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Sample records for absorption rate sar

  1. Combined Acquisition Technique (CAT) for Neuroimaging of Multiple Sclerosis at Low Specific Absorption Rates (SAR)

    PubMed Central

    Biller, Armin; Choli, Morwan; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix A.; Jakob, Peter M.; Bartsch, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare a novel combined acquisition technique (CAT) of turbo-spin-echo (TSE) and echo-planar-imaging (EPI) with conventional TSE. CAT reduces the electromagnetic energy load transmitted for spin excitation. This radiofrequency (RF) burden is limited by the specific absorption rate (SAR) for patient safety. SAR limits restrict high-field MRI applications, in particular. Material and Methods The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. T2- and PD-weighted brain images of n = 40 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients were acquired by CAT and TSE at 3 Tesla. Lesions were recorded by two blinded, board-certificated neuroradiologists. Diagnostic equivalence of CAT and TSE to detect MS lesions was evaluated along with their SAR, sound pressure level (SPL) and sensations of acoustic noise, heating, vibration and peripheral nerve stimulation. Results Every MS lesion revealed on TSE was detected by CAT according to both raters (Cohen’s kappa of within-rater/across-CAT/TSE lesion detection κCAT = 1.00, at an inter-rater lesion detection agreement of κLES = 0.82). CAT reduced the SAR burden significantly compared to TSE (p<0.001). Mean SAR differences between TSE and CAT were 29.0 (±5.7) % for the T2-contrast and 32.7 (±21.9) % for the PD-contrast (expressed as percentages of the effective SAR limit of 3.2 W/kg for head examinations). Average SPL of CAT was no louder than during TSE. Sensations of CAT- vs. TSE-induced heating, noise and scanning vibrations did not differ. Conclusion T2−/PD-CAT is diagnostically equivalent to TSE for MS lesion detection yet substantially reduces the RF exposure. Such SAR reduction facilitates high-field MRI applications at 3 Tesla or above and corresponding protocol standardizations but CAT can also be used to scan faster, at higher resolution or with more slices. According to our data, CAT is no more uncomfortable than TSE scanning. PMID

  2. Combined acquisition technique (CAT) for neuroimaging of multiple sclerosis at low specific absorption rates (SAR).

    PubMed

    Biller, Armin; Choli, Morwan; Blaimer, Martin; Breuer, Felix A; Jakob, Peter M; Bartsch, Andreas J

    2014-01-01

    To compare a novel combined acquisition technique (CAT) of turbo-spin-echo (TSE) and echo-planar-imaging (EPI) with conventional TSE. CAT reduces the electromagnetic energy load transmitted for spin excitation. This radiofrequency (RF) burden is limited by the specific absorption rate (SAR) for patient safety. SAR limits restrict high-field MRI applications, in particular. The study was approved by the local Medical Ethics Committee. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. T2- and PD-weighted brain images of n = 40 Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients were acquired by CAT and TSE at 3 Tesla. Lesions were recorded by two blinded, board-certificated neuroradiologists. Diagnostic equivalence of CAT and TSE to detect MS lesions was evaluated along with their SAR, sound pressure level (SPL) and sensations of acoustic noise, heating, vibration and peripheral nerve stimulation. Every MS lesion revealed on TSE was detected by CAT according to both raters (Cohen's kappa of within-rater/across-CAT/TSE lesion detection κCAT = 1.00, at an inter-rater lesion detection agreement of κLES = 0.82). CAT reduced the SAR burden significantly compared to TSE (p<0.001). Mean SAR differences between TSE and CAT were 29.0 (± 5.7) % for the T2-contrast and 32.7 (± 21.9) % for the PD-contrast (expressed as percentages of the effective SAR limit of 3.2 W/kg for head examinations). Average SPL of CAT was no louder than during TSE. Sensations of CAT- vs. TSE-induced heating, noise and scanning vibrations did not differ. T2-/PD-CAT is diagnostically equivalent to TSE for MS lesion detection yet substantially reduces the RF exposure. Such SAR reduction facilitates high-field MRI applications at 3 Tesla or above and corresponding protocol standardizations but CAT can also be used to scan faster, at higher resolution or with more slices. According to our data, CAT is no more uncomfortable than TSE scanning.

  3. Local specific absorption rate (SAR), global SAR, transmitter power, and excitation accuracy trade-offs in low flip-angle parallel transmit pulse design.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Bastien; Gebhardt, Matthias; Cauley, Steven; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L

    2014-04-01

    We propose a constrained optimization approach for designing parallel transmit (pTx) pulses satisfying all regulatory and hardware limits. We study the trade-offs between excitation accuracy, local and global specific absorption rate (SAR), and maximum and average power for small flip-angle pTx (eight channels) spokes pulses in the torso at 3 T and in the head at 7 T. We compare the trade-offs between the above-mentioned quantities using the L-curve method. We use a primal-dual algorithm and a compressed set of local SAR matrices to design radio-frequency (RF) pulses satisfying all regulatory (including local SAR) and hardware constraints. Local SAR can be substantially reduced (factor of 2 or more) by explicitly constraining it in the pulse design process compared to constraining global SAR or pulse power alone. This often comes at the price of increased pulse power. Simultaneous control of power and SAR is needed for the design of pTx pulses that are safe and can be played on the scanner. Constraining a single quantity can create large increase in the others, which can then rise above safety or hardware limits. Simultaneous constraint of local SAR and power is fast enough to be applicable in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effects of Averaging Mass on Predicted Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) Values

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    lung, liver , muscle, cerebral spinal fluid, nerve spinal, heart) in relation to various frequencies and orientations. This parametric study...relatively low ratios between spatial peak SAR and whole body SAR average were found in heart, liver , lung outer and lung inner (between 3 and 7) (see...MASS ON PREDICTED SAR 38 Figure 19. Ratios between peak localized SAR and whole body SAR average for liver for various mass intervals (1g and 10 g

  5. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-07

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  6. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  7. Verification of Parallel C Code for Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) of Electromagnetic Fields (EMF)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-06

    P.A. Mason. 2002. Empirical validation of SAR values predicted by FDTD modeling. Bioelectromagnetics 23, no. 1: 37-48. doi:10.1002/bem.96. Gajšek P...permittivity values. Bioelectromagnetics 22, no. 6: 384-400. doi:10.1002/bem.66. Gandhi OP, Numerical and experimental methods for dosimetry of RF radiation

  8. The effect of increase in dielectric values on specific absorption rate (SAR) in eye and head tissues following 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz radio frequency (RF) exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshvari, Jafar; Keshvari, Rahim; Lang, Sakari

    2006-03-01

    Numerous studies have attempted to address the question of the RF energy absorption difference between children and adults using computational methods. They have assumed the same dielectric parameters for child and adult head models in SAR calculations. This has been criticized by many researchers who have stated that child organs are not fully developed, their anatomy is different and also their tissue composition is slightly different with higher water content. Higher water content would affect dielectric values, which in turn would have an effect on RF energy absorption. The objective of this study was to investigate possible variation in specific absorption rate (SAR) in the head region of children and adults by applying the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and using anatomically correct child and adult head models. In the calculations, the conductivity and permittivity of all tissues were increased from 5 to 20% but using otherwise the same exposure conditions. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source to minimize the uncertainties of the positioning of a real mobile device and making the simulations easily replicable. Common mobile telephony frequencies of 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz were used in this study. The exposures of ear and eye regions were investigated. The SARs of models with increased dielectric values were compared to the SARs of the models where dielectric values were unchanged. The analyses suggest that increasing the value of dielectric parameters does not necessarily mean that volume-averaged SAR would increase. Under many exposure conditions, specifically at higher frequencies in eye exposure, volume-averaged SAR decreases. An increase of up to 20% in dielectric conductivity or both conductivity and permittivity always caused a SAR variation of less than 20%, usually about 5%, when it was averaged over 1, 5 or 10 g of cubic mass for all models. The thickness and composition of different tissue layers in the exposed

  9. The effect of increase in dielectric values on specific absorption rate (SAR) in eye and head tissues following 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz radio frequency (RF) exposure.

    PubMed

    Keshvari, Jafar; Keshvari, Rahim; Lang, Sakari

    2006-03-21

    Numerous studies have attempted to address the question of the RF energy absorption difference between children and adults using computational methods. They have assumed the same dielectric parameters for child and adult head models in SAR calculations. This has been criticized by many researchers who have stated that child organs are not fully developed, their anatomy is different and also their tissue composition is slightly different with higher water content. Higher water content would affect dielectric values, which in turn would have an effect on RF energy absorption. The objective of this study was to investigate possible variation in specific absorption rate (SAR) in the head region of children and adults by applying the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method and using anatomically correct child and adult head models. In the calculations, the conductivity and permittivity of all tissues were increased from 5 to 20% but using otherwise the same exposure conditions. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source to minimize the uncertainties of the positioning of a real mobile device and making the simulations easily replicable. Common mobile telephony frequencies of 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz were used in this study. The exposures of ear and eye regions were investigated. The SARs of models with increased dielectric values were compared to the SARs of the models where dielectric values were unchanged. The analyses suggest that increasing the value of dielectric parameters does not necessarily mean that volume-averaged SAR would increase. Under many exposure conditions, specifically at higher frequencies in eye exposure, volume-averaged SAR decreases. An increase of up to 20% in dielectric conductivity or both conductivity and permittivity always caused a SAR variation of less than 20%, usually about 5%, when it was averaged over 1, 5 or 10 g of cubic mass for all models. The thickness and composition of different tissue layers in the exposed

  10. Effects of dielectric values of human body on Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) following 800 MHz radio frequency exposure to ingestible wireless device.

    PubMed

    Xu, L S; Meng, Max Q-H; Li, B P

    2009-01-01

    In order to assess the compliance of Ingested Wireless Device (IWD) within safety guidelines, the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and near fields of IWD in two realistic human body models whose dielectric values are increased from the original by +/-10 and +/-20% are studied using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method. The radiation characteristics of the IWD in the human body models with original and changed dielectric values are compared. Simulations are carried out at 13 scenarios where the IWD is placed at center positions of abdomens in the two models at the operation frequency of 800 MHz. Results show that variation of radiation intensity near the surface of abdomen is around 1.6 dB within 20% variation of dielectric values at the frequency of 800 MHz. Electric fields in the anterior of the human body models are higher than those in the posterior for all scenarios. SAR values increase as the conductivities of human body tissues increase and usually decrease as the increase of relative permittivities of human body tissues increase. The effect of the dielectric values of human body on SAR is orientation, human body and frequency dependent. An increment up to 20% in conductivities and relative permittivities alone or simultaneously always causes a SAR variation less than 20%. As far as the compliance of safety was concerned, the IWD was safe to be used at the input power less than 9.3 mW according to IEEE safety standards.

  11. SAROTA: application of specific absorption rate (SAR) and over-the-air (OTA) data for the characterization of the real-life exposure due to mobile phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monebhurrun, Vikass

    2013-04-01

    The RF exposure level of a mobile phone is quantified by the measurement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) under laboratory conditions. The SAR which is measured while the mobile phone is operated at maximum power level does not reflect the real-life exposure scenario since the mobile phone typically re-adjusts its power level and frequency depending on the quality of the communication link with the nearest base station. The choice of a low RF exposure device based on the comparison of the relative SAR values of mobile phones can be misleading. The real-life RF exposure also depends on the over-the-air (OTA) performance of the mobile phone. Taken independently, the two sets of data do not allow a straightforward comparison of the global RF performance amongst mobile phones. A unique and simple parameter denoted as the SAROTA index is proposed for the characterization of mobile phones with regard to both RF exposure and OTA performance. The SAROTA index provides the real-life exposure index of the mobile phone.

  12. Influence of information about specific absorption rate (SAR) upon customers' purchase decisions and safety evaluation of mobile phones.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Peter M; Schütz, Holger; Clauberg, Martin

    2008-02-01

    This study investigated whether the SAR value is a purchase-relevant characteristic of mobile phones for laypersons and what effect the disclosure of a precautionary SAR value has on laypersons' risk perception. The study consisted of two parts: Study part 1 used a conjoint analysis design to explore the relevance of the SAR value and other features of mobile phones for an intended buying decision. Study part 2 used an experimental, repeated measures design to examine the effect of the magnitude of SAR values and the disclosure of a precautionary SAR value on risk perception. In addition, the study included an analysis of prior concerns of the study participants with regard to mobile phone risks. Part 1 indicates that the SAR value has a high relevance for laypersons' purchase intentions. In the experimental purchase setting it ranks even before price and equipment features. The results of study part 2 show that providing information of a precautionary limit value does not influence risk perception. This result suggests that laypersons' underlying subjective "safety model" for mobile phones resembles more a "margin of safety" concept than a threshold concept. The latter observation holds true no matter how concerned the participants are. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Local specific absorption rate in brain tumors at 7 tesla.

    PubMed

    Restivo, Matthew C; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Polders, Daniël L; Raaijmakers, Alexander J E; Luijten, Peter R; Hoogduin, Hans

    2016-01-01

    MR safety at 7 Tesla relies on accurate numerical simulations of transmit electromagnetic fields to fully assess local specific absorption rate (SAR) safety. Numerical simulations for SAR safety are currently performed using models of healthy patients. These simulations might not be useful for estimating SAR in patients who have large lesions with potentially abnormal dielectric properties, e.g., brain tumors. In this study, brain tumor patient models are constructed based on scans of four patients with high grade brain tumors. Dielectric properties for the modeled tumors are assigned based on electrical properties tomography data for the same patients. Simulations were performed to determine SAR. Local SAR increases in the tumors by as much as 30%. However, the location of the maximum 10-gram averaged SAR typically occurs outside of the tumor, and thus does not increase. In the worst case, if the tumor model is moved to the location of maximum electric field intensity, then we do observe an increase in the estimated peak 10-gram SAR directly related to the tumor. Peak local SAR estimation made on the results of a healthy patient model simulation may underestimate the true peak local SAR in a brain tumor patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    SciTech Connect

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  15. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P [Albuquerque, NM; Thompson, Douglas G [Albuqerque, NM; Walker, Bruce C [Albuquerque, NM

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  16. Accurate measurement of the specific absorption rate using a suitable adiabatic magnetothermal setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, Eva; Castro, Miguel; Mediano, Arturo

    2008-03-01

    Accurate measurements of the specific absorption rate (SAR) of solids and fluids were obtained by a calorimetric method, using a special-purpose setup working under adiabatic conditions. Unlike in current nonadiabatic setups, the weak heat exchange with the surroundings allowed a straightforward determination of temperature increments, avoiding the usual initial-time approximations. The measurements performed on a commercial magnetite aqueous ferrofluid revealed a good reproducibility (4%). Also, the measurements on a copper sample allowed comparison between experimental and theoretical values: adiabatic conditions gave SAR values only 3% higher than the theoretical ones, while the typical nonadiabatic method underestimated SAR by 21%.

  17. Intelligent low rate compression of speckled SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compression technique under development at Sandia National Laboratories for the compression of complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery at very low overall bit rates. The methods involved combine several elements of existing and new lossy and lossless compression schemes in order to achieve an overall compression ratio of large SAR scenes of at least 50:1, while maintaining reasonable image quality. It is assumed that the end user will be primarily interested in specific regions of interest within the image (called chips), but that the context in which these chips appear within the entire scene is also of importance to an image analyst. The term intelligent is used to signify an external cuer which locates the chips of interest.

  18. A specific absorption rate reduction method for simultaneous multislice magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fu-Hsing; Wu, Edzer L.; Tung, Yi-Hang; Cheng, Po-Wei; Chiueh, Tzi-Dar; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2017-04-01

    This study proposes a modified Shinnar-Le Roux method to synthesize the excitation radio frequency (RF) pulse for a 2D gradient echo (GRE) based simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with features of low specific absorption rate (SAR) and small out-of-slice ripple. This synthesis method for SMS RF pulses employs thinner slice bandwidth and lower multislice offset frequencies to reduce SAR values and adopts a weighted Parks-McClellan algorithm to reduce sidelobes. Formulas for estimating relative SAR values of the SMS pulses are also introduced. Relative SAR values and out-of-slice ripples of the proposed and typical RF pulses with different parameters are presented. In simultaneous 5-slice phantom and 3-slice human brain imaging, SMS pulses synthesized with the proposed method achieve 32% and 28% SAR values of standard pulses while providing similar image qualities. Typical RF pulses such as sinc x cos can also take advantage of the proposed method and offer lower SAR values for SMS imaging. The RF pulse synthesized using the proposed method features low SAR, small sidelobes, and consistent image quality for 2D GRE-based SMS MRI. This method is applicable to the synthesis of typical SMS RF pulses for significant SAR reduction.

  19. MRI scanner-independent specific absorption rate measurements using diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngseob; Wang, Zhiyue J

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure specific absorption rate (SAR) during MRI scanning using a human torso phantom through quantification of diffusion coefficients independently of those reported by the scanner software for five 1.5 and 3 T clinical MRI systems from different vendors. A quadrature body coil transmitted the RF power and a body array coil received the signals. With diffusion tensor imaging, SAR values for three MRI sequences were measured on the five scanners and compared to the nominal values calculated by the scanners. For the GE 1.5 T MRI system, the MRI scanner-reported SAR value was 1.58 W kg(-1) and the measured SAR value was 1.38 W kg(-1) . For the Philips 1.5 T MRI scanner, the MRI system-reported SAR value was 1.48 W kg(-1) and the measured value was 1.39 W kg(-1) . For the Siemens 3 T MRI system, the reported SAR value was 2.5 W kg(-1) and the measured SAR value was 1.96 W kg(-1) . For two Philips 3 T MRI scanners, the reported SAR values were 1.5 W kg(-1) and the measured values were 1.94 and 1.96 W kg(-1) . The percentage differences between the measured and reported SAR values on the GE 1.5 T, Philips 1.5 T, Siemens 3 T, and Philips 3 T were 13.5, 6.3, 24.2, 25.6, and 26.6% respectively. The scanner-independent SAR measurements using diffusion coefficients described in this study can play a significant role in estimating accurate SAR values as a standardized method. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Design of Miniaturized Double-Negative Material for Specific Absorption Rate Reduction in Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a double-negative triangular metamaterial (TMM) structure, which exhibits a resounding electric response at microwave frequency, was developed by etching two concentric triangular rings of conducting materials. A finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with the lossy-Drude model was used in this study. Simulations were performed using the CST Microwave Studio. The specific absorption rate (SAR) reduction technique is discussed, and the effects of the position of attachment, the distance, and the size of the metamaterials on the SAR reduction are explored. The performance of the double-negative TMMs in cellular phones was also measured in the cheek and the tilted positions using the COMOSAR system. The TMMs achieved a 52.28% reduction for the 10 g SAR. These results provide a guideline to determine the triangular design of metamaterials with the maximum SAR reducing effect for a mobile phone. PMID:25350398

  1. Rate allocation for spotlight SAR phase history data compression.

    PubMed

    Owens, J W; Marcellin, M W

    1999-01-01

    Complex phase history data in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems require extensive processing before useful images can be obtained. In spotlight mode SAR systems, useful images can be obtained by applying aperture weighting and inverse Fourier transform operations to SAR phase history data. In this paper, we are concerned with the compression of the complex phase history data obtained by a spotlight SAR system. We exploit knowledge of the aperture weighting function along with Fourier transform processing to attach a "gain" factor to each complex phase history data sample. This gain factor is then used to efficiently allocate bits to the phase history data during quantization. Performance evaluations are presented for this compression system relative to other existing SAR phase history data compression systems.

  2. Parallel Transmission Pulse Design with Explicit Control for the Specific Absorption Rate in the Presence of Radiofrequency Errors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adrian; Schiavi, Emanuele; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Gagoski, Borjan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.; Guerin, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A new framework for the design of parallel transmit (pTx) pulses is presented introducing constraints for local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in the presence of errors in the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain. Methods The first step is the design of a pTx RF pulse with explicit constraints for global and local SAR. Then, the worst possible SAR associated with that pulse due to RF transmission errors (“worst-case SAR”) is calculated. Finally, this information is used to re-calculate the pulse with lower SAR constraints, iterating this procedure until its worst-case SAR is within safety limits. Results Analysis of an actual pTx RF transmit chain revealed amplitude errors as high as 8% (20%) and phase errors above 3° (15°) for spokes (spiral) pulses. Simulations show that using the proposed framework, pulses can be designed with controlled “worst-case SAR” in the presence of errors of this magnitude at minor cost of the excitation profile quality. Conclusion Our worst-case SAR-constrained pTx design strategy yields pulses with local and global SAR within the safety limits even in the presence of RF transmission errors. This strategy is a natural way to incorporate SAR safety factors in the design of pTx pulses. PMID:26147916

  3. Analysis of the role of lead resistivity in specific absorption rate for deep brain stimulator leads at 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Angelone, Leonardo M; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With rho(lead) = rho(copper) , and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery.

  4. Analysis of the Role of Lead Resistivity in Specific Absorption Rate for Deep Brain Stimulator Leads at 3T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Angelone, Leonardo M.; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With ρlead = ρcopper, and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery. PMID:20335090

  5. Comparison of FDTD-calculated specific absorption rate in adults and children when using a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M; Martín, A; Anguiano, M; Villar, R

    2004-01-21

    In this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) in scaled human head models is analysed to study possible differences between SAR in the heads of adults and children and for assessment of compliance with the international safety guidelines, while using a mobile phone. The finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) has been used for calculating SAR values for models of both children and adults, at 900 and 1800 MHz. Maximum 1 g averaged SAR (SAR1 g) and maximum 10 g averaged SAR (SAR10 g) have been calculated in adults and scaled head models for comparison and assessment of compliance with ANSI/IEEE and European guidelines. Results show that peak SAR1 g and peak SAR10 g all trend downwards with decreasing head size but as head size decreases, the percentage of energy absorbed in the brain increases. So, higher SAR in children's brains can be expected depending on whether the thickness of their skulls and surrounding tissues actually depends on age. The SAR in eyes of different sizes, as a critical organ, has also been studied and very similar distributions for the full size and the scaled models have been obtained. Standard limits can only be exceeded in the unpractical situation where the antenna is located at a very short distance in front of the eye.

  6. Local specific absorption rate in high-pass birdcage and transverse electromagnetic body coils for multiple human body models in clinical landmark positions at 3T.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Desmond T B; Wang, Zhangwei; Loew, Wolfgang; Vogel, Mika W; Hancu, Ileana

    2011-05-01

    To use electromagnetic (EM) simulations to study the effects of body type, landmark position, and radiofrequency (RF) body coil type on peak local specific absorption rate (SAR) in 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Numerically computed peak local SAR for four human body models (HBMs) in three landmark positions (head, heart, pelvic) were compared for a high-pass birdcage and a transverse electromagnetic 3T body coil. Local SAR values were normalized to the IEC whole-body average SAR limit of 2.0 W/kg for normal scan mode. Local SAR distributions were highly variable. Consistent with previous reports, the peak local SAR values generally occurred in the neck-shoulder area, near rungs, or between tissues of greatly differing electrical properties. The HBM type significantly influenced the peak local SAR, with stockier HBMs, extending extremities towards rungs, displaying the highest SAR. There was also a trend for higher peak SAR in the head-centric and heart-centric positions. The impact of the coil types studied was not statistically significant. The large variability in peak local SAR indicates the need to include more than one HBM or landmark position when evaluating safety of body coils. It is recommended that an HBM with arms near the rungs be included to create physically realizable high-SAR scenarios. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Occurrence rate of SAR arcs during the 23nd solar activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ievenko, Igor

    By data of photometric observations at the Maimaga station (57° N, 200° E, geomagnetic coordinates) at the Yakutsk meridian the occurrence rate of subauroral red (SAR) arcs for the 1997 to 2006 period has been analysed. The observations were carried out during winterspring periods at moonless nights under favorable atmospheric conditions. For˜370 nights of observations (total duration is˜3170 hours) 114 cases of SAR arcs occurrence (˜500 hours) have been registered. The occurrence rate of SAR arcs have been determined as a ratio of the number of registration hour intervals of SAR arcs to the summary observation time in hours for particular months. Subauroral red arcs have been registered every year both in the maximum and in the minimum of the solar activity cycle. The most observation occurrence of red arcs is registered on the rise (˜27%) and decay of the maximum of the solar activity cycle (˜36%). The average occurrence rate of SAR arcs during these years was less than in the 22nd solar activity cycle and is equal to ˜16% of the total observation time. The occurrence rate of SAR arcs observations corresponds to the changes of geomagnetic activity during the 23nd solar activity cycle.

  8. Enhancement of specific absorption rate in lossy dielectric objects using a slab of left-handed material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Lei; Cui, Tie Jun

    2005-12-01

    An enhancement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) inside a lossy dielectric object has been investigated theoretically based on a slab of left-handed medium (LHM). In order to make an accurate analysis of SAR distribution, a proper Green’s function involved in the LHM slab is proposed, from which an integral equation for the electric field inside the dielectric object is derived. Such an integral equation has been solved accurately and efficiently using the conjugate gradient method and the fast Fourier transform. We have made a lot of numerical experiments on the SAR distributions inside the dielectric object excited by a line source with and without the LHM slab. Numerical experiments show that SAR can be enhanced tremendously when the LHM slab is involved due to the proper usage of strong surface waves, which will be helpful in the potential biomedical applications for hyperthermia. The physical insight for such a phenomenon has also been discussed.

  9. Enhancement of specific absorption rate in lossy dielectric objects using a slab of left-handed material.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Cui, Tie Jun

    2005-12-01

    An enhancement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) inside a lossy dielectric object has been investigated theoretically based on a slab of left-handed medium (LHM). In order to make an accurate analysis of SAR distribution, a proper Green's function involved in the LHM slab is proposed, from which an integral equation for the electric field inside the dielectric object is derived. Such an integral equation has been solved accurately and efficiently using the conjugate gradient method and the fast Fourier transform. We have made a lot of numerical experiments on the SAR distributions inside the dielectric object excited by a line source with and without the LHM slab. Numerical experiments show that SAR can be enhanced tremendously when the LHM slab is involved due to the proper usage of strong surface waves, which will be helpful in the potential biomedical applications for hyperthermia. The physical insight for such a phenomenon has also been discussed.

  10. Specific absorption rate evaluation for passengers using wireless communication devices inside vehicles with different handedness, passenger counts, and seating locations.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sai-Wing; Diao, Yinliang; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Siu, Yun-Ming; Wu, Yongle

    2012-10-01

    Radiation from mobile phones inside vehicles, which are semiopen metallic enclosures with irregular shapes and apertures, has been a major concern and has warranted investigation in past years. In this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in mobile phone users inside a vehicle was evaluated using different scenarios, including handedness, passenger counts, and seating locations. A computer simulation for SAR distributions in a human body was performed based on the finite-difference time-domain method. The SAR values in mobile phone users in free space were also compared to those inside a vehicle; results illustrated that the maximum SAR induced for mobile phone users in a vehicle is 5% higher than those in free space, but the SAR results showed no significant difference for the handedness. By comparing the SAR values between mobile phone users and nonusers inside a vehicle with a passenger count and seating locations, it was observed that the SAR values around the nonusers' body varied much in different situations, and were higher than those in free space, in some circumstances.

  11. Application of pixel segmentation to the low rate compression of complex SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes a technique to identify pixels within a subregion (chip) of a complex or detected SAR image which are to be losslessly compressed while the remainder of the image is subjected to a high compression ratio. This multi-modal compression is required for the intelligent low rate compression of SAR imagery, which addresses the problem of transmitting massive amounts of high resolution complex SAR data from a remote airborne sensor to a ground station for exploitation by an automatic target recognition (ATR) system, in a real time environment, over a narrow bandwidth. The ATR system results might then be presented to an image analyst who, using the contextual information from the SAR image, makes final target determination.

  12. FDTD chiral brain tissue model for specific absorption rate determination under radiation from mobile phones at 900 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, M.; Torres-Silva, H.

    2006-04-01

    A new electrodynamics model formed by chiral bioplasma, which represents the human head inner structure and makes it possible to analyse its behaviour when it is irradiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones, is presented. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numeric technique is used, which allows simulation of the electromagnetic fields, deduced with Maxwell's equations, and allows us to simulate the specific absorption rate (SAR). The results show the SAR behaviour as a function of the input power and the chirality factor. In considering the chiral brain tissue in the proposed human head model, the two more important conclusions of our work are the following: (a) the absorption of the electromagnetic fields from cellular phones is stronger, so the SAR coefficient is higher than that using the classical model, when values of the chiral factor are of order of 1; (b) 'inverse skin effect' shows up at 1800 MHz, with respect to a 900 MHz source.

  13. Animal model of Sar1b deficiency presents lipid absorption deficits similar to Anderson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Levic, Daniel S.; Minkel, JR; Wang, Wen-Der; Rybski, Witold M.; Melville, David B.; Knapik, Ela W.

    2015-01-01

    Anderson Disease (ANDD) or Chylomicron Retention Disease (CMRD) is a rare, hereditary lipid malabsorption syndrome associated with mutations in the SAR1B gene that is characterized by failure to thrive and hypocholesterolemia. Although the SAR1B structure has been resolved and its role in formation of coat protein II (COPII) coated carriers is well established, little is known about the requirement for SAR1B during embryogenesis. To address this question, we have developed a zebrafish model of Sar1b deficiency based on antisense oligonucleotide knockdown. We show that zebrafish sar1b is highly conserved among vertebrates, broadly expressed during development, and enriched in the digestive tract organs, brain and craniofacial skeleton. Consistent with ANDD symptoms of chylomicron retention, we found that dietary lipids in Sar1b deficient embryos accumulate in enterocytes. Transgenic expression analysis revealed that Sar1b is required for growth of exocrine pancreas and liver. Furthermore, we found abnormal differentiation and maturation of craniofacial cartilage associated with defects in procollagen II secretion, and absence of select, neuroD-positive neurons of the midbrain and hindbrain. The model presented here will help to systematically dissect developmental roles of Sar1b and to discover molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to organ-specific ANDD pathology. PMID:25559265

  14. Design of parallel transmission pulses for simultaneous multi-slice with explicit control for peak power and local specific absorption rate

    PubMed Central

    Guérin, Bastien; Setsompop, Kawin; Ye, Huihui; Poser, Benedikt A.; Stenger, Andrew V.; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To design parallel transmit (pTx) simultaneous multi-slice (SMS) spokes pulses with explicit control for peak power, local and global specific absorption rate (SAR). Methods We designed SMS pTx least-squares and magnitude least squares spokes pulses while constraining local SAR using the virtual observation points (VOPs) compression of SAR matrices. We evaluated our approach in simulations of a head (7 T) and a body (3 T) coil with 8 channels arranged in two z-rows. Results For many of our simulations, control of average power by Tikhonov regularization of the SMS pTx spokes pulse design yielded pulses that violated hardware and SAR safety limits. On the other hand, control of peak power alone yielded pulses that violated local SAR limits. Pulses optimized with control of both local SAR and peak power satisfied all constraints and therefore had the best excitation performance under limiting power and SAR constraints. These results extend our previous results for single slice pTx excitations but are more pronounced because of the large power demands and SAR of SMS pulses. Conclusions Explicit control of local SAR and peak power is required to generate optimal SMS pTx excitations satisfying both the system's hardware limits and regulatory safety limits. PMID:24938991

  15. Comparison of specific absorption rate induced in brain tissues of a child and an adult using mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-04-01

    The steady increase of mobile phone usage, especially mobile phones by children, has led to a rising concern about the possible adverse health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. The objective of this work is to study whether there is a larger radio frequency energy absorption in the brain of a child compared to that of an adult. For this reason, three high-resolution models, two child head models (6 - and 11-year old) and one adult head model (34-year old) have been used in the study. A finite-difference time-domain method was employed to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the models from exposure to a generic handset at 1750 MHz. The results show that the SAR distributions in the human brain are age-dependent, and there is a deeper penetration of the absorbed SAR in the child's brain. The induced SAR can be significantly higher in subregions of the child's brain. In all of the examined cases, the SAR values in the brains of a child and an adult are well below the IEEE safety standard.

  16. Bioelectromagnetic effects measurements - SAR and induced current.

    PubMed

    Dlugosz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses several theoretical and practical aspects of the application of currents flowing through the body of a radiotelephone operator and Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). SAR is known as the physical quantity which is a perfect solution for biological experiments. Unfortunately, SAR cannot be measured directly. Contrary to SAR, which is limited to the penetration depth, a current induced in a point of a body is measurable in any other point of the body. The main objective of this paper is to show that the current induced in a human body when using a radiotelephone or mobile phone is significant and should be analyzed as widely as SAR is. Computer simulations of a human's hand with a radiotelephone were made. Experiments were also conducted. The results of the experiments show that induced current is also as important as SAR and it cannot be omitted in bioelectromagnetic experiments. In biomedical studies both parameters: induced current and SAR play a major role.

  17. High intraspecific recombination rate in a native population of Candidatus pelagibacter ubique (SAR11).

    PubMed

    Vergin, Kevin L; Tripp, H James; Wilhelm, Larry J; Denver, Dee R; Rappé, Michael S; Giovannoni, Stephen J

    2007-10-01

    Recombination is an important process in microbial evolution. Rates of recombination with extracellular DNA matter because models of microbial population structure are profoundly influenced by the degree to which recombination is occurring within the population. Low rates of recombination may be sufficient to ensure the lateral propagation of genes that have a high selective advantage without disrupting the clonal pattern of inheritance for other genes. High rates of recombination potentially can obscure clonal patterns, leading to linkage equilibrium, and give microbial populations a population genetic structure more akin to sexually interbreeding eukaryotic populations. We examined eight loci from nine strains of candidatus Pelagibacter ubique (SAR11), isolated from a single 2L niskin sample of natural seawater, for evidence of genetic recombination between strains. The Shimodaira-Hasegawa test revealed significant phylogenetic incongruence in seven of the genes, indicating that frequent recombination obscures phylogenetic signals from the linear inheritance of genes in this population. Statistical evidence for intragenic recombination was found for six loci. An informative sites matrix showed extensive evidence for a widespread breakdown of linkage disequilibrium. Although the mechanisms of genetic transfer in native SAR11 populations are unknown, we measured recombination rates, rho, that are much higher than point mutation rates, theta, as a source of genetic diversity in this clade. The eukaryotic model of species sharing a common pool of alleles is more apt for this SAR11 population than a strictly clonal model of inheritance in which allelic diversity is controlled by periodic selection.

  18. Animal Guts as Ideal Chemical Reactors: Maximizing Absorption Rates.

    PubMed

    Jumars

    2000-04-01

    I solved equations that describe coupled hydrolysis in and absorption from a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR), a plug flow reactor (PFR), and a batch reactor (BR) for the rate of ingestion and/or the throughput time that maximizes the rate of absorption (=gross rate of gain from digestion). Predictions are that foods requiring a single hydrolytic step (e.g., disaccharides) yield ingestion rates that vary inversely with the concentration of food substrate ingested, whereas foods that require multiple hydrolytic and absorptive reactions proceeding in parallel (e.g., proteins) yield maximal ingestion rates at intermediate substrate concentrations. Counterintuitively, then, animals acting to maximize their absorption rates should show compensatory ingestion (more rapid feeding on food of lower concentration), except for the lower range of diet quality for complex diets and except for animals that show purely linear (passive) uptake. At their respective maxima in absorption rates, the PFR and BR yield only modestly higher rates of gain than the CSTR but do so at substantially lower rates of ingestion. All three ideal reactors show milder than linear reduction in rate of absorption when throughput or holding time in the gut is increased (e.g., by scarcity or predation hazard); higher efficiency of hydrolysis and extraction offset lower intake. Hence adding feeding costs and hazards of predation is likely to slow ingestion rates and raise absorption efficiencies substantially over the cost-free optima found here.

  19. Tide-corrected strain rate and crevasses of Campbell Glacier Tongue in East Antarctica measured by SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H.; Lee, H.

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of flow velocity strain rate of a floating glacier is critical to the investigation of detailed flow regime and crevassing mechanism. We measured the surface deformation of Campbell Glacier Tongue (CGT) in East Antarctica from the 14 COSMO-SkyMed one-day tandem differential interferometric SAR (DInSAR) image pairs obtained in 2011. By removing the vertical tidal deflection obtained from the double-differential InSAR (DDInSAR) signals, we derived the tide-corrected ice-flow velocity and strain rate of CGT. The vertical tidal deflection of CGT was estimated by multiplying the tidal variations corresponding to the DInSAR images by the DDInSAR-derived tide deflection ratio, which was removed from the DInSAR signals to extract ice velocity only. The orientation of crevasses in CGT was nearly perpendicular to the direction of the most tensile strain rate calculated from the tide-corrected ice velocity. This demonstrates that the crevasses form by ice flow in respect of the DInSAR accuracy, not by tidal deflection. The tide correction of DInSAR signals over floating glaciers by using the DDInSAR-derived tide deflection ratio is useful for estimating accurate ice velocity and strain rate for analyzing crevasses. The tide-corrected ice velocity and strain rate will thus be of great value in a better understating of ice dynamics of floating glaciers. This research was funded by National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2016R1D1A1A09916630).

  20. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry).

    PubMed

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-09

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the 'specific absorption rate (SAR)', is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 °C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m(-1) in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  1. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  2. Exercise, Insulin Absorption Rates, and Artificial Pancreas Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Spencer; Hinshaw, Ling; Basu, Rita; Basu, Ananda; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2016-11-01

    Type 1 Diabetes is characterized by an inability of a person to endogenously produce the hormone insulin. Because of this, insulin must be injected - usually subcutaneously. The size of the injected dose and the rate at which the dose reaches the circulatory system have a profound effect on the ability to control glucose excursions, and therefore control of diabetes. However, insulin absorption rates via subcutaneous injection are variable and depend on a number of factors including tissue perfusion, physical activity (vasodilation, increased capillary throughput), and other tissue geometric and physical properties. Exercise may also have a sizeable effect on the rate of insulin absorption, which can potentially lead to dangerous glucose levels. Insulin-dosing algorithms, as implemented in an artificial pancreas controller, should account accurately for absorption rate variability and exercise effects on insulin absorption. The aforementioned factors affecting insulin absorption will be discussed within the context of both fluid mechanics and data driven modeling approaches.

  3. The formation of linear aggregates in magnetic hyperthermia: implications on specific absorption rate and magnetic anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Saville, Steven L; Qi, Bin; Baker, Jonathon; Stone, Roland; Camley, Robert E; Livesey, Karen L; Ye, Longfei; Crawford, Thomas M; Mefford, O Thompson

    2014-06-15

    The design and application of magnetic nanoparticles for use as magnetic hyperthermia agents has garnered increasing interest over the past several years. When designing these systems, the fundamentals of particle design play a key role in the observed specific absorption rate (SAR). This includes the particle's core size, polymer brush length, and colloidal arrangement. While the role of particle core size on the observed SAR has been significantly reported, the role of the polymer brush length has not attracted as much attention. It has recently been reported that for some suspensions linear aggregates form in the presence of an applied external magnetic field, i.e. chains of magnetic particles. The formation of these chains may have the potential for a dramatic impact on the biomedical application of these materials, specifically the efficiency of the particles to transfer magnetic energy to the surrounding cells. In this study we demonstrate the dependence of SAR on magnetite nanoparticle core size and brush length as well as observe the formation of magnetically induced colloidal arrangements. Colloidally stable magnetic nanoparticles were demonstrated to form linear aggregates in an alternating magnetic field. The length and distribution of the aggregates were dependent upon the stabilizing polymer molecular weight. As the molecular weight of the stabilizing layer increased, the magnetic interparticle interactions decreased therefore limiting chain formation. In addition, theoretical calculations demonstrated that interparticle spacing has a significant impact on the magnetic behavior of these materials. This work has several implications for the design of nanoparticle and magnetic hyperthermia systems, while improving understanding of how colloidal arrangement affects SAR.

  4. A New Design of Metamaterials for SAR Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. A. M.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to calculate the reduction of specific absorption rate (SAR) with a new design of square metamaterials (SMMs). The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with lossy-Drude model is adopted in this analysis. The method of SAR reduction is discussed and the effects of location, distance, and size of metamaterials are analyzed. SMMs have achieved a 53.06% reduction of the initial SAR value for the case of 10 gm SAR. These results put forward a guideline to select various types of metamaterials with the maximum SAR reducing effect for a cellular phone.

  5. Microsaccade-rate indicates absorption by music listening.

    PubMed

    Lange, Elke B; Zweck, Fabian; Sinn, Petra

    2017-08-05

    The power of music is a literary topos, which can be attributed to intense and personally significant experiences, one of them being the state of absorption. Such phenomenal states are difficult to grasp objectively. We investigated the state of musical absorption by using eye tracking. We utilized a load related definition of state absorption: multimodal resources are committed to create a unified representation of music. Resource allocation was measured indirectly by microsaccade rate, known to indicate cognitive processing load. We showed in Exp. 1 that microsaccade rate also indicates state absorption. Hence, there is cross-modal coupling between an auditory aesthetic experience and fixational eye movements. When removing the fixational stimulus in Exp. 2, saccades are no longer generated upon visual input and the cross-modal coupling disappeared. Results are interpreted in favor of the load hypothesis of microsaccade rate and against the assumption of general slowing by state absorption. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Metal-framed spectacles and implants and specific absorption rate among adults and children using mobile phones at 900/1800/2100 MHz.

    PubMed

    Joó, Ervin; Szász, András; Szendrö, Péter

    2006-01-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) from mobile telephones at horizontal and vertical positions is investigated in human adult and child heads wearing metal-rim spectacles and having metallic implants. The SAR values calculated by Finite Difference Time Domain (FTDT) method are compared to the actual ANSI/IEEE standards and to the 900/1800/2100 MHz electromagnetic radiation limits according to EU standards. Our calculation shows a maximum of the cellular SAR in the child head, which in the case of metallic implant could be as much as 100% higher than in the adult head. The averaging on 1 and 10 g tissue-masses shows SAR generally under the limit of 519/1999/EC standards. However, in the case of 2100 MHz with vertical position of the phone for adults and of the 900 MHz for children with metallic implants the ANSI/IEEE limits are exceeded.

  7. Further studies of human whole-body radiofrequency absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Hill, D A

    1985-01-01

    Further studies of human whole-body radiofrequency (RF) absorption rates were carried out using a TEM-cell exposure system. Experiments were done at one frequency near the grounded resonance frequency (approximately 40 MHz), and at several below-resonance frequencies. Absorption rates are small for the K and H orientations of the body, even when grounded. For the body trunk in an E orientation, the absorption rate of a sitting person is about half of the rate for the same person standing with arms at the sides; the latter in turn is about half the rate for the same subject standing with arms over the head. Two-body interactions cause no increase in absorption rates for grounded people. They do, however, increase the absorption rates for subjects in an E orientation in free space; the largest interaction occurs when one subject is lambda/2 behind the other (as seen by the incident wave). When these results are applied to practical occupational exposure situations, the whole-body specific absorption rate does not exceed the ANSI limit of 0.4 W/kg for exposures permitted by the ANSI standard (C95.1-1982) at frequencies from 7 to 40 MHz.

  8. Correlation between relative growth rate and specific leaf area requires associations of specific leaf area with nitrogen absorption rate of roots.

    PubMed

    Osone, Yoko; Ishida, Atsushi; Tateno, Masaki

    2008-07-01

    Close correlations between specific leaf area (SLA) and relative growth rate (RGR) have been reported in many studies. However, theoretically, SLA by itself has small net positive effect on RGR because any increase in SLA inevitably causes a decrease in area-based leaf nitrogen concentration (LNCa), another RGR component. It was hypothesized that, for a correlation between SLA and RGR, SLA needs to be associated with specific nitrogen absorption rate of roots (SAR), which counteracts the negative effect of SLA on LNCa. Five trees and six herbs were grown under optimal conditions and relationships between SAR and RGR components were analyzed using a model based on balanced growth hypothesis. SLA varied 1.9-fold between species. Simulations predicted that, if SAR is not associated with SLA, this variation in SLA would cause a47% decrease in LNCa along the SLA gradient, leading to a marginal net positive effect on RGR. In reality, SAR was positively related to SLA, showing a 3.9-fold variation, which largely compensated for the negative effect of SLA on LNCa. Consequently, LNCa values were almost constant across species and a positive SLA-RGR relationship was achieved. These results highlight the importance of leaf-root interactions in understanding interspecific differences in RGR.

  9. Water-soluble iron oxide nanocubes with high values of specific absorption rate for cancer cell hyperthermia treatment.

    PubMed

    Guardia, Pablo; Di Corato, Riccardo; Lartigue, Lenaic; Wilhelm, Claire; Espinosa, Ana; Garcia-Hernandez, Mar; Gazeau, Florence; Manna, Liberato; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2012-04-24

    Iron oxide nanocrystals (IONCs) are appealing heat mediator nanoprobes in magnetic-mediated hyperthermia for cancer treatment. Here, specific absorption rate (SAR) values are reported for cube-shaped water-soluble IONCs prepared by a one-pot synthesis approach in a size range between 13 and 40 nm. The SAR values were determined as a function of frequency and magnetic field applied, also spanning technical conditions which are considered biomedically safe for patients. Among the different sizes tested, IONCs with an average diameter of 19 ± 3 nm had significant SAR values in clinical conditions and reached SAR values up to 2452 W/g(Fe) at 520 kHz and 29 kAm(-1), which is one of the highest values so far reported for IONCs. In vitro trials carried out on KB cancer cells treated with IONCs of 19 nm have shown efficient hyperthermia performance, with cell mortality of about 50% recorded when an equilibrium temperature of 43 °C was reached after 1 h of treatment.

  10. Specific absorption rate and electric field measurements in the near field of six mobile phone base station antennas.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Puranen, Lauri; Jokela, Kari

    2009-05-01

    In this article, the exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic fields was studied in close proximity (distances of 10, 100, 300, and 600 mm) to six base station antennas. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in 800 mm x 500 mm x 200 mm box phantom as well as unperturbed electric field (E) in air was measured. The results were used to determine whether the measurement of local maximum of unperturbed electric field can be used as a compliance check for local exposure. Also, the conservativeness of this assessment method compared to the ICNIRP basic restriction was studied. Moreover, the assessment of whole-body exposure was discussed and the distance ranges presented in which the ICNIRP limit for local exposure could be exceeded before the limit for whole-body SAR. These results show that the electric field measurement alone can be used for easy compliance check for the local exposure at all distances and for all antenna types studied. However, in some cases when the local peak value of E was compared directly to the ICNIRP reference level for unperturbed E, the exposure was overestimated only very slightly (by factor 1.1) compared to the basic restriction for localized SAR in a human, and hence these results can not be generalized to all antenna types. Moreover, it was shown that the limit for localized exposure could be exceeded before the limit for the whole-body average SAR, if the distance to the antenna was less than 240 mm.

  11. The relationship of temperature rise to specific absorption rate and current in the human leg for exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the high frequency band.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P R

    2003-10-07

    Of the biological effects of human exposure to radiofrequency and microwave radiation, the best-established are those due to elevation of tissue temperature. To prevent harmful levels of heating, restrictions have been proposed on the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the relationship between SAR and temperature rise is not an invariant, since not only the heat capacity but also the efficiency of heat dissipation varies between different tissues and exposure scenarios. For small enough SAR, the relationship is linear and may be characterized by a 'heating factor' deltaT/SAR. Under whole-body irradiation the SAR may be particularly high in the ankles due to the concentration of current flowing through a relatively small cross-sectional area. In a previous paper, the author has presented calculations of the SAR distribution in a human leg in the high frequency (HF) band. In this paper, the heating factor for this situation is derived using a finite element approximation of the Pennes bioheat equation. The sensitivity of the results to different blood perfusion rates is investigated, and a simple local thermoregulatory model is applied. Both time-dependent and steady-state solutions are considered. Results confirm the appropriateness of the ICNIRP reference level of 100 mA on current through the leg, but suggest that at higher currents significant thermoregulatory adjustments to muscle blood flow will occur.

  12. Adiabatic vs. non-adiabatic determination of specific absorption rate of ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natividad, Eva; Castro, Miguel; Mediano, Arturo

    2009-05-01

    The measurement of temperature variations in adiabatic conditions allows the determination of the specific absorption rate of magnetic nanoparticles and ferrofluids from the correct incremental expression, SAR=(1/ m MNP) C(Δ T/Δ t). However, when measurements take place in non-adiabatic conditions, one must approximate this expression by SAR≈ Cβ/ m MNP, where β is the initial slope of the temperature vs. time curve during alternating field application. The errors arising from the use of this approximation were estimated through several experiments with different isolating conditions, temperature sensors and sample-sensor contacts. It is concluded that small to appreciable errors can appear, which are difficult to infer or control.

  13. Magnetic Nanoparticles with High Specific Absorption Rate at Low Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, K.; Baker, I.; Meyers, R.; Shyong, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a new type of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) for use in the hyperthermia treatment of tumors. These particles consist of 2–4 nm crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 gathered in 20–40 nm aggregates with a coating of carboxymethyl-dextran, producing a zetasize of 110–120 nm. Despite their very low saturation magnetization (1.5–6.5 emu/g), the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the nanoparticles is 22–200 W/g at applied alternating magnetic field (AMF) with strengths of 100–500 Oe at a frequency of 160 kHz. PMID:26884816

  14. MRI-based anatomical model of the human head for specific absorption rate mapping

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Nikos; Angelone, Leonardo; Tulloch, Seann; Sorg, Scott; Kaiser, Jonathan; Kennedy, David

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based, high-resolution, numerical model of the head of a healthy human subject. In order to formulate the model, we performed quantitative volumetric segmentation on the human head, using T1-weighted MRI. The high spatial resolution used (1 × 1 × 1 mm3), allowed for the precise computation and visualization of a higher number of anatomical structures than provided by previous models. Furthermore, the high spatial resolution allowed us to study individual thin anatomical structures of clinical relevance not visible by the standard model currently adopted in computational bioelectromagnetics. When we computed the electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) at 7 Tesla MRI using this high-resolution model, we were able to obtain a detailed visualization of such fine anatomical structures as the epidermis/dermis, bone structures, bone-marrow, white matter and nasal and eye structures. PMID:18985401

  15. Local SAR in Parallel Transmission Pulse Design

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonsung; Gebhardt, Matthias; Wald, Lawrence L.; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2011-01-01

    The management of local and global power deposition in human subjects (Specific Absorption Rate, SAR) is a fundamental constraint to the application of parallel transmission (pTx) systems. Even though the pTx and single channel have to meet the same SAR requirements, the complex behavior of the spatial distribution of local SAR for transmission arrays poses problems that are not encountered in conventional single-channel systems and places additional requirements on pTx RF pulse design. We propose a pTx pulse design method which builds on recent work to capture the spatial distribution of local SAR in numerical tissue models in a compressed parameterization in order to incorporate local SAR constraints within computation times that accommodate pTx pulse design during an in vivo MRI scan. Additionally, the algorithm yields a Protocol-specific Ultimate Peak in Local SAR (PUPiL SAR), which is shown to bound the achievable peak local SAR for a given excitation profile fidelity. The performance of the approach was demonstrated using a numerical human head model and a 7T eight-channel transmit array. The method reduced peak local 10g SAR by 14–66% for slice-selective pTx excitations and 2D selective pTx excitations compared to a pTx pulse design constrained only by global SAR. The primary tradeoff incurred for reducing peak local SAR was an increase in global SAR, up to 34% for the evaluated examples, which is favorable in cases where local SAR constraints dominate the pulse applications. PMID:22083594

  16. Soft black hole absorption rates as conservation laws

    DOE PAGES

    Avery, Steven G.; Schwab, Burkhard U. W.

    2017-04-10

    The absorption rate of low-energy, or soft, electromagnetic radiation by spherically symmetric black holes in arbitrary dimensions is shown to be fixed by conservation of energy and large gauge transformations. Here, we interpret this result as the explicit realization of the Hawking-Perry-Strominger Ward identity for large gauge transformations in the background of a non-evaporating black hole. Along the way we rederive and extend our previous analytic results regarding the absorption rate for the minimal scalar and the photon.

  17. Impact of head morphology on local brain specific absorption rate from exposure to mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, Fatemeh; Bakker, Jurriaan F; Paulides, Margarethus M; Verhaart, René F; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2015-01-01

    Among various possible health effects of mobile phone radiation, the risk of inducing cancer has the strongest interest of laymen and health organizations. Recently, the Interphone epidemiological study investigated the association between the estimated Radio Frequency (RF) dose from mobile phones and the risk of developing a brain tumor. Their dosimetric analysis included over 100 phone models but only two homogeneous head phantoms. So, the potential impact of individual morphological features on global and local RF absorption in the brain was not investigated. In this study, we performed detailed dosimetric simulations for 20 head models and quantified the variation of RF dose in different brain regions as a function of head morphology. Head models were exposed to RF fields from generic mobile phones at 835 and 1900 MHz in the "tilted" and "cheek" positions. To evaluate the local RF dose variation, we used and compared two different post-processing methods, that is, averaging specific absorption rate (SAR) over Talairach regions and over sixteen predefined 1 cm(3) cube-shaped field-sensors. The results show that the variation in the averaged SAR among the heads can reach up to 16.4 dB at a 1 cm(3) cube inside the brain (field-sensor method) and alternatively up to 15.8 dB in the medulla region (Talairach method). In conclusion, we show head morphology as an important uncertainty source for dosimetric studies of mobile phones. Therefore, any dosimetric analysis dealing with RF dose at a specific region in the brain (e.g., tumor risk analysis) should be based upon real morphology. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A study on transmission characteristics and specific absorption rate using impedance-matched electrodes for various human body communication.

    PubMed

    Machida, Yuta; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Human body communication (HBC) is a new communication technology that has presented potential applications in health care and elderly support systems in recent years. In this study, which is focused on a wearable transmitter and receiver for HBC in a body area network (BAN), we performed electromagnetic field analysis and simulation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with various models of the human body. Further we redesigned a number of impedance-matched electrodes to allow transmission without stubs or transformers. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and transmission characteristics S21 of these electrode structures were compared for several models.

  19. Local SAR in parallel transmission pulse design.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joonsung; Gebhardt, Matthias; Wald, Lawrence L; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2012-06-01

    The management of local and global power deposition in human subjects (specific absorption rate, SAR) is a fundamental constraint to the application of parallel transmission (pTx) systems. Even though the pTx and single channel have to meet the same SAR requirements, the complex behavior of the spatial distribution of local SAR for transmission arrays poses problems that are not encountered in conventional single-channel systems and places additional requirements on pTx radio frequency pulse design. We propose a pTx pulse design method which builds on recent work to capture the spatial distribution of local SAR in numerical tissue models in a compressed parameterization in order to incorporate local SAR constraints within computation times that accommodate pTx pulse design during an in vivo magnetic resonance imaging scan. Additionally, the algorithm yields a protocol-specific ultimate peak in local SAR, which is shown to bound the achievable peak local SAR for a given excitation profile fidelity. The performance of the approach was demonstrated using a numerical human head model and a 7 Tesla eight-channel transmit array. The method reduced peak local 10 g SAR by 14-66% for slice-selective pTx excitations and 2D selective pTx excitations compared to a pTx pulse design constrained only by global SAR. The primary tradeoff incurred for reducing peak local SAR was an increase in global SAR, up to 34% for the evaluated examples, which is favorable in cases where local SAR constraints dominate the pulse applications. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. FDTD based SAR analysis in human head using irregular volume averaging techniques of different resolutions at GSM 900 band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Md Faruk; Ray, Sudhabindu

    2014-06-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside human head in the near-field of a mobile phone antenna has been investigated for three different SAR resolutions using Finite Difference in Time Domain (FDTD) method at GSM 900 band. Voxel based anthropomorphic human head model, consisting of different anatomical tissues, is used to calculate the peak SAR values averaged over 10-g, 1-g and 0.1-g mass. It is observed that the maximum local SAR increases significantly for smaller mass averages.

  1. Fault creep rates of the Chaman fault (Afghanistan and Pakistan) inferred from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnhart, William D.

    2017-01-01

    The Chaman fault is the major strike-slip structural boundary between the India and Eurasia plates. Despite sinistral slip rates similar to the North America-Pacific plate boundary, no major (>M7) earthquakes have been documented along the Chaman fault, indicating that the fault either creeps aseismically or is at a late stage in its seismic cycle. Recent work with remotely sensed interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series documented a heterogeneous distribution of fault creep and interseismic coupling along the entire length of the Chaman fault, including an 125 km long creeping segment and an 95 km long locked segment within the region documented in this study. Here I present additional InSAR time series results from the Envisat and ALOS radar missions spanning the southern and central Chaman fault in an effort to constrain the locking depth, dip, and slip direction of the Chaman fault. I find that the fault deviates little from a vertical geometry and accommodates little to no fault-normal displacements. Peak-documented creep rates on the fault are 9-12 mm/yr, accounting for 25-33% of the total motion between India and Eurasia, and locking depths in creeping segments are commonly shallower than 500 m. The magnitude of the 1892 Chaman earthquake is well predicted by the total area of the 95 km long coupled segment. To a first order, the heterogeneous distribution of aseismic creep combined with consistently shallow locking depths suggests that the southern and central Chaman fault may only produce small to moderate earthquakes (

  2. [Nutrient absorption rate from the peritoneal cavity in rats].

    PubMed

    Mahedero Ruiz, G; Morán Penco, J M; Caballero Loscos, M J; Salas Martínez, J; Maciá Botejara, E A; Mariño Hernández, E L

    1990-01-01

    A study has been done of the absorption/elimination kinetics of nutritive substances such as glucose, amino acids and fats from the peritoneal cavity. For this purpose, 48 male Wistar rats were administered an intravenous or intraperitoneal "bolus" of 2 microCi of L-glucose-C14/250 g of body weight, 3 microCi of D-alanine-L-C14/250 g and 0.4 g of Intralipid/250 g body weight. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model was applied to determine the absorption, elimination and distribution constants among the different body compartments of each of these substrates, as well as the absorption and elimination halflife. When the areas under the curves were compared following intravenous and intraperitoneal infusion, the total physiological availability or fraction of dose absorbed over a given period of time were calculated. A higher absorption and elimination constant for glucose and amino acids as compared to fats was found. Higher than 90% absorption for all substrates was found, but since in the case of fats the elimination constant is lower and longer the elimination halflife, we must be cautious regarding its infusion rate.

  3. Absorption and turnover rates of manganese in the chick

    SciTech Connect

    Halpin, K.M.; Baker, D.H.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were conducted with young chicks to assess the absorption and turnover rates of manganese (Mn), using tissue Mn accumulation as the response criterion. To estimate Mn absorption efficiency, chicks were injected intraperitoneally (IP) or crop intubated twice daily with three levels of inorganic Mn (provided as MnSo/sub 4/ H/sub 2/O). All chicks were fed a Mn-deficient (1.4 mg/kg) casein-dextrose diet during this 14-day period. Tibia Mn concentration was regressed on Mn intake (r/sup 2/ = 0.99) and the two routes (IP injection and crop intubation) of Mn administration were compared using the slope-ratio technique. The absorption efficiency of crop-intubated Mn was 2.40%. To estimate turnover rates of Mn in avian tissues, chicks were serially killed following a period of Mn loading (fed 2000 mg/kg Mn for 14 days). The log of tissue Mn concentration was regressed on depletion time, and biological half-life was determined. The half-life of Mn in tibia, pancreas, and bile was 6.0, 7.3, and 1.1 days, respectively. These data suggest that the avian's relatively high dietary requirement for Mn cannot be explained by inefficient gut absorption, but instead by a more rapid turnover of body Mn relative to that which occurs in mammalian species.

  4. Toward Online Adaptive Hyperthermia Treatment Planning: Correlation Between Measured and Simulated Specific Absorption Rate Changes Caused by Phase Steering in Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, H. Petra; Ciampa, Silvia; Kroon-Oldenhof, Rianne de; Steggerda-Carvalho, Eva J.; Stam, Gerard van; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Bardati, Fernando; Bel, Arjan; Crezee, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Hyperthermia is the clinical application of heat, in which tumor temperatures are raised to 40°C to 45°C. This proven radiation and chemosensitizer significantly improves clinical outcome for several tumor sites. Earlier studies of the use of pre-treatment planning for hyperthermia showed good qualitative but disappointing quantitative reliability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) can be used more reliably for online adaptive treatment planning during locoregional hyperthermia treatments. Methods and Materials: This study included 78 treatment sessions for 15 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. At the start of treatments, temperature rise measurements were performed with 3 different antenna settings optimized for each patient, from which the absorbed power (specific absorption rate [SAR]) was derived. HTP was performed based on a computed tomography (CT) scan in treatment position with the bladder catheter in situ. The SAR along the thermocouple tracks was extracted from the simulated SAR distributions. Correlations between measured and simulated (average) SAR values were determined. To evaluate phase steering, correlations between the changes in simulated and measured SAR values averaged over the thermocouple probe were determined for all 3 combinations of antenna settings. Results: For 42% of the individual treatment sessions, the correlation coefficient between measured and simulated SAR profiles was higher than 0.5, whereas 58% showed a weak correlation (R of <0.5). The overall correlation coefficient between measured and simulated average SAR was weak (R=0.31; P<.001). The measured and simulated changes in average SAR after adapting antenna settings correlated much better (R=0.70; P<.001). The ratio between the measured and simulated quotients of maximum and average SARs was 1.03 ± 0.26 (mean ± SD), indicating that HTP can also correctly predict the relative amplitude of

  5. Specific absorption rate variation in a brain phantom due to exposure by a 3G mobile phone: problems in dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2013-12-01

    A specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements system has been developed for compliance testing of personal mobile phone in a brain phantom material contained in a Perspex box. The volume of the box has been chosen corresponding to the volume of a small rat and illuminated by a 3G mobile phone frequency (1718.5 MHz), and the emitted radiation directed toward brain phantom .The induced fields in the phantom material are measured. Set up to lift the plane carrying the mobile phone is run by a pulley whose motion is controlled by a stepper motor. The platform is made to move at a pre-determined rate of 2 degrees per min limited up to 20 degrees. The measured data for induced fields in various locations are used to compute corresponding SAR values and inter comparison obtained. These data are also compared with those when the mobile phone is placed horizontally with respect to the position of the animal. The SAR data is also experimentally obtained by measuring a rise in temperature due to this mobile exposures and data compared with those obtained in the previous set. To seek a comparison with the safety criteria same set of measurements are performed in 10 g phantom material contained in a cubical box. These results are higher than those obtained with the knowledge of induced field measurements. It is concluded that SAR values are sensitive to the angular position of the moving platform and are well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure. The data are suggestive of having a fresh look to understand the mode of electromagnetic field -bio interaction.

  6. Contrast-enhanced specific absorption rate-efficient 3D cardiac cine with respiratory-triggered radiofrequency gating.

    PubMed

    Henningsson, Markus; Chan, Raymond H; Goddu, Beth; Goepfert, Lois A; Razavi, Reza; Botnar, Rene M; Schaeffter, Tobias; Nezafat, Reza

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the use of radiofrequency (RF) gating in conjunction with a paramagnetic contrast agent to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR) and increase the blood-myocardium contrast in balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) 3D cardiac cine. RF gating was implemented by synchronizing the RF-excitation with an external respiratory sensor (bellows), which could additionally be used for respiratory gating. For reference, respiratory-gated 3D cine images were acquired without RF gating. Free-breathing 3D cine images were acquired in eight healthy subjects before and after contrast injection (Gd-BOPTA) and compared to breath-hold 2D cine. RF-gated 3D cine reduced the SAR by nearly 40% without introducing significant artifacts while providing left ventricle (LV) measurements similar to those obtained with 2D cine. The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was significantly higher for 3D cine compared to 2D cine, both before and after contrast injection; however, no statistically significant CNR increase was observed for the postcontrast 3D cine compared to the precontrast acquisitions. Respiratory-triggered RF gating significantly reduces SAR in 3D cine acquisitions, which may enable a more widespread clinical use of 3D cine. Furthermore, CNR of 3D bSSFP cine is higher than of 2D and administration of Gd-BOPTA does not improve the CNR of 3D cine. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Calculating Strain Rate Field for Active Fault in Small Area Based on GPS and InSAR Geodetic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Shan, X.; Song, X.

    2016-12-01

    How to estimate strain rate field of active faults is a key question in geophysics science. With the rapid development of geodetic techniques, GPS and InSAR are powerful techniques to monitor crustal deformation, and provide essential dataset for strain rate calculation. However, there are multiple methods of calculating strain rate field, and some of them may lead to entirely different results even with common data. Two experiments are conducted in this study, and all of them are based on simulated data. The aim of the first experiment is to compare three methods of calculating strain rate, I: triangular mesh method, II: neighboring point method in Cartesian coordinate system, whose weight is a function of distance, III: our method-applying method II in spherical coordinate system. The theoretical GPS velocity field and strain rate field are designed with resolution of 0.01, and close to an active fault. Observation velocity field is processed sparsely to 0.1 from theoretical velocity field. Three methods are used to compute strain rate field based on observation velocity field, and the results indicate that (1) result of method I is not smooth due to the mesh network, and several areas with high strain rate are unexpected; (2) results of method II and III are smooth, and their spatial patterns fit the theoretical strain rate field; (3) RMS magnitude related to coordinate system is same as magnitude of theoretical strain rate field. In real case, observation error is inevitable in GPS data, so random error is added in the second experiment. Based on method III, we calculate strain rate field from GPS data with observation error. The result shows that observation error causes a gross distortion. Then we add InSAR with random error to GPS data, and the result shows that based on the combination of GPS and InSAR, RMS magnitude of velocity field and strain rate field is much smaller than that based on GPS only. This experiment suggests that combining GPS and InSAR

  8. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1-30 GHz.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1-30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3-4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  9. FDTD calculations of specific energy absorption rate in a seated voxel model of the human body from 10 MHz to 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Dimbylow, P J

    2006-05-07

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed to investigate the frequency dependence of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a seated voxel model of the human body. The seated model was derived from NORMAN (NORmalized MAN), an anatomically realistic voxel phantom in the standing posture with arms to the side. Exposure conditions included both vertically and horizontally polarized plane wave electric fields between 10 MHz and 3 GHz. The resolution of the voxel model was 4 mm for frequencies up to 360 MHz and 2 mm for calculations in the higher frequency range. The reduction in voxel size permitted the calculation of SAR at these higher frequencies using the FDTD method. SAR values have been calculated for the seated adult phantom and scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children under isolated and grounded conditions. These scaled models do not exactly reproduce the dimensions and anatomy of children, but represent good geometric information for a seated child. Results show that, when the field is vertically polarized, the sitting position causes a second, smaller resonance condition not seen in resonance curves for the phantom in the standing posture. This occurs at approximately 130 MHz for the adult model when grounded. Partial-body SAR calculations indicate that the upper and lower regions of the body have their own resonant frequency at approximately 120 MHz and approximately 160 MHz, respectively, when the grounded adult model is orientated in the sitting position. These combine to produce this second resonance peak in the whole-body averaged SAR values calculated. Two resonance peaks also occur for the sitting posture when the incident electric field is horizontally polarized. For the adult model, the peaks in the whole-body averaged SAR occur at approximately 180 and approximately 600 MHz. These peaks are due to resonance in the arms and feet, respectively. Layer absorption plots and colour images of SAR in

  10. FDTD calculations of specific energy absorption rate in a seated voxel model of the human body from 10 MHz to 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed to investigate the frequency dependence of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a seated voxel model of the human body. The seated model was derived from NORMAN (NORmalized MAN), an anatomically realistic voxel phantom in the standing posture with arms to the side. Exposure conditions included both vertically and horizontally polarized plane wave electric fields between 10 MHz and 3 GHz. The resolution of the voxel model was 4 mm for frequencies up to 360 MHz and 2 mm for calculations in the higher frequency range. The reduction in voxel size permitted the calculation of SAR at these higher frequencies using the FDTD method. SAR values have been calculated for the seated adult phantom and scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children under isolated and grounded conditions. These scaled models do not exactly reproduce the dimensions and anatomy of children, but represent good geometric information for a seated child. Results show that, when the field is vertically polarized, the sitting position causes a second, smaller resonance condition not seen in resonance curves for the phantom in the standing posture. This occurs at ~130 MHz for the adult model when grounded. Partial-body SAR calculations indicate that the upper and lower regions of the body have their own resonant frequency at ~120 MHz and ~160 MHz, respectively, when the grounded adult model is orientated in the sitting position. These combine to produce this second resonance peak in the whole-body averaged SAR values calculated. Two resonance peaks also occur for the sitting posture when the incident electric field is horizontally polarized. For the adult model, the peaks in the whole-body averaged SAR occur at ~180 and ~600 MHz. These peaks are due to resonance in the arms and feet, respectively. Layer absorption plots and colour images of SAR in individual voxels show the specific regions in which the seated

  11. Subsidence rate monitoring of Aghajari oil field based on Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, N. Fouladi; Sahebi, M. R.; Matkan, A. A.; Roostaei, M.

    2013-06-01

    Land subsidence, due to natural or anthropogenic processes, causes significant costs in both economic and structural aspects. That part of subsidence observed most is the result of human activities, which relates to underground exploitation. Since the gradual surface deformation is a consequence of hydrocarbon reservoirs extraction, the process of displacement monitoring is amongst the petroleum industry priorities. Nowadays, Differential SAR Interferometry, in which satellite images are utilized for elevation change detection and analysis - in a millimetre scale, has proved to be a more real-time and cost-effective technology in contrast to the traditional surveying method. In this study, surface displacements in Aghajari oil field, i.e. one of the most industrious Iranian hydrocarbon sites, are being examined using radar observations. As in a number of interferograms, the production wells inspection reveals that surface deformation signals develop likely due to extraction in a period of several months. In other words, different subsidence or uplift rates and deformation styles occur locally depending on the geological conditions and excavation rates in place.

  12. Accuracy improvement of the ice flow rate measurements on Antarctic ice sheet by DInSAR method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiramizu, Kaoru; Doi, Koichiro; Aoyama, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    DInSAR (Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is an effective tool to measure the flow rate of slow flowing ice streams on Antarctic ice sheet with high resolution. In the flow rate measurement by DInSAR method, we use Digital Elevation Model (DEM) at two times in the estimating process. At first, we use it to remove topographic fringes from InSAR images. And then, it is used to project obtained displacements along Line-Of-Sight (LOS) direction to the actual flow direction. ASTER-GDEM widely-used for InSAR prosessing of the data of polar region has a lot of errors especially in the inland ice sheet area. Thus the errors yield irregular flow rates and directions. Therefore, quality of DEM has a substantial influence on the ice flow rate measurement. In this study, we created a new DEM (resolution 10m; hereinafter referred to as PRISM-DEM) based on ALOS/PRISM images, and compared PRISM-DEM and ASTER-GDEM. The study area is around Skallen, 90km south from Syowa Station, in the southern part of Sôya Coast, East Antarctica. For making DInSAR images, we used ALOS/PALSAR data of 13 pairs (Path633, Row 571-572), observed during the period from November 23, 2007 through January 16, 2011. PRISM-DEM covering the PALSAR scene was created from nadir and backward view images of ALOS/PRISM (Observation date: 2009/1/18) by applying stereo processing with a digital mapping equipment, and then the automatically created a primary DEM was corrected manually to make a final DEM. The number of irregular values of actual ice flow rate was reduced by applying PRISM-DEM compared with that by applying ASTER-GDEM. Additionally, an averaged displacement of approximately 0.5cm was obtained by applying PRISM-DEM over outcrop area, where no crustal displacement considered to occur during the recurrence period of ALOS/PALSAR (46days), while an averaged displacement of approximately 1.65 cm was observed by applying ASTER-GDEM. Since displacements over outcrop area are considered

  13. Distribution of photon absorption rates across the rat retina

    PubMed Central

    Williams, T P; Webbers, J P P; Giordano, L; Henderson, R P

    1998-01-01

    An investigation into the distribution of light intensity across the rat retina was carried out on excised, intact rat eyes exposed to Ganzfeld illumination from a helium-neon laser (543 nm). Some of the light entering the eyes exits through the sclera where its intensity can be monitored with an optical ‘pick-up’ that samples the intensity coming from a small region of external sclera and underlying retina. The spatial resolution of the pick-up is such that it samples light that has passed through ca 2% of the rods in the rat eye. Some of the laser light is absorbed by the rod pigment, rhodopsin, which gradually bleaches. Bleaching in the retina, in turn, causes an exponential increase in intensity emanating from the sclera. By monitoring this intensity increase, we are able to measure two important parameters in a single bleaching run: the local rhodopsin concentration and the local intensity falling on the rods. With an ocular transmission photometer, we have measured both the local intensity and the local rhodopsin concentration across wide regions of rat retina. Both pigmented and albino rats were studied. The distributions of rhodopsin and intensity were both nearly uniform; consequently, the product, (rhodopsin concentration) × (intensity), was similarly nearly equal across the retina. This means that the initial rate of photon absorption is about the same at all retinal locations. Interpreted in terms of photostasis (the regulation of daily photon catch), this means that the rate of photon absorption is about the same in each rod, viz. 14 400 photons absorbed per rod per second. Since this rate of absorption is sufficient to saturate the rod, one possible purpose of photostasis is to maintain the rod system in a saturated state during daylight hours. PMID:9508814

  14. Definition of a parameter for a typical specific absorption rate under real boundary conditions of cellular phones in a GSM networkd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhardt, D.

    2003-05-01

    Using cellular phones the specific absorption rate (SAR) as a physical value must observe established and internationally defined levels to guarantee human protection. To assess human protection it is necessary to guarantee safety under worst-case conditions (especially maximum transmitting power) using cellular phones. To evaluate the exposure to electromagnetic fields under normal terms of use of cellular phones the limitations of the specific absorption rate must be pointed out. In a mobile radio network normal terms of use of cellular phones, i.e. in interconnection with a fixed radio transmitter of a mobile radio network, power control of the cellular phone as well as the antenna diagram regarding a head phantom are also significant for the real exposure. Based on the specific absorption rate, the antenna diagram regarding a head phantom and taking into consideration the power control a new parameter, the typical absorption rate (SARtyp), is defined in this contribution. This parameter indicates the specific absorption rate under average normal conditions of use. Constant radio link attenuation between a cellular phone and a fixed radio transmitter for all mobile models tested was assumed in order to achieve constant field strength at the receiving antenna of the fixed radio transmitter as a result of power control. The typical specific absorption rate is a characteristic physical value of every mobile model. The typical absorption rate was calculated for 16 different mobile models and compared with the absorption rate at maximum transmitting power. The results confirm the relevance of the definition of this parameter (SARtyp) as opposed to the specific absorption rate as a competent and applicable method to establish the real mean exposure from a cellular phone in a mobile radio network. The typical absorption rate provides a parameter to assess electromagnetic fields of a cellular phone that is more relevant to the consumer.

  15. SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Waveforms from CryoSat-2: CRUCIAL Methodology and Validation of heights.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, J.; Moore, P.; Birkinshaw, S.; Restano, M.; Ambrozio, A.

    2016-12-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from CryoSat-2 with a forward-look component to the recently launched Sentinel-3 and future Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The along-track sampling of CryoSat-2 SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. The Full Bit Rate (FBR) Level 1A Doppler beams have been processed to form a waveform product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking. Inland water heights are derived using a set of empirical retrackers formulated for inland water applications. Analyses of SAR and SARin FBR data for 2011-2015 will be compared against in situ data. This includes FBR SAR heights over the Mekong and Amazon which are compared to stage data from the nearest gauge and heights from Tonle Sap compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented based on the rms of heights across Tonle Sap. FBR SARin processing for the Amazon and Brahmaputra will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae, consideration of target point and validation against ground data where available. Comparisons will include results from the empirical retrackers and from SAR and SARin waveforms and heights obtained via ESA's Grid Processing on Demand (G-POD) using the SAMOSA2 retracker.

  16. Water-absorption rate equation of rice for brewing sake.

    PubMed

    Mizuma, Tomochika; Tomita, Akiko; Kitaoka, Atsushi; Kiyokawa, Yoshifumi; Wakai, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    This study was undertaken to analyze the kinetics of water absorption and to derive an equation for the rate at which water is absorbed by rice for brewing sake. We used two rice varieties: Gin-oumi, commonly used as a staple food, and Gohyakumangoku, a variety used particularly for brewing sake. The water-absorption rate equations of Gin-oumi and Gohyakumangoku were postulated based on the following equations. For Gin-oumi (water content, 11.5%), dx/dtheta=k(1-x)(n), n=1, k=(2 x 10(-9))exp(0.0604 x (t+273.15)). For Gohyakumangoku (11.5%), dx/dtheta=k(1-x)(n)(x+a), n=1, a=0.29, k=(2 x 10(-8))exp(0.0534 x (t+273.15)). Here, x, theta (min), and t ( degrees C) are the water absorbing ratio, time, and temperature, respectively. The result shows that the values of the temperature-dependence parameter k (min(-1)), as well as its curves, are different; a typical rice grain has a monotonically smooth curve, whereas that suitable for sake brewing has an S-shaped curve.

  17. Cubic spline functions and polynomials for calculation of absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Popović, J

    1998-01-01

    A model-independent method for calculation of the absorption rate based on an exact mathematical solution to the deconvolution problem of systems with linear pharmacokinetics and a polyexponential impulse responses has been examined. Theoretical analysis shows how a noninteracting primary input can be precisely evaluated when data on blood levels from a known source such as an i.v. bolus or zero-order infusion are available. This work compares the use of a Lagrange 3rd degree polynomial with that of a cubic spline function (special 3rd degree polynomial) for calculation of the absorption rate. The method is compared to another using simulated data (12 data points) containing various degrees of random noise.The accuracy of the methods is determined by how well the estimates represent the true values. It was found that the accuracy of the two methods was not significantly different, and that it was of the same order of magnitude as the noise level of the data.

  18. Specific absorption rate levels measured in a phantom head exposed to radio frequency transmissions from analog hand-held mobile phones

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, V.; Joyner, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    Electric fields (E-fields) induced within a phantom head from exposure to three different advanced mobile phone system (AMPS) hand-held telephones were measured using an implantable E-Field probe. Measurements were taken in the eye nearest the phone and along a lateral scan through the brain from its center to the side nearest the phone. During measurement, the phones were positioned alongside the phantom head as in typical use and were configured to transmit at maximum power (600 mW nominal). The specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated from the in situ E-field measurements, which varied significantly between phone models and antenna configuration. The SARs induced in the eye ranged from 0.007 to 0.21 W/kg. Metal-framed spectacles enhanced SAR levels in the eye by 9--29%. In the brain, maximum levels were recorded at the measurement point closest to the phone and ranged from 0.12 to 0.83 W/kg. These SARs are below peak spatial limits recommended in the US and Australian national standards and the IRPA guidelines for safe exposure to radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, a detailed thermal analysis of the eye indicated only a 0.022 C maximum steady-state temperature rise in the eye from a uniform SAR loading of 0.21 W/kg. A more approximate thermal analysis in the brain also indicated only a small maximum temperature rise of 0.034 C for a local SAR loading of 0.83 W/kg.

  19. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg-1 and 91 mV m-1 for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg-1) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m-1) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  20. Multimodal Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles with Unusually Enhanced Specific Absorption Rate for Synergetic Cancer Therapeutics and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Nanasaheb D; Bohara, Raghvendra A; Malgras, Victor; Tofail, Syed A M; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Wu, Kevin C-W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-06-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy frequently face trade off between a high magnetization saturation and their good colloidal stability, high specific absorption rate (SAR), and most importantly biological compatibility. This necessitates the development of new nanomaterials, as MFH and MRI are considered to be one of the most promising combined noninvasive treatments. In the present study, we investigated polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) SPMNPs for efficient cancer hyperthermia therapy and MRI application. The superparamagnetic nanomaterial revealed excellent colloidal stability and biocompatibility. A high SAR of 390 W/g was observed due to higher colloidal stability leading to an increased Brownian and Neel's spin relaxation. Cell viability of PEG capped nanoparticles is up to 80% on different cell lines tested rigorously using different methods. PEG coating provided excellent hemocompatibility to human red blood cells as PEG functionalized SPMNPs reduced hemolysis efficiently compared to its uncoated counterpart. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia of SPMNPs resulted in cancer cell death up to 80%. Additionally, improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the PEG capped La1-xSrxMnO3 formulation in aqueous medium compared to the bare LSMO. Taken together, PEG capped SPMNPs can be useful for diagnosis, efficient magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and multimodal cancer treatment as the amphiphilicity of PEG can easily be utilized to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs.

  1. Super-spreaders and the rate of transmission of the SARS virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Michael; Tse, C. K.; Walker, David M.

    2006-03-01

    We describe a stochastic small-world network model of transmission of the SARS virus. Unlike the standard Susceptible-Infected-Removed models of disease transmission, our model exhibits both geographically localised outbreaks and “super-spreaders”. Moreover, the combination of localised and long range links allows for more accurate modelling of partial isolation and various public health policies. From this model, we derive an expression for the probability of a widespread outbreak and a condition to ensure that the epidemic is controlled. Moreover, multiple simulations are used to make predictions of the likelihood of various eventual scenarios for fixed initial conditions. The main conclusions of this study are: (i) “super-spreaders” may occur even if the infectiousness of all infected individuals is constant; (ii) consistent with previous reports, extended exposure time beyond 3-5 days (i.e. significant nosocomial transmission) was the key factor in the severity of the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong; and, (iii) the spread of SARS can be effectively controlled by either limiting long range links (imposing a partial quarantine) or enforcing rapid hospitalisation and isolation of symptomatic individuals.

  2. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-21

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg(-1) with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings

  3. Direct SAR mapping by thermoacoustic imaging: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Simone A; Picot, Paul A; Thornton, Michael M; Rutt, Brian K

    2016-10-25

    To develop a new method capable of directly measuring specific absorption rate (SAR) deposited in tissue using the thermoacoustic signal induced by short radiofrequency (RF) pulse excitation. A detailed model based on the thermoacoustic wave generation and propagation is presented. We propose a new concept for direct measurement of SAR, to be used as a safety assessment/monitoring tool for MRI. The concept involves the use of short bursts of RF energy and the measurement of the resulting thermoacoustic excitation pattern by an array of ultrasound transducers, followed by image reconstruction to yield the 3D SAR distribution. We developed a simulation framework to model this thermoacoustic SAR mapping concept and verified the concept in vitro. Simulations show good agreement between reconstructed and original SAR distributions with an error of 4.2, 7.2, and 8.4% of the mean SAR values in axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and support the feasibility of direct experimental mapping of SAR distributions in vivo. The in vitro experiments show good agreement with theory (r(2)  = 0.52). A novel thermoacoustic method for in vivo mapping of local SAR patterns in MRI has been proposed and verified in simulation and in a phantom experiment. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. System and SAR characterization in parallel RF transmission.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yudong; Alon, Leeor; Deniz, Cem M; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K

    2012-05-01

    The markedly increased degrees of freedom introduced by parallel radiofrequency transmission presents both opportunities and challenges for specific absorption rate (SAR) management. On one hand they enable E-field tailoring and SAR reduction while facilitating excitation profile control. On other hand they increase the complexity of SAR behavior and the risk of inadvertently exacerbating SAR by improper design or playout of radiofrequency pulses. The substantial subject-dependency of SAR in high field magnetic resonance can be a compounding factor. Building upon a linear system concept and a calibration scheme involving a finite number of in situ measurements, this work establishes a clinically applicable method for characterizing global SAR behavior as well as channel-by-channel power transmission. The method offers a unique capability of predicting, for any excitation, the SAR and power consequences that are specific to the subject to be scanned and the MRI hardware. The method was validated in simulation and experimental studies, showing promise as the foundation to a prospective paradigm where power and SAR are not only monitored but, through prediction-guided optimization, proactively managed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Observations on the relation between alcohol absorption and the rate of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S

    1981-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is absorbed slowly from the stomach and rapidly from the small intestine, and the rate of its absorption depends on the rate of gastric emptying. When gastric emptying is fast, the absorption of alcohol is fast. When gastric emptying is slow the absorption of alcohol is delayed and peak blood alcohol concentrations are reduced. Alterations of the gastric emptying rate, which may have a physiologic, pharmacologic or pathologic cause, markedly influence the rate of alcohol absorption. The gastric emptying rate makes an important contribution to inter- and intraindividual variations in the rate of alcohol absorption and therefore the timing and magnitude of the acute intoxicating effect of an oral dose of alcohol. PMID:7459787

  6. Proportion-corrected scaled voxel models for Japanese children and their application to the numerical dosimetry of specific absorption rate for frequencies from 30 MHz to 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Etsuo; Watanabe, Soichi

    2008-12-01

    The development of high-resolution anatomical voxel models of children is difficult given, inter alia, the ethical limitations on subjecting children to medical imaging. We instead used an existing voxel model of a Japanese adult and three-dimensional deformation to develop three voxel models that match the average body proportions of Japanese children at 3, 5 and 7 years old. The adult model was deformed to match the proportions of a child by using the measured dimensions of various body parts of children at 3, 5 and 7 years old and a free-form deformation technique. The three developed models represent average-size Japanese children of the respective ages. They consist of cubic voxels (2 mm on each side) and are segmented into 51 tissues and organs. We calculated the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rates (WBA-SARs) and tissue-averaged SARs for the child models for exposures to plane waves from 30 MHz to 3 GHz; these results were then compared with those for scaled down adult models. We also determined the incident electric-field strength required to produce the exposure equivalent to the ICNIRP basic restriction for general public exposure, i.e., a WBA-SAR of 0.08 W kg-1.

  7. Analysis of specific absorption rate and internal electric field in human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil-type transcutaneous energy transmission transformer.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Zulkifli, Nur Elina Binti; Ishioka, Yuji

    2017-06-01

    In this study, we analyzed the internal electric field E and specific absorption rate (SAR) of human biological tissues surrounding an air-core coil transcutaneous energy transmission transformer. Using an electromagnetic simulator, we created a model of human biological tissues consisting of a dry skin, wet skin, fat, muscle, and cortical bone. A primary coil was placed on the surface of the skin, and a secondary coil was located subcutaneously inside the body. The E and SAR values for the model representing a 34-year-old male subject were analyzed using electrical frequencies of 0.3-1.5 MHz. The transmitting power was 15 W, and the load resistance was 38.4 Ω. The results showed that the E values were below the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) limit for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.9 and 1.5 MHz, and SAR values were well below the limit prescribed by the ICNIRP for the general public exposure between the frequencies of 0.3 and 1.2 MHz.

  8. SAR Simulations & Safety.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Thomas M; Ladd, Mark E; Bitz, Andreas K

    2017-03-20

    At ultra-high fields, the assessment of radiofrequency (RF) safety presents several new challenges compared to low-field systems. Multi-channel RF transmit coils in combination with parallel transmit techniques produce time-dependent and spatially varying power loss densities in the tissue. Further, in ultra-high-field systems, localized field effects can be more pronounced due to a transition from the quasi stationary to the electromagnetic field regime. Consequently, local information on the RF field is required for reliable RF safety assessment as well as for monitoring of RF exposure during MR examinations. Numerical RF and thermal simulations for realistic exposure scenarios with anatomical body models are currently the only practical way to obtain the requisite local information on magnetic and electric field distributions as well as tissue temperature. In this article, safety regulations and the fundamental characteristics of RF field distributions in ultra-high-field systems are reviewed. Numerical methods for computation of RF fields as well as typical requirements for the analysis of realistic multi-channel RF exposure scenarios including anatomical body models are highlighted. In recent years, computation of the local tissue temperature has become of increasing interest, since a more accurate safety assessment is expected because temperature is directly related to tissue damage. Regarding thermal simulation, bio-heat transfer models and approaches for taking into account the physiological response of the human body to RF exposure are discussed. In addition, suitable methods are presented to validate calculated RF and thermal results with measurements. Finally, the concept of generalized simulation-based specific absorption rate (SAR) matrix models is discussed. These models can be incorporated into local SAR monitoring in multi-channel MR systems and allow the design of RF pulses under constraints for local SAR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  9. Local SAR management by RF shimming: a simulation study with multiple human body models.

    PubMed

    Homann, Hanno; Graesslin, Ingmar; Eggers, Holger; Nehrke, Kay; Vernickel, Peter; Katscher, Ulrich; Dössel, Olaf; Börnert, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Parallel transmission facilitates a relatively direct control of the RF transmit field. This is usually applied to improve the RF field homogeneity but might also allow a reduction of the specific absorption rate (SAR) to increase freedom in sequence design for high-field MRI. However, predicting the local SAR is challenging as it depends not only on the multi-channel drive but also on the individual patient. The potential of RF shimming for SAR management is investigated for a 3 T body coil with eight independent transmit elements, based on Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) simulations. To address the patient-dependency of the SAR, nine human body models were generated from volunteer MR data and used in the simulations. A novel approach to RF shimming that enforces local SAR constraints is proposed. RF shimming substantially reduced the local SAR, consistently for all volunteers. Using SAR constraints, a further SAR reduction could be achieved with only minor compromises in RF performance. Parallel transmission can become an important tool to control and manage the local SAR in the human body. The practical use of local SAR constraints is feasible with consistent results for a variety of body models.

  10. The specific absorption rate of tissues in rats exposed to electromagnetic plane waves in the frequency range of 0.05-5 GHz and SARwb in free-moving rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingxin; Wang, Jiamin; Qi, Hongxin; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Shude; Wang, Xianghui

    2017-03-01

    As electromagnetic exposure experiments can only be performed on small animals, usually rats, research on the characteristics of specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution in the rat has received increasing interest. A series of calculations, which simulated the SAR in a male rat anatomical model exposed to electromagnetic plane waves ranging from 0.05 to 5 GHz with different incidence and polarization, were conducted. The whole-body-averaged SAR (SARwb) and the tissue-averaged SAR (SARavg) in 20 major tissues were determined. Results revealed that incidence has great impact on SAR in the rat at higher frequencies owing to the skin effect and the effect on SARavg in tissues is much more apparent than that on SARwb; while polarization plays an important role under lower frequencies. Not only the incidence, but also the polarization in the rat keeps changing when the rat is in free movement. Thus, this article discussed a convenient way to obtain relatively accurate SARwb in a free-moving rat.

  11. Induction of an adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to radiofrequency fields: influence of the universal mobile telecommunication system (UMTS) signal and the specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Olga; Sannino, Anna; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Sarti, Maurizio; Reddy, Abishek B; Prihoda, Thomas J; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2012-08-30

    The induction of an adaptive response (AR) was examined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF). Cells from nine healthy human volunteers were stimulated for 24h with phytohaemagglutinin and then exposed for 20h to an adaptive dose (AD) of a 1950MHz RF UMTS (universal mobile telecommunication system) signal used for mobile communications, at different specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1.25, 0.6, 0.3, and 0.15W/kg. This was followed by treatment of the cells at 48h with a challenge dose (CD) of 100ng/ml mitomycin C (MMC). Lymphocytes were collected at the end of the 72h total culture period. The cytokinesis-block method was used to record the frequency of micronuclei (MN) as genotoxicity end-point. When lymphocytes from six donors were pre-exposed to RF at 0.3W/kg SAR and then treated with MMC, these cells showed a significant reduction in the frequency of MN, compared with the cells treated with MMC alone; this result is indicative of induction of AR. The results from our earlier study indicated that lymphocytes that were stimulated for 24h, exposed for 20h to a 900MHz RF GSM (global system for mobile communication) signal at 1.25W/kg SAR and then treated with 100ng/ml MMC, also exhibited AR. These overall data suggest that the induction of AR depends on RF frequency, type of the signal and SAR. Further characterization of RF-induced AR is in progress.

  12. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  13. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory Testing & Specimens SARS-Associated Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) Sequencing Informed Consent for Laboratory Testing Specimen Collection and ... person touches a surface or object contaminated with infectious droplets and then touches his or her mouth, ...

  14. Variations in Creep Rate along the Central San Andreas Fault from InSAR and GPS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, I. M.; Burgmann, R.

    2007-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault is locked along most of its length, but the 170 km-long section between San Juan Bautista and Parkfield undergoes creep. Measurements from creepmeters, alignment arrays and GPS over the last 25 years have shown that surface creep rates reach about 30 mm/year in the central portion, tapering off towards the locked segments at either end. Though useful, these measurements have been spatially isolated and intermittent in time. We present InSAR observations of creep across the fault, which have superior spatial coverage than previous data, and analyse them to investigate spatial variations in creep rate along the fault segment. From multiple ERS-1 and ERS-2 descending interferograms covering 1992 to 2001, we produce a stack which gives the spatial distribution of creep rate up to about 50 km either side of the fault. We find a maximum creep rate of about 32 mm/year. Deformation is step-like most of the way along the segment, but more distributed at the northern end, where the Calaveras Fault comes very close to the San Andreas Fault. We perform a linear inversion for shallow and deep sliding velocity on these faults using both the InSAR stack and GPS velocities from continuous (PBO) and campaign networks. Creep in the top few kilometers is variable along strike, with patches of faster creep interspersed with more slowly-moving patches. Creep at intermediate depths is greatest in the centre of the segment, reaching a few mm/yr less than the relative plate rate. The deep (> 12 km) sliding velocity is constrained to be less than or equal to the estimated long term relative plate velocity, and we estimate it to be a few mm/yr less than this. We compare the depth-averaged creep rate profile along the fault segment with that estimated by Nadeau and McEvilly (2004) from characteristic repeating microearthquakes. Between them, the three datasets utilised in this study suggest that creep is a spatially heterogeneous process.

  15. Accumulation Rates in the Dry Snow Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet Inferred from L-band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet contains about 2.9 million km3 of ice and would raise global sea levels by about 7.1 m if it melted completely. Two unusually large iceberg calving events at Petermann Glacier in the past several years, along with the unusually large extent of ice sheet melt this summer point to the relevance of understanding the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. In this study, we use data from the PALSAR instrument aboard the ALOS satellite to form L-band (23-centimeter carrier wavelength) InSAR images of the dry snow zone of the Greenland ice sheet. We form geocoded differential interferograms, using the ice sheet elevation model produced by Howat et.al. [1]. By applying phase and radiometric calibration, we can examine interferograms formed between any pair of transmit and receive polarization channels. In co-polarized interferograms, the InSAR correlation ranges from about 0.35 at the summit (38.7 deg W, 73.0 deg N) where accumulation is about 20 cm w.e./yr to about 0.70 at the north-eastern part of the dry snow zone (35.1 deg W, 77.1 deg N), where accumulation is about 11.7 cm w.e./yr. Cross-polarized interferograms show similar geographic variation with overall lower correlation. We compare our InSAR data with in-situ measurements published by Bales et.al. [2]. We examine the applicability of dense-medium radiative transfer electromagnetic scattering models for estimating accumulation rates from L-band InSAR data. The large number and broad coverage of ALOS scenes acquired between 2007 and 2009 with good InSAR coherence at 46-day repeat times and 21.5 degree incidence angles gives us the opportunity to examine the empirical relationship between in-situ accumulation rate observations and the polarimetric InSAR correlation and radar brightness at this particular imaging geometry. This helps us quantify the accuracy of accumulation rates estimated from InSAR data. In some regions, 46-day interferograms acquired in the winters of several consecutive

  16. Analysis on the effect of the distances and inclination angles between human head and mobile phone on SAR.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M I; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the distances between the human head and internal cellular device antenna on the specific absorption rate (SAR). This paper also analyzes the effects of inclination angles between user head and mobile terminal antenna on SAR values. The effects of the metal-glass casing of mobile phone on the SAR values were observed in the vicinity of the human head model. Moreover, the return losses were investigated in all cases to mark antenna performance. This analysis was performed by adopting finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method on Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio. The results indicate that by increasing the distance between the user head and antenna, SAR values are decreased. But the increase in inclination angle does not reduce SAR values in all cases. Additionally, this investigation provides some useful indication for future design of low SAR mobile terminal antenna. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Poster - Thur Eve - 13: Quantifying specific absorption rate of shielded RF coils through electromagnetic simulations for 7-T MRI.

    PubMed

    Belliveau, J-G; Gilbert, K M; Abou-Khousa, M; Menon, R S

    2012-07-01

    Ultra-high field MRI has many advantages such as increasing spatial resolution and exploiting contrast never before seen in-vivo. This contrast has been shown to be beneficial for many applications such as monitoring early and late effect to radiation therapy and transient changes during disease to name a few. However, at higher field strengths the RF wave, needed to for transmitting and receiving signal, approaches that of the head. This leads to constructive and deconstructive interference and a non -uniform flip angle over the volume being imaged. A transmit or transceive RF surface coil arrays is currently a method of choice to overcome this problem; however, mutual inductance between elements poses a significant challenge for the designer. A method to decouple elements in such an array is by using circumferential shielding; however, the potential benefits and/or disadvantages have not been investigated. This abstract primarily focuses on understanding power deposition - measured through Specific Absorption Rate - in the sample using circumferentially shielded RF coils. Various geometries of circumferentially shielded coils are explored to determine the behaviour of shield width and its effect on required transmit power and power deposition to the sample. Our results indicate that there is an optimization on shield width depending on the imaging depth. Additionally, the circumferential shield focuses the field more than unshielded coils, meaning that slight SAR may even be lower for circumferential shielded RF coils in array. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  18. Approach for an improved experimental evaluation of the specific absorption rate in magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacob, N.; Schinteie, G.; Palade, P.; Kuncser, V.

    2015-04-01

    A new methodology for the accurate determination of the specific absorption rate of ferrofluids with magnetite nanoparticles of average size of about 10 nm subjected to alternative current magnetic fields is proposed. A simple numerical compensation of the heating rates by the cooling rates obtained at similar temperatures is employed. Comparisons of the as-obtained adiabatic heating curves with theoretical evaluations are discussed.

  19. Carbonic anhydrase promotes the absorption rate of CO2 in post-combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Vinoba, Mari; Bhagiyalakshmi, Margandan; Grace, Andrews Nirmala; Kim, Dae Hoon; Yoon, Yeoil; Nam, Sung Chan; Baek, Il Hyun; Jeong, Soon Kwan

    2013-05-09

    The rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption by monoethanol amine (MEA), diethanol amine (DEA), N-methyl-2,2'-iminodiethanol (MDEA), and 2-amino-2-methyl 1-propanol (AMP) solutions was found to be enhanced by the addition of bovine carbonic anhydrase (CA), has been investigated using a vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE) device. The enthalpy (-ΔHabs) of CO2 absorption and the absorption capacities of aqueous amines were measured in the presence and/or absence of CA enzyme via differential reaction calorimeter (DRC). The reaction temperature (ΔT) under adiabatic conditions was determined based on the DRC analysis. Bicarbonate and carbamate species formation mechanisms were elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analysis. The overall CO2 absorption rate (flux) and rate constant (kapp) followed the order MEA > DEA > AMP > MDEA in the absence or presence of CA. Hydration of CO2 by MDEA in the presence of CA directly produced bicarbonate, whereas AMP produced unstable carbamate intermediate, then underwent hydrolytic reaction and converted to bicarbonate. The MDEA > AMP > DEA > MEA reverse ordering of the enhanced CO2 flux and kapp in the presence of CA was due to bicarbonate formation by the tertiary and sterically hindered amines. Thus, CA increased the rate of CO2 absorption by MDEA by a factor of 3 relative to the rate of absorption by MDEA alone. The thermal effects suggested that CA yielded a higher activity at 40 °C.

  20. GPS and InSAR constraints on vertical tectonic motion improve the estimate of slip rate of the San Andreas Fault in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, William; Johnson, Kaj; Blewitt, Geoff; Kreemer, Corné; Weldon, Ray; Burgette, Reed

    2014-05-01

    The San Andreas fault (SAF) is the fastest slipping member of a complex plate boundary system that poses a looming earthquake hazard to millions of people in southern California. Seismic hazard analysis products rely on accurate estimates of fault slip rate in order to best forecast the shaking from future damaging earthquakes. Data from geodetic GPS networks such as the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory, SCIGN, and other municipal networks place strong constraints on faults slip rates. However, models based geodetic measurements in the eastern Transverse Ranges suffer from uncertainties in fault dip, slip history, and viscoelastic Earth structure. Part of the problem is that data are commonly limited to horizontal interseismic rates of motion at GPS stations. Here we present results of integrated analysis of GPS and space-based InSAR data that together provide a high-resolution three-component estimation of the interseismic velocity field around the SAF. Aligning the InSAR to GPS mitigates long wavelength errors in InSAR while increasing the density of measurements between geographically sparse GPS stations. We use solutions from our GPS mega-network analysis of over 12,000 globally distributed stations processed using the GIPSY-OASIS software. Solutions are aligned to our new North America fixed reference frame (NA12), which provides strong vertical reference to compare rates across the plate boundary. Vertical data are considered if the station has at least 4 years of data, have time series that are fit well by a linear plus seasonal terms plus steps from known equipment changes and earthquakes. We use over 750 ERS and ENVISAT radar scenes from between 1992 and 2009 obtained from the WinSAR archive, including 4 frames from 5 tracks to form over 10,000 interferograms, providing line-of-sight (LOS) velocities for overlapping domains. To separate the contributions from vertical and horizontal signals, we align the InSAR LOS rates to the GPS LOS rates and

  1. An analytical solution for improved HIFU SAR estimation

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, C R; Vyas, U; Payne, A; Christensen, D A; Roemer, R B

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of the specific absorption rates (SARs) present during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) experiments and treatments provides a solid physical basis for scientific comparison of results among HIFU studies and is necessary to validate and improve SAR predictive software, which will improve patient treatment planning, control and evaluation. This study develops and tests an analytical solution that significantly improves the accuracy of SAR values obtained from HIFU temperature data. SAR estimates are obtained by fitting the analytical temperature solution for a one-dimensional radial Gaussian heating pattern to the temperature versus time data following a step in applied power and evaluating the initial slope of the analytical solution. The analytical method is evaluated in multiple parametric simulations for which it consistently (except at high perfusions) yields maximum errors of less than 10% at the center of the focal zone compared with errors up to 90% and 55% for the commonly used linear method and an exponential method, respectively. For high perfusion, an extension of the analytical method estimates SAR with less than 10% error. The analytical method is validated experimentally by showing that the temperature elevations predicted using the analytical method’s SAR values determined for the entire 3-D focal region agree well with the experimental temperature elevations in a HIFU-heated tissue-mimicking phantom. PMID:22722656

  2. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues.

  3. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  4. A study of energy absorption rate in a quantum dot and metallic nanosphere hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindel, Daniel; Singh, Mahi R.

    2015-09-01

    We have studied energy absorption rate in a quantum dot-metallic nanosphere system embedded on a dielectric substrate. We applied a control field to induce dipole moments in the quantum dot and the metal nanosphere, and monitored the energy absorption using a probe field. These external fields induce dipole moments in the metal nanosphere and the quantum dot, and these two structures interact with one another via the dipole-dipole interaction. The density matrix method was used to evaluate the absorption, indicating that it can be shifted by moving the metal nanosphere close to the quantum dot. Also, absorption efficiency can either be quenched or enhanced by the addition of a metal nanosphere. This hybrid system can be used to create ultrafast switching and sensing nanodevices.

  5. Measurement of the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous diethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.L.; Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Oscarson, J.L.; Wilding, W.V.; Anderson, D.J.

    1998-05-01

    Aqueous alkanolamine solutions are commonly used in natural gas sweetening processes to remove the acid gases CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) solutions were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. The absorption rate was found to be insensitive to the diffusion coefficient of CO{sub 2} in solution but very sensitive to the diffusion rate of bicarbonate, protonated DEA, and carbamate ions. Evidence also suggested that chemical reaction equilibrium is rapid relative to diffusion. The diffusion coefficient of DEA in water was also measured using a Taylor dispersion apparatus. A numerical model was developed and used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and protonated amine from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and protonated DEA were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % DEA in water.

  6. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenu, Luigi; Forni, Daniele; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) was finally evaluated.

  7. A review of lung-to-blood absorption rates for radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J W; Bailey, M R

    2013-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) treats clearance of materials from the respiratory tract as a competitive process between absorption into blood and particle transport to the alimentary tract and lymphatics. The ICRP recommended default absorption rates for lead and polonium (Type M) in ICRP Publication 71 but stated that the values were not appropriate for short-lived radon progeny. This paper reviews and evaluates published data from volunteer and laboratory animal experiments to estimate the HRTM absorption parameter values for short-lived radon progeny. Animal studies showed that lead ions have two phases of absorption: ∼10 % absorbed with a half-time of ∼15 min, the rest with a half-time of ∼10 h. The studies also indicated that some of the lead ions were bound to respiratory tract components. Bound fractions, f(b), for lead were estimated from volunteer and animal studies and ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Based on the evaluations of published data, the following HRTM absorption parameter values were derived for lead as a decay product of radon: f(r) = 0.1, s(r) = 100 d(-1), s(s) = 1.7 d(-1), f(b) = 0.5 and s(b) = 1.7 d(-1). Effective doses calculated assuming these absorption parameter values instead of a single absorption half-time of 10 h with no binding (as has generally been assumed) are only a few per cent higher. However, as there is some conflicting evidence on the absorption kinetics for radon progeny, dose calculations have been carried out for different sets of absorption parameter values derived from different studies. The results of these calculations are discussed.

  8. Uncertainty of GHz-band Whole-body Average SARs in Infants based on their Kaup Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miwa, Hironobu; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi

    We previously showed that a strong correlation exists between the absorption cross section and the body surface area of a human for 0.3-2GHz far field exposure, and proposed a formula for estimating whole-body-average specific absorption rates (WBA-SARs) in terms of height and weight. In this study, to evaluate variability in the WBA-SARs in infants based on their physique, we derived a new formula including Kaup indices of infants, which are being used to check their growth, and thereby estimated the WBA-SARs in infants with respect to their age from 0 month to three years. As a result, we found that under the same height/weight, the smaller the Kaup indices are, the larger the WBA-SARs become, and that the variability in the WBA-SARs is around 15% at the same age. To validate these findings, using the FDTD method, we simulated the GHz-band WBA-SARs in numerical human models corresponding to infants with age of 0, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months, which were obtained by scaling down the anatomically based Japanese three-year child model developed by NICT (National Institute of Information and Communications Technology). Results show that the FDTD-simulated WBA-SARs are smaller by 20% compared to those estimated for infants having the median height and the Kaup index of 0.5 percentiles, which provide conservative WBA-SARs.

  9. Mobile phone types and SAR characteristics of the human brain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Hong, Seon-Eui; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Hyung-Do; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-04-07

    Mobile phones differ in terms of their operating frequency, outer shape, and form and location of the antennae, all of which affect the spatial distributions of their electromagnetic field and the level of electromagnetic absorption in the human head or brain. For this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated for four anatomical head models at different ages using 11 numerical phone models of different shapes and antenna configurations. The 11 models represent phone types accounting for around 86% of the approximately 1400 commercial phone models released into the Korean market since 2002. Seven of the phone models selected have an internal dual-band antenna, and the remaining four possess an external antenna. Each model was intended to generate an average absorption level equivalent to that of the same type of commercial phone model operating at the maximum available output power. The 1 g peak spatial SAR and ipsilateral and contralateral brain-averaged SARs were reported for all 11 phone models. The effects of the phone type, phone position, operating frequency, and age of head models on the brain SAR were comprehensively determined.

  10. Mobile phone types and SAR characteristics of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ae-Kyoung; Hong, Seon-Eui; Kwon, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Hyung-Do; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-04-01

    Mobile phones differ in terms of their operating frequency, outer shape, and form and location of the antennae, all of which affect the spatial distributions of their electromagnetic field and the level of electromagnetic absorption in the human head or brain. For this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated for four anatomical head models at different ages using 11 numerical phone models of different shapes and antenna configurations. The 11 models represent phone types accounting for around 86% of the approximately 1400 commercial phone models released into the Korean market since 2002. Seven of the phone models selected have an internal dual-band antenna, and the remaining four possess an external antenna. Each model was intended to generate an average absorption level equivalent to that of the same type of commercial phone model operating at the maximum available output power. The 1 g peak spatial SAR and ipsilateral and contralateral brain-averaged SARs were reported for all 11 phone models. The effects of the phone type, phone position, operating frequency, and age of head models on the brain SAR were comprehensively determined.

  11. THE EFFECT OF GAZE ANGLE ON THE EVALUATIONS OF SAR AND TEMPERATURE RISE IN HUMAN EYE UNDER PLANE-WAVE EXPOSURES FROM 0.9 TO 10 GHZ.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yinliang; Leung, Sai-Wing; Chan, Kwok Hung; Sun, Weinong; Siu, Yun-Ming; Kong, Richard

    2016-12-01

    This article investigates the effect of gaze angle on the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature rise in human eye under electromagnetic exposures from 0.9 to 10 GHz. Eye models in different gaze angles are developed based on biometric data. The spatial-average SARs in eyes are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method, and the corresponding maximum temperature rises in lens are calculated by the finite-difference method. It is found that the changes in the gaze angle produce a maximum variation of 35, 12 and 20 % in the eye-averaged SAR, peak 10 g average SAR and temperature rise, respectively. Results also reveal that the eye-averaged SAR is more sensitive to the changes in the gaze angle than peak 10 g average SAR, especially at higher frequencies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, M. R. I.; Hossain, M. I.; Misran, N.; Singh, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances. PMID:26599584

  13. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone.

    PubMed

    Faruque, M R I; Hossain, M I; Misran, N; Singh, M; Islam, M T

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances.

  14. Mechanism and rate of glucose absorption differ between an Australian honeyeater (Meliphagidae) and a lorikeet (Loriidae).

    PubMed

    Napier, Kathryn R; McWhorter, Todd J; Fleming, Patricia A

    2008-11-01

    Efficient mechanisms of glucose absorption are necessary for volant animals as a means of reducing mass during flight: they speed up gut transit time and require smaller volume and mass of gut tissue. One mechanism that may be important is absorption via paracellular (non-mediated) pathways. This may be particularly true for nectarivorous species which encounter large quantities of sugar in their natural diet. We investigated the extent of mediated and non-mediated glucose absorption in red wattlebirds Anthochaera carunculata (Meliphagidae) and rainbow lorikeets Trichoglossus haematodus (Loriidae) to test the hypothesis that paracellular uptake accounts for a significant proportion of total glucose uptake in these species. We found that routes of glucose absorption are highly dynamic in both species. In lorikeets, absorption of L-glucose (non-mediated uptake) is slower than that of D-glucose (mediated and non-mediated uptake), with as little as 10% of total glucose absorbed by the paracellular pathway initially (contrasting previous indirect estimates of approximately 80%). Over time, however, more glucose may be absorbed via the paracellular route. Glucose absorption by both mediated and non-mediated mechanisms in wattlebirds occurred at a faster rate than in lorikeets, and wattlebirds also rely substantially on paracellular uptake. In wattlebirds, we recorded higher bioavailability of L-glucose (96+/-3%) compared with D-glucose (57+/-2%), suggesting problems with the in vivo use of radiolabeled d-glucose. Further trials with 3-O-methyl-D-glucose revealed high bioavailability in wattlebirds (90+/-5%). This non-metabolisable glucose analogue remains the probe of choice for measuring uptake rates in vivo, especially in birds in which absorption and metabolism occur extremely rapidly.

  15. Measures of exposure versus measures of rate and extent of absorption.

    PubMed

    Chen, M L; Lesko, L; Williams, R L

    2001-01-01

    Regulatory assessment of bioavailability and bioequivalence in the US frequently relies on measures of rate and extent of absorption. Rate of absorption is not only difficult to measure but also bears little clinical relevance. This paper proposes that measures of bioavailability and bioequivalence for drugs that achieve their therapeutic effects after entry into the systemic circulation are best expressed in terms of early [partial area under the concentration-time curve (AUC)], peak plasma or serum drug concentration and total AUC exposure for a plasma or serum concentration-time profile. With suitable documentation, these systemic exposure measures can be related to efficacy and tolerability outcomes. The early measure is recommended for an immediate release drug product where a better control of drug absorption is needed, for example to ensure rapid onset of a therapeutic effect or to avoid an adverse reaction from a fast input rate. The 3 systemic exposure measures for bioavailability and bioequivalence studies can provide critical links between product quality and clinical outcome and thereby reduce the current emphasis on rate of absorption.

  16. B1-based specific energy absorption rate determination for nonquadrature radiofrequency excitation.

    PubMed

    Katscher, Ulrich; Findeklee, Christian; Voigt, Tobias

    2012-12-01

    The current gold standard to estimate local and global specific energy absorption rate for MRI involves numerically modeling the patient and the transmit radiofrequency coil. Recently, a patient-individual method was presented, which estimated specific energy absorption rate from individually measured B(1) maps. This method, however, was restricted to quadrature volume coils due to difficulties distinguishing phase contributions from radiofrequency transmission and reception. In this study, a method separating these two phase contributions by comparing the electric conductivity reconstructed from different transmit channels of a parallel radiofrequency transmission system is presented. This enables specific energy absorption rate estimation not only for quadrature excitation but also for the nonquadrature excitation of the single elements of the transmit array. Though the contributions of the different phases are known, unknown magnetic field components and tissue boundary artifacts limit the technique. Nevertheless, the high agreement between simulated and experimental results found in this study is promising. B(1)-based specific energy absorption rate determination might become possible for arbitrary radiofrequency excitation on a patient-individual basis.

  17. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Christ, A; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2010-06-07

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR(wb)) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR(10g)). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SAR(wb)) and 58% (SAR(10g)) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SAR(wb) is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR(10g) values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning.

  18. Estimation of the whole-body averaged SAR of grounded human models for plane wave exposure at respective resonance frequencies.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Yanase, Kazuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Chan, Kwok Hung; Fujiwara, Osamu; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Soichi; Conil, Emmanuelle; Wiart, Joe

    2012-12-21

    According to the international guidelines, the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) is used as a metric of basic restriction for radio-frequency whole-body exposure. It is well known that the WBA-SAR largely depends on the frequency of the incident wave for a given incident power density. The frequency at which the WBA-SAR becomes maximal is called the 'resonance frequency'. Our previous study proposed a scheme for estimating the WBA-SAR at this resonance frequency based on an analogy between the power absorption characteristic of human models in free space and that of a dipole antenna. However, a scheme for estimating the WBA-SAR in a grounded human has not been discussed sufficiently, even though the WBA-SAR in a grounded human is larger than that in an ungrounded human. In this study, with the use of the finite-difference time-domain method, the grounded condition is confirmed to be the worst-case exposure for human body models in a standing posture. Then, WBA-SARs in grounded human models are calculated at their respective resonant frequencies. A formula for estimating the WBA-SAR of a human standing on the ground is proposed based on an analogy with a quarter-wavelength monopole antenna. First, homogenized human body models are shown to provide the conservative WBA-SAR as compared with anatomically based models. Based on the formula proposed here, the WBA-SARs in grounded human models are approximately 10% larger than those in free space. The variability of the WBA-SAR was shown to be ±30% even for humans of the same age, which is caused by the body shape.

  19. Specific Absorption Rate Studies of the Parallel Transmission of Inner-Volume Excitations at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Zelinski, Adam C.; Angelone, Leonardo M.; Goyal, Vivek K; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the behavior of whole-head and local SAR as a function of trajectory acceleration factor and target excitation pattern due to the parallel transmission (pTX) of spatially-tailored excitations at 7T. Materials and Methods FDTD simulations in a multi-tissue head model are used to obtain B+1 and electric field maps of an eight-channel transmit head array. Local and average SAR produced by 2D-spiral-trajectory excitations are examined as a function of trajectory acceleration factor, R, and a variety of target excitation parameters when pTX pulses are designed for constant root-mean-square excitation pattern error. Results Mean and local SAR grow quadratically with flip angle and more than quadratically with R, but the ratio of local to mean SAR is not monotonic with R. SAR varies greatly with target position, exhibiting different behaviors as a function of target shape and size for small and large R. For example, exciting large regions produces less SAR than exciting small ones for R ≥ 4, but the opposite trend occurs when R < 4. Furthermore, smoother and symmetric patterns produce lower SAR. Conclusion Mean and local SAR vary by orders of magnitude depending on acceleration factor and excitation pattern, often exhibiting complex, non-intuitive behavior. To ensure safety compliance, it seems that model-based validation of individual target patterns and corresponding pTX pulses is necessary. PMID:18821601

  20. Effects of Receive-Only Inserts on SAR, B1+ Field and Tx Coil Performance

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Narayanan; Zhao, Tiejun; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect of different cylindrical and close conforming receive only array designs on spin excitation and specific absorption rate (SAR) of a 7 Tesla transmit only head coil. Materials and Methods We developed FDTD models of different receive only array geometries. Cylindrical and close fitting helmet arrays with varying copper trace widths; a TEM Tx coil model and two head models were used in numerical simulations. Tx coil coupling was experimentally measured and validated with FDTD modeling. Results Changing copper trace width of loops in array models caused subtle changes in RF absorption (<5%). Changes in SAR distribution were observed in the head models with Rx-only inserts. Peak SAR increased (−1 to +15%) in different tissues for a mean B1+ in the brain of 2 μT. Total absorption in the head models for 1 Watt forward power increased (5 to 21%) in the heads with Rx-only inserts. Changes in RF absorption with different Rx-inserts indicate a change in RF radiation of the Tx coil even when changes in B1+ and coupling between ports of Tx coil were minimal. Conclusion Changes in local/global SAR and subtle changes in B1+ field distributions were observed with the presence of Rx-only inserts. Thus, incorporation of the receive-only array effects are needed when evaluating SAR and designing RF transmit pulse waveform parameters for shimming and/or Tx-SENSE for 7 T MRI. PMID:23913474

  1. Intersubject local SAR variation for 7T prostate MR imaging with an eight-channel single-side adapted dipole antenna array.

    PubMed

    Ipek, Ozlem; Raaijmakers, Alexander J; Lagendijk, Jan J; Luijten, Peter R; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2014-04-01

    Surface transmit arrays used in ultra-high field body MRI require local specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment. As local SAR cannot be measured directly, local SAR is determined by simulations using dielectric patient models. In this study, the inter-patient local SAR variation is investigated for 7T prostate imaging with the single-side adapted dipole antenna array. Four-dedicated dielectric models were created by segmenting Dixon water-fat separated images that were obtained from four subjects with a 1.5T scanner and the surface array in place. Electromagnetic simulations were performed to calculate the SAR distribution for each model. Radio frequency (RF) exposure variations were determined by analyzing the SAR(10g) distributions (1) with one element active, (2) using a Q-matrix eigenvalue/eigenvector approach, (3) with the maximum potential SAR in each voxel, and (4) for a phase shimmed prostate measurement. Maximum potential local SAR levels for 1 W time-averaged accepted power per transmit channel range from 4.1 to 7.1 W/kg. These variations show that one model is not sufficient to determine safe scan settings. For the operation of the surface array conservative power settings were derived based on a worst-case SAR evaluation and the most SAR-sensitive body model. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land: SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Heights and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Philip; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Restano, Marco; Ambrozio, Americo; Benveniste, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The high along-track sampling and resolution of Cryosat-2 altimeter in SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. This paper will present the theoretical approach to analysis of the FBR L1A Doppler beams to form a product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking from which inland water heights are derivable from the retracked Cryosat-2 altimetric waveforms. Details of the processing strategy will include a comparison of waveforms and heights from the burst echoes (~80 m along-track) and from multi-look waveforms (~320 m along-track). SAR and SARin FBR data are available for the Amazon, Brahmaputra and Mekong. The Mekong and Amazon FBR SAR data has been processed for 2011-2015 and results will be compared against stage data from the nearest gauge. Similarly, heights from Tonle Sap will be compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture web site. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented. Results of FBR SARin processing will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae and the extraction of slope of the ground surface.

  3. Updated Long Term Fault Slip Rates and Seismic Hazard in the Central Alborz, Iran: New Constraints From InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Alborz mountain range, located south of the Caspian Sea, accommodates 30% of the 25 mm/yr convergence between Arabia and Eurasia. The resulting shortening and left lateral motion is distributed over several active fault zones within the Central Alborz. Despite earlier efforts using only GPS data, little is known about the long term rate of vertical deformation and aseismic slip. Several historical earthquakes have affected this region, some of the largest of these events occurred on the Mosha fault which is close to the capital city, Tehran, which has a population of over eight million. Thus, constraining the interseismic slip rates in this region is particularly important. In this study we complement existing horizontal velocities from a regional GPS network, with line of sight velocities from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), to provide additional constraints on the vertical deformation and enhance the spatial coverage. Assuming a seismogenic depth of 30 km, based on microseismicity data, we solve for the geometry and long term slip rates on four major fault strands in this region. We obtain a long term slip rate of ~ 3 mm/yr for the Mosha and North Alborz faults, and ~ 10 mm/yr for the Khazar fault and Parchin faults. These rates and fault geometries are in agreement with earlier works, and fit the GPS data well. However, close to the fault traces there are large residuals in the InSAR data, suggesting that there is shallow creep (< 30 km). Therefore, we carry out a subsequent inversion using only the residual InSAR displacements to solve for the distribution of creep within the seismogenic zones on these faults. We find that the Mosha and North Alborz faults remain locked between 0 - 30 km depth, whilst the Parchin and Khazar faults are creeping. This new observation of fault creep has direct implications for the seismic hazard in the region. On the Mosha fault we estimate a slip deficit equivalent to a Mw 7.0 event. The combination of InSAR

  4. Analytic SAR computation in a multilayer elliptic cylinder for bioelectromagnetic applications.

    PubMed

    Caorsi, S; Pastorino, M; Raffetto, M

    1999-09-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) is usually considered as the basic quantity to derive the reference levels for the exposure of workers and general population. In this paper, we propose an analytical procedure for the SAR computation inside a biological elliptic cylinder model made up of layers of different biological tissues. The procedure makes it possible to obtain accurate SAR values in simplified models of biological subsystems, and it is also helpful to test numerical techniques to be used for more realistic models and to generate synthetic input data for diagnostic methodologies. For the assumed model, the calculation of the analytical solution has been obtained by generalizing a known procedure that deals only with lossless materials, and the model makes possible the calculation of the SAR for realistic human tissues. Various calculations prove the reliability of the technique.

  5. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  6. Specific absorption rate analysis of broadband mobile antenna with negative index metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Touhidul; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial-inspired printed mobile wireless antenna that can support most mobile applications such as GSM, UMTS, Bluetooth and WLAN frequency bands. The antenna consists of a semi-circular patch, a 50Ω microstrip feed line and metamaterial ground plane. The antenna occupies a very small space of 37 × 47 × 0.508 mm3, making it suitable for mobile wireless application. The perceptible novelty shown in this proposed antenna is that reduction of specific absorption rate using the negative index metamaterial ground plane. The proposed antenna reduced 72.11 and 75.53 % of specific absorption rate at 1.8 and 2.4 GHz, respectively.

  7. Specific absorption rate determination of magnetic nanoparticles through hyperthermia measurements in non-adiabatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Martino, L.; Vinai, F.; Martino, P.; Ferraro, G.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for magnetic hyperthermia operating in non-adiabatic conditions is described. A thermodynamic model that takes into account the heat exchanged by the sample with the surrounding environment is developed. A suitable calibration procedure is proposed that allows the experimental validation of the model. Specific absorption rate can then be accurately determined just from the measurement of the sample temperature at the equilibrium steady state. The setup and the measurement procedure represent a simplification with respect to other systems requiring calorimeters or crucial corrections for heat flow. Two families of magnetic nanoparticles, one superparamagnetic and one characterised by larger sizes and static hysteresis, have been characterised as a function of field intensity, and specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power have been obtained.

  8. Spatial and temporal variations in creep rate along the El Pilar fault at the Caribbean-South American plate boundary (Venezuela), from InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse Beltran, Léa.; Pathier, Erwan; Jouanne, François; Vassallo, Riccardo; Reinoza, Carlos; Audemard, Franck; Doin, Marie Pierre; Volat, Matthieu

    2016-11-01

    In eastern Venezuela, the Caribbean-South American plate boundary follows the El Pilar fault system. Previous studies based on three GPS campaigns (2003-2005-2013) demonstrated that the El Pilar fault accommodates the whole relative displacement between the two tectonic plates (20 mm/yr) and proposed that 50-60% of the slip is aseismic. In order to quantify the possible variations of the aseismic creep in time and space, we conducted an interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) time series analysis, using the (NSBAS) New Small BAseline Subset method, on 18 images from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS-1) satellite spanning the 2007-2011 period. During this 3.5 year period, InSAR observations show that aseismic slip decreases eastward along the fault: the creep rate of the western segment reaches 25.3 ± 9.4 mm/yr on average, compared to 13.4 ± 6.9 mm/yr on average for the eastern segment. This is interpreted, through slip distribution models, as being related to coupled and uncoupled areas between the surface and 20 km in depth. InSAR observations also show significant temporal creep rate variations (accelerations) during the considered time span along the western segment. The transient behavior of the creep is not consistent with typical postseismic afterslip following the 1997 Ms 6.8 earthquake. The creep is thus interpreted as persistent aseismic slip during an interseismic period, which has a pulse- or transient-like behavior.

  9. Absorption cross-section and decay rate of rotating linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Aslan, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We analytically study the scalar perturbation of non-asymptotically flat (NAF) rotating linear dilaton black holes (RLDBHs) in 4-dimensions. We show that both radial and angular wave equations can be solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The exact greybody factor (GF), the absorption cross-section (ACS), and the decay rate (DR) for the massless scalar waves are computed for these black holes (BHs). The results obtained for ACS and DR are discussed through graphs.

  10. Calculations of B1 Distribution, Specific Energy Absorption Rate, and Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio for a Body-Size Birdcage Coil Loaded with Different Human Subjects at 64 and 128 MHz.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Collins, C M; Smith, M B

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model of a female body is developed to study the effects of different body types with different coil drive methods on radio-frequency magnetic (B1) field distribution, specific energy absorption rate (SAR), and intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (ISNR) for a body-size birdcage coil at 64 and 128 MHz. The coil is loaded with either a larger, more muscular male body model (subject 1) or a newly developed female body model (subject 2), and driven with two-port (quadrature), four-port, or many (ideal) sources. Loading the coil with subject 1 results in significantly less homogeneous B1 field, higher SAR, and lower ISNR than those for subject 2 at both frequencies. This dependence of MR performance and safety measures on body type indicates a need for a variety of numerical models representative of a diverse population for future calculations. The different drive methods result in similar B1 field patterns, SAR, and ISNR in all cases.

  11. Local SAR, Global SAR, and Power-Constrained Large-Flip-Angle Pulses with Optimal Control and Virtual Observation Points

    PubMed Central

    Vinding, Mads S.; Guérin, Bastien; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To present a constrained optimal-control (OC) framework for designing large-flip-angle parallel-transmit (pTx) pulses satisfying hardware peak-power as well as regulatory local and global specific-absorption-rate (SAR) limits. The application is 2D and 3D spatial-selective 90° and 180° pulses. Theory and Methods The OC gradient-ascent-pulse-engineering method with exact gradients and the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method is proposed. Local SAR is constrained by the virtual-observation-points method. Two numerical models facilitated the optimizations, a torso at 3 T and a head at 7 T, both in eight-channel pTx coils and acceleration-factors up to 4. Results The proposed approach yielded excellent flip-angle distributions. Enforcing the local-SAR constraint, as opposed to peak power alone, reduced the local SAR 7 and 5-fold with the 2D torso excitation and inversion pulse, respectively. The root-mean-square errors of the magnetization profiles increased less than 5% with the acceleration factor of 4. Conclusion A local and global SAR, and peak-power constrained OC large-flip-angle pTx pulse design was presented, and numerically validated for 2D and 3D spatial-selective 90° and 180° pulses at 3 T and 7 T. PMID:26715084

  12. Local SAR, global SAR, and power-constrained large-flip-angle pulses with optimal control and virtual observation points.

    PubMed

    Vinding, Mads S; Guérin, Bastien; Vosegaard, Thomas; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2017-01-01

    To present a constrained optimal-control (OC) framework for designing large-flip-angle parallel-transmit (pTx) pulses satisfying hardware peak-power as well as regulatory local and global specific-absorption-rate (SAR) limits. The application is 2D and 3D spatial-selective 90° and 180° pulses. The OC gradient-ascent-pulse-engineering method with exact gradients and the limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno method is proposed. Local SAR is constrained by the virtual-observation-points method. Two numerical models facilitated the optimizations, a torso at 3 T and a head at 7 T, both in eight-channel pTx coils and acceleration-factors up to 4. The proposed approach yielded excellent flip-angle distributions. Enforcing the local-SAR constraint, as opposed to peak power alone, reduced the local SAR 7 and 5-fold with the 2D torso excitation and inversion pulse, respectively. The root-mean-square errors of the magnetization profiles increased less than 5% with the acceleration factor of 4. A local and global SAR, and peak-power constrained OC large-flip-angle pTx pulse design was presented, and numerically validated for 2D and 3D spatial-selective 90° and 180° pulses at 3 T and 7 T. Magn Reson Med 77:374-384, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Strain Rate Effects on the Energy Absorption of Rapidly Manufactured Composite Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brighton, Aaron M; Forrest, Mark; Starbuck, J Michael; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Fox, Bronwyn

    2009-01-01

    Quasi-static and intermediate rate axial crush tests were conducted on tubular specimens of Carbon/Epoxy (Toray T700/G83C) and Glass/Polypropylene (Twintex). The quasi-static tests were conducted at 10 mm/min (1.67x10-4 m/s); five different crush initiators were used. Tests at intermediate rates were performed at speeds of 0.25 m/s, 0.5 m/s, 0.75 m/s 1m/s, 2 m/s and 4 m/s. Quasi-static tests of tubular specimens showed high specific energy absorption (SEA) values with 86 kJ/kg for Carbon/Epoxy specimens. The specific energy absorption of the Glass/Polypropylene specimens was measured to be 29 kJ/kg. Results from the intermediate test rates showed that while a decrease in specific energy absorbed was observed as speeds increased, values did not fall below 55kj/kg for carbon specimens or 35 kJ/kg for the Glass/Polypropylene specimens. When compared with steel and aluminium, specific energy absorption values of 15 kJ/kg and 30 kJ/kg respectively, the benefits of using composite materials in crash structures are apparent.

  14. SAR distributions for 915 MHz interstitial microwave antennas used in hyperthermia for cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.M.; Mechling, J.A.; Trembly, B.S.; Strohbehn, J.W.

    1988-10-01

    Many research centers are investigating interstitial microwave antenna array hyperthermia (IMAAH) systems as a treatment modality for tumors at various sites. This paper presents theoretical and experimental specific absorption rate (SAR< W/kg) distributions for single insulated antennas operating at 915 MHz in muscle phantom; SAR is deduced from measured temperature rise. These coaxial antennas were typically 1-2 mm in diameter and 5-10 cm in length. Results show that dipoles with lengths much shorter than their resonant length have a characteristically large reactive input impedance component and a substantially smaller absolute SAR magnitude than resonant dipoles. Over the range of dimensions studied, the thickness of the catheter wall has little effect on the SAR distribution. All cases investigated demonstrate that the maximum SAR occurs near the junction regardless of insertion depth. Furthermore, the insertion depth has little effect on the radial SAR distribution or the distribution near the antenna tip. If the length of the tip section is shorter than resonant length, the radial SAR pattern decreases. As predicted by theory, experimental results show that an antenna with the tip section equal to a quarter-wave-length and the insertion depth equal to a half-wavelength achieves a substantial increase in the longitudinal power distribution compared to other antenna designs that were evaluated.

  15. Fine resolution calculations of SAR in the human body for frequencies up to 3 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, P. J.

    2002-08-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed from 100 MHz to 3 GHz at the basic 2 mm resolution of the voxel (volume pixel) model NORMAN without any rescaling to larger cell sizes. The reduction in the voxel size from previous work allows SAR to be calculated at higher frequencies. Additionally, the calculations have been extended down to 10 MHz, covering the whole-body resonance regions at a resolution of 4 mm. As well as for the adult phantom, SAR values are calculated for scaled versions representing 10-, 5- and 1-year-old children for both grounded and isolated conditions. External electric field levels are derived from limits of whole-body averaged SAR and localized SAR in the ankle, and compared with NRPB investigation levels and ICNIRP reference levels. The ICNIRP field reference levels alone would not provide a conservative estimate of the localized SAR exposure in the leg for grounded conditions. It would be necessary to invoke the secondary reference level on limb current to provide compliance with basic restrictions on localized SAR averaged over 10 g.

  16. A method to approximate maximum local SAR in multichannel transmit MR systems without transmit phase information.

    PubMed

    Orzada, Stephan; Ladd, Mark E; Bitz, Andreas K

    2017-08-01

    To calculate local specific absorption rate (SAR) correctly, both the amplitude and phase of the signal in each transmit channel have to be known. In this work, we propose a method to derive a conservative upper bound for the local SAR, with a reasonable safety margin without knowledge of the transmit phases of the channels. The proposed method uses virtual observation points (VOPs). Correction factors are calculated for each set of VOPs that prevent underestimation of local SAR when the VOPs are applied with the correct amplitudes but fixed phases. The proposed method proved to be superior to the worst-case calculation based on the maximum eigenvalue of the VOPs. The mean overestimation for six coil setups could be reduced, whereas no underestimation of the maximum local SAR occurred. In the best investigated case, the overestimation could be reduced from a factor of 3.3 to a factor of 1.7. The upper bound for the local SAR calculated with the proposed method allows a fast estimation of the local SAR based on power measurements in the transmit channels and facilitates SAR monitoring in systems that do not have the capability to monitor transmit phases. Magn Reson Med 78:805-811, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  17. Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate as a Dosimetric Quantity for Electromagnetic Fields Bioeffects

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. Methods We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. Results We find that: a) The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b) All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c) The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. Conclusions SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc) which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar uncertainty to predict

  18. Evaluation of specific absorption rate as a dosimetric quantity for electromagnetic fields bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. WE FIND THAT: a) The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b) All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c) The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc) which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar uncertainty to predict the biological effect due to non-linearity.

  19. CASCADE CALCULATION OF EXOTIC HELIUM ATOMS -- s-orbit vs. p-orbit absorption rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, T.; Akaishi, Y.

    2000-09-01

    We construct a new model for the Stark-mixing process of exotic helium atoms using the impact-parameter method, and compared it with a phenomenological one used so far (sliding transition model). It turns out that the sliding transition model is justified only for low-n states and largely overestimates the Stark-mixing transition rate at high-n states. As a result of the atomic-cascade calculation, the s-(p-)orbit absorption rates in our new model are considerably smaller (larger) than those in the phenomenological one, although both our new model and old one well reproduce the experimental x-ray yields.

  20. Thermal effects of high-field (1.5 tesla) magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Clinical experience above a specific absorption rate of 0.4 W/kg.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Schaefer, D J; Grundfest, W; Crues, J V

    1986-01-01

    Current safety guidelines recommend limiting the exposure to radiofrequency (RF) radiation used for clinical magnetic resonance imaging to a whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 W/kg. Since it may be desirable to image with SARs that exceed this level during MRI of the spine, we evaluated the thermal responses associated with these procedures. Body and skin temperatures were determined in 25 patients immediately before and after MRI. Since the eye is particularly susceptible to thermal injury, corneal temperature was also measured. High-resolution thermography was performed on three subjects to evaluate the surface heating pattern and identify potential thermal 'hot spots'. A 1.5 tesla/64 MHz MRI system with quadrature transmission and reception was used iN this study. The whole body average specific absorption rate ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 W/kg. Ambient conditions were room temperature 20-24 degrees C and relative humidity between 40 and 50 per cent. There was a slight but statistically significant (p less than 0.01) increase in body temperature after MRI (36.5 +/- 0.4 to 36.7 +/- 0.4 degrees C). Temperatures of the hand (30.4 +/- 1.4 to 31.2 +/- 1.0 degrees C), positioning isocenter (32.1 +/- 0.6 to 32.9 +/- 0.5), and cornea (32.5 +/- 0.6 to 32.9 +/- 0.5 degrees C) also increased a statistically significant amount. Thermographic imaging revealed normal heating patterns with no surface 'hot spots'. We conclude that the temperature changes associated with MRI of the spine at the SARs we studied were well below known thresholds for adverse effects and do not appear to be harmful to patients.

  1. Two-spoke placement optimization under explicit specific absorption rate and power constraints in parallel transmission at ultra-high field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupas, Laura; Massire, Aurélien; Amadon, Alexis; Vignaud, Alexandre; Boulant, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    The spokes method combined with parallel transmission is a promising technique to mitigate the B1+ inhomogeneity at ultra-high field in 2D imaging. To date however, the spokes placement optimization combined with the magnitude least squares pulse design has never been done in direct conjunction with the explicit Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and hardware constraints. In this work, the joint optimization of 2-spoke trajectories and RF subpulse weights is performed under these constraints explicitly and in the small tip angle regime. The problem is first considerably simplified by making the observation that only the vector between the 2 spokes is relevant in the magnitude least squares cost-function, thereby reducing the size of the parameter space and allowing a more exhaustive search. The algorithm starts from a set of initial k-space candidates and performs in parallel for all of them optimizations of the RF subpulse weights and the k-space locations simultaneously, under explicit SAR and power constraints, using an active-set algorithm. The dimensionality of the spoke placement parameter space being low, the RF pulse performance is computed for every location in k-space to study the robustness of the proposed approach with respect to initialization, by looking at the probability to converge towards a possible global minimum. Moreover, the optimization of the spoke placement is repeated with an increased pulse bandwidth in order to investigate the impact of the constraints on the result. Bloch simulations and in vivo T2∗-weighted images acquired at 7 T validate the approach. The algorithm returns simulated normalized root mean square errors systematically smaller than 5% in 10 s.

  2. Two-spoke placement optimization under explicit specific absorption rate and power constraints in parallel transmission at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Laura; Massire, Aurélien; Amadon, Alexis; Vignaud, Alexandre; Boulant, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    The spokes method combined with parallel transmission is a promising technique to mitigate the B1(+) inhomogeneity at ultra-high field in 2D imaging. To date however, the spokes placement optimization combined with the magnitude least squares pulse design has never been done in direct conjunction with the explicit Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and hardware constraints. In this work, the joint optimization of 2-spoke trajectories and RF subpulse weights is performed under these constraints explicitly and in the small tip angle regime. The problem is first considerably simplified by making the observation that only the vector between the 2 spokes is relevant in the magnitude least squares cost-function, thereby reducing the size of the parameter space and allowing a more exhaustive search. The algorithm starts from a set of initial k-space candidates and performs in parallel for all of them optimizations of the RF subpulse weights and the k-space locations simultaneously, under explicit SAR and power constraints, using an active-set algorithm. The dimensionality of the spoke placement parameter space being low, the RF pulse performance is computed for every location in k-space to study the robustness of the proposed approach with respect to initialization, by looking at the probability to converge towards a possible global minimum. Moreover, the optimization of the spoke placement is repeated with an increased pulse bandwidth in order to investigate the impact of the constraints on the result. Bloch simulations and in vivo T2(∗)-weighted images acquired at 7 T validate the approach. The algorithm returns simulated normalized root mean square errors systematically smaller than 5% in 10 s. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensitivity of the atmospheric lapse rate to solar cloud absorption in a radiative-convective model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlick, Carynelisa; Ramaswamy, V.

    2003-08-01

    Previous radiative-convective model studies of the radiative forcing due to absorbing aerosols such as soot and dust have revealed a strong dependence on the vertical distribution of the absorbers. In this study, we extend this concept to absorption in cloud layers, using a one-dimensional radiative-convective model employing high, middle, and low cloud representations to investigate the response of the surface temperature and atmospheric lapse rate to increases in visible cloud absorption. The visible single-scattering albedo (ssa) of the clouds is prescribed, ranging from 1.0 to 0.6, where 0.99 is the minimum that would be expected from the presence of absorbing aerosols within the cloud drops on the basis of recent Monterey Area Ship Track (MAST) Experiment case studies. Simulations are performed with respect to both a constant cloud optical depth and an increasing cloud optical depth and as a function of cloud height. We find that increases in solar cloud absorption tend to warm the troposphere and surface and stabilize the atmosphere, while increases in cloud optical depth cool the troposphere and surface and slightly stabilize the atmosphere between the low cloud top and surface because of the increase in surface cooling. In the absence of considerations involving microphysical or cloud-climate feedbacks, we find that two conditions are required to yield an inversion from a solar cloud absorption perturbation: (1) The solar absorption perturbation must be included throughout the tropospheric clouds column, distributing the solar heating to higher altitudes, and (2) the ssa of the clouds must be ≤0.6, which is an unrealistically low value. The implication is that there is very little possibility of significant stabilization of the global mean atmosphere due to perturbation of cloud properties given current ssa values.

  4. Influence of light absorption rate by Nannochloropsis oculata on triglyceride production during nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Kandilian, Razmig; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to understand the role of light transfer in triglyceride fatty-acid (TG-FA) cell content and productivity from microalgae during nitrogen starvation. Large amounts of TG-FA can be produced via nitrogen starvation of microalgae in photobioreactors exposed to intense light. First, spectral absorption and scattering cross-sections of N. oculata were measured at different times during nitrogen starvation. They were used to relate the mean volumetric rate of energy absorption (MVREA) per unit mass of microalgae to the TG-FA productivity and cell content. TG-FA productivity correlated with the MVREA and reached a maximum for MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs. This indicated that TG-FA synthesis was limited by the photon absorption rate in the PBR. A minimum MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs was also necessary at the onset of nitrogen starvation to trigger large accumulation of TG-FA in cells. These results will be instrumental in defining protocols for TG-FA production in scaled-up photobioreactors.

  5. Effective absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of anthropogenic and biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Ali, Nujhat N.; Saiduddin, Mariyah N.; Wu, Michael; Lee, Hyun Ji (Julie); Aiona, Paige K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-04-01

    Mass absorption coefficient (MAC) values were measured for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples produced by flow tube ozonolysis and smog chamber photooxidation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically: α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, farnesene, guaiacol, imidazole, isoprene, linalool, ocimene, p-xylene, 1-methylpyrrole, and 2-methylpyrrole. Both low-NOx and high-NOx conditions were employed during the chamber photooxidation experiments. MAC values were converted into effective molecular absorption cross sections assuming an average molecular weight of 300 g/mol for SOA compounds. The upper limits for the effective photolysis rates of SOA compounds were calculated by assuming unity photolysis quantum yields and convoluting the absorption cross sections with a time-dependent solar spectral flux. A more realistic estimate for the photolysis rates relying on the quantum yield of acetone was also obtained. The results show that condensed-phase photolysis of SOA compounds can potentially occur with effective lifetimes ranging from minutes to days, suggesting that photolysis is an efficient and largely overlooked mechanism of SOA aging.

  6. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  7. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  9. INTERSTELLAR METASTABLE HELIUM ABSORPTION AS A PROBE OF THE COSMIC-RAY IONIZATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    Indriolo, Nick; McCall, Benjamin J.; Hobbs, L. M.; Hinkle, K. H.

    2009-10-01

    The ionization rate of interstellar material by cosmic rays has been a major source of controversy, with different estimates varying by three orders of magnitude. Observational constraints of this rate have all depended on analyzing the chemistry of various molecules that are produced following cosmic-ray ionization, and in many cases these analyses contain significant uncertainties. Even in the simplest case (H{sup +} {sub 3}), the derived ionization rate depends on an (uncertain) estimate of the absorption path length. In this paper, we examine the feasibility of inferring the cosmic-ray ionization rate using the 10830 A absorption line of metastable helium. Observations through the diffuse clouds toward HD 183143 are presented, but yield only an upper limit on the metastable helium column density. A thorough investigation of He{sup +} chemistry reveals that only a small fraction of He{sup +} will recombine into the triplet state and populate the metastable level. In addition, excitation to the triplet manifold of helium by secondary electrons must be accounted for as it is the dominant mechanism which produces He* in some environments. Incorporating these various formation and destruction pathways, we derive new equations for the steady state abundance of metastable helium. Using these equations in concert with our observations, we find zeta{sub He} < 1.2 x 10{sup -15} s{sup -1}, an upper limit about 5 times larger than the ionization rate previously inferred for this sight line using H{sup +} {sub 3}. While observations of interstellar He* are extremely difficult at present, and the background chemistry is not nearly as simple as previously thought, potential future observations of metastable helium would provide an independent check on the cosmic-ray ionization rate derived from H{sup +} {sub 3} in diffuse molecular clouds, and, perhaps more importantly, allow the first direct measurements of the ionization rate in diffuse atomic clouds.

  10. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  11. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels

    2011-08-07

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm(3) of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  12. Comparison of simulated parallel transmit body arrays at 3 T using excitation uniformity, global SAR, local SAR, and power efficiency metrics.

    PubMed

    Guérin, Bastien; Gebhardt, Matthias; Serano, Peter; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Hamm, Michael; Pfeuffer, Josef; Nistler, Juergen; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-03-01

    We compare the performance of eight parallel transmit (pTx) body arrays with up to 32 channels and a standard birdcage design. Excitation uniformity, local specific absorption rate (SAR), global SAR, and power metrics are analyzed in the torso at 3 T for radiofrequency (RF)-shimming and 2-spoke excitations. We used a fast cosimulation strategy for field calculation in the presence of coupling between transmit channels. We designed spoke pulses using magnitude least squares optimization with explicit constraint of SAR and power and compared the performance of the different pTx coils using the L-curve method. PTx arrays outperformed the conventional birdcage coil in all metrics except peak and average power efficiency. The presence of coupling exacerbated this power efficiency problem. At constant excitation fidelity, the pTx array with 24 channels arranged in three z-rows could decrease local SAR more than 4-fold (2-fold) for RF-shimming (2-spoke) compared to the birdcage coil for pulses of equal duration. Multi-row pTx coils had a marked performance advantage compared to single row designs, especially for coronal imaging. PTx coils can simultaneously improve the excitation uniformity and reduce SAR compared to a birdcage coil when SAR metrics are explicitly constrained in the pulse design. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Lipid nanoparticles with no surfactant improve oral absorption rate of poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Yuka; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-07-15

    A pharmacokinetic study was performed in rats to evaluate the oral absorption ratios of nanoparticle suspensions containing the poorly water-soluble compound nifedipine (NI) and two different types of lipids, including hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. NI-lipid nanoparticle (LN) suspensions with a mean particle size of 48.0 nm and a zeta potential of -57.2 mV were prepared by co-grinding combined with a high-pressure homogenization process. The oral administration of NI-LN suspensions to rats led to a significant increase in the NI plasma concentration, and the area under the curve (AUC) value was found to be 108 min μg mL⁻¹, indicating a 4-fold increase relative to the NI suspensions. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the NI-LN suspensions with those of the NI solution prepared using only the surfactant polysorbate 80 revealed that although the AUC and bioavailability (59%) values were almost identical, a rapid absorption rate was still observed in the NI-LN suspensions. These results therefore indicated that lipid nanoparticles prepared using only two types of phospholipid with a mean particle size of less than 50 nm could improve the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Greater apparent absorption of flavonoids is associated with lesser human fecal flavonoid disappearance rates.

    PubMed

    Simons, Andrean L; Renouf, Mathieu; Murphy, Patricia A; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2010-01-13

    It was hypothesized that 5,7,4'-OH-flavonoids disappeared more rapidly from human fecal incubations and were less absorbable by humans than flavonoids without 5-OH moieties. Anaerobic fecal disappearance rates over 24 h were determined for 15 flavonoids in samples from 20 men and 13 women. In these anaerobic fecal mixtures, flavonoids with 5,7,4'-OH groups, genistein, apigenin, naringenin, luteolin, kaempferol, and quercetin (disappearance rate, k=0.46+/-0.10 h(-1)), and methoxylated flavonoids, hesperetin and glycitein (k=0.24+/-0.21 h(-1)), disappeared rapidly compared with flavonoids lacking 5-OH (e.g., daidzein, k=0.07+/-0.03 h(-1)). Apparent absorption of flavonoids that disappeared rapidly from in vitro fecal incubations, genistein, naringenin, quercetin, and hesperetin, was compared with that of daidzein, a slowly disappearing flavonoid, in 5 men and 5 women. Subjects ingested 104 micromol of genistein and 62 micromol of daidzein (soy milk), 1549 micromol of naringenin and 26 micromol of hesperetin (grapefruit juice), and 381 micromol of quercetin (onions) in three test meals, each separated by 1 week. Blood and urine samples were collected over 24 h after each test meal. Plasma flavonoid concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 1 microM. The apparent absorption, expressed as percentage of ingested dose excreted in urine, was significantly less for naringenin (3.2+/-1.7%), genistein (7.2+/-4.6%), hesperetin (7.3+/-3.2%), and quercetin (5.6+/-3.7%) compared with daidzein (43.4+/-15.5%, p=0.02). These data affirmed the hypothesis that the 5,7,4'-OH of flavonoids limited apparent absorption of these compounds in humans.

  15. The absorption efficiency and respiration rate of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae.

    PubMed

    Nash, Troy R; Ruppert, Edward E; Colacino, James M

    2009-12-01

    The present study investigates some aspects of the digestive biology and physiological energetics of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae. Florida lancelets are able to remove 47.2-56.9% of the energy from a diet of mixed algae. The respiration rate is 0.100mL O(2) (STPD) h(-1) g(-1) (wet), which estimates a metabolic rate of 0.248 J h(-1), at an average body mass of 0.125 g (wet). Published values of the chlorophyll a concentration in its natural habitat indicate that a 125 mg lancelet would need to filter 0.018-0.031 L h(-1) to remove sufficient food to support its resting metabolism. The filtration rate of lancelets has been reported as 0.138 L h(-1), indicating that the actual filtration rate is 4-7 times greater than the filtration rate needed to meet resting metabolic demands. It appears that lancelets have the potential to be raised in aquaculture, because their absorption efficiency and respiration rate are comparable to suspension-feeding invertebrates that have been successfully aquacultured.

  16. The modification of specific absorption rates in interstitial microwave hyperthermia via tissue-equivalent material bolus.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, S; Denman, D L; Legorreta, R A; Foster, A E; Redmond, K P; Elson, H R; Born, A M; Samaratunga, R C; Lewis, G C; Kereiakes, J G

    1990-09-01

    Patterns of specific absorption rates generated by interstitial, microwave antenna arrays must be experimentally ascertained and quantified to facilitate their clinical incorporation. Phantom studies involved the use of four single-gap, coaxial antennas oriented in a 2 cm square array. These dipoles were driven in phase by a microwave generator at a frequency of 915 MHz. The inherent limitations in modifying the specific absorption rate patterns were addressed with the addition of bolus to the phantom. These additions of Guy's muscle tissue-equivalent material were made either proximal or distal to the phantom proper. Experiments conducted in the presence and absence of tissue-equivalent material bolus showed the ability to achieve broader bands of 50% power deposition in certain bolus conditions. These heating patterns were sufficiently reproducible and predictable to warrant clinical application of the bolus addition. A through-and-through method of catheter implantation allowed for bolus addition when deemed necessary. Treatments with veterinary and human patients using the bolus method to modify heating patterns yielded augmented patterns of power deposition. The effective length of the antennas that would radiate efficiently was essentially broadened via introduction of a microwave-interacting medium. As a result of the tissue equivalent material's ability to absorb microwave power, it was necessary to interpose minimally-interactive styrofoam spacers to limit heat transfer effects at the tissue-bolus interfaces.

  17. A simple parameterization of ozone infrared absorption for atmospheric heating rate calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfield, Joan E.

    1991-01-01

    A simple parameterization of ozone absorption in the 9.6-micron region which is suitable for two- and three-dimensional stratospheric and tropospheric models is presented. The band is divided into two parts, a brand center region and a band wing region, grouping together regions for which the temperature dependence of absorption is similar. Each of the two regions is modeled with a function having the form of the Goody random model, with pressure and temperature dependent band parameters chosen by empirically fitting line-by-line equivalent widths for pressures between 0.25 and 1000 mbar and ozone absorber amounts between 1.0 x 10 to the -7th and 1.0 cm atm. The model has been applied to calculations of atmospheric heating rates using an absorber amount weighted mean pressure and temperature along the inhomogeneous paths necessary for flux computations. In the stratosphere, maximum errors in the heating rates relative to line-by-line calculations are 0.1 K/d, or 5 percent of the peak cooling at the stratopause. In the troposphere the errors are at most 0.005 K/d.

  18. Video-rate near infrared tomography to image pulsatile absorption properties in thick tissue

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqiu; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Davis, Scott C.; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2009-01-01

    A high frame-rate near-infrared (NIR) tomography system was created to allow transmission imaging of thick tissues with spectral encoding for parallel source implementation. The design was created to maximize tissue penetration through up to 10 cm of tissue, allowing eventual use in human imaging. Eight temperature-controlled laser diodes (LD) are used in parallel with 1.5 nm shifts in their lasing wavelengths. Simultaneous detection is achieved with eight high-resolution, CCD-based spectrometers that were synchronized to detect the intensities and decode their source locations from the spectrum. Static and dynamic imaging is demonstrated through a 64 mm tissue-equivalent phantom, with acquisition rates up to 20 frames per second. Imaging of pulsatile absorption changes through a 72 mm phantom was demonstrated with a 0.5 Hz varying object having only 1% effect upon the transmitted signal. This subtle signal change was used to show that while reconstructing the signal changes in a tissue may not be possible, image-guided recovery of the pulsatile change in broad regions of tissue was possible. The ability to image thick tissue and the capacity to image periodic changes in absorption makes this design well suited for tracking thick tissue hemodynamics in vivo during MR or CT imaging. PMID:19582120

  19. Video-rate near infrared tomography to image pulsatile absorption properties in thick tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiu; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Davis, Scott C; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Paulsen, Keith D; Pogue, Brian W

    2009-07-06

    A high frame-rate near-infrared (NIR) tomography system was created to allow transmission imaging of thick tissues with spectral encoding for parallel source implementation. The design was created to maximize tissue penetration through up to 10 cm of tissue, allowing eventual use in human imaging. Eight temperature-controlled laser diodes (LD) are used in parallel with 1.5 nm shifts in their lasing wavelengths. Simultaneous detection is achieved with eight high-resolution, CCD-based spectrometers that were synchronized to detect the intensities and decode their source locations from the spectrum. Static and dynamic imaging is demonstrated through a 64 mm tissue-equivalent phantom, with acquisition rates up to 20 frames per second. Imaging of pulsatile absorption changes through a 72 mm phantom was demonstrated with a 0.5 Hz varying object having only 1% effect upon the transmitted signal. This subtle signal change was used to show that while reconstructing the signal changes in a tissue may not be possible, image-guided recovery of the pulsatile change in broad regions of tissue was possible. The ability to image thick tissue and the capacity to image periodic changes in absorption makes this design well suited for tracking thick tissue hemodynamics in vivo during MR or CT imaging.

  20. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  1. Prostaglandin E2 regulation of amnion cell vascular endothelial growth factor expression: relationship with intramembranous absorption rate in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Beardall, Michael K; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates amniotic fluid transport across the amnion by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in amnion cells and that amniotic PGE2 concentration correlates positively with intramembranous (IM) absorption rate in fetal sheep. The effects of PGE2 at a range of concentrations on VEGF 164 and caveolin-1 gene expressions were analyzed in cultured ovine amnion cells. IM absorption rate, amniotic fluid (AF) volume, and PGE2 concentration in AF were determined in late-gestation fetal sheep during control conditions, isovolumic fetal urine replacement (low IM absorption rate), or intra-amniotic fluid infusion (high IM absorption rate). In ovine amnion cells, PGE2 induced dose- and time-dependent increases in VEGF 164 mRNA levels and reduced caveolin-1 mRNA and protein levels. VEGF receptor blockade abolished the caveolin-1 response, while minimally affecting the VEGF response to PGE2. In sheep fetuses, urine replacement reduced amniotic PGE2 concentration by 58%, decreased IM absorption rate by half, and doubled AF volume (P < 0.01). Intra-amniotic fluid infusion increased IM absorption rate and AF volume (P < 0.01), while amniotic PGE2 concentration was unchanged. Neither IM absorption rate nor AF volume correlated with amniotic PGE2 concentration under each experimental condition. Although PGE2 at micromolar concentrations induced dose-dependent responses in VEGF and caveolin-1 gene expression in cultured amnion cells consistent with a role of PGE2 in activating VEGF to mediate AF transport across the amnion, amniotic PGE2 at physiological nanomolar concentrations does not appear to regulate IM absorption rate or AF volume.

  2. ENHANCED ABSORPTION OF MILLIMETER WAVE ENERGY IN MURINE SUBCUTANEOUS BLOOD VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Stanislav I.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine millimeter wave (MMW) absorption by blood vessels traversing the subcutaneous fat layer of murine skin. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. We used two types of models: (1) a rectangular block of multilayer tissue with blood vessels traversing the fat layer and (2) cylindrical models with circular and elliptical cross sections simulating the real geometry of murine limbs. We found that the specific absorption rate (SAR) in blood vessels normally traversing the fat layer achieved its maximal value at the parallel orientation of the E-field to the vessel axis. At 42 GHz exposure, the maximal SAR in small blood vessels could be more than 30 times greater than that in the skin. The SAR increased with decreasing the blood vessel diameter and increasing the fat thickness. The SAR decreased with increasing the exposure frequency. When the cylindrical or elliptical models of murine limbs were exposed to plane MMW, the greatest absorption of MMW energy occurred in blood vessels located on the lateral areas of the limb model. At these areas the maximal SAR values were comparable with or were greater than the maximal SAR on the front surface of the skin. Enhanced absorption of MMW energy by blood vessels traversing the fat layer may play a primary role in initiating MMW effects on blood cells and vasodilatation of cutaneous blood vessels. PMID:21344460

  3. Enhanced absorption of millimeter wave energy in murine subcutaneous blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Alekseev, Stanislav I; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2011-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine millimeter wave (MMW) absorption by blood vessels traversing the subcutaneous fat layer of murine skin. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. We used two types of models: (1) a rectangular block of multilayer tissue with blood vessels traversing the fat layer and (2) cylindrical models with circular and elliptical cross-sections simulating the real geometry of murine limbs. We found that the specific absorption rate (SAR) in blood vessels normally traversing the fat layer achieved its maximal value at the parallel orientation of the E-field to the vessel axis. At 42 GHz exposure, the maximal SAR in small blood vessels could be more than 30 times greater than that in the skin. The SAR increased with decreasing the blood vessel diameter and increasing the fat thickness. The SAR decreased with increasing the exposure frequency. When the cylindrical or elliptical models of murine limbs were exposed to plane MMW, the greatest absorption of MMW energy occurred in blood vessels located on the lateral areas of the limb model. At these areas the maximal SAR values were comparable with or were greater than the maximal SAR on the front surface of the skin. Enhanced absorption of MMW energy by blood vessels traversing the fat layer may play a primary role in initiating MMW effects on blood cells and vasodilatation of cutaneous blood vessels.

  4. Gas-phase rate coefficients for reactions of NO 3, OH, O 3 and O( 3P) with unsaturated alcohols and ethers: Correlations and structure-activity relations (SARs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrang, Christian; King, Martin D.; Braeckevelt, Mareike; Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Wayne, Richard P.

    Experimental difficulties sometimes force modellers to use predicted rate coefficients for reactions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (oVOCs). We examine here methods for making the predictions for reactions of atmospheric initiators of oxidation, NO 3, OH, O 3 and O( 3P), with unsaturated alcohols and ethers. Logarithmic correlations are found between measured rate coefficients and calculated orbital energies, and these correlations may be used directly to estimate rate coefficients for compounds where measurements have not been performed. To provide a shortcut that obviates the need to calculate orbital energies, structure-activity relations (SARs) are developed. Our SARs are tested for predictive power against compounds for which experimental rate coefficients exist, and their accuracy is discussed. Estimated atmospheric lifetimes for oVOCs are presented. The SARs for alkenols successfully predict key rate coefficients, and thus can be used to enhance the scope of atmospheric models incorporating detailed chemistry. SARs for the ethers have more limited applicability, but can still be useful in improving tropospheric models.

  5. C (max) and t (max) verification using Fibonacci sequence and absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, Tomasz; Jaroszewski, Jerzy J; Borucka, Beata; Ziółkowski, Hubert

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the values of maximal observed concentration (C max,obs) and the time, at which maximum concentration is observed (t max,obs) using the analysis of the absorption rate constant (k ab). It focused on the changes in concentration over time (C-T) for drugs, for which several peaks of concentration occur. In addition, the attempt was made to use Fibonacci sequence to facilitate the visual analysis of the dynamics in changes of concentration on C-T graphs. The analyses were conducted with the use of three hypothetical data groups (groups I, II and III), which had distinct C-T profiles, and with the in vivo data form healthy subjects (n = 10) taking part in a bioequivalence study, who was given a single oral dose of topiramate (100 mg). The comparison of hypothetical and real in vivo data demonstrated that for the C-T curves, in which there are several peaks of concentration C max,obs and t max,obs values can easily be miscalculated when the increase in concentration is not properly related to the appropriate absorption phase (63.2, 87.50, 96.88 %). It was also demonstrated that the data transformation with the use of Fibonacci sequence exposes slight differences in the observed concentration values in a semi-logarithmic scale. The results of this study show that in case of C-T curves with several peaks of concentration, the verification of C max and t max data obtained taking into account different absorption phases enables more precise evaluation of these parameters.

  6. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested.

  7. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-01

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance.

  8. Statistical simulation of SAR variability with geometric and tissue property changes by using the unscented transform.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Shumin

    2015-06-01

    The local specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical to the safety of radio frequency transmit coils. A statistical simulation approach is introduced to address the local SAR variability related to tissue property and geometric variations. The local SAR is modeled as the output of a nonlinear transformation with factors that may affect its value being treated as random input variables. Instead of using the Monte Carlo method with a large number of sample points, the unscented transform is applied with a small set of deterministic sample points. A sensitivity analysis is further performed to determine the significance of each input variable. Electromagnetic simulations are carried out by the finite-difference time-domain method implemented on graphic processing unit. The local SAR variability of a 7 Tesla square loop coil for spine imaging and a 16-element brain imaging array as the result of tissue property and geometric changes were examined respectively. SAR limits were determined based on their means and standard deviations. The proposed approach is efficient and general for the study of local SAR variability. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. SAR reduction in 7T C-spine imaging using a "dark modes" transmit array strategy.

    PubMed

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Guerin, Bastien; Keil, Boris; Mareyam, Azma; Herraiz, Joaquin L; Kosior, Robert K; Martin, Adrian; Torrado-Carvajal, Angel; Malpica, Norberto; Hernandez-Tamames, Juan A; Schiavi, Emanuele; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-04-01

    Local specific absorption rate (SAR) limits many applications of parallel transmit (pTx) in ultra high-field imaging. In this Note, we introduce the use of an array element, which is intentionally inefficient at generating spin excitation (a "dark mode") to attempt a partial cancellation of the electric field from those elements that do generate excitation. We show that adding dipole elements oriented orthogonal to their conventional orientation to a linear array of conventional loop elements can lower the local SAR hotspot in a C-spine array at 7 T. We model electromagnetic fields in a head/torso model to calculate SAR and excitation B1 (+) patterns generated by conventional loop arrays and loop arrays with added electric dipole elements. We utilize the dark modes that are generated by the intentional and inefficient orientation of dipole elements in order to reduce peak 10g local SAR while maintaining excitation fidelity. For B1 (+) shimming in the spine, the addition of dipole elements did not significantly alter the B1 (+) spatial pattern but reduced local SAR by 36%. The dipole elements provide a sufficiently complimentary B1 (+) and electric field pattern to the loop array that can be exploited by the radiofrequency shimming algorithm to reduce local SAR. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-07

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance.

  11. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  13. Quasi-static magnetic measurements to predict specific absorption rates in magnetic fluid hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coral, D. F.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; de Sousa, M. E.; Muraca, D.; Lassalle, V.; Nicolás, P.; Ferreira, M. L.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the issue on whether dynamic magnetic properties of polydispersed magnetic colloids modeled using physical magnitudes derived from quasi-static magnetic measurement can be extrapolated to analyze specific absorption rate data acquired at high amplitudes and frequencies of excitation fields is addressed. To this end, we have analyzed two colloids of magnetite nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and chitosan in water displaying, under a radiofrequency field, high and low specific heat power release. Both colloids are alike in terms of liquid carrier, surfactant and magnetic phase composition but differ on the nanoparticle structuring. The colloid displaying low specific dissipation consists of spaced magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 4.8 nm inside a large chitosan particle of 52.5 nm. The one displaying high specific dissipation consists of clusters of magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 9.7 nm inside a chitosan particle of 48.6 nm. The experimental evaluation of Néel and Brown relaxation times (˜10-10 s and 10-4 s, respectively) indicate that the nanoparticles in both colloids magnetically relax by Néel mechanism. The isothermal magnetization curves analysis for this mechanism show that the magnetic nanoparticles behave in the interacting superparamagnetic regime. The specific absorption rates were determined calorimetrically at 260 kHz and up to 52 kA/m and were well modeled within linear response theory using the anisotropy density energy retrieved from quasi-static magnetic measurement, validating their use to predict heating ability of a given polydispersed particle suspension. Our findings provide new insight in the validity of quasi-static magnetic characterization to analyze the high frequency behavior of polydispersed colloids within the framework of the linear response and Wohlfarth theories and indicate that dipolar interactions play a key role being their strength larger for the colloid displaying higher dissipation, i

  14. Terrain Measurement with SAR/InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Deren; Liao, Mingsheng; Balz, Timo; Zhang, Lu; Yang, Tianliang

    2016-08-01

    Terrain measurement and surface motion estimation are the most important applications for commercial and scientific SAR missions. In Dragon-3, we worked on these applications, especially regarding DEM generation, surface motion estimation with SAR time- series for urban subsidence monitoring and landslide motion estimation, as well as developing tomographic SAR processing methods in urban areas.

  15. Calving laws and strain rates: a comparison between modelled relationships and observations from InSAR velocity maps from across Greenland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, James; Nick, Faezeh; Benn, Douglas; Kirchner, Nina

    2017-04-01

    Calving is a major mechanism of cryospheric ice mass loss and a significant contributor to global sea level change, though it is currently poorly understood as a process. Longitudinal strain rate is often cited as a first order control on calving, however multiple different calving laws (not always including the strain rate) have been used to represent this in numerical models of ice sheets. This study seeks to investigate how (1) different calving laws within a 1D flowline model predict strain rate will evolve within increasing terminus thickness for steady state and transient simulations, and (2) how these relationships compare with observed strains (derived from MEaSUREs Greenland InSAR velocity maps; Joughin et al., 2010 [updated 2016]) and depths (from BedMachine v.2 subglacial topography data; Morlighem et al., 2014). We identify that systematic relationships with terminus thickness exist for height above buoyancy, waterline and full-depth crevasse calving laws amongst others for both steady state and transient simulations. However, analysis of observed near-terminus strain rates for multiple Greenlandic glaciers using a variety of metrics (with a range of bed depths predicted by BedMachine) does not reproduce the shape or magnitude of any of these modelled relationships. Relationships between strain rate and depth derived from simple 1D model simulations therefore cannot be realistically compared to current real-world observations. This suggests that the magnitude of observed strain rates at an individual point, or area-averaged conditions near a real-world terminus are not meaningful in determining the potential for calving when taken in isolation. To improve understanding of first/second order calving processes, future modelling work should therefore look to analyse how/if the distribution of strain across the terminus region impacts calving as part of 2D-planform/3D models.

  16. Decadal deformation rates from SAR interferometry in the eastern Pamir-Tian Shan collision zone and implication for the growth and erosion of detachment folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, A.; Burbank, D. W.; Bookhagen, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Cenozoic Indo-Asian collision caused the impingement of the north-verging Pamir orogen with the south-verging Tian Shan. Rapid convergence rates of 8-12 mm/y across the Pamir-Tian Shan boundary are suggested by GPS measurements and broadly match Holocene and Quaternary shortening rates. The shortening is dominantly accommodated by a series of oppositely verging thrust faults that interfere to form a complex pattern of temporal and spatial variation in deformation style and rate. Cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) dating and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating suggest late Quaternary shortening rates of 3-7 mm/y on individual structures. To the east, the rigid Tarim basin is translated northward alongside the Pamir and subducted beneath the Tian Shan. Since ~16 Ma deformation has stepped southward into the Tarim basin from the Tian Shan range-bounding fault. Most recently a series of detachment folds with inferred shortening rates of 1-5 mm/y and lateral propagation rates of up to 50-80 mm/y formed and continue to be active today. We present (1) new decadal deformation rates in the Pamir - Tian Shan and Tarim - Tian Shan collision zone in westernmost China inferred from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and (2) digital topography and fluvial network analysis to constrain deformation on longer timescales. These data are integrated with (3), published GPS data, (4) published Quaternary shortening rates, and (5) geologic mapping in order to identify spatial patterns of modern deformation, investigate temporal variations in deformation rate and show the response of the river network to active deformation. Preliminary InSAR results reveal interseismic deformation of 1-6 mm/y that is concentrated on thrust faults and detachment folds. However, current deformation appears localized on particular segments of the structures, a pattern that is likely to change with time. We speculate that rapid Quaternary growth of detachment folds in the Kashi

  17. Enhanced specific absorption rate in silanol functionalized Fe3O4 core-shell nanoparticles: study of Fe leaching in Fe3O4 and hyperthermia in L929 and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Jerina; Pradhan, Lina; Ningthoujam, Raghumani Singh; Vatsa, Rajesh Kumar; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Core-shell Fe3O4-SiO2 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been synthesized using a simple synthesis procedure at different temperatures. These MNPs are used to investigate the effect of surface coating on specific absorption rate (SAR) under alternating magnetic field. The temperature achieved by silica coated Fe3O4 is higher than that by uncoated MNPs (Fe3O4). This can be attributed to extent of increase in Brownian motion for silica coated MNPs. The sample prepared at optimized temperature of 80°C shows the highest SAR value of 111W/g. It is found that SAR value decreases with increase in shell thickness. The chemical stability of these samples is analyzed by leaching experiments at pH 2-7. The silica coated samples are stable up to 7 days even at pH 2. Biocompatibility of the MNPs is evaluated in vitro by assessing their cytotoxicity on L929 and human cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) using sulforhodamine-B assay. Their hyperthermic killing ability is also evaluated in HeLa cells using the same method. Cells treated with MNPs along with induction heating show decrease in viability as compared to that without induction heating. Further, cell death is found to be ∼55% more in cells treated with silica coated MNPs under induction heating as compared to untreated control. These results establish the efficacy of Fe3O4-SiO2 prepared at 80°C in killing of tumor cells by cellular hyperthermia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Heat Equation Inversion Framework for Average SAR Calculation From Magnetic Resonance Thermal Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K.; Deniz, Cem M.

    2017-01-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. PMID:27490064

  19. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. SAR transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1983-06-01

    In the follow-on of the ESA contract 4122/79 it was intended to demonstrate on breadboard the feasibility of a modular EPC supplied by a multibus for a KLYSTRON power transmitter. The aim of this final report is to give details on the design and on test results of the electronics required to drive a KLYSTRON for a SAR system. The concept utilized for the DC/DC conversion is a Series Resonant type (SCHWARZ Converter). An elegant Breadboard of 2 Modules (over 4 required for the complete EPC) has been realized and the tests have demonstrated the envisaged feasibility of an active redundancy with modular EPC both for output voltage generation and for output power. Also the concept of the multibus has been implemented (2 bus over 4) and verified in the EPC breadboard.

  1. Shock tube/laser absorption measurements of the reaction rates of OH with ethylene and propene.

    PubMed

    Vasu, Subith S; Hong, Zekai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M

    2010-11-04

    Reaction rates of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with ethylene (C₂H₄) and propene (C₃H₆) were studied behind reflected shock waves. OH + ethylene → products (rxn 1) rate measurements were conducted in the temperature range 973-1438 K, for pressures from 2 to 10 atm, and for initial concentrations of ethylene of 500, 751, and 1000 ppm. OH + propene → products (rxn 2) rate measurements spanned temperatures of 890-1366 K, pressures near 2.3 atm, and initial propene concentrations near 300 ppm. OH radicals were produced by shock-heating tert-butyl hydroperoxide, (CH₃)₃-CO-OH, and monitored by laser absorption near 306.7 nm. Rate constants for the reactions of OH with ethylene and propene were extracted by matching modeled and measured OH concentration time-histories in the reflected shock region. Current data are in excellent agreement with previous studies and extend the temperature range of OH + propene data. Transition state theory calculations using recent ab initio results give excellent agreement with our measurements and other data outside our temperature range. Fits (in units of cm³/mol/s) to the abstraction channels of OH + ethylene and OH + propene are k₁ = 2.23 × 10⁴ (T)(2.745) exp(-1115 K/T) for 600-2000 K and k₂ = 1.94 × 10⁶ (T)(2.229) exp(-540 K/T) for 700-1500 K, respectively. A rate constant determination for the reaction TBHP → products (rxn 3) was also obtained in the range 745-1014 K using OH data from behind both incident and reflected shock waves. These high-temperature measurements were fit with previous low-temperature data, and the following rate expression (0.6-2.6 atm), applicable over the temperature range 400-1050 K, was obtained: k₃ (1/s) = 8.13 × 10⁻¹² (T)(7.83) exp(-14598 K/T).

  2. Electromagnetic absorption in the head of adults and children due to mobile phone operation close to the head.

    PubMed

    de Salles, Alvaro A; Bulla, Giovani; Rodriguez, Claudio E Fernández

    2006-01-01

    The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) produced by mobile phones in the head of adults and children is simulated using an algorithm based on the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Realistic models of the child and adult head are used. The electromagnetic parameters are fitted to these models. Comparison also are made with the SAR calculated in the children model when using adult human electromagnetic parameters values. Microstrip (or patch) antennas and quarter wavelength monopole antennas are used in the simulations. The frequencies used to feed the antennas are 1850 MHz and 850 MHz. The SAR results are compared with the available international recommendations. It is shown that under similar conditions, the 1g-SAR calculated for children is higher than that for the adults. When using the 10-year old child model, SAR values higher than 60% than those for adults are obtained.

  3. Feeding rates and absorption efficiencies of four species of sea urchins (genus Echinometra) fed a prepared diet.

    PubMed

    Hiratsuka, Yuji; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Four closely related species of sea urchins belonging to the genus Echinometra, Echinometra sp. A (Ea), E. mathaei (Em), E. sp. C (Ec), and E. oblonga (Eo), occur sympatrically but in different microhabitats on Okinawan coral reefs. Feeding rates and absorption efficiencies of the four species were investigated in the laboratory by feeding sea urchins ad libitum a diet prepared from turf algae and agar over a 7-day period. Feeding rates differed significantly among the four species of Echinometra (Ea > Em approximately = Ec > Eo). Absorption efficiencies of protein and lipid did not differ significantly among the four species. Carbohydrate, a major nutrient component in the diet, was absorbed by the four species at significantly different efficiencies (Eo > Ec approximately = Em > Ea), which resulted in similar interspecific differences in absorption efficiencies of dry matter, total organic matter, and energy. The amount of nutrients absorbed from the diet was directly related to the feeding rate, indicating that the increase in absorption efficiency was not sufficient to completely compensate for low feeding rate. The interspecific difference in physiological performance in relation to feeding and absorption is consistent with taxonomic differentiation among the four species.

  4. Activable enriched stable isotope iron-58 for monitoring absorption rate of juvenile athletes for iron: a case study.

    PubMed

    Qian, Qinfang; Chai, Zhifang; Feng, Weiyu; Chen, Jidi; Zhang, Peiqun; Pan, Jianxiang

    2002-09-01

    Activable enriched stable isotopes can play a unique role in studies of nutritional status, metabolism, absorption rates, and bioavailability of minerals. As a practical example, eight juvenile athletes were selected to test the absorption rates of iron during training and non-training periods by enriched stable isotope of Fe-58 (enriched degree: 51.1%) via activation analysis Fe-58 (n, gamma) Fe-59 of the collected feces samples. The results indicated that the average iron absorption rates of the juvenile athletes with and without training are 9.1 +/- 2.8 and 11.9 +/- 4.7%, respectively, which implies that the long-term endurance training with high intensity makes the iron absorption rate of athletes lower. In the meantime, the comparison of the activable enriched isotope technique with atomic absorption spectrometry was performed, which showed that the former was better than the latter in reliability and sensitivity. It is because this nuclear method can distinguish the exogenous and endogenous iron in the samples, but not for non-nuclear methods.

  5. Measurement and validation of GHz-band whole-body average SAR in a human volunteer using reverberation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqing; Suzuki, Tokio; Fujiwara, Osamu; Harima, Katsushige

    2012-12-01

    The World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation on the need for further research for radio-frequency dosimetry has promoted studies on the whole-body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) in various kinds of anatomical-based numerical models. For experimental validation of GHz-band WBA-SARs in a real human, however, there have not so far been any published papers, despite the fact that, in 1982, Hill measured WBA-SARs at frequencies less than 40 MHz in human volunteers using a TEM-cell exposure system. In this study, we provide a measurement technique with a reverberation chamber for validating numerical dosimetry results on GHz-band WBA-SARs in living humans. We measured WBA-SARs at 1, 1.5 and 2 GHz for a 22 year old male volunteer, with a height of 173 cm and a weight of 73 kg, in the reverberation chamber, and compared the results with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The reverberation chamber was excited by using a signal generator through an amplifier with an output power of 30-40 mW, which produced inside the chamber with the volunteer an average electric field strength of 5 V m-1 equivalent to an average power spectral density of 6.6 μW cm-2. The WBA-SARs were obtained from the measured S11 and S21 together with the power density. On the other hand, the WBA-SARs have been calculated using the FDTD method for an adult male model with almost the same physique as that of the volunteer exposed to the electromagnetic field in the reverberation chamber. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated WBA-SARs, we could confirm that the measured GHz-band WBA-SARs approximately agree with the FDTD calculated results.

  6. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  7. SAR prediction in adults and children by combining measured B1+ maps and simulations at 7.0 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Tiberi, Gianluigi; Costagli, Mauro; Biagi, Laura; Ciantis, Alessio De; Fontana, Nunzia; Stara, Riccardo; Symms, Mark Roger; Cosottini, Mirco; Guerrini, Renzo; Tosetti, Michela

    2016-10-01

    To predict local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in individual subjects. SAR was simulated for a head volume coil for two imaging sequences: axial T1-weighted "zero" time-of-echo (ZTE) sequence, sagittal T2-weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR). Two head models (one adult, one child) were simulated inside the coil. For 19 adults and 27 children, measured B1 (+) maps were acquired, and global (head) SAR estimated by the system was recorded. We performed t-test between the B1 (+) in models and human subjects. The B1 (+) maps of individual subjects were used to scale the SAR simulated on the models, to predict local and global (head) SAR. A phantom experiment was performed to validate SAR prediction, using a fiberoptic temperature probe to measure the temperature rise due to ZTE scanning. The normalized B1 (+) standard deviation in subjects was not significantly different from that of the models (P > 0.68 and P > 0.54). The rise in temperature generated in the phantom by ZTE was 0.3°C; from the heat equation it followed that the temperature-based measured SAR was 2.74 W/kg, while the predicted value was 3.1 W/kg. For ZTE and FLAIR, limits on maximum local and global SAR were met in all subjects, both adults and children. To enhance safety in adults and children with 7.0 Tesla MR systems, we suggest the possibility of using SAR prediction. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;44:1048-1055. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Comparison of SAR in realistic fetus models of two fetal positions exposed to electromagnetic wave from business portable radio close to maternal abdomen.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Shimpei; Nagaoka, Tomoaki; Saito, Kazuyuki; Watanabe, Soichi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Since the diversification of the electromagnetic (EM) environment is spreading, it is essential to estimate the EM energy absorption rate [specific absorption rate (SAR)] of a pregnant woman's body and her fetus under various exposure situations. For example, if pregnant women work in jobs where they might wear business portable radios around their abdomens, they should also be concerned about this issue, because the fetuses are in their abdomens. In this paper, in order to evaluate the SAR in the pregnant woman and her fetus when wearing the wireless radio terminal on her abdomen, the SAR distribution in the fetus is calculated using the numerical model of the pregnant woman by exposed to near-field of a normal mode helical antenna (NHA) with a metallic case at 150 MHz. In addition, the SAR in the fetus will be evaluated under two fetal positions. It was found that the fetal SARs are greatly affected by the distance and penetration path from the antenna to the fetal surface. In addition, the fetal SARs are lower than the RF safety guidelines for occupational exposure.

  9. CHBr3 (bromoform): Revised UV Absorption Spectrum and Atmospheric Photolysis Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, J. B.; Papanastasiou, D.; McKeen, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    CHBr3 (bromoform) is a short-lived atmospheric trace compound primarily of natural origin that is a source of reactive bromine in both the troposphere and stratosphere. Estimating the impact of CHBr3 on the environment and its transport to the stratosphere requires a thorough understanding of its atmospheric loss processes, which are primarily UV photolysis and reaction with the OH radical. In this presentation, new measurements of the UV absorption spectrum of CHBr3 will be presented. Spectra were measured at wavelengths between 300 and 345 nm at temperatures between 260 and 330 K using cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The present results will be compared with currently recommended values for use in atmospheric modeling taken from Moortgat et al. [The tropospheric chemistry of ozone in the polar regions, edited by H. Niki and K. H. Becker, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 1993]. The discrepancies and impact on CHBr3 photolysis lifetime will be discussed. A parameterization of the CHBr3 UV spectrum for use in atmospheric models will be presented and local photolysis rate calculations used to highlight the impact of the revised cross section data on local lifetimes and the relative importance of photolysis loss versus reaction with the OH radical. The results from the present study will contribute to a better understanding (and accuracy) of estimates of stratospheric ozone loss due to very short-lived brominated substances.

  10. Magnetic-field-sweep-rate dependence of the microwave absorption in high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrivastava, Keshav N.

    1991-02-01

    Equally spaced lines are found in the magnetic-field derivative of the imaginary part of the susceptibility as a function of magnetic field at small fields of zero to 200 G, at the microwave frequency of 9.2 GHz. The number of lines seen within a given sweep range depends on the sweep rate such that the line separation is constant in units of time. The larger is the sweep time, the larger is the number of lines. For a small powdered sample of Tl 2CaBa 2Cu 2O 8 ( T c ˜ 105 K) the line separation at 77 K is about 2.8 s. The intensity of the lines decreases with increasing temperature till at T c where the lines vanish. The microwaves induce Josephson currents on the surface of the superconductor which tunnel through flux quantized states. These flux-quantized states have large relaxation times characteristics of glassy states. As the microwaves are absorbed the flux creeps through the material so that the time constant of the microwave absorption lines is identified with the flux creep time.

  11. Phenolic acids are absorbed from the rat stomach with different absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yutaka; Zhao, Zhaohui; Shimizu, Makoto

    2006-10-04

    The intestinal absorption characteristics of phenolic acids (PAs) have been elucidated in terms of their affinity for the monocarboxylic acid transporter (MCT). Recently, the involvement of the stomach has been implicated in the absorption of polyphenols. The present work demonstrates that the gastric absorption efficiency of each PA is apparently different between various PAs. Various PAs with different affinities for MCT were administered (2.25 mumol) to rat stomach, and then the plasma concentration of the PA was measured. The plasma concentration of ferulic acid (FA) peaked 5 min after administration in the stomach. At 5 min after administration, the plasma concentration of each PA increased in the order: gallic acid = chlorogenic acid < caffeic acid < p-coumaric acid = FA. This order matches their respective affinity for MCT in Caco-2 cells, which we have demonstrated in previous studies. These results indicated that MCT might be involved in the gastric absorption of PAs, similar to the intestinal absorption.

  12. [Follow up study on viruses associated with SARS among the SARS patients].

    PubMed

    Sun, Ying; Xin, Shao-jie; Shen, Hong-hui; Hu, Yan; Xu, Dong-ping; Zhu, Hong; Zhu, Lei; Duan, Qing; Mao, Pan-yong

    2006-06-01

    To study the existence status of the SARS-CoV, retrovirus, and the poliovirus in the bodies of the patients with SARS and the possible relationship between the three viruses and SARS. The clinical specimens of the nasopharyngeal swabs, sputum (or saliva), urine, fecal specimens were collected on three consecutive days from 8 patients with SARS 2 years after the recovery from SARS. SARS-CoV, reovirus and poliovirus RNA was detected by using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR; IgG antibody to the poliovirus type 1 and 3 and the antibody to SARS-CoV were determined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All the specimens were negative for SARS-CoV and reovirus by RT-PCR, but the fecal specimens from 4 persons were positive for poliovirus. The sequences of these poliovirus were highly homologous to that of human poliovirus type 1 strain sabin 1 genome at nucleotide level, but back mutations have occurred in the primary attenuating mutation sites at nucleotide position 480 (G --> A) in the 5' UTR and the nucleotide position 2795 (A --> G). No SARS-CoV, reovirus, and poliovirus were found in the normal controls. Three serum specimens were positive for the antibody to SARS-CoV. The IgG antibody to poliovirus were detected in 4 SARS patients and 23 healthy persons. No positive results for antibody to SARS-CoV were detected in the 25 healthy persons. The positive rate of the poliovirus antibody in the serum of SARS patients 2 years after recovery was significantly different from that of the normal controls, and the positive rate of poliovirus in the fecal specimens was still very high, and more importantly back mutations have occurred in the attenuating mutation sites at nucleotide position which plays an important role in the poliomyelitis.

  13. Improved prediction of MHC class I binders/non-binders peptides through artificial neural network using variable learning rate: SARS corona virus, a case study.

    PubMed

    Soam, Sudhir Singh; Bhasker, Bharat; Mishra, Bhartendu Nath

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental step of an adaptive immune response to pathogen or vaccine is the binding of short peptides (also called epitopes) to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The various prediction algorithms are being used to capture the MHC peptide binding preference, allowing the rapid scan of entire pathogen proteomes for peptide likely to bind MHC, saving the cost, effort, and time. However, the number of known binders/non-binders (BNB) to a specific MHC molecule is limited in many cases, which still poses a computational challenge for prediction. The training data should be adequate to predict BNB using any machine learning approach. In this study, variable learning rate has been demonstrated for training artificial neural network and predicting BNB for small datasets. The approach can be used for large datasets as well. The dataset for different MHC class I alleles for SARS Corona virus (Tor2 Replicase polyprotein 1ab) has been used for training and prediction of BNB. A total of 90 datasets (nine different MHC class I alleles with tenfold cross validation) have been retrieved from IEDB database for BNB. For fixed learning rate approach, the best value of AROC is 0.65, and in most of the cases it is 0.5, which shows the poor predictions. In case of variable learning rate, of the 90 datasets the value of AROC for 76 datasets is between 0.806 and 1.0 and for 7 datasets the value is between 0.7 and 0.8 and for rest of 7 datasets it is between 0.5 and 0.7, which indicates very good performance in most of the cases.

  14. Potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements: OH reaction rate constants between 250 and 315 K and infrared absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, N.L.; Medhurst, L.J.; Nelson, H.H.

    1993-12-20

    The authors measured the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with several potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements over the temperature range 251-314 K using laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The compounds studied and Arrhenius parameters determined from fits to the measured rate constants are as follows: CHF{sub 2}OCHF{sub 2} (E 134), k(T) = (5.4 {+-} 3.5) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}3.1 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (FC 236fa), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}1.8 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CHFCHF{sub 2} (FC 236ea), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.0 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; and CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F (FC 236cb), k(T) = (2.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]. The measured activation energies (2-3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) are consistent with a mechanism of H atom abstraction. The tropospheric lifetimes, estimated from the measured OH reaction rates, and measured integrated infrared absorption cross sections over the range 770 to 1430 cm{sup {minus}1} suggest that E 134 and FC 236fa may have significant global warming potential, while FC 236ea and FC 236cb do not. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Specific absorption rates and induced current distributions in an anatomically based human model for plane-wave exposures

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, O.P.; Gu, Y.G.; Chen, J.Y.; Bassen, H.I. )

    1992-09-01

    The authors have previously reported local, layer-averaged, and whole-body-averaged specific absorption rates and induced currents for a 5,628-cell anatomically based model of a human for plane-wave exposures 20-100 MHz. Using a higher resolution, 45,024-cell model of the human body, calculations have now been extended to 915 MHz using the finite-difference time-domain method. Because of the higher resolution of the model, it has been possible to calculate specific absorption rates for various organs (brain, eyes, heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, and intestines) and for various parts of the body (head, neck, torso, legs, and arms) as a function of frequency in the band 100-915 MHz. Consistent with some of the experimental data in the literature, the highest part-body-averaged specific absorption rate for the head and neck region (as well as for the eyes and brain) occurs at 200 MHz for the isolated condition and at 150 MHz for the grounded condition of the model. Also observed is an increasing specific absorption rate for the eyes for frequencies above 350 MHz due to the superficial nature of power deposition at increasing frequencies.

  16. On the SAR and field inhomogeneity of birdcage coils loaded with the human head.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Chen, J

    1997-12-01

    Birdcage coils are widely used as a radiofrequency (RF) resonator in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) because of their capability to produce a highly homogeneous B1 field over a large volume within the coil. When they are employed for high-frequency MRI, the interaction between the electromagnetic field and the object to be imaged deteriorates the B1-field homogeneity and increases the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the object. To investigate this problem, a finite-element method (FEM) is developed to analyze the SAR and the B1 field in a two-dimensional (2D) model of a birdcage coil loaded with a 2D model of a human head. The electric field, magnetic field, and SAR distributions are shown, and a comprehensive study is carried out for both linear and quadrature birdcage coils at 64, 128, 171, and 256 MHz. It is shown that to generate the same value of the B1 field, the SAR is increased significantly with the frequency, and for the same imaging method the SAR produced by a quadrature coil is significantly lower than that of a linear coil. It is also shown that the B1-field inhomogeneity is increased significantly with the frequency.

  17. SAR exposure from UHF RFID reader in adult, child, pregnant woman, and fetus anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Serena; Markakis, Ioannis A; Ravazzani, Paolo; Samaras, Theodoros

    2013-09-01

    The spread of radio frequency identification (RFID) devices in ubiquitous applications without their simultaneous exposure assessment could give rise to public concerns about their potential adverse health effects. Among the various RFID system categories, the ultra high frequency (UHF) RFID systems have recently started to be widely used in many applications. This study addresses a computational exposure assessment of the electromagnetic radiation generated by a realistic UHF RFID reader, quantifying the exposure levels in different exposure scenarios and subjects (two adults, four children, and two anatomical models of women 7 and 9 months pregnant). The results of the computations are presented in terms of the whole-body and peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue to allow comparison with the basic restrictions of the exposure guidelines. The SAR levels in the adults and children were below 0.02 and 0.8 W/kg in whole-body SAR and maximum peak SAR levels, respectively, for all tested positions of the antenna. On the contrary, exposure of pregnant women and fetuses resulted in maximum peak SAR(10 g) values close to the values suggested by the guidelines (2 W/kg) in some of the exposure scenarios with the antenna positioned in front of the abdomen and with a 100% duty cycle and 1 W radiated power.

  18. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing. PMID:22559603

  19. SAR measurement due to mobile phone exposure in a simulated biological media.

    PubMed

    Behari, J; Nirala, Jay Prakash

    2012-09-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) measurements are carried out for compliance testing of personal 3G Mobile phone. The accuracy of this experimental setup has been checked by comparing the SAR in 10 gm of simulated tissue and an arbitrary shaped box. This has been carried out using a 3G mobile Phone at 1718.5 MHz, in a medium simulating brain and muscle phantom. The SAR measurement system consists of a stepper motor to move a monopole E-field probe in two dimensions inside an arbitrary shaped box. The phantom is filled with appropriate frequency-specific fluids with measured electrical properties (dielectric constant and conductivity). That is close to the average for gray and white matters of the brain at the frequencies of interest (1718.5 MHz). Induced fields are measured using a specially designed monopole probe in its close vicinity. The probe is immersed in the phantom material. The measured data for induced fields are used to compute SAR values at various locations with respect to the mobile phone location. It is concluded that these SAR values are position dependent and well below the safety criteria prescribed for human exposure.

  20. B1-based SAR reconstruction using contrast source inversion-electric properties tomography (CSI-EPT).

    PubMed

    Balidemaj, Edmond; van den Berg, Cornelis A T; van Lier, Astrid L H M W; Nederveen, Aart J; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Crezee, Hans; Remis, Rob F

    2017-02-01

    Specific absorption rate (SAR) assessment is essential for safety purposes during MR acquisition. Online SAR assessment is not trivial and requires, in addition, knowledge of the electric tissue properties and the electric fields in the human anatomy. In this study, the potential of the recently developed CSI-EPT method to reconstruct SAR distributions is investigated. This method is based on integral representations for the electromagnetic field and attempts to reconstruct the tissue parameters and the electric field strength based on [Formula: see text] field data only. Full three-dimensional FDTD simulations using a female pelvis model are used to validate two-dimensional CSI reconstruction results in the central transverse plane of a 3T body coil. Numerical experiments demonstrate that the reconstructed SAR distributions are in good agreement with the SAR distributions as determined via 3D FDTD simulations and show that these distributions can be computed very efficiently in the central transverse plane of a body coil with the two-dimensional approach of CSI-EPT.

  1. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing.

  2. Whole-body and local RF absorption in human models as a function of anatomy and position within 1.5T MR body coil.

    PubMed

    Murbach, Manuel; Neufeld, Esra; Kainz, Wolfgang; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Kuster, Niels

    2014-02-01

    Radiofrequency energy deposition in magnetic resonance imaging must be limited to prevent excessive heating of the patient. Correlations of radiofrequency absorption with large-scale anatomical features (e.g., height) are investigated in this article. The specific absorption rate (SAR), as the pivotal parameter for quantifying absorbed radiofrequency, increases with the radial dimension of the patient and therefore with the large-scale anatomical properties. The absorbed energy in six human models has been modeled in different Z-positions (head to knees) within a 1.5T bodycoil. For a fixed B1+ incident field, the whole-body SAR can be up to 2.5 times higher (local SAR up to seven times) in obese adult models compared to children. If the exposure is normalized to 4 W/kg whole-body SAR, the local SAR can well-exceed the limits for local transmit coils and shows intersubject variations of up to a factor of three. The correlations between anatomy and induced local SAR are weak for normalized exposure, but strong for a fixed B1+ field, suggesting that anatomical properties could be used for fast SAR predictions. This study demonstrates that a representative virtual human population is indispensable for the investigation of local SAR levels. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. SAR Reduction in 7T C-Spine Imaging Using a “Dark Modes” Transmit Array Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Guerin, Bastien; Keil, Boris; Mareyam, Azma; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Kosior, Robert K.; Martin, Adrian; Torrado-Carvajal, Angel; Malpica, Norberto; Hernandez-Tamames, Juan A.; Schiavi, Emanuele; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local specific absorption rate (SAR) limits many applications of parallel transmit (pTx) in ultra high-field imaging. In this Note, we introduce the use of an array element, which is intentionally inefficient at generating spin excitation (a “dark mode”) to attempt a partial cancellation of the electric field from those elements that do generate excitation. We show that adding dipole elements oriented orthogonal to their conventional orientation to a linear array of conventional loop elements can lower the local SAR hotspot in a C-spine array at 7 T. Methods We model electromagnetic fields in a head/torso model to calculate SAR and excitation B1+ patterns generated by conventional loop arrays and loop arrays with added electric dipole elements. We utilize the dark modes that are generated by the intentional and inefficient orientation of dipole elements in order to reduce peak 10g local SAR while maintaining excitation fidelity. Results For B1+ shimming in the spine, the addition of dipole elements did not significantly alter the B1+ spatial pattern but reduced local SAR by 36%. Conclusion The dipole elements provide a sufficiently complimentary B1+ and electric field pattern to the loop array that can be exploited by the radiofrequency shimming algorithm to reduce local SAR. PMID:24753012

  4. SAR compliance assessment of PMR 446 and FRS walkie-talkies.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2015-10-01

    The vast amount of studies on radiofrequency dosimetry deal with exposure due to mobile devices and base station antennas for cellular communication systems. This study investigates compliance of walkie-talkies to exposure guidelines established by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and the Federal Communications Committee. The generic walkie-talkie consisted of a helical antenna and a ground plane and was derived by reverse engineering of a commercial walkie-talkie. Measured and simulated values of antenna characteristics and electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie were within 2% and 8%, respectively. We also validated normalized electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie against a commercial device and observed a very good agreement (deviation <6%). We showed that peak localized specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the oval flat phantom by the generic walkie-talkie is in agreement with four commercial devices if input power of the generic walkie-talkie is rescaled based on magnetic near field. Finally, we found that SAR of commercial devices is within current SAR limits for general public exposure for a worst-case duty cycle of 100%, that is, about 3 times and 6 times lower than the limit on the 1 g SAR (1.6 W/kg) and 10 g SAR (2 W/kg), respectively. But, an effective radiated power as specified by the Private Mobile Radio at 446 MHz (PMR 446) radio standard can cause localized SAR exceeding SAR limits for 1 g of tissue. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. STAP for SAR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-04-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP014042 TITLE: STAP for SAR DISTRIBUTION: Approved for public release...compilation report: ADP014040 thru ADP014047 UNCLASSIFIED 3-1 STAP for SAR A. Farina Technical Directorate, Radar & Technology Division Alenia...Adaptive Processing) to Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) systems. SAR is a microwave sensor that allows us to have a high resolution mapping of

  6. Electromagnetic (EM) absorption reduction in a muscle cube with metamaterial attachment.

    PubMed

    Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T; Misran, N

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) reduction in a muscle cube with metamaterial attachment. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method has been used to evaluate the SAR in a realistic anatomically based model of the muscle cube. In this paper, we have designed the single-negative metamaterials from a periodic arrangement of split ring resonators (SRRs). By properly designing the structural parameter of the SRRs, the effective medium parameter can be tuned negative at the 900 MHz and 1800 MHz bands. Numerical results concerning the SAR values in the muscle cube in the presence of resonators exhibit significant SAR reduction. These results can provide useful information when designing safety-compliant mobile communication equipment. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Near-source high-rate GPS, strong motion and InSAR observations to image the 2015 Lefkada (Greece) Earthquake rupture history.

    PubMed

    Avallone, Antonio; Cirella, Antonella; Cheloni, Daniele; Tolomei, Cristiano; Theodoulidis, Nikos; Piatanesi, Alessio; Briole, Pierre; Ganas, Athanassios

    2017-09-04

    The 2015/11/17 Lefkada (Greece) earthquake ruptured a segment of the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF) where probably the penultimate major event was in 1948. Using near-source strong motion and high sampling rate GPS data and Sentinel-1A SAR images on two tracks, we performed the inversion for the geometry, slip distribution and rupture history of the causative fault with a three-step self-consistent procedure, in which every step provided input parameters for the next one. Our preferred model results in a ~70° ESE-dipping and ~13° N-striking fault plane, with a strike-slip mechanism (rake ~169°) in agreement with the CTF tectonic regime. This model shows a bilateral propagation spanning ~9 s with the activation of three main slip patches, characterized by rise time and peak slip velocity in the ranges 2.5-3.5 s and 1.4-2.4 m/s, respectively, corresponding to 1.2-1.8 m of slip which is mainly concentrated in the shallower (<10 km) southern half of the causative fault. The inferred slip distribution and the resulting seismic moment (M0 = 1.05 × 10(19) N m) suggest a magnitude of M w 6.6. Our best solution suggests that the occurrence of large (M w  > 6) earthquakes to the northern and to the southern boundaries of the 2015 causative fault cannot be excluded.

  8. Effect of dietary sphingomyelin on absorption and fractional synthetic rate of cholesterol and serum lipid profile in humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diets enriched with sphingolipids may improve blood lipid profiles. Studies in animals have shown reductions in cholesterol absorption and alterations in blood lipids after treatment with sphingomyelin (SM). However, minimal information exists on effect of SM on cholesterol absorption and metabolism in humans. The objective was to assess the effect of SM consumption on serum lipid concentrations and cholesterol metabolism in healthy humans. Methods Ten healthy adult males and females completed a randomized crossover study. Subjects consumed controlled diets with or without 1 g/day SM for 14 days separated by at least 4 week washout period. Serum lipid profile and markers of cholesterol metabolism including cholesterol absorption and synthesis were analyzed. Results Serum triglycerides, total, LDL- and VLDL- cholesterol were not affected while HDL cholesterol concentrations were increased (p = 0.043) by SM diet consumption. No change in cholesterol absorption and cholesterol fractional synthesis rate was observed with supplementation of SM compared to control. Intraluminal cholesterol solubilization was also not affected by consumption of SM enriched diet. Conclusions In humans, 1 g/day of dietary SM does not alter the blood lipid profile except for an increased HDL-cholesterol concentration and has no effect on cholesterol absorption, synthesis and intraluminal solubilization compared to control. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov # NCT00328211 PMID:23958473

  9. Household transmission of SARS, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Clark, Samantha D.; Deeks, Shelley L.; Gournis, Effie; Hay, Karen; Bondy, Susan; Kennedy, Erin; Johnson, Ian; Rea, Elizabeth; Kuschak, Theodore; Green, Diane; Abbas, Zahid; Guarda, Brenda

    2006-01-01

    Background In the 2003 outbreak in Toronto (in Ontario, Canada) of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), about 20% of cases resulted from household transmission. The purpose of our study was to determine characteristics associated with the transmission of SARS within households. Methods A retrospective cohort of SARS-affected households was studied to determine risk factors for household transmission. Questionnaires addressed characteristics of the index case, the household and behaviours among household members. Potential risk factors for secondary transmission of infection were assessed in regression models appropriate to the outcome (secondary cases) and nonindependence of household members. Results The 74 households that participated included 18 secondary cases and 158 uninfected household members in addition to the 74 index cases. The household secondary attack rate was 10.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.7%–23.5%). There was a linear association between the time the index patient spent at home after symptom onset and the secondary attack rate. Infected health care workers who were index cases had lower rates of household transmission. Interpretation SARS transmission in households is complex and increases with the length of time an ill person spends at home. Risk of transmission was lower when the index case was a health care worker. Rapid case identification is the public health measure most useful in minimizing exposure in the home. PMID:17098951

  10. 4G antennas for wireless eyewear devices and related SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cihangir, Aykut; Whittow, Will; Panagamuwa, Chinthana; Jacquemod, Gilles; Gianesello, Frédéric; Luxey, Cyril

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we first present a feasibility study to design 4G antennas (700-960 MHz and 1.7-2.7 GHz) for eyewear devices. Those eyewear devices should be connected to the last generation cellular networks, Wireless Local Area Networks or wireless hotspots. Three coupling element type antennas with their matching networks are evaluated in terms of reflection coefficient and total radiation efficiency when the eyewear is placed on the user's head. We also present Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) simulations when the eyewear is positioned over a homogeneous SAM phantom and over a heterogeneous VH (Visible Human) phantom: the SAR levels are compared to international limit values. In a second step, we present experimental results obtained with 3D printed eyewear and coupling elements etched on a classical PCB substrate where the matching circuits are optimized close to the feeding point of the coupling element. Simulated and measured values are in very good agreement: 7 to 16% and 9 to 35% total efficiency are respectively obtained for the low- and high-frequency bands. However, simulated SAR values are somewhat higher than authorized levels with preoccupant high electromagnetic field distribution close to the eye of the user.

  11. Calculated SAR distributions in a human voxel phantom due to the reflection of electromagnetic fields from a ground plane between 65 MHz and 2 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2008-05-01

    If an electromagnetic field is incident normally onto a perfectly conducting ground plane, the field is reflected back into the domain. This produces a standing wave above the ground plane. If a person is present within the domain, absorption of the field in the body may cause problems regarding compliance with electromagnetic guidelines. To investigate this, the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR), localised SAR and ankle currents in the voxel model NORMAN have been calculated for a variety of these exposures under grounded conditions. The results were normalised to the spatially averaged field, a technique used to determine a mean value for comparison with guidelines when the field varies along the height of the body. Additionally, the external field values required to produce basic restrictions for whole-body averaged SAR have been calculated. It was found that in all configurations studied, the ICNIRP reference levels and IEEE MPEs provided a conservative estimate of these restrictions.

  12. Influence of dentures on SAR in the visible Chinese human head voxel phantom exposed to a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Zhang, Ruoyu; Liu, Qian

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the influence of dentures on electromagnetic energy absorption during the daily use of a mobile phone, a high-resolution head phantom based on the Visible Chinese Human dataset was reconstructed. Simulations on phantoms with various dentures were performed by using the finite-difference time-domain method with a 0.47 wavelength dipole antenna and a mobile phone model as radiation sources at 900 and 1800 MHz. The Specific energy Absorption Rate (SAR) values including 1 and 10 g average SAR values were assessed. When the metallic dental crowns with resonance lengths of approximately one-third to one-half wavelength in the tissue nearby are parallel to the radiation source, up to 121.6% relative enhancement for 1 g average SAR and 17.1% relative enhancement for 10 g average SAR are observed due to the resonance effect in energy absorption. When the radiation sources operate in the normal configuration, the 10 g average SAR values are still in compliance with the basic restrictions established by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), indicating that the safety limits will not be challenged by the usage of dentures. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Amirhajeloo, Leila Rasouli; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m and 2.23±0.39 v/m, respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23% and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone. PMID:27157169

  14. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone.

  15. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; Verhaart, R. F.; Verduijn, G. M.; Fortunati, V.; Rijnen, Z.; Franckena, M.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR10g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  16. Between-country comparison of whole-body SAR from personal exposure data in Urban areas.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Frei, Patrizia; Röösli, Martin; Vermeeren, Günter; Bolte, John; Thuróczy, György; Gajšek, Peter; Trček, Tomaž; Mohler, Evelyn; Juhász, Péter; Finta, Viktoria; Martens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), personal radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements were performed in different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoors using the same exposure meters. From the mean personal field exposure levels (excluding mobile phone exposure), whole-body absorption values in a 1-year-old child and adult male model were calculated using a statistical multipath exposure method and compared for the five countries. All mean absorptions (maximal total absorption of 3.4 µW/kg for the child and 1.8 µW/kg for the adult) were well below the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) basic restriction of 0.08 W/kg for the general public. Generally, incident field exposure levels were well correlated with whole-body absorptions (SAR(wb) ), although the type of microenvironment, frequency of the signals, and dimensions of the considered phantom modify the relationship between these exposure measures. Exposure to the television and Digital Audio Broadcasting band caused relatively higher SAR(wb) values (up to 65%) for the 1-year-old child than signals at higher frequencies due to the body size-dependent absorption rates. Frequency Modulation (FM) caused relatively higher absorptions (up to 80%) in the adult male.

  17. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  18. Abnormal oral glucose tolerance and glucose malabsorption after vagotomy and pyloroplasty. A tracer method for measuring glucose absorption rates

    SciTech Connect

    Radziuk, J.; Bondy, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    The mechanisms underlying the abnormal glucose tolerance in patients who had undergone vagotomy and pyloroplasty were investigated by measuring the rates of absorption of ingested glucose and the clearance rate of glucose using tracer methods. These methods are based on labeling a 100-g oral glucose load with (1-/sup 14/C)glucose and measuring glucose clearance using plasma levels of infused (3-/sup 3/H)glucose. The rate of appearance of both ingested and total glucose is then calculated continuously using a two-compartment model of glucose kinetics. It was found that about 30% of the ingested glucose (100 g) failed to appear in the systemic circulation. That this was due to malabsorption was confirmed using breath-hydrogen analysis. The absorption period is short (101 +/- 11 min) compared with normal values but the clearance of glucose is identical to that in control subjects, and it peaks 132 +/- 7 min after glucose loading. The peak plasma insulin values were more than four times higher in patients than in normal subjects, and this may afford an explanation of rates of glucose clearance that are inappropriate for the short absorption period. The combination of glucose malabsorption and this clearance pattern could yield the hypoglycemia that may be observed in patients after gastric surgery.

  19. Heating from free-free absorption and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Björnsson, C.-I.; Lundqvist, P. E-mail: peter@astro.su.se

    2014-06-01

    An accurate determination of the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to core-collapse supernovae is often limited by uncertainties pertaining to various model assumptions. It is shown that under conditions when the temperature of the circumstellar medium is set by heating due to free-free absorption, observations of the accompanying free-free optical depth allow a direct determination of the mass-loss rate from observed quantities in a rather model-independent way. The temperature is determined self-consistently, which results in a characteristic time dependence of the free-free optical depth. This can be used to distinguish free-free heating from other heating mechanisms. Since the importance of free-free heating is quite model dependent, this also makes possible several consistency checks of the deduced mass-loss rate. It is argued that the free-free absorption observed in SN 1993J is consistent with heating from free-free absorption. The deduced mass-loss rate of the progenitor star is, approximately, 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for a wind velocity of 10 km s{sup –1}.

  20. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  1. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  2. Differential Evolution Optimization of the SAR Distribution for Head and Neck Hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, G; McGinley, B; Elahi, M A; Drizdal, T; Paulides, M M; Glavin, M; O'Halloran, M; Jones, E

    2017-08-01

    Hyperthermia is an emerging cancer treatment modality, which involves applying heat to the malignant tumor. The heating can be delivered using electromagnetic (EM) energy, mostly in the radiofrequency (RF) or microwave range. Accurate patient-specific hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) is essential for effective and safe treatments, in particular, for deep and loco-regional hyperthermia. An important aspect of HTP is the ability to focus microwave energy into the tumor and reduce the occurrence of hot spots in healthy tissue. This paper presents a method for optimizing the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution for the head and neck cancer hyperthermia treatment. The SAR quantifies the rate at which localized RF or microwave energy is absorbed by the biological tissue when exposed to an EM field. A differential evolution (DE) optimization algorithm is proposed in order to improve the SAR coverage of the target region. The efficacy of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by testing with the Erasmus MC patient dataset. DE is compared to the particle swarm optimization (PSO) method, in terms of average performance and standard deviation and across various clinical metrics, such as the hot-spot-tumor SAR quotient (HTQ), treatment quantifiers, and temperature parameters. While hot spots in the SAR distribution remain a problem with current approaches, DE enhances focusing microwave energy absorption to the target region during hyperthermia treatment. In particular, DE offers improved performance compared to the PSO algorithm currently deployed in the clinic, reporting a range of improvement of HTQ standard deviation of between 40.1-96.8% across six patients.

  3. The generation of simple compliance boundaries for mobile communication base station antennas using formulae for SAR estimation.

    PubMed

    Thors, B; Hansson, B; Törnevik, C

    2009-07-07

    In this paper, a procedure is proposed for generating simple and practical compliance boundaries for mobile communication base station antennas. The procedure is based on a set of formulae for estimating the specific absorption rate (SAR) in certain directions around a class of common base station antennas. The formulae, given for both whole-body and localized SAR, require as input the frequency, the transmitted power and knowledge of antenna-related parameters such as dimensions, directivity and half-power beamwidths. With knowledge of the SAR in three key directions it is demonstrated how simple and practical compliance boundaries can be generated outside of which the exposure levels do not exceed certain limit values. The conservativeness of the proposed procedure is discussed based on results from numerical radio frequency (RF) exposure simulations with human body phantoms from the recently developed Virtual Family.

  4. [Effect of antidotes on the rate of absorption of 2,4-dinitrophenol from the digestive tract into the blood].

    PubMed

    Sen'chuk, V; Adamska, T

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the rate of the 2,4-dinitrophenol absorption from the digestive tract into the blood with the use of an antidote and its components (activated charcoal, tannin, magnesium oxide), stach water and paraffin oil demonstrated the activated charcoal and magnesium oxide to be the best antidotes among the ones studied. The antidote exerts a somewhat less marked, but still quite a strong action.

  5. Is apolipoprotein A-IV rate limiting in the intestinal transport and absorption of triglyceride?

    PubMed

    Kohan, Alison B; Wang, Fei; Li, Xiaoming; Vandersall, Abbey E; Huesman, Sarah; Xu, Min; Yang, Qing; Lou, Danwen; Tso, Patrick

    2013-06-15

    Apolipoprotein A-IV (apoA-IV) is synthesized by the intestine and secreted when dietary fat is absorbed and transported into lymph associated with chylomicrons. We have recently demonstrated that loss of apoA-IV increases chylomicron size and delays its clearance from the blood. There is still uncertainty, however, about the precise role of apoA-IV on the transport of dietary fat from the intestine into the lymph. ApoA-IV knockout (KO) mice do not have a gross defect in dietary lipid absorption, as measured by oral fat tolerance and fecal fat measurements. Here, using the in vivo lymph fistula mouse model, we show that the cumulative secretion of triglyceride (TG) into lymph in apoA-IV KO mice is very similar to that of wild-type (WT) mice. However, the apoA-IV KO mice do have subtle changes in TG accumulation in the intestinal mucosa during a 6-h continuous, but not bolus, infusion of lipid. There are no changes in the ratio of esterified to free fatty acids in the intestinal mucosa of the apoA-IV KO, however. When we extended these findings, by giving a higher dose of lipid (6 μmol/h) and for a longer infusion period (8 h), we found no effect of apoA-IV KO on intestinal TG absorption. This higher lipid infusion most certainly stresses the intestine, as we see a drastically lower absorption of TG (in both WT and KO mice); however, the loss of A-IV does not exacerbate this effect. This supports our hypothesis that apoA-IV is not required for TG absorption in the intestine. Our data suggest that the mechanisms by which the apoA-IV KO intestine responds to intestinal lipid may not be different from their WT counterparts. We conclude that apoA-IV is not required for normal lymphatic transport of TG.

  6. Inhaled histamine increases the rate of absorption of sodium cromoglycate from the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R; Fowler, C; Simpson, S; Renwick, A G; Holgate, S T

    1992-01-01

    Since many factors may alter lung epithelial permeability (LEP) to water soluble molecules, the effect of histamine on the absorption and clearance of inhaled sodium cromoglycate was examined in seven mildly asthmatic patients with hyperresponsive airways and eight normal subjects. The subjects underwent histamine challenge to determine the provocative concentration of histamine required to reduce the forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) by 20% (PC20) from baseline. On two further visits they inhaled either saline placebo or histamine and 5 min later inhaled an aerosol containing sodium cromoglycate. Measurements of FEV1 were made and blood samples taken for analysis of plasma sodium cromoglycate concentration at intervals for 3 h. In the asthmatic group histamine inhalation led to a 24 +/- 4% reduction in FEV1 but had no effect on the normal subjects. When compared with inhaled saline, histamine increased the initial pulmonary absorption of SCG without influencing the total amount of drug absorbed in both asthmatics and normals. These observations suggest that the pharmacokinetics of inhaled sodium cromoglycate may be altered significantly by inflammatory mediators present at the site of drug absorption from the airways. PMID:1576060

  7. Application of postured human model for SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuchkovikj, M.; Munteanu, I.; Weiland, T.

    2013-07-01

    In the last two decades, the increasing number of electronic devices used in day-to-day life led to a growing interest in the study of the electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissues. The design of medical devices and wireless communication devices such as mobile phones benefits a lot from the bio-electromagnetic simulations in which digital human models are used. The digital human models currently available have an upright position which limits the research activities in realistic scenarios, where postured human bodies must be considered. For this reason, a software application called "BodyFlex for CST STUDIO SUITE" was developed. In its current version, this application can deform the voxel-based human model named HUGO (Dipp GmbH, 2010) to allow the generation of common postures that people use in normal life, ensuring the continuity of tissues and conserving the mass to an acceptable level. This paper describes the enhancement of the "BodyFlex" application, which is related to the movements of the forearm and the wrist of a digital human model. One of the electromagnetic applications in which the forearm and the wrist movement of a voxel based human model has a significant meaning is the measurement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) when a model is exposed to a radio frequency electromagnetic field produced by a mobile phone. Current SAR measurements of the exposure from mobile phones are performed with the SAM (Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin) phantom which is filled with a dispersive but homogeneous material. We are interested what happens with the SAR values if a realistic inhomogeneous human model is used. To this aim, two human models, a homogeneous and an inhomogeneous one, in two simulation scenarios are used, in order to examine and observe the differences in the results for the SAR values.

  8. A comparative study of the PIFA and printed monopole antenna EM absorption.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Ikbal; Iqbal Faruque, Mohammad Rashed; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents a comparative study on electromagnetic (EM) absorption in the human head between a printed monopole antenna and a planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA). The specific absorption rate (SAR) values and total absorbed power in the human head phantom are used to evaluate EM absorption for both antennae. Moreover, antenna performances in terms of return loss, radiation efficiency, and gain are also investigated in this study. The finite integration technique (FIT) based on CST Microwave studio and SAM head phantom are used in this study. The antenna performances are measured in an anechoic chamber and the SAR is tested using COMOSAR measurement system. The obtained results indicate that the printed monopole antenna lead to higher EM absorption in the human head as compared to PIFA for both GSM frequencies.

  9. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  10. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average

  11. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  12. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Qian, Di; El-Sharkawy, Abdel-Monem M; Bottomley, Paul A; Edelstein, William A

    2013-12-01

    The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B1) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole-body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on average independent of the imaging

  13. Enhanced absorption of the poorly soluble drug fenofibrate by tuning its release rate from ordered mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Van Speybroeck, Michiel; Mellaerts, Randy; Mols, Raf; Thi, Thao Do; Martens, Johan Adriaan; Van Humbeeck, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Van den Mooter, Guy; Augustijns, Patrick

    2010-12-23

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of release rate from ordered mesoporous silica materials on the rate and extent of absorption of the poorly soluble drug fenofibrate. Three ordered mesoporous silica materials with different pore diameter (7.3 nm, 4.4 nm and 2.7 nm) were synthesized and loaded with fenofibrate via impregnation. Release experiments were conducted under sink conditions and under supersaturating conditions in biorelevant media, simulating the fasted and the fed state. Subsequently, all silica-based formulations were evaluated in vivo (rat model). The release experiments under sink conditions indicated a clear increase in release rate with increasing pore size. However, under supersaturating conditions (FaSSIF), the, pharmaceutical performance (in terms of both the degree and duration of supersaturation), increased with decreasing pore size. The same trend was observed in vivo (fasted state): the area under the plasma concentration-time profile amounted to 102 ± 34 μMh, 86 ± 19 μMh and 20 ± 13 μMh for the materials with pore diameter of 2.7 nm, 4.4 nm and 7.3 nm, respectively. The results of this, study demonstrate that a decrease in drug release rate - and thus, a decrease of the rate at which supersaturation is created - is beneficial to the absorption of fenofibrate. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Modifying the high rate algal pond light environment and its effects on light absorption and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-03-01

    The combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) for wastewater treatment and commercial algal production is considered to be an economically viable option. However, microalgal photosynthesis and biomass productivity is constrained in HRAPs due to light limitation. This paper investigates how the light climate in the HRAP can be modified through changes in pond depth, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and light/dark turnover rate and how this impacts light absorption and utilisation by the microalgae. Wastewater treatment HRAPs were operated at three different pond depth and HRT during autumn. Light absorption by the microalgae was most affected by HRT, significantly decreasing with increasing HRT, due to increased internal self-shading. Photosynthetic performance (as defined by Pmax, Ek and α), significantly increased with increasing pond depth and decreasing HRT. Despite this, increasing pond depth and/or HRT, resulted in decreased pond light climate and overall integrated water column net oxygen production. However, increased light/dark turnover was able to compensate for this decrease, bringing the net oxygen production in line with shallower ponds operated at shorter HRT. On overcast days, modelled daily net photosynthesis significantly increased with increased light/dark turnover, however, on clear days such increased turnover did not enhance photosynthesis. This study has showed that light absorption and photosynthetic performance of wastewater microalgae can be modified through changes to pond depth, HRT and light/dark turnover.

  15. Transient absorption and photocurrent microscopy show that hot electron supercollisions describe the rate-limiting relaxation step in graphene.

    PubMed

    Graham, Matt W; Shi, Su-Fei; Wang, Zenghui; Ralph, Daniel C; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    Using transient absorption (TA) microscopy as a hot electron thermometer, we show that disorder-assisted acoustic-phonon supercollisions (SCs) best describe the rate-limiting relaxation step in graphene over a wide range of lattice temperatures (Tl = 5-300 K), Fermi energies (E(F) = ± 0.35 eV), and optical probe energies (~0.3-1.1 eV). Comparison with simultaneously collected transient photocurrent, an independent hot electron thermometer, confirms that the rate-limiting optical and electrical response in graphene are best described by the SC-heat dissipation rate model, H = A(T(e)(3) - T(l)(3)). Our data further show that the electron cooling rate in substrate-supported graphene is twice as fast as in suspended graphene sheets, consistent with SC model prediction for disorder.

  16. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land: Analyses and Validation of SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Philip; Benveniste, Jérôme; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The high along-track sampling of Cryosat-2 in its SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. A theoretical approach has been developed to process the FBR L1A Doppler beams to form a product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking from which inland water heights are derivable from the retracked Cryosat-2 altimetric waveforms. Results of the processing strategy will include a comparison of waveforms and heights from the burst echoes (˜80 m along-track) and from multi-look waveforms (˜320 m along-track). SAR and SARin FBR data are available for the Amazon, Brahmaputra and Mekong for 2011-2015. FBR SAR results will be compared against stage data from the nearest gauge where applicable with heights from Tonle Sap compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented. Results of FBR SARin processing for the Amazon and Brahmaputra will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae, extraction of slope of the ground surface and validation against ground data where appropriate.

  17. Calorimetric calibration of head coil SAR estimates displayed on a clinical MR scanner.

    PubMed

    Gorny, Krzysztof R; Bernstein, Matt A; Felmlee, Joel P; Ward, Heidi A; McGee, Kiaran P; Lanners, Diana M; Lee, Kendall H

    2008-05-21

    Calorimetric measurements were performed to determine the average specific absorption rates (SAR) resulting from MRI head examinations. The data were compared with average head coil SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner in order to refine the imaging protocols used in imaging patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBS). The experiments were performed using transmit-receive (TR) head coil on clinical 1.5 T General Electric MR scanners running 11.0 M4 revision software. The average applied SAR was derived from temperature increases measured inside a head phantom, due to deposition of RF energy during MRI scanning with a spin echo imaging sequence. The measurements were repeated for varied levels of RF transmit gain (TG) and analyzed with a range of entered patient weights. The measurements demonstrate that the ratio of the actual average head SAR to the scanner-displayed value (coil correction factor) decreases for decreasing TG or for increasing patient weight and may vary between 0.3 and 2.1. An additional retrospective patient study, however, shows that not all combinations of TG and patient weight are encountered clinically and, instead, TG generally increases with the patient weight. As a result, a much narrower range of coil correction factors (e.g., typically 0.5-1.0) will be encountered in practice. The calorimetric method described in this work could aid the physicians and technologists in refinement of the model-dependent SAR estimates displayed by the MR scanner, and in selection of imaging parameters for MR head examinations within allowable SAR safety levels.

  18. Studies in RF Power Communication, SAR, and Temperature Elevation in Wireless Implantable Neural Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements. PMID:24223123

  19. Studies in RF power communication, SAR, and temperature elevation in wireless implantable neural interfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yujuan; Tang, Lin; Rennaker, Robert; Hutchens, Chris; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2013-01-01

    Implantable neural interfaces are designed to provide a high spatial and temporal precision control signal implementing high degree of freedom real-time prosthetic systems. The development of a Radio Frequency (RF) wireless neural interface has the potential to expand the number of applications as well as extend the robustness and longevity compared to wired neural interfaces. However, it is well known that RF signal is absorbed by the body and can result in tissue heating. In this work, numerical studies with analytical validations are performed to provide an assessment of power, heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the wireless RF transmitting within the human head. The receiving antenna on the neural interface is designed with different geometries and modeled at a range of implanted depths within the brain in order to estimate the maximum receiving power without violating SAR and tissue temperature elevation safety regulations. Based on the size of the designed antenna, sets of frequencies between 1 GHz to 4 GHz have been investigated. As expected the simulations demonstrate that longer receiving antennas (dipole) and lower working frequencies result in greater power availability prior to violating SAR regulations. For a 15 mm dipole antenna operating at 1.24 GHz on the surface of the brain, 730 uW of power could be harvested at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) SAR violation limit. At approximately 5 cm inside the head, this same antenna would receive 190 uW of power prior to violating SAR regulations. Finally, the 3-D bio-heat simulation results show that for all evaluated antennas and frequency combinations we reach FCC SAR limits well before 1 °C. It is clear that powering neural interfaces via RF is possible, but ultra-low power circuit designs combined with advanced simulation will be required to develop a functional antenna that meets all system requirements.

  20. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): knowledge, attitudes, practices and sources of information among physicians answering a SARS fever hotline service.

    PubMed

    Deng, J-F; Olowokure, B; Kaydos-Daniels, S C; Chang, H-J; Barwick, R S; Lee, M-L; Deng, C-Y; Factor, S H; Chiang, C-E; Maloney, S A

    2006-01-01

    In June 2003, Taiwan introduced a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) telephone hotline service to provide concerned callers with rapid access to information, advice and appropriate referral where necessary. This paper reports an evaluation of the knowledge, attitude, practices and sources of information relating to SARS among physicians who staffed the SARS fever hotline service. A retrospective survey was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire. Participants were physicians who staffed a SARS hotline during the SARS epidemic in Taipei, Taiwan from June 1 to 10, 2003. A response rate of 83% was obtained. All respondents knew the causative agent of SARS, and knowledge regarding SARS features and preventive practices was good. However, only 54% of respondents knew the incubation period of SARS. Hospital guidelines and news media were the major information sources. In responding to two case scenarios most physicians were likely to triage callers at high risk of SARS appropriately, but not callers at low risk. Less than half of all respondents answered both scenarios correctly. The results obtained suggest that knowledge of SARS was generally good although obtained from both medical and non-medical sources. Specific knowledge was however lacking in certain areas and this affected the ability to appropriately triage callers. Standardized education and assessment of prior knowledge of SARS could improve the ability of physicians to triage callers in future outbreaks.

  1. Effects of 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields with a wide range of SARs on bacterial and HPRT gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shin; Takashima, Yoshio; Sakurai, Tomonori; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Taki, Masao; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2007-01-01

    Present day use of mobile phones is ubiquitous. This causes some concern for human health due to exposure to high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HFEMF) from mobile phones. Consequently, we have examined the effects of 2.45 GHz electromagnetic fields on bacterial mutations and the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene mutations. Using the Ames test, bacteria were exposed to HFEMF for 30 min at specific absorption rates (SARs) from 5 to 200 W/kg. In all strains, there was no significant difference in the frequency of revertant colonies between sham exposure and HFEMF-exposed groups. In examination of mutations of the HPRT gene, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells were exposed to HFEMF for 2 h at SARs from 5 to 200 W/kg. We detected a combination effect of simultaneous exposure to HFEMF and bleomycin at the respective SARs. A statistically significant difference was observed between the cells exposed to HFEMF at the SAR of 200 W/kg. Cells treated with the combination of HFEMF at SARs from 50 to 200 W/kg and bleomycin exhibited increased HPRT mutations. As the exposure to HFEMF induced an increase in temperature, these increases of mutation frequency may be a result of activation of bleomycin by heat. We consider that the increase of mutation frequency may be due to a thermal effect.

  2. Analysis of the effect of mobile phone base station antenna loading on localized SAR and its consequences for measurements.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Björn; Thors, Björn; Törnevik, Christer

    2011-12-01

    In this work, the effect of antenna element loading on the localized specific absorption rate (SAR) has been analyzed for base station antennas. The analysis was conducted in order to determine whether localized SAR measurements of large multi-element base station antennas can be conducted using standardized procedures and commercially available equipment. More specifically, it was investigated if the antenna shifting measurement procedure, specified in the European base station exposure assessment standard EN 50383, will produce accurate localized SAR results for base station antennas larger than the specified measurement phantom. The obtained results show that SAR accuracy is affected by the presence of lossy material within distances of one wavelength from the tested antennas as a consequence of coupling and redistribution of transmitted power among the antenna elements. It was also found that the existing standardized phantom is not optimal for SAR measurements of large base station antennas. A new methodology is instead proposed based on a larger, box-shaped, whole-body phantom.

  3. Reducing SAR requirements in multislice volumetric single-shot spatiotemporal MRI by two-dimensional RF pulses.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Gilad; Frydman, Lucio

    2017-05-01

    Spatiotemporal encoding (SPEN) can deliver single-scan MR images without folding complications and with increased robustness to chemical shift and susceptibility artifacts. Yet, it does so at the expense of relatively high specific absorption rates (SAR) owing to its reliance on frequency-swept pulses. This study describes SPEN implementations aimed at full three-dimensional (3D) multislice imaging, possessing reduced SAR thanks to an implementation based on new 2D radiofrequency (RF) pulses. Fully refocused spin- and stimulated-echo SPEN sequences incorporating 2D spatial/spatial swept RF pulses were implemented at 3 Tesla and compared to echo planar imaging. The use of effective 90-degree slice-selective excitation pulses enabled the scanning of 3D volumes with a low SAR. Experiments validating the theoretical expectations were carried out on phantoms and on human volunteers, including zooming and diffusion measurements. The chosen sequences showed much smaller SARs than EPI, while delivering similar sensitivities when targeting human brain and fewer distortions when targeting human breast. Two-dimensional RF pulses can exploit SPEN's advantages while fulfilling the SAR and multislice coverage demands required for clinical imaging. Magn Reson Med 77:1959-1965, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Simulation of exposure and SAR estimation for adult and child heads exposed to radiofrequency energy from portable communication devices.

    PubMed

    Bit-Babik, G; Guy, A W; Chou, C-K; Faraone, A; Kanda, M; Gessner, A; Wang, J; Fujiwara, O

    2005-05-01

    The level and distribution of radiofrequency energy absorbed in a child's head during the use of a mobile phone compared to those in an adult head has been a controversial issue in recent years. It has been suggested that existing methods that are used to determine specific absorption rate (SAR) and assess compliance with exposure standards using an adult head model may not adequately account for potentially higher levels of exposure in children due to their smaller head size. The present study incorporates FDTD computations of locally averaged SAR in two different anatomically correct adult and child head models using the IEEE standard (Std. C95.3-2002) SAR averaging algorithm. The child head models were obtained by linear scaling of the adult head model to replicate the conditions of previous studies reported in the literature and also by transforming the different adult head models based on data on the external shapes of children's heads. The tissue properties of the adult and corresponding child head models were kept the same. In addition, modeling and experimental measurements were made using three spheres filled with a tissue-equivalent mixture to approximate heads of increasing size. Results show that the peak local average SAR over 1 g and 10 g of tissue and the electromagnetic energy penetration depths are about the same in all of the head models under the same exposure conditions. When making interlaboratory comparisons, the model and the SAR averaging algorithm used must be standardized to minimize controversy.

  5. A novel encapsulation of N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) favorably modifies skin absorption while maintaining effective evaporation rates.

    PubMed

    Karr, Jennifer I; Speaker, Tycho J; Kasting, Gerald B

    2012-06-28

    N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET) is popular insect repellent which is considered safe and effective, yet is subject to considerable skin absorption. Skin absorption decreases effective repellency since less DEET is available for evaporation. We have investigated the extent to which DEET skin absorption can be reduced and evaporation sustained through encapsulation. DEET permeation through human skin in vitro was measured for an ethanolic solution standard and for two novel topical controlled-release formulations in which the DEET active material was temporarily sequestered within a permeable, charged-film microcapsule. Evaporation measurements were gathered using Tenax TA cartridges and a sampling pump drawing air over the skin. Three formulations were studied: a previously reported microcapsule formulation (Formulation A); a newly-developed microcapsule formulation (Formulation B); and a non-encapsulated ethanol control solution. Formulation B led to a 30% reduction in DEET permeation versus control. The two microcapsule DEET formulations exhibited 36-40% higher cumulative evaporation from the skin than did the control. The vapor trapping measurements in vitro show that Formulation B provided more than 48h of effective evaporation rate for repellency, while Formulation A provided less than 35h and the ethanol control less than 15h. This establishes a technical advantage for the controlled-release approach.

  6. New model for assessing dose, dose rate, and temperature sensitivity of radiation-induced absorption in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gilard, Olivier; Quadri, Gianandrea; Caussanel, Matthieu; Duval, Herve; Reynaud, Francois

    2010-11-15

    A new theoretical approach is proposed to explain the dose, dose rate and temperature sensitivity of the radiation-induced absorption (RIA) in glasses. In this paper, a {beta}{sup th}-order dispersive kinetic model is used to simulate the growth of the density of color centers in irradiated glasses. This model yields an explanation for the power-law dependence on dose and dose rate usually observed for the RIA in optical fibers. It also leads to an Arrhenius-like relationship between the RIA and the glass temperature during irradiation. With a very limited number of adjustable parameters, the model succeeds in explaining, with a good agreement, the RIA growth of two different optical fiber references over wide ranges of dose, dose rate and temperature.

  7. A physico-chemical properties based model for estimating evaporation and absorption rates of perfumes from skin.

    PubMed

    Kasting, G B; Saiyasombati, P

    2001-02-01

    Because of their potential for inducing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) if used improperly, perfumes are carefully assessed for dermal safety prior to incorporation into cosmetic products. Exposure assessment for these materials often involves the conservative assumption of 100% absorption of each component. This report describes an improved method to estimate the absorption and evaporation of perfume ingredients from skin, based on their physico-chemical properties. The effect of environmental variables such as temperature and wind velocity can be accounted for in a logical way. This was accomplished using a first-order kinetic approach expected to be applicable for small doses applied to skin. Skin penetration rate was calculated as a fraction of the maximum flux estimated from the compound's lipid solubility, S(lip) (represented by the product of octanol/water partition coefficient, K(octt), and water solubility, S(w)), and molecular weight, MW. Evaporation rates were estimated from a modified Henry's Law approach with a stagnant boundary layer whose thickness is a function of surface airflow, v. At a given value of v, evaporation rate was assumed proportional to the ratio P(vp)/S(lip), where P(vp) is the vapour pressure of the ingredient at skin temperature, T. The model predicts a relationship for total evaporation from skin of the form %evap = 100x/(k+x) where x = P(vp)MW(2.7)/(K(oct)S(w)) and k is a parameter which depends only on v and T. Comparison with published data on perfume evaporation from human skin in vivo showed good agreement between theory and experiment for two closely related perfume mixtures (r(2) = 0.52-0.74, s = 12-14%, n = 10). Thus, the method would seem to have a good prospect of providing skin absorption estimates suitable for use in exposure assessment and improved understanding of dose-related contact allergy.

  8. On the safety margin of using simplified human head models for local SAR simulations of B1-shimming at 7 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu; Shang, Shuo; Wang, Shumin

    2015-07-01

    Using simplified human models significantly alleviates the difficulty of rendering human models for subject-specific local specific absorption rate (SAR) simulations. Although its accuracy has been demonstrated with the birdcage mode combination of RF transmitters, its accuracy in general B1-shimming, where numerous phase and magnitude combinations can take place, is yet unknown. The electromagnetic fields of a 7-Tesla eight-channel brain imaging array were simulated by using four detailed human models from the Virtual Family and their two-, three-, and four-tissue simplifications. The 10-g averaged local SAR was computed for each case with 1,000 sets of uniformly distributed random B1-shimming parameters. Linear regression was applied to relate the local SAR obtained by using detailed and simplified human models. The 99% confidence prediction interval was determined as the safety margin in order to cover the largest local SAR variability introduced by using simplified human models. The local SAR computed by using three- and four-tissue simplifications are strongly correlated with those computed by using detailed models. Safety margins of 0.38 and 0.45W/kg/W were found appropriate for each case being considered. The proposed procedure can be applied to evaluate the safety margin of the local SAR simulated by using simplified human models. However, discretion needs to be exercised since the safety margins in some cases may represent more than 50% overestimation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-07

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  10. Some present problems and a proposed experimental phantom for SAR compliance testing of cellular telephones at 835 and 1900 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Kang, Gang

    2002-05-01

    This paper compares the maximum allowable powers of some typical cellular telephones at 835 and 1900 MHz for compliance with the limits of specific absorption rates (SAR) given in ANSI/IEEE, ICNIRP and the proposed modification of ANSI/IEEE safety guidelines. It is shown that the present ANSI/IEEE guideline is the most conservative with the ICNIRP guidelines allowing a maximum radiated power that is 2.5-3 times higher, and the proposed IEEE modification of treating pinna as an extremity tissue the least conservative allowing even higher radiated powers by up to 50%. The paper also expands the previously reported study of energy deposition in models of adults versus children to two different and distinct anatomically-based models of the adult head, namely the Utah model and the 'Visible Man' model, each of which is increased or reduced by the voxel size to obtain additional head models larger or smaller in all dimensions by 11.1% or -9.1%, respectively. The peak 1 g body-tissue SAR calculated using the widely accepted FDTD method for smaller models is up to 56% higher at 1900 MHz and up to 20% higher at 835 MHz compared to the larger models, with the average models giving intermediate SARs. Also given in the paper is a comparison of the peak 1 g and 10 g SARs for two different anatomically-based models with 6 mm thick smooth plastic ear models used for SAR compliance testing. The SARs obtained with the insulating plastic ear models are up to two or more times smaller than realistic anatomic models. We propose a 2 mm thin shell phantom with lossy ear that should give SARs within +/-15% of those of anatomic models.

  11. The estimation of 3D SAR distributions in the human head from mobile phone compliance testing data for epidemiological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Wiart, Joe; Mann, Simon; Deltour, Isabelle; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2009-10-01

    A worldwide epidemiological study called 'INTERPHONE' has been conducted to estimate the hypothetical relationship between brain tumors and mobile phone use. In this study, we proposed a method to estimate 3D distribution of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head due to mobile phone use to provide the exposure gradient for epidemiological studies. 3D SAR distributions due to exposure to an electromagnetic field from mobile phones are estimated from mobile phone compliance testing data for actual devices. The data for compliance testing are measured only on the surface in the region near the device and in a small 3D region around the maximum on the surface in a homogeneous phantom with a specific shape. The method includes an interpolation/extrapolation and a head shape conversion. With the interpolation/extrapolation, SAR distributions in the whole head are estimated from the limited measured data. 3D SAR distributions in the numerical head models, where the tumor location is identified in the epidemiological studies, are obtained from measured SAR data with the head shape conversion by projection. Validation of the proposed method was performed experimentally and numerically. It was confirmed that the proposed method provided good estimation of 3D SAR distribution in the head, especially in the brain, which is the tissue of major interest in epidemiological studies. We conclude that it is possible to estimate 3D SAR distributions in a realistic head model from the data obtained by compliance testing measurements to provide a measure for the exposure gradient in specific locations of the brain for the purpose of exposure assessment in epidemiological studies. The proposed method has been used in several studies in the INTERPHONE.

  12. MicroCT image-generated tumour geometry and SAR distribution for tumour temperature elevation simulations in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Alexander; Manuchehrabadi, Navid; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Wang, Frank; Ma, Ronghui; Zhu, Liang

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and test computer algorithms to export micro computed tomography (microCT) images and to generate tumour geometry and specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution for heat transfer simulation in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. Computer algorithms were written to analyse and export microCT images of 3D tumours containing magnetic nanoparticles. MATLAB(®) and ProE(®) programs were used to generate a prototype of the tumour geometry. The enhancements in the microCT pixel index number due to presence of nanoparticles in the tumours were first converted into corresponding SAR values. The SAR data were then averaged over three-dimensional clusters of pixels using the SAS(®) program. This greatly decreased the size of the SAR file, while in the meantime it ensured that the amount of total energy deposited in the tumour was conserved. Both the tumour geometry and the SAR file were then imported into the COMSOL(®) software package to simulate temperature elevations in the tumour and their surrounding tissue region during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. A linear relationship was obtained to relate individual pixel index numbers in the microCT images to the SAR values under a specific magnetic field. The generated prototype of the tumour geometry based on only 30 slices of microCT images resembled the original tumour shape and size. The tumour geometry and the simplified SAR data set were successfully accepted by the COMSOL software for heat transfer simulation. Up to 20 °C temperature elevations from its baseline temperature were found inside the tumours, implying possible thermal damage to the tumour during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia.

  13. SAR Interferometry with TerraSAR-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eineder, M.; Runge, H.; Boerner, E.; Bamler, R.; Adam, N.; Schättler, B.; Breit, H.; Suchandt, S.

    2004-06-01

    The TerraSAR-X project is a public private partnership between Astrium GmbH and the German Aerospace Center DLR. Astrium will launch the satellite in late 2005 and holds the rights of commercial data exploitation. DLR is currently developing the ground segment and is responsible for the scientific exploitation of the data. Even if the mission goal is not primarily SAR interferometry, TerraSAR-X offers a number of new perspectives to SAR interferometry when compared to ERS and also ENVISAT: a) High resolution of 3 meters and better in stripmap and spotlight mode. b) The option for a burst synchronized ScanSAR mode. c) The high range bandwidth will allow large baselines and the option for highly precise DEM generation. d) X- Band will show new scattering properties. e) High observation frequency due to the short repeat cycle and variable incidence angles. f) An along track interferometric mode. The available products relevant for interferometry are presented and other relevant topics like orbit control and delta-k interferometry are discussed.

  14. Effects of radiation and SAR from wireless implanted medical devices on the human body.

    PubMed

    Soontornpipit, Pichitpong

    2012-06-01

    To study the effect and impact from electromagnetic field radiation and specific absorption rate (SAR) on the human body. The present study describes a quasi-experimental research. The implanted antenna embedded to the medical device such as the cardiac pacemaker was designed in the human phantom using finite-difference time-domain method. The skin mimicking gels were developed as the tissue stimulant to realistically represent the human body. The dual-band implantable antenna is designed to operate at 400 MHz and 2.4 GHz and is used to determine the level of electromagnetic field radiated and SAR levels from implanted biosensors. The SAR limitations, maximum gain, maximum temperature rise in the body model and the radiation efficiency on each operating frequency are determined to provide the safety level. The research results indicate that SAR and safety limitations are body and frequency dependent. High-performance and low-operated power dual-band PIFA antenna for development of the next generation of medical implants operating on the MICS and the ISM bands will facilitate clinically significant improvements in healthcare.

  15. Effects of frequency, irradiation geometry and polarisation on computation of SAR in human brain.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hongmei; Su, Zhentao; Ning, Jing; Wang, Changzhen; Xie, Xiangdong; Qu, Decheng; Wu, Ke; Zhang, Xiaomin; Pan, Jie; Yang, Guoshan

    2014-12-01

    The power absorbed by the human brain has possible implications in the study of the central nervous system-related biological effects of electromagnetic fields. In order to determine the specific absorption rate (SAR) of radio frequency (RF) waves in the human brain, and to investigate the effects of geometry and polarisation on SAR value, the finite-difference time-domain method was applied for the SAR computation. An anatomically realistic model scaled to a height of 1.70 m and a mass of 63 kg was selected, which included 14 million voxels segmented into 39 tissue types. The results suggested that high SAR values were found in the brain, i.e. ∼250 MHz for vertical polarisation and 900-1200 MHz both for vertical and horizontal polarisation, which may be the result of head resonance at these frequencies. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Simplified segmented human models for whole body and localised SAR evaluation of 20 MHz to 6 GHz electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongning; Shao, Qing; Yang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    The digital human model is a key element in evaluating the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure. This paper proposes the application of simplified segmented human models for EMF exposure compliance evaluation with the whole body and the localised limits. The method is based on the fact that most of the EMF power absorption is concentrated in several major tissues. Two kinds of human models were simply (the proposed method) and precisely segmented from two sets of whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanned images. The whole body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) and the peak localised SAR averaging over 10 g tissues for the two kinds of models are calculated for various exposure configurations. The results confirmed the efficiency and the validity of the proposed method. The application as evaluating the MRI radiofrequency EMF exposure is also discussed in the paper.

  17. Health communication during SARS.

    PubMed

    Arguin, Paul M; Navin, Ava W; Steele, Stefanie F; Weld, Leisa H; Kozarsky, Phyliss E

    2004-02-01

    During the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak, electronic media made it possible to disseminate prevention messages rapidly. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Travelers' Health Web site was frequently visited in the first half of 2003; more than 2.6 million visits were made to travel alerts, advisories, and other SARS-related documents.

  18. Laboratory diagnosis of SARS.

    PubMed Central

    Bermingham, A; Heinen, P; Iturriza-Gómara, M; Gray, J; Appleton, H; Zambon, M C

    2004-01-01

    The emergence of new viral infections of man requires the development of robust diagnostic tests that can be applied in the differential diagnosis of acute illness, or to determine past exposure, so as to establish the true burden of disease. Since the recognition in April 2003 of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) as the causative agent of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), enormous efforts have been applied to develop molecular and serological tests for SARS which can assist rapid detection of cases, accurate diagnosis of illness and the application of control measures. International progress in the laboratory diagnosis of SARS-CoV infection during acute illness has led to internationally agreed World Health Organization criteria for the confirmation of SARS. Developments in the dissection of the human immune response to SARS indicate that serological tests on convalescent sera are essential to confirm SARS infection, given the sub-optimal predictive value of molecular detection tests performed during acute SARS illness. PMID:15306394

  19. Feeding rates affect growth, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Li, Xiang-Fei; Tian, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream (average initial weight 23.74 ± 0.09 g) based on the results on growth performance, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions. A total of 840 fish were randomly distributed into 24 cages and fed a commercial feed at six feeding rates ranging from 2.0 to 7.0% body weight (BW)/day. The results indicated that weight gain rate increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0% BW/day, but decreased with the further increasing feeding rates (P > 0.05). Protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen and energy retention all showed a similar trend. However, feed conversion ratio increased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing feeding rates. Feeding rates have little effects (P > 0.05) on whole-body moisture, ash and protein contents, but significantly (P < 0.05) affect both lipid and energy contents with the highest values both observed in fish fed 4.0% BW/day. In addition, moderate ration sizes (2.0-4.0% BW/day) resulted in the enhanced activities of intestinal enzymes, including lipase, protease, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors-I, growth hormone receptor and neuropeptide all increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0% and 6.0% BW/day, but decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with the further increase in feeding rates, whereas both leptin and cholecystokinin expressions showed an opposite trend. Based on the broken-line regression analysis of SGR against feeding rates, the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream was estimated to be 4.57% BW/day.

  20. Numerical simulation of SAR induced around Co-Cr-Mo hip prostheses in situ exposed to RF fields associated with 1.5 and 3 T MRI body coils.

    PubMed

    Powell, John; Papadaki, Annie; Hand, Jeff; Hart, Alister; McRobbie, Donald

    2012-09-01

    When patients with metallic prosthetic implants undergo an MR procedure, the interaction between the RF field and the prosthetic device may lead to an increase in specific absorption rate (SAR) in tissues surrounding the prosthesis. In this work, the distribution of SAR(10g) around bilateral CoCrMo alloy hip prostheses in situ in anatomically realistic voxel models of an adult male and female due to RF fields from a generic birdcage coil driven at 64 or 128 MHz are predicted using a time-domain finite integration technique. Results indicate that the spatial distribution and maximum values of SAR(10g) are dependent on body model, frequency, and the position of the coil relative to the body. Enhancement of SAR(10g) close to the extremities of a prosthesis is predicted. Values of SAR(10g) close to the prostheses are compliant with recommended limits if the prostheses are located outside the coil. However, caution is required when the prostheses are within the coil since the predicted SAR(10g) close to an extremity of a prosthesis exceeds recommended limits when the whole body averaged SAR is 2 W kg(-1) . Compliance with recommended limits is likely to require a reduction in the time averaged input power. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  2. Mathematical modeling and SAR simulation multifunction SAR technology efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, C. R.; Estes, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The orbital SAR (synthetic aperture radar) simulation data was used in several simulation efforts directed toward advanced SAR development. Efforts toward simulating an operational radar, simulation of antenna polarization effects, and simulation of SAR images at serveral different wavelengths are discussed. Avenues for improvements in the orbital SAR simulation and its application to the development of advanced digital radar data processing schemes are indicated.

  3. Time-stretched real-time measurement technique for ultrafast absorption variations with TS/s sampling-rate.

    PubMed

    Weber, Stefan; Waller, Erik H; Kaiser, Christoph; von Freymann, Georg

    2017-06-26

    We present a real-time measurement technique, based on time-stretching for measuring the temporal dynamic of ultrafast absorption variations with a sampling-rate of up to 1.1 TS/s. The single-shot captured data are stretched in a resonator-based time-stretch system with a variable stretch-factor of up to 13.8. The time-window of the time-stretch system for capturing the signal of interest is about 800 ps with an update-rate of 10 MHz. An adapted optical backpropagation algorithm is introduced for reconstructing the original unstretched event. As proof-of-principle the temporal characteristic of a picosecond semiconductor saturable absorber mirror is measured: The real-time results agree well with the results of a conventional pump-probe experiment. The time-stretch technique potentially allows to gain access to a large field of ultrafast absorption variations like semiconductor charge carrier dynamics, irreversible polymerization processes, and saturable absorber materials.

  4. Enhancement of specific absorption rate by exchange coupling of the core-shell structure of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadatare, M. R.; Meshram, J. V.; Gurav, K. V.; Hyeok Kim, Jin; Pawar, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia, drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this paper, an attempt has been made to increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs. To increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs, one can take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the NP and maximize the specific absorption rate, which is the gauge of conversion efficiency. In order to examine the tunability of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetic heating power, a representative magnetically hard material (CoFe2O4) has been coupled to a soft material (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4). The synthesized NPs show specific absorption rates that are of an order of magnitude larger than the conventional one.

  5. High Repetition Rate and Frequency Stabilized Ho:YLF Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, M.; Petzar, Pau; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    High repetition rate operation of an injection seeded Ho:YLF laser has been demonstrated. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy reaches 5.8mJ and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W.

  6. Absorbed Dose Rates in Tissue from Prompt Gamma Emissions from Near-thermal Neutron Absorption.

    PubMed

    Schwahn, Scott O

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency's Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  7. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  8. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGES

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  9. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  10. Preliminary imaging results and SAR analysis of a microwave imaging system for early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Dagheyan, Ashkan Ghanbarzadeh; Molaei, Ali; Obermeier, Richard; Martinez-Lorenzo, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Currently X-ray-based imaging systems suffer from low contrast between malignant and healthy fibrous tissues in breast. Microwave Near-field Radar Imaging (NRI) shows a higher contrast between the aforementioned tissues and therefore can enhance tumor detection and diagnosis accuracy. In this work, we present the first imaging results of our developed NRI system that is equipped with a pair of Antipodal Vivaldi Antennas. We used a metal bearing ball immersed in oil as our object of interest, to keep the first measurement configuration simple. Moreover, to demonstrate the safety of our system for human subject tests, we simulated the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) in a realistic breast tissue model and compared the resulted values with both the USA and Europe standards. The results show that firstly the imaging results from the measurements and simulations are comparable, and secondly the antennas radiations meet the SAR criteria.

  11. B1 field homogeneity and SAR calculations for the birdcage coil.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, T S; Lee, R; Baertlein, B A; Robitaille, P M

    2001-02-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to model a birdcage resonator. All the coil components, including the wires, lumped capacitors and the source, are geometrically modelled together. As such, the coupling effects within the birdcage, including the interactions of coil, source and human head, are accurately computed. A study of the transverse magnetic (B1) field homogeneity and the specific absorption rate (SAR) is presented on an anatomically detailed human head model at 64 and 200 MHz representing 1.5 and 4.7 T MRI systems respectively. Unlike that at 64 MHz, the B1 field distribution is found to be inhomogeneous at 200 MHz. Also, high local SAR values are observed in the tissue near the source due to the coupling between the source and the head at 200 MHz.

  12. B1 field homogeneity and SAR calculations for the birdcage coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, T. S.; Lee, R.; Baertlein, B. A.; Robitaille, P.-M. L.

    2001-02-01

    The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to model a birdcage resonator. All the coil components, including the wires, lumped capacitors and the source, are geometrically modelled together. As such, the coupling effects within the birdcage, including the interactions of coil, source and human head, are accurately computed. A study of the transverse magnetic (B1) field homogeneity and the specific absorption rate (SAR) is presented on an anatomically detailed human head model at 64 and 200 MHz representing 1.5 and 4.7 T MRI systems respectively. Unlike that at 64 MHz, the B1 field distribution is found to be inhomogeneous at 200 MHz. Also, high local SAR values are observed in the tissue near the source due to the coupling between the source and the head at 200 MHz.

  13. Transient finite element analysis of thermal methods used to estimate SAR and blood flow in homogeneously and nonhomogeneously perfused tumour models.

    PubMed

    Wong, T Z; Mechling, J A; Jones, E L; Strohbehn, J W

    1988-01-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent finite element model was developed to evaluate thermal techniques for estimating blood flow and specific absorption rate (SAR). In these computer simulations, homogeneously and nonhomogeneously perfused tumour models were heated by a 915 MHz interstitial microwave antenna array. Representative blood flow values were assigned within the tumour, and the applied SAR distribution was based on a previously developed antenna theory. SAR values were estimated from the power-on transient temperatures, and blood flow values were estimated from thermal clearance data after power was discontinued. These estimated parameters were then compared to the known 'true' blood flow and SAR values throughout the treatment region. SAR values could be predicted with reasonable accuracy throughout most of the heated region independent of local blood flow. For a homogeneous model, thermal clearance was found to yield reasonably accurate blood flow estimates at high perfusion rates and less accurate estimates at lower perfusion rates. However, for the inhomogeneous model, the blood perfusion estimates were generally poor, and an average blood flow value for the tumour was obtained with little ability to resolve the differences in perfusion between regions. Using temperatures observed early in the cool-down curve resulted in improved spatial resolution, but increased the contribution of thermal conduction to the blood flow estimates. A single time-constant exponential thermal decay curve was found to be a necessary but not sufficient condition for reliable blood flow estimates using this technique.

  14. SAR distribution in human beings when using body-worn RF transmitters.

    PubMed

    Christ, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros; Neufeld, Esra; Klingenböck, Anja; Kuster, Niels

    2007-01-01

    This study analyzes the exposure of the human torso to electromagnetic fields caused by wireless body-mounted or handheld devices. Because of the frequency and distance ranges from 30-5800 MHz and 10 to 200 mm, respectively, both near-field and far-field effects are considered. A generic body model and simulations of anatomical models are used to evaluate the worst case tissue composition with respect to the absorption of electromagnetic energy. Both standing wave effects and enhanced coupling of reactive near-field components can lead to a specific absorption rate (SAR) increase in comparison to homogeneous tissue. In addition, the exposure and temperature increase of different inner organs is assessed. With respect to compliance testing, the observed SAR enhancement may require the introduction of a multiplication factor for the spatial peak SAR measured in the liquid-filled phantom in order to obtain a conservative exposure assessment. The observed tissue heating at the body surface under adiabatic conditions can be significant, whereas the temperature increase in the inner organs turned out to be negligible for the cases investigated.

  15. Heating rates in furnace atomic absorption using the L'vov platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koirtyohann, S.R.; Giddings, R.C.; Taylor, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Heating rate profiles for the furnace tube wall, the furnace atmosphere, and a L'vov platform were established for a range of conditions in a cyclically heated graphite atomizer. The tube wall profile was made by direct observation with a recording optical pyrometer. The sodium line reversal method was used to establish the heating rate of the furnace atmosphere, and appearance temperatures for a series metals of differing volatility was used to establish platform profiles. The tube wall heating rate was nearly linear at 2240??C s- until the desired temperature was reached after which the temperature remained constant. The furnace atmosphere reached a given temperature 0.2-0.4 s later than the tube wall through most of the atomize cycle. The platform lagged the tube wall 0.5-0.8 s. Under typical operating conditions the furnace atmosphere was 100-200??C cooler than the tube wall and at nearly constant temperature when the analyte vaporized from the platform. The L'vov platform causes the cyclically heated commercial furnace to approximate the behavior of a constant temperature furnace during atomization. ?? 1984.

  16. Generalized energy-aperture product limit for multi-beam and spotlight SARs

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1995-12-21

    The SAR energy-aperture product limit is extended to multi-beam SARS, Spotlight and moving spotlight SARS. This fundamental limit bounds the tradeoff between energy and antenna size. The kinematic relations between design variables such as platform speed, pulse repetition frequency, beam width and area rate are analyzed in a unified framework applicable to a wide variety of SARs including strip maps, spotlights, vermer arrays and multi-beam SARS, both scanning and swept-beam. Then the energy-aperture product limit is derived from the signal-to noise requirement and the kinematic constraints. The derivation clarifies impact of multiple beams and spotlighting on SAR performance.

  17. Unimolecular Decomposition Rate of the Criegee Intermediate (CH3)2COO Measured Directly with UV Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2016-07-14

    The unimolecular decomposition of (CH3)2COO and (CD3)2COO was measured by direct detection of the Criegee intermediate at temperatures from 283 to 323 K using time-resolved UV absorption spectroscopy. The unimolecular rate coefficient kd for (CH3)2COO shows a strong temperature dependence, increasing from 269 ± 82 s(-1) at 283 K to 916 ± 56 s(-1) at 323 K with an Arrhenius activation energy of ∼6 kcal mol(-1). The bimolecular rate coefficient for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, kSO2, was also determined in the temperature range 283 to 303 K. Our temperature-dependent values for kd and kSO2 are consistent with previously reported relative rate coefficients kd/kSO2 of (CH3)2COO formed from ozonolysis of tetramethyl ethylene. Quantum chemical calculations of kd for (CH3)2COO are consistent with the experiment, and the combination of experiment and theory for (CD3)2COO indicates that tunneling plays a significant role in (CH3)2COO unimolecular decomposition. The fast rates of unimolecular decomposition for (CH3)2COO measured here, in light of the relatively slow rate for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with water previously reported, suggest that thermal decomposition may compete with the reactions with water and with SO2 for atmospheric removal of the dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate.

  18. Modelling strategies for controlling SARS outbreaks.

    PubMed Central

    Gumel, Abba B.; Ruan, Shigui; Day, Troy; Watmough, James; Brauer, Fred; van den Driessche, P.; Gabrielson, Dave; Bowman, Chris; Alexander, Murray E.; Ardal, Sten; Wu, Jianhong; Sahai, Beni M.

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a new, highly contagious, viral disease, emerged in China late in 2002 and quickly spread to 32 countries and regions causing in excess of 774 deaths and 8098 infections worldwide. In the absence of a rapid diagnostic test, therapy or vaccine, isolation of individuals diagnosed with SARS and quarantine of individuals feared exposed to SARS virus were used to control the spread of infection. We examine mathematically the impact of isolation and quarantine on the control of SARS during the outbreaks in Toronto, Hong Kong, Singapore and Beijing using a deterministic model that closely mimics the data for cumulative infected cases and SARS-related deaths in the first three regions but not in Beijing until mid-April, when China started to report data more accurately. The results reveal that achieving a reduction in the contact rate between susceptible and diseased individuals by isolating the latter is a critically important strategy that can control SARS outbreaks with or without quarantine. An optimal isolation programme entails timely implementation under stringent hygienic precautions defined by a critical threshold value. Values below this threshold lead to control, but those above are associated with the incidence of new community outbreaks or nosocomial infections, a known cause for the spread of SARS in each region. Allocation of resources to implement optimal isolation is more effective than to implement sub-optimal isolation and quarantine together. A community-wide eradication of SARS is feasible if optimal isolation is combined with a highly effective screening programme at the points of entry. PMID:15539347

  19. A fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. R.; Cumming, I. G.; Lim, J.; Wedding, R. M.

    1983-01-01

    The launch of spaceborne SARs during the 1980's is discussed. The satellite SARs require high quality and high throughput ground processors. Compression ratios in range and azimuth of greater than 500 and 150 respectively lead to frequency domain processing and data computation rates in excess of 2000 million real operations per second for C-band SARs under consideration. Various hardware architectures are examined and two promising candidates and proceeds to recommend a fast, programmable hardware architecture for spaceborne SAR processing are selected. Modularity and programmability are introduced as desirable attributes for the purpose of HTSP hardware selection.

  20. Quarantine for SARS, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    King, Chwan-Chuan; Chen, Cathy W. S.; Ho, Mei-Shang; Lee, Jen-Yu; Liu, Feng-Chi; Wu, Yi-Chun

    2005-01-01

    During the 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan, >150,000 persons were quarantined, 24 of whom were later found to have laboratory-confirmed SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection. Since no evidence exists that SARS-CoV is infective before the onset of symptoms and the quarantined persons were exposed but not symptomatic, we thought the quarantine's effectiveness should be investigated. Using the Taiwan quarantine data, we found that the onset-to-diagnosis time of previously quarantined confirmed case-patients was significantly shortened compared to that for those who had not been quarantined. Thus, quarantine for SARS in Taiwan screened potentially infective persons for swift diagnosis and hospitalization after onset, thereby indirectly reducing infections. Full-scale quarantine measures implemented on April 28 led to a significant improvement in onset-to-diagnosis time of all SARS patients, regardless of previous quarantine status. We discuss the temporal effects of quarantine measures and other interventions on detection and isolation as well as the potential usefulness of quarantine in faster identification of persons with SARS and in improving isolation measures. PMID:15752447

  1. Energy transfer among CP29 chlorophylls: calculated Förster rates and experimental transient absorption at room temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Cinque, G; Croce, R; Holzwarth, A; Bassi, R

    2000-01-01

    The energy transfer rates between chlorophylls in the light harvesting complex CP29 of higher plants at room temperature were calculated ab initio according to the Förster mechanism (Förster T. 1948, Ann. Physik. 2:55-67). Recently, the transition moment orientation of CP29 chlorophylls was determined by differential linear dichroism and absorption spectroscopy of wild-type versus mutant proteins in which single chromophores were missing (Simonetto R., Crimi M., Sandonà D., Croce R., Cinque G., Breton J., and Bassi R. 1999. Biochemistry. 38:12974-12983). In this way the Q(y) transition energy and chlorophyll a/b affinity of each binding site was obtained and their characteristics supported by reconstruction of steady-state linear dichroism and absorption spectra at room temperature. In this study, the spectral form of individual chlorophyll a and b ligands within the protein environment was experimentally determined, and their extinction coefficients were also used to evaluate the absolute overlap integral between donors and acceptors employing the Stepanov relation for both the emission spectrum and the Stokes shift. This information was used to calculate the time-dependent excitation redistribution among CP29 chlorophylls on solving numerically the Pauli master equation of the complex: transient absorption measurements in the (sub)picosecond time scale were simulated and compared to pump-and-probe experimental data in the Q(y) region on the native CP29 at room temperature upon selective excitation of chlorophylls b at 640 or 650 nm. The kinetic model indicates a bidirectional excitation transfer over all CP29 chlorophylls a species, which is particularly rapid between the pure sites A1-A2 and A4-A5. Chlorophylls b in mixed sites act mostly as energy donors for chlorophylls a, whereas site B5 shows high and bidirectional coupling independent of the pigment hosted. PMID:11023879

  2. High repetition rate laser produced soft x-ray source for ultrafast x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    PubMed

    Fourmaux, S; Lecherbourg, L; Harmand, M; Servol, M; Kieffer, J C

    2007-11-01

    Recent progress in high intensity ultrafast laser systems provides the opportunity to produce laser plasma x-ray sources exhibiting broad spectrum and high average x-ray flux that are well adapted to x-ray absorption measurements. In this paper, the development of a laser based x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) beamline exhibiting high repetition rate by using the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility 100 Hz laser system (100 mJ, 35 fs at 800 nm) is presented. This system is based on a broadband tantalum solid target soft x-ray source and a grazing incidence grating spectrometer in the 1-5 nm wavelength range. To demonstrate the high potential of this laser based XANES technique in condensed matter physics, material science, or biology, measurements realized with several samples are presented: VO2 vanadium L edge, Si3N4 nitrogen K edge, and BPDA/PPD polyimide carbon K edge. The characteristics of this laser based beamline are discussed in terms of brightness, signal to noise ratio, and compared to conventional synchrotron broadband x-ray sources which allow achieving similar measurements. Apart from the very compact size and the relative low cost, the main advantages of such a laser based soft x-ray source are the picosecond pulse duration and the perfect synchronization between this x-ray probe and a laser pulse excitation which open the way to the realization of time resolved x-ray absorption measurements with picosecond range time resolution to study the dynamics of ultrafast processes and phase transition.

  3. High repetition rate laser produced soft x-ray source for ultrafast x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fourmaux, S.; Lecherbourg, L.; Harmand, M.; Servol, M.; Kieffer, J. C.

    2007-11-15

    Recent progress in high intensity ultrafast laser systems provides the opportunity to produce laser plasma x-ray sources exhibiting broad spectrum and high average x-ray flux that are well adapted to x-ray absorption measurements. In this paper, the development of a laser based x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) beamline exhibiting high repetition rate by using the Advanced Laser Light Source (ALLS) facility 100 Hz laser system (100 mJ, 35 fs at 800 nm) is presented. This system is based on a broadband tantalum solid target soft x-ray source and a grazing incidence grating spectrometer in the 1-5 nm wavelength range. To demonstrate the high potential of this laser based XANES technique in condensed matter physics, material science, or biology, measurements realized with several samples are presented: VO{sub 2} vanadium L edge, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nitrogen K edge, and BPDA/PPD polyimide carbon K edge. The characteristics of this laser based beamline are discussed in terms of brightness, signal to noise ratio, and compared to conventional synchrotron broadband x-ray sources which allow achieving similar measurements. Apart from the very compact size and the relative low cost, the main advantages of such a laser based soft x-ray source are the picosecond pulse duration and the perfect synchronization between this x-ray probe and a laser pulse excitation which open the way to the realization of time resolved x-ray absorption measurements with picosecond range time resolution to study the dynamics of ultrafast processes and phase transition.

  4. SAR antenna calibration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.; Newell, A. C.

    1978-01-01

    Calibration of SAR antennas requires a measurement of gain, elevation and azimuth pattern shape, boresight error, cross-polarization levels, and phase vs. angle and frequency. For spaceborne SAR antennas of SEASAT size operating at C-band or higher, some of these measurements can become extremely difficult using conventional far-field antenna test ranges. Near-field scanning techniques offer an alternative approach and for C-band or X-band SARs, give much improved accuracy and precision as compared to that obtainable with a far-field approach.

  5. Block adaptive quantization of Magellan SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Ronald; Johnson, William T. K.

    1989-01-01

    A report is presented on a data compression scheme that will be used to reduce the SAR data rate on the NASA Magellan mission to Venus. The spacecraft has only one scientific instrument, a radar system for imaging the surface, for altimetric profiling of the planet topography, and for measuring radiation from the planet surface. A straightforward implementation of the scientific requirements of the mission results in a data rate higher than can be accommodated by the available system bandwidth. A data-rate-reduction scheme which includes operation of the radar in burst mode and block-adaptive quantization of the SAR data is selected to satisfy the scientific requirements. Descriptions of the quantization scheme and its hardware implementation are given. Burst-mode SAR operation is also briefly discussed.

  6. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. The absorption and metabolism of a single L-menthol oral versus skin administration: Effects on thermogenesis and metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Valente, Angelica; Carrillo, Andres E; Tzatzarakis, Manolis N; Vakonaki, Elena; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Kenny, Glen P; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Flouris, Andreas D

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the absorption and metabolism pharmacokinetics of a single L-menthol oral versus skin administration and the effects on human thermogenesis and metabolic rate. Twenty healthy adults were randomly distributed into oral (capsule) and skin (gel) groups and treated with 10 mg kg(-1) L-menthol (ORALMENT; SKINMENT) or control (lactose capsule: ORALCON; water application: SKINCON) in a random order on two different days. Levels of serum L-menthol increased similarly in ORALMENT and SKINMENT (p > 0.05). L-menthol glucuronidation was greater in ORALMENT than SKINMENT (p < 0.05). Cutaneous vasoconstriction, rectal temperature and body heat storage showed greater increase following SKINMENT compared to ORALMENT and control conditions (p < 0.05). Metabolic rate increased from baseline by 18% in SKINMENT and 10% in ORALMENT and respiratory exchange ratio decreased more in ORALMENT (5.4%) than SKINMENT (4.8%) compared to control conditions (p < 0.05). Levels of plasma adiponectin and leptin as well as heart rate variability were similar to control following either treatment (p > 0.05). Participants reported no cold, shivering, discomfort, stress or skin irritation. We conclude that a single L-menthol skin administration increased thermogenesis and metabolic rate in humans. These effects are minor following L-menthol oral administration probably due to faster glucuronidation and greater blood menthol glucuronide levels.

  8. Ingestion of insoluble dietary fibre increased zinc and iron absorption and restored growth rate and zinc absorption suppressed by dietary phytate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hara, H; Asvarujanon, P; Aoyama, Y; Luangpituksa, P

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effects of ingestion of five types of insoluble fibre on growth and Zn absorption in rats fed a marginally Zn-deficient diet (6.75 mg (0.103 mmol) Zn/kg diet) with or without added sodium phytate (12.6 mmol/kg diet). The types of insoluble fibre tested were corn husks, watermelon skin, yam-bean root (Pachyrhizus erosus) and pineapple core, and cellulose was used as a control (100 g/kg diet). Body-weight gain in the cellulose groups was suppressed by 57 % by feeding phytate. Body-weight gain in phytate-fed rats was 80 % greater in the watermelon skin fibre and yam-bean root fibre group than that in the cellulose group. Zn absorption ratio in the cellulose groups was lowered by 46 and 70 % in the first (days 7-10) and second (days 16-19) measurement periods with feeding phytate. In the rats fed the phytate-containing diets, Zn absorption ratio in the watermelon skin, yam-bean root and pineapple core fibre groups was 140, 80 and 54 % higher respectively than that in the cellulose group, in the second period. Fe absorption was not suppressed by phytate, however, feeding of these three types of fibre promoted Fe absorption in rats fed phytate-free diets. The concentration of soluble Zn in the caecal contents in the watermelon skin fibre or yam-bean root fibre groups was identical to that in the control group in spite of a higher short-chain fatty acid concentration and lower pH in the caecum. These findings indicate that ingestion of these types of insoluble fibre recovered the growth and Zn absorption suppressed by feeding a high level of phytate, and factors other than caecal fermentation may also be involved in this effect of insoluble fibre.

  9. The correlation between mass-averaged SAR and temperature elevation in the human head model exposed to RF near-fields from 1 to 6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2009-12-07

    In the present study, we investigate the relationship between the mass-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature elevation in anatomically based Japanese head models due to the dipole antenna. A homogeneous cubical model is also used as a basis for the investigation. The frequency region considered is from 1 to 6 GHz. We focused on the averaging mass of SAR, which maximizes the correlation with local temperature elevation. An averaged SAR over 10 g was found to reasonably correlate with local temperature elevation even for frequencies from 3 to 6 GHz. The dominant factor influencing the correlation between mass-averaged SAR and temperature elevation is suggested to be the thermal diffusion length in biological tissue, together with the penetration depth of radio-frequency waves. The correlation of local temperature elevation to mass-averaged SAR is largely influenced by the blood perfusion rate, while at most 10% or less is due to the pinna, model inhomogeneity and the antenna position relative to the head model.

  10. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  11. Comparing the rates of absorption and weight loss during a desorption test using near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qassem, M; Kyriacou, P A

    2013-05-01

    The importance of determining skin hydration has over the years prompt the development of many instruments and methods, specifically designed to assess this parameter or water contents especially in the stratum corneum, and have greatly matured to suit different anatomical sites and measure multiple attributes. Of those, Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) has gained wide interest as a precise, safe, fast and noninvasive technique for determining skin hydration due to its high sensitivity to hydrogen bonding and ability to measure the amount of water in skin directly using the intensities of overtone and combination bands of OH and HOH water bonds occurring in the NIR region, that are good indicators of the state of skin hydration. This paper reports near infrared spectrophotometric measurements using a highly sophisticated spectrophotometer in the region of 1000-2500 nm to study the water uptake and dehydration properties of skin in vitro using samples of porcine skin. Initial results of pure liquid water and skin samples have clearly displayed the prominent bands associated with water content, and desorption tests have been able to verify changes in these bands associated with water content, although a clear correlation between the rates of weight loss and absorbance loss at various hydration periods has not yet been established. These preliminary results are expected to further explain the relationship between water and skin, and its role within, in hope to aid the future development of a portable instrument based on near infrared spectroscopy that would be capable of directly measuring skin hydration and/or water content in a fast and noninvasive manner.

  12. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  13. SARS Outbreak, Taiwan, 2003

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cathy W.S.; Hsu, Sze-Bi

    2004-01-01

    We studied the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Taiwan, using the daily case-reporting data from May 5 to June 4 to learn how it had spread so rapidly. Our results indicate that most SARS-infected persons had symptoms and were admitted before their infections were reclassified as probable cases. This finding could indicate efficient admission, slow reclassification process, or both. The high percentage of nosocomial infections in Taiwan suggests that infection from hospitalized patients with suspected, but not yet classified, cases is a major factor in the spread of disease. Delays in reclassification also contributed to the problem. Because accurate diagnostic testing for SARS is currently lacking, intervention measures aimed at more efficient diagnosis, isolation of suspected SARS patients, and reclassification procedures could greatly reduce the number of infections in future outbreaks. PMID:15030683

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-07

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  15. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  16. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  17. SAR versus VAR, and the size and shape that provide the most appropriate RF exposure metric in the range of 0.5-6 GHz.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Robert L; Anderson, Vitas

    2011-05-01

    Basic restrictions for protecting against localized tissue heating induced from exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields are typically specified as the specific energy absorption rate (SAR), which is mass averaged in recognition of the thermal diffusion properties of tissues. This article seeks to determine the most appropriate averaging mass (1, 3, 5, 7, or 10 g) and averaging shape (cube or sphere). We also consider an alternative metric, volumetric energy absorption rate (VAR), which uses volume averaging (over 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 cm(3) ; cube and sphere). The SAR and VAR averaging approaches were compared by considering which was a better predictor of tissue temperature rise (ΔT) induced by near- and far-field RF exposures (0.5-6 GHz), calculated in a detailed human body model. For the exposure scenarios that we examined, VAR is better correlated with ΔT than SAR, though not at a statistically significant level for most of the metric types we studied. However, as VAR offers substantive advantages in ease of assessment we recommend this metric over SAR. Averaging over a cube or a sphere provides equivalent levels of correlation with ΔT, and so we recommend choosing the averaging shape on the basis of which is easier to assess. The optimal averaging volume is 10 cm(3) for VAR, and the optimal mass is 10 g for SAR. The correlation between VAR or SAR and ΔT diminishes substantially at 6 GHz, where incident power flux density may be a better exposure metric.

  18. Stepped heating procedure for experimental SAR evaluation of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Iacob, N; Schinteie, G; Palade, P; Ticos, C M; Kuncser, V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a reliable procedure for the experimental determination of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in case of superparamagnetic Fe oxide nanoparticles dispersed in liquid environments. It is based on the acquisition of consecutive steps of time-temperature dependences along of both heating and cooling processes. Linear fitting of these recorded steps provides the heating and cooling speeds at different temperatures, which finally allow the determination of the heating profile in adiabatic-like conditions over a broad temperature range. The presented methodology represents on one hand, a useful alternative tool for the experimental evaluation of the heating capability of nanoparticulate systems for magnetic hyperthermia applications and on the other hand, gives support for a more accurate modeling of bio-heat transfer phenomena.

  19. Influence of patient mispositioning on SAR distribution and simulated temperature in regional deep hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Aklan, Bassim; Gierse, Pia; Hartmann, Josefin; Ott, Oliver J; Fietkau, Rainer; Bert, Christoph

    2017-06-21

    Patient positioning plays an important role in regional deep hyperthermia to obtain a successful hyperthermia treatment. In this study, the influence of possible patient mispositioning was systematically assessed on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distribution. With a finite difference time domain approach, the SAR and temperature distributions were predicted for six patients at 312 positions. Patient displacements and rotations as well as the combination of both were considered inside the Sigma-Eye applicator. Position sensitivity is assessed for hyperthermia treatment planning -guided steering, which relies on model-based optimization of the SAR and temperature distribution. The evaluation of the patient mispositioning was done with and without optimization. The evaluation without optimization was made by creating a treatment plan for the patient reference position in the center of the applicator and applied for all other positions, while the evaluation with optimization was based on creating an individual plan for each position. The parameter T90 was used for the temperature evaluation, which was defined as the temperature that covers 90% of the gross tumor volume (GTV). Furthermore, the hotspot tumor quotient (HTQ) was used as a goal function to assess the quality of the SAR and temperature distribution. The T90 was shown considerably dependent on the position within the applicator. Without optimization, the T90 was clearly decreased below 40 °C by patient shifts and the combination of shifts and rotations. However, the application of optimization for each positon led to an increase of T90 in the GTV. Position inaccuracies of less than 1 cm in the X-and Y-directions and 2 cm in the Z-direction, resulted in an increase of HTQ of less than 5%, which does not significantly affect the SAR and temperature distribution. Current positioning precision is sufficient in the X (right-left)-direction, but position accuracy is required in the Y-and Z-directions.

  20. Microscale temperature and SAR measurements in cell monolayer models exposed to millimeter waves.

    PubMed

    Zhadobov, Maxim; Alekseev, Stanislav I; Sauleau, Ronan; Le Page, Yann; Le Dréan, Yves; Fesenko, Evgeny E

    2017-01-01

    Due to shallow penetration of millimeter waves (MMW) and convection in liquid medium surrounding cells, the problem of accurate assessment of local MMW heating in in vitro experiments remains unsolved. Conventional dosimetric MMW techniques, such as infrared imaging or fiber optic (FO) sensors, face several inherent limits. Here we propose a methodology for accurate local temperature measurement and subsequent specific absorption rate (SAR) retrieval using microscale thermocouples (TC). SAR was retrieved by fitting the measured initial temperature rise to the numerical solution of an equivalent thermal model. It was found that the accuracy of temperature measurement depends on thermosensor size, that is, the smaller TC, the more accurate the temperature measurement. SAR determined using TC with lead diameters of 25 and 75 μm demonstrated 98.5% and 80.4% match with computed SAR, respectively. However, both TC provided the same temperature rises in long run (> 10 min). FO probe failed to measure adequately local heating both for short and long exposures due to the relatively large size of the probe sensor (400 μm) and time constant (0.6 s). Calculated SAR in the cell monolayer was almost two times lower than that in the surrounding liquid. It was shown that the impact of the cell monolayer on heating due to its small thickness (5 to 10 μm) can be considered as negligible. Moreover, we demonstrated the possibility of accurate measurement of MMW-induced thermal pulses (up to 10 °C) using 25 μm TC. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:11-21, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Influence of patient mispositioning on SAR distribution and simulated temperature in regional deep hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklan, Bassim; Gierse, Pia; Hartmann, Josefin; Ott, Oliver J.; Fietkau, Rainer; Bert, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    Patient positioning plays an important role in regional deep hyperthermia to obtain a successful hyperthermia treatment. In this study, the influence of possible patient mispositioning was systematically assessed on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distribution. With a finite difference time domain approach, the SAR and temperature distributions were predicted for six patients at 312 positions. Patient displacements and rotations as well as the combination of both were considered inside the Sigma-Eye applicator. Position sensitivity is assessed for hyperthermia treatment planning -guided steering, which relies on model-based optimization of the SAR and temperature distribution. The evaluation of the patient mispositioning was done with and without optimization. The evaluation without optimization was made by creating a treatment plan for the patient reference position in the center of the applicator and applied for all other positions, while the evaluation with optimization was based on creating an individual plan for each position. The parameter T90 was used for the temperature evaluation, which was defined as the temperature that covers 90% of the gross tumor volume (GTV). Furthermore, the hotspot tumor quotient (HTQ) was used as a goal function to assess the quality of the SAR and temperature distribution. The T90 was shown considerably dependent on the position within the applicator. Without optimization, the T90 was clearly decreased below 40 °C by patient shifts and the combination of shifts and rotations. However, the application of optimization for each positon led to an increase of T90 in the GTV. Position inaccuracies of less than 1 cm in the X-and Y-directions and 2 cm in the Z-direction, resulted in an increase of HTQ of less than 5%, which does not significantly affect the SAR and temperature distribution. Current positioning precision is sufficient in the X (right-left)-direction, but position accuracy is required in the Y-and Z-directions.

  2. Optical absorption and heating rate dependent glass transition in vanadyl doped calcium oxy-chloride borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, M. S.; Khasa, S.; Agarwal, A.

    2015-04-01

    Some important results pertaining to optical and thermal properties of vanadyl doped oxy-halide glasses in the chemical composition CaCl2-CaO-B2O3 are discussed. These glasses have been prepared by conventional melt quench technique. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles the amorphous nature of the doped glasses has been confirmed. The electronic polarizability is calculated and found to increase with increase in chloride content. The optical absorption spectra have been recorded in the frequency range of 200-3200 nm. Recorded spectra are analyzed to evaluate cut-off wavelength (λcut-off), optical band gap (Eg), band tailing (B), Urbach energy (ΔE) and refractive index (n). Thermal analysis has been carried out for the prepared glasses at three different heating rates viz. 5, 10 and 20 °C/min. The glass transition temperature (Tg) along with thermal activation energy (Ea) corresponding to each heating rate are evaluated from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermographs. It is found that Ea decrease and Tg increase with increase in heating rate. The variation in Tg is also observed with the substitution of calcium chloride in place of calcium oxide. The increasing and higher values of Ea suggest that prepared glasses have good thermal stability. Variation in Tg and Eg suggests that Cl- anions enter into the voids of borate network at low concentrations (<5.0%) and contribute to the network formation at high concentration (>5.0%).

  3. The influence of colloidal parameters on the specific power absorption of PAA-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to act as heat nano-sources by application of an alternating magnetic field has recently been studied due to their promising applications in biomedicine. The understanding of the magnetic relaxation mechanism in biocompatible nanoparticle systems is crucial in order to optimize the magnetic properties and maximize the specific absorption rate (SAR). With this aim, the SAR of magnetic dispersions containing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles bio-coated with polyacrylic acid of an average particle size of ≈10 nm has been evaluated separately by changing colloidal parameters such as the MNP concentration and the viscosity of the solvent. A remarkable decrease of the SAR values with increasing particle concentration and solvent viscosity was found. These behaviours have been discussed on the basis of the magnetic relaxation mechanisms involved. PACS: 80; 87; 87.85jf PMID:21711915

  4. Detection of antibodies against SARS-CoV in serum from SARS-infected donors with ELISA and Western blot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue-Dan; Li, Yan; Xu, Guo-Bin; Dong, Xue-Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Ang; Feng, Zhen-Ru; Tian, Chan; Chen, Wei Feng

    2004-11-01

    Recombinant fragments of S proteins from the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARA-CoV) were generated and used in a Western blot (WB) assay that was compared to a commercial SARS ELISA method. In 85% of confirmed SARS cases (n = 20), the S2 recombinant fragment based WB was positive and this was comparable to the commercial ELISA using heat killed SARS-CoV. WB using the other four recombinant fragments in confirmed SARS cases generated lower rates of detection (S1--75%, S1-N--25%, S1-C--55%). Evaluation of sera from healthy controls (n = 60) resulted in two weakly positive ELISA results with the remainder being negative while the S2 protein WB demonstrated three positive results from the 20 controls with a history of SARS contact and no positive results in 40 noncontact controls. A discrepancy between the ELISA and S2 WB arose when evaluating per-2003 sera from individuals (n = 10) with SARS-like symptoms (ELISA--100% positive, S2 WB--30% positive). These data suggest that the S2 WB assay may be particularly useful in ELISA-negative SARS cases and in some ELISA-positive non-SARS cases.

  5. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; Verhaart, R F; Verduijn, G M; Fortunati, V; Rijnen, Z; Franckena, M; van Rhoon, G C; Paulides, M M

    2015-02-07

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR₁₀g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR₁₀g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  6. SAR Simulation with Magneto Chiral Effects for Human Head Radiated from Cellular Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Silva, H.

    2008-09-01

    A numerical method for a microwave signal emitted by a cellular phone, propagating in a magneto-chiral media, characterized by an extended Born-Fedorov formalism, is presented. It is shown that the use of a cell model, combined with a real model of the human head, derived from the magnetic resonance of images allows a good determination of the near fields induced in the head when the brain chirality and the battery magnetic field are considered together. The results on a 2-Dim human head model show the evolution of the specific absorption rate, (SAR coefficient) and the spatial peak specific absorption rate which are sensitives to the magneto-chiral factor, which is important in the brain layer. For GSM/PCN phones, extremely low frequency real pulsed magnetic fields (in the order of 10 to 60 milligauss) are added to the model through the whole of the user's head. The more important conclusion of our work is that the head absorption is bigger than the results for a classical model without the magneto chiral effect. Hot spots are produced due to the combination of microwave and the magnetic field produced by the phone's operation. The FDTD method was used to compute the SARs inside the MRI based head models consisting of various tissues for 1.8 GHz. As a result, we found that in the head model having more than four kinds of tissue, the localized peak SAR reaches maximum inside the head for over five tissues including skin, bone, blood and brain cells.

  7. SAR transfer across different targets.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bijun; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2013-07-22

    Despite obvious relevance for the practice of medicinal chemistry, SAR transfer events have thus far only been little investigated in a systematic manner. Two types of SAR transfer can principally be distinguished. In target-based SAR (T_SAR) transfer, a series of corresponding analogs with different core structures display comparable potency progression against a given target. In addition, in series-based SAR (S_SAR) transfer, a given analog series shows comparable potency progression against two or more targets. Only a few studies have previously investigated T_SAR transfer. In these studies, T_SAR transfer series were frequently found for targets belonging to different families. By contrast, S_SAR transfer has thus far not been explored. It is currently unknown to what extent these S_SAR transfer events might occur in available compound data. We have devised an approach to detect S_SAR transfer and systematically searched public domain compound data for S_SAR transfer events. In total, 63 S_SAR transfer series involving two targets and 26 series involving three targets were identified. Series involving four targets were not found. The majority of S_SAR transfer series were identified for different subfamilies of G protein coupled receptors, but transfer series were also found for other target families. However, S_SAR transfer across different families was not observed. On average, S_SAR transfer series consisted of five to six analogs. The series were structurally diverse and represented SARs with varying degrees of continuity or discontinuity but displayed closely corresponding potency progression across related targets. All series and the corresponding source data sets are made freely available.

  8. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X™). The skin model consisted of a 30 µm stratum corneum, 350 µm epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 µm dermis. Five SGD of 60 µm radius and 300 µm height were embedded linearly with 370 µm separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 µm from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  9. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Shafirstein, Gal; Moros, Eduardo G

    2011-03-07

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X™). The skin model consisted of a 30 µm stratum corneum, 350 µm epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 µm dermis. Five SGD of 60 µm radius and 300 µm height were embedded linearly with 370 µm separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 µm from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  10. From complex B(1) mapping to local SAR estimation for human brain MR imaging using multi-channel transceiver coil at 7T.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortele, Pierre-Francois; Liu, Jiaen; He, Bin

    2013-06-01

    Elevated specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with increased main magnetic field strength remains a major safety concern in ultra-high-field (UHF) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications. The calculation of local SAR requires the knowledge of the electric field induced by radio-frequency (RF) excitation, and the local electrical properties of tissues. Since electric field distribution cannot be directly mapped in conventional MR measurements, SAR estimation is usually performed using numerical model-based electromagnetic simulations which, however, are highly time consuming and cannot account for the specific anatomy and tissue properties of the subject undergoing a scan. In the present study, starting from the measurable RF magnetic fields (B1) in MRI, we conducted a series of mathematical deduction to estimate the local, voxel-wise and subject-specific SAR for each single coil element using a multi-channel transceiver array coil. We first evaluated the feasibility of this approach in numerical simulations including two different human head models. We further conducted experimental study in a physical phantom and in two human subjects at 7T using a multi-channel transceiver head coil. Accuracy of the results is discussed in the context of predicting local SAR in the human brain at UHF MRI using multi-channel RF transmission.

  11. From Complex B1 Mapping to Local SAR Estimation for Human Brain MR Imaging Using Multi-channel Transceiver Coil at 7T

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaotong; Schmitter, Sebastian; Van de Moortel, Pierre-François; Liu, Jiaen

    2014-01-01

    Elevated Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) associated with increased main magnetic field strength remains as a major safety concern in ultra-high-field (UHF) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) applications. The calculation of local SAR requires the knowledge of the electric field induced by radiofrequency (RF) excitation, and the local electrical properties of tissues. Since electric field distribution cannot be directly mapped in conventional MR measurements, SAR estimation is usually performed using numerical model-based electromagnetic simulations which, however, are highly time consuming and cannot account for the specific anatomy and tissue properties of the subject undergoing a scan. In the present study, starting from the measurable RF magnetic fields (B1) in MRI, we conducted a series of mathematical deduction to estimate the local, voxel-wise and subject-specific SAR for each single coil element using a multi-channel transceiver array coil. We first evaluated the feasibility of this approach in numerical simulations including two different human head models. We further conducted experimental study in a physical phantom and in two human subjects at 7T using a multi-channel transceiver head coil. Accuracy of the results is discussed in the context of predicting local SAR in the human brain at UHF MRI using multi-channel RF transmission. PMID:23508259

  12. Local SAR near deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes at 64 and 127 MHz: A simulation study of the effect of extracranial loops.

    PubMed

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Angelone, Leonardo M; Iacono, Maria Ida; Katnani, Husam; Wald, Lawrence L; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2016-10-31

    MRI may cause brain tissue around deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes to become excessively hot, causing lesions. The presence of extracranial loops in the DBS lead trajectory has been shown to affect the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the radiofrequency energy at the electrode tip, but experimental studies have reported controversial results. The goal of this study was to perform a systematic numerical study to provide a better understanding of the effects of extracranial loops in DBS leads on the local SAR during MRI at 64 and 127 MHz. A total of 160 numerical simulations were performed on patient-derived data, in which relevant factors including lead length and trajectory, loop location and topology, and frequency of MRI radiofrequency (RF) transmitter were assessed. Overall, the presence of extracranial loops reduced the local SAR in the tissue around the DBS tip compared with straight trajectories with the same length. SAR reduction was significantly larger at 127 MHz compared with 64 MHz. SAR reduction was significantly more sensitive to variable loop parameters (eg, topology and location) at 127 MHz compared with 64 MHz. Lead management strategies could exist that significantly reduce the risks of 3 Tesla (T) MRI for DBS patients. Magn Reson Med, 2016. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Whole-body-averaged SAR from 50 MHz to 4 GHz in the University of Florida child voxel phantoms.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, Peter; Bolch, Wesley

    2007-11-21

    The University of Florida (UF) Series B paediatric phantoms were developed for medical and radiation protection photon dosimetry. The series includes a 9 month male, a 4 year female, an 8 year female, an 11 year male and a 14 year male. In this paper they have been adapted to calculate the whole-body-averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in children for plane wave exposure from 50 MHz to 4 GHz. The consideration of children is important in the application of the ICNIRP public exposure reference levels above approximately 1 GHz. The uniformly scaled models of NORMAN and NAOMI suggest that the ICNIRP reference level does not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body-averaged SAR restriction for 5 year and 1 year old models. Comparison is made with the previous linearly scaled versions of NORMAN and NAOMI for calculations at 2 mm resolution. Further FDTD calculations were performed at resolutions of 1 and 0.7 mm above 900 MHz to elucidate the effects of grid resolution on SAR. A comparison is made between the calculated external electric fields required to produce the basic restriction on the whole-body-averaged SAR and the ICNIRP reference levels for public exposure.

  14. Whole-body-averaged SAR from 50 MHz to 4 GHz in the University of Florida child voxel phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter; Bolch, Wesley

    2007-11-01

    The University of Florida (UF) Series B paediatric phantoms were developed for medical and radiation protection photon dosimetry. The series includes a 9 month male, a 4 year female, an 8 year female, an 11 year male and a 14 year male. In this paper they have been adapted to calculate the whole-body-averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in children for plane wave exposure from 50 MHz to 4 GHz. The consideration of children is important in the application of the ICNIRP public exposure reference levels above ~1 GHz. The uniformly scaled models of NORMAN and NAOMI suggest that the ICNIRP reference level does not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body-averaged SAR restriction for 5 year and 1 year old models. Comparison is made with the previous linearly scaled versions of NORMAN and NAOMI for calculations at 2 mm resolution. Further FDTD calculations were performed at resolutions of 1 and 0.7 mm above 900 MHz to elucidate the effects of grid resolution on SAR. A comparison is made between the calculated external electric fields required to produce the basic restriction on the whole-body-averaged SAR and the ICNIRP reference levels for public exposure.

  15. SAR and temperature distribution in the rat head model exposed to electromagnetic field radiation by 900 MHz dipole antenna.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Hao, Dongmei; Wu, Shuicai; Zhong, Rugang; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-06-01

    Rats are often used in the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure experiments. In the study for the effect of 900 MHz EMF exposure on learning and memory in SD rats, the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the temperature rise in the rat head are numerically evaluated. The digital anatomical model of a SD rat is reconstructed with the MRI images. Numerical method as finite difference time domain has been applied to assess the SAR and the temperature rise during the exposure. Measurements and simulations are conducted to characterize the net radiated power of the dipole to provide a precise dosimetric result. The whole-body average SAR and the localized SAR averaging over 1, 0.5 and 0.05 g mass for different organs/tissues are given. It reveals that during the given exposure experiment setup, no significant temperature rise occurs. The reconstructed anatomical rat model could be used in the EMF simulation and the dosimetric result provides useful information for the biological effect studies.

  16. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  17. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  18. SAR target recognition based on improved sparse LSSVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangrong; Zhang, Yifan; Jiao, Licheng

    2009-10-01

    An Improved Fast Sparse Least Squares Support Vector Machine (IFSLSSVM) is proposed for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) target recognition. Least Squares Support Vector Machine (LSSVM) is a least square version of Support Vector Machine (SVM), but it lacks the sparseness compared with SVM. IFSLSSVM, which combines the incremental learning and decremental learning, selects those important samples as the support vectors, and implements pruning by a certain condition, can solve the non-sparse problem of LSSVM effectively. Benchmarking UCI datasets are firstly used for testing the performance of our algorithm, followed by SAR target recognition. Experimental results on MSTAR SAR dataset show that IFSLSSVM is an effective SAR target recognition approach (SAR-ATR), which not only reduces the number of support vectors but also enhances the recognition rate.

  19. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry to Monitor Land Subsidence in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Zahra; Valadan Zoej, Mohammad Javad; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2016-08-01

    This letter uses a combination of ADInSAR with a coherence optimization method. Polarimetric DInSAR is able to enhance pixel phase quality and thus coherent pixel density. The coherence optimization method is a search-based approach to find the optimized scattering mechanism introduced by Navarro-Sanchez [1]. The case study is southwest of Tehran basin located in the North of Iran. It suffers from a high-rate of land subsidence and is covered by agricultural fields. Usually such an area would significantly decorrelate but applying polarimetric ADInSAR it is possible to obtain a more coherent pixel coverage. A set of dual-pol TerraSAR-X images was ordered for polarimetric ADInSAR procedure. The coherence optimization method is shown to have increased the density and phase quality of coherent pixels significantly.

  20. Applications of independent component analysis in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiqi; Cai, Xinhua; Hui, Weihua; Xu, Ping

    2009-07-01

    The detection of faint, small and hidden targets in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is still an issue for automatic target recognition (ATR) system. How to effectively separate these targets from the complex background is the aim of this paper. Independent component analysis (ICA) theory can enhance SAR image targets and improve signal clutter ratio (SCR), which benefits to detect and recognize faint targets. Therefore, this paper proposes a new SAR image target detection algorithm based on ICA. In experimental process, the fast ICA (FICA) algorithm is utilized. Finally, some real SAR image data is used to test the method. The experimental results verify that the algorithm is feasible, and it can improve the SCR of SAR image and increase the detection rate for the faint small targets.

  1. SARS and Common Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Jill K.; Mark, Jennifer; Gavali, Shilpa S.; Yagi, Shigeo; Espinosa, Alex; Schnurr, David P.; Cossen, Cynthia K.; Isaacson, Erin R.; Glaser, Carol A.; Fischer, Marc; Reingold, Arthur L.; Vugia, Duc J.

    2004-01-01

    In California, molecular testing was useful in decreasing suspicion for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), by detecting common respiratory pathogens (influenza A/B, human metapneumovirus, picornavirus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia spp., parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in 23 (45%) of 51 patients with suspected SARS and 9 (47%) of 19 patients with probable SARS. PMID:15207072

  2. Effects of continuous and intermittent exposure to RF fields with a wide range of SARs on cell growth, survival, and cell cycle distribution.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Yoshio; Hirose, Hideki; Koyama, Shin; Suzuki, Yukihisa; Taki, Masao; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2006-07-01

    To examine the biological effects of radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields in vitro, we have examined the fundamental cellular responses, such as cell growth, survival, and cell cycle distribution, following exposure to a wide range of specific absorption rates (SAR). Furthermore, we compared the effects of continuous and intermittent exposure at high SARs. An RF electromagnetic field exposure unit operating at a frequency of 2.45 GHz was used to expose cells to SARs from 0.05 to 1500 W/kg. When cells were exposed to a continuous RF field at SARs from 0.05 to 100 W/kg for 2 h, cellular growth rate, survival, and cell cycle distribution were not affected. At 200 W/kg, the cell growth rate was suppressed and cell survival decreased. When the cells were exposed to an intermittent RF field at 300 W/kg(pk), 900 W/kg(pk) and 1500 W/kg(pk) (100 W/kg(mean)), no significant differences were observed between these conditions and intermittent wave exposure at 100 W/kg. When cells were exposed to a SAR of 50 W/kg for 2 h, the temperature of the medium around cells rose to 39.1 degrees C, 100 W/kg exposure increased the temperature to 41.0 degrees C, and 200 W/kg exposure increased the temperature to 44.1 degrees C. Exposure to RF radiation results in heating of the medium, and the thermal effect depends on the mean SAR. Hence, these results suggest that the proliferation disorder is caused by the thermal effect.

  3. A new high-absorption-rate Paracetamol 500-mg formulation: a comparative bioavailability study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Portolés, Antonio; Puerro, Miguel; Terleira, Ana; Rodríguez, Angel; Caturla, Maria-Cruz; Fernández, Nieves; Vargas, Emilio

    2003-01-01

    Background: Paracetamol is often the analgesic or antipyretic of choice, especially for patients for whom salicylates or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are contraindicated. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the absorption rate of a new tablet formulation of paracetamol (500 mg) with a reference formulation of paracetamol at the same dose. Methods: This was a single-center, Phase I, open-label, randomized, 2-period, crossover, single-dose, comparative bioavailability clinical trial. During both study periods, healthy volunteers were given a single oral dose of a more hydrophilic test formulation of paracetamol, or a reference formulation. Fifteen plasma samples were obtained to determine paracetamol concentrations and to calculate kinetic parameters. Results: The study participants comprised 24 healthy volunteers (12 men, 12 women; mean [SD] age, 22.8 [1.5] years). The pharmacokinetic parameters calculated for the test versus the reference formulation were as follows: median time to maximum concentration (Tmax), 0.42 versus 0.75 hour; mean (SD) maximum plasma drug concentration (Cmax), 9.85 (2.40) μg/mL versus 8.33 (2.22) μg/mL; and mean (SD) area under the plasma concentration–time curve from time 0 to infinity (AUC0–∞), 30.16 (8.87) μg·h/mL versus 28.49 (8.57) μg · h/mL. The 90% CIs of the ratios were as follows: base e logarithm (Ln)-transformed Cmax, 105.08% to 137.59%; Ln-AUC0–∞, 102.02% to 110.43%; and the difference in Tmax, −0.375 to −0.085 hours. Conclusions: The speed of release and absorption was statistically significantly higher with the test formulation compared with the reference one (evaluated using Tmax, Cmax, and Cmax/AUC parameters). This speed is especially important for a rapid analgesic or antipyretic effect. PMID:24944391

  4. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss

    PubMed Central

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel; Nath, Sangeeta; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Burns, Andrew S.; Ranjan, Piyush; Sarode, Neha; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Padilla, Cory C.; Stone, Benjamin K.; Bristow, Laura A.; Larsen, Morten; Glass, Jennifer B.; Thamdrup, Bo; Woyke, Tanja; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Stewart, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. DNA sequences from SAR11 are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes play important roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Evidence for anaerobic metabolism in SAR11 has not yet been observed, and the question of how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling is unanswered. Here, we identify the metabolic basis for SAR11 activity in anoxic ocean waters. Genomic analysis of single cells from the world’s largest OMZ revealed diverse and previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages that peak in abundance at anoxic depths, but are largely undetectable in oxygen-rich ocean regions. OMZ SAR11 contain adaptations to low oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalyzing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of all OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the zone of maximum nitrate reduction rates. These results redefine the ecological niche of Earth’s most abundant organismal group and suggest an important contribution of SAR11 to nitrite production in OMZs, and thus to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss. PMID:27487207

  5. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-09-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development.

  6. Understanding the T cell immune response in SARS coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Janice Oh, Hsueh-Ling; Ken-En Gan, Samuel; Bertoletti, Antonio; Tan, Yee-Joo

    2012-01-01

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic started in late 2002 and swiftly spread across 5 continents with a mortality rate of around 10%. Although the epidemic was eventually controlled through the implementation of strict quarantine measures, there continues a need to investigate the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and develop interventions should it re-emerge. Numerous studies have shown that neutralizing antibodies against the virus can be found in patients infected with SARS-CoV within days upon the onset of illness and lasting up to several months. In contrast, there is little data on the kinetics of T cell responses during SARS-CoV infection and little is known about their role in the recovery process. However, recent studies in mice suggest the importance of T cells in viral clearance during SARS-CoV infection. Moreover, a growing number of studies have investigated the memory T cell responses in recovered SARS patients. This review covers the available literature on the emerging importance of T cell responses in SARS-CoV infection, particularly on the mapping of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes, longevity, polyfunctionality and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association as well as their potential implications on treatment and vaccine development. PMID:26038429

  7. Minimal-SAR RF pulse optimization for parallel transmission in MRI.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinan; Ji, Jim X

    2008-01-01

    Parallel transmission is an emerging technique to achieve multi-dimensional spatially selective or modulated excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Minimizing Specific Absorption Ratio (SAR) is a critical issue in this technique for radio frequency power absorption safety. In this paper, we presented an automatic design method to minimize SAR in an optimization framework. The RF pulses and corresponding k-space trajectory are iteratively adjusted. The method is verified using computer simulations of a 4-channel parallel transmission system. The results showed significantly reduction in SAR can be achieved while the quality of the excited pattern is well preserved without enlonging the pulse duration.

  8. admetSAR: a comprehensive source and free tool for assessment of chemical ADMET properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Li, Weihua; Zhou, Yadi; Shen, Jie; Wu, Zengrui; Liu, Guixia; Lee, Philip W; Tang, Yun

    2012-11-26

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET) properties play key roles in the discovery/development of drugs, pesticides, food additives, consumer products, and industrial chemicals. This information is especially useful when to conduct environmental and human hazard assessment. The most critical rate limiting step in the chemical safety assessment workflow is the availability of high quality data. This paper describes an ADMET structure-activity relationship database, abbreviated as admetSAR. It is an open source, text and structure searchable, and continually updated database that collects, curates, and manages available ADMET-associated properties data from the published literature. In admetSAR, over 210,000 ADMET annotated data points for more than 96,000 unique compounds with 45 kinds of ADMET-associated properties, proteins, species, or organisms have been carefully curated from a large number of diverse literatures. The database provides a user-friendly interface to query a specific chemical profile, using either CAS registry number, common name, or structure similarity. In addition, the database includes 22 qualitative classification and 5 quantitative regression models with highly predictive accuracy, allowing to estimate ecological/mammalian ADMET properties for novel chemicals. AdmetSAR is accessible free of charge at http://www.admetexp.org.

  9. Occupational exposure assessment on an FM mast: electric field and SAR values.

    PubMed

    Valič, Blaž; Kos, Bor; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Electric field strengths normally exceed the reference levels for occupational exposure in close vicinity to large frequency modulation (FM) transmitters. Thus, a detailed investigation on compliance with basic restrictions is needed before any administrative protection measures are applied. We prepared a detailed numerical model of a 20-kW FM transmitter on a 32-m mast. An electrically isolated anatomical human model was placed in 3 different positions inside the mast in the region where the values of the electric field were highest. The electric field strengths in this region were up to 700 V/m. The highest calculated whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) was 0.48 W/kg, whereas the maximum 10-g average SAR in the head and trunk was 1.66 W/kg. The results show that the reference levels in the FM frequency range are very conservative for near field exposure. SAR values are not exceeded even for fields 10 times stronger than the reference levels.

  10. Simulation of SAR in the Human Body to Determine Effects of RF Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michiyama, Tetsuyuki; Nikawa, Yoshio

    The body area network (BAN) has attracted attention because of its potential for high-grade wireless communication technology and its safety and high durability. Also, human area transmission of a BAN propagating at an ultra-wide band (UWB) has been demonstrated recently. When considering the efficiency of electromagnetic (EM) propagation inside the human body for BAN and hyperthermia treatment using RF, it is important to determine the mechanism of EM dissipation in the human body. A body heating system for hyperthermia must deposit EM energy deep inside the body. Also, it is important that the EM field generated by the implant system is sufficiently strong. In this study, the specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution is simulated using an EM simulator to consider the biological transmission mechanism and its effects. To utilize the EM field distribution using an implant system for hyperthermia treatment, the SAR distribution inside the human body is simulated. As a result, the SAR distribution is concentrated on the surface of human tissue, the muscle-bolus interface, the pancreas, the stomach, the spleen and the regions around bones. It can also be concentrated in bone marrow and cartilage. From these results, the appropriate location for the implant system is revealed on the basis of the current distribution and differences in the wave impedance of interfacing tissues. The possibility of accurate data transmission and suitable treatment planning is confirmed.

  11. SAR in human head model due to resonant wireless power transfer system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Guoqiang; Li, Yanhong; Song, Xianjin

    2016-04-29

    Efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between transmitter and the receiver has been achieved based on the magnetic resonant coupling method. The influence of electromagnetic field on the human body due to resonant wireless power transfer system (RWPT) should be taken into account during the design process of the system. To analyze the transfer performance of the RWPT system and the change rules of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the human head model due to the RWPT system. The circuit-field coupling method for a RWPT system with consideration of the displacement current was presented. The relationship between the spiral coil parameters and transfer performance was studied. The SAR in the human head model was calculated under two different exposure conditions. A system with output power higher than 10 W at 0.2 m distance operating at a frequency of approximately 1 MHz was designed. The FEM simulation results show the peak SAR value is below the safety limit which appeared when the human head model is in front of the transmitter. The simulation results agreed well with the experimental results, which verified the validity of the analysis and design.

  12. Effect of high SARs produced by cell phone like radiofrequency fields on mollusk single neuron.

    PubMed

    Partsvania, B; Sulaberidze, T; Shoshiashvili, L

    2013-03-01

    During exposure to the cell phone electromagnetic field (EMF), some neurons in the brain at areas of peak specific absorption rate (SAR) absorb more electromagnetic energy than is permitted by existing guidelines. The goal of the present work was to investigate the influence of cell phone-like EMF signal on excitability and memory processes in single neurons. A Transverse Electromagnetic Cell (TEM Cell) was used to expose single neurons of mollusk to the EMF. Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method was used for modeling the TEM Cell and the EMF interactions with living nerve ganglion and neurons. Neuron electrophysiology was investigated using standard microelectrode technique. SAR deposited into the single neuron was calculated to be 8.2 W/kg with a temperature increment of 1.21°C. After acute exposure, the threshold of firing of action potentials (AP) was significantly decreased (p ≈ 0.001). Time of habituation to stimulation with the intracellular current injection was increased (p ≈ 0.003). These results indicate that acute exposure to EMF at high SARs impairs the ability of neurons to store information.

  13. Measurement of SAR-induced temperature increase in a phantom and in vivo with comparison to numerical simulation

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sukhoon; Ryu, Yeun-Chul; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Sica, Christopher T.; Collins, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Compare numerically-simulated and experimentally-measured temperature increase due to Specific energy Absorption Rate (SAR) from radiofrequency fields. Methods Temperature increase induced in both a phantom and in the human forearm when driving an adjacent circular surface coil was mapped using the proton resonance frequency shift technique of Magnetic Resonance (MR) thermography. The phantom and forearm were also modeled from MR image data, and both SAR and temperature change as induced by the same coil were simulated numerically. Results The simulated and measured temperature increase distributions were generally in good agreement for the phantom. The relative distributions for the human forearm were very similar, with the simulations giving maximum temperature increase about 25% higher than measured. Conclusion Although a number of parameters and uncertainties are involved, it should be possible to use numerical simulations to produce reasonably accurate and conservative estimates of temperature distribution to ensure safety in MR imaging. PMID:23804188

  14. Validation of experimental whole-body SAR assessment method in a complex indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Aliou; Joseph, Wout; Vermeeren, Gunter; Tanghe, Emmeric; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Andersen, Jørgen B; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Experimentally assessing the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR(wb) ) in a complex indoor environment is very challenging. An experimental method based on room electromagnetics theory (accounting only the line-of-sight as specular path) is validated using numerical simulations with the finite-difference time-domain method. Furthermore, the method accounts for diffuse multipath components (DMC) in the total absorption rate by considering the reverberation time of the investigated room, which describes all the losses in a complex indoor environment. The advantage of the proposed method is that it allows discarding the computational burden because it does not use any discretizations. Results show good agreement between measurement and computation at 2.8 GHz, as long as the plane wave assumption is valid, that is, at large distances from the transmitter. Relative deviations of 0.71% and 4% have been obtained for far-field scenarios, and 77.5% for the near field-scenario. The contribution of the DMC in the total absorption rate is also quantified here, which has never been investigated before. It is found that the DMC may represent an important part of the total absorption rate; its contribution may reach up to 90% for certain scenarios in an indoor environment.

  15. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  16. SARS: just another viral acronym?

    PubMed

    Broxmeyer, L

    2003-08-01

    Recent observations and experimental evidence have purported that a virus causes SARS, but such viruses have been isolated in only less than half of SARS patients in some studies and virologist Vincent Plummer of Winnipeg's National Microbiology Laboratory found that indeed 1 in 5 perfectly healthy Canadians with a history of recent travel to Asia had the virus. Therefore SARS microbiologic origins remain unclear. Outbreaks of multi-drug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis and the atypical mycobacteria simulate SARS on clinical, radiologic, epidemiologic, and diagnostic laboratory grounds and it is only logical then to include them in the differential to find a definitive cause and cure for SARS.

  17. The effect of MRET polymer compound on SAR values of RF phones.

    PubMed

    Smirnov, Igor

    2008-01-01

    This article is related to the proposed hypothesis and experimental data regarding the ability of defined polar polymer compound (MRET polymer) applied to RF phones to increase the dielectric permittivity of water based solutions and to reduce the SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) values inside the "phantom head" filled with the jelly simulating muscle and brain tissues. Due to the high organizational state of fractal structures of MRET polymer compounds and the phenomenon of piezoelectricity, this polymer generates specific subtle, low frequency, non-coherent electromagnetic oscillations (optimal random field) that can affect the hydrogen lattice of the molecular structure of water and subsequently modify the electrodynamic properties of water. The increase of dielectric permittivity of water finally leads to the reduction of the absorption rate of the electromagnetic field by living tissue. The reduction of SAR values is confirmed by the research conducted in June - July of 2006 at RF Exposure Laboratory in Escondido, California. This test also confirmed that the application of MRET polymer to RF phones does not significantly affect the air measurements of RF phone signals, and subsequently does not lead to any significant distortion of transmitted RF signals.

  18. Simple SAR demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpa, Krzysztof; Misiurewicz, Jacek; Baranowski, Piotr; Wojdołowicz, Grzegorz

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple SAR radar demonstrator build using commercially available (COTS) components. For the microwave analog front end, a standard police radar microwave head has been used. The Motorola DSP processor board, equipped with ADC and DAC, has been used for generating of modulating signal and for signal acquisition. The raw radar signal (I and Q components) have been recorded on 2.5" HDD. The signal processing has been performed on standard PC computer after copying the recorded data. The aim of constructing simple and relatively cheap demonstrator was to provide the students the real-life unclassified radar signals and motivate them to test and develop various kinds of SAR and ISAR algorithms, including image formation, motion compensation and autofocusing. The simple microwave frontend hardware has a lot of non-idealities, so for obtaining nice SAR image it was necessary to develop the number of correction algorithms at the calibration stage. The SAR demonstrator have been tested using car as a moving platform. The flight tests with a small airborne platform are planned for the summer.

  19. A comparative numerical study of rotating and stationary RF coils in terms of flip angle and specific absorption rate for 7 T MRI.

    PubMed

    Trakic, A; Jin, J; Li, M Y; McClymont, D; Weber, E; Liu, F; Crozier, S

    2013-11-01

    While high-field magnetic resonance imaging promises improved image quality and faster scan time, it is affected by non-uniform flip angle distributions and unsafe specific absorption rate levels within the patient, as a result of the complicated radiofrequency (RF) field-tissue interactions. This numerical study explored the possibility of using a single mechanically rotating RF coil for RF shimming and specific absorption rate management applications at 7 T. In particular, this new approach (with three different RF coil element arrangements) was compared against both an 8-channel parallel coil array and a birdcage volume coil, with and without RF current optimisation. The evaluation was conducted using an in-house developed and validated finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with a tissue-equivalent human head model. It was found that, without current optimisation, the rotating RF coil method produced a more uniform flip angle distribution and a lower maximum global and local specific absorption rate compared to the 8-channel parallel coil array and birdcage resonator. In addition, due to the large number of degrees of freedom in the form of rotated sensitivity profiles, the rotating RF coil approach exhibited good RF shimming and specific absorption rate management performance. This suggests that the proposed method can be useful in the development of techniques that address contemporary RF issues associated with high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. A comparative numerical study of rotating and stationary RF coils in terms of flip angle and specific absorption rate for 7 T MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trakic, A.; Jin, J.; Li, M. Y.; McClymont, D.; Weber, E.; Liu, F.; Crozier, S.

    2013-11-01

    While high-field magnetic resonance imaging promises improved image quality and faster scan time, it is affected by non-uniform flip angle distributions and unsafe specific absorption rate levels within the patient, as a result of the complicated radiofrequency (RF) field - tissue interactions. This numerical study explored the possibility of using a single mechanically rotating RF coil for RF shimming and specific absorption rate management applications at 7 T. In particular, this new approach (with three different RF coil element arrangements) was compared against both an 8-channel parallel coil array and a birdcage volume coil, with and without RF current optimisation. The evaluation was conducted using an in-house developed and validated finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with a tissue-equivalent human head model. It was found that, without current optimisation, the rotating RF coil method produced a more uniform flip angle distribution and a lower maximum global and local specific absorption rate compared to the 8-channel parallel coil array and birdcage resonator. In addition, due to the large number of degrees of freedom in the form of rotated sensitivity profiles, the rotating RF coil approach exhibited good RF shimming and specific absorption rate management performance. This suggests that the proposed method can be useful in the development of techniques that address contemporary RF issues associated with high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  2. SARS in Hospital Emergency Room

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yee-Chun; Huang, Li-Min; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Su, Chan-Ping; Chang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Mei-Ling; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chen, Wen-Jone; Lin, Fang-Yue; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) occurred after exposure in the emergency room at the National Taiwan University Hospital. The index patient was linked to an outbreak at a nearby municipal hospital. Three clusters were identified over a 3-week period. The first cluster (5 patients) and the second cluster (14 patients) occurred among patients, family members, and nursing aids. The third cluster (12 patients) occurred exclusively among healthcare workers. Six healthcare workers had close contact with SARS patients. Six others, with different working patterns, indicated that they did not have contact with a SARS patient. Environmental surveys found 9 of 119 samples of inanimate objects to be positive for SARS coronavirus RNA. These observations indicate that although transmission by direct contact with known SARS patients was responsible for most cases, environmental contamination with the SARS coronavirus may have lead to infection among healthcare workers without documented contact with known hospitalized SARS patients. PMID:15200809

  3. Mixed base of hydrophilic ointment and purified lanolin to improve the drug release rate and absorption of water of minocycline hydrochloride ointment for treatment of bedsores.

    PubMed

    Shigeyama, M; Ohgaya, T; Kawashima, Y; Takeuchi, H; Hino, T

    1999-06-01

    A desired ointment bases for better treatment of bedsores was developed to improve the release rate of minocycline hydrochloride (MH) and the water absorption capacity using various types of hydrophobic to hydrophilic ointment base. The influence of purified lanolin (PL) on the release behavior of MH from hydrophilic ointment (HO) base was primarily focused on. It was found that the release rate of drug increased with increase in the hydrophilicity of the base. A linear correlation between the apparent release rate constant of drug from the HO and PL mixed ointment base at various combination ratios and the elution of ointment base was noted. The HO ointment base containing 30% PL had the highest apparent release rate constant of MH. The mixed ointment base with the lowest viscosity showed the highest absorption of water and elution of ointment base. In conclusion, it was found that HO (70%) and PL (30%) mixed ointment base was a promising candidate for better treatment of bedsores.

  4. EARSEC SAR processing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protheroe, Mark; Sloggett, David R.; Sieber, Alois J.

    1994-12-01

    Traditionally, the production of high quality Synthetic Aperture Radar imagery has been an area where a potential user would have to expend large amounts of money in either the bespoke development of a processing chain dedicated to his requirements or in the purchase of a dedicated hardware platform adapted using accelerator boards and enhanced memory management. Whichever option the user adopted there were limitations based on the desire for a realistic throughput in data load and time. The user had a choice, made early in the purchase, for either a system that adopted innovative algorithmic manipulation, to limit the processing time of the purchase of expensive hardware. The former limits the quality of the product, while the latter excludes the user from any visibility into the processing chain. Clearly there was a need for a SAR processing architecture that gave the user a choice into the methodology to be adopted for a particular processing sequence, allowing him to decide on either a quick (lower quality) product or a detailed slower (high quality) product, without having to change the algorithmic base of his processor or the hardware platform. The European Commission, through the Advanced Techniques unit of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) Institute for Remote Sensing at Ispra in Italy, realizing the limitations on current processing abilities, initiated its own program to build airborne SAR and Electro-Optical (EO) sensor systems. This program is called the European Airborne Remote Sensing Capabilities (EARSEC) program. This paper describes the processing system developed for the airborne SAR sensor system. The paper considers the requirements for the system and the design of the EARSEC Airborne SAR Processing System. It highlights the development of an open SAR processing architecture where users have full access to intermediate products that arise from each of the major processing stages. It also describes the main processing stages in the overall

  5. Real-time optical processor prototype for remote SAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Doucet, Michel; Harnisch, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Bourqui, Pascal; Legros, Mathieu; Desnoyers, Nichola; Guillot, Ludovic; Mercier, Luc; Savard, Maxime; Martel, Anne; Châteauneuf, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2009-09-01

    A Compact Real-Time Optical SAR Processor has been successfully developed and tested. SAR, or Synthetic Aperture Radar, is a powerful tool providing enhanced day and night imaging capabilities. SAR systems typically generate large amounts of information generally in the form of complex data that are difficult to compress. Specifically, for planetary missions and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems with limited communication data rates this is a clear disadvantage. SAR images are typically processed electronically applying dedicated Fourier transformations. This, however, can also be performed optically in real-time. Indeed, the first SAR images have been optically processed. The optical processor architecture provides inherent parallel computing capabilities that can be used advantageously for the SAR data processing. Onboard SAR image generation would provide local access to processed information paving the way for real-time decision-making. This could eventually benefit navigation strategy and instrument orientation decisions. Moreover, for interplanetary missions, onboard analysis of images could provide important feature identification clues and could help select the appropriate images to be transmitted to Earth, consequently helping bandwidth management. This could ultimately reduce the data throughput requirements and related transmission bandwidth. This paper reviews the design of a compact optical SAR processor prototype that would reduce power, weight, and size requirements and reviews the analysis of SAR image generation using the table-top optical processor. Various SAR processor parameters such as processing capabilities, image quality (point target analysis), weight and size are reviewed. Results of image generation from simulated point targets as well as real satellite-acquired raw data are presented.

  6. Initial analysis of SAR from a cell phone inside a vehicle by numerical computation.

    PubMed

    Anzaldi, Gabriel; Silva, Ferran; Fernández, Mireya; Quílez, Marcos; Riu, Pere J

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the influence of the metallic structures of a realistic car body frame on the specific absorption rate (SAR) produced by a cell phone when a complete human body model is placed at different locations inside the vehicle, and to identify the relevant parameters responsible for these changes. The modeling and analysis of the whole system was conducted by means of computer simulations based on the full wave finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numerical method. The excitation considered was an 835 MHz lambda/2 dipole located as a hands-free communication device or as a hand-held portable system. We compared the SAR at different planes on the human model, placed inside the vehicle with respect to the free space situation. The presence of the car body frame significantly changes the SAR distributions, especially when the dipole is far from the body. Although the results are not conclusive on this point, this change in SAR distribution is not likely to produce an increase above the limits in current guidelines for partial body exposure, but may be significant for whole-body exposure. The most relevant change found was the change in the impedance of the dipole, affecting the radiated power. A complementary result from the electromagnetic computations performed is the change in the electromagnetic field distribution inside a vehicle when human bodies are present. The whole vehicle model has been optimized to provide accurate results for sources placed inside the vehicle, while keeping low requirements for computer storage and simulation time.

  7. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-01

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application.

  8. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-01-01

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application. PMID:27924935

  9. A New SAR Image Segmentation Algorithm for the Detection of Target and Shadow Regions.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiqi; Huang, Wenzhun; Zhang, Ting

    2016-12-07

    The most distinctive characteristic of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is that it can acquire data under all weather conditions and at all times. However, its coherent imaging mechanism introduces a great deal of speckle noise into SAR images, which makes the segmentation of target and shadow regions in SAR images very difficult. This paper proposes a new SAR image segmentation method based on wavelet decomposition and a constant false alarm rate (WD-CFAR). The WD-CFAR algorithm not only is insensitive to the speckle noise in SAR images but also can segment target and shadow regions simultaneously, and it is also able to effectively segment SAR images with a low signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). Experiments were performed to assess the performance of the new algorithm on various SAR images. The experimental results show that the proposed method is effective and feasible and possesses good characteristics for general application.

  10. Time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in transmission mode on liquids at MHz repetition rates.

    PubMed

    Fondell, Mattis; Eckert, Sebastian; Jay, Raphael M; Weniger, Christian; Quevedo, Wilson; Niskanen, Johannes; Kennedy, Brian; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Schick, Daniel; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Adamczyk, Katrin; Huse, Nils; Wernet, Philippe; Mitzner, Rolf; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    We present a setup combining a liquid flatjet sample delivery and a MHz laser system for time-resolved soft X-ray absorption measurements of liquid samples at the high brilliance undulator beamline UE52-SGM at Bessy II yielding unprecedented statistics in this spectral range. We demonstrate that the efficient detection of transient absorption changes in transmission mode enables the identification of photoexcited species in dilute samples. With iron(II)-trisbipyridine in aqueous solution as a benchmark system, we present absorption measurements at various edges in the soft X-ray regime. In combination with the wavelength tunability of the laser system, the set-up opens up opportunities to study the photochemistry of many systems at low concentrations, relevant to materials sciences, chemistry, and biology.

  11. Time-resolved soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy in transmission mode on liquids at MHz repetition rates

    PubMed Central

    Fondell, Mattis; Eckert, Sebastian; Jay, Raphael M.; Weniger, Christian; Quevedo, Wilson; Niskanen, Johannes; Kennedy, Brian; Sorgenfrei, Florian; Schick, Daniel; Giangrisostomi, Erika; Ovsyannikov, Ruslan; Adamczyk, Katrin; Huse, Nils; Wernet, Philippe; Mitzner, Rolf; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We present a setup combining a liquid flatjet sample delivery and a MHz laser system for time-resolved soft X-ray absorption measurements of liquid samples at the high brilliance undulator beamline UE52-SGM at Bessy II yielding unprecedented statistics in this spectral range. We demonstrate that the efficient detection of transient absorption changes in transmission mode enables the identification of photoexcited species in dilute samples. With iron(II)-trisbipyridine in aqueous solution as a benchmark system, we present absorption measurements at various edges in the soft X-ray regime. In combination with the wavelength tunability of the laser system, the set-up opens up opportunities to study the photochemistry of many systems at low concentrations, relevant to materials sciences, chemistry, and biology. PMID:28852689

  12. [Study on intestinal absorption rate of glucose electrolyte solution during enteral resuscitation of 35% total body surface area burn injury in dog].

    PubMed

    Che, Jin-wei; Hu, Sen; Du, Ying; Bao, Cheng-mei; Tian, Yi-jun; Wang, Lei; Sheng, Zhi-yong

    2008-03-01

    To investigate the intestinal absorption rate of glucose-electrolyte solution (GES) during enteral resuscitation of burn injury in Beagle dogs, and compare the effect of enteral intake with that of intravenous infusion resuscitation. Twelve male Beagle dogs were subjected to a 35% total body surface area (TBSA) full-thickness flame III degree injury. Thirty minutes after burn, each dog was given either enteral resuscitation with a GES (EGES group) or intravenous resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution (IVLR group), and the amount and speed of replenishment of fluid were in accordance with Parkland formula. In the first 8 hours post burn, intestinal absorption rates of water and Na+ were continuously assessed using phenol red as a nonabsorbable marker for water absorption rate. The plasma volume (PV) was measured by the dye (indocyanine green) dilution technique, and the plasma concentration of Na+, mean arterial pressure (MAP) cardiac output (CO), and urine volume were also determined in the first 8 hours. All above measurement were performed in animals without anesthesia. At the end of 8-hour-period of experiment, the remnant fluids in the intestine were collected to calculate the total volume of fluid absorbed in 8 hours. The intestinal absorption rates of water and Na+ reduced markedly down to lowest level (21% and 37% of pre-injury level) at 3.5 hours post burn, and then increased slowly. But the mean absorption rate of water was similar to infusing rate according to Parkland formula [(99+/-47) mlxh(-1)xm(-1) vs. (81+/-11) mlxh(-1)xm(-1), P>0.05]. The total fluid absorbed by intestine was (94.8+/-3.7)% of the total fluid infused within 8 hours post burn. There were no significant differences in plasma concentration of Na+, MAP and CO between two groups at 8 hours post burn. The urine volume and PV at 4 hours in EGES group were lower than those in IVLR group (both P<0.05), but those indexes at 8 hours showed no significant difference between two groups

  13. Evaluation of SAR in a human body model due to wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka; Tsuchida, Shogo; Hirata, Akimasa; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    2012-08-07

    This study discusses a computational method for calculating the specific absorption rate (SAR) due to a wireless power transmission system in the 10 MHz frequency band. A two-step quasi-static method comprised of the method of moments and the scalar potential finite-difference method are proposed. The applicability of the quasi-static approximation for localized exposure in this frequency band is discussed by comparing the SAR in a lossy dielectric cylinder computed with a full-wave electromagnetic analysis and the quasi-static approximation. From the computational results, the input impedance of the resonant coils was affected by the existence of the cylinder. On the other hand, the magnetic field distribution in free space and considering the cylinder and an impedance matching circuit were in good agreement; the maximum difference in the amplitude of the magnetic field was 4.8%. For a cylinder-coil distance of 10 mm, the difference between the peak 10 g averaged SAR in the cylinder computed with the full-wave electromagnetic method and our quasi-static method was 7.8%. These results suggest that the quasi-static approach is applicable for conducting the dosimetry of wireless power transmission in the 10 MHz band. With our two-step quasi-static method, the SAR in the anatomically based model was computed for different exposure scenarios. From those computations, the allowable input power satisfying the limit of a peak 10 g averaged SAR of 2.0 W kg(-1) was 830 W in the worst case exposure scenario with a coil positioned at a distance of 30 mm from the chest.

  14. Very High Resolution SAR and Multichannel SAR/MTI

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    single channel SAR system: • Detection outside the clutter bandwidth • Chirp slope analysis • Chirp filter bank • MTI via multilook images (change...53343 Wachtberg, Germany berens@fgan.de ABSTRACT SAR is widely used today in earth observation and is a potential means for military surveillance...However, systems only operating in the basic SAR mode will be superseded by new developments which fulfil much more user demands. Highest resolution

  15. Hospital Preparedness and SARS

    PubMed Central

    Wallington, Tamara; Rutledge, Tim; Mederski, Barbara; Rose, Keith; Kwolek, Sue; McRitchie, Donna; Ali, Azra; Wolff, Bryan; White, Diane; Glassman, Edward; Ofner, Marianna; Low, Don E.; Berger, Lisa; McGeer, Allison; Wong, Tom; Baron, David; Berall, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    On May 23, 2003, Toronto experienced the second phase of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. Ninety cases were confirmed, and >620 potential cases were managed. More than 9,000 persons had contact with confirmed or potential case-patients; many required quarantine. The main hospital involved during the second outbreak was North York General Hospital. We review this hospital’s response to, and management of, this outbreak, including such factors as building preparation and engineering, personnel, departmental workload, policies and documentation, infection control, personal protective equipment, training and education, public health, management and administration, follow-up of SARS patients, and psychological and psychosocial management and research. We also make recommendations for other institutions to prepare for future outbreaks, regardless of their origin. PMID:15200807

  16. Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Joan T.

    In August of 2007, the Los Angeles Police Department pioneered a Suspicious Activity Report (SAR) program that enabled local, state and federal law enforcement agencies to, for the first time, gather and share information about suspicious activities with a possible nexus to terrorism. The SAR program established an information platform at the local level that previously didn’t exist and had the potential to connect many of the country’s police departments, thus shifting local law enforcement’s approach to terrorism from a reactive to a preventative model. It also essentially flipped the age-old paradigm in which information was pushed from the federal to the local level. Now local police departments are valuable players in the information sharing process and are increasingly relied on to provide their federal partners with an accurate picture of what is happening at the local level.

  17. Aseismic events in Southern California: Detection with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.; McGuire, J. J.; Lundgren, P.

    2007-05-01

    Aseismic slow slip events are usually studied using data types that have a dense temporal sampling rate, such as continuous GPS or tremor analysis using seismic data. However, even the sparser temporal coverage of InSAR data can further our understanding of these events in three significant ways - First, in areas where aseismic transients have been detected on geodetic arrays, InSAR may be able to provide a spatially denser image of the extent and magnitude of deformation. Second, InSAR observations are complementary to GPS because of the differing sensitivities to horizontal and vertical motions. Thirdly, in areas with no ground-based geodetic instrumentation, InSAR can be used in survey mode to detect deformation signals that are not associated with any observed seismicity. The temporal constraints on such signals may not be tight enough to allow for dynamics models of how aseismic transients occur, but InSAR-only detections can improve our understanding of the spatial extent of these types of events and can also identify key areas for future instrumentation and observation. Here, I summarize some of the contributions of InSAR observations of slow slip events, including data spanning the 2005 Obsidian Buttes swam in the Salton Trough, CA, and InSAR time-series results for the Salton Trough using both traditional interferometry and the persistent scatterer method.

  18. Circular SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven

    2014-06-01

    We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target SAR responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel SAR chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).

  19. Mixed jamming method for SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong-feng; Zhang, Peng; Wang, Yong-sheng

    2007-11-01

    The mixed jamming method of synthetic aperture radar is analyzed and discussed. The methods of active noise and deception jamming and the signal model of transmitting is described. The raw echo signal of SAR and the model of jammed echo signal are expatiated, the characteristic of SAR and the evaluating method of jamming effect are established. Finally, the mixed jamming imaging of SAR is simulated.

  20. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  1. SAR Educational Resources From ASF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.

    2006-12-01

    In parallel with developing software tools specifically for SAR data, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) has a long history of supporting users in the use of the tools and the data. Over the years a number of educational resources have been developed as well. ASF distributes a number of educational CDs (Glacier Power, Dynamic Planet, and Ends of the Earth) that cover a wide range of imagery and applications. In addition, an extensive and frequently updated SAR bibliograpy is made available to users through the ASF website. Summer courses in SAR/InSAR and its applications are offered for credit and are being well received by the user community. The summer courses allow users to get a complete overview about SAR and InSAR as well as all the relevant techniques within an intense two week time frame. In order to explain the various processing steps in a Range-Doppler SAR Processor in detail the SAR Training Processor (STP) has been developed. This enhanced debugging mode of the fully functional, regular SAR processor allows the user to save all the intermediate products and have full control over all processing steps and parameters. This way, the user can evaluate the results of omitting a processing step or changing Doppler parameters. For the future, tailor made offsite training courses and workshops are planned. Updates on these can be found at http://www.asf.alaska.edu/educational/index.html.

  2. [Study on cadmium absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Jing, Rui-Jun; Dong, Wei-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng; Liu, Hong

    2006-08-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of cadmium absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results show that the cadmium absorption amount in pumpkin increased with the increase in cadmium concentration. Meanwhile the cadmium absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time. Eight hours after being cultured in the liquid, the cadmium absorption amount became saturated. The cadmium absorption rate reached the peak after 2 hours, then the absorption rate gradually reduced. The cadmium absorption amount in pumpkin is less in acid or alkali compared with neutral condition. And the absorption amount became minimum in pH 3, while maximum in pH 7.

  3. Deformation Monitoring of Urban Infrastructure by Tomographic SAR Using Multi-View TerraSAR-X Data Stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montazeri, Sina; Zhu, Xiaoxiang; Eineder, Michael; Hanssen, Ramon F.; Bamler, Richard

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Tomography (TomoSAR) coupled with data from modern SAR sensors, such as the German TerraSAR-X (TS-X) produces the most detailed three-dimensional (3D) maps by distinguishing among multiple scatterers within a resolution cell. Furthermore, multi-temporal TomoSAR allows for recording the underlying deformation phenomenon of each individual scatterer. One of the limitations of using InSAR techniques, including TomoSAR, is that they only measure deformation along the radar Line-of-Sight (LOS). In order to enhance the understanding of deformation, a decomposition of the observed LOS displacement into the 3D deformation vector in the local coordinate system is desired. In this paper we propose a method, based on L1 norm minimization within local spatial cubes, to reconstruct 3D deformation vectors from TomoSAR point clouds available from, at least, three different viewing geometries. The methodology is applied on two pair of cross-heading TS-X spotlight image stacks over the city of Berlin. The linear deformation rate and amplitude of seasonal deformation are decomposed and the results from two individual test sites with remarkable deformation patterns are discussed in details.

  4. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. RF dosimetry: a comparison between power absorption of female and male numerical models from 0.1 to 4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, L.; Vaccari, A.; Malacarne, C.; Cristoforetti, L.; Pontalti, R.

    2004-11-01

    Realistic numerical models of human subjects and their surrounding environment represent the basic points of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic dosimetry. This also involves differentiating the human models in men and women, possibly with different body shapes and postures. In this context, the aims of this paper are, firstly, to propose a female dielectric anatomical model (fDAM) and, secondly, to compare the power absorption distributions of a male and a female model from 0.1 to 4 GHz. For realizing the fDAM, a magnetic resonance imaging tomographer to acquire images and a recent technique which avoids the discrete segmentation of body tissues into different types have been used. Simulations have been performed with the FDTD method by using a novel filtering-based subgridding algorithm. The latter is applied here for the first time to dosimetry, allowing an abrupt mesh refinement by a factor of up to 7. The results show that the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) of the female model is higher than that of the male counterpart, mainly because of a thicker subcutaneous fat layer. In contrast, the maximum averaged SAR over 1 g (1gA-SAR) and 10 g (10gA-SAR) does not depend on gender, because it occurs in regions where no subcutaneous fat layer is present.

  6. Feasibility of using linearly polarized rotating birdcage transmitters and close-fitting receive arrays in MRI to reduce SAR in the vicinity of deep brain simulation implants.

    PubMed

    Golestanirad, Laleh; Keil, Boris; Angelone, Leonardo M; Bonmassar, Giorgio; Mareyam, Azma; Wald, Lawrence L

    2017-04-01

    MRI of patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) implants is strictly limited due to safety concerns, including high levels of local specific absorption rate (SAR) of radiofrequency (RF) fields near the implant and related RF-induced heating. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a rotating linearly polarized birdcage transmitter and a 32-channel close-fit receive array to significantly reduce local SAR in MRI of DBS patients. Electromagnetic simulations and phantom experiments were performed with generic DBS lead geometries and implantation paths. The technique was based on mechanically rotating a linear birdcage transmitter to align its zero electric-field region with the implant while using a close-fit receive array to significantly increase signal to noise ratio of the images. It was found that the zero electric-field region of the transmitter is thick enough at 1.5 Tesla to encompass DBS lead trajectories with wire segments that were up to 30 degrees out of plane, as well as leads with looped segments. Moreover, SAR reduction was not sensitive to tissue properties, and insertion of a close-fit 32-channel receive array did not degrade the SAR reduction performance. The ensemble of rotating linear birdcage and 32-channel close-fit receive array introduces a promising technology for future improvement of imaging in patients with DBS implants. Magn Reson Med 77:1701-1712, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  7. SAR and thermal response effects of a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil in a magnetic induction sensor on a human head.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyi; Liu, Peiguo; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the radiation safety of a newly designed magnetic induction sensor. This novel magnetic induction sensor uses a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil (TAASC) as the exciter. A human head model with a real anatomical structure was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature change. Computer Simulation Technology (CST) was used to determine the values of the peak 10-g SAR under different operating parameters (current, frequency, horizontal distance between the excitation coil and the receiver coil, vertical distance between the top of the head model and the XOY plane, position of excitation coil, and volume of hemorrhage). Then, the highest response for the SAR and temperature rise was determined. The results showed that this new magnetic induction sensor is safe in the initial state; for safety reasons, the TAASC current should not exceed 4 A. The scalp tissue absorbed most of the electromagnetic energy. The TAASC's SAR/thermal performance was close to that of the circular coil.

  8. Analytical SAR-GMTI principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Majumder, Uttam K.; Barnes, Christopher; Sobota, David; Minardi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides analytical principles to relate the signature of a moving target to parameters in a SAR system. Our objective is to establish analytical tools that could predict the shift and smearing of a moving target in a subaperture SAR image. Hence, a user could identify the system parameters such as the coherent processing interval for a subaperture that is suitable to localize the signature of a moving target for detection, tracking and geolocating the moving target. The paper begins by outlining two well-known SAR data collection methods to detect moving targets. One uses a scanning beam in the azimuth domain with a relatively high PRF to separate the moving targets and the stationary background (clutter); this is also known as Doppler Beam Sharpening. The other scheme uses two receivers along the track to null the clutter and, thus, provide GMTI. We also present results on implementing our SAR-GMTI analytical principles for the anticipated shift and smearing of a moving target in a simulated code. The code would provide a tool for the user to change the SAR system and moving target parameters, and predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image for a scene that is composed of both stationary and moving targets. Hence, the SAR simulation and imaging code could be used to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the above analytical principles to predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image.

  9. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  10. Ambiguities analysis in SAR tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziwei; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Chao; Tang, Yixian; Zhang, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture radar tomography (TomoSAR) is typically used to retrieve elevation, deformation, and other key information by separating scatters of the same slant range in multiple baseline SAR images. In this paper, we investigate two kinds of ambiguities for TomoSAR. Rank-1 ambiguity, as the first one we concerned, is due to the baseline distribution of the SAR image dataset which makes the steering matrix out of full rank. It will result in false alarms appearing in a permanent distance. However, an example using the TomoSAR imaging parameters shows this ambiguity makes no sense in most cases. The second ambiguity refers to the coherence of scatters contained in one pixel. In simulation experiment, the coherence will enhance the side lobes of the spectrum, even make the real peaks fused.

  11. Addition of sodium bicarbonate to either 1 or 2 feedings of colostrum replacer: effect on uptake and rate of absorption of immunoglobulin G in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Cabral, R G; Kent, E J; Haines, D M; Erickson, P S

    2012-06-01

    Forty Holstein dairy calves were blocked by birth date and sex, and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments within each block to elucidate the effect of feeding regimen and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) supplementation on absorption of IgG from colostrum replacer (CR). Calves received CR containing 191.4 g of IgG fed either in 1 feeding at 0 h (within 45 min of birth), with or without 30 g of NaHCO₃, or in 2 feedings (127.6 g of IgG at 0 h, with or without 20 g of NaHCO₃, and 63.8 g of IgG at 6 h, with or without 10 g of NaHCO₃). The treatments were (1) 1 feeding of CR+0 g of NaHCO₃; (2) 1 feeding of CR+30 g of NaHCO₃; (3) 2 feedings of CR+0 g of NaHCO₃; and (4) 2 feedings of CR+30 g total of NaHCO₃. Only calves born with no dystocia were used on this study. Blood samples were taken at 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24h postpartum and were analyzed for IgG using a radial immunoassay. Results indicated that, individually, feeding regimen and NaHCO₃ treatments had no effect. However, the interaction was significant for 24-h IgG and area under the curve, and showed a trend for apparent efficiency of absorption. Absorption rate data indicated that, for calves fed within 45 min of birth, most IgG absorption occurred in the first 6 h after birth. From 6 to 12 h postpartum, IgG absorption started to decrease; however, IgG absorption remained higher for calves fed in a single feeding than in 2 feedings. These data indicated that NaHCO₃ may increase IgG absorption when calves are fed colostrum in a single feeding but is not beneficial when colostrum is fed in 2 feedings.

  12. Rate-controlled rectal absorption enhancement of cefoxitin by co-administration of sodium salicylate or sodium octanoate in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Van Hoogdalem, E J; Wackwitz, A T; De Boer, A G; Cohen, A F; Breimer, D D

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of sodium octanoate and sodium salicylate on the rectal absorption of cefoxitin were investigated in healthy volunteers. Drug solutions were given either as a bolus or as a zero-order infusion. 2. On rectal infusion sodium octanoate and sodium salicylate both enhanced mean cefoxitin bioavailability (+/- s.d.) from 5.0 +/- 1.2% to 9.1 +/- 1.3% and 9.2 +/- 1.5%, respectively. After rectal bolus delivery octanoate increased the mean cefoxitin bioavailability from 7 +/- 3% to 17 +/- 3%, whereas bolus salicylate did not produce a statistically significant effect. All formulations were well tolerated by the volunteers. 3. It is concluded that both octanoate and salicylate are capable of enhancing rectal cefoxitin absorption in man; rate of delivery seems to be an important factor. PMID:2706190

  13. The Alaska SAR processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carande, R. E.; Charny, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Alaska SAR processor was designed to process over 200 100 km x 100 km (Seasat like) frames per day from the raw SAR data, at a ground resolution of 30 m x 30 m from ERS-1, J-ERS-1, and Radarsat. The near real time processor is a set of custom hardware modules operating in a pipelined architecture, controlled by a general purpose computer. Input to the processor is provided from a high density digital cassette recording of the raw data stream as received by the ground station. A two pass processing is performed. During the first pass clutter-lock and auto-focus measurements are made. The second pass uses the results to accomplish final image formation which is recorded on a high density digital cassette. The processing algorithm uses fast correlation techniques for range and azimuth compression. Radiometric compensation, interpolation and deskewing is also performed by the processor. The standard product of the ASP is a high resolution four-look image, with a low resolution (100 to 200 m) many look image provided simultaneously.

  14. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders following SARS: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Stainsby, Brynne; Howitt, Scott; Porr, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To detail the presentation of three health care workers diagnosed with sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) who later presented to a CMCC teaching clinic with neuromusculoskeletal sequelae and underwent conservative treatments. This case series aims to inform practitioners of the potential pathogenesis of these neuromuscular complaints and describes their treatment in a chiropractic practice. Clinical Features: Three patients presented with a variety of neurological, muscular and joint findings. Conservative treatment was aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing joint mobility, and improving ability to perform activities of daily living. Intervention and Outcome: The conservative treatment approach utilized in these cases involved spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, modalities, and rehabilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, disability indices, and return to work. Conclusion: Three patients previously diagnosed with SARS presented with neuromusculoskeletal complaints and subjectively experienced intermittent relief of pain and improvement in disability status after conservative treatments. PMID:21403780

  15. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders following SARS: a case series.

    PubMed

    Stainsby, Brynne; Howitt, Scott; Porr, Jason

    2011-03-01

    To detail the presentation of three health care workers diagnosed with sudden acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) who later presented to a CMCC teaching clinic with neuromusculoskeletal sequelae and underwent conservative treatments. This case series aims to inform practitioners of the potential pathogenesis of these neuromuscular complaints and describes their treatment in a chiropractic practice. Three patients presented with a variety of neurological, muscular and joint findings. Conservative treatment was aimed at decreasing hypertonic muscles, increasing joint mobility, and improving ability to perform activities of daily living. The conservative treatment approach utilized in these cases involved spinal manipulative therapy, soft tissue therapy, modalities, and rehabilitation. Outcome measures included subjective pain ratings, disability indices, and return to work. Three patients previously diagnosed with SARS presented with neuromusculoskeletal complaints and subjectively experienced intermittent relief of pain and improvement in disability status after conservative treatments.

  16. SARS in Three Categories of Hospital Workers, Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xilin; Leung, Ping-Chung; Chan, Louis; Wong, Eliza; Fong, Carmen; Tsui, Hi-Yi

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed attack rates for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in three categories of hospital workers (nurses, nonmedical support staff, and other technical or medical staff) in all public hospitals in Hong Kong that had admitted SARS patients. Of 16 such hospitals, 14 had cases. The overall attack rate was 1.20%. Nonmedical support staff had the highest attack rate (2.73%). The odds ratios of group nonmedical support staff versus those of nurses and of nonmedical support staff versus other technical or medical staff were 2.30 (p < 0.001) and 9.78 (p < 0.001), respectively. The number of affected staff and attack rates were significantly correlated with the number of SARS patients admitted (r = 0.914 and 0.686, respectively). Affected patients were concentrated in three hospitals and in the earlier phase of the epidemic. Cleaning and clerical staff on hospital wards were at a much higher risk. PMID:15496240

  17. Thermal Index Evaluation of Local SAR in MRI-Based Head Models of Adult and Children for Portable Telephones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu; Miyamoto, Kayoko; Wang, Jianqing

    Biological hazards due to radio-frequency (RF) waves result mainly from the temperature rise in tissue. It should be, therefore, clarified to what extent the RF waves of portable telephones increase the temperature-rise in human brain that includes the central part governing the body-temperature regulation function. In this paper, we calculated both the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the resultant temperature-rise for 900 MHz and 2 GHz portable telephones using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method for three typical use positions, i.e., the vertical position, cheek position and tilt position. As a result, we found that there was an increase for median and 1% value of the cumulative distribution of temperature-rise in children’s brains for any use positions of the portable telephones compared to that in the adult’s brain, and also that the increasing trend in children’s brains for temperature-rise is identical to the temperature-rise trend in children’s hypothalamus. In addition, we found that the ten-gram averaged peak SAR among the adult and children heads had the same trend as that of the 0.1% value of the relatively cumulative distribution of temperature-rise, which shows that the ten-gram averaged peak SAR reflects only the localized temperature-rise in the brain surface.

  18. Analysis of SAR distribution in human head of antenna used in wireless power transform based on magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gong, Feixiang; Wei, Zhiqiang; Cong, Yanping; Chi, Haokun; Yin, Bo; Sun, Mingui

    2017-07-20

    In this paper, a novel wireless power transfer antenna system was designed for human head implantable devices. The antenna system used the structure of three plates and four coils and operated at low frequencies to transfer power via near field. In order to verify the electromagnetic radiation safety on the human head, the electromagnetic intensity and specific absorption rate (SAR) were studied by finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) method. A three-layer model of human head including skin, bone and brain tissues was constructed. The transmitting and receiving antenna were set outside and inside the model. The local and average SAR were simulated at the resonance frequency of 18.67 MHz in two situations, in one scenario both transmitting and receiving coil worked, while in the other scenario only the transmitting coil worked. The results showed that the maximum of 10 g SAR average value of human thoracic were 0.142 W/kg and 0.148 W/kg, respectively, both were lower than the international safety standards for human body of the ICNIRP and FCC, which verified the safety of the human body in wireless power transmission based on magnetic coupling resonance.

  19. SAR and scan-time optimized 3D whole-brain double inversion recovery imaging at 7T.

    PubMed

    Pracht, Eberhard D; Feiweier, Thorsten; Ehses, Philipp; Brenner, Daniel; Roebroeck, Alard; Weber, Bernd; Stöcker, Tony

    2017-09-14

    The aim of this project was to implement an ultra-high field (UHF) optimized double inversion recovery (DIR) sequence for gray matter (GM) imaging, enabling whole brain coverage in short acquisition times ( ≈5 min, image resolution 1 mm(3) ). A 3D variable flip angle DIR turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence was optimized for UHF application. We implemented an improved, fast, and specific absorption rate (SAR) efficient TSE imaging module, utilizing improved reordering. The DIR preparation was tailored to UHF application. Additionally, fat artifacts were minimized by employing water excitation instead of fat saturation. GM images, covering the whole brain, were acquired in 7 min scan time at 1 mm isotropic resolution. SAR issues were overcome by using a dedicated flip angle calculation considering SAR and SNR efficiency. Furthermore, UHF related artifacts were minimized. The suggested sequence is suitable to generate GM images with whole-brain coverage at UHF. Due to the short total acquisition times and overall robustness, this approach can potentially enable DIR application in a routine setting and enhance lesion detection in neurological diseases. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. Assessment of the computational uncertainty of temperature rise and SAR in the eyes and brain under far-field exposure from 1 to 10 GHz.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka

    2009-06-07

    This paper presents finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the head under plane-wave exposure from 1 to 10 GHz using a resolution of 0.5 mm in adult male and female voxel models. Temperature rise due to the power absorption is calculated by the bioheat equation using a multigrid method solver. The computational accuracy is investigated by repeating the calculations with resolutions of 1 mm and 2 mm and comparing the results. Cubically averaged 10 g SAR in the eyes and brain and eye-averaged SAR are calculated and compared to the corresponding temperature rise as well as the recommended limits for exposure. The results suggest that 2 mm resolution should only be used for frequencies smaller than 2.5 GHz, and 1 mm resolution only under 5 GHz. Morphological differences in models seemed to be an important cause of variation: differences in results between the two different models were usually larger than the computational error due to the grid resolution, and larger than the difference between the results for open and closed eyes. Limiting the incident plane-wave power density to smaller than 100 W m(-2) was sufficient for ensuring that the temperature rise in the eyes and brain were less than 1 degrees C in the whole frequency range.

  1. Health Council of The Netherlands: no need to change from SAR to time-temperature relation in electromagnetic fields exposure limits.

    PubMed

    van Rhoon, Gerard C; Aleman, André; Kelfkens, Gert; Kromhout, Hans; Van Leeuwen, Flora E; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wadman, Wytse J; Van De Weerdt, Rik D H J; Zwamborn, A Peter M; Van Rongen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The Health Council of the Netherlands (HCN) and other organisations hold the basic assumption that induced electric current and the generation and absorption of heat in biological material caused by radiofrequency electromagnetic fields are the only causal effects with possible adverse consequences for human health that have been scientifically established to date. Hence, the exposure guidelines for the 10 MHz-10 GHz frequency range are based on avoiding adverse effects of increased temperatures that may occur of the entire human body at a specific absorption rate (SAR) level above 4 W/kg. During the workshop on Thermal Aspects of Radio Frequency Exposure on 11-12 January 2010 in Gaithersburg, Maryland, USA, the question was raised whether there would be a practical advantage in shifting from expressing the exposure limits in SAR to expressing them in terms of a maximum allowable temperature increase. This would mean defining adverse time-temperature thresholds. In this paper, the HCN discusses the need for this, considering six points: consistency, applicability, quantification, causality, comprehensibility and acceptability. The HCN concludes that it seems unlikely that a change of dosimetric quantity will help us forward in the discussion on the scientific controversies regarding the existence or non-existence of non-thermal effects in humans following long duration, low intensity exposure to electromagnetic fields. Therefore, the HCN favours maintaining the current approach of basic restrictions and reference levels being expressed as SAR and in V/m or µT, respectively.

  2. Assessment of the computational uncertainty of temperature rise and SAR in the eyes and brain under far-field exposure from 1 to 10 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laakso, Ilkka

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of specific absorption rate (SAR) values in the head under plane-wave exposure from 1 to 10 GHz using a resolution of 0.5 mm in adult male and female voxel models. Temperature rise due to the power absorption is calculated by the bioheat equation using a multigrid method solver. The computational accuracy is investigated by repeating the calculations with resolutions of 1 mm and 2 mm and comparing the results. Cubically averaged 10 g SAR in the eyes and brain and eye-averaged SAR are calculated and compared to the corresponding temperature rise as well as the recommended limits for exposure. The results suggest that 2 mm resolution should only be used for frequencies smaller than 2.5 GHz, and 1 mm resolution only under 5 GHz. Morphological differences in models seemed to be an important cause of variation: differences in results between the two different models were usually larger than the computational error due to the grid resolution, and larger than the difference between the results for open and closed eyes. Limiting the incident plane-wave power density to smaller than 100 W m-2 was sufficient for ensuring that the temperature rise in the eyes and brain were less than 1 °C in the whole frequency range.

  3. Human biokinetics of strontium. Part I: intestinal absorption rate and its impact on the dose coefficient of 90Sr after ingestion.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei Bo; Höllriegl, Vera; Roth, Paul; Oeh, Uwe

    2006-07-01

    Intestinal absorption of strontium (Sr) in thirteen healthy adult German volunteers has been investigated by simultaneous oral and intravenous administration of two stable tracer isotopes, i.e. (84)Sr and (86)Sr. The measured Sr tracer concentration in plasma was analyzed using the convolution integral technique to obtain the intestinal absorption rate. The results showed that the Sr labeled in different foodstuffs was absorbed into the body fluids in a large range of difference. The maximum Sr absorption rates were observed within 60-120 min after administration. The rate of absorption is used to evaluate the intestinal absorption fraction, i.e. the f (1) value for various foodstuffs. The equivalent and effective dose coefficients for ingestion of (90)Sr were calculated using these f (1) values, and they were compared with those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The geometric and arithmetic means of the f (1) values are 0.38 and 0.45 associated with a geometric standard deviation and a standard deviation of 1.88 and 0.22, respectively. The 90% confidence interval of the f (1) values obtained in the present study ranges from 0.13 to 0.98. Expressed as the ratio of the 95 and 50% percentiles of the estimated probability, the uncertainty for the f (1) value corresponds to a factor of 2.58. The effective dose coefficients of (90)Sr after ingestion are 6.1 x 10(-9) Sv Bq(-1) for an f(1) value of 0.05, 1.0 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.1, 1.9 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.2, 2.8 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.3, 3.6 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.4, 5.3 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.6, 7.1 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.8, and 7.9 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for 0.9, respectively. Taking the effective dose coefficient of 2.8 x 10(-8) Sv Bq(-1) for an f (1) value of 0.3, which is recommended by the ICRP, as a reference, the effective dose coefficient of (90)Sr after ingestion varies by a factor of 2.8 when the f (1) value changes by a factor of 3, i.e. it decreases

  4. Processor architecture for airborne SAR systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, C. M.

    1983-01-01

    Digital processors for spaceborne imaging radars and application of the technology developed for airborne SAR systems are considered. Transferring algorithms and implementation techniques from airborne to spaceborne SAR processors offers obvious advantages. The following topics are discussed: (1) a quantification of the differences in processing algorithms for airborne and spaceborne SARs; and (2) an overview of three processors for airborne SAR systems.

  5. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  6. InSAR Monitoring of Landslides using RADARSAT and Alos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Pierre-Jean, A.; Pavlic, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results of InSAR monitoring of several landslides using RADARDAT, and ALOS satellites. InSAR techniques are increasingly being used in slope stability assessment. Our research has shown that differential InSAR and coherent target monitoring techniques using field corner reflectors are useful to monitor landslide activity along strategic transportation and energy corridors. The Mackenzie Valley in northern Canada is experiencing one of the highest rates on mean annual air temperature for any region in Canada, thereby triggering melting in the permafrost, which results in active layer detachment slides. There are approximately 2000 landslides along the proposed Mackenzie Valley pipeline route. In addition, the Trans Canada Highway in the Canadian Rockies are affected by several rock avalanches and slow retrogressive slides. The ALOS PALSAR InSAR results show that we can observe deformation on both vegetated and exposed rock areas on the Little Smokey slide and the Frank Slide. RADARSAT-1 InSAR images indicate the different level of activity of the slopes (large and small) during different periods of the year. RADARSAT-2 is providing the high resolution rapid revisit capabilities needed to continuously monitor these active slopes along Canadian strategic energy and transportation corridors. The information produced by our InSAR activity maps on various landslides are used to realign the pipeline route in sensitive permafrost areas, and to install slope stability measures along the Trans-Canada and Provincial Highways. Using these different satellites we are able to develop guidelines for more reliable uses of these SAR missions Keywords: InSAR, landslides, RADARSAT, ALOS .

  7. [A study of absorption of energy of the extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in the rat skin by various dosimetric methods and approaches].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Sokolov, P A; Chemeris, N K

    2002-01-01

    Using experimental and theoretical methods of dosimetry, the energy absorption of extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR) in the skin of laboratory rats was analyzed. Specific absorption rate (SAR) in the skin was determined on the basis of both microthermometric measurements of initial rates of temperature rise in rat skin induced by the exposure and microcalorimetric measurements of specific heat of the skin. Theoretical calculations of SAR in the skin were performed with consideration for dielectric parameters of rat skin obtained from the measurements of the standing wave ratio upon reflection of electromagnetic waves from the skin surface and for the effective area of stationary overheating measured by infrared thermography. A numerical method was developed to determine electromagnetic wave energy reflected, absorbed, and transmitted in the model of flat layers. The algorithm of the method was realized in a computer program and used to calculate SAR in the skin on the basis of the complex dielectric constant of rat skin. The SAR values obtained from experimental measurements, theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are in good mutual correspondence and make about 220-280 W/kg at a frequency of 42.25 GHz and a power of 20 mW at the radiator output. The results obtained can be used for dosimetric supply of biomedical experiments on studying the physicochemical mechanisms of the biological effects of EHF EMR.

  8. Studies of ice sheet hydrology using SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R. A.; Vornberger, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of SAR data of the Greenland ice sheet in summer and winter suggest the use of SAR to monitor the temporal hydrology of ice sheets. Comparisons of each SAR data set with summer Landsat TM imagery show an areal-positive correlation with summer SAR data and a negative correlation with winter SAR data. It is proposed that the summer SAR data are most sensitive to the variable concentrations of free water in the surface snow and that the winter SAR data indicate variations in snow grain size.

  9. Enhanced Rates of Hydrogen Absorption Resulting from Oxidation of Pd and Internal Oxidation of Pd-Al Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1999-08-20

    The goal of this research was the determination of the relative rates before and after internal oxidation of Pd--Al alloys and oxidation (Pd) and this is independent of whether heat transfer is the rate-limiting step for the internally oxidized Pd--Al alloys rather than a more fundamental step.

  10. Determination of drug absorption rate in time-variant disposition by direct deconvolution using beta clearance correction and end-constrained non-parametric regression.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, S; Veng-Pedersen, P

    2005-11-01

    A novel numerical deconvolution method is presented that enables the estimation of drug absorption rates under time-variant disposition conditions. The method involves two components. (1) A disposition decomposition-recomposition (DDR) enabling exact changes in the unit impulse response (UIR) to be constructed based on centrally based clearance changes iteratively determined. (2) A non-parametric, end-constrained cubic spline (ECS) input response function estimated by cross-validation. The proposed DDR-ECS method compensates for disposition changes between the test and the reference administrations by using a "beta" clearance correction based on DDR analysis. The representation of the input response by the ECS method takes into consideration the complex absorption process and also ensures physiologically realistic approximations of the response. The stability of the new method to noisy data was evaluated by comprehensive simulations that considered different UIRs, various input functions, clearance changes and a novel scaling of the input function that includes the "flip-flop" absorption phenomena. The simulated input response was also analysed by two other methods and all three methods were compared for their relative performances. The DDR-ECS method provides better estimation of the input profile under significant clearance changes but tends to overestimate the input when there were only small changes in the clearance.

  11. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W.; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  12. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, F. L.; Ahr, H. A.; Ausherman, D. A.; Cutrona, L. J.; Francisco, S.; Harrison, R. E.; Heuser, J. S.; Jordan, R. L.; Justus, J.; Manning, B.

    1978-01-01

    The available and optimal methods for generating SAR imagery for NASA applications were identified. The SAR image quality and data processing requirements associated with these applications were studied. Mathematical operations and algorithms required to process sensor data into SAR imagery were defined. The architecture of SAR image formation processors was discussed, and technology necessary to implement the SAR data processors used in both general purpose and dedicated imaging systems was addressed.

  13. Spaceborne SAR sensor architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carver, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    Spaceborne imaging radars for the decade of the '90s will be called upon to provide increased illumination parameter flexibility, polar orbital coverage, and to operate from the same platform with other advanced sensors such as multilinear arrays. The potential information content in accurately merged microwave infrared, or microwave visible images is enormous by comparison to either radar images alone or visible/infrared images alone, since microwave images are principally responsive to surface geometry whereas visible/infrared images are highly sensitive to surface chemistry. A strawman system concept in which a SAR and multilinear array (MLA) are flown on a polar orbiting free flyer at 800 km altitude is discussed. Data would be relayed to ground via the TDRSS (or equivalent).

  14. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and psychological adaptation of the nurses in a structured SARS caring unit during outbreak: a prospective and periodic assessment study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Su, Tung-Ping; Lien, Te-Cheng; Yang, Chih-Yi; Su, Yiet Ling; Wang, Jia-Horng; Tsai, Sing-Ling; Yin, Jeo-Chen

    2007-01-01

    To assess the rapidly changing psychological status of nurses during the acute phase of the 2003 SARS outbreak, we conducted a prospective and periodic evaluation of psychiatric morbidity and psychological adaptation among nurses in SARS units and non-SARS units. Nurse participants were from two SARS units (regular SARS [N=44] and SARS ICU [N=26]) and two non-SARS units (Neurology [N=15] and CCU [N=17]). Participants periodically self-evaluated their depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, sleep disturbance, attitude towards SARS and family support. Results showed that depression (38.5% vs. 3.1%) and insomnia (37% vs. 9.7%) were, respectively, greater in the SARS unit nurses than the non-SARS unit nurses. No difference between these two groups was found in the prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms (33% vs. 18.7%), yet, three unit subjects (SARS ICU, SARS regular and Neurology) had significantly higher rate than those in CCU (29.7% vs. 11.8%, respectively) (p<0.05). For the SARS unit nurses, significant reduction in mood ratings, insomnia rate and perceived negative feelings as well as increasing knowledge and understanding of SARS at the end of the study (all p<0.001) indicated that a gradual psychological adaptation had occurred. The adjustment of nurses in the more structured SARS ICU environment, where nurses care for even more severely ill patients, may have been as good or better than that of nurses in the regular SARS unit. Occurrence of psychiatric symptoms was linked to direct exposure to SARS patient care, previous mood disorder history, younger age and perceived negative feelings. Positive coping attitude and strong social and family support may have protected against acute stress. In conclusion, the psychological impact on the caring staffs facing future bio-disaster will be minimized with lowered risk factors and a safer and more structured work environment.

  15. High energy, low repetition rate, photonic crystal fiber generated supercontinuum for nanosecond to millisecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kho, Julie L. H.; Rohde, Charles A.; Vanholsbeeck, Frédérique; Cather Simpson, M.

    2013-05-01

    High energy density per pulse (-15 dBm nm-1) supercontinuum (SC) source has been developed as a probe for transient absorption (TrA) spectroscopy of systems with lifetimes from nanoseconds to a few milliseconds. We have generated a 600-1600 nm, broadband SC by pumping a 15 m photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with relatively high power, 7 ns, 1064 nm pulses. The SC generated at peak pump power of 7.1 kW was randomly polarized and maintained a stable output (6.5% rms average power; 9.1% rms shot-to-shot power). Co-pumping with both 1064 and 532 nm light extended the wavelength range of the SC by about 20%, to 500-1700 nm. Power conversion efficiency and spectral flatness were improved as well. In the visible range, the single-pump SC shows a flatness of 5 dB while the dual-pump SC exhibits 3 dB. In the NIR (1100-1600 nm), the flatness in single- and dual-pump configurations were 3 and 2 dB, respectively. Optically induced fiber breakdown was characterized.

  16. The Influence of Low Salivary Flow Rates on the Absorption of a Sublingual Fentanyl Citrate Formulation for Breakthrough Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Davies, Andrew; Mundin, Gill; Vriens, Joanna; Webber, Kath; Buchanan, Alison; Waghorn, Melanie

    2016-03-01

    Salivary gland hypofunction may affect the absorption of drugs through the oral mucosa, which in turn may affect their clinical efficacy (e.g., onset of action). The aim of this study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of a sublingual fentanyl orally disintegrating tablet (Abstral, Prostrakan Inc.) in a group of cancer patients with salivary gland hypofunction. Nine cancer patients with salivary gland hypofunction underwent a series of three pharmacokinetic studies with the sublingual fentanyl orally disintegrating tablet. In the first phase, the patients received no pretreatment; in the second phase, the patients were allowed to moisten the oral cavity before dosing; in the third phase, the patients were given pilocarpine hydrochloride (saliva stimulant) before dosing. Fentanyl concentrations were measured using a method of high-performance liquid chromatography with validated tandem mass spectrometric detection. The Tmax was longer, the Cmax was lower, the AUC0-30 lower, and the AUClast lower in the phase involving no pretreatment; the Tmax/Cmax/AUC0-30/AUClast were similar in the phase involving moistening of the oral cavity and the phase involving giving pilocarpine hydrochloride. The pharmacokinetics of the sublingual fentanyl orally disintegrating tablet appear to be negatively affected by the presence of salivary gland hypofunction, although the moistening of the oral cavity before dosing results in a pharmacokinetic profile similar to that seen with the giving of pilocarpine hydrochloride. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Initial Point Selection and Validation in PS-InSAR Using Integrated Amplitude Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-25

    in PS-InSAR analysis can be summarized as: 1) oversampling with a factor 2 to avoid aliasing, 2) SAR image coregistration to the same radar grid, 3...are not caused by coregistration precision, which is for both methods around 0.1 pixel. The higher detection rate of the calibration validation

  18. Geodetic imaging of tectonic deformation with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Heresh

    Precise measurements of ground deformation across the plate boundaries are crucial observations to evaluate the location of strain localization and to understand the pattern of strain accumulation at depth. Such information can be used to evaluate the possible location and magnitude of future earthquakes. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) potentially can deliver small-scale (few mm/yr) ground displacement over long distances (hundreds of kilometers) across the plate boundaries and over continents. However, Given the ground displacement as our signal of interest, the InSAR observations of ground deformation are usually affected by several sources of systematic and random noises. In this dissertation I identify several sources of systematic and random noise, develop new methods to model and mitigate the systematic noise and to evaluate the uncertainty of the ground displacement measured with InSAR. I use the developed approach to characterize the tectonic deformation and evaluate the rate of strain accumulation along the Chaman fault system, the western boundary of the India with Eurasia tectonic plates. I evaluate the bias due to the topographic residuals in the InSAR range-change time-series and develope a new method to estimate the topographic residuals and mitigate the effect from the InSAR range-change time-series (Chapter 2). I develop a new method to evaluate the uncertainty of the InSAR velocity field due to the uncertainty of the satellite orbits (Chapter 3) and a new algorithm to automatically detect and correct the phase unwrapping errors in a dense network of interferograms (Chapter 4). I develop a new approach to evaluate the impact of systematic and stochastic components of the tropospheric delay on the InSAR displacement time-series and its uncertainty (Chapter 5). Using the new InSAR time-series approach developed in the previous chapters, I study the tectonic deformation across the western boundary of the India plate with Eurasia and

  19. Ingestion of a protein hydrolysate is accompanied by an accelerated in vivo digestion and absorption rate when compared with its intact protein.

    PubMed

    Koopman, René; Crombach, Nico; Gijsen, Annemie P; Walrand, Stéphane; Fauquant, Jacques; Kies, Arie K; Lemosquet, Sophie; Saris, Wim H M; Boirie, Yves; van Loon, Luc J C

    2009-07-01

    It has been suggested that a protein hydrolysate, as opposed to its intact protein, is more easily digested and absorbed from the gut, which results in greater plasma amino acid availability and a greater muscle protein synthetic response. We aimed to compare dietary protein digestion and absorption kinetics and the subsequent muscle protein synthetic response to the ingestion of a single bolus of protein hydrolysate compared with its intact protein in vivo in humans. Ten elderly men (mean +/- SEM age: 64 +/- 1 y) were randomly assigned to a crossover experiment that involved 2 treatments in which the subjects consumed a 35-g bolus of specifically produced L-[1-(13)C]phenylalanine-labeled intact casein (CAS) or hydrolyzed casein (CASH). Blood and muscle-tissue samples were collected to assess the appearance rate of dietary protein-derived phenylalanine in the circulation and subsequent muscle protein fractional synthetic rate over a 6-h postprandial period. The mean (+/-SEM) exogenous phenylalanine appearance rate was 27 +/- 6% higher after ingestion of CASH than after ingestion of CAS (P < 0.001). Splanchnic extraction was significantly lower in CASH compared with CAS treatment (P < 0.01). Plasma amino acid concentrations increased to a greater extent (25-50%) after the ingestion of CASH than after the ingestion of CAS (P < 0.01). Muscle protein synthesis rates averaged 0.054 +/- 0.004% and 0.068 +/- 0.006%/h in the CAS and CASH treatments, respectively (P = 0.10). Ingestion of a protein hydrolysate, as opposed to its intact protein, accelerates protein digestion and absorption from the gut, augments postprandial amino acid availability, and tends to increase the incorporation rate of dietary amino acids into skeletal muscle protein.

  20. In vitro dermal absorption rate testing of certain chemicals of interest to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration: summary and evaluation of USEPA's mandated testing.

    PubMed

    Fasano, William J; McDougal, James N

    2008-07-01

    In 2004, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) published a final test rule in the US Federal Register requiring in vitro dermal penetration rate testing for selected industrial chemicals. The test rule described procedures for determining a permeability coefficient (Kp) and two short-term dermal absorption rates at 10 and 60min using human cadaver skin mounted in an in vitro diffusion cell model. According to the USEPA announcement, the selected chemicals were to be spiked with their radiolabeled form and tested in either water, isopropyl myristate (IPM) or neat depending on their physical character at room temperature, their aqueous solubility, their potential to damage the skin and their ability to achieve the study endpoints as prescribed. Overall, and for the majority of chemicals, the short-term absorption rates were higher at 10min than at 60min and the portion of applied dose remaining in the skin at the end of the exposure period was greater than the portion of dose that had penetrated through the skin and was detected in the receptor solution. In contrast to this, the amount of chemical in the receptor solution at study termination for the Kp (steady-state) experiments was greater than the amount remaining in the skin. For the Kp experiments, which lasted from 2 to 48h, a majority of skins exposed to neat chemical exhibited a reduced barrier function. However, integrity was mostly unaltered for skins from the short-term experiments and Kp experiments using chemicals applied either in water or IPM. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model-predicted Kp values were in fair agreement with experimental data for those chemicals that were applied in a water vehicle when the integrity of the skin was not compromised. However, QSAR-derived Kp values were not predictive for those chemicals when applied in IPM vehicle or neat. Absorption predictions, based on the measured Kp and steady-state flux data for chemicals applied in

  1. SAR imaging - Seeing the unseen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, M.

    1982-01-01

    The functional abilities and operations of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are described. SAR employs long wavelength radio waves in bursts, imaging a target by 'listening' to the small frequency changes that result from the Doppler shift due to the relative motion of the imaging craft and the motions of the target. The time delay of the signal return allows a determination of the location of the target, leading to the build up of a two-dimensional image. The uses of both Doppler shifts and time delay enable detailed imagery which is independent of distance. The synthetic aperture part of the name of SAR derives from the beaming of multiple pulses, which result in a picture that is effectively the same as using a large antenna. Mechanisms contributing to the fineness of SAR images are outlined.

  2. The effects of receiving room dimensions and absorption in the measurement of impact insulation class (IIC) rating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rose Mary; Tocci, Gregory

    2005-09-01

    The measurement of the Impact Insulation Class (IIC) rating of any floor/ceiling construction requires the use of a certified laboratory space. In a recent investigation into the IIC rating of a new floor system, several tests were conducted in a certified laboratory. In many tests, the IIC rating was controlled by the 100-Hz 1/3-octave frequency band, despite changes in the floor/ceiling construction. The base floor/ceiling construction included a wood structural floor on open-web wood joists and a GWB ceiling below. This paper will investigate the possibility that room resonances influenced the IIC ratings of the several floor systems tested. These data will be compared with IIC data collected for the same floor construction with the GWB ceiling removed. The removal of the GWB ceiling increased the receiver room volume and exposed the glass fiber insulation to the receiver room, thus eliminating the control of the 100-Hz 1/3-octave band over the IIC rating.

  3. TerraSAR-X mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  4. Transdermal absorption of (-)-linalool induces autonomic deactivation but has no impact on ratings of well-being in humans.

    PubMed

    Heuberger, Eva; Redhammer, Sandra; Buchbauer, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    Essential lavender oil has a long tradition as a mild sedative in herbal medicine. Relaxing effects after inhalation have also been demonstrated for one of its main constituents, (-)-linalool. The aim of the present investigation was to determine the effects of this monoterpenoid alcohol on human physiological parameters (blood oxygen saturation, breathing rate, eye-blink rate, pulse rate, skin conductance, skin temperature, surface electromyogram as well as systolic and diastolic blood pressure) and assessments of subjective well-being. (-)-Linalool was applied to 14 healthy subjects by percutaneous administration. Inhalation of the fragrance was prevented by means of breathing masks. (-)-Linalool induced deactivation with respect to physiology, that is, a decrease of systolic blood pressure and a smaller decrease of skin temperature, compared to a corresponding control group receiving a placebo, but had no effects on subjective evaluation of well-being.

  5. Evaluation of in vitro release rate and in vivo absorption characteristics of four metoprolol tartrate immediate-release tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Rekhi, G S; Eddington, N D; Fossler, M J; Schwartz, P; Lesko, L J; Augsburger, L L

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the impact of formulation and process changes on dissolution and bioavailability/bioequivalency of metoprolol tartrate tablets manufactured using a high-shear granulation process. A half-factorial (2(4-1), Res IV) design was undertaken to study the selected formulation and processing variables during scale-up. Levels and ranges for excipients and processing changes studied represented level 2 or greater changes as indicated by the SUPAC-IR Guidance. Blend and tableting properties were evaluated. Changes in sodium starch glycolate and magnesium stearate levels, and the order of addition microcrystalline cellulose (intra- vs. extragranular) were significant only in affecting percent drug released (Q) in 5, 10, and 15 min. Statistical analysis of data showed no significant curvature. No interaction effects were found to be statistically significant. To examine the impact of formulation and processing variables on in vivo absorption, three batches were selected for a bioavailability study based on their dissolution profiles. Subjects received four metoprolol treatments (Lopressor, slow-, medium-, and fast-dissolving formulations) separated by 1 week according to a randomized crossover design. After an overnight fast, subjects were administered one tablet (100 mg), blood samples were collected over 24 hr and plasma samples were analyzed. The formulations were found to be bioequivalent with respect to the log Cmax and log AUC0-infinity. The results of this study suggest that: (i) bioavailability/bioequivalency studies may not be necessary for metoprolol tartrate and perhaps other class 1 drugs after level 2 type changes and (ii) in vitro dissolution tests may be used to show bioequivalence of metoprolol formulations with processing or formulation changes within the specified level 2 ranges for the equipment examined.

  6. Normal and Differential SAR Interferometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    Geudtner, B. Schättler, P. Vachon, U. Steinbrecher, J. Holzner, J. Mittermayer , H. Breit, A. Moreira. RADARSAT ScanSAR interferometry. In: Proceedings of...part 4, pp. 470-475 Krieger, G., Wendler, M., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Moreira, A., 2002. Performance analysis for bistatic interferometric...SAR configurations. In: Proceedings of IGARSS 2002, Toronto, Canada, vol. 1, pp. 650-652. Krieger, G., Fiedler, H., Mittermayer , J., Papathanassiou, K

  7. Focusing of bistatic SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bia, Pietro; Ricci, Nicola; Zonno, Mariantonietta; Nico, Giovanni; Catalao, Joao; Tesauro, Manlio

    2014-10-01

    The problems of simulation of bistatic SAR raw data and focusing are studied. A discrete target simulator is described. The simulator introduces the scene topography and compute the integration time of general bistatic configurations providing a means to derived maps of the range and azimuth spatial resolutions. The problem of focusing of bistatic SAR data acquired in a translational-invariant bistatic configuration is studied by deriving the bistatic Point Target Reference spectrum and presenting an analytical solution for its stationary points.

  8. Landslide Mapping Using SqueeSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Bellotti, F.; Alberti, S.; Allievi, J.; Del Conte, S.; Tamburini, A.; Broccolato, M.; Ratto, S.; Alberto, W.

    2011-12-01

    SqueeSAR represents the most recent advancement of PSInSAR algorithm. By exploiting signal radar returns both from Permanent and Distributed Scatterers (PS and DS), it is able to detect millimetre displacements over long periods and large areas and to obtain a significant increase in the spatial density of ground measurement points. SqueeSAR analysis is complementary to conventional geological and geomorphological studies in landslide mapping over wide areas, traditionally based on aerial-photo interpretation and field surveys. However, whenever surface displacement rates are low (mm to cm per year), assessing landslide activity is difficult or even impossible without a long-term monitoring tool, as in the case of Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DGSD), typically characterized by large areal extent and subtle surface displacement. The availability of surface displacement time series per each measurement point allows one to have both a synoptic overview, at regional scale, as well as an in depth characterization of the instability phenomena analyzed, a meaningful support to the design of traditional monitoring networks and the efficiency testing of remedial works. When data archives are available, SqueeSAR can also provide valuable information before the installation of any terrestrial measurement system. The Italian authorities increasing interest in the application of SqueeSAR as a standard monitoring tool to help hydrogeological risk assessment, resulted in a national project, Piano Straordinario di Telerilevamento (PST), founded by the Ministry of the Environment. The aim of the project was to create the first interferometric database on a national scale for mapping unstable areas. More than 12,000 ERS and ENVISAT radar scenes acquired over Italy were processed spanning the period 1992-2010, proving that, in less than ten years, radar interferometry has become a standard monitoring tool. Recently, many regional governments in Italy have applied

  9. Analysis of three-dimensional SAR distributions emitted by mobile phones in an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Deltour, Isabelle; Wiart, Joe; Taki, Masao; Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Mann, Simon; Schüz, Joachim; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the specific absorption rate of energy (SAR) in phantom models was analysed to detect clusters of mobile phones producing similar spatial deposition of energy in the head. The clusters' characteristics were described from the phones external features, frequency band and communication protocol. Compliance measurements with phones in cheek and tilt positions, and on the left and right side of a physical phantom were used. Phones used the Personal Digital Cellular (PDC), Code division multiple access One (CdmaOne), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) communication systems, in the 800, 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz bands. Each phone's measurements were summarised by the half-ellipsoid in which the SAR values were above half the maximum value. Cluster analysis used the Partitioning Around Medoids algorithm. The dissimilarity measure was based on the overlap of the ellipsoids, and the Manhattan distance was used for robustness analysis. Within the 800 MHz frequency band, and in part within the 900 MHz and the 1800 MHz frequency bands, weak clustering was obtained for the handset shape (bar phone, flip with top and flip with central antennas), but only in specific positions (tilt or cheek). On measurements of 120 phones, the three-dimensional distribution of SAR in phantom models did not appear to be related to particular external phone characteristics or measurement characteristics, which could be used for refining the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency energy within the brain in epidemiological studies such as the Interphone.

  10. Comparisons of peak SAR levels in concentric sphere head models of children and adults for irradiation by a dipole at 900 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Vitas

    2003-10-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the scale and significance of differences in peak specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the brains of children and adults exposed to radiofrequency emissions from mobile phones. Estimates were obtained by method of multipole analysis of a three layered (scalp/cranium/brain) spherical head exposed to a nearby 0.4lgr dipole at 900 MHz. A literature review of head parameters that influence SAR induction revealed strong indirect evidence based on total body water content that there are no substantive age-related changes in tissue conductivity after the first year of life. However, it was also found that the thickness of the ear, scalp and cranium do decrease on average with decreasing age, though individual variability within any age group is very high. The model analyses revealed that compared to an average adult, the peak brain 10 g averaged SAR in mean 4, 8, 12 and 16 year olds (yo) is increased by a factor of 1.31, 1.23, 1.15 and 1.07, respectively. However, contrary to the expectations of a recent prominent expert review, the UK Stewart Report, the relatively small scale of these increases does not warrant any special precautionary measures for child mobile phone users since: (a) SAR testing protocols as contained in the CENELEC (2001) standard provide an additional safety margin which ensures that allowable localized SAR limits are not exceeded in the brain; (b) the maximum worst case brain temperature rise (~0.13 to 0.14 °C for an average 4 yo) in child users of mobile phones is well within safe levels and normal physiological parameters; and (c) the range of age average increases in children is less than the expected range of variation seen within the adult population.

  11. Comparisons of peak SAR levels in concentric sphere head models of children and adults for irradiation by a dipole at 900 MHz.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vitas

    2003-10-21

    The aim of this study is to examine the scale and significance of differences in peak specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the brains of children and adults exposed to radiofrequency emissions from mobile phones. Estimates were obtained by method of multipole analysis of a three layered (scalp/cranium/brain) spherical head exposed to a nearby 0.4 lambda dipole at 900 MHz. A literature review of head parameters that influence SAR induction revealed strong indirect evidence based on total body water content that there are no substantive age-related changes in tissue conductivity after the first year of life. However, it was also found that the thickness of the ear, scalp and cranium do decrease on average with decreasing age, though individual variability within any age group is very high. The model analyses revealed that compared to an average adult, the peak brain 10 g averaged SAR in mean 4, 8, 12 and 16 year olds (yo) is increased by a factor of 1.31, 1.23, 1.15 and 1.07, respectively. However, contrary to the expectations of a recent prominent expert review, the UK Stewart Report, the relatively small scale of these increases does not warrant any special precautionary measures for child mobile phone users since: (a) SAR testing protocols as contained in the CENELEC (2001) standard provide an additional safety margin which ensures that allowable localized SAR limits are not exceeded in the brain; (b) the maximum worst case brain temperature rise (approximately 0.13 to 0.14 degrees C for an average 4 yo) in child users of mobile phones is well within safe levels and normal physiological parameters; and (c) the range of age average increases in children is less than the expected range of variation seen within the adult population.

  12. A numerical evaluation of SAR distribution and temperature changes around a metallic plate in the head of a RF exposed worker.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Robert L; Anderson, Vitas; McKenzie, Raymond J

    2005-07-01

    The 1998 International Commission for Non-Ionising Radiation (ICNIRP) Guidelines for human exposure to radiofrequency (RF) fields contain a recommendation to assess the potential impact of metallic implants in workers exposed up to the allowable occupational field limits. This study provides an example of how numerical electromagnetic (EM) and thermal modelling can be used to determine whether scattered RF fields around metallic implants in workers exposed to allowable occupational ambient field limits will comply with the recommendations of relevant standards and guidelines. A case study is performed for plane wave exposures of a 50 mm diameter titanium cranioplasty plate, implanted around 5-6 mm under the surface of the forehead. The level of exposures was set to the ambient power flux density limits for occupational exposures specified in the 1998 ICNIRP guidelines and the current 1999 IEEE C95.1 standard over the frequency range 100-3000 MHz. Two distinct peak responses were observed. There was a resonant response for the whole implant at 200-300 MHz where the maximum dimension of the implant is around a third of the wavelength of the RF exposure. This, however, resulted in relatively low peak specific energy absorption rate (SAR) levels around the implant at the exposure limits. Between 2100-2800 MHz, a second SAR concentrating mechanism of constructive interference of the wave reflected back and forth between the air-scalp interface and the scalp-plate interface resulted in higher peak SARs that were within the allowable limits for the ICNIRP exposures, but not for the IEEE C95.1 exposures. Moreover, the IEEE peak SAR limits were also exceeded, to a lesser degree, even when the implant was not present. However, thermal modelling indicated that the peak SAR concentrations around the implant did not result in any peak temperature rise above 1 degrees C for occupational exposures recommended in the ICNIRP guidelines, and hence would not pose any significant

  13. SAR changes in a human head model for plane wave exposure (500 - 2500 MHz) and a comparison with IEEE 2005 safety limits.

    PubMed

    Yelkenci, Tanju; Paker, Selcuk

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, external electric field values that are derived from the largest peak average 10 g SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) results in a realistic human head model are compared with current IEEE and ICNIRP reference levels. The head is illuminated by a plane wave source at seven different frequencies ranging from 500 MHz to 2500 MHz, with five different incident directions and three polarizations. Results reveal that the presence of metallic wire spectacles reduces the external electric field levels in the region above 900 MHz. Comparison of derived electric field values shows that the current IEEE and ICNIRP safety limits provide a conservative estimate.

  14. Diffusion coefficients significant in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine and of hydrogen sulfide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Rowley, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) and of gaseous H{sub 2}S into aqueous MDEA were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. A numerical model for absorption, diffusion, and reaction of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S in blends of MDEA, DEA, and water was developed. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for the case of CO{sub 2} absorption and of bisulfide ion for the case of H{sub 2}S absorption from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 50 mass % total amine at DEA:MDEA mole ratios of 1:20, 1:4, 1L3, and 2:3. H{sub 2}S absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bisulfide ion were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA.

  15. Receptor-binding domain as a target for developing SARS vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaojie; Liu, Qi; Du, Lanying; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-08-01

    A decade ago, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused a global pandemic with a mortality rate of 10%. Reports of recent outbreaks of a SARS-like disease caused by Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) have raised serious concerns of a possible reemergence of SARS-CoV, either by laboratory escape or the presence of a natural reservoir. Therefore, the development of effective and safe SARS vaccines is still needed. Based on our previous studies, we believe that the receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the S1 subunit of the SARS-CoV spike (S) protein is the most important target for developing a SARS vaccine. In particular, RBD of S protein contains the critical neutralizing domain (CND), which is able to induce highly potent neutralizing antibody response and cross-protection against divergent SARS-CoV strains. Furthermore, a RBD-based subunit vaccine is expected to be safer than other vaccines that may induce Th2-type immunopathology. This review will discuss key advances in the development of RBD-based SARS vaccines and the possibility of using a similar strategy to develop vaccines against MERS-CoV.

  16. Millimeter-wave interferometric SAR and polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehmsdorff, Stephan; Essen, Helmut; Schimpf, Hartmuf; Wahlen, Alfred

    1998-07-01

    Using synthetic aperture radars with appropriate signal processing algorithms is a recognized technique for remote sensing applications. A wide spectrum of radar frequencies is used and a high degree of sophistication implies polarimetric and further multichannel approaches. Each frequency band used, exhibits special sensitivities to features of the earth's surface or man-made targets. This is mostly due to the coupling of the electromagnetic waves to backscattering geometries which are related to the radarwavelength. A part of the spectrum which has been covered not very intensely is the millimeterwave region. This may be mostly due to the relatively high atmospheric absorption at millimeterwaves which obstructs the use of such sensors for long range applications. On the other hand for military applications IR-imaging sensors are widely used which suffer even more from adverse transmission properties of the atmosphere. Application of multichannel techniques as polarimetry, multifrequency techniques and interferometry are also done with more ease due to compactness of the hardware and simplicity of processing. As there exist no data which would allow to investigate the potential of multifrequency polarimetric and interferometric mmW-SAR the Millimeterwave Experimental Multifrequency Polarimetric High Resolution Interferometric Imaging System was installed into an aircraft C-160 `Transall' to gather respective data over different land scenarios. The off-line evaluation of the radar data starts with off-line track, calibration and reformatting procedures. Afterwards synthetic aperture processing is applied to these data to generate radar images for co- and cross-polarization at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. As already mentioned above, SAR-processing at millimeterwavelengths requires a considerable lower amount of sophistication in comparison with algorithms applied at lower radar-frequencies. This can mainly be attributed to the short aperture length at mm-wave frequencies

  17. SAR reduction using a single SRR superstrate for a dual-band antenna.

    PubMed

    Rosaline, Imaculate; Singaravelu, Raghavan

    2017-01-01

    A dual-band microstrip antenna operating at GSM 900 and GSM 1800 MHz is designed initially. Then a single split ring resonator (SRR) structure is used as a superstrate for this dual-band antenna. A circular current is induced in the SRR due to the perpendicular plane wave excitation, which in turn leads to an electric excitation coupled to the magnetic resonance. It also exhibits higher order excitations at 0.9 and 1.8 GHz which ultimately resulted in specific absorption rate (SAR) reduction of human head at both the designed frequencies of the antenna. The antenna and the SRR superstrate are printed on a 1.6 mm thick FR-4 substrate of dimension 59.6 × 49.6 mm(2). Analysis of the SRR using the classic waveguide theory approach is discussed. Radiation pattern of the antenna in the presence of SRR superstrate and human head is also discussed. Prototype of the antenna along with the SRR superstrate is fabricated and measured for return loss and radiation pattern. Measurement results fairly agree with the simulated results. A human head phantom is utilized in the calculation of SAR.

  18. Effects of Anatomical Differences on Electromagnetic Fields, SAR, and Temperature Change.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Deniz, Cem Murat; Carluccio, Giuseppe; Brown, Ryan; Sodickson, Daniel K; Collins, Christopher M

    2016-02-01

    Electromagnetic field simulations are increasingly used to assure RF safety of patients during MRI exams. In practice, however, tissue property distribution of the patient being imaged is not known, but may be represented with a pre-existing model. Repeatedly, agreement in transmit magnetic (B1(+)) field distributions between two geometries has been used to suggest agreement in heating distributions. Here we examine relative effects of anatomical differences on B1(+) distribution, Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) and temperature change (ΔT). Numerical simulations were performed for a single surface coil positioned adjacent a homogeneous phantom and bovine phantom, each with slight geometric variations, and adjacent two different human body models. Experimental demonstration was performed on a bovine phantom using MR thermometry and B1(+) mapping. Simulations and experiments demonstrate that B1(+) distributions in different samples can be well correlated, while notable difference in maximum SAR and ΔT occur. This work illustrates challenges associated with utilizing simulations or experiments for RF safety assurance purposes. Reliance on B1(+) distributions alone for validation of simulations and/or experiments with a sample or subject for assurance of safety in another should be performed with caution.

  19. Local SAR enhancements in anatomically correct children and adult models as a function of position within 1.5 T MR body coil.

    PubMed

    Murbach, Manuel; Cabot, Eugenia; Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Christ, Andreas; Pruessmann, Klaas P; Kuster, Niels

    2011-12-01

    Usage of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is continuously increasing due to its excellent soft-tissue contrast and improving diagnostic values. MRI also has the advantage that it operates without ionizing radiation. The main safety concerns are torque, acceleration by the static field, nerve stimulation by the gradient fields, and tissue heating by the radio-frequency (RF) fields. This paper investigates if children and fetuses are at higher risks than adults when the current RF regulations are applied. We analyzed and compared local absorption hotspots, i.e., the peak spatial specific absorption rate averaged over any 10 g (psSAR10g) for five adults, three children of ages 5, 11 and 14 years, and 1 pregnant female (36 weeks' gestation) in 10 different Z-positions (head to calves). In the First Level Operating Mode (4 W/kg whole-body averaged exposure), the psSAR10g values found for adults were as large as 60 W/kg in the trunk and 104 W/kg in the extremities. The corresponding values for children were 43 and 58 W/kg, respectively, and 14 W/kg for the unborn child. Modeling of worst case anatomical RF loops can substantially increase the psSAR10g values, i.e., by factor >2. The results suggest that local exposure for children and fetuses is smaller than for adults (15-75%), i.e., no special considerations for children and the unborn child are needed regarding psSAR10g due to RF. However, the local thermal load of the unborn may be significantly increased due to the high exposure average (up to 4 W/kg) of the non-perfused amniotic fluid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adapted RF Pulse Design for SAR Reduction in Parallel Excitation with Experimental Verification at 9.4 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoping; Akgün, Can; Vaughan, J. Thomas; Andersen, Peter; Strupp, John; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Van de Moortele, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    Parallel excitation holds strong promises to mitigate the impact of large transmit B1 (B1+) distortion at very high magnetic field. Accelerated RF pulses, however, inherently tend to require larger values in RF peak power which may result in substantial increase in Specific Absorption Rate in tissues, which is a constant concern for patient safety at very high field. In this study, we demonstrate adapted rate RF pulse design allowing for SAR reduction while preserving excitation target accuracy. Compared with other proposed implementations of adapted rate RF pulses, our approach is compatible with any k-space trajectories, does not require an analytical expression of the gradient waveform and can be used for large flip angle excitation. We demonstrate our method with numerical simulations based on electromagnetic modeling and we include an experimental verification of transmit pattern accuracy on an 8 transmit channel 9.4 T system. PMID:20556882

  1. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate: a shock tube study using tunable laser absorption of H(2)O near 2.5 microm.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zekai; Farooq, Aamir; Barbour, Ethan A; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2009-11-19

    The thermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was measured behind reflected shock waves in hydrogen peroxide/inert gas mixtures using a sensitive laser diagnostic for water vapor. In these mixtures, the formation rate of water is predominantly controlled by the decomposition rate of hydrogen peroxide. Rate determinations were made over a temperature range of 1000-1200 K and a pressure range of 0.9-3.2 atm for both argon and nitrogen carrier gases. Good detection sensitivity for water was achieved using tunable diode laser absorption of water at 2550.96 nm within its v(3) fundamental band. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition rates were found to be independent of pressure at 0.9 and 1.7 atm and showed only slight influence of pressure at 3.2 atm. The best fit of the current data to the low-pressure-limit rate for H(2)O(2) dissociation in argon bath gas is k(1,0) = 10(15.97+/-0.10) exp(-21 220 +/- 250 K/T) [cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1)] (1000-1200 K). Experiments conducted in a nitrogen bath gas show a relative collision efficiency of argon to nitrogen of 0.67.

  2. The effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evelyn; Ho, Khoy Kheng

    2006-07-01

    From early March 2003 to late May 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was detected in Singapore. The increase in workload and new infection control procedures were thought to affect resuscitation and airway management. Our aim was to study the effects of wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) and the restriction in the number of resuscitation personnel on airway management during the SARS crisis. Data was collected prospectively through an ongoing emergency airway registry. The data was divided into three periods: (1) before PPE was instituted from 1 November 2002 to 31 March 2003; (2) during SARS (when PPE use was mandatory) from 1 April to 31 July 2003; (3) post-SARs (when PPE use was non-mandatory but encouraged) from 1 August to 31 March 2004. There was no change in patient demographics during the three periods. There were significant increases in the proportion of resuscitation cases and airway interventions during the SARS period compared to the pre-SARS period. The resident medical officer intubation rate decreased from 45.1% pre-SARS to 35.2% during SARS and 17.7% post-SARS. The complication rates were 10.5%, 9.9% and 9.4% in periods 1-3, respectively. Restriction in the number of healthcare staff attending to each patient may have influenced the department's decision to allow only the most confident or experienced personnel to manage the airway. The exposure of junior medical officers in emergency airway management during SARS and the immediate post-SARS period was decreased. This trend should be monitored further and intervention may be necessary should it continue to decline.

  3. Lightweight SAR GMTI radar technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, John C.; Lin, Kai; Gray, Andrew; Hseih, Chung; Darden, Scott; Kwong, Winston; Majumder, Uttam; Scarborough, Steven

    2013-05-01

    A small and lightweight dual-channel radar has been developed for SAR data collections. Using standard Displaced Phase Center Antenna (DPCA) radar digital signal processing, SAR GMTI images have been obtained. The prototype radar weighs 5-lbs and has demonstrated the extraction of ground moving targets (GMTs) embedded in high-resolution SAR imagery data. Heretofore this type of capability has been reserved for much larger systems such as the JSTARS. Previously, small lightweight SARs featured only a single channel and only displayed SAR imagery. Now, with the advent of this new capability, SAR GMTI performance is now possible for small UAV class radars.

  4. X-SAR as high-performance interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Marian U.; Schandl, Josef

    1995-11-01

    In April and October 1994 the X-SAR radar has been flown twice onboard the Space Shuttle, as part of the Space Radar Laboratory (SRL-1 and SRL-2). This radar payload is the first synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system of its kind in space, with three frequencies, multi- polarization, variable incidence angle and variable modes of operation. SIR-C/X-SAR, the new generation of imaging microwave remote sensing sensors from space, demonstrated successfully repeat pass interferometry in all three frequencies with a one day repeat as well as a six month repeat orbit. The major problems with the repeat orbit interferometry are the temporal target decorrelation, unsuitable baseline and different squint angles for the two passes to be processed. Therefore, for the third mission of the Space Radar Lab which shall be called SRTM (shuttle radar topographic mapper), single pass interferometry with a second receive antenna is proposed to generate a topographic map of all land surfaces between +60 degrees and -56 degrees latitude. X-SAR's 12 meter long and 40 cm wide main transmit and receive antenna is mounted directly to a tiltable part of the SIR-C antenna truss structure in the Shuttle cargo bay. The second receive antenna is 6 meters long and is mounted together with the second C-band antenna to a 31 meter long deployable boom structure perpendicular to the velocity direction to build the baseline. X-SAR is not capable of operating in a scan SAR model like SIR-C to allow continuous coverage, but will operate in a high resolution mode with a swath width of 30 - 35 km. The engineering design of the interferometric configuration for X-SAR, the requirement specifications, and the predicted performance as well as the mission operation aspects are described in this paper. SIR-C/X- SAR is a cooperative project. The SIR-C instrument was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The X-band radar (X-SAR) was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio Companies for the German

  5. Exercise-trained young men have higher calcium absorption rates and plasma calcitriol levels compared with age-matched sedentary controls.

    PubMed

    Zittermann, A; Sabatschus, O; Jantzen, S; Platen, P; Danz, A; Dimitriou, T; Scheld, K; Klein, K; Stehle, P

    2000-09-01

    The effect of physical activity on human calcium (Ca) metabolism is still not completely understood. Thus, we investigated fractional Ca absorption using a stable strontium test (Fc(240)), calciotropic hormones, and renal Ca excretion in 31 young men with a high activity level (GH) and in 26 age-matched sedentary control subjects (GL). Weekly hours spent on physical activity, obtained with a questionnaire were 15.0 +/- 6.6 (GH) and 1.0 +/- 1.4 (GL), respectively. Serum testosterone levels were significantly lower in GH compared with GL (P < 0.005). Dietary Ca intake (4-day food record) was twice as high in GH compared with GL men (P < 0.001). GH had significantly higher serum calcitriol levels and Fc(240) values than GL (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). In a stepwise multiple regression analysis including serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D, calcitriol, testosterone, and dietary Ca intake, only calcitriol was significantly correlated with Fc(240) (P = 0. 017). Twenty-four hour renal Ca excretion was only slightly higher in GH compared with GL (P < 0.05). However, additional Ca losses might have occurred through the extensive sweating of GH, as indicated by a difference of 1.7 liter between fluid intake and renal fluid excretion (P < 0.001). In summary, we observed a higher fractional Ca absorption rate in physically active young men compared with sedentary controls which is probably mediated by calcitriol. The low testosterone serum levels of the athletes were obviously not a limiting factor in Ca absorption efficiency. An additional Ca retention might, however, only be obtained if absorbed Ca exceeded total obligatory Ca losses.

  6. Absolute, high resolution water transpiration rate measurements on single plant leaves via tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) at 1.37 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunsmann, S.; Wunderle, K.; Wagner, S.; Rascher, U.; Schurr, U.; Ebert, V.

    2008-09-01

    A new sampling-free and calibration-free multi-channel hygrometer using near infrared (NIR) tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) at 1.37 μm was developed and used to determine absolute transpiration rates of single plant leafs. Four 8×6× 4 cm3, fiber-coupled absorption cells are used to simultaneously measure absolute water vapor concentrations with an absolute accuracy of about 5% and a temporal resolution of about 2 s. Two chambers (BOTTOM, TOP) are directly attached to the leaf surface, while two chambers (IN, OUT) analyze the purge gas supplied to the plant leaf and the total outflow of the leaf chambers. The BOTTOM-TOP comparison provided a direct, leaf-side resolved ratio of stomatal conductance and-by taking into account the purge gas flow and the leaf area exposed-leaf side resolved water transpiration rates. The OUT-IN-difference yielded the total leaf transpiration rate with 2 μmol/m2/s resolution. The new multi-point hygrometer was validated by monitoring of the transpiration dynamics of a plant of the species Epipremnum pinnatum (L.) Engl. during diurnal variation of the leaf irradiation. During these experiments the differential H2O concentration resolution between two chambers was determined to be better than 3 ppm at Δt= 2 s (i.e. better than 711 ppb m Hz1/2). This performance was verified by an Allan analysis over a 30 min time period using CH4 as a surrogate absorber and yielded an average optimum optical resolution of 4.9×10-6 for 83 s measurement time, i.e. a CH4 resolution of 892 ppb, which corresponds to the optical resolution needed for a water sensitivity of 454 ppb m Hz1/2.

  7. Measuring the Absorption Rate of CO 2 in Nonaqueous CO 2 -Binding Organic Liquid Solvents with a Wetted-Wall Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mathias, Paul M.; Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J.; Zwoster, Andy; Whyatt, Greg; Freeman, Charles M.; Bearden, Mark D.; Koech, Phillip

    2015-09-17

    The kinetics of the absorption of CO2 into two nonaqueous CO2-binding organic liquid (CO2BOL) solvents were measured at T=35, 45, and 55 °C with a wetted-wall column. Selected CO2 loadings were run with a so-called “first-generation” CO2BOL, comprising an independent base and alcohol, and a “second-generation” CO2BOL, in which the base and alcohol were conjoined. Liquid-film mass-transfer coefficient (k'g) values for both solvents were measured to be comparable to values for monoethanolamine and piperazine aqueous solvents under a comparable driving force, in spite of far higher solution viscosities. An inverse temperature dependence of the k'g value was also observed, which suggests that the physical solubility of CO2 in organic liquids may be making CO2 mass transfer faster than expected. Aspen Plus software was used to model the kinetic data and compare the CO2 absorption behavior of nonaqueous solvents with that of aqueous solvent platforms. This work continues our development of the CO2BOL solvents. Previous work established the thermodynamic properties related to CO2 capture. The present paper quantitatively studies the kinetics of CO2 capture and develops a rate-based model.

  8. Measuring the Absorption Rate of CO2 in Nonaqueous CO2-Binding Organic Liquid Solvents with a Wetted-Wall Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paul M; Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J; Zwoster, Andy; Whyatt, Greg; Freeman, Charles M; Bearden, Mark D; Koech, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of the absorption of CO2 into two nonaqueous CO2-binding organic liquid (CO2 BOL) solvents were measured at T=35, 45, and 55 °C with a wetted-wall column. Selected CO2 loadings were run with a so-called "first-generation" CO2 BOL, comprising an independent base and alcohol, and a "second-generation" CO2 BOL, in which the base and alcohol were conjoined. Liquid-film mass-transfer coefficient (k'g ) values for both solvents were measured to be comparable to values for monoethanolamine and piperazine aqueous solvents under a comparable driving force, in spite of far higher solution viscosities. An inverse temperature dependence of the k'g value was also observed, which suggests that the physical solubility of CO2 in organic liquids may be making CO2 mass transfer faster than expected. Aspen Plus software was used to model the kinetic data and compare the CO2 absorption behavior of nonaqueous solvents with that of aqueous solvent platforms. This work continues our development of the CO2 BOL solvents. Previous work established the thermodynamic properties related to CO2 capture. The present paper quantitatively studies the kinetics of CO2 capture and develops a rate-based model.

  9. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (<1500 K). The current-reflected shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data.

  10. Severe acute respiratory syndrome: 'SARS' or 'not SARS'.

    PubMed

    Li, A M; Hon, K L E; Cheng, W T; Ng, P C; Chan, F Y; Li, C K; Leung, T F; Fok, T F

    2004-01-01

    Accurate clinical diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) based on the current World Health Organization definition is difficult and at times impossible at the early stage of the disease. Both false positive and false negative cases are commonly encountered and this could have far-reaching detrimental effects on the patients, their family and the clinicians alike. Contact history is particularly important in diagnosing SARS in children as their presenting features are often non-specific. The difficulty in making a correct diagnosis is further compounded by the lack of a sensitive rapid diagnostic test. Serology is not particularly helpful in the initial triaging of patients as it takes at least 3 weeks to become positive. Co-infection and other treatable conditions should not be missed and conventional antibiotics should remain as part of the first-line treatment regimen. We report five cases to illustrate the difficulties and dilemmas faced by clinicians in diagnosing SARS in children.

  11. SAR data exploitation: computational technology enabling SAR ATR algorithm development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, Uttam K.; Casteel, Curtis H., Jr.; Buxa, Peter; Minardi, Michael J.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Nehrbass, John W.

    2007-04-01

    A fundamental issue with synthetic aperture radar (SAR) application development is data processing and exploitation in real-time or near real-time. The power of high performance computing (HPC) clusters, FPGA, and the IBM Cell processor presents new algorithm development possibilities that have not been fully leveraged. In this paper, we will illustrate the capability of SAR data exploitation which was impractical over the last decade due to computing limitations. We can envision that SAR imagery encompassing city size coverage at extremely high levels of fidelity could be processed at near-real time using the above technologies to empower the warfighter with access to critical information for the war on terror, homeland defense, as well as urban warfare.

  12. Ten Years Of Subsidence Monitoring With SAR Interferometry And Its Contribution To Risk Management In Aguascalientes, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esquivel, Ruben; Castaneda, Laura; Taud, Hind; Lira, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    A Study involving GPS and differential SAR interferometry (DInSAR) monitoring is developed to investigate a subsidence phenomenon in Aguascalientes valley and to obtain displacement models concerned with risk management applications and geodetic purposes. DInSAR study with archived Envisat data allows accumulated displacement mapping yearly, and recent TerraSAR-X data implementation provides a more accurate estimation of displacements, which is used for developing models to correct geodetic positions. The maximum subsidence rate calculated is 15 cm/year with a decreasing rate throughout time in some areas.

  13. Effect of the abrasive properties of sedges on the intestinal absorptive surface and resting metabolic rate of root voles.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Monika; Szafrańska, Paulina A; Labecka, Anna Maria; Lázaro, Javier; Konarzewski, Marek

    2015-01-15

    Recent studies on grasses and sedges suggest that the induction of a mechanism reducing digestibility of plant tissues in response to herbivore damage may drive rodent population cycles. This defence mechanism seems to rely on the abrasive properties of ingested plants. However, the underlying mechanism has not been demonstrated in small wild herbivores. Therefore, we carried out an experiment in which we determined the joint effect of abrasive sedge components on the histological structure of small intestine as well as resting metabolic rate (RMR) of the root vole (Microtus oeconomus). Histological examination revealed that voles fed with a sedge-dominated diet had shorter villi composed from narrower enterocytes in duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Reduction in the height of villi decreased along the small intestine. Activity of the mucus secretion increased along the small intestine and was significantly higher in the ileum. The intestinal abrasion exceeded the compensatory capabilities of voles, which responded to a sedge-dominated diet by a reduction of body mass and a concomitant decrease in whole body RMR. These results explain the inverse association between body mass and the probability of winter survival observed in voles inhabiting homogenous sedge wetlands.

  14. SAR Segmentation using Anisotropic Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intajag, Sathit; Tipsuwanporn, Vittaya; Cheevasuwit, Fusak

    Speckle effects are commonly observed in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The human eye is capable of deriving meaningful information from SAR images; however, an automatic or semi-automatic processing algorithm has difficulty in distinguishing objects in the images because of noise effects present in those images. This paper presents a segmentation method for SAR images, which employs an anisotropic diffusion algorithm. In the proposed scheme, a SAR image is transformed into a logarithmic domain where the diffusion process is used to grow homogeneous regions in the noise environment until the regions reach some criteria for homogeneity; consequently, the segmented image in the logarithm domain is converted to the intensity domain by an exponential function. To grow homogeneous regions the adaptive diffusion method is introduced with a tensor technique in which tensor data are varied with the neighboring pixels. The diffusion algorithm will stop itself by a standard deviation divided by the mean, which is provided according to the homogeneity criteria. Results are shown on both synthetic and satellite SAR images. The evaluation of the proposed method employs the theoretical gain of equivalent numbers of looks (ENL).

  15. On Ambiguities in SAR Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Ambiguities are an aliasing effect caused by the periodic sampling of the scene backscatter inherent to pulsed radar systems such as Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR). In this paper we take a fresh look at the relationship between SAR range and azimuth ambiguity constraints on the allowable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the antenna length. We show that for high squint angles smaller antennas may be feasible in some cases. For some applications, the ability to form a synthetic aperture at high squint angles is desirable, but the size of the antenna causes problems in the design of systems capable of such operation. This is because the SAR system design is optimized for a side-looking geometry. In two examples design examples we take a suboptimum antenna size and examine the performance in terms of azimuth resolution and swath width as a function of squint angle. We show that for stripmap SARs, the swath width is usually worse for off-boresight squint angles, because it is severely limited by range walk, except in cases where we relax the spatial resolution. We consider the implications for the design of modest-resolution, narrow swath, scanning SAR scatterometers .

  16. On Ambiguities in SAR Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Ambiguities are an aliasing effect caused by the periodic sampling of the scene backscatter inherent to pulsed radar systems such as Synthetic Aperture radar (SAR). In this paper we take a fresh look at the relationship between SAR range and azimuth ambiguity constraints on the allowable pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and the antenna length. We show that for high squint angles smaller antennas may be feasible in some cases. For some applications, the ability to form a synthetic aperture at high squint angles is desirable, but the size of the antenna causes problems in the design of systems capable of such operation. This is because the SAR system design is optimized for a side-looking geometry. In two examples design examples we take a suboptimum antenna size and examine the performance in terms of azimuth resolution and swath width as a function of squint angle. We show that for stripmap SARs, the swath width is usually worse for off-boresight squint angles, because it is severely limited by range walk, except in cases where we relax the spatial resolution. We consider the implications for the design of modest-resolution, narrow swath, scanning SAR scatterometers .

  17. Marine Targets Classification in PolInSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Yang, Jingsong; Ren, Lin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, marine stationary targets and moving targets are studied by Pol-In-SAR data of Radarsat-2. A new method of stationary targets detection is proposed. The method get the correlation coefficient image of the In-SAR data, and using the histogram of correlation coefficient image. Then, A Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) algorithm and The Probabilistic Neural Network model are imported to detect stationary targets. To find the moving targets, Azimuth Ambiguity is show as an important feature. We use the length of azimuth ambiguity to get the target's moving direction and speed. Make further efforts, Targets classification is studied by rebuild the surface elevation of marine targets.

  18. Marine Targets Classification in PolInSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Yang, Jingsong; Ren, Lin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, marine stationary targets and moving targets are studied by Pol-In-SAR data of Radarsat-2. A new method of stationary targets detection is proposed. The method get the correlation coefficient image of the In-SAR data, and using the histogram of correlation coefficient image. Then , A Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) algorithm and The Probabilistic Neural Network model are imported to detect stationary targets. To find the moving targets, Azimuth Ambiguity is show as an important feature. We use the length of azimuth ambiguity to get the target's moving direction and speed. Make further efforts, Targets classification is studied by rebuild the surface elevation of marine targets.

  19. Basis for optronic ScanSAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchese, Linda; Bourqui, Pascal; Turgeon, Sandra; Harnish, Bernd; Suess, Martin; Châteauneuf, François; Bergeron, Alain

    2011-11-01

    ScanSAR is an important imaging mode of operation for SAR systems. It allows extended range coverage albeit at the expense of azimuth resolution. Compared to stripmap, ScanSAR is used more for large swath coverage for mapping and monitoring over a wide area. Applications are numerous and include boreal forest mapping, wetland mapping and soil moisture monitoring. The goal of the present work was thus to explore the possibility of processing ScanSAR data optronicaly. Tests were performed with artificially bursted ASAR stripmap data demonstrating that reconstruction of ScanSAR data using the optronic SAR processor is feasible. This paper describes specifically how the data control and handling of ScanSAR data is performed to make it compatible with the optronic processor that was otherwise specifically designed for stripmap processing. As well, the ScanSAR images generated optronicaly are presented.

  20. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  1. A Bottom-Up Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Mechanistically Predict Tissue Distribution and the Rate of Subcutaneous Absorption of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine L; Gardner, Iain; Li, Linzhong; Jamei, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict subcutaneous (SC) absorption rate and tissue distribution of therapeutic proteins (TPs) using a bottom-up approach is highly desirable early in the drug development process prior to clinical data being available. A whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, requiring only a few drug parameters, to predict plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of TPs in humans after intravenous and subcutaneous dosing has been developed. Movement of TPs between vascular and interstitial spaces was described by considering both convection and diffusion processes using a 2-pore framework. The model was optimised using a variety of literature sources, such as tissue lymph/plasma concentration ratios in humans and animals, information on the percentage of dose absorbed following SC dosing via lymph in animals and data showing loss of radiolabelled IgG from the SC dosing site in humans. The resultant model was used to predict t max and plasma concentration profiles for 12 TPs (molecular weight 8-150 kDa) following SC dosing. The predicted plasma concentration profiles were generally comparable to observed data. t max was predicted within 3-fold of reported values, with one third of the predictions within 0.8-1.25-fold. There was no systematic bias in simulated C max values, although a general trend for underprediction of t max was observed. No clear trend between prediction accuracy of t max and TP isoelectric point or molecular size was apparent. The mechanistic whole-body PBPK model described here can be applied to predict absorption rate of TPs into blood and movement into target tissues following SC dosing.

  2. SAR matrices: automated extraction of information-rich SAR tables from large compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Wassermann, Anne Mai; Haebel, Peter; Weskamp, Nils; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2012-07-23

    We introduce the SAR matrix data structure that is designed to elucidate SAR patterns produced by groups of structurally related active compounds, which are extracted from large data sets. SAR matrices are systematically generated and sorted on the basis of SAR information content. Matrix generation is computationally efficient and enables processing of large compound sets. The matrix format is reminiscent of SAR tables, and SAR patterns revealed by different categories of matrices are easily interpretable. The structural organization underlying matrix formation is more flexible than standard R-group decomposition schemes. Hence, the resulting matrices capture SAR information in a comprehensive manner.

  3. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  4. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  5. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  6. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  7. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  8. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  9. Kronecker STAP and SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, Kristjan H.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-05-01

    As a high resolution radar imaging modality, SAR detects and localizes non-moving targets accurately, giving it an advantage over lower resolution GMTI radars. Moving target detection is more challenging due to target smearing and masking by clutter. Space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is often used on multiantenna SAR to remove the stationary clutter and enhance the moving targets. In (Greenewald et al., 2016),1 it was shown that the performance of STAP can be improved by modeling the clutter covariance as a space vs. time Kronecker product with low rank factors, providing robustness and reducing the number of training samples required. In this work, we present a massively parallel algorithm for implementing Kronecker product STAP, enabling application to very large SAR datasets (such as the 2006 Gotcha data collection) using GPUs. Finally, we develop an extension of Kronecker STAP that uses information from multiple passes to improve moving target detection.

  10. Effects of dielectric values of human body on specific absorption rate following 430, 800, and 1200 MHz RF exposure to ingestible wireless device.

    PubMed

    Xu, L S; Meng, Max Q-H; Hu, Chao

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the compliance of ingestible wireless device (IWD) within safety guidelines, the SAR, and near fields of IWD in two realistic human body models, whose dielectric values are increased from the original by +/-10% and +/- 20% are studied using the finite-difference time-domain method. The radiation characteristics of the IWD in the human body models with changed and unchanged dielectric values are compared. Simulations are carried out at 13 scenarios where the IWD is placed at center positions of abdomens in the two models at the operation frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. Results show that variation of radiation intensity near the surface of abdomen is around 2.5, 2.6, and 3.5 dB within 20% variation of dielectric values corresponding to the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. Electric fields in the anterior of the human body models are higher than those in the posterior for all scenarios. SAR values increase with the increase of conductivities of human body tissues, and usually decrease with the increase of relative permittivities of human body tissues. The effect of the dielectric values of human body on SAR is orientation-, human-body-, and frequency-dependent. A variation up to 20% in conductivities and relative permittivities alone or simultaneously always causes a SAR variation less than 10%, 20%, and 30% at the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. As far as the compliance of safety was concerned, the IWD was safe to be used at the input power less than 12.6, 9.3, and 8.4 mW, according to the IEEE safety standards at the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively.

  11. System Turns SAR Images Into Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Kwok, Ronald; Pang, Shirley S. N.

    1988-01-01

    Postprocessing system for synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) transforms raw images from natural rotated and distorted SAR reference frame into geocoded images. Images automatically corrected to remove slant-range nonlinearities and Doppler skew. Produces multiple-frame mosaics for large-scale mapping. Does not require tedious manual registration of representative "tie" points in raw SAR imagery with known locations on Earth.

  12. Registration Of SAR Images With Multisensor Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Diane L.; Burnette, Charles F.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1993-01-01

    Semiautomated technique intended primarily to facilitate registration of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images with other images of same or partly overlapping terrain while preserving polarization information conveyed by SAR data. Technique generally applicable in sense one or both of images to be registered with each other generated by polarimetric or nonpolarimetric SAR, infrared radiometry, conventional photography, or any other applicable sensing method.

  13. Polarization Filtering of SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of polarization filtering of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns provide hybrid method applied to either (1) maximize signal-to-noise ratio of return from given target or (2) enhance contrast between targets of two different types (that have different polarization properties). Method valid for both point and extended targets and for both monostatic and bistatic radars as well as SAR. Polarization information in return signals provides more complete description of radar-scattering properties of targets and used to obtain additional information about targets for use in classifying them, discriminating between them, or enhancing features of radar images.

  14. How change of public transportation usage reveals fear of the SARS virus in a city.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear). These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear). About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50-70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays.

  15. How Change of Public Transportation Usage Reveals Fear of the SARS Virus in a City

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear). These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear). About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50–70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays. PMID:24647278

  16. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  17. Utilizing feedback in adaptive SAR ATR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Owen; Blacknell, David

    2009-05-01

    Existing SAR ATR systems are usually trained off-line with samples of target imagery or CAD models, prior to conducting a mission. If the training data is not representative of mission conditions, then poor performance may result. In addition, it is difficult to acquire suitable training data for the many target types of interest. The Adaptive SAR ATR Problem Set (AdaptSAPS) program provides a MATLAB framework and image database for developing systems that adapt to mission conditions, meaning less reliance on accurate training data. A key function of an adaptive system is the ability to utilise truth feedback to improve performance, and it is this feature which AdaptSAPS is intended to exploit. This paper presents a new method for SAR ATR that does not use training data, based on supervised learning. This is achieved by using feature-based classification, and several new shadow features have been developed for this purpose. These features allow discrimination of vehicles from clutter, and classification of vehicles into two classes: targets, comprising military combat types, and non-targets, comprising bulldozers and trucks. The performance of the system is assessed using three baseline missions provided with AdaptSAPS, as well as three additional missions. All performance metrics indicate a distinct learning trend over the course of a mission, with most third and fourth quartile performance levels exceeding 85% correct classification. It has been demonstrated that these performance levels can be maintained even when truth feedback rates are reduced by up to 55% over the course of a mission.

  18. InSAR Geodesy: The Next Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, M.

    2016-12-01

    Published in 1993, the first prominent geophysical applications of repeat pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) demonstrated spatially continuous imaging of the velocity of a remote ice stream in Antarctica and the ground displacement from a large earthquake in California. These studies heralded comprehensive assessments of rapid changes in the ice sheets and novel perspectives on earthquake source physics, all enabled by a new era in geodetic imaging with sub-centimeter sensitivity, meter-scale spatial resolution and expansive coverage. Since 1993, the promise of InSAR has been to provide deformation measurements "everywhere and all the time". Indeed, the new generation of satellites are already providing shorter revisit times and the gradual move to constellations of nearly identical satellites allows sub-weekly revisits at selected radar frequencies for many regions of interest. This increase in temporal sampling has prompted the geodetic community to develop a variety of InSAR time series methods and corrections techniques to mitigate the impact of path delays accrued in the atmosphere, all while inferring one or more components of the 3D time-dependent motions of Earth's solid surface. We illustrate these capabilities with recent studies that include detection of shallow aseismic slip transients on a major strike slip fault, dynamics of a subglacial eruption, the signature of aquifer management, mapping of rapid aseismic fault slip following a major earthquake and the long-distance response of ice stream motion to ocean tides. The increased sampling rate of observations allows us to improve our sensitivity to small amplitude deformation processes, separate overlapping physical processes by their different spatio-temporal signatures, and increase the general utility of imaging geodesy for rapid disaster response. At the same time, we need to rethink how data is managed for users with different capabilities - a critical challenge as we aim for a

  19. Experimental and numerical analysis of B1+ field and SAR with a new transmit array design for 7 T breast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghwan; Krishnamurthy, Narayan; Santini, Tales; Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2016-08-01

    Developing a radiofrequency (RF) coil system that produces a uniform B1+ field (circularly polarized component of the transverse magnetic field responsible for excitation) and low specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical for high performance ultrahigh field human imaging. In this study, we provide the design of a new eight channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit (Tx) array for breast MRI at 7 T. A numerical analysis utilizing an in-house finite difference time domain (FDTD) package was carried out in (1) four breast models, (2) homogeneous spherical model and (3) full body model to calculate the B1+ intensity (μT) and homogeneity represented by coefficient of variation (CoV = standard deviation/mean) in the proposed RF array design. The numerical results were compared with that measured in breast phantom (Bphantom) and homogeneous spherical phantom at 7 T MRI and showed very good agreement. Average and peak SARs were also calculated in the four breast models and the temperature rises due to the operation of the RF array were also measured in the Bphantom. The proposed RF array; which can operate in a single or multi transmit modes, demonstrates homogeneous RF field excitation with acceptable local/average SAR levels for breast MRI at 7 T.

  20. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  1. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-07-19

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  2. Beyond PSInSAR: the SQUEESAR Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.; Fumagalli, A.; Prati, C.; Rocca, F.; Rucci, A.

    2009-12-01

    After a decade since the first results on ERS data, Permanent Scatterer (PS) InSAR has become an operational technology for detecting and monitoring slow surface deformation phenomena such as subsidence and uplift, landslides, seismic fault creeping, volcanic inflation, etc. Processing procedures have been continuously updated, but the core of the algorithm has not been changed significantly. As well known, in PSInSAR, the main target is the identification of individual pixels that exhibit a “PS behavior”, i.e. they are only slightly affected by both temporal and geometrical decorrelation. Typically, these scatterers correspond to man-made objects, but PS have been identified also in non-urban areas, where exposed rocks or outcrops can indeed create good radar benchmarks and enable high-quality displacement measurements. Contrary to interferogram stacking techniques, PS analyses are carried out on a pixel-by-pixel basis, with no filtering of the interferograms, in order to preserve phase values from possible incoherent clutter surrounding good radar targets. In fact, any filtering process implies a spatial smoothing of the data that could compromise - rather than improve - phase coherence, at least for isolated PS. Although the PS approach usually allows one to retrieve high quality deformation measurements on a sparse grid of good radar targets, in some datasets it is quite evident how the number of pixels where some information can be extracted could be significantly increased by relaxing the hypothesis on target coherence and searching for pixels where the coherence level is high enough at least in some interferograms of the data-stack, not necessarily all. The idea of computing a “coherence matrix” for each pixel of the area of interest have been already proposed in previous papers, together with a statistical estimation of some physical parameters of interest (e.g. the average displacement rate) based on the covariance matrix. In past publications

  3. Computerized ionospheric tomography based on geosynchronous SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Cheng; Tian, Ye; Dong, Xichao; Wang, Rui; Long, Teng

    2017-02-01

    Computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) based on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an emerging technique to construct the three-dimensional (3-D) image of ionosphere. The current studies are all based on the Low Earth Orbit synthetic aperture radar (LEO SAR) which is limited by long repeat period and small coverage. In this paper, a novel ionospheric 3-D CIT technique based on geosynchronous SAR (GEO SAR) is put forward. First, several influences of complex atmospheric environment on GEO SAR focusing are detailedly analyzed, including background ionosphere and multiple scattering effects (induced by turbulent ionosphere), tropospheric effects, and random noises. Then the corresponding GEO SAR signal model is constructed with consideration of the temporal-variant background ionosphere within the GEO SAR long integration time (typically 100 s to 1000 s level). Concurrently, an accurate total electron content (TEC) retrieval method based on GEO SAR data is put forward through subband division in range and subaperture division in azimuth, obtaining variant TEC value with respect to the azimuth time. The processing steps of GEO SAR CIT are given and discussed. Owing to the short repeat period and large coverage area, GEO SAR CIT has potentials of covering the specific space continuously and completely and resultantly has excellent real-time performance. Finally, the TEC retrieval and GEO SAR CIT construction are performed by employing a numerical study based on the meteorological data. The feasibility and correctness of the proposed methods are verified.

  4. Spacecraft on-board SAR processing technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, K. Y.; Arens, W. E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the on-board SAR processing technology for Eos-type missions. The proposed Eos SAR sensor and flight data system are introduced, and the SAR processing requirements are described. The SAR on-board SAR processor architecture selection is discussed, and a baseline processor architecture using a frequency-domain processor for range correlation and a modular fault-tolerant VLSI time-domain parallel array for azimuth correlation are described. The mass storage and VLSI technologies needed for implementing the proposed SAR processing are assessed. It is shown that acceptable processor power and mass characteristics should be feasible for Eos-type applications. A proposed development strategy for the on-board SAR processor is presented.

  5. [Medical history from SARS to pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Zhen, Cheng

    2003-05-31

    SARS is a new kind of pneumonia. From the end of 2002 to the beginning of 2003, SARS broke in Guangdong province, Hong Kong and Beijing, and then gradually spread to the world. SARS is extremely contagious. The symptoms of SARS progress very quickly. SARS smashes the people's tranquil life and many people live in horror, worry and anxiety. But if we review the medical history of pneumonia, we would have a better understanding of SARS. This article focuses the history of people's understanding of pneumonia on the historical documents, diagnosis, etiology and treatment. Through the epidemic of SARS, the author hopes to express that contagion will live with us for a long time, but it is not a deadly disease. It is preventable and good care is essential for contagious patients. As Chinese people, we should have the best use of TCM in our combat with contagion.

  6. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  7. Characterization of personal RF electromagnetic field exposure and actual absorption for the general public.

    PubMed

    Joseph, W; Vermeeren, G; Verloock, L; Heredia, Mauricio Masache; Martens, Luc

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, personal electromagnetic field exposure of the general public due to 12 different radiofrequency sources is characterized. Twenty-eight different realistic exposure scenarios based upon time, environment, activity, and location have been defined and a relevant number of measurements were performed with a personal exposure meter. Indoor exposure in office environments can be higher than outdoor exposure: 95th percentiles of field values due to WiFi ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 V m(-1), and for DECT values of 0.33 V m(-1) were measured. The downlink signals of GSM and DCS caused the highest outdoor exposures up to 0.52 V m(-1). The highest total field exposure occurred for mobile scenarios (inside a train or bus) from uplink signals of GSM and DCS (e.g., mobile phones) due to changing environmental conditions, handovers, and higher required transmitted signals from mobile phones due to penetration through windows while moving. A method to relate the exposure to the actual whole-body absorption in the human body is proposed. An application is shown where the actual absorption in a human body model due to a GSM downlink signal is determined. Fiftieth, 95th, and 99 th percentiles of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) due to this GSM signal of 0.58 microW kg(-1), 2.08 microW kg(-1), and 5.01 microW kg(-1) are obtained for a 95th percentile of 0.26 V m(-1). A practical usable function is proposed for the relation between the whole-body SAR and the electric fields. The methodology of this paper enables epidemiological studies to make an analysis in combination with both electric field and actual whole-body SAR values and to compare exposure with basic restrictions.

  8. Multi-coil approach to reduce electromagnetic energy absorption for wirelessly powered implants

    PubMed Central

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Near-field inductive coupling is a commonly used technique for wireless power transfer (WPT) in biomedical implants. Owing to the close proximity of the implant coil(s) with the tissue ( ∼1 mm) and high current ( ∼100–300 mA) in the magnetic coil(s), a significant induced electric field can be generated for the operating frequency (1–20 MHz). In this Letter, a multi-coil-based WPT technique is proposed to selectively control the currents in the external and implant coils to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). A three-coil WPT system, that can achieve 26% reduction in peak 1-g SAR and 15% reduction in peak 10-g SAR, as compared to a two-coil WPT system with the same dimensions, is implemented and used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. To achieve the seamless design for the external and implant electronics, the multi-coil system achieves the same voltage gain and bandwidth as the two-coil design with 46% improvement in the power transfer efficiency.

  9. Multi-coil approach to reduce electromagnetic energy absorption for wirelessly powered implants.

    PubMed

    RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Near-field inductive coupling is a commonly used technique for wireless power transfer (WPT) in biomedical implants. Owing to the close proximity of the implant coil(s) with the tissue ( ∼1 mm) and high current ( ∼100-300 mA) in the magnetic coil(s), a significant induced electric field can be generated for the operating frequency (1-20 MHz). In this Letter, a multi-coil-based WPT technique is proposed to selectively control the currents in the external and implant coils to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). A three-coil WPT system, that can achieve 26% reduction in peak 1-g SAR and 15% reduction in peak 10-g SAR, as compared to a two-coil WPT system with the same dimensions, is implemented and used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. To achieve the seamless design for the external and implant electronics, the multi-coil system achieves the same voltage gain and bandwidth as the two-coil design with 46% improvement in the power transfer efficiency.

  10. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of L-Ornithine-L-Aspartate on the Development of Encephalopathy, Using Localization Pulses with Reduced Specific Absorption Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotboom, J.; Vogels, B. A. P. M.; Dehaan, J. G.; Creyghton, J. H. N.; Quack, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.; Bovee, W. M. M. J.

    Using the SADLOVE ( single-shot adiabatic localized volume excitation) localization technique with reduced specific absorption rate phase-compensated 2π pulses for localization, in vivo rat brain spectra were obtained in order to study the possible beneficial effects of L-ornithine-L-aspartate (OA) on the development of encephalopathy induced by hyperammonemia in portacaval shunted rats, an experimental model for subacute hepatic encephalopathy. The in vivo1H spectra were quantified using a conjugate-gradient-based frequency-domain fitting procedure. OA treatment resulted in an about threefold lower increase in train lactate ( P < 0.0001) and a slower increase of brain glutamine ( P = 0.022) concentration. However, these changes in brain metabolism, including a significantly lower ammonia concentration during OA treatment, were not associated with a sig significant improvement in clinical symptoms of encephalopathy, suggesting either insufficient decrease in brain ammonia concentration or another effect of OA treatment counteracting the lowering effect on blood and brain ammonia and on brain glutamine and lactate. It is concluded that localized in vivo1H MRS of the brain in combination with other analytical techniques, such as in vivo microdialysis, is helpful in explaining pathophysiological changes during hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy.

  11. Intrinsic absolute bioavailability prediction in rats based on in situ absorption rate constants and/or in vitro partition coefficients: 6-fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Castaño, G; Ruíz-García, A; Bañón, N; Bermejo, M; Merino, V; Freixas, J; Garriguesx, T M; Plá-Delfina, J M

    2000-11-01

    A preliminary study attempting to predict the intrinsic absolute bioavailability of a group of antibacterial 6-fluoroquinolones-including true and imperfect homologues as well as heterologues-was carried out. The intrinsic absolute bioavailability of the test compounds, F, was assessed on permanently cannulated conscious rats by comparing the trapezoidal normalized areas under the plasma concentration-time curves obtained by intravenous and oral routes (n = 8-12). The high-performance liquid chromatography analytical methods used for plasma samples are described. Prediction of the absolute bioavailability of th