6. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: latest science cases and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Shelley A.; Walth, Gregory; Do, Tuan; Marshall, Daniel; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Adamkovics, Mate; Andersen, David; Armus, Lee; Barth, Aaron; Cote, Patrick; Cooke, Jeff; Chisholm, Eric M.; Davidge, Timothy; Dunn, Jennifer S.; Dumas, Christophe; Ellerbroek, Brent L.; Ghez, Andrea M.; Hao, Lei; Hayano, Yutaka; Liu, Michael; Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique; Lu, Jessica R.; Mao, Shude; Marois, Christian; Pandey, Shashi B.; Phillips, Andrew C.; Schoeck, Matthias; Subramaniam, Annapurni; Subramanian, Smitha; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tan, Jonathan C.; Terai, Tsuyoshi; Treu, Tommaso; Simard, Luc; Weiss, Jason L.; Wincentsen, James; Wong, Michael; Zhang, Kai

    2016-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) will complete its preliminary design phase in 2016. The IRIS instrument design includes a near-infrared (0.85 - 2.4 micron) integral field spectrograph (IFS) and imager that are able to conduct simultaneous diffraction-limited observations behind the advanced adaptive optics system NFIRAOS. The IRIS science cases have continued to be developed and new science studies have been investigated to aid in technical performance and design requirements. In this development phase, the IRIS science team has paid particular attention to the selection of filters, gratings, sensitivities of the entire system, and science cases that will benefit from the parallel mode of the IFS and imaging camera. We present new science cases for IRIS using the latest end-to-end data simulator on the following topics: Solar System bodies, the Galactic center, active galactic nuclei (AGN), and distant gravitationally-lensed galaxies. We then briefly discuss the necessity of an advanced data management system and data reduction pipeline.

  7. Conceptual Design of the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS) for the Subaru Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Mary Anne; Groff, Tyler; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; McElwain, Michael W.; Galvin, Michael; Carr, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert; Gunn, James E.; Knapp, Gillian; Gong, Qian; hide

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in high-contrast imaging techniques now make possible both imaging and spectroscopy of planets around nearby stars. We present the conceptual design of the Coronagraphic High Angular Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (CHARIS), a lenslet-based, cryogenic integral field spectrograph (IFS) for imaging exoplanets on the Subaru telescope. The IFS will provide spectral information for 140 x 140 spatial elements over a 1.75 arcsecs x 1.75 arcsecs field of view (FOV). CHARIS will operate in the near infrared (lambda = 0.9 - 2.5 micron) and provide a spectral resolution of R = 14, 33, and 65 in three separate observing modes. Taking advantage of the adaptive optics systems and advanced coronagraphs (AO188 and SCExAO) on the Subaru telescope, CHARIS will provide sufficient contrast to obtain spectra of young self-luminous Jupiter-mass exoplanets. CHARIS is in the early design phases and is projected to have first light by the end of 2015. We report here on the current conceptual design of CHARIS and the design challenges.

  8. Effectiveness of using a magnetic spectrograph with the Trojan Horse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manwell, S.; Parikh, A.; Chen, A. A.; de Séréville, N.; Adsley, P.; Irvine, D.; Hammache, F.; Stefan, I.; Longland, R. F.; Tomlinson, J.; Morfuace, P.; Le Crom, B.

    2018-01-01

    The Trojan Horse method relies on performing reactions in a specific kinematic phase space that maximizes contributions of a quasi-free reaction mechanism. The hallmark of this method is that the incident particle can be accelerated to high enough energies to overcome the Coulomb barrier of the target, but once inside the target nucleus the relative motion of the clustered nuclei allows the reaction of interest to proceed at energies below this Coulomb Barrier. This method allows the experimentalist to probe reactions that have significance in astrophysics at low reaction energies that would otherwise be impossible due to the vanishing cross section. Traditionally the Trojan Horse method has been applied with the use of silicon detectors to observe the reaction products. In this study we apply the Trojan Horse method to a well studied reaction to examine the potential benefits of using a splitpole magnetic spectrograph to detect one of the reaction products. We have measure the three body 7Li(d,αn)α reaction to constrain the energy 7Li(d,α)α cross section. Measurements were first made using two silicon detectors, and then by replacing one detector with the magnetic spectrograph. The experimental design, limitations, and early results are discussed.

  9. DMDs for multi-object near-infrared spectrographs in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Barkhouser, Robert; Hope, Stephen; Conley, Devin; Gray, Aidan; Hope, Gavin; Robberto, Massimo

    2018-02-01

    The Digital Micromirror Device (DMD), typically used in projection screen technology, has utility in instrumentation for astronomy as a digitally programmable slit in a spectrograph. When placed at an imaging focal plane the device can be used to selectively direct light from astronomical targets into the optical path of a spectrograph, while at the same time directing the remaining light into an imaging camera, which can be used for slit alignment, science imaging, or both. To date the use of DMDs in astronomy has been limited, especially for instruments that operate in the near infrared (1 - 2.5 μm). This limitation is due in part to a host of technical challenges with respect to DMDs that, to date, have not been thoroughly explored. Those challenges include operation at cryogenic temperature, control electronics that facilitate DMD use at these temperatures, window coatings properly coated for the near infrared bandpass, and scattered light. This paper discusses these technical challenges and presents progress towards understanding and mitigating them.

  10. Curved diamond-crystal spectrographs for x-ray free-electron laser noninvasive diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Terentyev, Sergey; Blank, Vladimir; Kolodziej, Tomasz

    Here, we report on the manufacturing and X-ray tests of bent diamond-crystal X-ray spectrographs, designed for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) spectra in the spectral range from 5 to 15 keV. The key component is a curved, 20-µm thin, single crystalline diamond triangular plate in the (110) orientation. The radius of curvature can be varied between R = 0.6 m and R = 0.1 m in a controlled fashion, ensuring imaging in a spectral window of up to 60 eV for ' 8 keV X-rays. All of the components of the bending mechanism (about 10 parts) aremore » manufactured from diamond, thus ensuring safe operations in intense XFEL beams. The spectrograph is transparent to 88% for 5-keV photons, and to 98% for 15-keV photons. Therefore, it can be used for noninvasive diagnostics of the X-ray spectra during XFEL operations.« less

  11. Using CeSiC for UV spectrographs for the WSO/UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutlinger, A.; Gál, C.; Brandt, C.; Haberler, P.; Zuknik, K.-H.; Sedlmaier, T.; Shustov, B.; Sachkov, M.; Moisheev, A.; Kappelmann, N.; Barnstedt, J.; Werner, K.

    2017-11-01

    The World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO/UV) is a multi-national project lead by the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) with the objective of high performance observations in the ultraviolet range. The 1.7 m WSO/UV telescope feeds UV spectrometers and UV imagers. The UV spectrometers comprise two high resolution Echelle spectrographs for the 100 - 170 nm and 170 - 300 nm wavelength range and a long slit spectrograph for the 100 - 300 nm band. All three spectrometers represent individual instruments that are assembled and aligned separately. In order to save mass while maintaining high stiffness, the instruments are combined to a monoblock. Cesic has been selected to reduce CTE related distortions of the instruments. In contrast to aluminium, the stable structure of Cesic is significantly less sensitive to thermal gradients. No further mechanism for focus correction with high functional, technical and operational complexity and dedicated System costs are necessary. Using Cesic also relaxes the thermal control requirements of +/-5°C, which represents a considerable cost driver for the S/C design. The WUVS instrument is currently studied in the context of a phase B2 study by Kayser-Threde GmbH including a Structural Thermal Model (STM) for verification of thermal and mechanical loads, stability due to thermal distortions and Cesic manufacturing feasibility.

  12. Insulin analogues with improved absorption characteristics.

    PubMed

    Brange, J; Hansen, J F; Langkjaer, L; Markussen, J; Ribel, U; Sørensen, A R

    1992-01-01

    The insulin preparations available today are not ideal for therapy as s.c. injection does not provide a physiological insulin profile. With the aim to improve the absorption properties recombinant DNA technology has been utilized to design novel insulin molecules with changed physico-chemical characteristics and hence altered subcutaneous absorption kinetics. Soluble, long-acting human insulin analogues in which the isoelectric point has been increased from 5.4 to approx. 7 are absorbed very slowly, providing a more constant basal insulin delivery with lower day-to-day variation than present protracted preparations. In addition they have better storage stability. Rapid-acting human insulin analogues with largely reduced self-association are absorbed substantially faster from subcutaneous tissue than current regular insulin and thus are better suited for bolus injection. The absorption kinetics of these analogues have been able to explain the mechanism behind the dose effect on insulin absorption rate.

  13. A Hubble Space Telescope Survey of Intrinsic Absorption in Nearby AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashtamirova, Dzhuliya; Dunn, Jay P.; Crenshaw, D. Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present a survey of the intrinsic UV absorption lines in active galactic nuclei (AGN). We limit our study to the ultraviolet spectra of type 1 AGN with a redshift of z < 0.15 as a continuation of the Dunn et al. (2007, 2008) and Crenshaw et al. (1999) studies of smaller samples. We identify approximately 90 AGN fit our redshift specifications in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes (MAST) database with Cosmic Origin Spectrograph (COS) observations. We download and co-add all of the COS spectra. We find that about 80 of these are type 1 AGN. We normalize the COS spectra and identify all of the intrinsic Lyman-alpha, N V, Si IV, and C IV intrinsic absorption features. From these data, we determine the fraction of type 1 AGN with intrinsic absorption in this redshift range and find the global covering factors of the absorbers. We also identify low ionization species as well as excited state lines. A number of objects have multiple epoch COS and/or Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations, which we use to investigate the absorption variability.

  14. Discovery of Variable Hydrogen Balmer Absorption Lines with Inverse Decrement in PG 1411+442

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Pan, Xiang; Zhang, Shao-Hua

    We present new optical spectra of the well-known broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1411+442, using the DBSP spectrograph at the Palomar 200 inch telescope in 2014 and 2017 and the YFOSC spectrograph at the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope in 2015. A blueshifted narrow absorption line system is clearly revealed in 2014 and 2015 consisting of hydrogen Balmer series and metastable He i lines. The velocity of these lines is similar to the centroid velocity of the UV BALs, suggesting that both originate from the outflow. The Balmer lines vary significantly between the two observations and vanished in 2017. Theymore » were also absent in the archived spectra obtained before 2001. The variation is thought to be driven by photoionization change. Besides, the absorption lines show inversed Balmer decrement, i.e., the apparent optical depths of higher-order Balmer absorption lines are larger than those of lower-order lines, which is inconsistent with the oscillator strengths of the transitions. We suggest that such anomalous line ratios can be naturally explained by the thermal structure of a background accretion disk, which allows the obscured part of the disk to contribute differently to the continuum flux at different wavelengths. High-resolution spectroscopic and photometric monitoring would be very useful to probe the structure of the accretion disk as well as the geometry and physical conditions of the outflow.« less

  15. Discovery of Variable Hydrogen Balmer Absorption Lines with Inverse Decrement in PG 1411+442

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Pan, Xiang; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Sun, Lu-Ming; Wang, Jian-Guo; Ji, Tuo; Yang, Chen-Wei; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Ning; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2017-07-01

    We present new optical spectra of the well-known broad absorption line (BAL) quasar PG 1411+442, using the DBSP spectrograph at the Palomar 200 inch telescope in 2014 and 2017 and the YFOSC spectrograph at the Lijiang 2.4 m telescope in 2015. A blueshifted narrow absorption line system is clearly revealed in 2014 and 2015 consisting of hydrogen Balmer series and metastable He I lines. The velocity of these lines is similar to the centroid velocity of the UV BALs, suggesting that both originate from the outflow. The Balmer lines vary significantly between the two observations and vanished in 2017. They were also absent in the archived spectra obtained before 2001. The variation is thought to be driven by photoionization change. Besides, the absorption lines show inversed Balmer decrement, I.e., the apparent optical depths of higher-order Balmer absorption lines are larger than those of lower-order lines, which is inconsistent with the oscillator strengths of the transitions. We suggest that such anomalous line ratios can be naturally explained by the thermal structure of a background accretion disk, which allows the obscured part of the disk to contribute differently to the continuum flux at different wavelengths. High-resolution spectroscopic and photometric monitoring would be very useful to probe the structure of the accretion disk as well as the geometry and physical conditions of the outflow.

  16. Observing stellar coronae with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph. 1: The dMe star AU microscopoii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maran, S. P.; Robinson, R. D.; Shore, S. N.; Brosius, J. W.; Carpenter, K. G.; Woodgate, B. E.; Linsky, J. L.; Brown, A.; Byrne, P. B.; Kundu, M. R.; White, S.; Brandt, J. C.; Shine, R. A.; Walter, F. M.

    1994-02-01

    We report on an observation of AU Mic taken with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The data consist of a rapid sequence of spectra covering the wavelength range 1345-1375 A with a spectral resolution of 10,000. The observations were originally intended to search for spectral variations during flares. No flares were detected during the 3.5 hr of monitoring. A method of reducing the noise while combining the individual spectra in the time series is described which resulted in the elimination of half of the noise while rejecting only a small fraction of the stellar signal. The resultant spectrum was of sufficient quality to allow the detection of emission lines with an integrated flux of 10-15 ergs/sq cm(sec) or greater. Lines of C I, O I, O V, Cl I, and Fe XXI were detected. This is the first indisputable detection of the 1354 A Fe XXI line, formed at T approximately = 107 K, on a star other than the Sun. The line was well resolved and displayed no significant bulk motions or profile asymmetry. From the upper limit on the observed line width, we derive an upper limit of 38 km/s for the turbulent velocity in the 107 K plasma. An upper limit is derived for the flux of the 1349 A Fe XII line, formed at T approximately = 1.3 x 106 K. These data are combined with contemporaneous GHRS and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) data to derive the volume emission measure distribution of AU Mic over the temperature range 104-107 K. Models of coronal loops in hydrostatic equilibrium are consistent with the observed volume emission measures of the coronal lines. The fraction of the stellar surface covered by the footprints of the loops depends upon the loop length and is less than 14% for lengths smaller than the stellar radius. From the upper limit to the estimated width of the Fe XXI line profile we find that the we cannot rule out Alfven wave dissipation as a possible contributor to the required quiescent loop heating rate.

  17. A HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE/COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH SEARCH FOR WARM-HOT BARYONS IN THE Mrk 421 SIGHT LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, Charles W.; Stocke, John T.; Keeney, Brian A.

    2011-12-10

    Thermally broadened Ly{alpha} absorbers (BLAs) offer an alternate method to using highly ionized metal absorbers (O VI, O VII, etc.) to probe the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM, T = 10{sup 5}-10{sup 7} K). Until now, WHIM surveys via BLAs have been no less ambiguous than those via far-UV and X-ray metal-ion probes. Detecting these weak, broad features requires background sources with a well-characterized far-UV continuum and data of very high quality. However, a recent Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observation of the z = 0.03 blazar Mrk 421 allows us to perform a metal-independent search for WHIM gas withmore » unprecedented precision. The data have high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N Almost-Equal-To 50 per {approx}20 km s{sup -1} resolution element) and the smooth, power-law blazar spectrum allows a fully parametric continuum model. We analyze the Mrk 421 sight line for BLA absorbers, particularly for counterparts to the proposed O VII WHIM systems reported by Nicastro et al. based on Chandra/Low Energy Transmission Grating observations. We derive the Ly{alpha} profiles predicted by the X-ray observations. The S/N of the COS data is high (S/N Almost-Equal-To 25 pixel{sup -1}), but much higher S/N can be obtained by binning the data to widths characteristic of the expected BLA profiles. With this technique, we are sensitive to WHIM gas over a large (N{sub H}, T) parameter range in the Mrk 421 sight line. We rule out the claimed Nicastro et al. O VII detections at their nominal temperatures (T {approx} 1-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K) and metallicities (Z = 0.1 Z{sub Sun }) at {approx}> 2{sigma} level. However, WHIM gas at higher temperatures and/or higher metallicities is consistent with our COS non-detections.« less

  18. A novel multiplex absorption spectrometer for time-resolved studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Thomas; Heard, Dwayne E.; Blitz, Mark A.

    2018-02-01

    A Time-Resolved Ultraviolet/Visible (UV/Vis) Absorption Spectrometer (TRUVAS) has been developed that can simultaneously monitor absorption at all wavelengths between 200 and 800 nm with millisecond time resolution. A pulsed photolysis laser (KrF 248 nm) is used to initiate chemical reactions that create the target species. The absorption signals from these species evolve as the composition of the gas in the photolysis region changes over time. The instrument can operate at pressures over the range ˜10-800 Torr and can measure time-resolved absorbances <10-4 in the UV (300 nm) and even lower in the visible (580 nm) 2.3 × 10-5, with the peak of sensitivity at ˜500 nm. The novelty of this setup lies in the arrangement of the multipass optics. Although appearing similar to other multipass optical systems (in particular the Herriott cell), there are fundamental differences, most notably the ability to adjust each mirror to maximise the overlap between the probe beam and the photolysis laser. Another feature which aids the sensitivity and versatility of the system is the use of 2 high-throughput spectrographs coupled with sensitive line-array CCDs, which can measure absorbance from ˜200 to 800 nm simultaneously. The capability of the instrument is demonstrated via measurements of the absorption spectrum of the peroxy radical, HOCH2CH2O2, and its self-reaction kinetics.

  19. Statistical Fine Structure in Inhomogeneously Broadened Absorption Lines in Solids.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-22

    the inhomogeneously broadened zero-phonon SijSo (0-0) absorption of pentacene molecules in crystals of p-terphenyl at liquid helium temperatures. SFS...structure (SFS) in the inhomogeneously broadened zero-phonon S, +- So (0-0) absorption of pentacene molecules in crystals of p-terphenyl at liquid helium...tile large multiplicity of local environments. Inhomogeneously broadened absorption lines are usually treated as smooth, Gaussian profiles. In recent

  20. Carbon Dioxide Absorption in a Membrane Contactor with Color Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantaleao, Ines; Portugal, Ana F.; Mendes, Adelio; Gabriel, Joaquim

    2010-01-01

    A pedagogical experiment is described to examine the physical absorption of gases, in this case carbon dioxide, in a hollow fiber membrane contactor (HFMC) where the absorption concentration profile can be followed by a color change. The HFMC is used to teach important concepts and can be used in interesting applications for students, such as…

  1. Performance testing of a novel off-plane reflection grating and silicon pore optic spectrograph at PANTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marlowe, Hannah; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Allured, Ryan; DeRoo, Casey; Miles, Drew M.; Donovan, Benjamin D.; Tutt, James H.; Burwitz, Vadim; Menz, Benedikt; Hartner, Gisela D.; Smith, Randall K.; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Ackermann, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    An X-ray spectrograph consisting of aligned, radially ruled off-plane reflection gratings and silicon pore optics (SPO) was tested at the Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics PANTER X-ray test facility. The SPO is a test module for the proposed Arcus mission, which will also feature aligned off-plane reflection gratings. This test is the first time two off-plane gratings were actively aligned to each other and with a SPO to produce an overlapped spectrum. We report the performance of the complete spectrograph utilizing the aligned gratings module and plans for future development.

  2. Optical design of the NASA-NSF extreme precision Doppler spectrograph concept "WISDOM"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stuart I.; Fżrész, Gábor; Simcoe, Robert A.; Shectman, Stephen A.; Woods, Deborah F.

    2016-08-01

    The WISDOM instrument concept was developed at MIT as part of a NASA-NSF funded study to equip the 3.5m WIYN telescope with an extremely precise radial velocity spectrometer. The spectrograph employs an asymmetric white pupil optical design, where the instrument is split into two nearly identical "Short" (380 to 750 nm) and "Long"" (750 to 1300 nm) wavelength channels. The echelle grating and beam sizes are R3.75/125mm and R6/80mm in the short and long channels respectively. Together with the pupil slicer, and octagonal to rectangular fibre coupling, this permits resolving powers over R = 120k with a 1.2" diameter fibre on the sky. A factor of two reduction in the focal length between the main collimator OAP and the transfer collimator ensures a very compact instrument, with a small white pupil footprint, thereby enabling small cross-dispersing and camera elements. A dichroic is used near the white pupil to split each of the long and short channels into two, so that the final spectrograph has 4 channels; namely "Blue," "Green," "Red" and "NIR." Each of these channels has an anamorphic VPH grism for cross-dispersion, and a fully dioptric all-spherical camera objective. The spectral footprints cover 4k×4k and 6k×6k CCDs with 15 µm pixels in the short "Blue" and "Green" wavelength channels, respectively. A 4k×4k CCD with 15 μm pixels is used in the long "Red" channel, with a HgCdTe 1.7 μm cutoff 4k×4k detector with 10um pixels is to be used in the long "NIR" channel. The white pupil relay includes a Mangin mirror very close to the intermediate focus to correct the white pupil relay Petzval curvature before it is swept into a cylinder by the cross-dispersers. This design decision allows each of the dioptric cameras to be fully optimised and tested independently of the rest of the spectrograph. The baseline design for the cameras also ensures that the highest possible (diffraction limited) image quality is achieved across all wavelengths, while also ensuring

  3. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: volume phase holographic grating performance testing and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaojie; Meyer, Elliot; Wright, Shelley A.; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.; Maire, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Simard, Luc

    2014-07-01

    Maximizing the grating efficiency is a key goal for the first light instrument IRIS (Infrared Imaging Spectrograph) currently being designed to sample the diffraction limit of the TMT (Thirty Meter Telescope). Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings have been shown to offer extremely high efficiencies that approach 100% for high line frequencies (i.e., 600 to 6000l/mm), which has been applicable for astronomical optical spectrographs. However, VPH gratings have been less exploited in the near-infrared, particularly for gratings that have lower line frequencies. Given their potential to offer high throughputs and low scattered light, VPH gratings are being explored for IRIS as a potential dispersing element in the spectrograph. Our team has procured near-infrared gratings from two separate vendors. We have two gratings with the specifications needed for IRIS current design: 1.51-1.82μm (H-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 4000 and 1.19-1.37μm (J-band) to produce a spectral resolution of 8000. The center wavelengths for each grating are 1.629μm and 1.27μm, and the groove densities are 177l/mm and 440l/mm for H-band R=4000 and J-band R=8000, respectively. We directly measure the efficiencies in the lab and find that the peak efficiencies of these two types of gratings are quite good with a peak efficiency of ~88% at the Bragg angle in both TM and TE modes at H-band, and 90.23% in TM mode, 79.91% in TE mode at J-band for the best vendor. We determine the drop in efficiency off the Bragg angle, with a 20-23% decrease in efficiency at H-band when 2.5° deviation from the Bragg angle, and 25%-28% decrease at J-band when 5° deviation from the Bragg angle.

  4. The infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: reflective ruled diffraction grating performance testing and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Elliot; Chen, Shaojie; Wright, Shelley A.; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.; Simard, Luc; Marie, Jerome; Mieda, Etsuko; Gordon, Jacob

    2014-07-01

    We present the efficiency of near-infrared reflective ruled diffraction gratings designed for the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS is a first light, integral field spectrograph and imager for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) and narrow field infrared adaptive optics system (NFIRAOS). IRIS will operate across the near-infrared encompassing the ZYJHK bands (~0.84 - 2.4μm) with multiple spectral resolutions. We present our experimental setup and analysis of the efficiency of selected reflective diffraction gratings. These measurements are used as a comparison sample against selected candidate Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings (see Chen et al., this conference). We investigate the efficiencies of five ruled gratings designed for IRIS from two separate vendors. Three of the gratings accept a bandpass of 1.19-1.37μm (J band) with ideal spectral resolutions of R=4000 and R=8000, groove densities of 249 and 516 lines/mm, and blaze angles of 9.86° and 20.54° respectively. The other two gratings accept a bandpass of 1.51-1.82μm (H Band) with an ideal spectral resolution of R=4000, groove density of 141 lines/mm, and blaze angle of 9.86°. The fraction of flux in each diffraction mode was compared to both a pure reflection mirror as well as the sum of the flux measured in all observable modes. We measure the efficiencies off blaze angle for all gratings and the efficiencies between the polarization transverse magnetic (TM) and transverse electric (TE) states. The peak reflective efficiencies are 98.90 +/- 3.36% (TM) and 84.99 +/- 2.74% (TM) for the H-band R=4000 and J-band R=4000 respectively. The peak reflective efficiency for the J-band R=8000 grating is 78.78 +/- 2.54% (TE). We find that these ruled gratings do not exhibit a wide dependency on incident angle within +/-3°. Our best-manufactured gratings were found to exhibit a dependency on the polarization state of the incident beam with a ~10-20% deviation, consistent with the theoretical efficiency

  5. CHISL: the combined high-resolution and imaging spectrograph for the LUVOIR surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Fleming, Brian; Hoadley, Keri

    2016-10-01

    NASA is currently carrying out science and technical studies to identify its next astronomy flagship mission, slated to begin development in the 2020s. It has become clear that a Large Ultraviolet/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) surveyor mission (d≈12 m, Δλ≈1000 Å, 2 μm spectroscopic bandpass) can carry out the largest number of NASA's exoplanet and astrophysics science goals over the coming decades. The science grasp of an LUVOIR surveyor is broad, ranging from the direct detection of potential biomarkers on rocky planets to the flow of matter into and out of galaxies and the history of star-formation across cosmic time. There are technical challenges for several aspects of the LUVOIR surveyor concept, including component level technology readiness maturation and science instrument concepts for a broadly capable ultraviolet spectrograph. We present the scientific motivation for, and a preliminary design of, a multiplexed ultraviolet spectrograph to support both the exoplanet and astrophysics goals of the LUVOIR surveyor mission concept, the combined high-resolution and imaging spectrograph for the LUVOIR surveyor (CHISL). CHISL includes a high-resolution (R≈120,000 1000 to 1700 Å) point-source spectroscopy channel and a medium-resolution (R≥14,000 from 1000 to 2000 Å in a single observation and R˜24,000 to 35,000 in multiple grating settings) imaging spectroscopy channel. CHISL addresses topics ranging from characterizing the composition and structure of planet-forming disks to the feedback of matter between galaxies and the intergalactic medium. We present the CHISL concept, a small sample of representative science cases, and the primary technological hurdles. Technical challenges include high-efficiency ultraviolet coatings and high-quantum efficiency, large-format, photon counting detectors. We are actively engaged in laboratory and flight characterization efforts for all of these enabling technologies as components on sounding rocket payloads under

  6. CHISL: the combined high-resolution and imaging spectrograph for the LUVOIR surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Fleming, Brian; Hoadley, Keri

    2016-07-01

    NASA is currently carrying out science and technical studies to identify its next astronomy flagship mission, slated to begin development in the 2020s. It has become clear that a Large Ultraviolet/Optical/IR (LUVOIR) Surveyor mission (dprimary ≍ 12 m, Δλ ≍ 1000 Å - 2 μm spectroscopic bandpass) can carry out the largest number of NASA's exoplanet and astrophysics science goals over the coming decades. The science grasp of a LUVOIR Surveyor is broad, ranging from the direct detection of potential biomarkers on rocky planets to the flow of matter into and out of galaxies and the history of star-formation across cosmic time. There are technical challenges for several aspects of the LUVOIR Surveyor concept, including component level technology readiness maturation and science instrument concepts for a broadly capable ultraviolet spectrograph. We present the scientific motivation for, and a preliminary design of, a multiplexed ultraviolet spectrograph to support both the exoplanet and astrophysics goals of the LUVOIR Surveyor mission concept, the Combined High-resolution and Imaging Spectrograph for the LUVOIR Surveyor (CHISL). CHISL includes a highresolution (R ≍ 120,000; 1000 - 1700Å) point-source spectroscopy channel and a medium resolution (R >= 14,000 from 1000 - 2000 Å in a single observation and R 24,000 - 35,000 in multiple grating settings) imaging spectroscopy channel. CHISL addresses topics ranging from characterizing the composition and structure of planet-forming disks to the feedback of matter between galaxies and the intergalactic medium. We present the CHISL concept, a small sample of representative science cases, and the primary technological hurdles. Technical challenges include high-efficiency ultraviolet coatings and high-quantum efficiency, large-format, photon counting detectors. We are actively engaged in laboratory and flight characterization efforts for all of these enabling technologies as components on sounding rocket payloads under

  7. Development of low-noise CCD drive electronics for the world space observatory ultraviolet spectrograph subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salter, Mike; Clapp, Matthew; King, James; Morse, Tom; Mihalcea, Ionut; Waltham, Nick; Hayes-Thakore, Chris

    2016-07-01

    World Space Observatory Ultraviolet (WSO-UV) is a major Russian-led international collaboration to develop a large space-borne 1.7 m Ritchey-Chrétien telescope and instrumentation to study the universe at ultraviolet wavelengths between 115 nm and 320 nm, exceeding the current capabilities of ground-based instruments. The WSO Ultraviolet Spectrograph subsystem (WUVS) is led by the Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences and consists of two high resolution spectrographs covering the Far-UV range of 115-176 nm and the Near-UV range of 174-310 nm, and a long-slit spectrograph covering the wavelength range of 115-305 nm. The custom-designed CCD sensors and cryostat assemblies are being provided by e2v technologies (UK). STFC RAL Space is providing the Camera Electronics Boxes (CEBs) which house the CCD drive electronics for each of the three WUVS channels. This paper presents the results of the detailed characterisation of the WUVS CCD drive electronics. The electronics include a novel high-performance video channel design that utilises Digital Correlated Double Sampling (DCDS) to enable low-noise readout of the CCD at a range of pixel frequencies, including a baseline requirement of less than 3 electrons rms readout noise for the combined CCD and electronics system at a readout rate of 50 kpixels/s. These results illustrate the performance of this new video architecture as part of a wider electronics sub-system that is designed for use in the space environment. In addition to the DCDS video channels, the CEB provides all the bias voltages and clocking waveforms required to operate the CCD and the system is fully programmable via a primary and redundant SpaceWire interface. The development of the CEB electronics design has undergone critical design review and the results presented were obtained using the engineering-grade electronics box. A variety of parameters and tests are included ranging from general system metrics, such as the power and mass

  8. Focal plane alignment and detector characterization for the Subaru prime focus spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Murdock; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Carr, Michael; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hope, Stephen C.; Smee, Stephen A.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the infrastructure being developed to align and characterize the detectors for the Subaru Measure- ment of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS). PFS will employ four three-channel spectrographs with an operating wavelength range of 3800 °A to 12600 °A. Each spectrograph will be comprised of two visible channels and one near infrared (NIR) channel, where each channel will use a separate Schmidt camera to image the captured spectra onto their respective detectors. In the visible channels, Hamamatsu 2k × 4k CCDs will be mounted in pairs to create a single 4k × 4k detector, while the NIR channel will use a single Teledyne 4k × 4k H4RG HgCdTe device. The fast f/1.1 optics of the Schmidt cameras will give a shallow depth of focus necessitating an optimization of the focal plane array flatness. The minimum departure from flatness of the focal plane array for the visible channels is set the by the CCD flatness, typically 10 μm peak-to-valley. We will adjust the coplanarity for a pair of CCDs such that the flatness of the array is consistent with the flatness of the detectors themselves. To achieve this we will use an optical non-contact measurement system to measure surface flatness and coplanarity at both ambient and operating temperatures, and use shims to adjust the coplanarity of the CCDs. We will characterize the performance of the detectors for PFS consistent with the scientific goals for the project. To this end we will measure the gain, linearity, full well, quantum efficiency (QE), charge diffusion, charge transfer inefficiency (CTI), and noise properties of these devices. We also desire to better understand the non-linearity of the photon transfer curve for the CCDs, and the charge persistence/reciprocity problems of the HgCdTe devices. To enable the metrology and characterization of these detectors we are building two test cryostats nearly identical in design. The first test cryostat will primarily be used for the

  9. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  10. DYNAMICS OF ON-DISK PLUMES AS OBSERVED WITH THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH, THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY, AND THE HELIOSEISMIC AND MAGNETIC IMAGER

    SciTech Connect

    Pant, Vaibhav; Mazumder, Rakesh; Banerjee, Dipankar

    2015-07-01

    We examine the role of small-scale transients in the formation and evolution of solar coronal plumes. We study the dynamics of plume footpoints seen in the vicinity of a coronal hole using the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) images, the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager magnetogram on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and spectroscopic data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). Quasi-periodic brightenings are observed in the base of the plumes and are associated with magnetic flux changes. With the high spectral and spatial resolution of IRIS, we identify the sources of these oscillations and try to understand what role themore » transients at the footpoints can play in sustaining the coronal plumes. IRIS “sit-and-stare” observations provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of footpoints of the plumes. We notice enhanced line width and intensity, and large deviation from the average Doppler shift in the line profiles at specific instances, which indicate the presence of flows at the footpoints of plumes. We propose that outflows (jet-like features) as a result of small-scale reconnections affect the line profiles. These jet-like features may also be responsible for the generation of propagating disturbances (PDs) within the plumes, which are observed to be propagating to larger distances as recorded from multiple AIA channels. These PDs can be explained in terms of slow magnetoacoustic waves.« less

  11. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  12. Constraints on the OH-to-H Abundance Ratio in Infrared-bright Galaxies Derived from the Strength of the OH 35 μm Absorption Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Myra; Veilleux, Sylvain; González-Alfonso, Eduardo; Spoon, Henrik; Sturm, Eckhard

    2018-02-01

    We analyze Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) observations of the OH 35 μm feature in 15 nearby (z ≲ 0.06) (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs). All objects exhibit OH 35 μm purely in absorption, as expected. The small optical depth of this transition makes the strength of this feature a good indicator of the true OH column density. The measured OH 35 μm equivalent widths imply an average OH column density and a 1-σ standard deviation to the mean of {N}{OH}=1.31+/- 0.22× {10}17 cm‑2. This number is then compared with the hydrogen column density for a typical optical depth at 35 μm of ∼0.5 and gas-to-dust ratio of 125 to derive an OH-to-H abundance ratio of {X}{OH}=1.01+/- 0.15× {10}-6. This abundance ratio is formally a lower limit. It is consistent with the values generally assumed in the literature. The OH 35 μm line profiles predicted from published radiative transfer models constrained by observations of OH 65, 79, 84, and 119 μm in 5 objects (Mrk 231, Mrk 273, IRAS F05189-2524, IRAS F08572+3915, and IRAS F20551-4250) are also found to be consistent with the IRS OH 35 μm spectra.

  13. Atomic emission spectrometer/spectrograph for the determination of barium in microamounts of diatom ash

    SciTech Connect

    Bankston, D.C.; Fisher, N.S.

    1977-06-01

    The development and routine application of a method for the determination of trace levels of barium in microsamples (5-10 mg) of diatom ash is described Acid-dissolved lithium metaborate fusion melts of ash samples are analyzed using a spectrometer/spectrograph equipped with a dc argon plasma jet excitation source and an echelle diffraction grating. Sample, standard, and blank solutions are buffered by lithium contributed by the flux, to a degree sufficient to reduce matrix effects to acceptable levels. Previous barium determinations by other analytical techniques, on seven interlaboratory reference materials, have been used to establish the accuracy of our results. The averagemore » relative standard deviation for the instrumental analyses was 0.07. Using recommended instrument settings, moreover, the lowest concentration of barium visible in synthetic standard solutions lies just below 2 ..mu..g/L, which is equivalent to 2 ..mu..g/g in the ash.« less

  14. A solar extreme ultraviolet telescope and spectrograph for space shuttle. Volume 1: Investigation and technical plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1978-01-01

    A scientific investigation of heating and mass transport in the solar corona that is currently planned for a future Shuttle/Spacelab flight is outlined. The instrument to be used is a near-normal incidence grating spectrograph fed by a grazing incidence Wolter Type 2 telescope. A toroidal grating design provides stigmatic images of the corona up to 8 arc min in extent over the spectral region from 225 A to 370 A. Spatial resolution of at least 2 arc sec and spectral resolution of 0.050 A is achievable throughout the central 4 arc min field or view. Primary scientific data are recorded on Schumann-type film. An H-alpha slit jaw monitor and zero order extreme ultraviolet monitor are also planned to support instrument operation.

  15. The control unit of the near infrared spectrograph of the Euclid space mission: detailed design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo-Moreo, Rafael; Colodro-Conde, Carlos; Gómez-Sáenz-de-Tejada, Jaime; Pérez-Lizán, David; Díaz-García, José Javier; Tubío-Araujo, Óscar; Raichs, Cayetano; Catalán, Jordi; Rebolo-López, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    The Near Infrared Spectrograph and Photometer (NISP) is one of the instruments on board the ESA EUCLID mission. The Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena and Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias are responsible of the Instrument Control Unit of the NISP (NI-ICU) in the Euclid Consortium. The NI-ICU hardware is developed by CRISA (Airbus Defence and Space), and its main functions are: communication with the S/C and the Data Processing Unit, control of the Filter and Grism Wheels, control of the Calibration Unit and thermal control of the instrument. This paper presents the NI-ICU status of definition and design at the end of the detailed design phase.

  16. DARKNESS: A Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detector Integral Field Spectrograph for High-contrast Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeker, Seth R.; Mazin, Benjamin A.; Walter, Alex B.; Strader, Paschal; Fruitwala, Neelay; Bockstiegel, Clint; Szypryt, Paul; Ulbricht, Gerhard; Coiffard, Grégoire; Bumble, Bruce; Cancelo, Gustavo; Zmuda, Ted; Treptow, Ken; Wilcer, Neal; Collura, Giulia; Dodkins, Rupert; Lipartito, Isabel; Zobrist, Nicholas; Bottom, Michael; Shelton, J. Chris; Mawet, Dimitri; van Eyken, Julian C.; Vasisht, Gautam; Serabyn, Eugene

    2018-06-01

    We present DARKNESS (the DARK-speckle Near-infrared Energy-resolving Superconducting Spectrophotometer), the first of several planned integral field spectrographs to use optical/near-infrared Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for high-contrast imaging. The photon counting and simultaneous low-resolution spectroscopy provided by MKIDs will enable real-time speckle control techniques and post-processing speckle suppression at frame rates capable of resolving the atmospheric speckles that currently limit high-contrast imaging from the ground. DARKNESS is now operational behind the PALM-3000 extreme adaptive optics system and the Stellar Double Coronagraph at Palomar Observatory. Here, we describe the motivation, design, and characterization of the instrument, early on-sky results, and future prospects.

  17. Stellar Astrophysics with a Dispersed Fourier Transform Spectrograph. II. Orbits of Double-lined Spectroscopic Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford B.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.; McMillan, Robert S.; Murison, Marc; Meade, Jeff; Hindsley, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We present orbital parameters for six double-lined spectroscopic binaries (ι Pegasi, ω Draconis, 12 Boötis, V1143 Cygni, β Aurigae, and Mizar A) and two double-lined triple star systems (κ Pegasi and η Virginis). The orbital fits are based upon high-precision radial velocity (RV) observations made with a dispersed Fourier Transform Spectrograph, or dFTS, a new instrument that combines interferometric and dispersive elements. For some of the double-lined binaries with known inclination angles, the quality of our RV data permits us to determine the masses M 1 and M 2 of the stellar components with relative errors as small as 0.2%.

  18. On-instrument wavefront sensor design for the TMT infrared imaging spectrograph (IRIS) update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Reshetov, Vladimir; Atwood, Jenny; Pazder, John; Wooff, Bob; Loop, David; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Moore, Anna M.; Larkin, James E.

    2014-08-01

    The first light instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) project will be the InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). IRIS will be mounted on a bottom port of the facility AO instrument NFIRAOS. IRIS will report guiding information to the NFIRAOS through the On-Instrument Wavefront Sensor (OIWFS) that is part of IRIS. This will be in a self-contained compartment of IRIS and will provide three deployable wavefront sensor probe arms. This entire unit will be rotated to provide field de-rotation. Currently in our preliminary design stage our efforts have included: prototyping of the probe arm to determine the accuracy of this critical component, handling cart design and reviewing different types of glass for the atmospheric dispersion.

  19. Flight Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) Optical Design for WFIRST Coronagraphic Exoplanet Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Groff, Tyler D.; Zimmerman, Neil; Mandell, Avi; McElwain, Michael; Rizzo, Maxime; Saxena, Prabal

    2017-01-01

    Based on the experience from Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST, we have moved to the flight instrument design phase. The specifications for flight IFS have similarities and differences from the prototype. This paper starts with the science and system requirement, discusses a number of critical trade-offs: such as IFS type selection, lenslet array shape and layout versus detector pixel accuracy, how to accommodate the larger Field Of View (FOV) and wider wavelength band for a potential add-on StarShade occulter. Finally, the traditional geometric optical design is also investigated and traded: reflective versus refractive, telecentric versus non-telecentric relay. The relay before the lenslet array controls the chief angle distribution on the lenslet array. Our previous paper has addressed how the relay design combined with lenslet arraypinhole mask can further compress the residual star light and increase the contrast. Finally, a complete phase A IFS optical design is presented.

  20. The CHARIS Integral Field Spectrograph with SCExAO: Data Reduction and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler; Brandt, Timothy; Currie, Thayne; Rizzo, Maxime; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; Guyon, Olivier; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Lozi, Julien; Norris, Barnaby; Tamura, Motohide

    2018-01-01

    We summarize the data reduction pipeline and on-sky performance of the CHARIS Integral Field Spectrograph behind the SCExAO Adaptive Optics system on the Subaru Telescope. The open-source pipeline produces data cubes from raw detector reads using a Χ^2-based spectral extraction technique. It implements a number of advances, including a fit to the full nonlinear pixel response, suppression of up to a factor of ~2 in read noise, and deconvolution of the spectra with the line-spread function. The CHARIS team is currently developing the calibration and postprocessing software that will comprise the second component of the data reduction pipeline. Here, we show a range of CHARIS images, spectra, and contrast curves produced using provisional routines. CHARIS is now characterizing exoplanets simultaneously across the J, H, and K bands.

  1. A flux calibration device for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Simona; Aldering, Greg; Hoffmann, Akos; Kowalski, Marek; Kuesters, Daniel; Reif, Klaus; Rigault, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Observational cosmology employing optical surveys often require precise flux calibration. In this context we present SNIFS Calibration Apparatus (SCALA), a flux calibration system developed for the SuperNova Integral Field Spectrograph (SNIFS), operating at the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. SCALA consists of a hexagonal array of 18 small parabolic mirrors distributed over the face of, and feeding parallel light to, the telescope entrance pupil. The mirrors are illuminated by integrating spheres and a wavelength-tunable (from UV to IR) light source, generating light beams with opening angles of 1°. These nearly parallel beams are flat and flux-calibrated at a subpercent level, enabling us to calibrate our "telescope + SNIFS system" at the required precision.

  2. A mask quality control tool for the OSIRIS multi-object spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ruiz, J. C.; Vaz Cedillo, Jacinto Javier; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Bongiovanni, Ángel; González Escalera, Víctor

    2012-09-01

    OSIRIS multi object spectrograph uses a set of user-customised-masks, which are manufactured on-demand. The manufacturing process consists of drilling the specified slits on the mask with the required accuracy. Ensuring that slits are on the right place when observing is of vital importance. We present a tool for checking the quality of the process of manufacturing the masks which is based on analyzing the instrument images obtained with the manufactured masks on place. The tool extracts the slit information from these images, relates specifications with the extracted slit information, and finally communicates to the operator if the manufactured mask fulfills the expectations of the mask designer. The proposed tool has been built using scripting languages and using standard libraries such as opencv, pyraf and scipy. The software architecture, advantages and limits of this tool in the lifecycle of a multiobject acquisition are presented.

  3. Characterization and on-sky demonstration of an integrated photonic spectrograph for astronomy.

    PubMed

    Cvetojevic, N; Lawrence, J S; Ellis, S C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Haynes, R; Horton, A

    2009-10-12

    We present results from the first on-sky demonstration of a prototype astronomical integrated photonic spectrograph (IPS) using the Anglo-Australian Telescope near-infrared imaging spectrometer (IRIS2) at Siding Spring Observatory to observe atmospheric molecular OH emission lines. We have succeeded in detecting upwards of 27 lines, and demonstrated the practicality of the IPS device for astronomy. Furthermore, we present a laboratory characterization of the device, which is a modified version of a commercial arrayed-waveguide grating multiplexer. We measure the spectral resolution full-width-half-maximum to be 0.75 +/- 0.05 nm (giving R = lambda/deltalambda = 2100 +/- 150 at 1500 nm). We find the free spectral range to be 57.4 +/- 0.6 nm and the peak total efficiency to be approximately 65%. Finally, we briefly discuss the future steps required to realize an astronomical instrument based on this technology concept.

  4. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; McElwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Hilton, George; Perrin, Marshall; Sayson, Llop; Domingo, Jorge; hide

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a prototype lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey TelescopeAstrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRSTAFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC). We will present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the compatibility to upgrade from the current 1k x 1k detector array to 4k x 4k detector array. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  5. "Slit Mask Design for the Giant Magellan Telescope Multi-object Astronomical and Cosmological Spectrograph"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Darius; Marshall, Jennifer L.; Schmidt, Luke M.; Prochaska, Travis; DePoy, Darren L.

    2018-01-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope Multi-object Astronomical and Cosmological Spectrograph (GMACS) is currently in development for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). GMACS will employ slit masks with a usable diameter of approximately 0.450 m for the purpose of multi-slit spectroscopy. Of significant importance are the design constraints and parameters of the multi-object slit masks themselves as well as the means for mapping astronomical targets to physical mask locations. Analytical methods are utilized to quantify deformation effects on a potential slit mask due to thermal expansion and vignetting of target light cones. Finite element analysis (FEA) is utilized to simulate mask flexure in changing gravity vectors. The alpha version of the mask creation program for GMACS, GMACS Mask Simulator (GMS), a derivative of the OSMOS Mask Simulator (OMS), is introduced.

  6. Update on the Status of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph onboard the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Svea; Aloisi, A.; Bostroem, K. A.; Cox, C.; Debes, J. H.; DiFelice, A.; Roman-Duval, J.; Hodge, P.; Holland, S.; Lindsay, K.; Lockwood, S. A.; Mason, E.; Oliveira, C. M.; Penton, S. V.; Proffitt, C. R.; Sonnentrucker, P.; Taylor, J. M.; Wheeler, T.

    2013-06-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) has been on orbit for approximately 16 years as one of the 2nd generation instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Its operations were interrupted by an electronics failure in 2004, but STIS was successfully repaired in May 2009 during Service Mission 4 (SM4) allowing it to resume science observations. The Instrument team continues to monitor its performance and work towards improving the quality of its products. Here we present updated information on the status of the FUV and NUV MAMA and the CCD detectors onboard STIS and describe recent changes to the STIS calibration pipeline. We also discuss the status of efforts to apply a pixel-based correction for charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) effects to STIS CCD data. These techniques show promise for ameliorating the effects of ongoing radiation damage on the quality of STIS CCD data.

  7. Optical design and optical properties of a VUV spectrographic imager for ICON mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loicq, Jerome; Kintziger, Christian; Mazzoli, Alexandra; Miller, Tim; Chou, Cathy; Frey, Harald U.; Immel, Thomas J.; Mende, Stephen B.

    2016-07-01

    In the frame of the ICON (Ionospheric Connection Explorer) mission of NASA led by UC Berkeley, CSL and SSL Berkeley have designed in cooperation a new Far UV spectro-imager. The instrument is based on a Czerny-Turner spectrograph coupled with two back imagers. The whole field of view covers [+/- 12° vertical, +/- 9° horizontal]. The instrument is surmounted by a rotating mirror to adjust the horizontal field of view pointing by +/- 30°. To meet the scientific imaging and spectral requirements the instrument has been optimized. The optimization philosophy and related analysis are presented in the present paper. PSF, distortion map and spectral properties are described. A tolerance study and alignment cases were performed to prove the instrument can be built and aligned. Finally straylight and out of band properties are discussed.

  8. Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) Multiple EUV Grating Spectrographs (MEGS): Radiometric Calibrations and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hock, R. A.; Woods, T. N.; Crotser, D.; Eparvier, F. G.; Woodraska, D. L.; Chamberlin, P. C.; Woods, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), scheduled for launch in early 2010, incorporates a suite of instruments including the Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE). EVE has multiple instruments including the Multiple Extreme ultraviolet Grating Spectrographs (MEGS) A, B, and P instruments, the Solar Aspect Monitor (SAM), and the Extreme ultraviolet SpectroPhotometer (ESP). The radiometric calibration of EVE, necessary to convert the instrument counts to physical units, was performed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility (SURF III) located in Gaithersburg, Maryland. This paper presents the results and derived accuracy of this radiometric calibration for the MEGS A, B, P, and SAM instruments, while the calibration of the ESP instrument is addressed by Didkovsky et al. . In addition, solar measurements that were taken on 14 April 2008, during the NASA 36.240 sounding-rocket flight, are shown for the prototype EVE instruments.

  9. Creating Data that Never Die: Building a Spectrograph Data Pipeline in the Virtual Observatory Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mink, D. J.; Wyatt, W. F.; Roll, J. B.; Tokarz, S. P.; Conroy, M. A.; Caldwell, N.; Kurtz, M.; Geller, M. J.

    2005-12-01

    Data pipelines for modern complex astronomical instruments do not begin when the data is taken and end when it is delivered to the user. Information must flow between the observatory and the observer from the time a project is conceived and between the observatory and the world well past the time when the original observers have extracted all the information they want from the data. For the 300-fiber Hectospec low dispersion spectrograph on the MMT, the SAO Telescope Data Center is constructing a data pipeline which provides assistance from preparing and submitting observing proposals through observation, reduction, and analysis to publication and an afterlife in the Virtual Observatory. We will describe our semi-automatic pipeline and how it has evolved over the first nine months of operation.

  10. Absence of a detectable lunar nanodust exosphere during a search with LRO's LAMP UV imaging spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grava, C.; Stubbs, T. J.; Glenar, D. A.; Retherford, K. D.; Kaufmann, D. E.

    2017-05-01

    The Lyman-Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) UV spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) performed a campaign to observe the Moon's nanodust exosphere, evidence for which was provided by the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVS) during the 2014 Quadrantid meteoroid stream. These LADEE/UVS observations were consistent with a nanodust exosphere modulated by meteoroid impacts. LRO performed off-nadir maneuvers around the peak of the 2016 Quadrantids, in order to reproduce, as closely as possible, the active meteoroid environment and observing geometry of LADEE/UVS. We analyzed LAMP spectra to search for sunlight backscattering from nanodust. No brightness enhancement attributable to dust, of any size, was observed. We determine an upper limit for dust column concentration of 105 cm-2 for grains of radius 25 nm, and an upper limit for dust column mass of 10-11 g cm-2, nearly independent of grain size for radii <100 nm.

  11. Industrial solutions trends for the control of HiRes spectrograph@E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Marcantonio, P.; Baldini, V.; Calderone, G.; Cirami, R.; Coretti, I.; Cristiani, S.

    Starting a few years ago, ESO initiated a number of projects aiming to explore the possible adoption of industrial standards and commercial off-the-shelf components (COTS) for the control of future VLT and E-ELT instrumentations. In this context, ESPRESSO, the next generation high-stability spectrograph for the VLT and to a certain extent, a precursor of HiRes, has adopted since the preliminary design phase those solutions. Based on the ESPRESSO experience and taking into account the requirements inferred from the preliminary Hi-Res studies in terms of both high-level operations as well as low-level control, I will present in this paper the current proposal for the HiRes hardware architecture.

  12. A reduction package for cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph data in IDL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffrey C.; Neff, James E.

    1992-12-01

    We have written in IDL a data reduction package that performs reduction and extraction of cross-dispersed echelle spectrograph data. The present package includes a complete set of tools for extracting data from any number of spectral orders with arbitrary tilt and curvature. Essential elements include debiasing and flatfielding of the raw CCD image, removal of scattered light background, either nonoptimal or optimal extraction of data, and wavelength calibration and continuum normalization of the extracted orders. A growing set of support routines permits examination of the frame being processed to provide continuing checks on the statistical properties of the data and on the accuracy of the extraction. We will display some sample reductions and discuss the algorithms used. The inherent simplicity and user-friendliness of the IDL interface make this package a useful tool for spectroscopists. We will provide an email distribution list for those interested in receiving the package, and further documentation will be distributed at the meeting.

  13. An Infrared Multi-Object Spectrograph (IRMS) with adaptive optics for TMT: the science case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobasher, Bahram; Crampton, David; Simard, Luc

    2010-07-01

    It has been recognized that a Near-Infrared Multi-object Spectrograph (IRMS) as one of the first light instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) would significantly increase the scientific capability of the observatory. The IRMS is planned to be a clone of the MOSFIRE instrument on the Keck telescope. As a result, we use the already available MOSFIRE design and expertise, significantly reducing the total cost and its development time. The IRMS will be a quasi diffraction limited multi-slit spectrograph with moderate resolution (R~4000), fed by Narrow-Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS). It images over the 2 arcmin diameter field of view of the NFIRAOS. There are a number of exceedingly important scientific questions, waiting to be addressed by the TMT/IRMS combination. Given its relatively small field of view, it is less affected by the sky background, which is a limiting factor in ground-based observations at near-IR wavelengths. The IRMS is the ideal instrument for studying spectroscopic properties of galaxies at the re-ionization epoch (z > 7), where the Lyman alpha line shifts to the near-ir wavelenghths. It can be used to measure rotation curves of spiral and velocity dispersion of elliptical galaxies at z~2-3 and hence, their spectroscopic mass. It can be used to search for population III stars via their spectroscopic signature and to perform measurement of spectroscopic lines at high redshifts, diagnostic of metallicity. Finally, IRMS allows measurement of the blue shifts in the rest-frame MgII line for high redshift galaxies, used to study the winds, leading to the feedback mechanism, responsible for quenching star formation activity in galaxies.

  14. KiwiSpec - an advanced spectrograph for high resolution spectroscopy: optical design and variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stuart I.; Gibson, Steve; Nield, Kathryn; Cochrane, Dave

    2012-09-01

    The KiwiSpec R4-100 is an advanced high resolution spectrograph developed by KiwiStar Optics, Industrial Research Ltd, New Zealand. The instrument is based around an R4 echelle grating and a 100mm collimated beam diameter. The optical design employs a highly asymmetric white pupil design, whereby the transfer collimator has a focal length only 1/3 that of the primary collimator. This allows the cross-dispersers (VPH gratings) and camera optics to be small and low cost while also ensuring a very compact instrument. The KiwiSpec instrument will be bre-fed and is designed to be contained in both thermal and/or vacuum enclosures. The instrument concept is highly exible in order to ensure that the same basic design can be used for a wide variety of science cases. Options include the possibility of splitting the wavelength coverage into 2 to 4 separate channels allowing each channel to be highly optimized for maximum eciency. CCDs ranging from smaller than 2K2K to larger than 4K4K can be accommodated. This allows good (3-4 pixel) sampling of resolving powers ranging from below 50,000 to greater than 100,000. Among the specic design options presented here will be a two-channel concept optimized for precision radial velocities, and a four-channel concept developed for the Gemini High- Resolution Optical Spectrograph (GHOST). The design and performance of a single-channel prototype will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.

  15. KiwiSpec - an advanced spectrograph for high resolution spectroscopy: prototype design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steve; Barnes, Stuart I.; Hearnshaw, John; Nield, Kathryn; Cochrane, Dave; Grobler, Deon

    2012-09-01

    A new advanced high resolution spectrograph has been developed by Kiwistar Optics of Industrial Research Ltd., New Zealand. The instrument, KiwiSpec R4-100, is bench-mounted, bre-fed, compact (0.75m by 1.5m footprint), and is well-suited for small to medium-sized telescopes. The instrument makes use of several advanced concepts in high resolution spectrograph design. The basic design follows the classical white pupil concept in an asymmetric implementation and employs an R4 echelle grating illuminated by a 100mm diameter collimated beam for primary dispersion. A volume phase holographic grating (VPH) based grism is used for cross-dispersion. The design also allows for up to four camera and detector channels to allow for extended wavelength coverage at high eciency. A single channel prototype of the instrument has been built and successfully tested with a 1m telescope. Targets included various spectrophotometric standard stars and several radial velocity standard stars to measure the instrument's light throughput and radial velocity capabilities. The prototype uses a 725 lines/mm VPH grism, an off-the-shelf camera objective, and a 2k×2k CCD. As such, it covers the wavelength range from 420nm to 660nm and has a resolving power of R ≍ 40,000. Spectrophotometric and precision radial velocity results from the on-sky testing period will be reported, as well as results of laboratory-based measurements. The optical design of KiwiSpec, and the various multi-channel design options, will be presented elsewhere in these proceedings.

  16. The assembly, calibration, and preliminary results from the Colorado high-resolution Echelle stellar spectrograph (CHESS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoadley, Keri; France, Kevin; Nell, Nicholas; Kane, Robert; Schultz, Ted; Beasley, Matthew; Green, James; Kulow, Jen; Kersgaard, Eliot; Fleming, Brian

    2014-07-01

    The Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph (CHESS) is a far ultraviolet (FUV) rocket-borne experiment designed to study the atomic-to-molecular transitions within translucent interstellar clouds. CHESS is an objective echelle spectrograph operating at f/12.4 and resolving power of 120,000 over a band pass of 100 - 160 nm. The echelle flight grating is the product of a research and development project with LightSmyth Inc. and was coated at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) with Al+LiF. It has an empirically-determined groove density of 71.67 grooves/mm. At the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA) at the University of Colorado (CU), we measured the efficiencies of the peak and adjacent dispersion orders throughout the 90 - 165 nm band pass to characterize the behavior of the grating for pre-flight calibrations and to assess the scattered-light behavior. The crossdispersing grating, developed and ruled by Horiba Jobin-Yvon, is a holographically-ruled, low line density (351 grooves/mm), powered optic with a toroidal surface curvature. The CHESS cross-disperser was also coated at GSFC; Cr+Al+LiF was deposited to enhance far-UV efficiency. Results from final efficiency and reflectivity measurements of both optics are presented. We utilize a cross-strip anode microchannel plate (MCP) detector built by Sensor Sciences to achieve high resolution (25 μm spatial resolution) and data collection rates (~ 106 photons/second) over a large format (40mm round, digitized to 8k x 8k) for the first time in an astronomical sounding rocket flight. The CHESS instrument was successfully launched from White Sands Missile Range on 24 May 2014. We present pre-flight sensitivity, effective area calculations, lab spectra and calibration results, and touch on first results and post-flight calibration plans.

  17. Commissioning the Robert Stobie Spectrograph on the 11-meter Southern African Large Telescope (SALT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; Nordsieck, K.; Williams, T.; Buckley, D.; SALT Operations Group; UW-Madison RSS Commissioning Group

    2012-01-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is an 11-meter optical and near-infrared telescope located in South Africa. It is operated by an international consortium led by South Africa and consisting of partners in the U.S., Europe, India, and New Zealand. After some initial telescope image quality problems were fixed, one of the main workhorse instruments called the Robert Stobie Spectrograph began checkout and commissioning in April, 2011. All of the instrument modes have been shown to be operational, and some of them are now in routine use. Shared-risk science observations began in September, 2011, alongside ongoing commissioning of the more unusual modes of this very versatile and complex instrument. The RSS provides numerous capabilities in a compact prime-focus design with an 8 arcminute field of view: • Long-slit spectroscopy. Six gratings provide resolving powers ranging from 800 to 11,000 and wavelength coverage from the blue atmospheric cutoff (320 nm) to around 1000 nm. • Multi-object spectroscopy using laser-cut slit masks. • High speed spectroscopy. By restricting the field of view in a slot mode, spectra can be read out as rapidly as 10 Hz. • Fixed band imaging. In addition to providing help with target acquisition, the RSS imaging mode is a powerful narrow-band imaging system, with a suite of narrow-band filters nearly continuously covering the wavelength range 430 - 900 nm. • Fabry-Perot imaging. The system can operate with either one or two etalons, providing a range in spectral resolving power from 250 to 10,000 over 430- 900 nm. • Polarimetry. All of the modes listed above also support polarimetric modes (linear and circular). Two next-generation instruments are under construction: a high-resolution fiber-fed spectrograph with resolving power reaching 65,000; and a near-infrared sibling of RSS, which will extend the spectral coverage to 1.7 microns.

  18. CAB Contribution to HARMONI: The first light spectrograph of the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piqueras López, J.; Arribas, S.; Calcines, A.

    2017-03-01

    HARMONI (High Angular Resolution Monolithic Optical and Near-infrared Integral field spectrograph) is a visible and near-infrared (0.47 to 2.45 μm) integral field spectrograph selected as a first-light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT). With four spatial scales (60, 20, 10 and 4 mas) and a wide range of spectral resolving powers (R=3500, 7500, 20000), HARMONI will allow scientists to address many of the E-ELT science cases. The HARMONI Consortium is led by the University of Oxford, and is also formed by the UK Astronomy Technology Centre (UKATC, Edinburgh, UK), Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CRAL), Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille (LAM), Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC, Spain) and the Centro de Astrobiología (CAB INTA-CSIC, Spain). We summarize here the current status of the project, and describe the participation of CAB to design and manufacture two of the instrument sub-systems: the calibration unit and the secondary guiding module. The calibration unit will simulate the optical output of the telescope, and provide the functionality needed to illuminate the focal plane in such a way that the following type of data can be obtained: data aimed at removing the instrumental signature from the raw data and to convert the data into a data product that uses physical units, data required for monitoring the status of the instrument, and data required for calibrating the secondary guiding subsystem. The secondary guiding subsystem basic requirement is to provide knowledge (relative or absolute) of the location of the science focal plane on timescales of a few seconds and longer (up to months), with an accuracy of 2mas or 0.1x the input FWHM (at H/K bands), whichever is greater. The subsystem should achieve this level performance for different observation modes, e.g. no- AO, GLAO and LTAO modes.

  19. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  20. Spectroscopic classification of Gaia17apq and Gaia17apv with Double Spectrograph on Palomar 200-inch telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagorodnova, N.; Adams, S.

    2017-03-01

    We report the classification of Gaia17apq and Gaia17apv (SN2017cao and SN2017cat), discovered by the Gaia ESA survey. The observations were performed on UT 2017-03-16 with the Double Spectrograph (DBSP; range 350-1000nm, spectral resolution R 4000) on Palomar 200-inch (P200) telescope.

  1. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor); Hua, Duy H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  2. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  3. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  4. Laser Atmospheric Absorption Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    A. Modification of Commercial C09 Laser 50 B. CW HF/DF Laser System * 53 C. Microcomputer Data Link 55 D . Fourier Transform...improved accuracy are used [5]. c. The absorption coefficient is listed for each absorbing species separately which some codes require. d . A super...series of water vapor absorption measurements was planned. The results of the first four lines studied are presented here in Figures 33a- d . Figure

  5. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  6. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  7. Absorption fluids data survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  8. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  9. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  10. Fiber link design for the NASA-NSF extreme precision Doppler spectrograph concept "WISDOM"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fżrész, Gábor; Pawluczyk, Rafal; Fournier, Paul; Simcoe, Robert; Woods, Deborah F.

    2016-08-01

    We describe the design of the fiber-optic coupling and light transfer system of the WISDOM (WIYN Spectrograph for DOppler Monitoring) instrument. As a next-generation Precision Radial Velocity (PRV) spectrometer, WISDOM incorporates lessons learned from HARPS about thermal, pressure, and gravity control, but also takes new measures to stabilize the spectrograph illumination, a subject that has been overlooked until recently. While fiber optic links provide more even illumination than a conventional slit, careful engineering of the interface is required to realize their full potential. Conventional round fiber core geometries have been used successfully in conjunction with optical double scramblers, but such systems still retain a memory of the input illumination that is visible in systems seeking sub-m/s PRV precision. Noncircular fibers, along with advanced optical scramblers, and careful optimization of the spectrograph optical system itself are therefore necessary to study Earth-sized planets. For WISDOM, we have developed such a state-of-the-art fiber link concept. Its design is driven primarily by PRV requirements, but it also manages to preserve high overall throughput. Light from the telescope is coupled into a set of six, 32 μm diameter octagonal core fibers, as high resolution is achieved via pupil slicing. The low-OH, step index, fused silica, FBPI-type fibers are custom designed for their numerical aperture that matches the convergence of the feeding beam and thus minimizes focal ratio degradation at the output. Given the demanding environment at the telescope the fiber end tips are mounted in a custom fused silica holder, providing a perfect thermal match. We used a novel process, chemically assisted photo etching, to manufacture this glass fiber holder. A single ball-lens scrambler is inserted into the 25m long fibers. Employing an anti-reflection (AR) coated, high index, cubic-zirconia ball lens the alignment of the scrambler components are

  11. Direct observation of extrasolar planets and the development of the gemini planet imager integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilcote, Jeffrey Kaplan

    This thesis is focused on the development and testing of a new instrument capable of finding and characterizing recently-formed Jupiter-sized planets orbiting other stars. To observe these planets, I present the design, construction and testing of the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS). GPI is a facility class instrument for the Gemini Observatory with the primary goal of directly detecting young Jovian planets. The GPI IFS utilizes an infrared transmissive lenslet array to sample a rectangular 2.7 x 2.7 arcsecond field of view and provide low-resolution spectra across five bands between 1 and 2.5 mum. The dispersing element can be replaced with a Wollaston prism to provide broadband polarimetry across the same five filter bands. The IFS construction was based at the University of California, Los Angeles in collaboration with the Universite de Montreal, Immervision and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. I will present performance results, from in-lab testing, of the Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) for the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). The IFS is a large, complex, cryogenic, optical system requiring several years of development and testing. I will present the design and integration of the mechanical and optical performance of the spectrograph optics. The IFS passed its pre-ship review in 2011 and was shipped to University of California, Santa Cruz for integration with the remaining sub-systems of GPI. The UCLA built GPI IFS was integrated with the rest of GPI and is delivering high quality spectral datacubes of GPI's coronagraphic field. Using the NIRC2 instrument located at the Keck Observatory, my collaborators and I observed the planetary companion to beta Pictoris in L' (3.5--4.1mum). Observations taken in the fall of 2009 and 2012 are used to find the location and inclination of the planet relative to the massive debris disk orbiting beta Pictoris. We find that the planet's orbit has a position angle on the sky of 211

  12. The LUVOIR Ultraviolet Multi-Object Spectrograph (LUMOS): instrument definition and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    France, Kevin; Fleming, Brian; West, Garrett; McCandliss, Stephan R.; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Harris, Walter; Moustakas, Leonidas; O'Meara, John M.; Pascucci, Ilaria; Rigby, Jane; Schiminovich, David; Tumlinson, Jason

    2017-08-01

    The Large Ultraviolet/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR) is one of four large mission concepts currently undergoing community study for consideration by the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. LUVOIR is being designed to pursue an ambitious program of exoplanetary discovery and characterization, cosmic origins astrophysics, and planetary science. The LUVOIR study team is investigating two large telescope apertures (9- and 15-meter primary mirror diameters) and a host of science instruments to carry out the primary mission goals. Many of the exoplanet, cosmic origins, and planetary science goals of LUVOIR require high-throughput, imaging spectroscopy at ultraviolet (100 - 400 nm) wavelengths. The LUVOIR Ultraviolet Multi-Object Spectrograph, LUMOS, is being designed to support all of the UV science requirements of LUVOIR, from exoplanet host star characterization to tomography of circumgalactic halos to water plumes on outer solar system satellites. LUMOS offers point source and multi-object spectroscopy across the UV bandpass, with multiple resolution modes to support different science goals. The instrument will provide low (R = 8,000 - 18,000) and medium (R = 30,000 - 65,000) resolution modes across the far-ultraviolet (FUV: 100 - 200 nm) and nearultraviolet (NUV: 200 - 400 nm) windows, and a very low resolution mode (R = 500) for spectroscopic investigations of extremely faint objects in the FUV. Imaging spectroscopy will be accomplished over a 3 × 1.6 arcminute field-of-view by employing holographically-ruled diffraction gratings to control optical aberrations, microshutter arrays (MSA) built on the heritage of the Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), advanced optical coatings for high-throughput in the FUV, and next generation large-format photon-counting detectors. The spectroscopic capabilities of LUMOS are augmented by an FUV imaging channel (100 - 200nm, 13 milliarcsecond angular resolution, 2 × 2

  13. KiwiSpec: The Design and Performance of a High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph for Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steven Ross

    This document describes the design, analysis, construction and testing of KiwiSpec, a fibre-fed, high resolution astronomical spectrograph of an asymmetric white pupil design. The instrument employs an R4, 31.6 groove mm-1 échelle grating for primary dispersion and a 725 lines mm-1 volume phase holographic (VPH) based grism for cross-dispersion. Two versions of the prototype were designed and constructed: an 'in-air' prototype, and a prototype featuring a vacuum chamber (to increase the stability of the instrument). The KiwiSpec optical design is introduced, as well as a description of the theory behind a cross-dispersed échelle spectrograph. The results of tolerancing the optical design are reported for alignment, optical fabrication, and optical surface quality groups of parameters. The optical windows of an iodine cell are also toleranced. The opto-mechanical mounts of both prototypes are described in detail, as is the design of the vacuum chamber system. Given the goal of 1 m/s radial velocity stability, analyses were undertaken to determine the allowable amount of movement of the vacuum windows, and to determine the allowable changes in temperature and pressure within and outside of the vacuum chamber. The spectral efficiency of the instrument was estimated through a predictive model; this was calculated for the as-built instrument and also for an instrument with ideal, high-efficiency coatings. Measurements of the spectral efficiency of various components of the instrument are reported, as well as a description of the measurement system developed to test the efficiency of VPH gratings. On-sky efficiency measurements from use of KiwiSpec on the 1-m McLellan telescope at Mt John University Observatory are reported. Two possible exposure meter locations are explored via an efficiency model, and also through the measurement of the zero-order reflectivity of the échelle grating. Various stability aspects of the design are investigated. These include the

  14. Extragalactic science, cosmology, and Galactic archaeology with the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Masahiro; Ellis, Richard S.; Chiba, Masashi; Greene, Jenny E.; Aihara, Hiroaki; Arimoto, Nobuo; Bundy, Kevin; Cohen, Judith; Doré, Olivier; Graves, Genevieve; Gunn, James E.; Heckman, Timothy; Hirata, Christopher M.; Ho, Paul; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Lin, Lihwai; More, Surhud; Murayama, Hitoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Ouchi, Masami; Seiffert, Michael; Silverman, John D.; Sodré, Laerte; Spergel, David N.; Strauss, Michael A.; Sugai, Hajime; Suto, Yasushi; Takami, Hideki; Wyse, Rosemary

    2014-02-01

    The Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a massively multiplexed fiber-fed optical and near-infrared three-arm spectrograph (Nfiber = 2400, 380 ≤ λ ≤ 1260 nm, 1 .^{circ}3 diameter field of view). Here, we summarize the science cases in terms of provisional plans for a 300-night Subaru survey. We describe plans to constrain the nature of dark energy via a survey of emission line galaxies spanning a comoving volume of 9.3 h-3 Gpc3 in the redshift range 0.8 < z < 2.4. In each of six redshift bins, the cosmological distances will be measured to 3% precision via the baryonic acoustic oscillation scale, and redshift-space distortion measures will constrain structure growth to 6% precision. In the near-field cosmology program, radial velocities and chemical abundances of stars in the Milky Way and M 31 will be used to infer the past assembly histories of spiral galaxies and the structure of their dark matter halos. Data will be secured for 106 stars in the Galactic thick-disk, halo, and tidal streams as faint as V ˜ 22, including stars with V < 20 to complement the goals of the Gaia mission. A medium-resolution mode with R = 5000 to be implemented in the red arm will allow the measurement of multiple α-element abundances and more precise velocities for Galactic stars. For the galaxy evolution program, our simulations suggest the wide wavelength range of PFS will be powerful in probing the galaxy population and its clustering over a wide redshift range. We plan to conduct a color-selected survey of 1 < z < 2 galaxies and AGN over 16 deg2 to J ≃ 23.4, yielding a fair sample of galaxies with stellar masses above ˜1010 M⊙ at z ≃ 2. A two-tiered survey of higher redshift Lyman break galaxies and Lyman alpha emitters will quantify the properties of early systems close to the reionization epoch.

  15. Absorption kinetics and action profiles of subcutaneously administered insulin analogues (AspB9GluB27, AspB10, AspB28) in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Brange, J; Burch, A; Vølund, A; Owens, D R

    1991-11-01

    The subcutaneous absorption and resulting changes in plasma insulin or analogue, glucose, C-peptide, and blood intermediary metabolite concentrations after subcutaneous bolus injection of three soluble human insulin analogues (AspB9GluB27, monomeric; AspB28, mixture of monomers and dimers; and AspB10, dimeric) and soluble human insulin were evaluated. Fasting healthy male volunteers (n = 7) were studied on five occasions 1 wk apart randomly receiving 0.6 nmol.kg-1 s.c. 125I-labeled AspB10 or soluble human insulin (Novolin R, Novo, Copenhagen); 1st study and 0.6 nmol.kg-1 s.c. 125I-labeled AspB28, AspB9GluB27 or soluble human insulin (2nd study). Residual radioactivity at the injection site was measured over 8 h with frequent venous sampling for plasma immunoreactive insulin or analogue, glucose, C-peptide, and blood intermediary metabolite concentrations. The three analogues were absorbed 2-3 times faster than human insulin. The mean +/- SE time to 50% residual radioactivity was 94 +/- 6 min for AspB10 compared with 184 +/- 10 min for human insulin (P less than 0.001), 83 +/- 8 min for AspB28 (P less than 0.005), and 63 +/- 9 min for AspB9GluB27 (P less than 0.001) compared with 182 +/- 21 min for human insulin. delta Peak plasma insulin analogue levels were significantly higher after each analogue than after human insulin (P less than 0.005). With all three analogues, the mean hypoglycemic nadir occurred earlier at 61-65 min postinjection compared with 201-210 min for the reference human insulins (P less than 0.005). The magnitude of the hypoglycemic nadir was greater after AspB9GluB27 (P less than 0.05) and AspB28 (P less than 0.001) compared with human insulin. There was a significantly faster onset and offset of responses in C-peptide and intermediary metabolite levels after the analogues than after human insulin (P less than 0.05). The rapid absorption and biological actions of these analogues offer potential therapeutic advantages over the current short

  16. A Decade of H α Transits for HD 189733 b: Stellar Activity versus Absorption in the Extended Atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cauley, P. Wilson; Redfield, Seth; Jensen, Adam G., E-mail: pcauley@wesleyan.edu

    HD 189733 b is one of the most well studied exoplanets due to its large transit depth and host star brightness. The focus on this object has produced a number of high-cadence transit observations using high-resolution optical spectrographs. Here we present an analysis of seven full H α transits of HD 189733 b using HARPS on the 3.6 meter La Silla telescope and HIRES on Keck I, taken over the course of nine years from 2006 to 2015. H α transmission signals are analyzed as a function of the stellar activity level, as measured using the normalized core flux ofmore » the Ca ii H and K lines. We find strong variations in the strength of the H α transmission spectrum from epoch to epoch. However, there is no clear trend between the Ca ii core emission and the strength of the in-transit H α signal, although the transit showing the largest absorption value also occurs when the star is the most active. We present simulations of the in-transit contrast effect and find that the planet must consistently transit active latitudes with very strong facular and plage emission regions in order to reproduce the observed line strengths. We also investigate the measured velocity centroids with models of planetary rotation and show that the small line profile velocities could be due to large velocities in the upper atmosphere of the planet. Overall, we find it more likely that the measured H α signals arise in the extended planetary atmosphere, although a better understanding of active region emission for active stars such as HD 189733 is needed.« less

  17. Imaging Spectrograph as a Tool to Enhance the Undergraduate Student Research Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, B.; Nielsen, K.; Johnson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Undergraduate students often engage in research activities that are part of a larger project outlined by research faculty, while it is less common for students to explore and define their own research project. The later has been shown to have tremendous impact on the learning outcome of the students and provide a stronger sense of pride and ownership of the research project. It is unrealistic to expect starting undergraduate students to define transformative research projects. However, with the proper training and guidance student-driven transformative research is possible for upper division students. We have instituted a student research paradigm with focus on the development of student research skills in coordination with their course progress. We present here a specific student project that engage students in aeronomy research activities and provide them with a solid base to establish their own research projects for senior year. The core of the project is an imaging spectrograph, which is constructed, tested, and calibrated by the students. The instrument provides unique opportunities student research projects across subject such as optics, quantum mechanics, and how these subjects are applied in the geosciences of aeronomy and space physics.

  18. A transmission imaging spectrograph and microfabricated channel system for DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J W; Ruiz-Martinez, M C; Mulhern, G T; Berka, J; Latimer, D R; Ball, J A; Rothberg, J M; Went, G T

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the development of a DNA analysis system using a microfabricated channel device and a novel transmission imaging spectrograph which can be efficiently incorporated into a high throughput genomics facility for both sizing and sequencing of DNA fragments. The device contains 48 channels etched on a glass substrate. The channels are sealed with a flat glass plate which also provides a series of apertures for sample loading and contact with buffer reservoirs. Samples can be easily loaded in volumes up to 640 nL without band broadening because of an efficient electrokinetic stacking at the electrophoresis channel entrance. The system uses a dual laser excitation source and a highly sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) detector allowing for simultaneous detection of many fluorescent dyes. The sieving matrices for the separation of single-stranded DNA fragments are polymerized in situ in denaturing buffer systems. Examples of separation of single-stranded DNA fragments up to 500 bases in length are shown, including accurate sizing of GeneCalling fragments, and sequencing samples prepared with a reduced amount of dye terminators. An increase in sample throughput has been achieved by color multiplexing.

  19. Estimating the electron energy distribution during ionospheric modification from spectrographic airglow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysell, D. L.; Varney, R. H.; Vlasov, M. N.; Nossa, E.; Watkins, B.; Pedersen, T.; Huba, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    The electron energy distribution during an F region ionospheric modification experiment at the HAARP facility near Gakona, Alaska, is inferred from spectrographic airglow emission data. Emission lines at 630.0, 557.7, and 844.6 nm are considered along with the absence of detectable emissions at 427.8 nm. Estimating the electron energy distribution function from the airglow data is a problem in classical linear inverse theory. We describe an augmented version of the method of Backus and Gilbert which we use to invert the data. The method optimizes the model resolution, the precision of the mapping between the actual electron energy distribution and its estimate. Here, the method has also been augmented so as to limit the model prediction error. Model estimates of the suprathermal electron energy distribution versus energy and altitude are incorporated in the inverse problem formulation as representer functions. Our methodology indicates a heater-induced electron energy distribution with a broad peak near 5 eV that decreases approximately exponentially by 30 dB between 5-50 eV.

  20. CASSOWARY20: a wide separation Einstein Cross identified with the X-shooter spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, Max; Christensen, Lise; D'Odorico, Sandro; Belokurov, Vasily; Evans, N. Wyn; Hewett, Paul C.; Koposov, Sergey; Mason, Elena; Vernet, Joël

    2010-03-01

    We have used spectra obtained with X-shooter, the triple arm optical-infrared spectrograph recently commissioned on the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory, to confirm the gravitational lens nature of the CAmbridge Sloan Survey Of Wide ARcs in the skY (CASSOWARY) candidate CSWA20. This system consists of a luminous red galaxy at redshift zabs = 0.741, with a very high velocity dispersion, σlens ~= 500kms-1, which lenses a blue star-forming galaxy at zem = 1.433 into four images with a mean separation of ~6arcsec. The source shares many of its properties with those of UV-selected galaxies at z = 2-3: it is forming stars at a rate SFR ~= 25Msolaryr-1, has a metallicity of ~1/4 solar and shows nebular emission from two components separated by 0.4arcsec (in the image plane), possibly indicating a merger. It appears that foreground interstellar material within the galaxy has been evacuated from the sightline along which we observe the starburst, giving an unextinguished view of its stars and HII regions. CSWA20, with its massive lensing galaxy producing a high magnification of an intrinsically luminous background galaxy, is a promising target for future studies at a variety of wavelengths. Based on public data from the X-shooter commissioning observations collected at the European Southern Observatory VLT/Melipal telescope, Paranal, Chile. E-mail: pettini@ast.cam.ac.uk

  1. Status of the Geostationary Spectrograph (GeoSpec) for Earth and Atmospheric Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janz, Scott; Hilsenrath, Ernest; Mount, G.; Brune, W.; Heath, D.

    2004-01-01

    GeoSpec will support future satellite mission concepts in the Atmospheric Sciences and in Land and Ocean Sciences by providing time-resolved measurements of both chemically linked atmospheric trace gas concentrations of important molecules such as O3, NO2, CH2O and SO2 and at the same time coastal and ocean pollution events, tidal effects, and the origin and evolution of aerosol plumes. The instrument design concept in development is a dual spectrograph covering the WMS wavelength region of 310-500 nm and the VIS/NIR wavelength region of 480-900 nm coupled to all reflective telescope and high sensitivity PIN/CMOS area detector. The goal of the project is to demonstrate a system capable of making moderate spatial resolution (750 meters at nadir) hyperspectral measurements (0.6 to 1.2 nm resolution) from a geostationary orbit. This would enable studies of time-varying pollution and coastal change processes with a temporal resolution of 5 minutes on a regional scale to 1 hour on a continental scale. Other spatial resolutions can be supported by varying the focal length of the input telescope. Scientific rationale and instrument design and status will be presented.

  2. Integration of the instrument control electronics for the ESPRESSO spectrograph at ESO-VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, V.; Calderone, G.; Cirami, R.; Coretti, I.; Cristiani, S.; Di Marcantonio, P.; Mégevand, D.; Riva, M.; Santin, P.

    2016-07-01

    ESPRESSO, the Echelle SPectrograph for Rocky Exoplanet and Stable Spectroscopic Observations of the ESO - Very Large Telescope site, is now in its integration phase. The large number of functions of this complex instrument are fully controlled by a Beckhoff PLC based control electronics architecture. Four small and one large cabinets host the main electronic parts to control all the sensors, motorized stages and other analogue and digital functions of ESPRESSO. The Instrument Control Electronics (ICE) is built following the latest ESO standards and requirements. Two main PLC CPUs are used and are programmed through the TwinCAT Beckhoff dedicated software. The assembly, integration and verification phase of ESPRESSO, due to its distributed nature and different geographical locations of the consortium partners, is quite challenging. After the preliminary assembling and test of the electronic components at the Astronomical Observatory of Trieste and the test of some electronics and software parts at ESO (Garching), the complete system for the control of the four Front End Unit (FEU) arms of ESPRESSO has been fully assembled and tested in Merate (Italy) at the beginning of 2016. After these first tests, the system will be located at the Geneva Observatory (Switzerland) until the Preliminary Acceptance Europe (PAE) and finally shipped to Chile for the commissioning. This paper describes the integration strategy of the ICE workpackage of ESPRESSO, the hardware and software tests that have been performed, with an overall view of the experience gained during these project's phases.

  3. The Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI): A Powerful New Integral Field Spectrograph for the Keck Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, Patrick; KCWI Team

    2013-01-01

    The Keck Cosmic Web Imager (KCWI) is a new facility instrument being developed for the W. M. Keck Observatory and funded for construction by the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP) of the National Science Foundation (NSF). KCWI is a bench-mounted spectrograph for the Keck II right Nasmyth focal station, providing integral field spectroscopy over a seeing-limited field up to 20"x33" in extent. Selectable Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings provide high efficiency and spectral resolution in the range of 1000 to 20000. The dual-beam design of KCWI passed a Preliminary Design Review in summer 2011. The detailed design of the KCWI blue channel (350 to 700 nm) is now nearly complete, with the red channel (530 to 1050 nm) planned for a phased implementation contingent upon additional funding. KCWI builds on the experience of the Caltech team in implementing the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI), in operation since 2009 at Palomar Observatory. KCWI adds considerable flexibility to the CWI design, and will take full advantage of the excellent seeing and dark sky above Mauna Kea with a selectable nod-and-shuffle observing mode. The KCWI team is lead by Caltech (project management, design and implementation) in partnership with the University of California at Santa Cruz (camera optical and mechanical design) and the W. M. Keck Observatory (program oversight and observatory interfaces).

  4. Performance characteristics of two volume phase holographic grisms produced for the ESPRESSO spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arns, James A.

    2016-08-01

    The ESPRESSO spectrograph [1], a new addition to the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Very Large Telescope (VLT), requires two volume phase holographic (VPH) grisms, one blue and the other red, splitting the overall spectral range of the instrument to maximize throughput while achieving high resolution. The blue grism covers the spectral range from 375 nm to 520 nm with a dispersion of 0.88 degrees/nm at the central wavelength of 438 nm. The red grism operates from 535 nm to 780 nm with a dispersion of 0.47 degrees/nm at 654.8 nm. Both designs use a single input prism to enhance the dispersion of the grism assembly. The grisms are relatively large in size with a working aperture of 185 mm x 185 mm for the blue grism and 215 nm x 185 mm for the red grism respectively. This paper describes the specifications of the two grating types, gives the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) theoretical performances of diffraction efficiency for the production designs and presents the measured performances of each of the delivered grisms.

  5. Slaying Hydra: A Python-Based Reduction Pipeline for the Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Richard; Mann, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    We present a Python-based data reduction pipeline for the Hydra Multi-Object Spectrograph on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope, an instrument which enables simultaneous spectroscopy of up to 93 targets. The reduction steps carried out include flat-fielding, dynamic fiber tracing, wavelength calibration, optimal fiber extraction, and sky subtraction. The pipeline also supports the use of sky lines to correct for zero-point offsets between fibers. To account for the moving parts on the instrument and telescope, fiber positions and wavelength solutions are derived in real-time for each dataset. The end result is a one-dimensional spectrum for each target fiber. Quick and fully automated, the pipeline enables on-the-fly reduction while observing, and has been known to outperform the IRAF pipeline by more accurately reproducing known RVs. While Hydra has many configurations in both high- and low-resolution, the pipeline was developed and tested with only one high-resolution mode. In the future we plan to expand the pipeline to work in most commonly used modes.

  6. New and Better Near-Infrared Detectors for JWST Near Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauscher, Bernard J.; Mott, D. Brent; Wen, Yiting; Linder, Don; Greenhouse, Matthew A.; Hill, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    ESA and NASA recently selected two 5 m cutoff Teledyne H2RG sensor chip assemblies (SCA) for flight on the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec). These HgCdTe SCAs incorporate Teledynes improved barrier layer design that eliminates the degradation that affected earlier JWST H2RGs(Rauscher et al. 2012a). The better indium barrier, together with other design changes, has improved the performance and reliability of JWSTs SCAs. In this article, we describe the measured performance characteristics that most directly affect scientific observations including read noise, total noise, dark current, quantum efficiency (QE), and image persistence. As part of measuring QE, we measured the quantum yield as a function of photon energy,, and found that it exceeds unity for photon energies E (2.65.2) Eg, where Eg is the HgCdTe bandgap energy. This corresponds to. 2 m for NIRSpecs 5 m cutoff HgCdTe. Our measurements agree well with a previous measurement by McCullough et al. (2008) for. 1.3. For 1.3, we find a slower increase in with photon energy than McCullough et al. did. However, and as McCullough et al. note, their two state model of the yield process is not valid for large 1.

  7. Hubble Space Telescope: Goddard high resolution spectrograph instrument handbook. Version 2.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Ebbets, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) is an ultraviolet spectrometer which has been designed to exploit the imaging and pointing capabilities of the Hubble Space Telescope. It will obtain observations of astronomical sources with greater spectral, spatial and temporal resolution than has been possible with previous space-based instruments. Data from the GHRS will be applicable to many types of scientific investigations, including studies of the interstellar medium, stellar winds, chromospheres and coronae, the byproducts and endproducts of stellar evolution, planetary atmospheres, comets, and many kinds of extragalactic sources. This handbook is intended to introduce the GHRS to potential users. The main purpose is to provide enough information to explore the feasibility of possible research projects and to plan, propose and execute a set of observations. An overview of the instrument performance, which should allow one to evaluate the suitability of the GHRS to specific projects, and a somewhat more detailed description of the GHRS hardware are given. How observing programs will be carried out, the various operating modes of the instrument, and the specific information about the performance of the instrument needed to plan an observation are discussed.

  8. Optical design of the PEPSI high-resolution spectrograph at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Michael I.; Spano, Paolo; Woche, Manfred; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Beckert, Erik

    2004-09-01

    PEPSI is a high-resolution, fiber fed echelle spectrograph with polarimetric capabilities for the LBT. In order to reach a maximum resolution R=120.000 in polarimetric mode and 300.000 in integral light mode with high efficiency in the spectral range 390-1050~nm, we designed a white-pupil configuration with Maksutov collimators. Light is dispersed by an R4 31.6 lines/mm monolithic echelle grating mosaic and split into two arms through dichroics. The two arms, optimized for the spectral range 390-550~nm and 550-1050~nm, respectively, consist of Maksutov transfer collimators, VPH-grism cross dispersers, optimized dioptric cameras and 7.5K x 7.5K 8~μ CCDs. Fibers of different core sizes coupled to different image-slicers allow a high throughput, comparable to that of direct feed instruments. The optical configuration with only spherical and cylindrical surfaces, except for one aspherical surface in each camera, reduces costs and guarantees high optical quality. PEPSI is under construction at AIP with first light expected in 2006.

  9. The ICE spectrograph for PEPSI at the LBT: preliminary optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallavicini, Roberto; Zerbi, Filippo M.; Spano, Paolo; Conconi, Paolo; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Molinari, Emilio; Strassmeier, Klaus G.

    2003-03-01

    We present a preliminary design study for a high-resolution echelle spectrograph (ICE) to be used with the spectropolarimeter PEPSI under development at the LBT. In order to meet the scientific requirements and take full advantage of the peculiarities of the LBT (i.e. the binocular nature and the adaptive optics capabilities), we have designed a fiber-fed bench mounted instrument for both high resolution (R ≍ 100,000; non-AO polarimetric and integral light modes) and ultra-high resolution (R ≍ 300,000; AO integral light mode). In both cases, 4 spectra per order (two for each primary mirror) shall be accomodated in a 2-dimensional cross dispersed echelle format. In order to obtain a resolution-slit product of ≍ 100,000 as required by the science case, we have considered two alternative designs, one with two R4 echelles in series and the other with a sigle R4 echelle and fiber slicing. A white-pupil design, VPH cross-dispersers and two cameras of different focal length for the AO and non-AO modes are adopted in both cases. It is concluded that the single-echelle fiber-slicer solution has to be preferred in terms of performances, complexity and cost. It can be implemented at the LBT in two phases, with the long-camera AO mode added in a second phase depending on the availability of funds and the time-scale for implementation of the AO system.

  10. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST/AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Mcelwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hilton, George; Sayson, Jorge Llop; Perrin, Marshall; hide

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST/AFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) cofigurations. We discuss why the lenslet array based IFS is selected for PISCES. We present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the specific function of our pinhole mask on the back surface of the lenslet array to further suppress star light introduced speckles. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  11. Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) for WFIRST-AFTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Qian; Mcelwain, Michael; Greeley, Bradford; Grammer, Bryan; Marx, Catherine; Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Hilton, George; Sayson, Jorge Llop; Perrin, Marshall; hide

    2015-01-01

    Prototype Imaging Spectrograph for Coronagraphic Exoplanet Studies (PISCES) is a lenslet array based integral field spectrometer (IFS) designed for high contrast imaging of extrasolar planets. PISCES will be used to advance the technology readiness of the high contrast IFS baselined on the Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope/Astrophysics Focused Telescope Assets (WFIRST-AFTA) coronagraph instrument. PISCES will be integrated into the high contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and will work with both the Hybrid Lyot Coronagraph (HLC) and the Shaped Pupil Coronagraph (SPC) configurations. We discuss why the lenslet array based IFS was selected for PISCES. We present the PISCES optical design, including the similarities and differences of lenslet based IFSs to normal spectrometers, the trade-off between a refractive design and reflective design, as well as the specific function of our pinhole mask on the back surface of the lenslet array to reduce the diffraction from the edge of the lenslets. The optical analysis, alignment plan, and mechanical design of the instrument will be discussed.

  12. StarCAT: A Catalog of Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Ultraviolet Echelle Spectra of Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2010-03-01

    StarCAT is a catalog of high resolution ultraviolet spectra of objects classified as "stars," recorded by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) during its initial seven years of operations (1997-2004). StarCAT is based on 3184 echelle observations of 545 distinct targets, with a total exposure duration of 5.2 Ms. For many of the objects, broad ultraviolet coverage has been achieved by splicing echellegrams taken in two or more FUV (1150-1700 Å) and/or NUV (1600-3100 Å) settings. In cases of multiple pointings on conspicuously variable sources, spectra were separated into independent epochs. Otherwise, different epochs were combined to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). A post-facto correction to the calstis pipeline data sets compensated for subtle wavelength distortions identified in a previous study of the STIS calibration lamps. An internal "fluxing" procedure yielded coherent spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for objects with broadly overlapping wavelength coverage. The best StarCAT material achieves 300 m s-1 internal velocity precision; absolute accuracy at the 1 km s-1 level; photometric accuracy of order 4%; and relative flux precision several times better (limited mainly by knowledge of SEDs of UV standard stars). While StarCAT represents a milestone in the large-scale post-processing of STIS echellegrams, a number of potential improvements in the underlying "final" pipeline are identified.

  13. Flare Ribbons Approach Observed by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hou, Yijun, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn

    We report flare ribbons approach (FRA) during a multiple-ribbon M-class flare on 2015 November 4 in NOAA AR 12443, obtained by the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph and the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The flare consisted of a pair of main ribbons and two pairs of secondary ribbons. The two pairs of secondary ribbons were formed later than the appearance of the main ribbons, with respective time delays of 15 and 19 minutes. The negative-polarity main ribbon spread outward faster than the first secondary ribbon with the same polarity in front of it, and thus the FRA was generated. Just before theirmore » encounter, the main ribbon was darkening drastically and its intensity decreased by about 70% in 2 minutes, implying the suppression of main-phase reconnection that produced two main ribbons. The FRA caused the deflection of the main ribbon to the direction of secondary ribbon with a deflection angle of about 60°. A post-approach arcade was formed about 2 minutes later and the downflows were detected along the new arcade with velocities of 35–40 km s{sup −1}, indicative of the magnetic restructuring during the process of FRA. We suggest that there are three topological domains with footpoints outlined by the three pairs of ribbons. Close proximity of these domains leads to deflection of the ribbons, which is in agreement with the magnetic field topology.« less

  14. Simulating observations with HARMONI: the integral field spectrograph for the European Extremely Large Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Thatte, Niranjan; Kendrew, Sarah; Houghton, Ryan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Fusco, Thierry; Swinbank, Mark

    2014-07-01

    With the next generation of extremely large telescopes commencing construction, there is an urgent need for detailed quantitative predictions of the scientific observations that these new telescopes will enable. Most of these new telescopes will have adaptive optics fully integrated with the telescope itself, allowing unprecedented spatial resolution combined with enormous sensitivity. However, the adaptive optics point spread function will be strongly wavelength dependent, requiring detailed simulations that accurately model these variations. We have developed a simulation pipeline for the HARMONI integral field spectrograph, a first light instrument for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The simulator takes high-resolution input data-cubes of astrophysical objects and processes them with accurate atmospheric, telescope and instrumental effects, to produce mock observed cubes for chosen observing parameters. The output cubes represent the result of a perfect data reduc- tion process, enabling a detailed analysis and comparison between input and output, showcasing HARMONI's capabilities. The simulations utilise a detailed knowledge of the telescope's wavelength dependent adaptive op- tics point spread function. We discuss the simulation pipeline and present an early example of the pipeline functionality for simulating observations of high redshift galaxies.

  15. Using local correlation tracking to recover solar spectral information from a slitless spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courrier, Hans T.; Kankelborg, Charles C.

    2018-01-01

    The Multi-Order Solar EUV Spectrograph (MOSES) is a sounding rocket instrument that utilizes a concave spherical diffraction grating to form simultaneous images in the diffraction orders m=0, +1, and -1. MOSES is designed to capture high-resolution cotemporal spectral and spatial information of solar features over a large two-dimensional field of view. Our goal is to estimate the Doppler shift as a function of position for every MOSES exposure. Since the instrument is designed to operate without an entrance slit, this requires disentangling overlapping spectral and spatial information in the m=±1 images. Dispersion in these images leads to a field-dependent displacement that is proportional to Doppler shift. We identify these Doppler shift-induced displacements for the single bright emission line in the instrument passband by comparing images from each spectral order. We demonstrate the use of local correlation tracking as a means to quantify these differences between a pair of cotemporal image orders. The resulting vector displacement field is interpreted as a measurement of the Doppler shift. Since three image orders are available, we generate three Doppler maps from each exposure. These may be compared to produce an error estimate.

  16. General Astrophysics Science Enabled by the HabEx Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scowen, Paul; Clarke, John; Gaudi, B. Scott; Kiessling, Alina; Martin, Stefan; Somerville, Rachel; Stern, Daniel; HabEx Science and Technology Definition Team

    2018-01-01

    The Habitable Exoplanet Imaging Mission (HabEx) is one of the four large mission concepts being studied by NASA as input to the upcoming 2020 Decadal Survey. The mission implements two world-class General Astrophysics instruments as part of its complement of instrumentation to enable compelling science using the 4m aperture. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph has been designed to address cutting edge far ultraviolet (FUV) science that has not been possible with the Hubble Space Telescope, and to open up a wide range of capabilities that will advance astrophysics as we look into the 2030s. Our poster discusses some of those science drivers and possible applications, which range from Solar System science, to nearby and more distant studies of star formation, to studies of the circumgalactic and intergalactic mediums where the ecology of mass and energy transfer are vital to understanding stellar and galactic evolution. We discuss the performance features of the instrument that include a large 3’x3’ field of view for multi-object spectroscopy, and some 20 grating modes for a variety of spectral resolution and coverage.

  17. Calibration Efforts and Unique Capabilities of the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Proffitt, Charles R.; Welty, Daniel; Branton, Doug; Carlberg, Joleen K.; debes, John Henry; Lockwood, Sean; Riley, Allyssa; Sohn, Sangmo Tony; Sonnentrucker, Paule G.; Walborn, Nolan R.; Jedrzejewski, Robert I.

    2018-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) continues to offer the astronomy community the ability to carry out innovative UV and optical spectroscopic and imaging studies, two decades after its deployment on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Most notably, STIS provides spectroscopy in the FUV and NUV, including high spectral resolution echelle modes, imaging in the FUV, optical spectroscopy, and coronagraphic capabilities. Additionally, spatial scanning on the CCD with the long-slits is now possible to enable very high S/N spectroscopic observations without saturation while mitigating telluric and fringing concerns in the far red and near-IR. This new mode may especially benefit the diffuse interstellar bands and exoplanet transiting communities. We present recent calibration efforts for the instrument, including work to optimize the calibration of the echelle spectroscopic modes by improving the flux agreement of overlapping spectral orders affected by changes in the grating blaze function since HST Servicing Mission 4. We also discuss considerations to maintain the wavelength precision of the spectroscopic modes, and the current capabilities of CCD spectroscopic spatial trails.

  18. COS2025: Extending the Lifetime of the FUV channel of the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph to 2025

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Marc; De Rosa, Gisella; Fischer, William J.; Fix, Mees; Fox, Andrew; Indriolo, Nick; James, Bethan; Magness, Camellia; Oliveira, Cristina M.; Penton, Steven V.; Plesha, Rachel; Roman-Duval, Julia; Sahnow, David J.; Sankrit, Ravi; Snyder, Elaine M.; Taylor, Joanna M.; White, James

    2018-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) microchannel plate detector's efficiency at converting incoming photons into detectable events decreases with usage. This depletion of the detector's gain (i.e. gain sag) results in unusable regions of the COS/FUV detector. In order to mitigate this gain sag, a number of strategies have been employed over the past 8 years of operations, ranging from moving to different lifetime positions, to managing the high voltage to extract a smaller amount of charge, to re-distributing the cenwave usage so that Ly-alpha does not produce a gain-sag hole in a given location. We are now at a point where none of the strategies above will, without any other changes, allow us to continue operating the COS/FUV detector to 2025. To address this a new COS2025 policy was developed, with the goal of retaining full science capability of COS/FUV to 2025. We present an overview of the COS2025 policy, which places restrictions on the G130M cenwaves allowed at Lifetime Position 4 (LP4). We also present a tool which allows users to visualize the COS/FUV wavelength ranges to help users prepare their proposals in the light of the restrictions on the G130M cenwaves.

  19. Near- infrared imager and slitless spectrograph (NIRISS): a new instrument on James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maszkiewicz, Michael

    2017-11-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5 m diameter deployable telescope that will orbit the L2 Earth-Sun point beginning in 2018. NASA is leading the development of the JWST mission with their partners, the European Space Agency and the Canadian Space Agency. The Canadian contribution to the mission is the Fine Guidance Sensor (FGS). Originally, the FGS incorporated a flexible narrow spectral band science imaging capability in the form of the Tunable Filter Imaging Module -TFI, based on a scanning Fabry-Perot etalon. In the course of building and testing of the TFI flight model, numerous technical issues arose with unforeseeable length of required mitigation effort. In addition to that, emerging new science priorities caused that in summer of 2011 a decision was taken to replace TFI with a new instrument called Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS). NIRISS preserves most of the TFI opto-mechanical design: focusing mirror, collimator and camera TMA telescopes, dual filter and pupil wheel and detectors but, instead of a tunable etalon, uses set of filters and grisms for wavelength selection and dispersion. The FGS-Guider and NIRISS have completed their instrument-level cryogenic testing and were delivered to NASA Goddard in late July 2012 for incorporation into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM).

  20. Observations of Leonid Meteors Using a Mid-Wave Infrared Imaging Spectrograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossano, G. S.; Russell, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Tessensohn, T. K.; Warren, D.; Jenniskens, P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report broadband 3-5.5 micrometer detections of two Leonid meteors observed during the 1998 Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. Each meteor was detected at only one position along their trajectory just prior to the point of maximum light emission. We describe the particular aspects of the Aerospace Corp. Mid-wave Infra-Red Imaging Spectrograph (MIRIS) developed for the observation of short duration transient events that impact its ability to detect Leonid meteors. This instrument had its first deployment during the 1998 Leonid MAC. We infer from our observations that the mid-infrared light curves of two Leonid meteors differed from the visible light curve. At the points of detection, the infrared emission in the MIRIS passband was 25 +/- 4 times that at optical wavelengths for both meteors. In addition, we find an upper limit of 800 K for the solid body temperature of the brighter meteor we observed, at the point in the trajectory where we made our mid-wave infrared detection.

  1. GLOBAL SAUSAGE OSCILLATION OF SOLAR FLARE LOOPS DETECTED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hui; He, Jiansen; Young, Peter R.

    An observation from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph reveals coherent oscillations in the loops of an M1.6 flare on 2015 March 12. Both the intensity and Doppler shift of Fe xxi 1354.08 Å show clear oscillations with a period of ∼25 s. Remarkably similar oscillations were also detected in the soft X-ray flux recorded by the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites ( GOES ). With an estimated phase speed of ∼2420 km s{sup −1} and a derived electron density of at least 5.4 × 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}, the observed short-period oscillation is most likely the global fast sausage mode ofmore » a hot flare loop. We find a phase shift of ∼ π /2 (1/4 period) between the Doppler shift oscillation and the intensity/ GOES oscillations, which is consistent with a recent forward modeling study of the sausage mode. The observed oscillation requires a density contrast between the flare loop and coronal background of a factor ≥42. The estimated phase speed of the global mode provides a lower limit of the Alfvén speed outside the flare loop. We also find an increase of the oscillation period, which might be caused by the separation of the loop footpoints with time.« less

  2. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  3. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  4. The opto-mechanical design of HARMONI: a first light integral field spectrograph for the E-ELT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatte, Niranjan A.; Tecza, Mathias; Freeman, David; Gallie, Angus M.; Montgomery, David; Clarke, Fraser; Fragoso-Lopez, Ana Belén.; Fuentes, Javier; Gago, Fernando; Garcia, Adolfo; Gracia, Felix; Kosmalski, Johan; Lynn, James; Sosa, Dario; Arribas, Santiago; Bacon, Roland; Davies, Roger L.; Fusco, Thierry; Lunney, David; Mediavilla, Evencio; Remillieux, Alban; Schnetler, Hermine

    2012-09-01

    HARMONI is a visible and near-IR integral field spectrograph, providing the E-ELT's spectroscopic capability at first light. It obtains simultaneous spectra of 32000 spaxels, at a range of resolving powers from R~4000 to R~20000, covering the wavelength range from 0.47 to 2.45 μm. The 256 × 128 spaxel field of view has four different plate scales, with the coarsest scale (40 mas) providing a 5″ × 10″ FoV, while the finest scale is a factor of 10 finer (4mas). We describe the opto-mechanical design of HARMONI, prior to the start of preliminary design, including the main subsystems - namely the image de-rotator, the scale-changing optics, the splitting and slicing optics, and the spectrographs. We also present the secondary guiding system, the pupil imaging optics, the field and pupil stops, the natural guide star wavefront sensor, and the calibration unit.

  5. The Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project: The Unusual Absorption-Line System in the Spectrum of PG 2302+029--Ejected or Intervening?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jannuzi, B. T.; Hartig, G. F.; Kirhakos, S.; Sargent, W. L. W.; Turnshek, D. A.; Weymann, R. J.; Bahcall, J. N.; Bergeron, J.; Boksenberg, A.; Savage, B. D.; hide

    1996-01-01

    We report the discovery of a high-ionization broad absorption line system at a redshift of z(sub abs) = 0.695 in the spectrum of the z(sub em) = 1.052 radio-quiet quasar PG 2302+029. Broad absorption with FWHM from 3000 to 5000 km/s is detected from C iv, N v, and O vi in Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Faint Object Spectrograph spectra of the quasar. A narrow-line system (FWHM approx. 250 km/s) at z(sub abs) = 0.7016 is resolved from the broad blend and includes absorption by Ly alpha and the C iv, N v, and O vi doublets. No absorption by low-ionization metal species (e.g., Si II and Mg II) is detected in the HST or ground-based spectra for either the broad or the narrow system. The centroids of the broad system lines are displaced by approx. 56,000 km/s to the blue of the quasar's broad emission lines. The reddest extent of the broad-line absorption is more than 50,000 km/s from the quasar. The properties of this system are unprecedented, whether it is an intervening or an ejected system.

  6. FFT Deconvultion of Be Star Hα Line Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    We have been monitoring the spectroscopic variability of Be stars using the UCA Fiber Fed Spectrograph. The spectra are 0.8 Angstrom/pixel resolution of the Hα line. The observed line profiles are a convolution of the actual profile and the instrumental profile. A Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method has been used to deconvolve the observed profiles, given the instrument profile obtained by observing the narrow lines from the HgNe wavelength calibration lamp. The long-term monitoring of the spectroscopic variability of Be stars is crucial for testing the various Be star models. Deconvolved H-α line profiles, velocities, and variability are shown for gamma Cas, delta Sco, chi Oph, eta PsA, 48 Lib, and upsilon Sgr (HD181615). Funding has been provided by the UCA University Research Council and the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium.

  7. Optical design of MEMS-based infrared multi-object spectrograph concept for the Gemini South Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shaojie; Sivanandam, Suresh; Moon, Dae-Sik

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the optical design of an infrared multi-object spectrograph (MOS) concept that is designed to take advantage of the multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) corrected field at the Gemini South telescope. This design employs a unique, cryogenic MEMS-based focal plane mask to select target objects for spectroscopy by utilizing the Micro-Shutter Array (MSA) technology originally developed for the Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRSpec) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The optical design is based on all spherical refractive optics, which serves both imaging and spectroscopic modes across the wavelength range of 0.9-2.5 μm. The optical system consists of a reimaging system, MSA, collimator, volume phase holographic (VPH) grisms, and spectrograph camera optics. The VPH grisms, which are VPH gratings sandwiched between two prisms, provide high dispersing efficiencies, and a set of several VPH grisms provide the broad spectral coverage at high throughputs. The imaging mode is implemented by removing the MSA and the dispersing unit out of the beam. We optimize both the imaging and spectrographic modes simultaneously, while paying special attention to the performance of the pupil imaging at the cold stop. Our current design provides a 1' ♢ 1' and a 0.5' ♢ 1' field of views for imaging and spectroscopic modes, respectively, on a 2048 × 2048 pixel HAWAII-2RG detector array. The spectrograph's slit width and spectral resolving power are 0.18'' and 3,000, respectively, and spectra of up to 100 objects can be obtained simultaneously. We present the overall results of simulated performance using optical model we designed.

  8. Performance characteristics of a suite of volume phase holographic gratings produced for the Subaru prime focus spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arns, James A.

    2016-08-01

    The Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph[1] (PFS) requires a suite of volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings that parse the observational spectrum into three sub-spectral regions. In addition, the red region has a second, higher resolution arm that includes a VPH grating that will eventually be incorporated into a grism. This paper describes the specifications of the four grating types, gives the theoretical performances of diffraction efficiency for the production designs and presents the measured performances on the gratings produced to date.

  9. PyEmir: Data Reduction Pipeline for EMIR, the GTC Near-IR Multi-Object Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual, S.; Gallego, J.; Cardiel, N.; Eliche-Moral, M. C.

    2010-12-01

    EMIR is the near-infrared wide-field camera and multi-slit spectrograph being built for Gran Telescopio Canarias. We present here the work being done on its data processing pipeline. PyEmir is based on Python and it will process automatically data taken in both imaging and spectroscopy mode. PyEmir is begin developed by the UCM Group of Extragalactic Astrophysics and Astronomical Instrumentation.

  10. The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF): an optical Echelle spectrograph for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szentgyorgyi, Andrew; Baldwin, Daniel; Barnes, Stuart; Bean, Jacob; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Brennan, Patricia; Budynkiewicz, Jamie; Chun, Moo-Young; Conroy, Charlie; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Epps, Harland; Evans, Ian; Evans, Janet; Foster, Jeff; Frebel, Anna; Gauron, Thomas; Guzmán, Dani; Hare, Tyson; Jang, Bi-Ho; Jang, Jeong-Gyun; Jordan, Andres; Kim, Jihun; Kim, Kang-Miin; Mendes de Oliveira, Claudia Mendes; Lopez-Morales, Mercedes; McCracken, Kenneth; McMuldroch, Stuart; Miller, Joseph; Mueller, Mark; Oh, Jae Sok; Onyuksel, Cem; Ordway, Mark; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan; Park, Sung-Joon; Paxson, Charles; Phillips, David; Plummer, David; Podgorski, William; Seifahrt, Andreas; Stark, Daniel; Steiner, Joao; Uomoto, Alan; Walsworth, Ronald; Yu, Young-Sam

    2016-08-01

    The GMT-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) will be a cross-dispersed, optical band echelle spectrograph to be delivered as the first light scientific instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) in 2022. G-CLEF is vacuum enclosed and fiber-fed to enable precision radial velocity (PRV) measurements, especially for the detection and characterization of low-mass exoplanets orbiting solar-type stars. The passband of G-CLEF is broad, extending from 3500Å to 9500Å. This passband provides good sensitivity at blue wavelengths for stellar abundance studies and deep red response for observations of high-redshift phenomena. The design of G-CLEF incorporates several novel technical innovations. We give an overview of the innovative features of the current design. G-CLEF will be the first PRV spectrograph to have a composite optical bench so as to exploit that material's extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion, high in-plane thermal conductivity and high stiffness-to-mass ratio. The spectrograph camera subsystem is divided into a red and a blue channel, split by a dichroic, so there are two independent refractive spectrograph cameras. The control system software is being developed in model-driven software context that has been adopted globally by the GMT. G-CLEF has been conceived and designed within a strict systems engineering framework. As a part of this process, we have developed a analytical toolset to assess the predicted performance of G-CLEF as it has evolved through design phases.

  11. Far-ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Recent Comets with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; Weaver, Harold A.; A’Hearn, Michael F.; Combi, Michael R.; Dello Russo, Neil

    2018-05-01

    Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has served as a platform with unique capabilities for remote observations of comets in the far-ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Successive generations of imagers and spectrographs have seen large advances in sensitivity and spectral resolution enabling observations of the diverse properties of a representative number of comets during the past 25 years. To date, four comets have been observed in the far-ultraviolet by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), the last spectrograph to be installed in HST, in 2009: 103P/Hartley 2, C/2009 P1 (Garradd), C/2012 S1 (ISON), and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy). COS has unprecedented sensitivity, but limited spatial information in its 2.″5 diameter circular aperture, and our objective was to determine the CO production rates from measurements of the CO Fourth Positive system in the spectral range of 1400–1700 Å. In the two brightest comets, 19 bands of this system were clearly identified. The water production rates were derived from nearly concurrent observations of the OH (0,0) band at 3085 Å by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The derived CO/{{{H}}}2{{O}} production rate ratio ranged from ∼0.3% for Hartley 2 to ∼22% for Garradd. In addition, strong partially resolved emission features due to multiplets of S I, centered at 1429 Å and 1479 Å, and of C I at 1561 Å and 1657 Å, were observed in all four comets. Weak emission from several lines of the {{{H}}}2 Lyman band system, excited by solar Lyα and Lyβ pumped fluorescence, were detected in comet Lovejoy.

  12. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  13. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution spectrograph - High-resolution observations of the 1942 A resonance line of HG II in the chemically peculiar B star, Chi Lupi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckrone, David S.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Johansson, Sveneric G.

    1991-01-01

    The Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph on the HST has been used to obtain high S/N observations of the sharp-lined, Hg- and Pt-rich B-type star, Chi Lupi, with a resolving power of 87,000. The observations reveal a level of spectroscopic detail never before observed at ultraviolet wavelengths for any star other than the sun. Concentrating on the region around the resonance line of Hg II at 1942 A, the profile and central position of this line confirm beyond doubt that the Hg isotope anomaly in Chi Lupi is real and extreme, with Hg being heavily concentrated in the form of Hg-204. The problems in atomic physics which impair the accurate analysis of spectra of this quality are emphasized.

  14. Volume phase holographic gratings for the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph: performance measurements of the prototype grating set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhouser, Robert H.; Arns, James; Gunn, James E.

    2014-08-01

    The Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) is a major instrument under development for the 8.2 m Subaru telescope on Mauna Kea. Four identical, fixed spectrograph modules are located in a room above one Nasmyth focus. A 55 m fiber optic cable feeds light into the spectrographs from a robotic fiber positioner mounted at the telescope prime focus, behind the wide field corrector developed for Hyper Suprime-Cam. The positioner contains 2400 fibers and covers a 1.3 degree hexagonal field of view. Each spectrograph module will be capable of simultaneously acquiring 600 spectra. The spectrograph optical design consists of a Schmidt collimator, two dichroic beamsplitters to separate the light into three channels, and for each channel a volume phase holographic (VPH) grating and a dual- corrector, modified Schmidt reimaging camera. This design provides a 275 mm collimated beam diameter, wide simultaneous wavelength coverage from 380 nm to 1.26 µm, and good imaging performance at the fast f/1.1 focal ratio required from the cameras to avoid oversampling the fibers. The three channels are designated as the blue, red, and near-infrared (NIR), and cover the bandpasses 380-650 nm (blue), 630-970 nm (red), and 0.94-1.26 µm (NIR). A mosaic of two Hamamatsu 2k×4k, 15 µm pixel CCDs records the spectra in the blue and red channels, while the NIR channel employs a 4k×4k, substrate-removed HAWAII-4RG array from Teledyne, with 15 µm pixels and a 1.7 µm wavelength cutoff. VPH gratings have become the dispersing element of choice for moderate-resolution astronomical spectro- graphs due their potential for very high diffraction efficiency, low scattered light, and the more compact instru- ment designs offered by transmissive dispersers. High quality VPH gratings are now routinely being produced in the sizes required for instruments on large telescopes. These factors made VPH gratings an obvious choice for PFS. In order to reduce risk to the project, as well as fully exploit the performance

  15. Infrared Telescope Facility's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abercromby, K.; Buckalew, B.; Abell, P.; Cowardin, H.

    2015-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2006 to 2008. The data collected using the SpeX infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 20 different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Four of the objects were controlled spacecraft, seven were non-controlled spacecraft, five were rocket bodies, and the final four were cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials, thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons, silicon, and thermal emission. The spacecraft, both the controlled and non-controlled, show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels, whereas the rocket bodies do not. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give excellent indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. However, based on the current state of the comparison between the observations and the laboratory data, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  16. Hubble Space Telescope: Faint object spectrograph instrument handbook. Version 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, Holland C. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) has undergone substantial rework since the 1985 FOS Instrument Handbook was published, and we are now more knowledgeable regarding the spacecraft and instrument operations requirements and constraints. The formal system for observation specification has also evolved considerably, as the GTO programs were defined in detail. This supplement to the FOS Instrument Handbook addresses the important aspects of these changes, to facilitate proper selection and specification of FOS observing programs. Since the Handbook was published, the FOS red detector has been replaced twice, first with the best available spare in 1985 (which proved to have a poor, and steadily degrading red response), and later with a newly developed Digicon, which exhibits a high, stable efficiency and a dark-count rate less than half that of its predecessors. Also, the FOS optical train was realigned in 1987-88 to eliminate considerable beam-vignetting losses, and the collimators were both removed and recoated for greater reflectivity. Following the optics and detector rework, the FOS was carefully recalibrated (although only ambient measurements were possible, so the far-UV characteristics could not be re-evaluated directly). The resulting efficiency curves, including improved estimates of the telescope throughput, are shown. A number of changes in the observing-mode specifications and addition of several optional parameters resulted as the Proposal Instructions were honed during the last year. Target-brightness limitations, which have only recently been formulated carefully, are described. Although these restrictions are very conservative, it is imperative that the detector safety be guarded closely, especially during the initial stages of flight operations. Restrictions on the use of the internal calibration lamps and aperture-illumination sources (TA LEDs), also resulting from detector safety considerations, are outlined. Finally, many changes have been made to

  17. GMTNIRS: progress toward the Giant Magellan Telescope near-infrared spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffe, Daniel T.; Barnes, Stuart; Brooks, Cynthia; Lee, Hanshin; Mace, Gregory; Pak, Soojong; Park, Byeong-Gon; Park, Chan

    2016-08-01

    GMTNIRS is a first-generation instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope. It is a high-resolution spectrograph that will cover the 1.15-5.3 μm range in a single exposure with R=60,000 in the J, H, and K bands and R=85,000 in the L and M bands. It resides on the GMT's rotating instrument platform and employs the facility adaptive optics system. The GMTNIRS design is evolving in response to emerging science problems, particularly in the area of exoplanet atmospheres. Our design revisions also derive lessons from GMTNIRS' highly successful forerunner instrument, IGRINS. Technical changes also drive evolution of the design. It has proven impractical to manufacture 200mm long immersion gratings at the necessary precision. The success of primary mirror phasing efforts has removed the need for a very wide entrance slit that we would have needed to accommodate the Airy pattern of individual segments at the shortest operating wavelengths. The high efficiency of our double-side coated JWST grisms introduces the possibility of transmissive cross-dispersers at L and M. These changes move us toward a design with almost the same R as presented in our previous work but with a much more compact physical envelope. We will report on the optimization of the instrument design with these technical changes in mind. We are also producing the critical Si immersion gratings. The grating production is well under way and includes manufacture of H and K gratings and process development for the precision needed in the J band and for the manufacture of larger gratings for the L and M band. The development of GMTNIRS is on track with the results from IGRINS and the progress in the lab giving us substantial assurance that the new instrument can meet its performance goals.

  18. The science case of the PEPSI high-resolution echelle spectrograph and polarimeter for the LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmeier, K. G.; Pallavicini, R.; Rice, J. B.; Andersen, M. I.

    2004-05-01

    We lay out the scientific rationale for and present the instrumental requirements of a high-resolution adaptive-optics Echelle spectrograph with two full-Stokes polarimeters for the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona. Magnetic processes just like those seen on the Sun and in the space environment of the Earth are now well recognized in many astrophysical areas. The application to other stars opened up a new field of research that became widely known as the solar-stellar connection. Late-type stars with convective envelopes are all affected by magnetic processes which give rise to a rich variety of phenomena on their surface and are largely responsible for the heating of their outer atmospheres. Magnetic fields are likely to play a crucial role in the accretion process of T-Tauri stars as well as in the acceleration and collimation of jet-like flows in young stellar objects (YSOs). Another area is the physics of active galactic nucleii (AGNs) , where the magnetic activity of the accreting black hole is now believed to be responsible for most of the behavior of these objects, including their X-ray spectrum, their notoriously dramatic variability, and the powerful relativistic jets they produce. Another is the physics of the central engines of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, the most powerful explosions in the universe, for which the extreme apparent energy release are explained through the collimation of the released energy by magnetic fields. Virtually all the physics of magnetic fields exploited in astrophysics is somehow linked to our understanding of the Sun's and the star's magnetic fields.

  19. GMTIFS: challenging optical design problems and their solutions for the GMT integral-field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, John; Bloxham, Gabe; Boz, Robert; Espeland, Brady; Sharp, Robert

    2016-08-01

    GMTIFS is a first generation instrument for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). It is a combined Imager and Integral Field Spectrograph (IFS) designed to work with the Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems of the GMT. Working at the diffraction limit of the GMT and satisfying the challenging AO interface requirements and constraints results in unique optical challenges. We describe two of these challenges and how we have addressed them. The GMT has a direct feed architecture that maximizes transmission and reduces emissivity. This means that the cryostat window is tilted to reflect visual wavelengths to the external Visual Wave Front Subsystem (VWS). For a plane-parallel window, this tilt causes astigmatism in the transmitted beam that must be corrected. A corrective system using two plates, tilted and slightly wedged in opposite directions, is used. Geometry and performance of the system is described. Another challenging problem is the optical design of the anamorphic field projector. The Integral Field Unit of GMTIFS requires that a small field delivered to it be projected onto an Image Slicer at much larger scale, with the magnification in the spectral direction being twice that in the spatial direction so that the spaxels are square when referred to the sky. Output images must be coincident in the spectral and spatial projections in both the field and pupil domains. Additionally, field and pupil image locations must be independently controllable so that they can be made coincident for interchangeable units that provide a range of output field scales. A two-mirror system that satisfies these requirements is described.

  20. Software requirements flow-down and preliminary software design for the G-CLEF spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Ian N.; Budynkiewicz, Jamie A.; DePonte Evans, Janet; Miller, Joseph B.; Onyuksel, Cem; Paxson, Charles; Plummer, David A.

    2016-08-01

    The Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT)-Consortium Large Earth Finder (G-CLEF) is a fiber-fed, precision radial velocity (PRV) optical echelle spectrograph that will be the first light instrument on the GMT. The G-CLEF instrument device control subsystem (IDCS) provides software control of the instrument hardware, including the active feedback loops that are required to meet the G-CLEF PRV stability requirements. The IDCS is also tasked with providing operational support packages that include data reduction pipelines and proposal preparation tools. A formal, but ultimately pragmatic approach is being used to establish a complete and correct set of requirements for both the G-CLEF device control and operational support packages. The device control packages must integrate tightly with the state-machine driven software and controls reference architecture designed by the GMT Organization. A model-based systems engineering methodology is being used to develop a preliminary design that meets these requirements. Through this process we have identified some lessons that have general applicability to the development of software for ground-based instrumentation. For example, tasking an individual with overall responsibility for science/software/hardware integration is a key step to ensuring effective integration between these elements. An operational concept document that includes detailed routine and non- routine operational sequences should be prepared in parallel with the hardware design process to tie together these elements and identify any gaps. Appropriate time-phasing of the hardware and software design phases is important, but revisions to driving requirements that impact software requirements and preliminary design are inevitable. Such revisions must be carefully managed to ensure efficient use of resources.

  1. The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: multi-tiered wavefront measurements and novel mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Andersen, David; Chapin, Edward; Reshetov, Vlad; Wierzbicki, Ramunas; Herriot, Glen; Chalmer, Dean; Isbrucker, Victor; Larkin, James E.; Moore, Anna M.; Suzuki, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    The InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) will be the first light adaptive optics instrument on the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). IRIS is being built by a collaboration between Caltech, the University of California, NAOJ and NRC Herzberg. In this paper we present novel aspects of the Support Structure, Rotator and On-Instrument Wavefront Sensor systems being developed at NRC Herzberg. IRIS is suspended from the bottom port of the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), and provides its own image de-rotation to compensate for sidereal rotation of the focal plane. This arrangement is a challenge because NFIRAOS is designed to host two other science instruments, which imposes strict mass requirements on IRIS. As the mechanical design of all elements has progressed, we have been tasked with keeping the instrument mass under seven tonnes. This requirement has resulted in a mass reduction of 30 percent for the support structure and rotator compared to the most recent IRIS designs. To accomplish this goal, while still being able to withstand earthquakes, we developed a new design with composite materials. As IRIS is a client instrument of NFIRAOS, it benefits from NFIRAOS's superior AO correction. IRIS plays an important role in providing this correction by sensing low-order aberrations with three On-Instrument Wavefront Sensors (OIWFS). The OIWFS consists of three independently positioned natural guide star wavefront sensor probe arms that patrol a 2-arcminute field of view. We expect tip-tilt measurements from faint stars within the IRIS imager focal plane will further stabilize the delivered image quality. We describe how the use of On-Detector Guide Windows (ODGWs) in the IRIS imaging detector can be incorporated into the AO correction. In this paper, we present our strategies for acquiring and tracking sources with this complex AO system, and for mitigating and measuring the various potential sources of image blur and misalignment due to properties of

  2. The Background-Limited Infrared Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) for SPICA: A Design Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Charles; BLISS-SPICA Study Team

    2010-05-01

    The far-IR waveband carries half of the photon energy ever produced in galaxies and quasars, evidence of the major role of dust-obscured processes in bringing about the modern Universe. The bulk of this appears to have occurred in the first half of the Universe's history (z>1). We are developing the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) to capitalize on SPICA's cold telescope and provide a breakthrough far-IR spectroscopy capability. BLISS-SPICA is 6 orders of magnitude faster than the spectrometers on Herschel and SOFIA in obtaining full-band spectra, and will observe dust-obscured galaxies at all epochs back to the first billion years after the Big Bang (redshift 6), BLISS-SPICA thus probes the complete history of dust-obscured star formation and black-hole growth. It will also be extremely powerful for studying ice-giant planet formation in protoplanetary disks, with its sensitivity to very small amounts of gas. BLISS covers the 38-433 micron range in five grating-spectrometer bands, with two simultaneous sky positions. The detector package is 4224 silicon-nitride micro-mesh leg-isolated bolometers with superconducting transition-edge-sensed (TES) thermistors, read out with a cryogenic time-domain multiplexer, all cooled to 50mK for optimal sensitivity. All technical elements of BLISS have heritage in mature scientific instruments, and many have flown. We report on our design study in which we are optimizing performance while accommodating SPICA's constraints, including the stringent cryogenic mass budget. We present the science case for BLISS, as well as our progress in all key technical aspects: 1) opto-mechanical instrument architecture, 2) detector and readout approach, and 3) sub-K cooling approach. We thank the NASA for support of the BLISS study.

  3. DUST AROUND R CORONAE BOREALIS STARS. I. SPITZER/INFRARED SPECTROGRAPH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Anibal Garcia-Hernandez, D.; Kameswara Rao, N.; Lambert, David L., E-mail: agarcia@iac.es, E-mail: nkrao@iiap.res.in, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu

    2011-09-20

    Spitzer/infrared spectrograph (IRS) spectra from 5 to 37 {mu}m for a complete sample of 31 R Coronae Borealis stars (RCBs) are presented. These spectra are combined with optical and near-infrared photometry of each RCB at maximum light to compile a spectral energy distribution (SED). The SEDs are fitted with blackbody flux distributions and estimates are made of the ratio of the infrared flux from circumstellar dust to the flux emitted by the star. Comparisons for 29 of the 31 stars are made with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) fluxes from three decades earlier: Spitzer and IRAS fluxes at 12 {mu}mmore » and 25 {mu}m are essentially equal for all but a minority of the sample. For this minority, the IRAS to Spitzer flux ratio exceeds a factor of three. The outliers are suggested to be stars where formation of a dust cloud or dust puff is a rare event. A single puff ejected prior to the IRAS observations may have been reobserved by Spitzer as a cooler puff at a greater distance from the RCB. RCBs which experience more frequent optical declines have, in general, a circumstellar environment containing puffs subtending a larger solid angle at the star and a quasi-constant infrared flux. Yet, the estimated subtended solid angles and the blackbody temperatures of the dust show a systematic evolution to lower solid angles and cooler temperatures in the interval between IRAS and Spitzer. Dust emission by these RCBs and those in the LMC is similar in terms of total 24 {mu}m luminosity and [8.0]-[24.0] color index.« less

  4. HYDROGEN BALMER CONTINUUM IN SOLAR FLARES DETECTED BY THE INTERFACE REGION IMAGING SPECTROGRAPH (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzel, P.; Kleint, L., E-mail: pheinzel@asu.cas.cz

    We present a novel observation of the white light flare (WLF) continuum, which was significantly enhanced during the X1 flare on 2014 March 29 (SOL2014-03-29T17:48). Data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) in its near-UV channel show that at the peak of the continuum enhancement, the contrast at the quasi-continuum window above 2813 Å reached 100%-200% and can be even larger closer to Mg II lines. This is fully consistent with the hydrogen recombination Balmer-continuum emission, which follows an impulsive thermal and non-thermal ionization caused by the precipitation of electron beams through the chromosphere. However, a less probable photosphericmore » continuum enhancement cannot be excluded. The light curves of the Balmer continuum have an impulsive character with a gradual fading, similar to those detected recently in the optical region on the Solar Optical Telescope on board Hinode. This observation represents a first Balmer-continuum detection from space far beyond the Balmer limit (3646 Å), eliminating seeing effects known to complicate the WLF detection. Moreover, we use a spectral window so far unexplored for flare studies, which provides the potential to study the Balmer continuum, as well as many metallic lines appearing in emission during flares. Combined with future ground-based observations of the continuum near the Balmer limit, we will be able to disentangle various scenarios of the WLF origin. IRIS observations also provide a critical quantitative measure of the energy radiated in the Balmer continuum, which constrains various models of the energy transport and deposit during flares.« less

  5. Observations of Disks around Brown Dwarfs in the TW Hydra Association with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, A. L.; Luhman, K. L.; Espaillat, C.; D'Alessio, P.; Adame, L.; Calvet, N.; Forrest, W. J.; Sargent, B.; Hartmann, L.; Watson, D. M.; Bohac, C. J.

    2008-04-01

    Using SpeX at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, we have obtained infrared spectra from 0.7 to 40 μm for three young brown dwarfs in the TW Hydra association (τ ~ 10 Myr), 2MASSW J1207334-393254, 2MASSW J1139511-315921, and SSSPM J1102-3431. The spectral energy distribution for 2MASSW J1139511-315921 is consistent with a stellar photosphere for the entire wavelength range of our data, whereas the other two objects exhibit significant excess emission at λ > 5μm. We are able to reproduce the excess emission from each brown dwarf using our models of irradiated accretion disks. According to our model fits, both disks have experienced a high degree of dust settling. We also find that silicate emission at 10 and 20 μm is absent from the spectra of these disks, indicating that grains in the upper disk layers have grown to sizes larger than ~5 μm. Both of these characteristics are consistent with previous observations of decreasing silicate emission with lower stellar masses and older ages. These trends suggest that either (1) the growth of dust grains, and perhaps planetesimal formation, occurs faster in disks around brown dwarfs than in disks around stars or (2) the radii of the mid-IR-emitting regions of disks are smaller for brown dwarfs than for stars, and grains grow faster at smaller disk radii. Finally, we note the possible detection of an unexplained emission feature near 14 μm in the spectra of both of the disk-bearing brown dwarfs. Based on observations made with the Spitzer Space Telescope, which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology under NASA contract 1407.

  6. United Kingdom Infrared Telescope's Spectrograph Observations of Human-Made Space Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckalew, Brent; Abercromby, Kira; Lederer, Susan; Frith, James; Cowardin, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Presented here are the results of the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) spectral observations of human-made space objects taken from 2014 to 2015. The data collected using the UIST infrared spectrograph cover the wavelength range 0.7-2.5 micrometers. Overall, data were collected on 18 different orbiting objects at or near the geosynchronous (GEO) regime. Thirteen of the objects are spacecraft, one is a rocket body, and four are cataloged as debris pieces. The remotely collected data are compared to the laboratory-collected reflectance data on typical spacecraft materials; thereby general materials are identified but not specific types. These results highlight the usefulness of observations in the infrared by focusing on features from hydrocarbons and silicon. The spacecraft show distinct features due to the presence of solar panels. Signature variations between rocket bodies, due to the presence of various metals and paints on their surfaces, show a clear distinction from those objects with solar panels, demonstrating that one can distinguish most spacecraft from rocket bodies through infrared spectrum analysis. Finally, the debris pieces tend to show featureless, dark spectra. These results show that the laboratory data in its current state give excellent indications as to the nature of the surface materials on the objects. Further telescopic data collection and model updates to include more materials, noise, surface roughness, and material degradation are necessary to make better assessments of orbital object material types. A comparison conducted between objects observed previously with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) shows similar materials and trends from the two telescopes and from the two distinct data sets. However, based on the current state of the model, infrared spectroscopic data are adequate to classify objects in GEO as spacecraft, rocket bodies, or debris.

  7. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  8. Absorption and emission spectra of Li atoms trapped in rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. J.; Balling, L. C.

    1980-10-01

    Pulsed-dye-laser excitation has been used to investigate the optical absorption and emission spectra of Li atoms trapped in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices at 10 °K. Attempts to stabilize Li atoms in a Ne matrix at 2 °K were unsuccessful. Results for all three rare gases were qualitatively the same. White light absorption scans showed a single absorption with three peaks centered near the free-atom 2s→2p transition wavelength. The intensity of fluorescence produced by dye-laser excitation within this absorption band was measured as a function of emission wavelength. Excitation of the longest- and shortest-wavelength absorption peaks produced identical emission profiles, but no distinct fluorescence signal was detected when the laser was tuned to the central absorption peaks, indicating that the apparent absorption triplet is actually the superposition of a singlet and a doublet absorption originating from two different trapping sites. No additional absorption bands were detected.

  9. Multiple Absorption Components in the Post-Periastron He I P Cygni Absorption Troughs of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; Damineli, Augusto; Gull, Ted; Moffat, Anthony; Groh, Jose; St.-Jean, Lucas; Walter, Frederick M.; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Tom; Corcoran, Michael; hide

    2015-01-01

    We have obtained more than 100 high spectral resolution (R approx. 90,000) spectra of the massive binary star eta Carinae since 2012 in an effort to continue our orbital and long-term echelle monitoring of this extreme binary (Richardson et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 1534) with the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO 1.5 m telescope (Tokovinin et al. 2013, PASP, 125, 1336) in the 4550-7500A region. We increased our monitoring efforts and observation frequency as the periastron event of 2014 has approached, and resumed observations in October. We note that since mid-October, we have observed unusual multiple absorption components in the P Cygni troughs of the He I lines (4714, 5876, 6678, and 7065; 4921 and 5015 are blended with Fe II). In particular, we note that these components extend to -700 km/s, well beyond the terminal wind speed of the primary. These absorptions are likely related to clumps and turbulence in the wind-wind collision region and bow shock, as suggested by the high-velocity absorption observed by Groh et al. (2010, A&A, 519, 9) in the He I 10830A transition and our pre-periastron observations (Richardson et al. 2014, ATel #6336). In these cases, we suspect that we look along an arm of the shock cone and that we see a fast absorption change from the other collision region shortly after periastron. Further, high spectral resolution data are highly encouraged, especially for resolving powers greater than 50,000. These observations were obtained with the CTIO 1.5 m telescope, operated by the SMARTS Consortium, and were obtained through both SMARTS and NOAO programs 2012A-0216, 2012B-0194, and 2013b-0328. We thank Emily MacPherson (Yale) for her efforts in scheduling the observations that we have and will obtain in the coming weeks and months.

  10. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ping, Yuan

    2005-10-01

    We present the first absorption measurements at laser intensity between 10^17 to 10^20 W/cm^2 using an intergrating sphere and a suite of diagnostics that measures scale length, hot electrons and laser harmonics. A much-enhanced absorption in the regime of relativestic electron heating was observed. Furthermore, we present measurements on the partitioning of absorbed laser energy into thermal and non-thermal electrons when illuminating solid targets from 10^17 to 10^19 W/cm^2. This was measured using a sub-picosecond x-ray streak camera interfaced to a dual crystal von H'amos crystal spectrograph, a spherical crystal x-ray imaging spectrometer, an electron spectrometer and optical spectrometer. Our data suggests an intensity dependent energy-coupling transition with greater energy portion into non-thermal electrons that rapidly transition to thermal electrons. The details of these experimental results and modeling simulations will be presented.

  11. Spectroscopic Profiles of Comets Garradd and McNaught

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ien; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2017-10-01

    We have used the integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectroscopic images of the comae of several comets. The images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Radial and azimuthal average profiles of the radical species were created to enhance any observed cometary coma morphological features. We compare the observed coma features across the observed species and over the different observation periods in order to constrain possible rotational states of the observed comets, as well as determine possible source differences in the coma between the observed radical species. We will present results for several comets, including C/2009 P1 (Garradd) and 260P (McNaught).

  12. Using Spectroscopic Profiles to Study the Morphology of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Ien; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2016-10-01

    We have used the integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory to obtain spectroscopic images of the comae of several comets. The images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3. CH, CN, NH2). Radial and azimuthal average profiles of the radical species were created to enhance any observed cometary coma morphological features. We compare the observed coma features across the observed species and over the different observation periods in order to constrain possible rotational states of the observed comets. We w