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Sample records for absorption rate sar

  1. A Prototype RF Dosimeter for Independent Measurement of the Average Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) During MRI

    PubMed Central

    Stralka, John P; Bottomley, Paul A

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To develop a scanner-independent dosimeter for measuring the average radio frequency (RF) power deposition and specific absorption rates (SAR) for human MRI exposure. Materials and Methods A prototype dosimeter has a transducer with orthogonal conducting loops surrounding a small signal-generating MRI sample. The loops contain resistors whose values are adjusted to load the scanner’s MRI coils equivalent to an average head or body during MRI. The scanner adjusts its power output to normal levels during setup, using the MRI sample. Following calibration, the total power and average SAR deposited in the transducer are measured from the root-mean-square (rms) power induced in the transducer during MRI. Results A 1.5 Tesla head transducer was adjusted to elicit the same load as the average of nine adult volunteers. Once adjusted, the transducer loads other head coils the same as the head does. The dosimeter is calibrated at up to 20 W total deposited power and 4.5 W/kg SAR in the average head, with about 5% accuracy. Conclusion This dosimeter provides a simple portable means of measuring the power deposited in a body-equivalent sample load, independent of the scanner. Further work will develop SAR dosimetry for the torso and for higher fields. PMID:17969145

  2. Assessment of specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the head from a TETRA handset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter; Khalid, Mohammed; Mann, Simon

    2003-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) from a representative TETRA handset have been performed in an anatomically realistic model of the head. TETRA (Terrestrial Trunked Radio) is a modern digital private mobile radio system designed to meet the requirements of professional users, such as the police and fire brigade. The current frequency allocations in the UK are 380-385 MHz and 390-395 MHz for the public sector network. A comprehensive set of calculations of SAR in the head was performed for positions of the handset in front of the face and at both sides of the head. The representative TETRA handset considered, operating at 1 W in normal use, will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a monopole antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a helical antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with the ICNIRP occupational exposure restriction but will be over the public exposure restriction by up to ~50% if kept in the position of maximum SAR for 6 min continuously.

  3. Assessment of specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the head from a TETRA handset.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, Peter; Khalid, Mohammed; Mann, Simon

    2003-12-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) from a representative TETRA handset have been performed in an anatomically realistic model of the head. TETRA (Terrestrial Trunked Radio) is a modern digital private mobile radio system designed to meet the requirements of professional users, such as the police and fire brigade. The current frequency allocations in the UK are 380-385 MHz and 390-395 MHz for the public sector network. A comprehensive set of calculations of SAR in the head was performed for positions of the handset in front of the face and at both sides of the head. The representative TETRA handset considered. operating at 1 W in normal use, will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a monopole antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with both the ICNIRP occupational and public exposure restrictions. The handset with a helical antenna operating at 3 W in normal use will show compliance with the ICNIRP occupational exposure restriction but will be over the public exposure restriction by up to approximately 50% if kept in the position of maximum SAR for 6 min continuously.

  4. Experimental determination of whole body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of mice exposed to 200-400 MHz CW

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, S.V.; Brown, R.F.

    1983-01-01

    A maximum of six live mice, mouse cadavers, prolate spheroids molded from muscle-equivalent tissue, or saline-filled culture flasks, were exposed to continuous wave radiation in a TEM cell at frequencies between 200 and 400 MHz. Whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) was determined from power meter measurements of incident, reflected, and transmitted powers. The SARs for both live mice and cadavers were approximately twice that for the prolate spheroid models, and when housed in Plexiglas restraining cages, about 2 1/2 times greater. An error multiplying factor is identified, that quantitatively expresses how SAR data obtained by the three-power-meter method becomes progressively more noisy as the irradiation frequency is lowered or as the TEM cell cross section is increased.

  5. Resonance behaviour of whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in the female voxel model, NAOMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimbylow, Peter

    2005-09-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations have been performed of the whole-body averaged specific energy absorption rate (SAR) in a female voxel model, NAOMI, under isolated and grounded conditions from 10 MHz to 3 GHz. The 2 mm resolution voxel model, NAOMI, was scaled to a height of 1.63 m and a mass of 60 kg, the dimensions of the ICRP reference adult female. Comparison was made with SAR values from a reference male voxel model, NORMAN. A broad SAR resonance in the NAOMI values was found around 900 MHz and a resulting enhancement, up to 25%, over the values for the male voxel model, NORMAN. This latter result confirmed previously reported higher values in a female model. The effect of differences in anatomy was investigated by comparing values for 10-, 5- and 1-year-old phantoms rescaled to the ICRP reference values of height and mass which are the same for both sexes. The broad resonance in the NAOMI child values around 1 GHz is still a strong feature. A comparison has been made with ICNIRP guidelines. The ICNIRP occupational reference level provides a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction. The linear scaling of the adult phantom using different factors in longitudinal and transverse directions, in order to match the ICRP stature and weight, does not exactly reproduce the anatomy of children. However, for public exposure the calculations with scaled child models indicate that the ICNIRP reference level may not provide a conservative estimate of the whole-body averaged SAR restriction, above 1.2 GHz for scaled 5- and 1-year-old female models, although any underestimate is by less than 20%.

  6. Synthetic aperture design for increased SAR image rate

    DOEpatents

    Bielek, Timothy P.; Thompson, Douglas G.; Walker, Bruce C.

    2009-03-03

    High resolution SAR images of a target scene at near video rates can be produced by using overlapped, but nevertheless, full-size synthetic apertures. The SAR images, which respectively correspond to the apertures, can be analyzed in sequence to permit detection of movement in the target scene.

  7. Specific absorption rate in models of man and monkey at 225 and 2000 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, R.G.; Griner, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    Full-size models of a man and a rhesus monkey were exposed to radiofrequency (RF) radiation at 225 MHz. The model of man was also exposed to 2000 MHz. Specific absorption rates (SARs) were measured in partial-body sections, such as the arms, legs, etc., using gradient-layer calorimeters. Also, front-surface thermographic images were obtained to qualitatively show the heating patterns. For all of the configurations used, the SAR in the limbs was much higher than in the torso. Agreement (whole-body SARs) with spheroidal models was better for both models at 225 MHz than at 2000 MHz. These results indicate that in the frequency range two orders of magnitude above whole-body resonance, SAR in the limbs significantly contributes to the whole-body average SAR.

  8. Intelligent low rate compression of speckled SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1997-05-01

    This paper describes a compression technique under development at Sandia National Laboratories for the compression of complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery at very low overall bit rates. The methods involved combine several elements of existing and new lossy and lossless compression schemes in order to achieve an overall compression ratio of large SAR scenes of at least 50:1, while maintaining reasonable image quality. It is assumed that the end user will be primarily interested in specific regions of interest within the image (called chips), but that the context in which these chips appear within the entire scene is also of importance to an image analyst. The term intelligent is used to signify an external cuer which locates the chips of interest.

  9. Measuring the Rate of Lava Effusion by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    2004-06-01

    The rate at which lava emerges from a volcano is a fundamental property of the dynamics of the eruption. Intensive field measurements can capture this. However, for many, often cloud-covered, volcanoes with long-lived eruptions, spaceborne InSAR provides a potentially useful source of information. Repeated DEM creation at intervals allows the changing thickness of the lava flow field to be measured and incremental changes to calculate the volumetric lava flux rate. ERS data from (i) an andesitic lava dome eruption at Soufri re Hills, Montserrat , and (ii) a basaltic andesite lava flow-field at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica illustrate the method. There are two main limitations. Firstly, flowing or otherwise thermo- mechanically unstable surfaces that are active between interferogram pair acquisitions leads to decorrelation. This effect is particularly difficult on lava domes where the surface is extremely dynamic. Compound lava flow-fields are more tractable. Secondly, very slight motions on flows that have "stopped" can be confused with topography in repeat-pass interferograms. The InSAR-measured rate of lava effusion at Arenal fits well with rates calculated by other methods over the last 30 years. Radar systems best suited to this task should be L-band, have short orbit repeat intervals and moderate perpendicular baselines.

  10. Quantifying intra- and extracellular aggregation of iron oxide nanoparticles and its influence on specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Seongho; Hurley, Katie R; Bischof, John C; Haynes, Christy L; Hogan, Christopher J

    2016-09-21

    A promising route to cancer treatment is hyperthermia, facilitated by superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). After exposure to an alternating external magnetic field, SPIONs generate heat, quantified by their specific absorption rate (SAR, in W g(-1) Fe). However, without surface functionalization, commercially available, high SAR SPIONs (EMG 308, Ferrotec, USA) aggregate in aqueous suspensions; this has been shown to reduce SAR. Further reduction in SAR has been observed for SPIONs in suspensions containing cells, but the origin of this further reduction has not been made clear. Here, we use image analysis methods to quantify the structures of SPION aggregates in the extra- and intracellular milieu of LNCaP cell suspensions. We couple image characterization with nanoparticle tracking analysis and SAR measurements of SPION aggregates in cell-free suspensions, to better quantify the influence of cellular uptake on SPION aggregates and ultimately its influence on SAR. We find that in both the intra- and extracellular milieu, SPION aggregates are well-described by a quasifractal model, with most aggregates having fractal dimensions in the 1.6-2.2 range. Intracellular aggregates are found to be significantly larger than extracellular aggregates and are commonly composed of more than 10(3) primary SPION particles (hence they are "superaggregates"). By using high salt concentrations to generate such superaggregates and measuring the SAR of suspensions, we confirm that it is the formation of superaggregates in the intracellular milieu that negatively impacts SAR, reducing it from above 200 W g(-1) Fe for aggregates composed of fewer than 50 primary particles to below 50 W g(-1) for superaggregates. While the underlying physical mechanism by which aggregation leads to reduction in SAR remains to be determined, the methods developed in this study provide insight into how cellular uptake influences the extent of SPION aggregation, and enable estimation of the

  11. Numerical assessment of the reduction of specific absorption rate by adding high dielectric materials for fetus MRI at 3 T.

    PubMed

    Luo, Minmin; Hu, Can; Zhuang, Yayun; Chen, Wufan; Liu, Feng; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2016-08-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) is an important issue to be considered in fetus MRI at 3 T due to the high radiofrequency energy deposited inside the body of pregnant woman. The high dielectric material (HDM) has shown its potential for enhancing B1 field and reducing SAR in MRI. The aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of SAR reduction by adding an HDM to the fetus MRI. The feasibility of SAR reduction is numerically assessed in this study, using a birdcage coil in transmission loaded with an electromagnetic pregnant woman model in the SEMCAD-EM solver. The HDMs with different geometric arrangements and dielectric constants are manually optimized. The B1+ ${B_1}^ + $ homogeneity is also considered while calculating the optimized fetus 10 g local SAR among different strategies in the application of HDM. The optimum maximum fetus 10 g local SAR was obtained as 2.25 W/kg, by using two conformal pads placed left and right with the dielectric constant to be 400, reduced by 24.75% compared to that without the HDM. It indicated that the SAR can be significantly reduced with strategic placement of the HDM and the use of HDM may provide a simple, effective and low-cost method for reducing the SAR for the fetus MRI at 3 T. PMID:26985683

  12. High rate data systems. [for High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer and SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Richard B.; Nichols, David A.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of the high resolution imaging spectrometer (HIRIS) and the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) are described with consideration given to the source of their high data rates. A functional-level description of the end-to-end data flow for HIRIS and SAR is provided. Attention is also given to major technological challenges that must be met in achieving an implementation of the system. Management issues associated with high rate, high volume data are also discussed.

  13. Analysis of the Role of Lead Resistivity in Specific Absorption Rate for Deep Brain Stimulator Leads at 3T MRI

    PubMed Central

    Angelone, Leonardo M.; Ahveninen, Jyrki; Belliveau, John W.; Bonmassar, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on patients with implanted deep brain stimulators (DBSs) can be hazardous because of the antenna-effect of leads exposed to the incident radio-frequency field. This study evaluated electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) changes as a function of lead resistivity on an anatomically precise head model in a 3T system. The anatomical accuracy of our head model allowed for detailed modeling of the path of DBS leads between epidermis and the outer table. Our electromagnetic finite difference time domain (FDTD) analysis showed significant changes of 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR for the range of lead resistivity modeled, including highly conductive leads up to highly resistive leads. Antenna performance and whole-head SAR were sensitive to the presence of the DBS leads only within 10%, while changes of over one order of magnitude were observed for the peak 10 g averaged SAR, suggesting that local SAR values should be considered in DBS guidelines. With ρlead = ρcopper, and the MRI coil driven to produce a whole-head SAR without leads of 3.2 W/kg, the 1 g averaged SAR was 1080 W/kg and the 10 g averaged SAR 120 W/kg at the tip of the DBS lead. Conversely, in the control case without leads, the 1 g and 10 g averaged SAR were 0.5 W/kg and 0.6 W/kg, respectively, in the same location. The SAR at the tip of lead was similar with electrically homogeneous and electrically heterogeneous models. Our results show that computational models can support the development of novel lead technology, properly balancing the requirements of SAR deposition at the tip of the lead and power dissipation of the system battery. PMID:20335090

  14. Comparison of FDTD-calculated specific absorption rate in adults and children when using a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Martín, A.; Anguiano, M.; Villar, R.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the specific absorption rate (SAR) in scaled human head models is analysed to study possible differences between SAR in the heads of adults and children and for assessment of compliance with the international safety guidelines, while using a mobile phone. The finite-difference time-domain method (FDTD) has been used for calculating SAR values for models of both children and adults, at 900 and 1800 MHz. Maximum 1 g averaged SAR (SAR1 g) and maximum 10 g averaged SAR (SAR10 g) have been calculated in adults and scaled head models for comparison and assessment of compliance with ANSI/IEEE and European guidelines. Results show that peak SAR1 g and peak SAR10 g all trend downwards with decreasing head size but as head size decreases, the percentage of energy absorbed in the brain increases. So, higher SAR in children's brains can be expected depending on whether the thickness of their skulls and surrounding tissues actually depends on age. The SAR in eyes of different sizes, as a critical organ, has also been studied and very similar distributions for the full size and the scaled models have been obtained. Standard limits can only be exceeded in the unpractical situation where the antenna is located at a very short distance in front of the eye.

  15. Motion measurement of SAR antenna based on high frame rate camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Cao, R.; Feng, H.; Xu, Z.

    2015-03-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is currently in the marine, agriculture, geology and other fields are widely used, while the SAR antenna is one of the most important subsystems. Performance of antenna has a significant impact on the SAR sensitivity, azimuth resolution, image blur degree and other parameter. To improve SAR resolution, SAR antenna is designed and fabricated according to flexible expandable style. However, the movement of flexible antenna will have a greater impact on accuracy of SAR systems, so the motion measurement of the flexible antenna is an urgent problem. This paper studied motion measurements method based on high frame rate camera, designed and completed a flexible antenna motion measurement experiment. In the experiment the main IMU and the sub IMU were placed at both ends of the cantilever, which is simulation of flexible antenna, the high frame rate camera was placed above the main IMU, and the imaging target was set on side of the sub IMU. When the cantilever motion occurs, IMU acquired spatial coordinates of cantilever movement in real-time, and high frame rate camera captured a series of target images, and then the images was input into JTC to obtain the cantilever motion coordinates. Through the contrast and analysis of measurement results, the measurement accuracy of flexible antenna motion is verified.

  16. Application of pixel segmentation to the low rate compression of complex SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, R.W.; Eichel, P.; Magotra, N.

    1998-03-01

    This paper describes a technique to identify pixels within a subregion (chip) of a complex or detected SAR image which are to be losslessly compressed while the remainder of the image is subjected to a high compression ratio. This multi-modal compression is required for the intelligent low rate compression of SAR imagery, which addresses the problem of transmitting massive amounts of high resolution complex SAR data from a remote airborne sensor to a ground station for exploitation by an automatic target recognition (ATR) system, in a real time environment, over a narrow bandwidth. The ATR system results might then be presented to an image analyst who, using the contextual information from the SAR image, makes final target determination.

  17. FDTD chiral brain tissue model for specific absorption rate determination under radiation from mobile phones at 900 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamorano, M.; Torres-Silva, H.

    2006-04-01

    A new electrodynamics model formed by chiral bioplasma, which represents the human head inner structure and makes it possible to analyse its behaviour when it is irradiated by a microwave electromagnetic field from cellular phones, is presented. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) numeric technique is used, which allows simulation of the electromagnetic fields, deduced with Maxwell's equations, and allows us to simulate the specific absorption rate (SAR). The results show the SAR behaviour as a function of the input power and the chirality factor. In considering the chiral brain tissue in the proposed human head model, the two more important conclusions of our work are the following: (a) the absorption of the electromagnetic fields from cellular phones is stronger, so the SAR coefficient is higher than that using the classical model, when values of the chiral factor are of order of 1; (b) 'inverse skin effect' shows up at 1800 MHz, with respect to a 900 MHz source.

  18. Specific absorption rate in electrically coupled biological samples between metal plates.

    PubMed

    Joines, W T; Blackman, C F; Spiegel, R J

    1986-01-01

    The specific absorption rate (SAR) in a biological sample irradiated by electromagnetic fields between the metal plates of a transmission line can be altered significantly by the spacing of the metal plates and the distance between neighboring samples. The SAR in spherical biological samples is calculated for a number of neighboring sample arrangements and metal-plate spacings by using the method of images and induced dipole coupling. For a decrease in metal-plate spacing, the derived equations predict an increase in SAR within a sample and a decrease in SAR with a decrease in neighboring-sample spacing. The calculations are compared with measurements made with the aid of an array of 1-in radius metal hemispheres on the lower plate of two parallel plates (thus forming an image system). The hemisphere on which measurements are taken is insulated from the metal plate and is connected via a coaxial center conductor to an HP 3582A spectrum analyzer that measures the voltage and hence the electric field intensity at the hemisphere. Measurements made at a frequency where wavelength is large compared with sample size (48 Hz) are in good agreement with calculations. PMID:3741491

  19. On the reliable measurement of specific absorption rates and intrinsic loss parameters in magnetic hyperthermia materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeboer, R. R.; Southern, P.; Pankhurst, Q. A.

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical application of magnetic hyperthermia, the heat generated by magnetic nanoparticles in an alternating magnetic field is used as a cancer treatment. The heating ability of the particles is quantified by the specific absorption rate (SAR), an extrinsic parameter based on the clinical response characteristic of power delivered per unit mass, and by the intrinsic loss parameter (ILP), an intrinsic parameter based on the heating capacity of the material. Even though both the SAR and ILP are widely used as comparative design parameters, they are almost always measured in non-adiabatic systems that make accurate measurements difficult. We present here the results of a systematic review of measurement methods for both SAR and ILP, leading to recommendations for a standardised, simple and reliable method for measurements using non-adiabatic systems. In a representative survey of 50 retrieved datasets taken from published papers, the derived SAR or ILP was found to be more than 5% overestimated in 24% of cases and more than 5% underestimated in 52% of cases.

  20. Comparison of specific absorption rate induced in brain tissues of a child and an adult using mobile phone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Mai; Ueno, Shoogo

    2012-04-01

    The steady increase of mobile phone usage, especially mobile phones by children, has led to a rising concern about the possible adverse health effects of radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure. The objective of this work is to study whether there is a larger radio frequency energy absorption in the brain of a child compared to that of an adult. For this reason, three high-resolution models, two child head models (6 - and 11-year old) and one adult head model (34-year old) have been used in the study. A finite-difference time-domain method was employed to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) in the models from exposure to a generic handset at 1750 MHz. The results show that the SAR distributions in the human brain are age-dependent, and there is a deeper penetration of the absorbed SAR in the child's brain. The induced SAR can be significantly higher in subregions of the child's brain. In all of the examined cases, the SAR values in the brains of a child and an adult are well below the IEEE safety standard.

  1. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  2. A New Design of Metamaterials for SAR Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. A. M.

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to calculate the reduction of specific absorption rate (SAR) with a new design of square metamaterials (SMMs). The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method with lossy-Drude model is adopted in this analysis. The method of SAR reduction is discussed and the effects of location, distance, and size of metamaterials are analyzed. SMMs have achieved a 53.06% reduction of the initial SAR value for the case of 10 gm SAR. These results put forward a guideline to select various types of metamaterials with the maximum SAR reducing effect for a cellular phone.

  3. Correlation between relative growth rate and specific leaf area requires associations of specific leaf area with nitrogen absorption rate of roots.

    PubMed

    Osone, Yoko; Ishida, Atsushi; Tateno, Masaki

    2008-07-01

    Close correlations between specific leaf area (SLA) and relative growth rate (RGR) have been reported in many studies. However, theoretically, SLA by itself has small net positive effect on RGR because any increase in SLA inevitably causes a decrease in area-based leaf nitrogen concentration (LNCa), another RGR component. It was hypothesized that, for a correlation between SLA and RGR, SLA needs to be associated with specific nitrogen absorption rate of roots (SAR), which counteracts the negative effect of SLA on LNCa. Five trees and six herbs were grown under optimal conditions and relationships between SAR and RGR components were analyzed using a model based on balanced growth hypothesis. SLA varied 1.9-fold between species. Simulations predicted that, if SAR is not associated with SLA, this variation in SLA would cause a47% decrease in LNCa along the SLA gradient, leading to a marginal net positive effect on RGR. In reality, SAR was positively related to SLA, showing a 3.9-fold variation, which largely compensated for the negative effect of SLA on LNCa. Consequently, LNCa values were almost constant across species and a positive SLA-RGR relationship was achieved. These results highlight the importance of leaf-root interactions in understanding interspecific differences in RGR.

  4. A map of strain rate for Eastern Turkey, from InSAR and GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B.; Wright, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Tectonic deformation in Eastern Turkey is dominated by strain localisation on two major strike-slip faults; the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) and the East Anatolian Fault (EAF). Here we use Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to map interseismic strain across the Eurasian-Arabian plate boundary zone in Eastern Turkey, covering both the NAF and the EAF. Most previous InSAR interseismic studies of the NAF have used only descending track data, and in these studies it was therefore necessary to assume purely horizontal, fault-parallel motion in modelling deformation. The slip rate of the EAF has been the focus of only a few geological and geodetic studies, and InSAR has not previously been used to measure interseismic strain accumulation across this fault. We construct ~400 Envisat interferograms on three descending and two ascending tracks in Eastern Turkey, covering both the NAF and EAF. We use these data to generate five line-of-sight velocity maps (ratemaps) using the PiRATE software package (Wang et al., GRL, 2009), which implements a multi-interferogram network approach in order to maximise spatial coverage and correct for orbital errors. We find that the five InSAR ratemaps agree best in overlapping regions when all interferograms are first corrected for atmospheric effects using model outputs from the ERA-Interim global atmospheric model (Jolivet et al., GRL, 2011). From these five overlapping ratemaps, we model elastic strain accumulation for both the NAF and EAF, and calculate slip rates of 20×3 mm/yr and 10×2 mm/yr respectively, with associated locking depths of 16×9 km and 13×4 km. We then use the ratemaps, together with a compilation of GPS data in the area, to calculate a velocity field for Eastern Turkey. We find that the velocity field derived from InSAR and GPS data significantly reduces the uncertainty of east-west velocities when compared with the velocity field derived from GPS data alone, and shows that strain is mainly localised

  5. InSAR observations of low slip rates on the major faults of western Tibet.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tim J; Parsons, Barry; England, Philip C; Fielding, Eric J

    2004-07-01

    Two contrasting views of the active deformation of Asia dominate the debate about how continents deform: (i) The deformation is primarily localized on major faults separating crustal blocks or (ii) deformation is distributed throughout the continental lithosphere. In the first model, western Tibet is being extruded eastward between the major faults bounding the region. Surface displacement measurements across the western Tibetan plateau using satellite radar interferometry (InSAR) indicate that slip rates on the Karakoram and Altyn Tagh faults are lower than would be expected for the extrusion model and suggest a significant amount of internal deformation in Tibet. PMID:15247476

  6. Creep rate estimation along the Hayward fault using polarimetric SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, S.; Tiampo, K. F.; Samsonov, S. V.; Gonzalez, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Hayward fault running through eastern San Francisco Bay represents a significant seismic hazard in northern California. Surface geodetic measurements, including those from creepmeters and continuous GPS, manifest aseismic creep equivalent to 4-9 mm/yr along this fault. Comparison with the long-term slip rate estimates of ~9 mm/yr suggest that up to several meters of slip potential has accumulated since the last large event, making the Hayward fault now capable of M>6.5 earthquakes. Here we apply polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar interferometry (PolInSAR) on quad-pol Radarsat-2 images acquired from 2008 to 2011 in order to map the surface creep along the northern thirty km of the Hayward fault. In addition to quantifying aseismic creep across the fault, the polInSAR data depict another sharp discontinuity in range change to the northeast of the fault, an indication of ongoing creep along a second fault in that region. Comparison of the recent creep rate estimates along the Hayward fault with the previous measurements proves that there is consistency in the right-lateral aseismic slip. However, vertical movements corresponding to landslides on slopes near Berkeley display a lower mean velocity for the period 2008-2011 than 1992-2000. Modeling of the slip distribution using the polInSAR data in conjunction with creepmeter and GPS data provides additional insights into the depth of the creeping zone and the locking segments of the fault, an indicator of the extent of any probable rupture and the magnitude of the potential future event.

  7. The relationship of temperature rise to specific absorption rate and current in the human leg for exposure to electromagnetic radiation in the high frequency band.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, P R

    2003-10-01

    Of the biological effects of human exposure to radiofrequency and microwave radiation, the best-established are those due to elevation of tissue temperature. To prevent harmful levels of heating, restrictions have been proposed on the specific absorption rate (SAR). However, the relationship between SAR and temperature rise is not an invariant, since not only the heat capacity but also the efficiency of heat dissipation varies between different tissues and exposure scenarios. For small enough SAR, the relationship is linear and may be characterized by a 'heating factor' deltaT/SAR. Under whole-body irradiation the SAR may be particularly high in the ankles due to the concentration of current flowing through a relatively small cross-sectional area. In a previous paper, the author has presented calculations of the SAR distribution in a human leg in the high frequency (HF) band. In this paper, the heating factor for this situation is derived using a finite element approximation of the Pennes bioheat equation. The sensitivity of the results to different blood perfusion rates is investigated, and a simple local thermoregulatory model is applied. Both time-dependent and steady-state solutions are considered. Results confirm the appropriateness of the ICNIRP reference level of 100 mA on current through the leg, but suggest that at higher currents significant thermoregulatory adjustments to muscle blood flow will occur.

  8. Magnetic Nanoparticles with High Specific Absorption Rate at Low Alternating Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Kekalo, K.; Baker, I.; Meyers, R.; Shyong, J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and properties of a new type of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) for use in the hyperthermia treatment of tumors. These particles consist of 2–4 nm crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 gathered in 20–40 nm aggregates with a coating of carboxymethyl-dextran, producing a zetasize of 110–120 nm. Despite their very low saturation magnetization (1.5–6.5 emu/g), the specific absorption rate (SAR) of the nanoparticles is 22–200 W/g at applied alternating magnetic field (AMF) with strengths of 100–500 Oe at a frequency of 160 kHz. PMID:26884816

  9. MRI-based anatomical model of the human head for specific absorption rate mapping

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Nikos; Angelone, Leonardo; Tulloch, Seann; Sorg, Scott; Kaiser, Jonathan; Kennedy, David

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based, high-resolution, numerical model of the head of a healthy human subject. In order to formulate the model, we performed quantitative volumetric segmentation on the human head, using T1-weighted MRI. The high spatial resolution used (1 × 1 × 1 mm3), allowed for the precise computation and visualization of a higher number of anatomical structures than provided by previous models. Furthermore, the high spatial resolution allowed us to study individual thin anatomical structures of clinical relevance not visible by the standard model currently adopted in computational bioelectromagnetics. When we computed the electromagnetic field and specific absorption rate (SAR) at 7 Tesla MRI using this high-resolution model, we were able to obtain a detailed visualization of such fine anatomical structures as the epidermis/dermis, bone structures, bone-marrow, white matter and nasal and eye structures. PMID:18985401

  10. Impact of head morphology on local brain specific absorption rate from exposure to mobile phone radiation.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, Fatemeh; Bakker, Jurriaan F; Paulides, Margarethus M; Verhaart, René F; van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2015-01-01

    Among various possible health effects of mobile phone radiation, the risk of inducing cancer has the strongest interest of laymen and health organizations. Recently, the Interphone epidemiological study investigated the association between the estimated Radio Frequency (RF) dose from mobile phones and the risk of developing a brain tumor. Their dosimetric analysis included over 100 phone models but only two homogeneous head phantoms. So, the potential impact of individual morphological features on global and local RF absorption in the brain was not investigated. In this study, we performed detailed dosimetric simulations for 20 head models and quantified the variation of RF dose in different brain regions as a function of head morphology. Head models were exposed to RF fields from generic mobile phones at 835 and 1900 MHz in the "tilted" and "cheek" positions. To evaluate the local RF dose variation, we used and compared two different post-processing methods, that is, averaging specific absorption rate (SAR) over Talairach regions and over sixteen predefined 1 cm(3) cube-shaped field-sensors. The results show that the variation in the averaged SAR among the heads can reach up to 16.4 dB at a 1 cm(3) cube inside the brain (field-sensor method) and alternatively up to 15.8 dB in the medulla region (Talairach method). In conclusion, we show head morphology as an important uncertainty source for dosimetric studies of mobile phones. Therefore, any dosimetric analysis dealing with RF dose at a specific region in the brain (e.g., tumor risk analysis) should be based upon real morphology.

  11. A study on transmission characteristics and specific absorption rate using impedance-matched electrodes for various human body communication.

    PubMed

    Machida, Yuta; Yamamoto, Takahiko; Koshiji, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Human body communication (HBC) is a new communication technology that has presented potential applications in health care and elderly support systems in recent years. In this study, which is focused on a wearable transmitter and receiver for HBC in a body area network (BAN), we performed electromagnetic field analysis and simulation using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with various models of the human body. Further we redesigned a number of impedance-matched electrodes to allow transmission without stubs or transformers. The specific absorption rate (SAR) and transmission characteristics S21 of these electrode structures were compared for several models.

  12. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-01

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg-1 with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings were confirmed

  13. Radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure in humans: Estimation of SAR distribution in the brain, effects on sleep and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Huber, Reto; Schuderer, Jürgen; Graf, Thomas; Jütz, Kathrin; Borbély, Alexander A; Kuster, Niels; Achermann, Peter

    2003-05-01

    In two previous studies we demonstrated that radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF EMF) similar to those emitted by digital radiotelephone handsets affect brain physiology of healthy young subjects exposed to RF EMF (900 MHz; spatial peak specific absorption rate [SAR] 1 W/kg) either during sleep or during the waking period preceding sleep. In the first experiment, subjects were exposed intermittently during an 8 h nighttime sleep episode and in the second experiment, unilaterally for 30 min prior to a 3 h daytime sleep episode. Here we report an extended analysis of the two studies as well as the detailed dosimetry of the brain areas, including the assessment of the exposure variability and uncertainties. The latter enabled a more in depth analysis and discussion of the findings. Compared to the control condition with sham exposure, spectral power of the non-rapid eye movement sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) was initially increased in the 9-14 Hz range in both experiments. No topographical differences with respect to the effect of RF EMF exposure were observed in the two experiments. Even unilateral exposure during waking induced a similar effect in both hemispheres. Exposure during sleep reduced waking after sleep onset and affected heart rate variability. Exposure prior to sleep reduced heart rate during waking and stage 1 sleep. The lack of asymmetries in the effects on sleep EEG, independent of bi- or unilateral exposure of the cortex, may indicate involvement of subcortical bilateral projections to the cortex in the generation of brain function changes, especially since the exposure of the thalamus was similar in both experiments (approx. 0.1 W/kg).

  14. Toward Online Adaptive Hyperthermia Treatment Planning: Correlation Between Measured and Simulated Specific Absorption Rate Changes Caused by Phase Steering in Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, H. Petra; Ciampa, Silvia; Kroon-Oldenhof, Rianne de; Steggerda-Carvalho, Eva J.; Stam, Gerard van; Zum Vörde Sive Vörding, Paul J.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Bardati, Fernando; Bel, Arjan; Crezee, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: Hyperthermia is the clinical application of heat, in which tumor temperatures are raised to 40°C to 45°C. This proven radiation and chemosensitizer significantly improves clinical outcome for several tumor sites. Earlier studies of the use of pre-treatment planning for hyperthermia showed good qualitative but disappointing quantitative reliability. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether hyperthermia treatment planning (HTP) can be used more reliably for online adaptive treatment planning during locoregional hyperthermia treatments. Methods and Materials: This study included 78 treatment sessions for 15 patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer. At the start of treatments, temperature rise measurements were performed with 3 different antenna settings optimized for each patient, from which the absorbed power (specific absorption rate [SAR]) was derived. HTP was performed based on a computed tomography (CT) scan in treatment position with the bladder catheter in situ. The SAR along the thermocouple tracks was extracted from the simulated SAR distributions. Correlations between measured and simulated (average) SAR values were determined. To evaluate phase steering, correlations between the changes in simulated and measured SAR values averaged over the thermocouple probe were determined for all 3 combinations of antenna settings. Results: For 42% of the individual treatment sessions, the correlation coefficient between measured and simulated SAR profiles was higher than 0.5, whereas 58% showed a weak correlation (R of <0.5). The overall correlation coefficient between measured and simulated average SAR was weak (R=0.31; P<.001). The measured and simulated changes in average SAR after adapting antenna settings correlated much better (R=0.70; P<.001). The ratio between the measured and simulated quotients of maximum and average SARs was 1.03 ± 0.26 (mean ± SD), indicating that HTP can also correctly predict the relative amplitude of

  15. Rating health and stability of engineering structures via classification indexes of InSAR Persistent Scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Fabio; Tapete, Deodato; Terenzi, Gloria; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Moretti, Sandro

    2015-08-01

    We propose a novel set of indexes to classify the information content of Persistent Scatterers (PS) and rate the health of engineering structures at urban to local scale. PS are automatically sampled and grouped via 'control areas' coinciding with the building and its surrounding environment. Density over the 'control areas' and velocity of PS are converted respectively into: Completeness of Information Index (Ici) that reflects the PS coverage grade; and Conservation Criticality Indexes (Icc) which rate the health condition of the monument separately for the object and surrounding control areas. The deformation pattern over the structure is classified as isolated (i) or diffused (d) based on the Velocity Distribution Index (Ivd). Both Ici and Icc are rated from A to E classes using a colour-coded system that intentionally emulates an energy-efficiency scale, to encourage the exploitation of PS by stakeholders and end-users in the practise of engineering surveying. Workability and reliability of the classification indexes are demonstrated over the urban heritage of Florence, Italy, using well established ERS-1/2 (1992-2000) descending, ENVISAT (2003-2010) ascending and descending PS datasets. The indexes are designed in perspective of handling outputs from InSAR processing of higher-resolution time series.

  16. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1-30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1-30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3-4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  17. Relationship between peak spatial-averaged specific absorption rate and peak temperature elevation in human head in frequency range of 1–30 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Ryota; Laakso, Ilkka; De Santis, Valerio; Hirata, Akimasa

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the peak temperature elevation and the peak specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue in human head models in the frequency range of 1–30 GHz. As a wave source, a half-wave dipole antenna resonant at the respective frequencies is located in the proximity of the pinna. The bioheat equation is used to evaluate the temperature elevation by employing the SAR, which is computed by electromagnetic analysis, as a heat source. The computed SAR is post-processed by calculating the peak spatial-averaged SAR with six averaging algorithms that consider different descriptions provided in international guidelines and standards, e.g. the number of tissues allowed in the averaging volume, different averaging shapes, and the consideration of the pinna. The computational results show that the SAR averaging algorithms excluding the pinna are essential when correlating the peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna. In the averaging scheme considering an arbitrary shape, for better correlation, multiple tissues should be included in the averaging volume rather than a single tissue. For frequencies higher than 3–4 GHz, the correlation for peak temperature elevation in the head excluding the pinna is modest for the different algorithms. The 95th percentile value of the heating factor as well as the mean and median values derived here would be helpful for estimating the possible temperature elevation in the head.

  18. Subsidence rate monitoring of Aghajari oil field based on Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, N. Fouladi; Sahebi, M. R.; Matkan, A. A.; Roostaei, M.

    2013-06-01

    Land subsidence, due to natural or anthropogenic processes, causes significant costs in both economic and structural aspects. That part of subsidence observed most is the result of human activities, which relates to underground exploitation. Since the gradual surface deformation is a consequence of hydrocarbon reservoirs extraction, the process of displacement monitoring is amongst the petroleum industry priorities. Nowadays, Differential SAR Interferometry, in which satellite images are utilized for elevation change detection and analysis - in a millimetre scale, has proved to be a more real-time and cost-effective technology in contrast to the traditional surveying method. In this study, surface displacements in Aghajari oil field, i.e. one of the most industrious Iranian hydrocarbon sites, are being examined using radar observations. As in a number of interferograms, the production wells inspection reveals that surface deformation signals develop likely due to extraction in a period of several months. In other words, different subsidence or uplift rates and deformation styles occur locally depending on the geological conditions and excavation rates in place.

  19. Monitoring land subsidence rates with permanent scatterers SAR interferometry: a case study of Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jun; Li, Xiaojuan; Yu, Jie; Wang, Yanbing; Wan, Yanyan; An, Zhihui

    2015-12-01

    The ground subsidence phenomenon is more serious in Beijing, large-scale land subsidence seriously threats to urban planning and construction and the safety of residents. In order to study the subsidence condition, it is necessary to monitor land subsidence. Choosing 28 scenes Envisat ASAR images covering Beijing city from December 2003 to March 2009, permanent scatterer SAR interferometry (PSI) technique was applied to obtained time series land subsidence information. Then the trend characteristics and factors of subsidence were analyzed, comparing land subsidence result with the groundwater data and geological structure data. Comparison between the PSI-derived subsidence rates and leveling data obtained shows that the result of PSI is agreed with the leveling data. The results indicate that the PSI technique is capable of providing high-level accuracy subsidence information. The results show that:(1) The deformation rates derived PSI ranging from -45.80 to 4.36mm/a;(2) In the study area, the serious subsidence areas distribute in Chaoyang District, Shunyi District, Tongzhou District and Pinggu District;(3) The subsidence tends to become more and more concentrated in 6 years from 2003 to 2009.

  20. Specific absorption rate levels measured in a phantom head exposed to radio frequency transmissions from analog hand-held mobile phones

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, V.; Joyner, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    Electric fields (E-fields) induced within a phantom head from exposure to three different advanced mobile phone system (AMPS) hand-held telephones were measured using an implantable E-Field probe. Measurements were taken in the eye nearest the phone and along a lateral scan through the brain from its center to the side nearest the phone. During measurement, the phones were positioned alongside the phantom head as in typical use and were configured to transmit at maximum power (600 mW nominal). The specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated from the in situ E-field measurements, which varied significantly between phone models and antenna configuration. The SARs induced in the eye ranged from 0.007 to 0.21 W/kg. Metal-framed spectacles enhanced SAR levels in the eye by 9--29%. In the brain, maximum levels were recorded at the measurement point closest to the phone and ranged from 0.12 to 0.83 W/kg. These SARs are below peak spatial limits recommended in the US and Australian national standards and the IRPA guidelines for safe exposure to radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields. Furthermore, a detailed thermal analysis of the eye indicated only a 0.022 C maximum steady-state temperature rise in the eye from a uniform SAR loading of 0.21 W/kg. A more approximate thermal analysis in the brain also indicated only a small maximum temperature rise of 0.034 C for a local SAR loading of 0.83 W/kg.

  1. Correlation between nasal membrane permeability and nasal absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hefei; Lin, Chih-Wei; Donovan, Maureen D

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between in vitro permeability (Papp) values obtained from isolated nasal tissues and the absorption rates (ka) of the same compounds following nasal administration in animals and humans. The Papp of a set of 11 drug compounds was measured using animal nasal explants and plasma time-concentration profiles for each of the same compounds following intravenous (IV) and intranasal (IN) administration were experimentally determined or obtained from literature reports. The plasma clearance was estimated from the IV plasma time-concentration profiles, and ka was determined from the IN plasma time-concentration profiles using a deconvolution approach. The level of correlation between Papp and ka was established using Pearson correlation analysis. A good correlation (r=0.77) representing a point-to-point relationship for each of the compounds was observed. This result indicates that the nasal absorption for many drug candidates can be estimated from a readily measured in vitro Papp value. PMID:23225081

  2. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-01

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg-1 and 91 mV m-1 for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg-1) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m-1) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  3. Multimodal Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles with Unusually Enhanced Specific Absorption Rate for Synergetic Cancer Therapeutics and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Nanasaheb D; Bohara, Raghvendra A; Malgras, Victor; Tofail, Syed A M; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Wu, Kevin C-W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-06-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy frequently face trade off between a high magnetization saturation and their good colloidal stability, high specific absorption rate (SAR), and most importantly biological compatibility. This necessitates the development of new nanomaterials, as MFH and MRI are considered to be one of the most promising combined noninvasive treatments. In the present study, we investigated polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) SPMNPs for efficient cancer hyperthermia therapy and MRI application. The superparamagnetic nanomaterial revealed excellent colloidal stability and biocompatibility. A high SAR of 390 W/g was observed due to higher colloidal stability leading to an increased Brownian and Neel's spin relaxation. Cell viability of PEG capped nanoparticles is up to 80% on different cell lines tested rigorously using different methods. PEG coating provided excellent hemocompatibility to human red blood cells as PEG functionalized SPMNPs reduced hemolysis efficiently compared to its uncoated counterpart. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia of SPMNPs resulted in cancer cell death up to 80%. Additionally, improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the PEG capped La1-xSrxMnO3 formulation in aqueous medium compared to the bare LSMO. Taken together, PEG capped SPMNPs can be useful for diagnosis, efficient magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and multimodal cancer treatment as the amphiphilicity of PEG can easily be utilized to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs. PMID:27197993

  4. Multimodal Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles with Unusually Enhanced Specific Absorption Rate for Synergetic Cancer Therapeutics and Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Nanasaheb D; Bohara, Raghvendra A; Malgras, Victor; Tofail, Syed A M; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Wu, Kevin C-W; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-06-15

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPMNPs) used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) cancer therapy frequently face trade off between a high magnetization saturation and their good colloidal stability, high specific absorption rate (SAR), and most importantly biological compatibility. This necessitates the development of new nanomaterials, as MFH and MRI are considered to be one of the most promising combined noninvasive treatments. In the present study, we investigated polyethylene glycol (PEG) functionalized La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) SPMNPs for efficient cancer hyperthermia therapy and MRI application. The superparamagnetic nanomaterial revealed excellent colloidal stability and biocompatibility. A high SAR of 390 W/g was observed due to higher colloidal stability leading to an increased Brownian and Neel's spin relaxation. Cell viability of PEG capped nanoparticles is up to 80% on different cell lines tested rigorously using different methods. PEG coating provided excellent hemocompatibility to human red blood cells as PEG functionalized SPMNPs reduced hemolysis efficiently compared to its uncoated counterpart. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia of SPMNPs resulted in cancer cell death up to 80%. Additionally, improved MRI characteristics were also observed for the PEG capped La1-xSrxMnO3 formulation in aqueous medium compared to the bare LSMO. Taken together, PEG capped SPMNPs can be useful for diagnosis, efficient magnetic fluid hyperthermia, and multimodal cancer treatment as the amphiphilicity of PEG can easily be utilized to encapsulate hydrophobic drugs.

  5. Specific absorption rate in neonates undergoing magnetic resonance procedures at 1.5 T and 3 T

    PubMed Central

    Beqiri, Arian; Price, Anthony N.; Teixeira, Jose Nuno; Hand, Jeffrey W.; Hajnal, Joseph V.

    2015-01-01

    MRI is finding increased clinical use in neonatal populations; the extent to which electromagnetic models used for quantification of specific absorption rate (SAR) by commercial MRI scanners accurately reflect this alternative scenario is unclear. This study investigates how SAR predictions relating to adults can be related to neonates under differing conditions when imaged using 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners. Electromagnetic simulations were produced in neonatal subjects of different sizes and positions within a generic MRI body transmit device operating at both 64 MHz and 128 MHz, corresponding to 1.5 T and 3 T MRI scanners, respectively. An adult model was also simulated, as was a spherical salt‐water phantom, which was also used in a calorimetry experiment. The SAR in neonatal subjects was found to be less than that experienced in an adult in all scenarios; however, the overestimation factor was variable. For example a 3 T body scan resulting in local 10 g SAR of 10.1 W kg−1 in an adult would deposit 2.6 W kg−1 in a neonate: an approximately fourfold difference. The SAR experienced by neonatal subjects undergoing MRI is lower than that in adults in equivalent situations. If the safety of such procedures is assessed using adult‐appropriate models then the result is a conservative estimate. © 2015 The Authors. NMR in Biomedicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25594939

  6. The relationship between specific absorption rate and temperature elevation in anatomically based human body models for plane wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Oizumi, Takuya; Hanatani, Ryuto; Chan, Kwok Hung; Wiart, Joe

    2013-02-21

    According to the international safety guidelines/standard, the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (Poljak et al 2003 IEEE Trans. Electromagn. Compat. 45 141-5) and the peak spatial average SAR are used as metrics for human protection from whole-body and localized exposures, respectively. The IEEE standard (IEEE 2006 IEEE C95.1) indicates that the upper boundary frequency, over which the whole-body-averaged SAR is deemed to be the basic restriction, has been reduced from 6 to 3 GHz, because radio-wave energy is absorbed around the body surface when the frequency is increased. However, no quantitative discussion has been provided to support this description especially from the standpoint of temperature elevation. It is of interest to investigate the maximum temperature elevation in addition to the core temperature even for a whole-body exposure. In the present study, using anatomically based human models, we computed the SAR and the temperature elevation for a plane-wave exposure from 30 MHz to 6 GHz, taking into account the thermoregulatory response. As the primary result, we found that the ratio of the core temperature elevation to the whole-body-averaged SAR is almost frequency independent for frequencies below a few gigahertz; the ratio decreases above this frequency. At frequencies higher than a few gigahertz, core temperature elevation for the same whole-body averaged SAR becomes lower due to heat convection from the skin to air. This lower core temperature elevation is attributable to skin temperature elevation caused by the power absorption around the body surface. Then, core temperature elevation even for whole-body averaged SAR of 4 W kg(-1) with the duration of 1 h was at most 0.8 °C, which is smaller than a threshold considered in the safety guidelines/standard. Further, the peak 10 g averaged SAR is correlated with the maximum body temperature elevations without extremities and pinna over the frequencies considered. These findings

  7. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines. PMID:24936747

  8. Analysis of in situ electric field and specific absorption rate in human models for wireless power transfer system with induction coupling.

    PubMed

    Sunohara, Tetsu; Hirata, Akimasa; Laakso, Ilkka; Onishi, Teruo

    2014-07-21

    This study investigates the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the in situ electric field in anatomically based human models for the magnetic field from an inductive wireless power transfer system developed on the basis of the specifications of the wireless power consortium. The transfer system consists of two induction coils covered by magnetic sheets. Both the waiting and charging conditions are considered. The transfer frequency considered in this study is 140 kHz, which is within the range where the magneto-quasi-static approximation is valid. The SAR and in situ electric field in the chest and arm of the models are calculated by numerically solving the scalar potential finite difference equation. The electromagnetic modelling of the coils in the wireless power transfer system is verified by comparing the computed and measured magnetic field distributions. The results indicate that the peak value of the SAR averaged over a 10 g of tissue and that of the in situ electric field are 72 nW kg(-1) and 91 mV m(-1) for a transmitted power of 1 W, Consequently, the maximum allowable transmitted powers satisfying the exposure limits of the SAR (2 W kg(-1)) and the in situ electric field (18.9 V m(-1)) are found to be 28 MW and 43 kW. The computational results show that the in situ electric field in the chest is the most restrictive factor when compliance with the wireless power transfer system is evaluated according to international guidelines.

  9. Accumulation Rates in the Dry Snow Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet Inferred from L-band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet contains about 2.9 million km3 of ice and would raise global sea levels by about 7.1 m if it melted completely. Two unusually large iceberg calving events at Petermann Glacier in the past several years, along with the unusually large extent of ice sheet melt this summer point to the relevance of understanding the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. In this study, we use data from the PALSAR instrument aboard the ALOS satellite to form L-band (23-centimeter carrier wavelength) InSAR images of the dry snow zone of the Greenland ice sheet. We form geocoded differential interferograms, using the ice sheet elevation model produced by Howat et.al. [1]. By applying phase and radiometric calibration, we can examine interferograms formed between any pair of transmit and receive polarization channels. In co-polarized interferograms, the InSAR correlation ranges from about 0.35 at the summit (38.7 deg W, 73.0 deg N) where accumulation is about 20 cm w.e./yr to about 0.70 at the north-eastern part of the dry snow zone (35.1 deg W, 77.1 deg N), where accumulation is about 11.7 cm w.e./yr. Cross-polarized interferograms show similar geographic variation with overall lower correlation. We compare our InSAR data with in-situ measurements published by Bales et.al. [2]. We examine the applicability of dense-medium radiative transfer electromagnetic scattering models for estimating accumulation rates from L-band InSAR data. The large number and broad coverage of ALOS scenes acquired between 2007 and 2009 with good InSAR coherence at 46-day repeat times and 21.5 degree incidence angles gives us the opportunity to examine the empirical relationship between in-situ accumulation rate observations and the polarimetric InSAR correlation and radar brightness at this particular imaging geometry. This helps us quantify the accuracy of accumulation rates estimated from InSAR data. In some regions, 46-day interferograms acquired in the winters of several consecutive

  10. Analysis on the effect of the distances and inclination angles between human head and mobile phone on SAR.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M I; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the distances between the human head and internal cellular device antenna on the specific absorption rate (SAR). This paper also analyzes the effects of inclination angles between user head and mobile terminal antenna on SAR values. The effects of the metal-glass casing of mobile phone on the SAR values were observed in the vicinity of the human head model. Moreover, the return losses were investigated in all cases to mark antenna performance. This analysis was performed by adopting finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method on Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio. The results indicate that by increasing the distance between the user head and antenna, SAR values are decreased. But the increase in inclination angle does not reduce SAR values in all cases. Additionally, this investigation provides some useful indication for future design of low SAR mobile terminal antenna.

  11. Analysis on the effect of the distances and inclination angles between human head and mobile phone on SAR.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M I; Faruque, M R I; Islam, M T

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of the distances between the human head and internal cellular device antenna on the specific absorption rate (SAR). This paper also analyzes the effects of inclination angles between user head and mobile terminal antenna on SAR values. The effects of the metal-glass casing of mobile phone on the SAR values were observed in the vicinity of the human head model. Moreover, the return losses were investigated in all cases to mark antenna performance. This analysis was performed by adopting finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method on Computer Simulation Technology (CST) Microwave Studio. The results indicate that by increasing the distance between the user head and antenna, SAR values are decreased. But the increase in inclination angle does not reduce SAR values in all cases. Additionally, this investigation provides some useful indication for future design of low SAR mobile terminal antenna. PMID:25863147

  12. Determination of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant from the frequency dependence of the specific absorption rate in a frozen ferrofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Nathaniel; Perkins-Harbin, Emily; Aho, Brandon; Wang, Lihua; Kumon, Ronald; Rablau, Corneliu; Vaishnava, Prem; Tackett, Ronald; Therapeutic Biomaterials Group Team

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal suspensions of superparamagnetic nanoparticles, known as ferrofluids, are promising candidates for the mediation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). In such materials, the dissipation of heat occurs as a result of the relaxation of the particles in an applied ac magnetic field via the Brownian and Neel mechanisms. In order to isolate and study the role of the Neel mechanism in this process, the sample can be frozen, using liquid nitrogen, in order to suppress the Brownian relaxation. In this experiment, dextran-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles synthesized via co-precipitation and characterized via transmission electron microscopy and dc magnetization are used as MFH mediators over the temperature range between -70 °C to -10 °C (Brownian-suppressed state). Heating the nanoparticles using ac magnetic field (amplitude ~300 Oe), the frequency dependence of the specific absorption rate (SAR) is calculated between 150 kHz and 350 kHz and used to determine the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the sample. We would like to thank Fluxtrol, Inc. for their help with this project

  13. SAR measurement in MRI: an improved method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Indovina, Pietro Luigi; Barone, Fabrizio

    2009-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2- 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. Furthermore, in this method, it is possible to show that all deposited SAR power can be considered acquired and measured.

  14. Theory of absorption rate of carriers in fused silica under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Wu, SY; Jiang, XD; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Kai

    2010-11-15

    A quantum non-perturbation theory for phonon-assisted photon absorption of conduction band electron in intense laser was developed. By carrying out the calculation in fused silica at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared in terawatt intensity laser, we show that the Non-perturbation approach can make a uniform description of energy absorption rate at both short wavelengths and long wavelengths on TW / cm2 intensity laser.

  15. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system.

    PubMed

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-21

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues. PMID:24002053

  16. Numerical analysis of specific absorption rate in the human head due to a 13.56 MHz RFID-based intra-ocular pressure measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirtl, Rene; Schmid, Gernot

    2013-09-01

    A modern wireless intra-ocular pressure monitoring system, based on 13.56 MHz inductively coupled data transmission, was dosimetrically analyzed with respect to the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced inside the head and the eye due to the electromagnetic field exposure caused by the reader antenna of the transmission system. The analysis was based on numerical finite difference time domain computations using a high resolution anatomical eye model integrated in a modern commercially available anatomical model of a male head. Three different reader antenna configurations, a 7-turn elliptic (30 mm × 50 mm) antenna at 12 mm distance from the eye, a flexible circular antenna (60 mm diameter, 8 turns on 2 mm substrate) directly attached to the skin, and a circular 7-turn antenna (30 mm diameter at 12 mm distance to the eye) were analyzed, respectively. Possible influences of the eye-lid status (closed or opened) and the transponder antenna contained in a contact lens directly attached to the eye were taken into account. The results clearly demonstrated that for typical reader antenna currents required for proper data transmission, the SAR values remain far below the limits for localized exposure of the head, as defined by the International Commission for Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. Particularly the induced SAR inside the eye was found to be substantially (orders of magnitudes for typical reader antenna currents in the order of 1 A turn) below values which have been reported to be critical with respect to thermally induced adverse health effects in eye tissues.

  17. Effect of a hands-free wire on specific absorption rate for a waist-mounted 1.8 GHz cellular telephone handset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troulis, S. E.; Scanlon, W. G.; Evans, N. E.

    2003-06-01

    A common feature of cellular telephony is the use of a 'hands-free' audio extension lead connected to a waist-worn handset. Interaction between the transmitting antenna, the wire and the user's body can occur, with detrimental effects including polar pattern degradation, reduced efficiency and localized increases in specific absorption rate (SAR). Using a realistic full-body model of an adult male, finite difference time domain analysis was employed to investigate the coupling between a hip-mounted 1.8 GHz handset fitted with a monopole antenna and a 1 m long wire representing a hands-free wire. Conduction current densities were computed for three identifiable coupling modes: magnetic-only, conductive-only and combined conductive-and-magnetic. Magnetic-only coupling was dominant. Without the lead, placing the handset at waist height led to a 42.8% increase in the total energy deposited in the body, compared to use at the head. Introducing the lead further increased the body loss, with a reduction in system radiation efficiency from 52% to 43.7%. Without the hands-free lead, the peak 1 g and 10 g SARs were 0.450 W kg-1 and 0.265 W kg-1, respectively, for 125 mW transmit power. With the hands-free lead connected, these values increased to 1.14 W kg-1 and 0.430 W kg-1, respectively.

  18. 3D finite element simulation of effects of deflection rate on energy absorption for TRIP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Asuka; Pham, Hang; Iwamoto, Takeshi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, with the requirement of lighter weight and more safety for a design of automobile, energy absorption capability of structural materials has become important. TRIP (Transformation-induced Plasticity) steel is expected to apply to safety members because of excellent energy absorption capability and ductility. Past studies proved that such excellent characteristics in TRIP steel are dominated by strain-induced martensitic transformation (SIMT) during plastic deformation. Because SIMT strongly depends on deformation rate and temperature, an investigation of the effects of deformation rate and temperature on energy absorption in TRIP is essential. Although energy absorption capability of material can be estimated by J-integral experimentally by using pre-cracked specimen, it is difficult to determine volume fraction of martensite and temperature rise during the crack extension. In addition, their effects on J-integral, especially at high deformation rate in experiment might be quite hard. Thus, a computational prediction needs to be performed. In this study, bending deformation behavior of pre-cracked specimen until the onset point of crack extension are predicted by 3D finite element simulation based on the transformation kinetics model proposed by Iwamoto et al. (1998). It is challenged to take effects of temperature, volume fraction of martensite and deformation rate into account. Then, the mechanism for higher energy absorption characteristic will be discussed.

  19. Measurement of the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous diethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.L.; Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Oscarson, J.L.; Wilding, W.V.; Anderson, D.J.

    1998-05-01

    Aqueous alkanolamine solutions are commonly used in natural gas sweetening processes to remove the acid gases CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous diethanolamine (DEA) solutions were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. The absorption rate was found to be insensitive to the diffusion coefficient of CO{sub 2} in solution but very sensitive to the diffusion rate of bicarbonate, protonated DEA, and carbamate ions. Evidence also suggested that chemical reaction equilibrium is rapid relative to diffusion. The diffusion coefficient of DEA in water was also measured using a Taylor dispersion apparatus. A numerical model was developed and used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and protonated amine from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and protonated DEA were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % DEA in water.

  20. A study of energy absorption rate in a quantum dot and metallic nanosphere hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Schindel, Daniel; Singh, Mahi R

    2015-09-01

    We have studied energy absorption rate in a quantum dot-metallic nanosphere system embedded on a dielectric substrate. We applied a control field to induce dipole moments in the quantum dot and the metal nanosphere, and monitored the energy absorption using a probe field. These external fields induce dipole moments in the metal nanosphere and the quantum dot, and these two structures interact with one another via the dipole-dipole interaction. The density matrix method was used to evaluate the absorption, indicating that it can be shifted by moving the metal nanosphere close to the quantum dot. Also, absorption efficiency can either be quenched or enhanced by the addition of a metal nanosphere. This hybrid system can be used to create ultrafast switching and sensing nanodevices.

  1. A study of energy absorption rate in a quantum dot and metallic nanosphere hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindel, Daniel; Singh, Mahi R.

    2015-09-01

    We have studied energy absorption rate in a quantum dot-metallic nanosphere system embedded on a dielectric substrate. We applied a control field to induce dipole moments in the quantum dot and the metal nanosphere, and monitored the energy absorption using a probe field. These external fields induce dipole moments in the metal nanosphere and the quantum dot, and these two structures interact with one another via the dipole-dipole interaction. The density matrix method was used to evaluate the absorption, indicating that it can be shifted by moving the metal nanosphere close to the quantum dot. Also, absorption efficiency can either be quenched or enhanced by the addition of a metal nanosphere. This hybrid system can be used to create ultrafast switching and sensing nanodevices.

  2. Energy absorption at high strain rate of glass fiber reinforced mortars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenu, Luigi; Forni, Daniele; Cadoni, Ezio

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the dynamic behaviour of cement mortars reinforced with glass fibers was studied. The influence of the addition of glass fibers on energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate was investigated. Static tests in compression, in tension and in bending were first performed. Dynamic tests by means of a Modified Hopkinson Bar were then carried out in order to investigate how glass fibers affected energy absorption and tensile strength at high strain-rate of the fiber reinforced mortar. The Dynamic Increase Factor (DIF) was finally evaluated.

  3. A review of lung-to-blood absorption rates for radon progeny.

    PubMed

    Marsh, J W; Bailey, M R

    2013-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 66 Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) treats clearance of materials from the respiratory tract as a competitive process between absorption into blood and particle transport to the alimentary tract and lymphatics. The ICRP recommended default absorption rates for lead and polonium (Type M) in ICRP Publication 71 but stated that the values were not appropriate for short-lived radon progeny. This paper reviews and evaluates published data from volunteer and laboratory animal experiments to estimate the HRTM absorption parameter values for short-lived radon progeny. Animal studies showed that lead ions have two phases of absorption: ∼10 % absorbed with a half-time of ∼15 min, the rest with a half-time of ∼10 h. The studies also indicated that some of the lead ions were bound to respiratory tract components. Bound fractions, f(b), for lead were estimated from volunteer and animal studies and ranged from 0.2 to 0.8. Based on the evaluations of published data, the following HRTM absorption parameter values were derived for lead as a decay product of radon: f(r) = 0.1, s(r) = 100 d(-1), s(s) = 1.7 d(-1), f(b) = 0.5 and s(b) = 1.7 d(-1). Effective doses calculated assuming these absorption parameter values instead of a single absorption half-time of 10 h with no binding (as has generally been assumed) are only a few per cent higher. However, as there is some conflicting evidence on the absorption kinetics for radon progeny, dose calculations have been carried out for different sets of absorption parameter values derived from different studies. The results of these calculations are discussed.

  4. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone.

    PubMed

    Faruque, M R I; Hossain, M I; Misran, N; Singh, M; Islam, M T

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances.

  5. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, M. R. I.; Hossain, M. I.; Misran, N.; Singh, M.; Islam, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances. PMID:26599584

  6. Metamaterial-Embedded Low SAR PIFA for Cellular Phone.

    PubMed

    Faruque, M R I; Hossain, M I; Misran, N; Singh, M; Islam, M T

    2015-01-01

    A metamaterial-embedded planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) is proposed in this study for cellular phone applications. A dual-band PIFA is designed to operate both GSM 900 MHz and DCS 1800 MHz. The ground plane of a conventional PIFA is modified using a planar one-dimensional metamaterial array. The investigation is performed using the Finite Integration Technique (FIT) of CST Microwave Studio. The performance of the developed antenna was measured in an anechoic chamber. The specific absorption rate (SAR) values are calculated considering two different holding positions: cheek and tilt. The SAR values are measured using COMOSAR measurement system. Good agreement is observed between the simulated and measured data. The results indicate that the proposed metamaterial-embedded antenna produces significantly lower SAR in the human head compared to the conventional PIFA. Moreover, the modified antenna substrate leads to slight improvement of the antenna performances. PMID:26599584

  7. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J F; Paulides, M M; Christ, A; Kuster, N; van Rhoon, G C

    2010-06-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SAR(wb)) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR(10g)). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SAR(wb)) and 58% (SAR(10g)) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SAR(wb) is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR(10g) values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning.

  8. Mechanism and rate of glucose absorption differ between an Australian honeyeater (Meliphagidae) and a lorikeet (Loriidae).

    PubMed

    Napier, Kathryn R; McWhorter, Todd J; Fleming, Patricia A

    2008-11-01

    Efficient mechanisms of glucose absorption are necessary for volant animals as a means of reducing mass during flight: they speed up gut transit time and require smaller volume and mass of gut tissue. One mechanism that may be important is absorption via paracellular (non-mediated) pathways. This may be particularly true for nectarivorous species which encounter large quantities of sugar in their natural diet. We investigated the extent of mediated and non-mediated glucose absorption in red wattlebirds Anthochaera carunculata (Meliphagidae) and rainbow lorikeets Trichoglossus haematodus (Loriidae) to test the hypothesis that paracellular uptake accounts for a significant proportion of total glucose uptake in these species. We found that routes of glucose absorption are highly dynamic in both species. In lorikeets, absorption of L-glucose (non-mediated uptake) is slower than that of D-glucose (mediated and non-mediated uptake), with as little as 10% of total glucose absorbed by the paracellular pathway initially (contrasting previous indirect estimates of approximately 80%). Over time, however, more glucose may be absorbed via the paracellular route. Glucose absorption by both mediated and non-mediated mechanisms in wattlebirds occurred at a faster rate than in lorikeets, and wattlebirds also rely substantially on paracellular uptake. In wattlebirds, we recorded higher bioavailability of L-glucose (96+/-3%) compared with D-glucose (57+/-2%), suggesting problems with the in vivo use of radiolabeled d-glucose. Further trials with 3-O-methyl-D-glucose revealed high bioavailability in wattlebirds (90+/-5%). This non-metabolisable glucose analogue remains the probe of choice for measuring uptake rates in vivo, especially in birds in which absorption and metabolism occur extremely rapidly.

  9. Mechanism and rate of glucose absorption differ between an Australian honeyeater (Meliphagidae) and a lorikeet (Loriidae).

    PubMed

    Napier, Kathryn R; McWhorter, Todd J; Fleming, Patricia A

    2008-11-01

    Efficient mechanisms of glucose absorption are necessary for volant animals as a means of reducing mass during flight: they speed up gut transit time and require smaller volume and mass of gut tissue. One mechanism that may be important is absorption via paracellular (non-mediated) pathways. This may be particularly true for nectarivorous species which encounter large quantities of sugar in their natural diet. We investigated the extent of mediated and non-mediated glucose absorption in red wattlebirds Anthochaera carunculata (Meliphagidae) and rainbow lorikeets Trichoglossus haematodus (Loriidae) to test the hypothesis that paracellular uptake accounts for a significant proportion of total glucose uptake in these species. We found that routes of glucose absorption are highly dynamic in both species. In lorikeets, absorption of L-glucose (non-mediated uptake) is slower than that of D-glucose (mediated and non-mediated uptake), with as little as 10% of total glucose absorbed by the paracellular pathway initially (contrasting previous indirect estimates of approximately 80%). Over time, however, more glucose may be absorbed via the paracellular route. Glucose absorption by both mediated and non-mediated mechanisms in wattlebirds occurred at a faster rate than in lorikeets, and wattlebirds also rely substantially on paracellular uptake. In wattlebirds, we recorded higher bioavailability of L-glucose (96+/-3%) compared with D-glucose (57+/-2%), suggesting problems with the in vivo use of radiolabeled d-glucose. Further trials with 3-O-methyl-D-glucose revealed high bioavailability in wattlebirds (90+/-5%). This non-metabolisable glucose analogue remains the probe of choice for measuring uptake rates in vivo, especially in birds in which absorption and metabolism occur extremely rapidly. PMID:18978218

  10. SARS Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... waiting room or office. Top of Page CDC’s response to SARS during the 2003 outbreak CDC worked ... Center to provide round-the-clock coordination and response. Committed more than 800 medical experts and support ...

  11. Updated Long Term Fault Slip Rates and Seismic Hazard in the Central Alborz, Iran: New Constraints From InSAR and GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weston, J. M.; Shirzaei, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Alborz mountain range, located south of the Caspian Sea, accommodates 30% of the 25 mm/yr convergence between Arabia and Eurasia. The resulting shortening and left lateral motion is distributed over several active fault zones within the Central Alborz. Despite earlier efforts using only GPS data, little is known about the long term rate of vertical deformation and aseismic slip. Several historical earthquakes have affected this region, some of the largest of these events occurred on the Mosha fault which is close to the capital city, Tehran, which has a population of over eight million. Thus, constraining the interseismic slip rates in this region is particularly important. In this study we complement existing horizontal velocities from a regional GPS network, with line of sight velocities from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), to provide additional constraints on the vertical deformation and enhance the spatial coverage. Assuming a seismogenic depth of 30 km, based on microseismicity data, we solve for the geometry and long term slip rates on four major fault strands in this region. We obtain a long term slip rate of ~ 3 mm/yr for the Mosha and North Alborz faults, and ~ 10 mm/yr for the Khazar fault and Parchin faults. These rates and fault geometries are in agreement with earlier works, and fit the GPS data well. However, close to the fault traces there are large residuals in the InSAR data, suggesting that there is shallow creep (< 30 km). Therefore, we carry out a subsequent inversion using only the residual InSAR displacements to solve for the distribution of creep within the seismogenic zones on these faults. We find that the Mosha and North Alborz faults remain locked between 0 - 30 km depth, whilst the Parchin and Khazar faults are creeping. This new observation of fault creep has direct implications for the seismic hazard in the region. On the Mosha fault we estimate a slip deficit equivalent to a Mw 7.0 event. The combination of InSAR

  12. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land: SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Heights and Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Philip; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Restano, Marco; Ambrozio, Americo; Benveniste, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The high along-track sampling and resolution of Cryosat-2 altimeter in SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. This paper will present the theoretical approach to analysis of the FBR L1A Doppler beams to form a product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking from which inland water heights are derivable from the retracked Cryosat-2 altimetric waveforms. Details of the processing strategy will include a comparison of waveforms and heights from the burst echoes (~80 m along-track) and from multi-look waveforms (~320 m along-track). SAR and SARin FBR data are available for the Amazon, Brahmaputra and Mekong. The Mekong and Amazon FBR SAR data has been processed for 2011-2015 and results will be compared against stage data from the nearest gauge. Similarly, heights from Tonle Sap will be compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture web site. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented. Results of FBR SARin processing will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae and the extraction of slope of the ground surface.

  13. Rate- and Extent-Limiting Factors of Oral Drug Absorption: Theory and Applications.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kiyohiko; Terada, Katsuhide

    2015-09-01

    The oral absorption of drugs has been represented by various concepts such as the absorption potential, the maximum absorbable dose, the biopharmaceutics classification system, and in vitro-in vivo correlation. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the theoretical relationships between these concepts. It shows how a simple analytical solution for the fraction of a dose absorbed (Fa equation) can offer a theoretical base to tie together the various concepts, and discusses how this solution relates to the rate-limiting cases of oral drug absorption. The article introduces the Fa classification system as a framework in which all the above concepts were included, and discusses its applications for food effect prediction, active pharmaceutical ingredient form selection, formulation design, and biowaiver strategy.

  14. SAR Computation inside Fetus by RF Coil during MR Imaging Employing Realistic Numerical Pregnant Woman Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Saito, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Masaharu; Ito, Koichi; Ikehira, Hiroo

    This paper presents the computational electromagnetic dosimetry inside an anatomically based pregnant woman models exposed to electromagnetic wave during magnetic resonance imaging. The two types of pregnant woman models corresponding to early gestation and 26 weeks gestation were used for this study. The specific absorption rate (SAR) in and around a fetus were calculated by radiated electromagnetic wave from highpass and lowpass birdcage coil. Numerical calculation results showed that high SAR region is observed at the body in the vicinity of gaps of the coil, and is related to concentrated electric field in the gaps of human body such as armpit and thigh. Moreover, it has confirmed that the SAR in the fetus is less than International Electrotechnical Commission limit of 10W/kg, when whole-body average SARs are 2W/kg and 4W/kg, which are the normal operating mode and first level controlled operating mode, respectively.

  15. Mass Loss Rates for Solar-like Stars Measured from Lyα Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Müller, H.-R.; Linsky, J. L.

    2003-10-01

    We present a number of mass loss rate measurements for solar-like stars with coronal winds, computed using a Lyα absorption technique. The collision between the solar wind and the interstellar wind seen by the Sun defines the large scale structure of our heliosphere. Similar structures, ``astrospheres,'' exist around other solar-like stars. The deceleration of the interstellar wind at the solar or stellar bow shock heats the interstellar material. Heated neutral hydrogen in the outer astrosphere (and/or heliosphere) produces a broad Lyα absorption profile that is often detectable in high resolution Hubble Space Telescope spectra. The amount of absorption is dependent upon the strength of the stellar wind. With guidance from hydrodynamic models of astrospheres, we use detected astrospheric Lyα absorption to estimate the stellar mass loss rates. For the solar-like GK stars in our sample, mass loss appears to increase with stellar activity, suggesting that young, active stars have stronger winds than old, inactive stars. However, Proxima Cen (M5.5 Ve) and λ And (G8 IV-III+M V) appear to be inconsistent with this relation.

  16. Specific absorption rate determination of magnetic nanoparticles through hyperthermia measurements in non-adiabatic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Martino, L.; Vinai, F.; Martino, P.; Ferraro, G.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    An experimental setup for magnetic hyperthermia operating in non-adiabatic conditions is described. A thermodynamic model that takes into account the heat exchanged by the sample with the surrounding environment is developed. A suitable calibration procedure is proposed that allows the experimental validation of the model. Specific absorption rate can then be accurately determined just from the measurement of the sample temperature at the equilibrium steady state. The setup and the measurement procedure represent a simplification with respect to other systems requiring calorimeters or crucial corrections for heat flow. Two families of magnetic nanoparticles, one superparamagnetic and one characterised by larger sizes and static hysteresis, have been characterised as a function of field intensity, and specific absorption rate and intrinsic loss power have been obtained.

  17. Specific absorption rate analysis of broadband mobile antenna with negative index metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Touhidul; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial-inspired printed mobile wireless antenna that can support most mobile applications such as GSM, UMTS, Bluetooth and WLAN frequency bands. The antenna consists of a semi-circular patch, a 50Ω microstrip feed line and metamaterial ground plane. The antenna occupies a very small space of 37 × 47 × 0.508 mm3, making it suitable for mobile wireless application. The perceptible novelty shown in this proposed antenna is that reduction of specific absorption rate using the negative index metamaterial ground plane. The proposed antenna reduced 72.11 and 75.53 % of specific absorption rate at 1.8 and 2.4 GHz, respectively.

  18. Absorption cross-section and decay rate of rotating linear dilaton black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakalli, I.; Aslan, O. A.

    2016-02-01

    We analytically study the scalar perturbation of non-asymptotically flat (NAF) rotating linear dilaton black holes (RLDBHs) in 4-dimensions. We show that both radial and angular wave equations can be solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. The exact greybody factor (GF), the absorption cross-section (ACS), and the decay rate (DR) for the massless scalar waves are computed for these black holes (BHs). The results obtained for ACS and DR are discussed through graphs.

  19. Laser absorption, mass ablation rate, and shock heating in direct-drive inertial confinement fusiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Li, D.; Radha, P. B.; Sawada, H.; Seka, W.; Boehly, T. R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Gotchev, O. V.; Knauer, J. P.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shvarts, D.; Skupsky, S.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Mancini, R. C.

    2007-05-01

    Direct-drive laser absorption, mass ablation rate, and shock heating are experimentally studied on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to validate hydrodynamics simulations. High-gain, direct-drive inertial confinement fusion target implosions require accurate predictions of the shell adiabat α (entropy), defined as the pressure in the main fuel layer to the Fermi-degenerate pressure, and the implosion velocity of the shell. The laser pulse shape determines the shell adiabat and the hydrodynamic efficiency determines the implosion velocity. A comprehensive set of measurements tracking the flow of energy from the laser to the target was conducted. Time-resolved measurements of laser absorption in the corona are performed on spherical implosion experiments. The mass ablation rate is inferred from time-resolved Ti K-shell spectroscopic measurements of nonaccelerating, solid CH spherical targets with a buried tracer layer of Ti. Shock heating is diagnosed in planar-CH-foil targets using time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy and noncollective spectrally resolved x-ray scattering. The highly reproducible experimental results achieved with a high level of laser drive uniformity [S. P. Regan et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 22, 998 (2005)] constrain the modeling of direct-drive energy coupling. A detailed comparison of the experimental results and the simulations reveals that a single-value flux limiter in the thermal transport model cannot explain all of the experimental observables. Simulations of laser absorption measurements need a time-dependent flux limiter to match the data. Modeling of both resonance absorption and nonlocal effects in the electron thermal conduction from the critical density to the ablation front are underway to resolve the observed discrepancies.

  20. Strain Rate Effects on the Energy Absorption of Rapidly Manufactured Composite Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brighton, Aaron M; Forrest, Mark; Starbuck, J Michael; ERDMAN III, DONALD L; Fox, Bronwyn

    2009-01-01

    Quasi-static and intermediate rate axial crush tests were conducted on tubular specimens of Carbon/Epoxy (Toray T700/G83C) and Glass/Polypropylene (Twintex). The quasi-static tests were conducted at 10 mm/min (1.67x10-4 m/s); five different crush initiators were used. Tests at intermediate rates were performed at speeds of 0.25 m/s, 0.5 m/s, 0.75 m/s 1m/s, 2 m/s and 4 m/s. Quasi-static tests of tubular specimens showed high specific energy absorption (SEA) values with 86 kJ/kg for Carbon/Epoxy specimens. The specific energy absorption of the Glass/Polypropylene specimens was measured to be 29 kJ/kg. Results from the intermediate test rates showed that while a decrease in specific energy absorbed was observed as speeds increased, values did not fall below 55kj/kg for carbon specimens or 35 kJ/kg for the Glass/Polypropylene specimens. When compared with steel and aluminium, specific energy absorption values of 15 kJ/kg and 30 kJ/kg respectively, the benefits of using composite materials in crash structures are apparent.

  1. Evaluation of Specific Absorption Rate as a Dosimetric Quantity for Electromagnetic Fields Bioeffects

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate SAR as a dosimetric quantity for EMF bioeffects, and identify ways for increasing the precision in EMF dosimetry and bioactivity assessment. Methods We discuss the interaction of man-made electromagnetic waves with biological matter and calculate the energy transferred to a single free ion within a cell. We analyze the physics and biology of SAR and evaluate the methods of its estimation. We discuss the experimentally observed non-linearity between electromagnetic exposure and biological effect. Results We find that: a) The energy absorbed by living matter during exposure to environmentally accounted EMFs is normally well below the thermal level. b) All existing methods for SAR estimation, especially those based upon tissue conductivity and internal electric field, have serious deficiencies. c) The only method to estimate SAR without large error is by measuring temperature increases within biological tissue, which normally are negligible for environmental EMF intensities, and thus cannot be measured. Conclusions SAR actually refers to thermal effects, while the vast majority of the recorded biological effects from man-made non-ionizing environmental radiation are non-thermal. Even if SAR could be accurately estimated for a whole tissue, organ, or body, the biological/health effect is determined by tiny amounts of energy/power absorbed by specific biomolecules, which cannot be calculated. Moreover, it depends upon field parameters not taken into account in SAR calculation. Thus, SAR should not be used as the primary dosimetric quantity, but used only as a complementary measure, always reporting the estimating method and the corresponding error. Radiation/field intensity along with additional physical parameters (such as frequency, modulation etc) which can be directly and in any case more accurately measured on the surface of biological tissues, should constitute the primary measure for EMF exposures, in spite of similar uncertainty to predict

  2. Effective absorption cross sections and photolysis rates of anthropogenic and biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romonosky, Dian E.; Ali, Nujhat N.; Saiduddin, Mariyah N.; Wu, Michael; Lee, Hyun Ji (Julie); Aiona, Paige K.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2016-04-01

    Mass absorption coefficient (MAC) values were measured for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) samples produced by flow tube ozonolysis and smog chamber photooxidation of a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOC), specifically: α-pinene, β-pinene, β-myrcene, d-limonene, farnesene, guaiacol, imidazole, isoprene, linalool, ocimene, p-xylene, 1-methylpyrrole, and 2-methylpyrrole. Both low-NOx and high-NOx conditions were employed during the chamber photooxidation experiments. MAC values were converted into effective molecular absorption cross sections assuming an average molecular weight of 300 g/mol for SOA compounds. The upper limits for the effective photolysis rates of SOA compounds were calculated by assuming unity photolysis quantum yields and convoluting the absorption cross sections with a time-dependent solar spectral flux. A more realistic estimate for the photolysis rates relying on the quantum yield of acetone was also obtained. The results show that condensed-phase photolysis of SOA compounds can potentially occur with effective lifetimes ranging from minutes to days, suggesting that photolysis is an efficient and largely overlooked mechanism of SOA aging.

  3. Influence of light absorption rate by Nannochloropsis oculata on triglyceride production during nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Kandilian, Razmig; Pruvost, Jérémy; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to understand the role of light transfer in triglyceride fatty-acid (TG-FA) cell content and productivity from microalgae during nitrogen starvation. Large amounts of TG-FA can be produced via nitrogen starvation of microalgae in photobioreactors exposed to intense light. First, spectral absorption and scattering cross-sections of N. oculata were measured at different times during nitrogen starvation. They were used to relate the mean volumetric rate of energy absorption (MVREA) per unit mass of microalgae to the TG-FA productivity and cell content. TG-FA productivity correlated with the MVREA and reached a maximum for MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs. This indicated that TG-FA synthesis was limited by the photon absorption rate in the PBR. A minimum MVREA of 13 μmol hν/gs was also necessary at the onset of nitrogen starvation to trigger large accumulation of TG-FA in cells. These results will be instrumental in defining protocols for TG-FA production in scaled-up photobioreactors.

  4. Determination of methane emission rates on a biogas plant using data from laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Groth, Angela; Maurer, Claudia; Reiser, Martin; Kranert, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the work was to establish a method for emission control of biogas plants especially the observation of fugitive methane emissions. The used method is in a developmental stage but the topic is crucial to environmental and economic issues. A remote sensing measurement method was adopted to determine methane emission rates of a biogas plant in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. An inverse dispersion model was used to deduce emission rates. This technique required one concentration measurement with an open path tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) downwind and upwind the source and basic wind information, like wind speed and direction. Different operating conditions of the biogas plant occurring on the measuring day (December 2013) could be represented roughly in the results. During undisturbed operational modes the methane emission rate averaged 2.8 g/s, which corresponds to 4% of the methane gas production rate of the biogas plant.

  5. New constraints in absorptive capacity and the optimum rate of petroleum output

    SciTech Connect

    El Mallakh, R

    1980-01-01

    Economic policy in four oil-producing countries is analyzed within a framework that combines a qualitative assessment of the policy-making process with an empirical formulation based on historical and current trends in these countries. The concept of absorptive capacity is used to analyze the optimum rates of petroleum production in Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait. A control solution with an econometric model is developed which is then modified for alternative development strategies based on analysis of factors influencing production decisions. The study shows the consistencies and inconsistencies between the goals of economic growth, oil production, and exports, and the constraints on economic development. Simulation experiments incorporated a number of the constraints on absorptive capacity. Impact of other constraints such as income distribution and political stability is considered qualitatively. (DLC)

  6. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  7. Analysis of the local worst-case SAR exposure caused by an MRI multi-transmit body coil in anatomical models of the human body.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, Esra; Gosselin, Marie-Christine; Murbach, Manuel; Christ, Andreas; Cabot, Eugenia; Kuster, Niels

    2011-08-01

    Multi-transmit coils are increasingly being employed in high-field magnetic resonance imaging, along with a growing interest in multi-transmit body coils. However, they can lead to an increase in whole-body and local specific absorption rate (SAR) compared to conventional body coils excited in circular polarization for the same total incident input power. In this study, the maximum increase of SAR for three significantly different human anatomies is investigated for a large 3 T (128 MHz) multi-transmit body coil using numerical simulations and a (generalized) eigenvalue-based approach. The results demonstrate that the increase of SAR strongly depends on the anatomy. For the three models and normalization to the sum of the rung currents squared, the whole-body averaged SAR increases by up to a factor of 1.6 compared to conventional excitation and the peak spatial SAR (averaged over any 10 cm(3) of tissue) by up to 13.4. For some locations the local averaged SAR goes up as much as 800 times (130 when looking only at regions where it is above 1% of the peak spatial SAR). The ratio of the peak spatial SAR to the whole-body SAR increases by a factor of up to 47 and can reach values above 800. Due to the potentially much larger power deposition, additional, preferably patient-specific, considerations are necessary to avoid injuries by such systems.

  8. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  9. Bit rate transparent interferometric noise mitigation utilizing the nonlinear modulation curve of electro-absorption modulator.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hanlin; Xiao, Shilin; Fok, Mable P

    2015-08-24

    we propose a bit-rate transparent interferometric noise mitigation scheme utilizing the nonlinear modulation curve of electro-absorption modulator (EAM). Both the zero-slope region and the linear modulation region of the nonlinear modulation curve are utilized to suppress interferometric noise and enlarge noise margin of degraded eye diagrams. Using amplitude suppression effect of the zero-slope region, interferometric noise at low frequency range is suppressed successfully. Under different signal to noise ratio (SNR), we measured the power penalties at bit error rate (BER) of 10<(-9) with and without EAM interferometric noise suppression. By using our proposed scheme, power penalty improvement of 8.5 dB is achieved in a signal with signal-to-noise ratio of 12.5 dB. BER results at various bit rates are analyzed, error floors for each BER curves are removed, significantly improvement in receiver sensitivity and widely opened eye diagrams are resulted.

  10. Lipid nanoparticles with no surfactant improve oral absorption rate of poorly water-soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, Yuka; Iwao, Yasunori; Noguchi, Shuji; Itai, Shigeru

    2013-07-15

    A pharmacokinetic study was performed in rats to evaluate the oral absorption ratios of nanoparticle suspensions containing the poorly water-soluble compound nifedipine (NI) and two different types of lipids, including hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol. NI-lipid nanoparticle (LN) suspensions with a mean particle size of 48.0 nm and a zeta potential of -57.2 mV were prepared by co-grinding combined with a high-pressure homogenization process. The oral administration of NI-LN suspensions to rats led to a significant increase in the NI plasma concentration, and the area under the curve (AUC) value was found to be 108 min μg mL⁻¹, indicating a 4-fold increase relative to the NI suspensions. A comparison of the pharmacokinetic parameters of the NI-LN suspensions with those of the NI solution prepared using only the surfactant polysorbate 80 revealed that although the AUC and bioavailability (59%) values were almost identical, a rapid absorption rate was still observed in the NI-LN suspensions. These results therefore indicated that lipid nanoparticles prepared using only two types of phospholipid with a mean particle size of less than 50 nm could improve the absorption of the poorly water-soluble drug.

  11. OH reaction rate constants and UV absorption cross-sections of unsaturated esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teruel, M. A.; Lane, S. I.; Mellouki, A.; Solignac, G.; Le Bras, G.

    Absolute rate coefficients have been determined for the gas-phase reactions of hydroxyl radicals with methyl acrylate ( k1), methyl methacrylate ( k2) and ethyl acrylate ( k3). Experiments were performed using two different techniques, the relative rate method and the pulsed laser photolysis-laser induced fluorescence technique. The kinetic data obtained were used to derive the following Arrhenius expressions in the temperature range 253-374 K (in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1): k1=(2.0±0.8)×10exp[(553±51)/T], k2=(2.5±0.8)×10exp[(821±55)/T], k3=(2.3±0.8)×10exp[(580±65)/T]. At 298 K, the reaction rate constants obtained by the two methods were in good agreement. In addition, the UV absorption spectra for the three unsaturated esters have been determined at (298±2) K and the absorption cross-sections in the wavelength region 215-298 nm were reported. The results are presented, discussed and used to estimate the atmospheric lifetimes for the studied esters.

  12. A no-calorimetric method for measuring SAR in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Barone, Fabrizio

    2011-04-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new no-calorimetric method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. On the other hand, it is necessary to establish if all deposited power SAR can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper, that will be shown.

  13. The phase transition method for SAR measurement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, R.; Canonico, R.; Acernese, F.; Giordano, G.; Barone, F.

    2014-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. Nevertheless, in order to consider this method it is necessary to verify that all deposited SAR power can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper considerations about this aspect are conducted.

  14. The phase transition method for SAR measurement in MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Rocco; Acernese, Fausto; Vilasi, Silvia; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-03-01

    During an MR procedure, the patient absorbs a portion of the transmitted RF energy, which may result in tissue heating and other adverse effects, such as alterations in visual, auditory and neural functions. The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), in W/kg, is the RF power absorbed per unit mass of tissue and is one of the most important parameters related with thermal effects and acts as a guideline for MRI safety. Strict limits to the SAR levels are imposed by patient safety international regulations (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33) and SAR measurements are required in order to verify its respect. The recommended methods for mean SAR measurement are quite problematic and often require a maintenance man intervention and long stop machine. For example, in the CEI recommended pulse energy method, the presence of a maintenance man is required in order to correctly connect the required instrumentation; furthermore, the procedure is complex and requires remarkable processing and calculus. Simpler are the calorimetric methods, also if in this case long acquisition times are required in order to have significant temperature variations and accurate heat capacity knowledge (CEI - EN 60601 - 2 - 33). The phase transition method is a new method to measure SAR in MRI which has the advantages to be very simple and to overcome all the typical calorimetric method problems. It does not require in gantry temperature measurements, any specific heat or heat capacity knowledge, but only mass and time measurement. On the other hand, it is necessary to establish if all deposited power SAR can be considered acquired and measured. In this paper, that will be shown.

  15. The absorption efficiency and respiration rate of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae.

    PubMed

    Nash, Troy R; Ruppert, Edward E; Colacino, James M

    2009-12-01

    The present study investigates some aspects of the digestive biology and physiological energetics of the Florida lancelet, Branchiostoma floridae. Florida lancelets are able to remove 47.2-56.9% of the energy from a diet of mixed algae. The respiration rate is 0.100mL O(2) (STPD) h(-1) g(-1) (wet), which estimates a metabolic rate of 0.248 J h(-1), at an average body mass of 0.125 g (wet). Published values of the chlorophyll a concentration in its natural habitat indicate that a 125 mg lancelet would need to filter 0.018-0.031 L h(-1) to remove sufficient food to support its resting metabolism. The filtration rate of lancelets has been reported as 0.138 L h(-1), indicating that the actual filtration rate is 4-7 times greater than the filtration rate needed to meet resting metabolic demands. It appears that lancelets have the potential to be raised in aquaculture, because their absorption efficiency and respiration rate are comparable to suspension-feeding invertebrates that have been successfully aquacultured.

  16. Elementary reaction rate measurements at high temperatures by tunable-laser flash-absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Hessler, J.P.

    1993-12-01

    The major objective of this program is to measure thermal rate coefficients and branching ratios of elementary reactions. To perform these measurements, the authors constructed an ultrahigh-purity shock tube to generate temperatures between 1000 and 5500 K. The tunable-laser flash-absorption technique is used to measure the rate of change of the concentration of species which absorb below 50,000 cm{sup {minus}1} e.g.: OH, CH, and CH{sub 3}. This technique is being extended into the vacuum-ultraviolet spectral region where one can measure atomic species e.g.: H, D, C, O, and N; and diatomic species e.g.: O{sub 2}, CO, and OH.

  17. Gas-phase rate coefficients for the reactions of NO 3, OH and O 3 with α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones: Structure-activity relations (SARs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfrang, Christian; King, Martin D.; Canosa-Mas, Carlos E.; Flugge, Mark; Wayne, Richard P.

    Gas-phase rate coefficients for the atmospherically important reactions of NO 3, OH and O 3 are predicted for 55 α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones. The rate coefficients were calculated using a correlation described previously [Pfrang, C., King, M.D., C. E. Canosa-Mas, C.E., Wayne, R.P., 2006. Atmospheric Environment 40, 1170-1179]. These rate coefficients were used to extend structure-activity relations for predicting the rate coefficients for the reactions of NO 3, OH or O 3 with alkenes to include α, β-unsaturated esters and ketones. Conjugation of an alkene with an α, β-keto or α, β-ester group will reduce the value of a rate coefficient by a factor of ˜110, ˜2.5 and ˜12 for reaction with NO 3, OH or O 3, respectively. The actual identity of the alkyl group, R, in -C(O)R or -C(O)OR has only a small influence. An assessment of the reliability of the SAR is given that demonstrates that it is useful for reactions involving NO 3 and OH, but less valuable for those of O 3 or peroxy nitrate esters.

  18. Prostaglandin E2 regulation of amnion cell vascular endothelial growth factor expression: relationship with intramembranous absorption rate in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Beardall, Michael K; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2014-08-01

    We hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) stimulates amniotic fluid transport across the amnion by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in amnion cells and that amniotic PGE2 concentration correlates positively with intramembranous (IM) absorption rate in fetal sheep. The effects of PGE2 at a range of concentrations on VEGF 164 and caveolin-1 gene expressions were analyzed in cultured ovine amnion cells. IM absorption rate, amniotic fluid (AF) volume, and PGE2 concentration in AF were determined in late-gestation fetal sheep during control conditions, isovolumic fetal urine replacement (low IM absorption rate), or intra-amniotic fluid infusion (high IM absorption rate). In ovine amnion cells, PGE2 induced dose- and time-dependent increases in VEGF 164 mRNA levels and reduced caveolin-1 mRNA and protein levels. VEGF receptor blockade abolished the caveolin-1 response, while minimally affecting the VEGF response to PGE2. In sheep fetuses, urine replacement reduced amniotic PGE2 concentration by 58%, decreased IM absorption rate by half, and doubled AF volume (P < 0.01). Intra-amniotic fluid infusion increased IM absorption rate and AF volume (P < 0.01), while amniotic PGE2 concentration was unchanged. Neither IM absorption rate nor AF volume correlated with amniotic PGE2 concentration under each experimental condition. Although PGE2 at micromolar concentrations induced dose-dependent responses in VEGF and caveolin-1 gene expression in cultured amnion cells consistent with a role of PGE2 in activating VEGF to mediate AF transport across the amnion, amniotic PGE2 at physiological nanomolar concentrations does not appear to regulate IM absorption rate or AF volume.

  19. ENHANCED ABSORPTION OF MILLIMETER WAVE ENERGY IN MURINE SUBCUTANEOUS BLOOD VESSELS

    PubMed Central

    Alekseev, Stanislav I.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine millimeter wave (MMW) absorption by blood vessels traversing the subcutaneous fat layer of murine skin. Most calculations were performed using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. We used two types of models: (1) a rectangular block of multilayer tissue with blood vessels traversing the fat layer and (2) cylindrical models with circular and elliptical cross sections simulating the real geometry of murine limbs. We found that the specific absorption rate (SAR) in blood vessels normally traversing the fat layer achieved its maximal value at the parallel orientation of the E-field to the vessel axis. At 42 GHz exposure, the maximal SAR in small blood vessels could be more than 30 times greater than that in the skin. The SAR increased with decreasing the blood vessel diameter and increasing the fat thickness. The SAR decreased with increasing the exposure frequency. When the cylindrical or elliptical models of murine limbs were exposed to plane MMW, the greatest absorption of MMW energy occurred in blood vessels located on the lateral areas of the limb model. At these areas the maximal SAR values were comparable with or were greater than the maximal SAR on the front surface of the skin. Enhanced absorption of MMW energy by blood vessels traversing the fat layer may play a primary role in initiating MMW effects on blood cells and vasodilatation of cutaneous blood vessels. PMID:21344460

  20. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested. PMID:22611018

  1. SAR simulations for high-field MRI: how much detail, effort, and accuracy is needed?

    PubMed

    Wolf, S; Diehl, D; Gebhardt, M; Mallow, J; Speck, O

    2013-04-01

    Accurate prediction of specific absorption rate (SAR) for high field MRI is necessary to best exploit its potential and guarantee safe operation. To reduce the effort (time, complexity) of SAR simulations while maintaining robust results, the minimum requirements for the creation (segmentation, labeling) of human models and methods to reduce the time for SAR calculations for 7 Tesla MR-imaging are evaluated. The geometric extent of the model required for realistic head-simulations and the number of tissue types sufficient to form a reliable but simplified model of the human body are studied. Two models (male and female) of the virtual family are analyzed. Additionally, their position within the head-coil is taken into account. Furthermore, the effects of retuning the coils to different load conditions and the influence of a large bore radiofrequency-shield have been examined. The calculation time for SAR simulations in the head can be reduced by 50% without significant error for smaller model extent and simplified tissue structure outside the coil. Likewise, the model generation can be accelerated by reducing the number of tissue types. Local SAR can vary up to 14% due to position alone. This must be considered and sets a limit for SAR prediction accuracy. All these results are comparable between the two body models tested.

  2. Confirmation of quasi-static approximation in SAR evaluation for a wireless power transfer system.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akimasa; Ito, Fumihiro; Laakso, Ilkka

    2013-09-01

    The present study discusses the applicability of the magneto-quasi-static approximation to the calculation of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in a cylindrical model for a wireless power transfer system. Resonant coils with different parameters were considered in the 10 MHz band. A two-step quasi-static method that is comprised of the method of moments and the scalar-potential finite-difference methods is applied, which can consider the effects of electric and magnetic fields on the induced SAR separately. From our computational results, the SARs obtained from our quasi-static method are found to be in good agreement with full-wave analysis for different positions of the cylindrical model relative to the wireless power transfer system, confirming the applicability of the quasi-static approximation in the 10 MHz band. The SAR induced by the external electric field is found to be marginal as compared to that induced by the magnetic field. Thus, the dosimetry for the external magnetic field, which may be marginally perturbed by the presence of biological tissue, is confirmed to be essential for SAR compliance in the 10 MHz band or lower. This confirmation also suggests that the current in the coil rather than the transferred power is essential for SAR compliance.

  3. Statistical Simulation of SAR Variability with Geometric and Tissue Property Changes by Using the Unscented Transform

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yu; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Shumin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The local specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical to the safety of radio frequency transmit coils. A statistical simulation approach is introduced to address the local SAR variability related to tissue property and geometric variations. Methods The local SAR is modeled as the output of a nonlinear transformation with factors that may affect its value being treated as random input variables. Instead of using the Monte Carlo method with a large number of sample points, the unscented transform is applied with a small set of deterministic sample points. A sensitivity analysis is further performed to determine the significance of each input variable. Electromagnetic simulations are carried out by the finite-difference time-domain method implemented on graphic processing unit. Results The local SAR variability of a 7 Tesla square loop coil for spine imaging and a 16-element brain imaging array as the result of tissue property and geometric changes were examined respectively. SAR limits were determined based on their means and standard deviations. Conclusion The proposed approach is efficient and general for the study of local SAR variability. PMID:25046818

  4. Chirp Scaling Algorithms for SAR Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, M.; Cheng, T.; Chen, M.

    1993-01-01

    The chirp scaling SAR processing algorithm is both accurate and efficient. Successful implementation requires proper selection of the interval of output samples, which is a function of the chirp interval, signal sampling rate, and signal bandwidth. Analysis indicates that for both airborne and spaceborne SAR applications in the slant range domain a linear chirp scaling is sufficient. To perform nonlinear interpolation process such as to output ground range SAR images, one can use a nonlinear chirp scaling interpolator presented in this paper.

  5. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV.

  6. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV. PMID:27440743

  7. Effective light absorption and absolute electron transport rates in the coral Pocillopora damicornis.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Milán; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Tamburic, Bojan; Larkum, Anthony W D; Schreiber, Ulrich; Suggett, David J; Kühl, Michael; Ralph, Peter J

    2014-10-01

    Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) fluorometry has been widely used to estimate the relative photosynthetic efficiency of corals. However, both the optical properties of intact corals as well as past technical constrains to PAM fluorometers have prevented calculations of the electron turnover rate of PSII. We used a new Multi-colour PAM (MC-PAM) in parallel with light microsensors to determine for the first time the wavelength-specific effective absorption cross-section of PSII photochemistry, σII(λ), and thus PAM-based absolute electron transport rates of the coral photosymbiont Symbiodinium both in culture and in hospite in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. In both cases, σII of Symbiodinium was highest in the blue spectral region and showed a progressive decrease towards red wavelengths. Absolute values for σII at 440 nm were up to 1.5-times higher in culture than in hospite. Scalar irradiance within the living coral tissue was reduced by 20% in the blue when compared to the incident downwelling irradiance. Absolute electron transport rates of P. damicornis at 440 nm revealed a maximum PSII turnover rate of ca. 250 electrons PSII(-1) s(-1), consistent with one PSII turnover for every 4 photons absorbed by PSII; this likely reflects the limiting steps in electron transfer between PSII and PSI. Our results show that optical properties of the coral host strongly affect light use efficiency of Symbiodinium. Therefore, relative electron transport rates do not reflect the productivity rates (or indeed how the photosynthesis-light response is parameterised). Here we provide a non-invasive approach to estimate absolute electron transport rates in corals.

  8. Fe /Fe oxide nanocomposite particles with large specific absorption rate for hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.; Hoopes, P. J.; Weaver, J. B.

    2007-06-01

    Using a water-in-oil microemulsion with cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide as the surfactant, iron was reduced to form a metallic core on which a passivating oxide shell was grown. Transmission electron microscopy, vibrating sample magnetometry, and heating measurements were used to characterize these monodispersed magnetic Fe /Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles with respect to the possible application for magnetic hyperthermia treatments of cancer. The aim is to utilize the fact that an iron core (high saturation magnetization) will give a greater heating effect than iron oxide, while the iron oxide coating will allow the nanoparticles to be observed using magnetic resonance imaging so that therapy can be effectively monitored and targeted. The largest specific absorption rate obtained was 345W/g under an alternating magnetic field of 150Oe at 250kHz.

  9. Quasi-static magnetic measurements to predict specific absorption rates in magnetic fluid hyperthermia experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coral, D. F.; Mendoza Zélis, P.; de Sousa, M. E.; Muraca, D.; Lassalle, V.; Nicolás, P.; Ferreira, M. L.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the issue on whether dynamic magnetic properties of polydispersed magnetic colloids modeled using physical magnitudes derived from quasi-static magnetic measurement can be extrapolated to analyze specific absorption rate data acquired at high amplitudes and frequencies of excitation fields is addressed. To this end, we have analyzed two colloids of magnetite nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and chitosan in water displaying, under a radiofrequency field, high and low specific heat power release. Both colloids are alike in terms of liquid carrier, surfactant and magnetic phase composition but differ on the nanoparticle structuring. The colloid displaying low specific dissipation consists of spaced magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 4.8 nm inside a large chitosan particle of 52.5 nm. The one displaying high specific dissipation consists of clusters of magnetic nanoparticles of mean size around 9.7 nm inside a chitosan particle of 48.6 nm. The experimental evaluation of Néel and Brown relaxation times (˜10-10 s and 10-4 s, respectively) indicate that the nanoparticles in both colloids magnetically relax by Néel mechanism. The isothermal magnetization curves analysis for this mechanism show that the magnetic nanoparticles behave in the interacting superparamagnetic regime. The specific absorption rates were determined calorimetrically at 260 kHz and up to 52 kA/m and were well modeled within linear response theory using the anisotropy density energy retrieved from quasi-static magnetic measurement, validating their use to predict heating ability of a given polydispersed particle suspension. Our findings provide new insight in the validity of quasi-static magnetic characterization to analyze the high frequency behavior of polydispersed colloids within the framework of the linear response and Wohlfarth theories and indicate that dipolar interactions play a key role being their strength larger for the colloid displaying higher dissipation, i

  10. Low SAR planar antenna for multi standard cellular phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Ahmed, M.; Bouhorma, M.; Elouaai, F.; Mamouni, A.

    2011-03-01

    In this paper the design of a multiband compact antenna for the integration into the new multi function mobile phones is presented. The antenna is matched to operate at GSM 920 MHz, WI-Fi 2.4 GHz and HiperLan 5.1 GHz standards with low SAR levels. Return loss coefficient and radiation pattern of this antenna are computed in free space as well as in the presence of head. The specific absorption rate (SAR) of the planar antenna is calculated and compared with that of the monopole antenna. To examine the performance of this antenna, a prototype was designed, fabricated and measured; the simulation analysis was performed using the HFSS software, good agreement with the simulation providing validation of the design procedure.

  11. Decadal deformation rates from SAR interferometry in the eastern Pamir-Tian Shan collision zone and implication for the growth and erosion of detachment folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufe, A.; Burbank, D. W.; Bookhagen, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Cenozoic Indo-Asian collision caused the impingement of the north-verging Pamir orogen with the south-verging Tian Shan. Rapid convergence rates of 8-12 mm/y across the Pamir-Tian Shan boundary are suggested by GPS measurements and broadly match Holocene and Quaternary shortening rates. The shortening is dominantly accommodated by a series of oppositely verging thrust faults that interfere to form a complex pattern of temporal and spatial variation in deformation style and rate. Cosmogenic radionuclide (CRN) dating and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating suggest late Quaternary shortening rates of 3-7 mm/y on individual structures. To the east, the rigid Tarim basin is translated northward alongside the Pamir and subducted beneath the Tian Shan. Since ~16 Ma deformation has stepped southward into the Tarim basin from the Tian Shan range-bounding fault. Most recently a series of detachment folds with inferred shortening rates of 1-5 mm/y and lateral propagation rates of up to 50-80 mm/y formed and continue to be active today. We present (1) new decadal deformation rates in the Pamir - Tian Shan and Tarim - Tian Shan collision zone in westernmost China inferred from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and (2) digital topography and fluvial network analysis to constrain deformation on longer timescales. These data are integrated with (3), published GPS data, (4) published Quaternary shortening rates, and (5) geologic mapping in order to identify spatial patterns of modern deformation, investigate temporal variations in deformation rate and show the response of the river network to active deformation. Preliminary InSAR results reveal interseismic deformation of 1-6 mm/y that is concentrated on thrust faults and detachment folds. However, current deformation appears localized on particular segments of the structures, a pattern that is likely to change with time. We speculate that rapid Quaternary growth of detachment folds in the Kashi

  12. Heat equation inversion framework for average SAR calculation from magnetic resonance thermal imaging.

    PubMed

    Alon, Leeor; Sodickson, Daniel K; Deniz, Cem M

    2016-10-01

    Deposition of radiofrequency (RF) energy can be quantified via electric field or temperature change measurements. Magnetic resonance imaging has been used as a tool to measure three dimensional small temperature changes associated with RF radiation exposure. When duration of RF exposure is long, conversion from temperature change to specific absorption rate (SAR) is nontrivial due to prominent heat-diffusion and conduction effects. In this work, we demonstrated a method for calculation of SAR via an inversion of the heat equation including heat-diffusion and conduction effects. This method utilizes high-resolution three dimensional magnetic resonance temperature images and measured thermal properties of the phantom to achieve accurate calculation of SAR. Accuracy of the proposed method was analyzed with respect to operating frequency of a dipole antenna and parameters used in heat equation inversion. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:493-503, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27490064

  13. Electromagnetic absorption in the head of adults and children due to mobile phone operation close to the head.

    PubMed

    de Salles, Alvaro A; Bulla, Giovani; Rodriguez, Claudio E Fernández

    2006-01-01

    The Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) produced by mobile phones in the head of adults and children is simulated using an algorithm based on the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Realistic models of the child and adult head are used. The electromagnetic parameters are fitted to these models. Comparison also are made with the SAR calculated in the children model when using adult human electromagnetic parameters values. Microstrip (or patch) antennas and quarter wavelength monopole antennas are used in the simulations. The frequencies used to feed the antennas are 1850 MHz and 850 MHz. The SAR results are compared with the available international recommendations. It is shown that under similar conditions, the 1g-SAR calculated for children is higher than that for the adults. When using the 10-year old child model, SAR values higher than 60% than those for adults are obtained.

  14. Study of the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the SAR induced in two head models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanmi, Amal; Varsier, Nadège; Hadjem, Abdelhamid; Conil, Emmanuelle; Picon, Odile; Wiart, Joe

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate and to analyse the influence of the laterality of mobile phone use on the exposure of the brain to radio-frequencies (RF) and electromagnetic fields (EMF) from different mobile phone models using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The study focuses on the comparison of the specific absorption rate (SAR) induced on the right and left sides of two numerical adult and child head models. The heads are exposed by both phone models operating in GSM frequency bands for both ipsilateral and contralateral configurations. A slight SAR difference between the two sides of the heads is noted. The results show that the variation between the left and the right sides is more important at 1800 MHz for an ipsilateral use. Indeed, at this frequency, the variation can even reach 20% for the SAR10g and the SAR1g induced in the head and in the brain, respectively. Moreover, the average SAR induced by the mobile phone in the half hemisphere of the brain in ipsilateral exposure is higher than in contralateral exposure. Owing to the superficial character of energy deposition at 1800 MHz, this difference in the SAR induced for the ipsilateral and contralateral usages is more significant at 1800 MHz than at 900 MHz. The results have shown that depending on the phantom head models, the SAR distribution in the brain can vary because of differences in anatomical proportions and in the geometry of the head models. The induced SAR in child head and in sub-regions of the brain is significantly higher (up to 30%) compared to the adult head. This paper confirms also that the shape/design of the mobile and the location of the antenna can have a large influence at high frequency on the exposure of the brain, particularly on the SAR distribution and on the distinguished brain regions.

  15. Potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements: OH reaction rate constants between 250 and 315 K and infrared absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, N.L.; Medhurst, L.J.; Nelson, H.H.

    1993-12-20

    The authors measured the rate constant for reactions of the OH radical with several potential chlorofluorocarbon replacements over the temperature range 251-314 K using laser photolysis laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The compounds studied and Arrhenius parameters determined from fits to the measured rate constants are as follows: CHF{sub 2}OCHF{sub 2} (E 134), k(T) = (5.4 {+-} 3.5) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}3.1 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CF{sub 3} (FC 236fa), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup {minus}14} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}1.8 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; CF{sub 3}CHFCHF{sub 2} (FC 236ea), k(T) = (2.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.0 {+-} 0.3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]; and CF{sub 3}CF{sub 2}CH{sub 2}F (FC 236cb), k(T) = (2.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} s{sup {minus}1} exp [({minus}2.2 {+-} 0.4 kcal mol{sup {minus}1})/RT]. The measured activation energies (2-3 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}) are consistent with a mechanism of H atom abstraction. The tropospheric lifetimes, estimated from the measured OH reaction rates, and measured integrated infrared absorption cross sections over the range 770 to 1430 cm{sup {minus}1} suggest that E 134 and FC 236fa may have significant global warming potential, while FC 236ea and FC 236cb do not. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. NOTE: SAR in a child voxel phantom from exposure to wireless computer networks (Wi-Fi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, R. P.; Dimbylow, P. J.

    2010-08-01

    Specific energy absorption rate (SAR) values have been calculated in a 10 year old sitting voxel model from exposure to electromagnetic fields at 2.4 and 5 GHz, frequencies commonly used by Wi-Fi devices. Both plane-wave exposure of the model and irradiation from antennas in the near field were investigated for a variety of exposure conditions. In all situations studied, the SAR values calculated were considerably below basic restrictions. For a typical Wi-Fi exposure scenario using an inverted F antenna operating at 100 mW, a duty factor of 0.1 and an antenna-body separation of 34 cm, the maximum peak localized SAR was found to be 3.99 mW kg-1 in the torso region. At 2.4 GHz, using a power of 100 mW and a duty factor of 1, the highest localized SAR value in the head was calculated as 5.7 mW kg-1. This represents less than 1% of the SAR previously calculated in the head for a typical mobile phone exposure condition.

  17. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing.

  18. A multichannel, real-time MRI RF power monitor for independent SAR determination

    PubMed Central

    El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; Edelstein, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate measurements of the RF power delivered during clinical MRI are essential for safety and regulatory compliance, avoiding inappropriate restrictions on clinical MRI sequences, and for testing the MRI safety of peripheral and interventional devices at known RF exposure levels. The goal is to make independent RF power measurements to test the accuracy of scanner-reported specific absorption rate (SAR) over the extraordinary range of operating conditions routinely encountered in MRI. Methods: A six channel, high dynamic range, real-time power profiling system was designed and built for monitoring power delivery during MRI up to 440 MHz. The system was calibrated and used in two 3 T scanners to measure power applied to human subjects during MRI scans. The results were compared with the scanner-reported SAR. Results: The new power measurement system has highly linear performance over a 90 dB dynamic range and a wide range of MRI duty cycles. It has about 0.1 dB insertion loss that does not interfere with scanner operation. The measurements of whole-body SAR in volunteers showed that scanner-reported SAR was significantly overestimated by up to about 2.2 fold. Conclusions: The new power monitor system can accurately and independently measure RF power deposition over the wide range of conditions routinely encountered during MRI. Scanner-reported SAR values are not appropriate for setting exposure limits during device or pulse sequence testing. PMID:22559603

  19. SAR exposure from UHF RFID reader in adult, child, pregnant woman, and fetus anatomical models.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Serena; Markakis, Ioannis A; Ravazzani, Paolo; Samaras, Theodoros

    2013-09-01

    The spread of radio frequency identification (RFID) devices in ubiquitous applications without their simultaneous exposure assessment could give rise to public concerns about their potential adverse health effects. Among the various RFID system categories, the ultra high frequency (UHF) RFID systems have recently started to be widely used in many applications. This study addresses a computational exposure assessment of the electromagnetic radiation generated by a realistic UHF RFID reader, quantifying the exposure levels in different exposure scenarios and subjects (two adults, four children, and two anatomical models of women 7 and 9 months pregnant). The results of the computations are presented in terms of the whole-body and peak spatial specific absorption rate (SAR) averaged over 10 g of tissue to allow comparison with the basic restrictions of the exposure guidelines. The SAR levels in the adults and children were below 0.02 and 0.8 W/kg in whole-body SAR and maximum peak SAR levels, respectively, for all tested positions of the antenna. On the contrary, exposure of pregnant women and fetuses resulted in maximum peak SAR(10 g) values close to the values suggested by the guidelines (2 W/kg) in some of the exposure scenarios with the antenna positioned in front of the abdomen and with a 100% duty cycle and 1 W radiated power.

  20. Assessment of induced SAR in children exposed to electromagnetic plane waves between 10 MHz and 5.6 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, J. F.; Paulides, M. M.; Christ, A.; Kuster, N.; van Rhoon, G. C.

    2010-06-01

    To avoid potentially adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has defined EMF reference levels from the basic restrictions on the induced whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (SARwb) and the peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (SAR10g). The objective of this study is to assess if the SAR in children remains below the basic restrictions upon exposure at the reference levels. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) modeling was used to calculate the SAR in six children and two adults when exposed to all 12 orthogonal plane wave configurations. A sensitivity study showed an expanded uncertainty of 53% (SARwb) and 58% (SAR10g) due to variations in simulation settings and tissue properties. In this study, we found that the basic restriction on the SARwb is occasionally exceeded for children, up to a maximum of 45% in small children. The maximum SAR10g values, usually found at body protrusions, remain under the limit for all scenarios studied. Our results are in good agreement with the literature, suggesting that the recommended ICNIRP reference levels may need fine tuning.

  1. SAR Reduction in 7T C-Spine Imaging Using a “Dark Modes” Transmit Array Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Eryaman, Yigitcan; Guerin, Bastien; Keil, Boris; Mareyam, Azma; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Kosior, Robert K.; Martin, Adrian; Torrado-Carvajal, Angel; Malpica, Norberto; Hernandez-Tamames, Juan A.; Schiavi, Emanuele; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local specific absorption rate (SAR) limits many applications of parallel transmit (pTx) in ultra high-field imaging. In this Note, we introduce the use of an array element, which is intentionally inefficient at generating spin excitation (a “dark mode”) to attempt a partial cancellation of the electric field from those elements that do generate excitation. We show that adding dipole elements oriented orthogonal to their conventional orientation to a linear array of conventional loop elements can lower the local SAR hotspot in a C-spine array at 7 T. Methods We model electromagnetic fields in a head/torso model to calculate SAR and excitation B1+ patterns generated by conventional loop arrays and loop arrays with added electric dipole elements. We utilize the dark modes that are generated by the intentional and inefficient orientation of dipole elements in order to reduce peak 10g local SAR while maintaining excitation fidelity. Results For B1+ shimming in the spine, the addition of dipole elements did not significantly alter the B1+ spatial pattern but reduced local SAR by 36%. Conclusion The dipole elements provide a sufficiently complimentary B1+ and electric field pattern to the loop array that can be exploited by the radiofrequency shimming algorithm to reduce local SAR. PMID:24753012

  2. SAR compliance assessment of PMR 446 and FRS walkie-talkies.

    PubMed

    Vermeeren, Günter; Joseph, Wout; Martens, Luc

    2015-10-01

    The vast amount of studies on radiofrequency dosimetry deal with exposure due to mobile devices and base station antennas for cellular communication systems. This study investigates compliance of walkie-talkies to exposure guidelines established by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and the Federal Communications Committee. The generic walkie-talkie consisted of a helical antenna and a ground plane and was derived by reverse engineering of a commercial walkie-talkie. Measured and simulated values of antenna characteristics and electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie were within 2% and 8%, respectively. We also validated normalized electromagnetic near fields of the generic walkie-talkie against a commercial device and observed a very good agreement (deviation <6%). We showed that peak localized specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the oval flat phantom by the generic walkie-talkie is in agreement with four commercial devices if input power of the generic walkie-talkie is rescaled based on magnetic near field. Finally, we found that SAR of commercial devices is within current SAR limits for general public exposure for a worst-case duty cycle of 100%, that is, about 3 times and 6 times lower than the limit on the 1 g SAR (1.6 W/kg) and 10 g SAR (2 W/kg), respectively. But, an effective radiated power as specified by the Private Mobile Radio at 446 MHz (PMR 446) radio standard can cause localized SAR exceeding SAR limits for 1 g of tissue. PMID:26344699

  3. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adibzadeh, F.; Verhaart, R. F.; Verduijn, G. M.; Fortunati, V.; Rijnen, Z.; Franckena, M.; van Rhoon, G. C.; Paulides, M. M.

    2015-02-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR10g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  4. Influence of dentures on SAR in the visible Chinese human head voxel phantom exposed to a mobile phone at 900 and 1800 MHz.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dong; Zhang, Ruoyu; Liu, Qian

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the influence of dentures on electromagnetic energy absorption during the daily use of a mobile phone, a high-resolution head phantom based on the Visible Chinese Human dataset was reconstructed. Simulations on phantoms with various dentures were performed by using the finite-difference time-domain method with a 0.47 wavelength dipole antenna and a mobile phone model as radiation sources at 900 and 1800 MHz. The Specific energy Absorption Rate (SAR) values including 1 and 10 g average SAR values were assessed. When the metallic dental crowns with resonance lengths of approximately one-third to one-half wavelength in the tissue nearby are parallel to the radiation source, up to 121.6% relative enhancement for 1 g average SAR and 17.1% relative enhancement for 10 g average SAR are observed due to the resonance effect in energy absorption. When the radiation sources operate in the normal configuration, the 10 g average SAR values are still in compliance with the basic restrictions established by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), indicating that the safety limits will not be challenged by the usage of dentures.

  5. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Amirhajeloo, Leila Rasouli; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m and 2.23±0.39 v/m, respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23% and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone.

  6. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone.

  7. Survey on Different Samsung with Nokia Smart Mobile Phones in the Specific Absorption Rate Electrical Field of Head.

    PubMed

    Fakhri, Yadolah; Alinejad, Azim; Keramati, Hassan; Bay, Abotaleb; Avazpour, Moayed; Zandsalimi, Yahya; Moradi, Bigard; Rasouli Amirhajeloo, Leila; Mirzaei, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    The use of smart phones is increasing in the world. This excessive use, especially in the last two decades, has created too much concern on the effects of emitted electromagnetic fields and specific absorption rate on human health. In this descriptive-analytical study of the electric field resulting from smart phones of Samsung and Nokia by portable measuring device, electromagnetic field, Model HI-3603-VDT/VLF, were measured. Then, head absorption rate was calculated in these two mobiles by ICNIRP equation. Finally, the comparison of specific absorption rate, especially between Samsung and Nokia smart phones, was conducted by T-Test statistics analysis. The mean of electric field for Samsung and Nokia smart mobile phones was obtained 1.8 ±0.19 v/m  and 2.23±0.39 v/m , respectively, while the range of the electric field was obtained as 1.56-2.21 v/m and 1.69-2.89 v/m for them, respectively. The mean of specific absorption rate in Samsung and Nokia was obtained 0.002 ± 0.0005 W/Kg and 0.0041±0.0013 W/Kg at the frequency of 900 MHz and 0.004±0.001 W/Kg and 0.0062±0.0002 W/Kg at the frequency of 1800 MHz respectively. The ratio of mean electronic field to guidance in the Samsung mobile phone at the frequency of 900 MHz and 1800 MHz was 4.36% and 3.34%, while was 5.62% and 4.31% in the Nokia mobile phone, respectively. The ratio of mean head specific absorption rate in smart mobile phones of Samsung and Nokia in the guidance level at the frequency of 900 was 0.15% and 0.25%, respectively, while was 0.23 %and 0.38% at the frequency of 1800 MHz, respectively. The rate of specific absorption of Nokia smart  mobile phones at the frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz  was significantly higher than Samsung (p value <0.05). Hence, we can say that in a fixed period, health risks of Nokia smart phones is higher than Samsung smart mobile phone. PMID:27157169

  8. Recovering Seasat SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, T. A.; Arko, S. A.; Rosen, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of orbital remote sensing for global ocean observations, NASA launched Seasat on June 27th, 1978. Being the first space borne SAR mission, Seasat produced the most detailed SAR images of Earth from space ever seen to that point in time. While much of the data collected in the USA was processed optically, a mere 150 scenes had been digitally processed by March 1980. In fact, only an estimated 3% of Seasat data was ever digitally processed. Thus, for over three decades, the majority of the SAR data from this historic mission has been dormant, virtually unavailable to scientists in the 21st century. Over the last year, researchers at the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) have processed the Seasat SAR archives into imagery products. A telemetry decoding system was created and the data were filtered into readily processable signal files. Due to nearly 35 years of bit rot, the bit error rate (BER) for the ASF DAAC Seasat archives was on the order of 1 out of 100 to 1 out of 100,000. This extremely high BER initially seemed to make much of the data undecodable - because the minor frame numbers are just 7 bits and no range line numbers exist in the telemetry even the 'simple' tasks of tracking the minor frame number or locating the start of each range line proved difficult. Eventually, using 5 frame numbers in sequence and a handful of heuristics, the data were successfully decoded into full range lines. Concurrently, all metadata were stored into external files. Recovery of this metadata was also problematic, the BER making the information highly suspect and, initially at least, unusable in any sort of automated fashion. Because of the BER, all of the single bit metadata fields proved unreliable. Even fields that should be constant for a data take (e.g. receiving station, day of the year) showed high variability, each requiring a median filter to be usable. The most challenging, however, were the

  9. Between-country comparison of whole-body SAR from personal exposure data in Urban areas.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Frei, Patrizia; Röösli, Martin; Vermeeren, Günter; Bolte, John; Thuróczy, György; Gajšek, Peter; Trček, Tomaž; Mohler, Evelyn; Juhász, Péter; Finta, Viktoria; Martens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), personal radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements were performed in different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoors using the same exposure meters. From the mean personal field exposure levels (excluding mobile phone exposure), whole-body absorption values in a 1-year-old child and adult male model were calculated using a statistical multipath exposure method and compared for the five countries. All mean absorptions (maximal total absorption of 3.4 µW/kg for the child and 1.8 µW/kg for the adult) were well below the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) basic restriction of 0.08 W/kg for the general public. Generally, incident field exposure levels were well correlated with whole-body absorptions (SAR(wb) ), although the type of microenvironment, frequency of the signals, and dimensions of the considered phantom modify the relationship between these exposure measures. Exposure to the television and Digital Audio Broadcasting band caused relatively higher SAR(wb) values (up to 65%) for the 1-year-old child than signals at higher frequencies due to the body size-dependent absorption rates. Frequency Modulation (FM) caused relatively higher absorptions (up to 80%) in the adult male. PMID:22674152

  10. Between-country comparison of whole-body SAR from personal exposure data in Urban areas.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Frei, Patrizia; Röösli, Martin; Vermeeren, Günter; Bolte, John; Thuróczy, György; Gajšek, Peter; Trček, Tomaž; Mohler, Evelyn; Juhász, Péter; Finta, Viktoria; Martens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), personal radio frequency electromagnetic field measurements were performed in different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoors using the same exposure meters. From the mean personal field exposure levels (excluding mobile phone exposure), whole-body absorption values in a 1-year-old child and adult male model were calculated using a statistical multipath exposure method and compared for the five countries. All mean absorptions (maximal total absorption of 3.4 µW/kg for the child and 1.8 µW/kg for the adult) were well below the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) basic restriction of 0.08 W/kg for the general public. Generally, incident field exposure levels were well correlated with whole-body absorptions (SAR(wb) ), although the type of microenvironment, frequency of the signals, and dimensions of the considered phantom modify the relationship between these exposure measures. Exposure to the television and Digital Audio Broadcasting band caused relatively higher SAR(wb) values (up to 65%) for the 1-year-old child than signals at higher frequencies due to the body size-dependent absorption rates. Frequency Modulation (FM) caused relatively higher absorptions (up to 80%) in the adult male.

  11. Heating from free-free absorption and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Björnsson, C.-I.; Lundqvist, P. E-mail: peter@astro.su.se

    2014-06-01

    An accurate determination of the mass-loss rate of the progenitor stars to core-collapse supernovae is often limited by uncertainties pertaining to various model assumptions. It is shown that under conditions when the temperature of the circumstellar medium is set by heating due to free-free absorption, observations of the accompanying free-free optical depth allow a direct determination of the mass-loss rate from observed quantities in a rather model-independent way. The temperature is determined self-consistently, which results in a characteristic time dependence of the free-free optical depth. This can be used to distinguish free-free heating from other heating mechanisms. Since the importance of free-free heating is quite model dependent, this also makes possible several consistency checks of the deduced mass-loss rate. It is argued that the free-free absorption observed in SN 1993J is consistent with heating from free-free absorption. The deduced mass-loss rate of the progenitor star is, approximately, 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for a wind velocity of 10 km s{sup –1}.

  12. SAR Product Control Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, P. J.; Hounam, D.; Rye, A. J.; Rosich, B.; Börner, T.; Closa, J.; Schättler, B.; Smith, P. J.; Zink, M.

    2003-03-01

    As SAR instruments and their operating modes become more complex, as new applications place more and more demands on image quality and as our understanding of their imperfections becomes more sophisticated, there is increasing recognition that SAR data quality has to be controlled more completely to keep pace. The SAR product CONtrol software (SARCON) is a comprehensive SAR product control software suite tailored to the latest generation of SAR sensors. SARCON profits from the most up-to-date thinking on SAR image performance derived from other spaceborne and airborne SAR projects and is based on the newest applications. This paper gives an overview of the structure and the features of this new software tool, which is a product of a co-operation between teams at BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technology Centre and DLR under contract to ESA (ESRIN). Work on SARCON began in 1999 and is continuing.

  13. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  14. SAR distribution in a bio-medium in close proximity with dual segment cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, R K; Singh, S P; Kumar, D

    2012-05-01

    This paper reports simulation and experimental studies of input characteristics of a dual segment cylindrical dielectric resonator antenna (DSCDRA) in free space and in the presence of a bio-medium (synthetic muscle) along with specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution in the synthetic muscle medium due to the antenna at microwave frequencies. The simulation study has been carried out using CST Microwave Studio software. The experimental SAR distribution has been obtained using two 50 Ω L-shaped and straight coaxial probes and Agilent 3 Hz-50 GHz spectrum analyser. The experimental results for variation in return loss versus frequency for the DSCDRA and SAR distribution in synthetic muscle medium due to the antenna are compared with simulated results. PMID:22506808

  15. Calculations of Solar Shortwave Heating Rates due to Black Carbon and Ozone Absorption Using in Situ Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, R. S.; Hall, S. R.; Swartz, W. H.; Spackman, J. R.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.; Aikin, K. C.; Shetter, R. E.; Bui, T. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the solar heating rates in ambient air due to absorption by black-carbon (BC) containing particles and ozone are presented as calculated from airborne observations made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) in January-February 2006. The method uses airborne in situ observations of BC particles, ozone and actinic flux. Total BC mass is obtained along the flight track by summing the masses of individually detected BC particles in the range 90 to 600-nm volume-equivalent diameter, which includes most of the BC mass. Ozone mixing ratios and upwelling and partial downwelling solar actinic fluxes were measured concurrently with BC mass. Two estimates used for the BC wavelength-dependent absorption cross section yielded similar heating rates. For mean altitudes of 16.5, 17.5, and 18.5 km (0.5 km) in the tropics, average BC heating rates were near 0.0002 K/d. Observed BC coatings on individual particles approximately double derived BC heating rates. Ozone heating rates exceeded BC heating rates by approximately a factor of 100 on average and at least a factor of 4, suggesting that BC heating rates in this region are negligible in comparison.

  16. Application of postured human model for SAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuchkovikj, M.; Munteanu, I.; Weiland, T.

    2013-07-01

    In the last two decades, the increasing number of electronic devices used in day-to-day life led to a growing interest in the study of the electromagnetic field interaction with biological tissues. The design of medical devices and wireless communication devices such as mobile phones benefits a lot from the bio-electromagnetic simulations in which digital human models are used. The digital human models currently available have an upright position which limits the research activities in realistic scenarios, where postured human bodies must be considered. For this reason, a software application called "BodyFlex for CST STUDIO SUITE" was developed. In its current version, this application can deform the voxel-based human model named HUGO (Dipp GmbH, 2010) to allow the generation of common postures that people use in normal life, ensuring the continuity of tissues and conserving the mass to an acceptable level. This paper describes the enhancement of the "BodyFlex" application, which is related to the movements of the forearm and the wrist of a digital human model. One of the electromagnetic applications in which the forearm and the wrist movement of a voxel based human model has a significant meaning is the measurement of the specific absorption rate (SAR) when a model is exposed to a radio frequency electromagnetic field produced by a mobile phone. Current SAR measurements of the exposure from mobile phones are performed with the SAM (Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin) phantom which is filled with a dispersive but homogeneous material. We are interested what happens with the SAR values if a realistic inhomogeneous human model is used. To this aim, two human models, a homogeneous and an inhomogeneous one, in two simulation scenarios are used, in order to examine and observe the differences in the results for the SAR values.

  17. An RF dosimeter for independent SAR measurement in MRI scanners

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Di; Bottomley, Paul A.; El-Sharkawy, AbdEl-Monem M.; Edelstein, William A.

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: The monitoring and management of radio frequency (RF) exposure is critical for ensuring magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) safety. Commercial MRI scanners can overestimate specific absorption rates (SAR) and improperly restrict clinical MRI scans or the application of new MRI sequences, while underestimation of SAR can lead to tissue heating and thermal injury. Accurate scanner-independent RF dosimetry is essential for measuring actual exposure when SAR is critical for ensuring regulatory compliance and MRI safety, for establishing RF exposure while evaluating interventional leads and devices, and for routine MRI quality assessment by medical physicists. However, at present there are no scanner-independent SAR dosimeters. Methods: An SAR dosimeter with an RF transducer comprises two orthogonal, rectangular copper loops and a spherical MRI phantom. The transducer is placed in the magnet bore and calibrated to approximate the resistive loading of the scanner's whole-body birdcage RF coil for human subjects in Philips, GE and Siemens 3 tesla (3T) MRI scanners. The transducer loop reactances are adjusted to minimize interference with the transmit RF field (B{sub 1}) at the MRI frequency. Power from the RF transducer is sampled with a high dynamic range power monitor and recorded on a computer. The deposited power is calibrated and tested on eight different MRI scanners. Whole-body absorbed power vs weight and body mass index (BMI) is measured directly on 26 subjects. Results: A single linear calibration curve sufficed for RF dosimetry at 127.8 MHz on three different Philips and three GE 3T MRI scanners. An RF dosimeter operating at 123.2 MHz on two Siemens 3T scanners required a separate transducer and a slightly different calibration curve. Measurement accuracy was ∼3%. With the torso landmarked at the xiphoid, human adult whole‑body absorbed power varied approximately linearly with patient weight and BMI. This indicates that whole-body torso SAR is on

  18. CRUCIAL: Cryosat-2 Success over Inland Water and Land: Analyses and Validation of SAR and SARin Full Bit Rate Altimetric Heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Philip; Benveniste, Jérôme; Birkinshaw, Stephen; Ambrózio, Américo; Restano, Marco

    2016-07-01

    CRUCIAL is an ESA/STSE funded project investigating innovative land and inland water applications from Cryosat-2 with a forward-look component to the future Sentinel-3 and Jason-CS/Sentinel-6 missions. The high along-track sampling of Cryosat-2 in its SAR and SARin modes offer the opportunity to recover high frequency signals over inland waters. A theoretical approach has been developed to process the FBR L1A Doppler beams to form a product using ground cell gridding, beam steering and beam stacking from which inland water heights are derivable from the retracked Cryosat-2 altimetric waveforms. Results of the processing strategy will include a comparison of waveforms and heights from the burst echoes (˜80 m along-track) and from multi-look waveforms (˜320 m along-track). SAR and SARin FBR data are available for the Amazon, Brahmaputra and Mekong for 2011-2015. FBR SAR results will be compared against stage data from the nearest gauge where applicable with heights from Tonle Sap compared against Jason-2 data from the United States Department of Agriculture. A strategy to select the number of multi-looks over rivers will also be presented. Results of FBR SARin processing for the Amazon and Brahmaputra will be presented including comparison of heights from the two antennae, extraction of slope of the ground surface and validation against ground data where appropriate.

  19. Operation of a low temperature absorption chiller at rating point and at reduced evaporator temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Best, R.; Biermann, W.; Reimann, R. C.

    1985-01-01

    The returned fifteen ton Solar Absorption Machine (SAM) 015 chiller was given a cursory visual inspection, some obvious problems were remedied, and then it was placed on a test stand to get a measure of dirty performance. It was then given a standard acid clean, the water side of the tubes was brushed clean, and then the machine was retested. The before and after cleaning data were compared to equivalent data taken before the machine was shipped. The second part of the work statement was to experimentally demonstrate the technical feasibility of operating the chiller at evaporator temperatures below 0(0)C (32(0)F) and identify any operational problems.

  20. Modifying the high rate algal pond light environment and its effects on light absorption and photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Donna L; Montemezzani, Valerio; Howard-Williams, Clive; Turnbull, Matthew H; Broady, Paul A; Craggs, Rupert J

    2015-03-01

    The combined use of high rate algal ponds (HRAPs) for wastewater treatment and commercial algal production is considered to be an economically viable option. However, microalgal photosynthesis and biomass productivity is constrained in HRAPs due to light limitation. This paper investigates how the light climate in the HRAP can be modified through changes in pond depth, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and light/dark turnover rate and how this impacts light absorption and utilisation by the microalgae. Wastewater treatment HRAPs were operated at three different pond depth and HRT during autumn. Light absorption by the microalgae was most affected by HRT, significantly decreasing with increasing HRT, due to increased internal self-shading. Photosynthetic performance (as defined by Pmax, Ek and α), significantly increased with increasing pond depth and decreasing HRT. Despite this, increasing pond depth and/or HRT, resulted in decreased pond light climate and overall integrated water column net oxygen production. However, increased light/dark turnover was able to compensate for this decrease, bringing the net oxygen production in line with shallower ponds operated at shorter HRT. On overcast days, modelled daily net photosynthesis significantly increased with increased light/dark turnover, however, on clear days such increased turnover did not enhance photosynthesis. This study has showed that light absorption and photosynthetic performance of wastewater microalgae can be modified through changes to pond depth, HRT and light/dark turnover.

  1. A simplified method for calculating the atmospheric heating rate by absorption of solar radiation in the stratosphere and mesosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimazaki, T.; Helmle, L. C.

    1979-01-01

    Calculations of the atmospheric heating rate by absorption of solar radiation by O3, H2O, and CO2 are reported. The method needs only seven parameters for each molecule and is particularly useful for heating calculations in three-dimensional global circulation models below 80 km. Applying the formula to the observed distributions of O3, H2O, and CO2 produces reasonable latitudinal and seasonal variations in the heating rate. The calculated heating rate, however, is sensitive to the global distributions of the absorbing gases, and uncertainties in the O3 distribution above approximately 50 km and the H2O distribution below approximately 20 km may seriously affect the global distributions of the heating rate in these regions.

  2. Real time SAR processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Premkumar, A. B.; Purviance, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    A simplified model for the SAR imaging problem is presented. The model is based on the geometry of the SAR system. Using this model an expression for the entire phase history of the received SAR signal is formulated. From the phase history, it is shown that the range and the azimuth coordinates for a point target image can be obtained by processing the phase information during the intrapulse and interpulse periods respectively. An architecture for a VLSI implementation for the SAR signal processor is presented which generates images in real time. The architecture uses a small number of chips, a new correlation processor, and an efficient azimuth correlation process.

  3. Variable food absorption by Antarctic krill: Relationships between diet, egestion rate and the composition and sinking rates of their fecal pellets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, A.; Schmidt, K.; Fielding, S.; Kawaguchi, S.; Geissler, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of food processing by zooplankton affects both their energy budgets and the biogeochemical fate of their fecal pellets. We sampled 40 schools of krill across the Scotia Sea during spring, summer and autumn and found that in all 3 seasons, every aspect of their absorption and defecation varied greatly. The C content of fecal pellets varied from 0.85% to 29% of their dry mass (median 9.8%) and C egestion rates varied 75-fold. C:N mass ratios of pellets ranged from 4.9 to 13.2 (median 7.8), higher than values of 3.9 in the krill and 5.4 in their food, pointing to enhanced uptake of N. Pellet sinking rates equated to 27-1218 m d -1 (median 304 m d -1), being governed mainly by pellet diameter (80-600 μm, mean 183 μm) and density (1.038-1.391 g cm -3, mean 1.121 g cm -3). Pellets showed little loss of C or N in filtered seawater over the first 2 days and were physically robust. When feeding rates were low, slow gut passage time and high absorption efficiency resulted in low egestion rates of pellets that were low in C and N content. These pellets were compact, dense and fast-sinking. Conversely, in good feeding conditions much food tended to pass quickly through the gut and was not efficiently absorbed, producing C and N-rich, slow-sinking pellets. Such "superfluous feeding" probably maximises the absolute rates of nutrient absorption. Food composition was also important: diatom-rich diets depressed the C content of the pellets but increased their sinking rates, likely due to silica ballasting. So depending on how krill process food, their pellets could represent both vehicles for rapid export and slow sinking, C and N-rich food sources for pelagic scavengers. C egestion rates by krill averaged 3.4% of summer primary production (and ingestion rates would be 2-10-fold higher than this) so whatever the fate of the pellets, krill are an important re-packager within the food web. While salp pellets tend to sink faster than those of krill, it is the latter

  4. Some present problems and a proposed experimental phantom for SAR compliance testing of cellular telephones at 835 and 1900 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Kang, Gang

    2002-05-01

    This paper compares the maximum allowable powers of some typical cellular telephones at 835 and 1900 MHz for compliance with the limits of specific absorption rates (SAR) given in ANSI/IEEE, ICNIRP and the proposed modification of ANSI/IEEE safety guidelines. It is shown that the present ANSI/IEEE guideline is the most conservative with the ICNIRP guidelines allowing a maximum radiated power that is 2.5-3 times higher, and the proposed IEEE modification of treating pinna as an extremity tissue the least conservative allowing even higher radiated powers by up to 50%. The paper also expands the previously reported study of energy deposition in models of adults versus children to two different and distinct anatomically-based models of the adult head, namely the Utah model and the 'Visible Man' model, each of which is increased or reduced by the voxel size to obtain additional head models larger or smaller in all dimensions by 11.1% or -9.1%, respectively. The peak 1 g body-tissue SAR calculated using the widely accepted FDTD method for smaller models is up to 56% higher at 1900 MHz and up to 20% higher at 835 MHz compared to the larger models, with the average models giving intermediate SARs. Also given in the paper is a comparison of the peak 1 g and 10 g SARs for two different anatomically-based models with 6 mm thick smooth plastic ear models used for SAR compliance testing. The SARs obtained with the insulating plastic ear models are up to two or more times smaller than realistic anatomic models. We propose a 2 mm thin shell phantom with lossy ear that should give SARs within +/-15% of those of anatomic models.

  5. SAR pattern perturbations from resonance effects in water bolus layers used with superficial microwave hyperthermia applicators.

    PubMed

    Neuman, D G; Stauffer, P R; Jacobsen, S; Rossetto, F

    2002-01-01

    This study examines the effect of various thickness water bolus coupling layers on the SAR (Specific Absorption Rate) patterns from Dual Concentric Conductor (DCC) based Conformal Microwave Array (CMA) superficial hyperthermia applicators. Previous theory has suggested that water bolus coupling layers can be considered as a dielectric resonator; therefore, it is possible for the impinging electric field to stimulate volume oscillations and surface wave oscillations inside the water bolus. These spurious oscillations will destructively or constructively interact with the impinging electric field to cause a perturbation of the applicator SAR pattern. An experiment was designed which consisted of mapping the electric field produced by a four element DCC CMA applicator in liquid muscle phantom at depths of 5 and 10mm in front of four different thickness water boli; 0 (no bolus) 4, 9 and 13mm. Using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method, SAR distributions were calculated for similar test cases. It was found that for water bolus thicknesses of 9mm or greater, there is a marked perturbation of both experimental and theoretical SAR distributions. It is believed that this perturbation is experimental confirmation of the volume and surface wave oscillation theory described by previous investigators.

  6. New model for assessing dose, dose rate, and temperature sensitivity of radiation-induced absorption in glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gilard, Olivier; Quadri, Gianandrea; Caussanel, Matthieu; Duval, Herve; Reynaud, Francois

    2010-11-15

    A new theoretical approach is proposed to explain the dose, dose rate and temperature sensitivity of the radiation-induced absorption (RIA) in glasses. In this paper, a {beta}{sup th}-order dispersive kinetic model is used to simulate the growth of the density of color centers in irradiated glasses. This model yields an explanation for the power-law dependence on dose and dose rate usually observed for the RIA in optical fibers. It also leads to an Arrhenius-like relationship between the RIA and the glass temperature during irradiation. With a very limited number of adjustable parameters, the model succeeds in explaining, with a good agreement, the RIA growth of two different optical fiber references over wide ranges of dose, dose rate and temperature.

  7. A physico-chemical properties based model for estimating evaporation and absorption rates of perfumes from skin.

    PubMed

    Kasting, G B; Saiyasombati, P

    2001-02-01

    Because of their potential for inducing allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) if used improperly, perfumes are carefully assessed for dermal safety prior to incorporation into cosmetic products. Exposure assessment for these materials often involves the conservative assumption of 100% absorption of each component. This report describes an improved method to estimate the absorption and evaporation of perfume ingredients from skin, based on their physico-chemical properties. The effect of environmental variables such as temperature and wind velocity can be accounted for in a logical way. This was accomplished using a first-order kinetic approach expected to be applicable for small doses applied to skin. Skin penetration rate was calculated as a fraction of the maximum flux estimated from the compound's lipid solubility, S(lip) (represented by the product of octanol/water partition coefficient, K(octt), and water solubility, S(w)), and molecular weight, MW. Evaporation rates were estimated from a modified Henry's Law approach with a stagnant boundary layer whose thickness is a function of surface airflow, v. At a given value of v, evaporation rate was assumed proportional to the ratio P(vp)/S(lip), where P(vp) is the vapour pressure of the ingredient at skin temperature, T. The model predicts a relationship for total evaporation from skin of the form %evap = 100x/(k+x) where x = P(vp)MW(2.7)/(K(oct)S(w)) and k is a parameter which depends only on v and T. Comparison with published data on perfume evaporation from human skin in vivo showed good agreement between theory and experiment for two closely related perfume mixtures (r(2) = 0.52-0.74, s = 12-14%, n = 10). Thus, the method would seem to have a good prospect of providing skin absorption estimates suitable for use in exposure assessment and improved understanding of dose-related contact allergy.

  8. Simplified segmented human models for whole body and localised SAR evaluation of 20 MHz to 6 GHz electromagnetic field exposures.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongning; Shao, Qing; Yang, Lei

    2013-03-01

    The digital human model is a key element in evaluating the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure. This paper proposes the application of simplified segmented human models for EMF exposure compliance evaluation with the whole body and the localised limits. The method is based on the fact that most of the EMF power absorption is concentrated in several major tissues. Two kinds of human models were simply (the proposed method) and precisely segmented from two sets of whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanned images. The whole body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) and the peak localised SAR averaging over 10 g tissues for the two kinds of models are calculated for various exposure configurations. The results confirmed the efficiency and the validity of the proposed method. The application as evaluating the MRI radiofrequency EMF exposure is also discussed in the paper.

  9. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  10. Antiviral drug discovery against SARS-CoV.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Shan; Lin, Wen-Hsing; Hsu, John T-A; Hsieh, Hsing-Pang

    2006-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a life-threatening infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV. In the 2003 outbreak, it infected more than 8,000 people worldwide and claimed the lives of more than 900 victims. The high mortality rate resulted, at least in part, from the absence of definitive treatment protocols or therapeutic agents. Although the virus spreading has been contained, due preparedness and planning, including the successful development of antiviral drugs against SARS-CoV, is necessary for possible reappearance of SARS. In this review, we have discussed currently available strategies for antiviral drug discovery and how these technologies have been utilized to identify potential antiviral agents for the inhibition of SARS-CoV replication. Moreover, progress in the drug development based on different molecular targets is also summarized, including 1) Compounds that block the S protein-ACE2-mediated viral entry; 2) Compounds targeting SARS-CoV M(pro); 3) Compounds targeting papain-like protease 2 (PLP2); 4) Compounds targeting SARS-CoV RdRp; 5) Compounds targeting SARS-CoV helicase; 6) Active compounds with unspecified targets; and 7) Research on siRNA. This review aims to provide a comprehensive account of drug discovery on SARS. The experiences with the SARS outbreak and drug discovery would certainly be an important lesson for the drug development for any new viral outbreaks that may emerge in the future.

  11. Advanced digital SAR processing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinson, L. W.; Gaffney, B. P.; Liu, B.; Perry, R. P.; Ruvin, A.

    1982-01-01

    A highly programmable, land based, real time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) processor requiring a processed pixel rate of 2.75 MHz or more in a four look system was designed. Variations in range and azimuth compression, number of looks, range swath, range migration and SR mode were specified. Alternative range and azimuth processing algorithms were examined in conjunction with projected integrated circuit, digital architecture, and software technologies. The advaced digital SAR processor (ADSP) employs an FFT convolver algorithm for both range and azimuth processing in a parallel architecture configuration. Algorithm performace comparisons, design system design, implementation tradeoffs and the results of a supporting survey of integrated circuit and digital architecture technologies are reported. Cost tradeoffs and projections with alternate implementation plans are presented.

  12. Generalized energy-aperture product limit for multi-beam and spotlight SARs

    SciTech Connect

    Karr, T.J.

    1995-12-21

    The SAR energy-aperture product limit is extended to multi-beam SARS, Spotlight and moving spotlight SARS. This fundamental limit bounds the tradeoff between energy and antenna size. The kinematic relations between design variables such as platform speed, pulse repetition frequency, beam width and area rate are analyzed in a unified framework applicable to a wide variety of SARs including strip maps, spotlights, vermer arrays and multi-beam SARS, both scanning and swept-beam. Then the energy-aperture product limit is derived from the signal-to noise requirement and the kinematic constraints. The derivation clarifies impact of multiple beams and spotlighting on SAR performance.

  13. Absorbed dose rates in tissue from prompt gamma emissions from near-thermal neutron absorption

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schwahn, Scott O.

    2015-10-01

    Prompt gamma emission data from the International Atomic Energy Agency s Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis database are analyzed to determine the absorbed dose rates in tissue to be expected when natural elements are exposed in a near-thermal neutron environment.

  14. High Repetition Rate and Frequency Stabilized Ho:YLF Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, Yingxin; Yu, Jirong; Petros, M.; Petzar, Pau; Trieu, Bo; Lee, Hyung; Singh, U.

    2009-01-01

    High repetition rate operation of an injection seeded Ho:YLF laser has been demonstrated. For 1 kHz operation, the output pulse energy reaches 5.8mJ and the optical-to-optical efficiency is 39% when the pump power is 14.5W.

  15. Enhancement of specific absorption rate by exchange coupling of the core-shell structure of magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadatare, M. R.; Meshram, J. V.; Gurav, K. V.; Hyeok Kim, Jin; Pawar, S. H.

    2016-03-01

    Conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat by nanoparticles (NPs) has the potential to be a powerful, non-invasive technique for biomedical applications such as magnetic fluid hyperthermia, drug release, disease treatment and remote control of single cell functions, but poor conversion efficiencies have hindered practical applications so far. In this paper, an attempt has been made to increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs. To increase the efficiency of magnetic thermal induction by NPs, one can take advantage of the exchange coupling between a magnetically hard core and magnetically soft shell to tune the magnetic properties of the NP and maximize the specific absorption rate, which is the gauge of conversion efficiency. In order to examine the tunability of magnetocrystalline anisotropy and its magnetic heating power, a representative magnetically hard material (CoFe2O4) has been coupled to a soft material (Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4). The synthesized NPs show specific absorption rates that are of an order of magnitude larger than the conventional one.

  16. Heating rates in furnace atomic absorption using the L'vov platform

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koirtyohann, S.R.; Giddings, R.C.; Taylor, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    Heating rate profiles for the furnace tube wall, the furnace atmosphere, and a L'vov platform were established for a range of conditions in a cyclically heated graphite atomizer. The tube wall profile was made by direct observation with a recording optical pyrometer. The sodium line reversal method was used to establish the heating rate of the furnace atmosphere, and appearance temperatures for a series metals of differing volatility was used to establish platform profiles. The tube wall heating rate was nearly linear at 2240??C s- until the desired temperature was reached after which the temperature remained constant. The furnace atmosphere reached a given temperature 0.2-0.4 s later than the tube wall through most of the atomize cycle. The platform lagged the tube wall 0.5-0.8 s. Under typical operating conditions the furnace atmosphere was 100-200??C cooler than the tube wall and at nearly constant temperature when the analyte vaporized from the platform. The L'vov platform causes the cyclically heated commercial furnace to approximate the behavior of a constant temperature furnace during atomization. ?? 1984.

  17. Unimolecular Decomposition Rate of the Criegee Intermediate (CH3)2COO Measured Directly with UV Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mica C; Chao, Wen; Takahashi, Kaito; Boering, Kristie A; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2016-07-14

    The unimolecular decomposition of (CH3)2COO and (CD3)2COO was measured by direct detection of the Criegee intermediate at temperatures from 283 to 323 K using time-resolved UV absorption spectroscopy. The unimolecular rate coefficient kd for (CH3)2COO shows a strong temperature dependence, increasing from 269 ± 82 s(-1) at 283 K to 916 ± 56 s(-1) at 323 K with an Arrhenius activation energy of ∼6 kcal mol(-1). The bimolecular rate coefficient for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, kSO2, was also determined in the temperature range 283 to 303 K. Our temperature-dependent values for kd and kSO2 are consistent with previously reported relative rate coefficients kd/kSO2 of (CH3)2COO formed from ozonolysis of tetramethyl ethylene. Quantum chemical calculations of kd for (CH3)2COO are consistent with the experiment, and the combination of experiment and theory for (CD3)2COO indicates that tunneling plays a significant role in (CH3)2COO unimolecular decomposition. The fast rates of unimolecular decomposition for (CH3)2COO measured here, in light of the relatively slow rate for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with water previously reported, suggest that thermal decomposition may compete with the reactions with water and with SO2 for atmospheric removal of the dimethyl-substituted Criegee intermediate.

  18. Aqueous suspensions of polymer coated magnetite nanoparticles: Colloidal stability, specific absorption rate, and transverse relaxivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saville, Steven Lee

    The design, functionalization, characterization, and applications of magnetic nanoparticles have garnered significant interest over the past several decades. While this area has garnered increasing attention, several questions remain unanswered about the stability of these systems and it's influence on their biomedical applications. To help answer these questions about the stability of these, a novel tri(nitroDOPA) terminated polymer based ligand has been developed for the stabilization of magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesis involves a process in which ethylene oxide is polymerized using a trivinyl initiator, modified with carboxylic acid using a free radical addition of mercaptoundecanoic acid, and then functionalized with nitroDOPA using N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry. This polymer has displayed robust adhesion even in harsh chemical environments, out performing many polymers used today for the stabilization of magnetite. Along these same lines, the effects of instability of these systems were analyzed in both MRI and magnetic hyperthermia applications. It is widely known that formation of linear aggregates (i.e. chains) occurs in more concentrated ferrofluids systems and that this has an affect on the ferrofluid properties. It has been recently reported that for some suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles the transverse proton relaxation rate, R2, is dependent on the time that the sample is exposed to an applied magnetic field. This time dependence has been linked to the formation of linear aggregates or chains in an applied magnetic field via numerical modeling. In this work the relationships between colloidal stability, the formation of these linear structures, and changes observed in the proton transverse relaxation rate and heating rate in magnetic hyperthermia of aqueous suspensions of magnetic particles are examined. The results indicate that varying the ligand length has a direct effect on the colloidal

  19. Block adaptive quantization of Magellan SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Ronald; Johnson, William T. K.

    1989-01-01

    A report is presented on a data compression scheme that will be used to reduce the SAR data rate on the NASA Magellan mission to Venus. The spacecraft has only one scientific instrument, a radar system for imaging the surface, for altimetric profiling of the planet topography, and for measuring radiation from the planet surface. A straightforward implementation of the scientific requirements of the mission results in a data rate higher than can be accommodated by the available system bandwidth. A data-rate-reduction scheme which includes operation of the radar in burst mode and block-adaptive quantization of the SAR data is selected to satisfy the scientific requirements. Descriptions of the quantization scheme and its hardware implementation are given. Burst-mode SAR operation is also briefly discussed.

  20. HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl): OH rate coefficient, UV and infrared absorption spectra, and atmospheric implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGillen, Max R.; Bernard, François; Fleming, Eric L.; Burkholder, James B.

    2015-07-01

    HCFC-133a (CF3CH2Cl), an ozone-depleting substance, is primarily removed from the atmosphere by gas-phase reaction with OH radicals and by UV photolysis. The rate coefficient, k, for the OH + HCFC-133a reaction was measured between 233 and 379 K and is given by k(T) = (9.32 ± 0.8) × 10-13 exp(-(1296 ± 28)/T), where k(296 K) was measured to be (1.10 ± 0.02) × 10-14 (cm3 molecule-1 s-1) (2σ precision uncertainty). The HCFC-133a UV absorption spectrum was measured between 184.95 and 240 nm at 213-323 K, and a spectrum parameterization is presented. The HCFC-133a atmospheric loss processes, lifetime, ozone depletion potential, and uncertainties were evaluated using a 2-D atmospheric model. The global annually averaged steady state lifetime and ozone depletion potential (ODP) were determined to be 4.45 (4.04-4.90) years and 0.017 (±0.001), respectively, where the ranges are based solely on the 2σ uncertainty in the kinetic and photochemical parameters. The infrared absorption spectrum of HCFC-133a was measured, and its global warming potential was determined to be 380 on the 100 year time horizon.

  1. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Ingestion of insoluble dietary fibre increased zinc and iron absorption and restored growth rate and zinc absorption suppressed by dietary phytate in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Hara, H; Asvarujanon, P; Aoyama, Y; Luangpituksa, P

    2001-10-01

    We examined the effects of ingestion of five types of insoluble fibre on growth and Zn absorption in rats fed a marginally Zn-deficient diet (6.75 mg (0.103 mmol) Zn/kg diet) with or without added sodium phytate (12.6 mmol/kg diet). The types of insoluble fibre tested were corn husks, watermelon skin, yam-bean root (Pachyrhizus erosus) and pineapple core, and cellulose was used as a control (100 g/kg diet). Body-weight gain in the cellulose groups was suppressed by 57 % by feeding phytate. Body-weight gain in phytate-fed rats was 80 % greater in the watermelon skin fibre and yam-bean root fibre group than that in the cellulose group. Zn absorption ratio in the cellulose groups was lowered by 46 and 70 % in the first (days 7-10) and second (days 16-19) measurement periods with feeding phytate. In the rats fed the phytate-containing diets, Zn absorption ratio in the watermelon skin, yam-bean root and pineapple core fibre groups was 140, 80 and 54 % higher respectively than that in the cellulose group, in the second period. Fe absorption was not suppressed by phytate, however, feeding of these three types of fibre promoted Fe absorption in rats fed phytate-free diets. The concentration of soluble Zn in the caecal contents in the watermelon skin fibre or yam-bean root fibre groups was identical to that in the control group in spite of a higher short-chain fatty acid concentration and lower pH in the caecum. These findings indicate that ingestion of these types of insoluble fibre recovered the growth and Zn absorption suppressed by feeding a high level of phytate, and factors other than caecal fermentation may also be involved in this effect of insoluble fibre. PMID:11591231

  3. Stepped heating procedure for experimental SAR evaluation of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Iacob, N; Schinteie, G; Palade, P; Ticos, C M; Kuncser, V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a reliable procedure for the experimental determination of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in case of superparamagnetic Fe oxide nanoparticles dispersed in liquid environments. It is based on the acquisition of consecutive steps of time-temperature dependences along of both heating and cooling processes. Linear fitting of these recorded steps provides the heating and cooling speeds at different temperatures, which finally allow the determination of the heating profile in adiabatic-like conditions over a broad temperature range. The presented methodology represents on one hand, a useful alternative tool for the experimental evaluation of the heating capability of nanoparticulate systems for magnetic hyperthermia applications and on the other hand, gives support for a more accurate modeling of bio-heat transfer phenomena. PMID:26087918

  4. Hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the SAES St707 non-evaporable getter at various temperatures.

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Irving; Mills, Bernice E.

    2010-08-01

    A prototype of a tritium thermoelectric generator (TTG) is currently being developed at Sandia. In the TTG, a vacuum jacket reduces the amount of heat lost from the high temperature source via convection. However, outgassing presents challenges to maintaining a vacuum for many years. Getters are chemically active substances that scavenge residual gases in a vacuum system. In order to maintain the vacuum jacket at approximately 1.0 x 10{sup -4} torr for decades, nonevaporable getters that can operate from -55 C to 60 C are going to be used. This paper focuses on the hydrogen capacity and absorption rate of the St707{trademark} non-evaporable getter by SAES. Using a getter testing manifold, we have carried out experiments to test these characteristics of the getter over the temperature range of -77 C to 60 C. The results from this study can be used to size the getter appropriately.

  5. SAR calibration technology review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) calibration technology including a general description of the primary calibration techniques and some of the factors which affect the performance of calibrated SAR systems are reviewed. The use of reference reflectors for measurement of the total system transfer function along with an on-board calibration signal generator for monitoring the temporal variations of the receiver to processor output is a practical approach for SAR calibration. However, preliminary error analysis and previous experimental measurements indicate that reflectivity measurement accuracies of better than 3 dB will be difficult to achieve. This is not adequate for many applications and, therefore, improved end-to-end SAR calibration techniques are required.

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  8. Optical absorption and heating rate dependent glass transition in vanadyl doped calcium oxy-chloride borate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahiya, M. S.; Khasa, S.; Agarwal, A.

    2015-04-01

    Some important results pertaining to optical and thermal properties of vanadyl doped oxy-halide glasses in the chemical composition CaCl2-CaO-B2O3 are discussed. These glasses have been prepared by conventional melt quench technique. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles the amorphous nature of the doped glasses has been confirmed. The electronic polarizability is calculated and found to increase with increase in chloride content. The optical absorption spectra have been recorded in the frequency range of 200-3200 nm. Recorded spectra are analyzed to evaluate cut-off wavelength (λcut-off), optical band gap (Eg), band tailing (B), Urbach energy (ΔE) and refractive index (n). Thermal analysis has been carried out for the prepared glasses at three different heating rates viz. 5, 10 and 20 °C/min. The glass transition temperature (Tg) along with thermal activation energy (Ea) corresponding to each heating rate are evaluated from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermographs. It is found that Ea decrease and Tg increase with increase in heating rate. The variation in Tg is also observed with the substitution of calcium chloride in place of calcium oxide. The increasing and higher values of Ea suggest that prepared glasses have good thermal stability. Variation in Tg and Eg suggests that Cl- anions enter into the voids of borate network at low concentrations (<5.0%) and contribute to the network formation at high concentration (>5.0%).

  9. Zinc absorption from composite meals. I. The significance of whest extraction rate, zinc, calcium, and protein content in meals based on bread.

    PubMed

    Sandström, B; Arvidsson, B; Cederblad, A; Björn-Rasmussen, E

    1980-04-01

    The absorption of zinc in man from composite meals based on bread was measured with a radionuclide technique using 65Zn and whole-body counting. Bread was made up from wheat flour of 100 and 72% extraction rate. A lower absolute amount of zinc was absorbed from the white bread compared to the absorption from the same amount of wholemeal bread. When the two types of bread were enriched with zinc chloride the absorption was higher from the white bread than from the wholemeal bread. Addition of calcium in the form of milk products improved the absorption of zinc from a meal with wholemeal bread. A significant positive correlation was found between zinc absorption and the protein content in meals containing milk, cheese, beef, and egg in various combinations with the wholemeal bread.

  10. The influence of colloidal parameters on the specific power absorption of PAA-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The suitability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to act as heat nano-sources by application of an alternating magnetic field has recently been studied due to their promising applications in biomedicine. The understanding of the magnetic relaxation mechanism in biocompatible nanoparticle systems is crucial in order to optimize the magnetic properties and maximize the specific absorption rate (SAR). With this aim, the SAR of magnetic dispersions containing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles bio-coated with polyacrylic acid of an average particle size of ≈10 nm has been evaluated separately by changing colloidal parameters such as the MNP concentration and the viscosity of the solvent. A remarkable decrease of the SAR values with increasing particle concentration and solvent viscosity was found. These behaviours have been discussed on the basis of the magnetic relaxation mechanisms involved. PACS: 80; 87; 87.85jf PMID:21711915

  11. The influence of colloidal parameters on the specific power absorption of PAA-coated magnetite nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Piñeiro-Redondo, Yolanda; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Pardiñas-Blanco, Iván; Goya, Gerardo; López-Quintela, M Arturo; Rivas, José

    2011-05-16

    The suitability of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to act as heat nano-sources by application of an alternating magnetic field has recently been studied due to their promising applications in biomedicine. The understanding of the magnetic relaxation mechanism in biocompatible nanoparticle systems is crucial in order to optimize the magnetic properties and maximize the specific absorption rate (SAR). With this aim, the SAR of magnetic dispersions containing superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles bio-coated with polyacrylic acid of an average particle size of ≈10 nm has been evaluated separately by changing colloidal parameters such as the MNP concentration and the viscosity of the solvent. A remarkable decrease of the SAR values with increasing particle concentration and solvent viscosity was found. These behaviours have been discussed on the basis of the magnetic relaxation mechanisms involved.PACS: 80; 87; 87.85jf.

  12. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Adibzadeh, F; Verhaart, R F; Verduijn, G M; Fortunati, V; Rijnen, Z; Franckena, M; van Rhoon, G C; Paulides, M M

    2015-02-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H&N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H&N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR₁₀g) in the brains of 16 selected H&N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR₁₀g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF.

  13. SAR Simulation with Magneto Chiral Effects for Human Head Radiated from Cellular Phones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Silva, H.

    2008-09-01

    A numerical method for a microwave signal emitted by a cellular phone, propagating in a magneto-chiral media, characterized by an extended Born-Fedorov formalism, is presented. It is shown that the use of a cell model, combined with a real model of the human head, derived from the magnetic resonance of images allows a good determination of the near fields induced in the head when the brain chirality and the battery magnetic field are considered together. The results on a 2-Dim human head model show the evolution of the specific absorption rate, (SAR coefficient) and the spatial peak specific absorption rate which are sensitives to the magneto-chiral factor, which is important in the brain layer. For GSM/PCN phones, extremely low frequency real pulsed magnetic fields (in the order of 10 to 60 milligauss) are added to the model through the whole of the user's head. The more important conclusion of our work is that the head absorption is bigger than the results for a classical model without the magneto chiral effect. Hot spots are produced due to the combination of microwave and the magnetic field produced by the phone's operation. The FDTD method was used to compute the SARs inside the MRI based head models consisting of various tissues for 1.8 GHz. As a result, we found that in the head model having more than four kinds of tissue, the localized peak SAR reaches maximum inside the head for over five tissues including skin, bone, blood and brain cells.

  14. Liver imaging at 3.0 T: diffusion-induced black-blood echo-planar imaging with large anatomic volumetric coverage as an alternative for specific absorption rate-intensive echo-train spin-echo sequences: feasibility study.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Indra C; Hussain, Shahid M; Krestin, Gabriel P; Wielopolski, Piotr A

    2008-07-01

    Institutional Review Board approval and signed informed consent were obtained by all participants for an ongoing sequence optimization project at 3.0 T. The purpose of this study was to evaluate breath-hold diffusion-induced black-blood echo-planar imaging (BBEPI) as a potential alternative for specific absorption rate (SAR)-intensive spin-echo sequences, in particular, the fast spin-echo (FSE) sequences, at 3.0 T. Fourteen healthy volunteers (seven men, seven women; mean age +/- standard deviation, 32.7 years +/- 6.8) were imaged for this purpose. Liver coverage (20 cm, z-axis) was always performed in one 25-second breath hold. Imaging parameters were varied interactively with regard to echo time, diffusion b value, and voxel size. Images were evaluated and compared with fat-suppressed T2-weighted FSE images for image quality, liver delineation, geometric distortions, fat suppression, suppression of the blood signal, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). An optimized short- (25 msec) and long-echo (80 msec) BBEPI provided full anatomic, single breath-hold liver coverage (100 and 50 sections, respectively), with resulting voxel sizes of 3.3 x 2.7 x 2.0 mm and 3.3 x 2.7 x 4.0 mm, respectively. Repetition time was 6300 msec, matrix size was 160 x 192, and an acceleration factor of 2.00 was used. b Values of more than 20 sec/mm(2) showed better suppression of the blood signal but b values of 10 sec/mm(2) provided improved volume coverage and signal consistency. Compared with fat-suppressed T2-weighted FSE, the optimized BBEPI sequence provided (a) comparable image quality and liver delineation, (b) acceptable geometric distortions, (c) improved suppression of fat and blood signals, and (d) high CNR and SNR. BBEPI is feasible for fast, low-SAR, thin-section morphologic imaging of the entire liver in a single breath hold at 3.0 T. PMID:18566178

  15. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X™). The skin model consisted of a 30 µm stratum corneum, 350 µm epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 µm dermis. Five SGD of 60 µm radius and 300 µm height were embedded linearly with 370 µm separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 µm from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  16. SAR and temperature distribution in the rat head model exposed to electromagnetic field radiation by 900 MHz dipole antenna.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Hao, Dongmei; Wu, Shuicai; Zhong, Rugang; Zeng, Yanjun

    2013-06-01

    Rats are often used in the electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure experiments. In the study for the effect of 900 MHz EMF exposure on learning and memory in SD rats, the specific absorption rate (SAR) and the temperature rise in the rat head are numerically evaluated. The digital anatomical model of a SD rat is reconstructed with the MRI images. Numerical method as finite difference time domain has been applied to assess the SAR and the temperature rise during the exposure. Measurements and simulations are conducted to characterize the net radiated power of the dipole to provide a precise dosimetric result. The whole-body average SAR and the localized SAR averaging over 1, 0.5 and 0.05 g mass for different organs/tissues are given. It reveals that during the given exposure experiment setup, no significant temperature rise occurs. The reconstructed anatomical rat model could be used in the EMF simulation and the dosimetric result provides useful information for the biological effect studies.

  17. Characterizing and estimating noise in InSAR and InSAR time series with MODIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhart, William D.; Lohman, Rowena B.

    2013-01-01

    InSAR time series analysis is increasingly used to image subcentimeter displacement rates of the ground surface. The precision of InSAR observations is often affected by several noise sources, including spatially correlated noise from the turbulent atmosphere. Under ideal scenarios, InSAR time series techniques can substantially mitigate these effects; however, in practice the temporal distribution of InSAR acquisitions over much of the world exhibit seasonal biases, long temporal gaps, and insufficient acquisitions to confidently obtain the precisions desired for tectonic research. Here, we introduce a technique for constraining the magnitude of errors expected from atmospheric phase delays on the ground displacement rates inferred from an InSAR time series using independent observations of precipitable water vapor from MODIS. We implement a Monte Carlo error estimation technique based on multiple (100+) MODIS-based time series that sample date ranges close to the acquisitions times of the available SAR imagery. This stochastic approach allows evaluation of the significance of signals present in the final time series product, in particular their correlation with topography and seasonality. We find that topographically correlated noise in individual interferograms is not spatially stationary, even over short-spatial scales (<10 km). Overall, MODIS-inferred displacements and velocities exhibit errors of similar magnitude to the variability within an InSAR time series. We examine the MODIS-based confidence bounds in regions with a range of inferred displacement rates, and find we are capable of resolving velocities as low as 1.5 mm/yr with uncertainties increasing to ∼6 mm/yr in regions with higher topographic relief.

  18. Rate-based modeling of reactive absorption of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S into aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Pacheco, M.A.; Rochelle, G.T.

    1998-10-01

    A general framework was developed to model the transport processes that take place during reactive absorption when both rate- and equilibrium-controlled reactions occur in the liquid phase. This framework was applied to the selective absorption of H{sub 2}S from fuel gas containing CO{sub 2} using aqueous methyldiethanolamine. A rate-based distillation column module was used for the column integration. The Maxwell-Stefan and enhancement factor theories were utilized. In packed columns, CO{sub 2} absorption is controlled by diffusion with fast chemical reactions; in trayed columns it is controlled primarily by physical absorption. Gas-film resistance is never significant for CO{sub 2} absorption. For H{sub 2}S absorption, gas- and liquid-film resistances are important, and diffusion of bisulfide controls the liquid-film resistance. Heat effects produce temperatures bulges that can cause equilibrium pinches at the maximum temperature. This phenomenon gives an optimum packing height for the H{sub 2}S removal. Trayed columns are more selective than packed columns for H{sub 2}S removal, primarily because of the larger number of liquid-film mass transfer units.

  19. PHARUS airborne SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snoeij, Paul; Pouwels, Henk; Koomen, Peter J.; Hoogeboom, Peter

    1995-11-01

    PHARUS (phased array universal SAR) is an airborne SAR concept which is being developed in the Netherlands. The PHARUS system differs from other airborne SARs by the use of a phased array antenna, which provides both for the flexibility in the design as well as for a compact, light-weight instrument that can be carried on small aircraft. The concept allows for the construction of airborne SAR systems on a common generic basis but tailored to specific user needs and can be seen as a preparation for future spaceborne SAR systems using solid state transmitters with electronically steerable phased array antenna. The whole approach is aimed at providing an economic and yet technically sophisticated solution to remote sensing or surveying needs of a specific user. The solid state phased array antenna consists of a collection of radiating patches; the design flexibility for a large part resides in the freedom to choose the number of patches, and thereby the essential radar performance parameters such as resolution and swath width. Another consequence of the use of the phased array antenna is the system's compactness and the possibility to rigidly mount it on a small aircraft. The use of small aircraft of course considerably improves the cost/benefit ratio of the use of airborne SAR. Flight altitude of the system is flexible between about 7,000 and 40,000 feet, giving much operational freedom within the meteo and airspace control limits. In the PHARUS concept the airborne segment is complemented by a ground segment, which consists of a SAR processor, possibly extended by a matching image processing package. (A quick look image is available in real-time on board the aircraft.) The SAR processor is UNIX based and runs on easily available hardware (SUN station). Although the additional image processing software is available, the SAR processing software is nevertheless designed to be able to interface with commercially available image processing software, as well as being able

  20. Design and optimization for variable rate selective excitation using an analytic RF scaling function.

    PubMed

    Gai, Neville D; Zur, Yuval

    2007-11-01

    At higher B(0) fields, specific absorption rate (SAR) deposition increases. Due to maximum SAR limitation, slice coverage decreases and/or scan time increases. Conventional selective RF pulses are played out in conjunction with a time independent field gradient. Variable rate selective excitation (VERSE) is a technique that modifies the original RF and gradient waveforms such that slice profile is unchanged. The drawback is that the slice profile for off-resonance spins is distorted. A new VERSE algorithm based on modeling the scaled waveforms as a Fermi function is introduced. It ensures that system related constraints of maximum gradient amplitude and slew rate are not exceeded. The algorithm can be used to preserve the original RF pulse duration while minimizing SAR and peak b1 or to minimize the RF pulse duration. The design is general and can be applied to any symmetrical or asymmetrical RF waveform. The algorithm is demonstrated by using it to (a) minimize the SAR of a linear phase RF pulse, (b) minimize SAR of a hyperbolic secant RF pulse, and (c) minimize the duration of a linear phase RF pulse. Images with a T1-FLAIR (T1 FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery) sequence using a conventional and VERSE adiabatic inversion RF pulse are presented. Comparison of images and scan parameters for different anatomies and coils shows increased scan coverage and decreased SAR with the VERSE inversion RF pulse, while image quality is preserved.

  1. Hybrid polarity SAR architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. Keith

    2009-05-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs, reviews the associated advantages, formalizes conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  2. Occupational exposure assessment on an FM mast: electric field and SAR values.

    PubMed

    Valič, Blaž; Kos, Bor; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Electric field strengths normally exceed the reference levels for occupational exposure in close vicinity to large frequency modulation (FM) transmitters. Thus, a detailed investigation on compliance with basic restrictions is needed before any administrative protection measures are applied. We prepared a detailed numerical model of a 20-kW FM transmitter on a 32-m mast. An electrically isolated anatomical human model was placed in 3 different positions inside the mast in the region where the values of the electric field were highest. The electric field strengths in this region were up to 700 V/m. The highest calculated whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) was 0.48 W/kg, whereas the maximum 10-g average SAR in the head and trunk was 1.66 W/kg. The results show that the reference levels in the FM frequency range are very conservative for near field exposure. SAR values are not exceeded even for fields 10 times stronger than the reference levels.

  3. SAR Characterization of Focused Planar Array of Water-Loaded Modified Box-Horns for Hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ramesh Chandra; Singh, S. P.

    2006-02-01

    A 4×4 planar array of modified box-horns as a microwave hyperthermia applicator is theoretically studied to characterize power deposition (SAR) in heating tissue (muscle) at 2450 MHz. A modified box-horn is a novel improved version of conventional box-horn in which horn exciting the box waveguide is flared in both E-and H-planes. Modified box-horn supports TE10 and TE30 modes. The amplitude distribution over the H-plane of the box-horn aperture is a closer approximation to the uniform distribution. It is proposed that the interior of the box-horn be filled with water to provide a better impedance match to biological tissue. By applying Fresnel-Kirchhoff scalar diffraction field theory, the expression for electric field in heating region is derived and distribution of specific absorption rate (SAR) in that region due to planar array of modified box-horns as direct contact applicator is evaluated at 2450 MHz. The results of modified box-horn array are compared with those of a single modified box-horn operating at the same frequency. Results demonstrate that planar array of modified box-horns offers improvement in SAR distribution and penetration depth. It is shown that by changing the phase and amplitude of excitation of the modified box-horns of the array, the relative amplitude and position of the hot spot can be changed. The present analysis is validated through the results obtained by plane wave spectral technique.

  4. Validation of experimental whole-body SAR assessment method in a complex indoor environment.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Aliou; Joseph, Wout; Vermeeren, Gunter; Tanghe, Emmeric; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Andersen, Jørgen B; Nielsen, Jesper Ødum; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Experimentally assessing the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR(wb) ) in a complex indoor environment is very challenging. An experimental method based on room electromagnetics theory (accounting only the line-of-sight as specular path) is validated using numerical simulations with the finite-difference time-domain method. Furthermore, the method accounts for diffuse multipath components (DMC) in the total absorption rate by considering the reverberation time of the investigated room, which describes all the losses in a complex indoor environment. The advantage of the proposed method is that it allows discarding the computational burden because it does not use any discretizations. Results show good agreement between measurement and computation at 2.8 GHz, as long as the plane wave assumption is valid, that is, at large distances from the transmitter. Relative deviations of 0.71% and 4% have been obtained for far-field scenarios, and 77.5% for the near field-scenario. The contribution of the DMC in the total absorption rate is also quantified here, which has never been investigated before. It is found that the DMC may represent an important part of the total absorption rate; its contribution may reach up to 90% for certain scenarios in an indoor environment.

  5. Polarization effects and multipolarization SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Imaging radar polarimeters are usually implemented using a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) approach to give a high resolution image in two dimensions: range and azimuth. For each pixel in the image a polarimetric SAR gives sufficient information to characterize the polarimetric scattering properties of the imaged area (or target) as seen by the radar. Using a polarimetric SAR system as opposed to a single-polarization SAR system provides significantly more information about the target scattering mechanisms and allows better discrimination between different types of surfaces. In these notes a brief overview of SAR polarimetry is offered. The notes are intended as a text to accompany a lecture on SAR polarimetry as part of an AGARD-NATO course. Covered in the notes are the following: the polarization properties of electromagnetic waves; the concepts of radar scattering and measuring radar backscatter with a SAR; polarization synthesis; scattering matrix, Stokes matrix, and covariance matrix representations of polarimetric SAR data; polarization signature plots; design and calibration of polarimetric SAR systems; polarization filtering for target detection; fitting a simple model to polarimetric SAR measurements of naturally occurring features; and supervised classification of polarimetric SAR data.

  6. Bistatic SAR: Proof of Concept.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Doren, Neall E.; Bacon, Terry A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Eichel, Paul H.; Jakowatz, Charles V,; Delaplain, Gilbert G.; Dubbert, Dale F.; Tise, Bertice L.; White, Kyle R.

    2014-10-01

    Typical synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) imaging employs a co-located RADAR transmitter and receiver. Bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. A bistatic SAR configuration allows for the transmitter and receiver(s) to be in a variety of geometric alignments. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) / New Mexico proposed the deployment of a ground-based RADAR receiver. This RADAR receiver was coupled with the capability of digitizing and recording the signal collected. SNL proposed the possibility of creating an image of targets the illuminating SAR observes. This document describes the developed hardware, software, bistatic SAR configuration, and its deployment to test the concept of a ground-based bistatic SAR. In the proof-of-concept experiments herein, the RADAR transmitter will be a commercial SAR satellite and the RADAR receiver will be deployed at ground level, observing and capturing RADAR ground/targets illuminated by the satellite system.

  7. Non-mass dependent photodissociation rates of ozone isotopologues from ab-initio absorption cross sections and experimental actinic flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndengué, Steve; Jost, Rémy; Gatti, Fabien; Schinke, Reinhard; Madronich, Sasha

    2010-05-01

    The absorption cross sections (XSs) of eighteen isotopologues of the ozone molecule have been calculated in the range of the Chappuis-Huggins-Hartley bands: 15000-55000 cm-1 with special emphasis to those of atmospheric interest: symmetric 16O3, 16O17O16O, and 16O18O16O and asymmetric 17O16O2 and 18O16O2. We have used the MCTDH code which is based on the time propagation of the X(0,0,0) ground state initial wavepacket on the excited state PESs. The XSs have been obtained as the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of this wavepacket. The calculations have been performed only for zero total angular momentum and the rotational structure has been modeled numerically. The isotopologue dependence of the overall XSs has been characterized differently in each of the three bands: in the Chappuis band (15000-27000 cm-1) and in the Hartley band (33000-55000 cm-1), the XSs are weakly structured and the isotopologue dependence is globally weak. In contrast, in the Huggins band (27000 to 33000 cm-1) the different XSs are highly structured and their peaks are significantly shifted from those of the 16O3 absolute XS which has been chosen as reference. The Hartley band of each isotopologue can be approximated by a bell shape envelop modeled by a modified Gaussian depending on only four parameters: amplitude, centre, width and asymmetry. The isotopologue dependence of the Hartley band resumes only into tiny differences between these parameters. The dependence of the Chappuis band is also weak. The isotopologue shifts of peaks in the Huggins bands induce a significant dependence of the photodissociation rates because these rates are the integral of the product of the XS by the actinic flux. Below 30 km, the actinic flux displays a tremendous attenuation in the range of the Hartley band because the solar flux is strongly absorbed by the stratospheric ozone, almost exclusively by the 16O3 isotopologue. This implies two consequences: a) the actinic flux reproduces

  8. Changes in ruminal volatile fatty acid production and absorption rate during the dry period and early lactation as affected by rate of increase of concentrate allowance.

    PubMed

    Dieho, K; Dijkstra, J; Schonewille, J T; Bannink, A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to study changes in volatile fatty acid (VFA) production using an isotope dilution technique, and changes in VFA fractional absorption rate (kaVFA) using a buffer incubation technique (BIT) during the dry period and early lactation, as affected by the postpartum (pp) rate of increase of concentrate allowance. The current results are complementary to previously reported changes on rumen papillae morphology from the same experiment. From 50 d antepartum to 80 d pp, VFA production rate was measured 5 times and kaVFA was measured 10 times in 12 rumen-cannulated Holstein Friesian cows. Cows had free access to a mixed ration, consisting of grass and corn silage, soybean meal, and (dry period only) chopped straw. Treatment consisted of either a rapid (RAP; 1.0 kg of DM/d; n=6) or gradual (GRAD; 0.25 kg of DM/d; n=6) increase of concentrate allowance (up to 10.9 kg of DM/d), starting at 4 d pp, aimed at creating a contrast in rumen-fermentable organic matter intake. For the BIT, rumen contents were evacuated, the rumen washed, and a standardized buffer fluid introduced [120 mM VFA, 60% acetic (Ac), 25% propionic (Pr), and 15% butyric (Bu) acid; pH 5.9 and Co-EDTA as fluid passage marker]. For the isotope dilution technique, a pulse-dose of (13)C-labeled Ac, Pr, and Bu and Co-EDTA as fluid passage marker was infused. The rate of total VFA production was similar between treatments and was 2 times higher during the lactation (114 mol/d) than the dry period (53 mol/d). Although papillae surface area at 16, 30, and 44 d pp was greater in RAP than GRAD, Bu and Ac production at these days did not differ between RAP and GRAD, whereas at 16 d pp RAP produced more Pr than GRAD. These results provide little support for the particular proliferative effects of Bu on papillae surface area. Similar to developments in papillae surface area in the dry period and early lactation, the kaVFA (per hour), measured using the BIT, decreased from 0.45 (Ac), 0

  9. Automated preprocessing of spaceborne SAR data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Wu, C.; Pang, A.

    1982-01-01

    An efficient algorithm has been developed for estimation of the echo phase delay in spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. This algorithm utilizes the spacecraft ephemeris data and the radar echo data to produce estimates of two parameters: (1) the centroid of the Doppler frequency spectrum f(d) and (2) the Doppler frequency rate. Results are presented from tests conducted with Seasat SAR data. The test data indicates that estimation accuracies of 3 Hz for f(d) and 0.3 Hz/sec for the Doppler frequency rate are attainable. The clutterlock and autofocus techniques used for estimation of f(d) and the Doppler frequency rate, respectively are discussed and the algorithm developed for optimal implementation of these techniques is presented.

  10. 3D SAR approach to IF SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Doug

    2000-08-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super- resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  11. Hospital Preparedness and SARS

    PubMed Central

    Wallington, Tamara; Rutledge, Tim; Mederski, Barbara; Rose, Keith; Kwolek, Sue; McRitchie, Donna; Ali, Azra; Wolff, Bryan; White, Diane; Glassman, Edward; Ofner, Marianna; Low, Don E.; Berger, Lisa; McGeer, Allison; Wong, Tom; Baron, David; Berall, Glenn

    2004-01-01

    On May 23, 2003, Toronto experienced the second phase of a severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. Ninety cases were confirmed, and >620 potential cases were managed. More than 9,000 persons had contact with confirmed or potential case-patients; many required quarantine. The main hospital involved during the second outbreak was North York General Hospital. We review this hospital’s response to, and management of, this outbreak, including such factors as building preparation and engineering, personnel, departmental workload, policies and documentation, infection control, personal protective equipment, training and education, public health, management and administration, follow-up of SARS patients, and psychological and psychosocial management and research. We also make recommendations for other institutions to prepare for future outbreaks, regardless of their origin. PMID:15200807

  12. SAR peculiarities, ambiguities and constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keydel, Wolfgang

    1992-08-01

    A synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is basically a coherent scatterometer that employs a coherent real aperture radar with highly sophisticated data evaluation and image processing capabilities. Therefore, the coherence of the system is very important; furthermore, the keypoints for SAR are data storage, evaluation, and processing. These facts entail peculiarities of SAR and special ambiguities which are different from those arising with real aperture radar (RAR). The objective of this paper is to point out the special peculiarities and ambiguities of SAR in comparison to the corresponding properties of RAR. Main topics in this connection are as follows: basic peculiarities like range dependency of signal to noise ratio; azimuth resolution; influence of platform velocity; range and azimuth ambiguities; pulse repetition frequency limitations; velocity effects; and phase error influence, on SAR-image, that can cause motion compensation problems. All these effects will be explained together with different contrast-equations between the target and clutter signals of SAR and RAR.

  13. Circular SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Douglas; Owirka, Gregory; Nichols, Howard; Scarborough, Steven

    2014-06-01

    We describe techniques for improving ground moving target indication (GMTI) performance in multi-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems. Our approach employs a combination of moving reference processing (MRP) to compensate for defocus of moving target SAR responses and space-time adaptive processing (STAP) to mitigate the effects of strong clutter interference. Using simulated moving target and clutter returns, we demonstrate focusing of the target return using MRP, and discuss the effect of MRP on the clutter response. We also describe formation of adaptive degrees of freedom (DOFs) for STAP filtering of MRP processed data. For the simulated moving target in clutter example, we demonstrate improvement in the signal to interference plus noise (SINR) loss compared to more standard algorithm configurations. In addition to MRP and STAP, the use of tracker feedback, false alarm mitigation, and parameter estimation techniques are also described. A change detection approach for reducing false alarms from clutter discretes is outlined, and processing of a measured data coherent processing interval (CPI) from a continuously orbiting platform is described. The results demonstrate detection and geolocation of a high-value target under track. The endoclutter target is not clearly visible in single-channel SAR chips centered on the GMTI track prediction. Detections are compared to truth data before and after geolocation using measured angle of arrival (AOA).

  14. Wetland InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.

    2006-12-01

    Wetlands are transition zones where the flow of water, the nutrient cycling, and the sun energy meet to produce a unique and very productive ecosystem. They provide critical habitat for a wide variety of plant and animal species, including the larval stages of many ocean fish. Wetlands also have a valuable economical importance, as they filter nutrients and pollutants from fresh water used by human and provide aquatic habitats for outdoor recreation, tourism, and fishing. Globally, many such regions are under severe environmental stress, mainly from urban development, pollution, and rising sea level. However, there is increasing recognition of the importance of these habitats, and mitigation and restoration activities have begun in a few regions. A key element in wetlands conservation, management, and restoration involves monitoring its hydrologic system, as the entire ecosystem depends on its water supply. Heretofore, hydrologic monitoring of wetlands are conducted by stage (water level) stations, which provide good temporal resolution, but suffer from poor spatial resolution, as stage station are typically distributed several, or even tens of kilometers, from one another. Wetland application of InSAR provides the needed high spatial resolution hydrological observations, complementing the high temporal resolution terrestrial observations. Although conventional wisdom suggests that interferometry does not work in vegetated areas, several studies have shown that both L- and C-band interferograms with short acquisition intervals (1-105 days) can maintain excellent coherence over wetlands. In this study we explore the usage of InSAR for detecting water level changes in various wetland environments around the world, including the Everglades (south Florida), Louisiana Coast (southern US), Chesapeake Bay (eastern US), Pantanal (Brazil), Okavango Delta (Botswana), and Lena Delta (Siberia). Our main study area is the Everglades wetland (south Florida), which is covered by

  15. Monomeric C-phycocyanin at room temperature and 77 K. Resolution of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the individual chromophores and the energy-transfer rate constants

    SciTech Connect

    Debreczeny, M.P.; Sauer, K. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA ); Zhou, J.; Bryant, D.A. )

    1993-09-23

    At both room temperature (RT) and 77 K, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the three individual chromophore types ([alpha][sub 84], [beta][sub 84], and [beta][sub 155]) found in monomeric C-phycocyanin ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]), isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, were resolved along with the rates of energy transfer between the chromophores. The cpcB/C155S mutant, whose PC is missing the [beta][sub 155] chromophore, was useful in effecting this resolution. At RT, the single broad peak in the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) was resolved into its three-component spectra by comparing the steady-state absorption spectra of the isolated wild-type [alpha] subunit of PC ([alpha][sup PC]) (containing only the [alpha][sub 84] chromophore) with those of the monomeric PCs isolated from the mutant strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) and the wild-type strain ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]). At 77 K, the visible region of the absorption spectrum of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) splits into two peaks. This partial resolution at 77 K of the chromophore spectra of ([alpha][sup PC][beta][sup PC]) when compared with the 77 K absorption spectra of [alpha][sup PC], [beta][sup PC], and ([alpha][sup PC][beta]*) provided a confirmation of our RT assignments of the chromophore absorption spectra. 38 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Enhancement of the dissolution rate and gastrointestinal absorption of pranlukast as a model poorly water-soluble drug by grinding with gelatin.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Takeda, Eri; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-01-22

    The effect of grinding with gelatin on the dissolution behavior and gastrointestinal absorption of a poorly water-soluble drug was evaluated using the antiasthmatic agent, pranlukast, as a model poorly water-soluble drug. A ground pranlukast-gelatin mixture was prepared by grinding equal quantities of pranlukast and gelatin. In the dissolution testing, the dissolution rate of pranlukast in the suspension of the ground pranlukast-gelatin mixture under conditions of pH 3.0, 5.0 and 7.0 was markedly faster than that in the suspension of pranlukast. According to powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis, the enhanced dissolution rate of pranlukast produced by grinding with gelatin was caused by changing the crystalline state of pranlukast into an amorphous state. In an animal experiment, the bioavailability of pranlukast following oral administration of the ground pranlukast-gelatin mixture to rats was threefold greater than that following administration of pranlukast. In the in vitro permeation experiment, the amount of permeated pranlukast through Caco-2 cell monolayers after application of the ground pranlukast-gelatin mixture was greater than that after application of pranlukast. These results suggest that the enhancement of the gastrointestinal absorption of pranlukast by grinding with gelatin is due to enhancement of the dissolution rate. Grinding a poorly water-soluble drug with gelatin is a useful method of enhancing its gastrointestinal absorption.

  17. SAR and thermal response effects of a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil in a magnetic induction sensor on a human head.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyi; Liu, Peiguo; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the radiation safety of a newly designed magnetic induction sensor. This novel magnetic induction sensor uses a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil (TAASC) as the exciter. A human head model with a real anatomical structure was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature change. Computer Simulation Technology (CST) was used to determine the values of the peak 10-g SAR under different operating parameters (current, frequency, horizontal distance between the excitation coil and the receiver coil, vertical distance between the top of the head model and the XOY plane, position of excitation coil, and volume of hemorrhage). Then, the highest response for the SAR and temperature rise was determined. The results showed that this new magnetic induction sensor is safe in the initial state; for safety reasons, the TAASC current should not exceed 4 A. The scalp tissue absorbed most of the electromagnetic energy. The TAASC's SAR/thermal performance was close to that of the circular coil.

  18. Statistical determination of whole-body average SARs in a 2 GHz whole-body exposure system for unrestrained pregnant and newborn rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqing; Wake, Kanako; Kawai, Hiroki; Watanabe, Soichi; Fujiwara, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    A 2 GHz whole-body exposure to rats over a multigeneration has been conducted as part of bio-effect research in Japan. In this study, the rats moved freely in the cage inside the exposure system. From observation of the activity of rats in the cage, we found that the rats do not stay in each position with uniform possibility. In order to determine the specific absorption rate (SAR) during the entire exposure period with high accuracy, we present a new approach to statistically determine the SAR level in an exposure system. First, we divided the rat cage in the exposure system into several small areas, and derived the fraction of time the rats spent in each small area based on the classification of the documentary photos of rat activity. Then, using the fraction of time spent in each small area as a weighting factor, we calculated the statistical characteristics of the whole-body average SAR for pregnant rats and young rats during the entire exposure period. As a result, this approach gave the statistical distribution as well as the corresponding mean value, median value and mode value for the whole-body SAR so that we can reasonably clarify the relationship between the exposure level and possible biological effect.

  19. Variability analysis of SAR from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for different adult and child models using finite-difference time-domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conil, E.; Hadjem, A.; Lacroux, F.; Wong, M. F.; Wiart, J.

    2008-03-01

    This paper deals with the variability of body models used in numerical dosimetry studies. Six adult anthropomorphic voxel models have been collected and used to build 5-, 8- and 12-year-old children using a morphing method respecting anatomical parameters. Finite-difference time-domain calculations of a specific absorption rate (SAR) have been performed for a range of frequencies from 20 MHz to 2.4 GHz for isolated models illuminated by plane waves. A whole-body-averaged SAR is presented as well as the average on specific tissues such as skin, muscles, fat or bones and the average on specific parts of the body such as head, legs, arms or torso. Results point out the variability of adult models. The standard deviation of whole-body-averaged SAR of adult models can reach 40%. All phantoms are exposed to the ICNIRP reference levels. Results show that for adults, compliance with reference levels ensures compliance with basic restrictions, but concerning children models involved in this study, the whole-body-averaged SAR goes over the fundamental safety limits up to 40%. For more information on this article, see medicalphysicsweb.org

  20. SAR and thermal response effects of a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil in a magnetic induction sensor on a human head.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziyi; Liu, Peiguo; Zhou, Dongming; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Liang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the radiation safety of a newly designed magnetic induction sensor. This novel magnetic induction sensor uses a two-arm Archimedean spiral coil (TAASC) as the exciter. A human head model with a real anatomical structure was used to calculate the specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature change. Computer Simulation Technology (CST) was used to determine the values of the peak 10-g SAR under different operating parameters (current, frequency, horizontal distance between the excitation coil and the receiver coil, vertical distance between the top of the head model and the XOY plane, position of excitation coil, and volume of hemorrhage). Then, the highest response for the SAR and temperature rise was determined. The results showed that this new magnetic induction sensor is safe in the initial state; for safety reasons, the TAASC current should not exceed 4 A. The scalp tissue absorbed most of the electromagnetic energy. The TAASC's SAR/thermal performance was close to that of the circular coil. PMID:26406030

  1. RF dosimetry: a comparison between power absorption of female and male numerical models from 0.1 to 4 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandrini, L.; Vaccari, A.; Malacarne, C.; Cristoforetti, L.; Pontalti, R.

    2004-11-01

    Realistic numerical models of human subjects and their surrounding environment represent the basic points of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic dosimetry. This also involves differentiating the human models in men and women, possibly with different body shapes and postures. In this context, the aims of this paper are, firstly, to propose a female dielectric anatomical model (fDAM) and, secondly, to compare the power absorption distributions of a male and a female model from 0.1 to 4 GHz. For realizing the fDAM, a magnetic resonance imaging tomographer to acquire images and a recent technique which avoids the discrete segmentation of body tissues into different types have been used. Simulations have been performed with the FDTD method by using a novel filtering-based subgridding algorithm. The latter is applied here for the first time to dosimetry, allowing an abrupt mesh refinement by a factor of up to 7. The results show that the whole-body-averaged specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) of the female model is higher than that of the male counterpart, mainly because of a thicker subcutaneous fat layer. In contrast, the maximum averaged SAR over 1 g (1gA-SAR) and 10 g (10gA-SAR) does not depend on gender, because it occurs in regions where no subcutaneous fat layer is present.

  2. Analytical SAR-GMTI principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, Mehrdad; Majumder, Uttam K.; Barnes, Christopher; Sobota, David; Minardi, Michael

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides analytical principles to relate the signature of a moving target to parameters in a SAR system. Our objective is to establish analytical tools that could predict the shift and smearing of a moving target in a subaperture SAR image. Hence, a user could identify the system parameters such as the coherent processing interval for a subaperture that is suitable to localize the signature of a moving target for detection, tracking and geolocating the moving target. The paper begins by outlining two well-known SAR data collection methods to detect moving targets. One uses a scanning beam in the azimuth domain with a relatively high PRF to separate the moving targets and the stationary background (clutter); this is also known as Doppler Beam Sharpening. The other scheme uses two receivers along the track to null the clutter and, thus, provide GMTI. We also present results on implementing our SAR-GMTI analytical principles for the anticipated shift and smearing of a moving target in a simulated code. The code would provide a tool for the user to change the SAR system and moving target parameters, and predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image for a scene that is composed of both stationary and moving targets. Hence, the SAR simulation and imaging code could be used to demonstrate the validity and accuracy of the above analytical principles to predict the properties of a moving target signature in a subaperture SAR image.

  3. Atypical SARS in Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Helen M.L.; Hui, K.P.; Lien, Christopher T.C.; Narendran, K.; Heng, B.H.; Ling, A.E.

    2004-01-01

    We describe an atypical presentation of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in a geriatric patient with multiple coexisting conditions. Interpretation of radiographic changes was confounded by cardiac failure, with resolution of fever causing delayed diagnosis and a cluster of cases. SARS should be considered even if a contact history is unavailable, during an ongoing outbreak. PMID:15030694

  4. Bounds and estimates for power absorption in two-dimensional highly lossy configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razansky, D.; Soldea, D. F.; Einziger, P. D.

    2004-06-01

    Electromagnetic power absorption in biological tissues has recently received due scientific and public attention, particularly, in the areas of cellular communication and hyperthermic treatments. While efficient numerical algorithms, such as the finite difference time domain technique and the method of moments, have been developed as to obtain accurate power distributions in complicated configurations, their physical interpretation and explicit dependence on problem's parameters are still difficult to achieve. In attempt to gain a clear insight into the electromagnetic power absorption mechanism as well as its estimation and relation to the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR), we have recently proposed an infinite-extent current-sheet model. Herein, the model is further extended by incorporating finite-extent sources, i.e., electric and magnetic line-sources, exciting a highly lossy semi-infinite half-space. This modification results in deeper insight and understanding of the crucially important parameters, commonly involved in realistic configurations, namely, bounds and estimates on the power absorption and radiation efficiencies, local and total SAR coupling coefficients, and effective absorption dimensions.

  5. Review of bats and SARS.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Fa; Shi, Zhengli; Zhang, Shuyi; Field, Hume; Daszak, Peter; Eaton, Bryan T

    2006-12-01

    Bats have been identified as a natural reservoir for an increasing number of emerging zoonotic viruses, including henipaviruses and variants of rabies viruses. Recently, we and another group independently identified several horseshoe bat species (genus Rhinolophus) as the reservoir host for a large number of viruses that have a close genetic relationship with the coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Our current research focused on the identification of the reservoir species for the progenitor virus of the SARS coronaviruses responsible for outbreaks during 2002-2003 and 2003-2004. In addition to SARS-like coronaviruses, many other novel bat coronaviruses, which belong to groups 1 and 2 of the 3 existing coronavirus groups, have been detected by PCR. The discovery of bat SARS-like coronaviruses and the great genetic diversity of coronaviruses in bats have shed new light on the origin and transmission of SARS coronaviruses.

  6. Review of Bats and SARS

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhengli; Zhang, Shuyi; Field, Hume; Daszak, Peter; Eaton, Bryan T.

    2006-01-01

    Bats have been identified as a natural reservoir for an increasing number of emerging zoonotic viruses, including henipaviruses and variants of rabies viruses. Recently, we and another group independently identified several horseshoe bat species (genus Rhinolophus) as the reservoir host for a large number of viruses that have a close genetic relationship with the coronavirus associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Our current research focused on the identification of the reservoir species for the progenitor virus of the SARS coronaviruses responsible for outbreaks during 2002–2003 and 2003–2004. In addition to SARS-like coronaviruses, many other novel bat coronaviruses, which belong to groups 1 and 2 of the 3 existing coronavirus groups, have been detected by PCR. The discovery of bat SARS-like coronaviruses and the great genetic diversity of coronaviruses in bats have shed new light on the origin and transmission of SARS coronaviruses. PMID:17326933

  7. Bistatic SAR: Imagery & Image Products.

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, David A.; Wahl, Daniel E.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

    2014-10-01

    While typical SAR imaging employs a co-located (monostatic) RADAR transmitter and receiver, bistatic SAR imaging separates the transmitter and receiver locations. The transmitter and receiver geometry determines if the scattered signal is back scatter, forward scatter, or side scatter. The monostatic SAR image is backscatter. Therefore, depending on the transmitter/receiver collection geometry, the captured imagery may be quite different that that sensed at the monostatic SAR. This document presents imagery and image products formed from captured signals during the validation stage of the bistatic SAR research. Image quality and image characteristics are discussed first. Then image products such as two-color multi-view (2CMV) and coherent change detection (CCD) are presented.

  8. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties. PMID:21571541

  9. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties.

  10. Comparison of SAR and induced current densities in adults and children exposed to electromagnetic fields from electronic article surveillance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Búrdalo, M.; Sanchis, A.; Martín, A.; Villar, R.

    2010-02-01

    Electronic article surveillance (EAS) devices are widely used in most stores as anti-theft systems. In this work, the compliance with international guidelines in the human exposure to these devices is analysed by using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. Two sets of high resolution numerical phantoms of different size (REMCOM/Hershey and Virtual Family), simulating adult and child bodies, are exposed to a 10 MHz pass-by panel-type EAS consisting of two overlapping current-carrying coils. Two different relative positions between the EAS and the body (frontal and lateral exposures), which imply the exposure of different parts of the body at different distances, have been considered. In all cases, induced current densities in tissues of the central nervous system and specific absorption rates (SARs) are calculated to be compared with the limits from the guidelines. Results show that induced current densities are lower in the case of adult models as compared with those of children in both lateral and frontal exposures. Maximum SAR values calculated in lateral exposure are significantly lower than those calculated in frontal exposure, where the EAS-body distance is shorter. Nevertheless, in all studied cases, with an EAS driving current of 4 A rms, maximum induced current and SAR values are below basic restrictions.

  11. FDTD calculations of SAR for child voxel models in different postures between 10 MHz and 3 GHz.

    PubMed

    Findlay, R P; Lee, A-K; Dimbylow, P J

    2009-08-01

    Calculations of specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed on the rescaled NORMAN 7-y-old voxel model and the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) child 7-y-old voxel model in the standing arms down, arms up and sitting postures. These calculations were for plane-wave exposure under isolated and grounded conditions between 10 MHz and 3 GHz. It was found that there was little difference at each resonant frequency between the whole-body averaged SAR values calculated for the NORMAN and ETRI 7-y-old models for each of the postures studied. However, when compared with the arms down posture, raising the arms increased the SAR by up to 25%. Electric field values required to produce the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers public basic restriction were calculated, and compared with reference levels for the different child models and postures. These showed that, under certain worst-case exposure conditions, the reference levels may not be conservative.

  12. Addition of sodium bicarbonate to either 1 or 2 feedings of colostrum replacer: effect on uptake and rate of absorption of immunoglobulin G in neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Cabral, R G; Kent, E J; Haines, D M; Erickson, P S

    2012-06-01

    Forty Holstein dairy calves were blocked by birth date and sex, and randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments within each block to elucidate the effect of feeding regimen and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO₃) supplementation on absorption of IgG from colostrum replacer (CR). Calves received CR containing 191.4 g of IgG fed either in 1 feeding at 0 h (within 45 min of birth), with or without 30 g of NaHCO₃, or in 2 feedings (127.6 g of IgG at 0 h, with or without 20 g of NaHCO₃, and 63.8 g of IgG at 6 h, with or without 10 g of NaHCO₃). The treatments were (1) 1 feeding of CR+0 g of NaHCO₃; (2) 1 feeding of CR+30 g of NaHCO₃; (3) 2 feedings of CR+0 g of NaHCO₃; and (4) 2 feedings of CR+30 g total of NaHCO₃. Only calves born with no dystocia were used on this study. Blood samples were taken at 0, 6, 12, 18, and 24h postpartum and were analyzed for IgG using a radial immunoassay. Results indicated that, individually, feeding regimen and NaHCO₃ treatments had no effect. However, the interaction was significant for 24-h IgG and area under the curve, and showed a trend for apparent efficiency of absorption. Absorption rate data indicated that, for calves fed within 45 min of birth, most IgG absorption occurred in the first 6 h after birth. From 6 to 12 h postpartum, IgG absorption started to decrease; however, IgG absorption remained higher for calves fed in a single feeding than in 2 feedings. These data indicated that NaHCO₃ may increase IgG absorption when calves are fed colostrum in a single feeding but is not beneficial when colostrum is fed in 2 feedings.

  13. InSAR Monitoring of Landslides using RADARSAT and Alos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhroy, V.; Pierre-Jean, A.; Pavlic, G.

    2009-05-01

    We present the results of InSAR monitoring of several landslides using RADARDAT, and ALOS satellites. InSAR techniques are increasingly being used in slope stability assessment. Our research has shown that differential InSAR and coherent target monitoring techniques using field corner reflectors are useful to monitor landslide activity along strategic transportation and energy corridors. The Mackenzie Valley in northern Canada is experiencing one of the highest rates on mean annual air temperature for any region in Canada, thereby triggering melting in the permafrost, which results in active layer detachment slides. There are approximately 2000 landslides along the proposed Mackenzie Valley pipeline route. In addition, the Trans Canada Highway in the Canadian Rockies are affected by several rock avalanches and slow retrogressive slides. The ALOS PALSAR InSAR results show that we can observe deformation on both vegetated and exposed rock areas on the Little Smokey slide and the Frank Slide. RADARSAT-1 InSAR images indicate the different level of activity of the slopes (large and small) during different periods of the year. RADARSAT-2 is providing the high resolution rapid revisit capabilities needed to continuously monitor these active slopes along Canadian strategic energy and transportation corridors. The information produced by our InSAR activity maps on various landslides are used to realign the pipeline route in sensitive permafrost areas, and to install slope stability measures along the Trans-Canada and Provincial Highways. Using these different satellites we are able to develop guidelines for more reliable uses of these SAR missions Keywords: InSAR, landslides, RADARSAT, ALOS .

  14. Anatomy of a SAR impulse response.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2007-08-01

    A principal measure of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image quality is the manifestation in the SAR image of a spatial impulse, that is, the SAR's Impulse Response (IPR). IPR requirements direct certain design decisions in a SAR. Anomalies in the IPR can point to specific anomalous behavior in the radar's hardware and/or software.

  15. [A study of absorption of energy of the extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in the rat skin by various dosimetric methods and approaches].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Sokolov, P A; Chemeris, N K

    2002-01-01

    Using experimental and theoretical methods of dosimetry, the energy absorption of extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (EHF EMR) in the skin of laboratory rats was analyzed. Specific absorption rate (SAR) in the skin was determined on the basis of both microthermometric measurements of initial rates of temperature rise in rat skin induced by the exposure and microcalorimetric measurements of specific heat of the skin. Theoretical calculations of SAR in the skin were performed with consideration for dielectric parameters of rat skin obtained from the measurements of the standing wave ratio upon reflection of electromagnetic waves from the skin surface and for the effective area of stationary overheating measured by infrared thermography. A numerical method was developed to determine electromagnetic wave energy reflected, absorbed, and transmitted in the model of flat layers. The algorithm of the method was realized in a computer program and used to calculate SAR in the skin on the basis of the complex dielectric constant of rat skin. The SAR values obtained from experimental measurements, theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are in good mutual correspondence and make about 220-280 W/kg at a frequency of 42.25 GHz and a power of 20 mW at the radiator output. The results obtained can be used for dosimetric supply of biomedical experiments on studying the physicochemical mechanisms of the biological effects of EHF EMR.

  16. On the effects of straight metallic jewellery on the specific absorption rates resulting from face-illuminating radio communication devices at popular cellular frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whittow, W. G.; Panagamuwa, C. J.; Edwards, R. M.; Vardaxoglou, J. C.

    2008-03-01

    This paper presents simulated and measured phantom results for the possible effects that head worn jewellery may have on the relative levels of energy absorbed in the human head with cellular enabled mobile communication devices. The FDTD electromagnetic code used with simple and complex anatomical mathematical phantoms was used to consider the interactions of metallic jewellery, heads and representative sources at 900 and 1800 MHz. Illuminated metallic pins of different lengths were positioned in front of the face. Initially, a homogenous phantom was used to understand the relative enhancement mechanisms. This geometry allowed the results to be validated with the industry standard DASY4 robot SAR measurement system related to the CENELEC head. Jewellery pins were then added to an anatomically realistic head. The relative increase in the 1 g and 10 g SAR, due to a pin with a length 0.4λ near the eyebrows of a complex, anatomically realistic head was approximately three times at 1800 MHz. Such pins increased the SAR averaged over a 1 g or 10 g mass by redistributing the energy absorbed inside the head and focusing this energy towards the area of the head nearest to the centre of the pin. Although, the pins increased the SAR, the SAR standards were not breached and the jewellery produced lower values than those of previous studies when the source was positioned close to the ear.

  17. Studies of ice sheet hydrology using SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bindschadler, R. A.; Vornberger, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of SAR data of the Greenland ice sheet in summer and winter suggest the use of SAR to monitor the temporal hydrology of ice sheets. Comparisons of each SAR data set with summer Landsat TM imagery show an areal-positive correlation with summer SAR data and a negative correlation with winter SAR data. It is proposed that the summer SAR data are most sensitive to the variable concentrations of free water in the surface snow and that the winter SAR data indicate variations in snow grain size.

  18. Enhanced Rates of Hydrogen Absorption Resulting from Oxidation of Pd and Internal Oxidation of Pd-Al Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1999-08-20

    The goal of this research was the determination of the relative rates before and after internal oxidation of Pd--Al alloys and oxidation (Pd) and this is independent of whether heat transfer is the rate-limiting step for the internally oxidized Pd--Al alloys rather than a more fundamental step.

  19. Prevalence of psychiatric morbidity and psychological adaptation of the nurses in a structured SARS caring unit during outbreak: a prospective and periodic assessment study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Su, Tung-Ping; Lien, Te-Cheng; Yang, Chih-Yi; Su, Yiet Ling; Wang, Jia-Horng; Tsai, Sing-Ling; Yin, Jeo-Chen

    2007-01-01

    To assess the rapidly changing psychological status of nurses during the acute phase of the 2003 SARS outbreak, we conducted a prospective and periodic evaluation of psychiatric morbidity and psychological adaptation among nurses in SARS units and non-SARS units. Nurse participants were from two SARS units (regular SARS [N=44] and SARS ICU [N=26]) and two non-SARS units (Neurology [N=15] and CCU [N=17]). Participants periodically self-evaluated their depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, sleep disturbance, attitude towards SARS and family support. Results showed that depression (38.5% vs. 3.1%) and insomnia (37% vs. 9.7%) were, respectively, greater in the SARS unit nurses than the non-SARS unit nurses. No difference between these two groups was found in the prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms (33% vs. 18.7%), yet, three unit subjects (SARS ICU, SARS regular and Neurology) had significantly higher rate than those in CCU (29.7% vs. 11.8%, respectively) (p<0.05). For the SARS unit nurses, significant reduction in mood ratings, insomnia rate and perceived negative feelings as well as increasing knowledge and understanding of SARS at the end of the study (all p<0.001) indicated that a gradual psychological adaptation had occurred. The adjustment of nurses in the more structured SARS ICU environment, where nurses care for even more severely ill patients, may have been as good or better than that of nurses in the regular SARS unit. Occurrence of psychiatric symptoms was linked to direct exposure to SARS patient care, previous mood disorder history, younger age and perceived negative feelings. Positive coping attitude and strong social and family support may have protected against acute stress. In conclusion, the psychological impact on the caring staffs facing future bio-disaster will be minimized with lowered risk factors and a safer and more structured work environment. PMID:16460760

  20. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W; Akens, Margarete K; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S

    2016-06-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  1. Dynamic absorption and scattering of water and hydrogel during high-repetition-rate (>100 MHz) burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser ablation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zuoming; Covarrubias, Andrés; Grindal, Alexander W.; Akens, Margarete K.; Lilge, Lothar; Marjoribanks, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    High-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation and disruption of biological tissues depends on interaction of each pulse with the sample, but under those particular conditions which persist from previous pulses. This work characterizes and compares the dynamics of absorption and scattering of a 133-MHz repetition-rate, burst-mode ultrafast-pulse laser, in agar hydrogel targets and distilled water. The differences in energy partition are quantified, pulse-by-pulse, using a time-resolving integrating-sphere-based device. These measurements reveal that high-repetition-rate burst-mode ultrafast-laser ablation is a highly dynamical process affected by the persistence of ionization, dissipation of plasma plume, neutral material flow, tissue tensile strength, and the hydrodynamic oscillation of cavitation bubbles. PMID:27375948

  2. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beckner, F. L.; Ahr, H. A.; Ausherman, D. A.; Cutrona, L. J.; Francisco, S.; Harrison, R. E.; Heuser, J. S.; Jordan, R. L.; Justus, J.; Manning, B.

    1978-01-01

    The available and optimal methods for generating SAR imagery for NASA applications were identified. The SAR image quality and data processing requirements associated with these applications were studied. Mathematical operations and algorithms required to process sensor data into SAR imagery were defined. The architecture of SAR image formation processors was discussed, and technology necessary to implement the SAR data processors used in both general purpose and dedicated imaging systems was addressed.

  3. Determination of drug absorption rate in time-variant disposition by direct deconvolution using beta clearance correction and end-constrained non-parametric regression.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, S; Veng-Pedersen, P

    2005-11-01

    A novel numerical deconvolution method is presented that enables the estimation of drug absorption rates under time-variant disposition conditions. The method involves two components. (1) A disposition decomposition-recomposition (DDR) enabling exact changes in the unit impulse response (UIR) to be constructed based on centrally based clearance changes iteratively determined. (2) A non-parametric, end-constrained cubic spline (ECS) input response function estimated by cross-validation. The proposed DDR-ECS method compensates for disposition changes between the test and the reference administrations by using a "beta" clearance correction based on DDR analysis. The representation of the input response by the ECS method takes into consideration the complex absorption process and also ensures physiologically realistic approximations of the response. The stability of the new method to noisy data was evaluated by comprehensive simulations that considered different UIRs, various input functions, clearance changes and a novel scaling of the input function that includes the "flip-flop" absorption phenomena. The simulated input response was also analysed by two other methods and all three methods were compared for their relative performances. The DDR-ECS method provides better estimation of the input profile under significant clearance changes but tends to overestimate the input when there were only small changes in the clearance.

  4. Geodetic imaging of tectonic deformation with InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, Heresh

    Precise measurements of ground deformation across the plate boundaries are crucial observations to evaluate the location of strain localization and to understand the pattern of strain accumulation at depth. Such information can be used to evaluate the possible location and magnitude of future earthquakes. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) potentially can deliver small-scale (few mm/yr) ground displacement over long distances (hundreds of kilometers) across the plate boundaries and over continents. However, Given the ground displacement as our signal of interest, the InSAR observations of ground deformation are usually affected by several sources of systematic and random noises. In this dissertation I identify several sources of systematic and random noise, develop new methods to model and mitigate the systematic noise and to evaluate the uncertainty of the ground displacement measured with InSAR. I use the developed approach to characterize the tectonic deformation and evaluate the rate of strain accumulation along the Chaman fault system, the western boundary of the India with Eurasia tectonic plates. I evaluate the bias due to the topographic residuals in the InSAR range-change time-series and develope a new method to estimate the topographic residuals and mitigate the effect from the InSAR range-change time-series (Chapter 2). I develop a new method to evaluate the uncertainty of the InSAR velocity field due to the uncertainty of the satellite orbits (Chapter 3) and a new algorithm to automatically detect and correct the phase unwrapping errors in a dense network of interferograms (Chapter 4). I develop a new approach to evaluate the impact of systematic and stochastic components of the tropospheric delay on the InSAR displacement time-series and its uncertainty (Chapter 5). Using the new InSAR time-series approach developed in the previous chapters, I study the tectonic deformation across the western boundary of the India plate with Eurasia and

  5. Earth observing SAR data processing systems at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory - Seasat to EOS SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, David A.; Curlander, John C.

    1991-01-01

    The evolution of SAR digital data processing and management ground systems developed at the JPL for earth science missions is discussed. Attention is given to the SAR ground data system requirements, the early data processing systems, the Seasat SAR system, and the SIR-B data processing system. Special consideration is given to two currently operational SAR data systems: the JPL aircraft SAR processing system that flies on the NASA DC-8 and the Alaska SAR Facility at Fairbanks.

  6. Analysis of three-dimensional SAR distributions emitted by mobile phones in an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Deltour, Isabelle; Wiart, Joe; Taki, Masao; Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Mann, Simon; Schüz, Joachim; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the specific absorption rate of energy (SAR) in phantom models was analysed to detect clusters of mobile phones producing similar spatial deposition of energy in the head. The clusters' characteristics were described from the phones external features, frequency band and communication protocol. Compliance measurements with phones in cheek and tilt positions, and on the left and right side of a physical phantom were used. Phones used the Personal Digital Cellular (PDC), Code division multiple access One (CdmaOne), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) communication systems, in the 800, 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz bands. Each phone's measurements were summarised by the half-ellipsoid in which the SAR values were above half the maximum value. Cluster analysis used the Partitioning Around Medoids algorithm. The dissimilarity measure was based on the overlap of the ellipsoids, and the Manhattan distance was used for robustness analysis. Within the 800 MHz frequency band, and in part within the 900 MHz and the 1800 MHz frequency bands, weak clustering was obtained for the handset shape (bar phone, flip with top and flip with central antennas), but only in specific positions (tilt or cheek). On measurements of 120 phones, the three-dimensional distribution of SAR in phantom models did not appear to be related to particular external phone characteristics or measurement characteristics, which could be used for refining the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency energy within the brain in epidemiological studies such as the Interphone.

  7. Analysis of three-dimensional SAR distributions emitted by mobile phones in an epidemiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Deltour, Isabelle; Wiart, Joe; Taki, Masao; Wake, Kanako; Varsier, Nadège; Mann, Simon; Schüz, Joachim; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2011-12-01

    The three-dimensional distribution of the specific absorption rate of energy (SAR) in phantom models was analysed to detect clusters of mobile phones producing similar spatial deposition of energy in the head. The clusters' characteristics were described from the phones external features, frequency band and communication protocol. Compliance measurements with phones in cheek and tilt positions, and on the left and right side of a physical phantom were used. Phones used the Personal Digital Cellular (PDC), Code division multiple access One (CdmaOne), Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) and Nordic Mobile Telephony (NMT) communication systems, in the 800, 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz bands. Each phone's measurements were summarised by the half-ellipsoid in which the SAR values were above half the maximum value. Cluster analysis used the Partitioning Around Medoids algorithm. The dissimilarity measure was based on the overlap of the ellipsoids, and the Manhattan distance was used for robustness analysis. Within the 800 MHz frequency band, and in part within the 900 MHz and the 1800 MHz frequency bands, weak clustering was obtained for the handset shape (bar phone, flip with top and flip with central antennas), but only in specific positions (tilt or cheek). On measurements of 120 phones, the three-dimensional distribution of SAR in phantom models did not appear to be related to particular external phone characteristics or measurement characteristics, which could be used for refining the assessment of exposure to radiofrequency energy within the brain in epidemiological studies such as the Interphone. PMID:21695709

  8. Landslide Mapping Using SqueeSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, A.; Bellotti, F.; Alberti, S.; Allievi, J.; Del Conte, S.; Tamburini, A.; Broccolato, M.; Ratto, S.; Alberto, W.

    2011-12-01

    SqueeSAR represents the most recent advancement of PSInSAR algorithm. By exploiting signal radar returns both from Permanent and Distributed Scatterers (PS and DS), it is able to detect millimetre displacements over long periods and large areas and to obtain a significant increase in the spatial density of ground measurement points. SqueeSAR analysis is complementary to conventional geological and geomorphological studies in landslide mapping over wide areas, traditionally based on aerial-photo interpretation and field surveys. However, whenever surface displacement rates are low (mm to cm per year), assessing landslide activity is difficult or even impossible without a long-term monitoring tool, as in the case of Deep-seated Gravitational Slope Deformations (DGSD), typically characterized by large areal extent and subtle surface displacement. The availability of surface displacement time series per each measurement point allows one to have both a synoptic overview, at regional scale, as well as an in depth characterization of the instability phenomena analyzed, a meaningful support to the design of traditional monitoring networks and the efficiency testing of remedial works. When data archives are available, SqueeSAR can also provide valuable information before the installation of any terrestrial measurement system. The Italian authorities increasing interest in the application of SqueeSAR as a standard monitoring tool to help hydrogeological risk assessment, resulted in a national project, Piano Straordinario di Telerilevamento (PST), founded by the Ministry of the Environment. The aim of the project was to create the first interferometric database on a national scale for mapping unstable areas. More than 12,000 ERS and ENVISAT radar scenes acquired over Italy were processed spanning the period 1992-2010, proving that, in less than ten years, radar interferometry has become a standard monitoring tool. Recently, many regional governments in Italy have applied

  9. TerraSAR-X mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werninghaus, Rolf

    2004-01-01

    The TerraSAR-X is a German national SAR- satellite system for scientific and commercial applications. It is the continuation of the scientifically and technologically successful radar missions X-SAR (1994) and SRTM (2000) and will bring the national technology developments DESA and TOPAS into operational use. The space segment of TerraSAR-X is an advanced high-resolution X-Band radar satellite. The system design is based on a sound market analysis performed by Infoterra. The TerraSAR-X features an advanced high-resolution X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar based on the active phased array technology which allows the operation in Spotlight-, Stripmap- and ScanSAR Mode with various polarizations. It combines the ability to acquire high resolution images for detailed analysis as well as wide swath images for overview applications. In addition, experimental modes like the Dual Receive Antenna Mode allow for full-polarimetric imaging as well as along track interferometry, i.e. moving target identification. The Ground Segment is optimized for flexible response to (scientific and commercial) User requests and fast image product turn-around times. The TerraSAR-X mission will serve two main goals. The first goal is to provide the strongly supportive scientific community with multi-mode X-Band SAR data. The broad spectrum of scientific application areas include Hydrology, Geology, Climatology, Oceanography, Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Monitoring as well as Cartography (DEM Generation) and Interferometry. The second goal is the establishment of a commercial EO-market in Europe which is driven by Infoterra. The commercial goal is the development of a sustainable EO-business so that the e.g. follow-on systems can be completely financed by industry from the profit. Due to its commercial potential, the TerraSAR-X project will be implemented based on a public-private partnership with the Astrium GmbH. This paper will describe first the mission objectives as well as the

  10. In vitro hyperthermia with improved colloidal stability and enhanced SAR of magnetic core/shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Patil, R M; Thorat, N D; Shete, P B; Otari, S V; Tiwale, B M; Pawar, S H

    2016-02-01

    Magnetic core/shell nanostructures of Fe3O4 nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and betaine-HCl were studied for their possible use in magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). Their colloidal stability and heat induction ability were studied in different media viz. phosphate buffer solution (PBS), saline solution and glucose solution with different physiological conditions and in human serum. The results showed enhanced colloidal stability in these media owing to their high zeta potential values. Heat induction studies showed that specific absorption rates (SAR) of core/shells were 82-94W/g at different pH of PBS and concentrations of NaCl and glucose. Interestingly, core/shells showed 78.45±3.90W/g SAR in human serum. The cytotoxicity of core/shells done on L929 and HeLa cell lines using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and trypan blue dye exclusion assays showed >89% and >80% cell viability for 24 and 48h respectively. Core/shell structures were also found to be very efficient for in vitro MFH on cancer cell line. About 95% cell death was occurred in 90min after hyperthermia treatment. The mechanism of cell death was found to be elevated ROS generation in cells after exposure to core/shells in external magnetic field. This study showed that these core/shells have a great potential to be used in in vivo MFH. PMID:26652424

  11. Diffusion coefficients significant in modeling the absorption rate of carbon dioxide into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine and diethanolamine and of hydrogen sulfide into aqueous N-methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.E.; Marshall, T.L.; Rowley, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Absorption rates of gaseous CO{sub 2} into aqueous blends of N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and diethanolamine (DEA) and of gaseous H{sub 2}S into aqueous MDEA were measured in a quiescent, inverted-tube diffusiometer by monitoring the rate of pressure drop. A numerical model for absorption, diffusion, and reaction of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S in blends of MDEA, DEA, and water was developed. The model was used to regress diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for the case of CO{sub 2} absorption and of bisulfide ion for the case of H{sub 2}S absorption from measured absorption rates. CO{sub 2} absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bicarbonate, carbamate, and MDEAH{sub 2}CO{sub 3} were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 50 mass % total amine at DEA:MDEA mole ratios of 1:20, 1:4, 1L3, and 2:3. H{sub 2}S absorption rates and diffusion coefficients of bisulfide ion were obtained at 298.2 K and 318.2 K in aqueous solutions containing 20, 35, and 50 mass % MDEA.

  12. Multiresolution analysis of SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The 'Multiresolution Analysis of SAR Data' program supported research work in five areas. Geometric hashing theory can now be viewed as a Bayesian approach to object recognition. False alarm rates can be greatly reduced by using certain enhancements and modifications developed under this project. Geometric hashing algorithms now exist for the Connection Machine. Recognition of synthetically-produced dot arrays was demonstrated using a model base of 1024 objects. The work represents a substantial advance over existing model-based vision capabilities. Algorithms were developed for determining the translation and rotation of a sensor given only the image flow field data. These are new algorithms, and are much more stable than existing computer vision algorithms for this task. The algorithms might provide independent verification of gyroscopic data, or might be used to compute relative motion with respect to a moving scene object, or may be useful for motion-based segmentation. Our theories explaining the Dempster/Shafer calculus and developing new uncertainty reasoning calculi were extended, and presented at a conference and were incorporated into the Bayesian interpretation of geometric hashing. 'Wavelet Slice Theorem' was developed in several different versions, any of which yields an alternate approach to image formation. The result may well provide a more stable approach to image formation than the standard Fourier-based projection slide theorem, since interpolation of unknown spectra values is better-founded.

  13. Crystal structure of the SarS protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ronggui; Manna, Adhar C; Dai, Shaodong; Cheung, Ambrose L; Zhang, Gongyi

    2003-07-01

    The expression of virulence determinants in Staphylococcus aureus is controlled by global regulatory loci (e.g., sarA and agr). One of these determinants, protein A (spa), is activated by sarS, which encodes a 250-residue DNA-binding protein. Genetic analysis indicated that the agr locus likely mediates spa repression by suppressing the transcription of sarS. Contrary to SarA and SarR, which require homodimer formation for proper function, SarS is unusual within the SarA protein family in that it contains two homologous halves, with each half sharing sequence similarity to SarA and SarR. Here we report the 2.2 A resolution X-ray crystal structure of the SarS protein. SarS has folds similar to those of SarR and, quite plausibly, the native SarA structure. Two typical winged-helix DNA-binding domains are connected by a well-ordered loop. The interactions between the two domains are extensive and conserved. The putative DNA-binding surface is highly positively charged. In contrast, negatively charged patches are located opposite to the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, sequence alignment and structural comparison revealed that MarR has folds similar to those of SarR and SarS. Members of the MarR protein family have previously been implicated in the negative regulation of an efflux pump involved in multiple antibiotic resistance in many gram-negative species. We propose that MarR also belongs to the winged-helix protein family and has a similar mode of DNA binding as SarR and SarS and possibly the entire SarA protein family member. Based on the structural differences of SarR, SarS, and MarR, we further classified these winged-helix proteins to three subfamilies, SarA, SarS, and MarR. Finally, a possible transcription regulation mechanism is proposed.

  14. The effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evelyn; Ho, Khoy Kheng

    2006-07-01

    From early March 2003 to late May 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was detected in Singapore. The increase in workload and new infection control procedures were thought to affect resuscitation and airway management. Our aim was to study the effects of wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) and the restriction in the number of resuscitation personnel on airway management during the SARS crisis. Data was collected prospectively through an ongoing emergency airway registry. The data was divided into three periods: (1) before PPE was instituted from 1 November 2002 to 31 March 2003; (2) during SARS (when PPE use was mandatory) from 1 April to 31 July 2003; (3) post-SARs (when PPE use was non-mandatory but encouraged) from 1 August to 31 March 2004. There was no change in patient demographics during the three periods. There were significant increases in the proportion of resuscitation cases and airway interventions during the SARS period compared to the pre-SARS period. The resident medical officer intubation rate decreased from 45.1% pre-SARS to 35.2% during SARS and 17.7% post-SARS. The complication rates were 10.5%, 9.9% and 9.4% in periods 1-3, respectively. Restriction in the number of healthcare staff attending to each patient may have influenced the department's decision to allow only the most confident or experienced personnel to manage the airway. The exposure of junior medical officers in emergency airway management during SARS and the immediate post-SARS period was decreased. This trend should be monitored further and intervention may be necessary should it continue to decline. PMID:16762480

  15. The effect of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) on emergency airway management.

    PubMed

    Wong, Evelyn; Ho, Khoy Kheng

    2006-07-01

    From early March 2003 to late May 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was detected in Singapore. The increase in workload and new infection control procedures were thought to affect resuscitation and airway management. Our aim was to study the effects of wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) and powered air-purifying respirator (PAPR) and the restriction in the number of resuscitation personnel on airway management during the SARS crisis. Data was collected prospectively through an ongoing emergency airway registry. The data was divided into three periods: (1) before PPE was instituted from 1 November 2002 to 31 March 2003; (2) during SARS (when PPE use was mandatory) from 1 April to 31 July 2003; (3) post-SARs (when PPE use was non-mandatory but encouraged) from 1 August to 31 March 2004. There was no change in patient demographics during the three periods. There were significant increases in the proportion of resuscitation cases and airway interventions during the SARS period compared to the pre-SARS period. The resident medical officer intubation rate decreased from 45.1% pre-SARS to 35.2% during SARS and 17.7% post-SARS. The complication rates were 10.5%, 9.9% and 9.4% in periods 1-3, respectively. Restriction in the number of healthcare staff attending to each patient may have influenced the department's decision to allow only the most confident or experienced personnel to manage the airway. The exposure of junior medical officers in emergency airway management during SARS and the immediate post-SARS period was decreased. This trend should be monitored further and intervention may be necessary should it continue to decline.

  16. Polymorphism of SARS-CoV genomes.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lei; Qi, Yan; Bao, Qi-Yu; Tian, Wei; Xu, Jian-Cheng; Feng, Ming-Guang; Yang, Huan-Ming

    2006-04-01

    In this work, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) genome BJ202 (AY864806) was completely sequenced. The genome was directly accessed from the stool sample of a patient in Beijing. Comparative genomics methods were used to analyze the sequence variations of 116 SARS-CoV genomes (including BJ202) available in the NCBI GenBank. With the genome sequence of GZ02 as the reference, there were 41 polymorphic sites identified in BJ202 and a total of 278 polymorphic sites present in at least two of the 116 genomes. The distribution of the polymorphic sites was biased over the whole genome. Nearly half of the variations (50.4%, 140/278) clustered in the one third of the whole genome at the 3' end (19.0 kb-29.7 kb). Regions encoding Orf10-11, Orf3/4, E, M and S protein had the highest mutation rates. A total of 15 PCR products (about 6.0 kb of the genome) including 11 fragments containing 12 known polymorphic sites and 4 fragments without identified polymorphic sites were cloned and sequenced. Results showed that 3 unique polymorphic sites of BJ202 (positions 13 804, 15 031 and 20 792) along with 3 other polymorphic sites (26 428, 26 477 and 27 243) all contained 2 kinds of nucleotides. It is interesting to find that position 18379 which has not been identified to be polymorphic in any of the other 115 published SARS-CoV genomes is actually a polymorphic site. The nucleotide composition of this site is A (8) to G (6). Among 116 SARS-CoV genomes, 18 types of deletions and 2 insertions were identified. Most of them were related to a 300 bp region (27,700-28,000) which encodes parts of the putative ORF9 and ORF10-11. A phylogenetic tree illustrating the divergence of whole BJ202 genome from 115 other completely sequenced SARS-CoVs was also constructed. BJ202 was phylogeneticly closer to BJ01 and LLJ-2004. PMID:16625834

  17. Interferometric SAR to EO image registration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, George W.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Rais, Houra

    2000-08-01

    Historically, SAR to EO registration accuracy has been at the multiple pixel level compared to sub-pixel EO to EO registration accuracies. This is due to a variety of factors including the different scattering characteristics of the ground for EO and SAR, SAR speckle, and terrain induced geometric distortion. One approach to improving the SAR to EO registration accuracy is to utilize the full information from multiple SAR surveys using interferometric techniques. In this paper we will examine this problem in detail with an example using ERS SAR imagery. Estimates of the resulting accuracy based on ERS are included.

  18. The impact of SARS on a tertiary care pediatric emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Boutis, Kathy; Stephens, Derek; Lam, Kelvin; Ungar, Wendy J.; Schuh, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Background The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) was considered a “hot zone” for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in 2003. In accordance with mandated city-wide infection control measures, the Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) drastically reduced all services while maintaining a fully operational emergency department. Because of the GTA health service suspensions and the overlap of SARS-like symptoms with many common childhood illnesses, this introduced the potential for a change in the volumes of patients visiting the emergency department of the only regional tertiary care children's hospital. Methods We compared HSC emergency department patient volumes, admission rates and length of stay in the emergency department in the baseline years of 2000–2002 (non-SARS years) with those in 2003 (SARS year). The data from the prior years were modeled as a time series. Using an interrupted time series analysis, we compared the 2003 data for the periods before, during and after the SARS periods with the modeled data for significant differences in the 3 aforementioned outcomes of interest. Results Compared with the 2000–2002 data, we found no differences in visits, admission rates or length of stay in the pre-SARS period in 2003. There were significant decreases in visits and length of stay (p < 0.001) and increases in admission rates (p < 0.001) during the periods in 2003 when there were new and active cases of SARS in the GTA. All 3 outcomes returned to expected estimates coincident with the absence of SARS cases from September to December 2003. Interpretation During the SARS outbreak in the GTA, the HSC emergency department experienced significantly reduced volumes of patients with low-acuity complaints. This gives insight into utilization rates of a pediatric emergency department during a time when there was additional perceived risk in using emergency department services and provides a foundation for emergency department preparedness policies for SARS-like public

  19. Surface deformation of Taipei basin detected by Differential SAR Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Chang, C.; Yen, J.; Lin, M.

    2006-12-01

    Taiwan island is located between the southeastern periphery of the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea plate. The two converging plates produced very active tectonics, and can be seen by the high seismicity and deformation rate. Taipei, the highest populated area, center of politics, and economics in Taiwan, is in Taipei basin at the northern part of the island. There are several faults in and surrounding the basin, and the city is threatened with a high geological hazard potential that we should keep monitoring the crustal deformation to prevent and mitigate the disaster effect. The aims of our study is to apply the DInSAR technique to determine the surface deformation of Taipei basin area, and discussing the relation between the manifestation of deformation and the tectonically active region, Shanjiao fault. In the past few years, Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) has been proved to be a powerful technique for monitoring the neotectonic activities and natural hazards. High spatial sampling rate of DInSAR technique allows studies of surface deformations with centimeter accuracy. In this area, we used ERS-1/2 SAR images acquired from 1993 to 2005 to generate 10 differential interferograms and processed the data using DIAPASON developed by CNES and SRTM global DEM.From our results, the deformation rate in Taipei is generally high in the western end of the basin along the Shanjiao fault and decrease eastward, while the subsidence center often appeared in the center of the Taipei basin. The neotectonic activity of the Shanjiao fault appeared to be insignificant by itself but it seemed to separate the subsiding basin from the surrounding areas. Further comparison between our DInSAR results and isopach of the Taipei basin revealed that the subsidence centers appeared in the interferograms did not coincide with the location where the sediments are thickest. Our results from differential interferometry will be compared to other geodetic measurements such as the

  20. A TACSAT SAR concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, C. D.; Baker, C. J.; Keyte, G. E.; Murphy, L. M.

    1993-02-01

    The payload concept covered is that of a low cost, high performance radar sensor capable of detecting and recognizing static objects within an imaged scene of the Earth's surface using the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technique. The overall system is integrated with a TACSAT platform in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and, although only passing reference is made to this feature, the radar could also have a capability for the detection of Ground Moving Targets (GMTI). A parametric review of such a sensor in the light of the target and background features to be observed is provided. A design concept is included showing the possible hardware realization of a candidate system, as well as budgets for the mass, size, power, and pointing requirements of the instrument. Additional design features considered are the influence that short duration missions may have on hardware redundancy and the effect of short, low duty-cycle observation periods on solar array and battery sizing. The way towards a low cost R and D demonstrator system allowing a practical investigation of the key techniques and technologies is addressed.

  1. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (<1500 K). The current-reflected shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data. PMID:27380878

  2. Measuring the Absorption Rate of CO2 in Nonaqueous CO2-Binding Organic Liquid Solvents with a Wetted-Wall Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paul M; Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J; Zwoster, Andy; Whyatt, Greg; Freeman, Charles M; Bearden, Mark D; Koech, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of the absorption of CO2 into two nonaqueous CO2-binding organic liquid (CO2 BOL) solvents were measured at T=35, 45, and 55 °C with a wetted-wall column. Selected CO2 loadings were run with a so-called "first-generation" CO2 BOL, comprising an independent base and alcohol, and a "second-generation" CO2 BOL, in which the base and alcohol were conjoined. Liquid-film mass-transfer coefficient (k'g ) values for both solvents were measured to be comparable to values for monoethanolamine and piperazine aqueous solvents under a comparable driving force, in spite of far higher solution viscosities. An inverse temperature dependence of the k'g value was also observed, which suggests that the physical solubility of CO2 in organic liquids may be making CO2 mass transfer faster than expected. Aspen Plus software was used to model the kinetic data and compare the CO2 absorption behavior of nonaqueous solvents with that of aqueous solvent platforms. This work continues our development of the CO2 BOL solvents. Previous work established the thermodynamic properties related to CO2 capture. The present paper quantitatively studies the kinetics of CO2 capture and develops a rate-based model.

  3. Influence of the oral dissolution time on the absorption rate of locally administered solid formulations for oromucosal use: the flurbiprofen lozenges paradigm.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Roberto; De Gregori, Simona; Lisi, Lucia; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Flurbiprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent preferentially used for local oromucosal treatment of painful and/or inflammatory conditions of the oropharynx such as gingivitis, stomatitis, periodontitis, pharyngitis and laryngitis. In this study, we have investigated the bioavailability of a new generic formulation of flurbiprofen lozenges developed by Epifarma Srl, compared to the originator Benactiv Gola® taken as reference. Within the framework of a formal bioequivalence study, we investigated in particular the putative influence of oral dissolution time (i.e. the time spent suckling the lozenge from its intake to complete dissolution) on the absorption rate, and the contribution of this factor to the total variability of plasma flurbiprofen during absorption. We found that the amount of flurbiprofen absorbed into the systemic circulation is not significantly higher for the test drug compared to that of the reference product. We observed that the length of oral dissolution time is inversely correlated to 10-min flurbiprofen plasma levels in the test but not in the reference formulation. We estimated that oral dissolution time accounts for about 14% of overall variability in flurbiprofen plasma 10 min after test drug administration.

  4. Measuring the Absorption Rate of CO2 in Nonaqueous CO2-Binding Organic Liquid Solvents with a Wetted-Wall Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Paul M; Zheng, Feng; Heldebrant, David J; Zwoster, Andy; Whyatt, Greg; Freeman, Charles M; Bearden, Mark D; Koech, Phillip

    2015-11-01

    The kinetics of the absorption of CO2 into two nonaqueous CO2-binding organic liquid (CO2 BOL) solvents were measured at T=35, 45, and 55 °C with a wetted-wall column. Selected CO2 loadings were run with a so-called "first-generation" CO2 BOL, comprising an independent base and alcohol, and a "second-generation" CO2 BOL, in which the base and alcohol were conjoined. Liquid-film mass-transfer coefficient (k'g ) values for both solvents were measured to be comparable to values for monoethanolamine and piperazine aqueous solvents under a comparable driving force, in spite of far higher solution viscosities. An inverse temperature dependence of the k'g value was also observed, which suggests that the physical solubility of CO2 in organic liquids may be making CO2 mass transfer faster than expected. Aspen Plus software was used to model the kinetic data and compare the CO2 absorption behavior of nonaqueous solvents with that of aqueous solvent platforms. This work continues our development of the CO2 BOL solvents. Previous work established the thermodynamic properties related to CO2 capture. The present paper quantitatively studies the kinetics of CO2 capture and develops a rate-based model. PMID:26377774

  5. Influence of the oral dissolution time on the absorption rate of locally administered solid formulations for oromucosal use: the flurbiprofen lozenges paradigm.

    PubMed

    Imberti, Roberto; De Gregori, Simona; Lisi, Lucia; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Flurbiprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent preferentially used for local oromucosal treatment of painful and/or inflammatory conditions of the oropharynx such as gingivitis, stomatitis, periodontitis, pharyngitis and laryngitis. In this study, we have investigated the bioavailability of a new generic formulation of flurbiprofen lozenges developed by Epifarma Srl, compared to the originator Benactiv Gola® taken as reference. Within the framework of a formal bioequivalence study, we investigated in particular the putative influence of oral dissolution time (i.e. the time spent suckling the lozenge from its intake to complete dissolution) on the absorption rate, and the contribution of this factor to the total variability of plasma flurbiprofen during absorption. We found that the amount of flurbiprofen absorbed into the systemic circulation is not significantly higher for the test drug compared to that of the reference product. We observed that the length of oral dissolution time is inversely correlated to 10-min flurbiprofen plasma levels in the test but not in the reference formulation. We estimated that oral dissolution time accounts for about 14% of overall variability in flurbiprofen plasma 10 min after test drug administration. PMID:25277061

  6. Marine Targets Classification in PolInSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Yang, Jingsong; Ren, Lin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, marine stationary targets and moving targets are studied by Pol-In-SAR data of Radarsat-2. A new method of stationary targets detection is proposed. The method get the correlation coefficient image of the In-SAR data, and using the histogram of correlation coefficient image. Then, A Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) algorithm and The Probabilistic Neural Network model are imported to detect stationary targets. To find the moving targets, Azimuth Ambiguity is show as an important feature. We use the length of azimuth ambiguity to get the target's moving direction and speed. Make further efforts, Targets classification is studied by rebuild the surface elevation of marine targets.

  7. SAR target classification based on multiscale sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Huaiyu; Zhang, Rong; Li, Jingge; Zhan, Yibing

    2016-03-01

    We propose a novel multiscale sparse representation approach for SAR target classification. It firstly extracts the dense SIFT descriptors on multiple scales, then trains a global multiscale dictionary by sparse coding algorithm. After obtaining the sparse representation, the method applies spatial pyramid matching (SPM) and max pooling to summarize the features for each image. The proposed method can provide more information and descriptive ability than single-scale ones. Moreover, it costs less extra computation than existing multiscale methods which compute a dictionary for each scale. The MSTAR database and ship database collected from TerraSAR-X images are used in classification setup. Results show that the best overall classification rate of the proposed approach can achieve 98.83% on the MSTAR database and 92.67% on the TerraSAR-X ship database.

  8. SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet for SARS Patients and Their Close Contacts Format: Select one PDF [256 KB] Recommend on ... that are not now known. What does "close contact" mean? In the context of SARS, close contact ...

  9. SweepSAR: Beam-forming on Receive Using a Reflector-Phased Array Feed Combination for Spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Krieger, G.; Rosen, P.; Younis, M.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huber, S.; Jordan, R.; Moreira, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an alternative approach is described that is suited for longer wavelength SARs in particular, employing a large, deployable reflector antenna and a much simpler phased array feed. To illuminate a wide swath, a substantial fraction of the phased array feed is excited on transmit to sub-illuminate the reflector. Shorter transmit pulses are required than for conventional SAR. On receive, a much smaller portion of the phased array feed is used to collect the return echo, so that a greater portion of the reflector antenna area is used. The locus of the portion of the phased array used on receive is adjusted using an analog beam steering network, to 'sweep' the receive beam(s) across the illuminated swath, tracking the return echo. This is similar in some respects to the whiskbroom approach to optical sensors, hence the name: SweepSAR.SweepSAR has advantages over conventional SAR in that it requires less transmit power, and if the receive beam is narrow enough, it is relatively immune to range ambiguities. Compared to direct radiating arrays with digital beam- forming, it is much simpler to implement, uses currently available technologies, is better suited for longer wavelength systems, and does not require extremely high data rates or onboard processing.

  10. The COS/UVES absorption survey of the Magellanic stream. III. Ionization, total mass, and inflow rate onto the Milky Way

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Andrew J.; Thom, Christopher; Tumlinson, Jason; Ely, Justin; Kumari, Nimisha; Wakker, Bart P.; Hernandez, Audra K.; Haffner, L. Matthew; Barger, Kathleen A.; Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher; Richter, Philipp; Charlton, Jane C.; Westmeier, Tobias; Misawa, Toru; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, Paola

    2014-06-01

    Dynamic interactions between the two Magellanic Clouds have flung large quantities of gas into the halo of the Milky Way. The result is a spectacular arrangement of gaseous structures, including the Magellanic Stream, the Magellanic Bridge, and the Leading Arm (collectively referred to as the Magellanic System). In this third paper of a series studying the Magellanic gas in absorption, we analyze the gas ionization level using a sample of 69 Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph sightlines that pass through or within 30° of the 21 cm emitting regions. We find that 81% (56/69) of the sightlines show UV absorption at Magellanic velocities, indicating that the total cross-section of the Magellanic System is ≈11,000 deg{sup 2}, or around one-quarter of the entire sky. Using observations of the Si III/Si II ratio together with Cloudy photoionization modeling, we calculate the total gas mass (atomic plus ionized) of the Magellanic System to be ≈2.0 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} (d/55 kpc){sup 2}, with the ionized gas contributing around three times as much mass as the atomic gas. This is larger than the current-day interstellar H I mass of both Magellanic Clouds combined, indicating that they have lost most of their initial gas mass. If the gas in the Magellanic System survives to reach the Galactic disk over its inflow time of ∼0.5-1.0 Gyr, it will represent an average inflow rate of ∼3.7-6.7 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, potentially raising the Galactic star formation rate. However, multiple signs of an evaporative interaction with the hot Galactic corona indicate that the Magellanic gas may not survive its journey to the disk fully intact and will instead add material to (and cool) the corona.

  11. A Bottom-Up Whole-Body Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic Model to Mechanistically Predict Tissue Distribution and the Rate of Subcutaneous Absorption of Therapeutic Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gill, Katherine L; Gardner, Iain; Li, Linzhong; Jamei, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    The ability to predict subcutaneous (SC) absorption rate and tissue distribution of therapeutic proteins (TPs) using a bottom-up approach is highly desirable early in the drug development process prior to clinical data being available. A whole-body physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, requiring only a few drug parameters, to predict plasma and interstitial fluid concentrations of TPs in humans after intravenous and subcutaneous dosing has been developed. Movement of TPs between vascular and interstitial spaces was described by considering both convection and diffusion processes using a 2-pore framework. The model was optimised using a variety of literature sources, such as tissue lymph/plasma concentration ratios in humans and animals, information on the percentage of dose absorbed following SC dosing via lymph in animals and data showing loss of radiolabelled IgG from the SC dosing site in humans. The resultant model was used to predict t max and plasma concentration profiles for 12 TPs (molecular weight 8-150 kDa) following SC dosing. The predicted plasma concentration profiles were generally comparable to observed data. t max was predicted within 3-fold of reported values, with one third of the predictions within 0.8-1.25-fold. There was no systematic bias in simulated C max values, although a general trend for underprediction of t max was observed. No clear trend between prediction accuracy of t max and TP isoelectric point or molecular size was apparent. The mechanistic whole-body PBPK model described here can be applied to predict absorption rate of TPs into blood and movement into target tissues following SC dosing.

  12. P-3 SAR motion compensation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Debra S.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Roth, Duane; Rais, Houra

    2000-08-01

    The potential of airborne SAR to support the search and rescue mission needs to be investigated. Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) is to process P-3 airborne SAR data to evaluate products such as Coherent Change Detection (CCD) and Digital Elevation Models (DEM). The most crucial step in this process is the precise registration of the two SAR images obtained from separate passes. This paper presents a new technique for this registration step.

  13. Method for removing RFI from SAR images

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2003-08-19

    A method of removing RFI from a SAR by comparing two SAR images on a pixel by pixel basis and selecting the pixel with the lower magnitude to form a composite image. One SAR image is the conventional image produced by the SAR. The other image is created from phase-history data which has been filtered to have the frequency bands containing the RFI removed.

  14. Effects of dielectric values of human body on specific absorption rate following 430, 800, and 1200 MHz RF exposure to ingestible wireless device.

    PubMed

    Xu, L S; Meng, Max Q-H; Hu, Chao

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the compliance of ingestible wireless device (IWD) within safety guidelines, the SAR, and near fields of IWD in two realistic human body models, whose dielectric values are increased from the original by +/-10% and +/- 20% are studied using the finite-difference time-domain method. The radiation characteristics of the IWD in the human body models with changed and unchanged dielectric values are compared. Simulations are carried out at 13 scenarios where the IWD is placed at center positions of abdomens in the two models at the operation frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. Results show that variation of radiation intensity near the surface of abdomen is around 2.5, 2.6, and 3.5 dB within 20% variation of dielectric values corresponding to the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. Electric fields in the anterior of the human body models are higher than those in the posterior for all scenarios. SAR values increase with the increase of conductivities of human body tissues, and usually decrease with the increase of relative permittivities of human body tissues. The effect of the dielectric values of human body on SAR is orientation-, human-body-, and frequency-dependent. A variation up to 20% in conductivities and relative permittivities alone or simultaneously always causes a SAR variation less than 10%, 20%, and 30% at the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively. As far as the compliance of safety was concerned, the IWD was safe to be used at the input power less than 12.6, 9.3, and 8.4 mW, according to the IEEE safety standards at the frequency of 430, 800, and 1200 MHz, respectively.

  15. Kronecker STAP and SAR GMTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenewald, Kristjan H.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Hero, Alfred O.

    2016-05-01

    As a high resolution radar imaging modality, SAR detects and localizes non-moving targets accurately, giving it an advantage over lower resolution GMTI radars. Moving target detection is more challenging due to target smearing and masking by clutter. Space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is often used on multiantenna SAR to remove the stationary clutter and enhance the moving targets. In (Greenewald et al., 2016),1 it was shown that the performance of STAP can be improved by modeling the clutter covariance as a space vs. time Kronecker product with low rank factors, providing robustness and reducing the number of training samples required. In this work, we present a massively parallel algorithm for implementing Kronecker product STAP, enabling application to very large SAR datasets (such as the 2006 Gotcha data collection) using GPUs. Finally, we develop an extension of Kronecker STAP that uses information from multiple passes to improve moving target detection.

  16. Monsoon '90 - Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubois, Pascale C.; Van Zyl, Jakob J.; Guerra, Abel G.

    1992-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  17. Monsoon 1990: Preliminary SAR results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Dubois, Pascale; Guerra, Abel

    1991-01-01

    Multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the Walnut Gulch watershed near Tombstone, Arizona were acquired on 28 Mar. 1990 and on 1 Aug. 1990. Trihedral corner reflectors were deployed prior to both overflights to allow calibration of the two SAR data sets. During both overflights, gravimetric soil moisture and dielectric constant measurements were made. Detailed vegetation height, density, and water content measurements were made as part of the Monsoon 1990 Experiment. Preliminary results based on analysis of the multitemporal polarimetric SAR data are presented. Only the C-band data (5.7-cm wavelength) radar images show significant difference between Mar. and Aug., with the strongest difference observed in the HV images. Based on the radar data analysis and the in situ measurements, we conclude that these differences are mainly due to changes in the vegetation and not due to the soil moisture changes.

  18. Registration of interferometric SAR images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) is a new way of performing topography mapping. Among the factors critical to mapping accuracy is the registration of the complex SAR images from repeated orbits. A new algorithm for registering interferometric SAR images is presented. A new figure of merit, the average fluctuation function of the phase difference image, is proposed to evaluate the fringe pattern quality. The process of adjusting the registration parameters according to the fringe pattern quality is optimized through a downhill simplex minimization algorithm. The results of applying the proposed algorithm to register two pairs of Seasat SAR images with a short baseline (75 m) and a long baseline (500 m) are shown. It is found that the average fluctuation function is a very stable measure of fringe pattern quality allowing very accurate registration.

  19. How change of public transportation usage reveals fear of the SARS virus in a city.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear). These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear). About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50-70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays.

  20. How change of public transportation usage reveals fear of the SARS virus in a city.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear). These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear). About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50-70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays. PMID:24647278

  1. How Change of Public Transportation Usage Reveals Fear of the SARS Virus in a City

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuo-Ying

    2014-01-01

    The outbreaks of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in 2003 resulted in unprecedented impacts on people's daily life. One of the most significant impacts to people is the fear of contacting the SARS virus while engaging daily routine activity. Here we use data from daily underground ridership in Taipei City and daily reported new SARS cases in Taiwan to model the dynamics of the public fear of the SARS virus during the wax and wane of the SARS period. We found that for each reported new SARS case there is an immediate loss of about 1200 underground ridership (the fresh fear). These daily loss rates dissipate to the following days with an e-folding time of about 28 days, reflecting the public perception on the risk of contacting SARS virus when traveling with the underground system (the residual fear). About 50% of daily ridership was lost during the peak of the 2003 SARS period, compared with the loss of 80% daily ridership during the closure of the underground system after Typhoon Nari, the loss of 50–70% ridership due to the closure of the governmental offices and schools during typhoon periods, and the loss of 60% daily ridership during Chinese New Year holidays. PMID:24647278

  2. SARS: hospital infection control and admission strategies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Pak-Leung; Tang, Xiao-Ping; Seto, Wing-Hong

    2003-11-01

    Nosocomial clustering with transmission to health care workers, patients and visitors is a prominent feature of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Hospital outbreaks of SARS typically occurred within the first week after admission of the very first SARS cases when the disease was not recognized and before isolation measures were implemented. In the majority of nosocomial infections, there was a history of close contact with a SARS patient, and transmission occurred via large droplets, direct contact with infectious material or by contact with fomites contaminated by infectious material. In a few instances, potential airborne transmission was reported in association with endotracheal intubation, nebulised medications and non-invasive positive pressure ventilation of SARS patients. In all SARS-affected countries, nosocomial transmission of the disease was effectively halted by enforcement of routine standard, contact and droplet precautions in all clinical areas and additional airborne precautions in the high-risk areas. In Hong Kong, where there are few private rooms for patient isolation, some hospitals have obtained good outcome by having designated SARS teams and separate wards for patient triage, confirmed SARS cases and step-down of patients in whom SARS had been ruled out. In conclusion, SARS represents one of the new challenges for those who are involved in hospital infection control. As SARS might re-emerge, all hospitals should take advantage of the current SARS-free interval to review their infection control programmes, alert mechanisms, response capability and to repair any identified inadequacies.

  3. Hybrid-Polarity SAR Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raney, R. K.; Freeman, A.

    2009-04-01

    A space-based synthetic aperture radar (SAR) designed to provide quantitative information on a global scale implies severe requirements to maximize coverage and to sustain reliable operational calibration. These requirements are best served by the hybrid-polarity architecture, in which the radar transmits in circular polarization, and receives on two orthogonal linear polarizations, coherently, retaining their relative phase. This paper reviews those advantages,summarizes key attributes of hybrid-polarity dual- and quadrature-polarized SARs including conditions under which the signal-to-noise ratio is conserved, and describes the evolution of this architecture from first principles.

  4. Foliage problem in interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, George W.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Roth, Duane; Poehler, Paul L.; Rais, Houra

    1999-08-01

    Interferometric SAR exploits the coherent nature of multiple synthetic aperture radar images to recover phase (range difference) information and thence terrain evaluation data as well as other phase derivative products such as Coherent Change Detection (CCD). Of the numerous factors that can degrade the coherency of multiple SAR collections, foliage constitutes one of the most challenging. The foliage problem in IFSAR is discussed and an airborne multiple pass collection is used to illustrate some facets of the problem. Resolution as a variable in the tradeoff between the bias and variance of the interferogram is discussed in the context of the example.

  5. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  6. Experimental and numerical analysis of B1(+) field and SAR with a new transmit array design for 7T breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junghwan; Krishnamurthy, Narayan; Santini, Tales; Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty; Ibrahim, Tamer S

    2016-08-01

    Developing a radiofrequency (RF) coil system that produces a uniform B1(+) field (circularly polarized component of the transverse magnetic field responsible for excitation) and low specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical for high performance ultrahigh field human imaging. In this study, we provide the design of a new eight channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit (Tx) array for breast MRI at 7T. A numerical analysis utilizing an in-house finite difference time domain (FDTD) package was carried out in (1) four breast models, (2) homogeneous spherical model and (3) full body model to calculate the B1(+) intensity (μT) and homogeneity represented by coefficient of variation (CoV=standard deviation/mean) in the proposed RF array design. The numerical results were compared with that measured in breast phantom (Bphantom) and homogeneous spherical phantom at 7T MRI and showed very good agreement. Average and peak SARs were also calculated in the four breast models and the temperature rises due to the operation of the RF array were also measured in the Bphantom. The proposed RF array; which can operate in a single or multi transmit modes, demonstrates homogeneous RF field excitation with acceptable local/average SAR levels for breast MRI at 7T.

  7. Experimental and numerical analysis of B1+ field and SAR with a new transmit array design for 7 T breast MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghwan; Krishnamurthy, Narayan; Santini, Tales; Zhao, Yujuan; Zhao, Tiejun; Bae, Kyongtae Ty; Ibrahim, Tamer S.

    2016-08-01

    Developing a radiofrequency (RF) coil system that produces a uniform B1+ field (circularly polarized component of the transverse magnetic field responsible for excitation) and low specific absorption rate (SAR) is critical for high performance ultrahigh field human imaging. In this study, we provide the design of a new eight channel radiofrequency (RF) transmit (Tx) array for breast MRI at 7 T. A numerical analysis utilizing an in-house finite difference time domain (FDTD) package was carried out in (1) four breast models, (2) homogeneous spherical model and (3) full body model to calculate the B1+ intensity (μT) and homogeneity represented by coefficient of variation (CoV = standard deviation/mean) in the proposed RF array design. The numerical results were compared with that measured in breast phantom (Bphantom) and homogeneous spherical phantom at 7 T MRI and showed very good agreement. Average and peak SARs were also calculated in the four breast models and the temperature rises due to the operation of the RF array were also measured in the Bphantom. The proposed RF array; which can operate in a single or multi transmit modes, demonstrates homogeneous RF field excitation with acceptable local/average SAR levels for breast MRI at 7 T.

  8. SAR digital spotlight implementation in MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dungan, Kerry E.; Gorham, LeRoy A.; Moore, Linda J.

    2013-05-01

    Legacy synthetic aperture radar (SAR) exploitation algorithms were image-based algorithms, designed to exploit complex and/or detected SAR imagery. In order to improve the efficiency of the algorithms, image chips, or region of interest (ROI) chips, containing candidate targets were extracted. These image chips were then used directly by exploitation algorithms for the purposes of target discrimination or identification. Recent exploitation research has suggested that performance can be improved by processing the underlying phase history data instead of standard SAR imagery. Digital Spotlighting takes the phase history data of a large image and extracts the phase history data corresponding to a smaller spatial subset of the image. In a typical scenario, this spotlighted phase history data will contain much fewer samples than the original data but will still result in an alias-free image of the ROI. The Digital Spotlight algorithm can be considered the first stage in a "two-stage backprojection" image formation process. As the first stage in two-stage backprojection, Digital Spotlighting filters the original phase history data into a number of "pseudo"-phase histories that segment the scene into patches, each of which contain a reduced number of samples compared to the original data. The second stage of the imaging process consists of standard backprojection. The data rate reduction offered by Digital Spotlighting improves the computational efficiency of the overall imaging process by significantly reducing the total number of backprojection operations. This paper describes the Digital Spotlight algorithm in detail and provides an implementation in MATLAB.

  9. sarU, a sarA homolog, is repressed by SarT and regulates virulence genes in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Manna, Adhar C; Cheung, Ambrose L

    2003-01-01

    In searching the Staphylococcus aureus genome, we previously identified sarT, a homolog of sarA, which encodes a repressor for alpha-hemolysin synthesis. Adjacent but transcribed divergently to sarT is sarU, which encodes a 247-residue polypeptide, almost twice the length of SarA. Sequence alignment disclosed that SarU, like SarS, which is another SarA homolog, could be envisioned as a molecule with two halves, with each half being homologous to SarA. SarU, as a member of the SarA family proteins, disclosed conservation of basic residues within the helix-turn-helix motif and within the beta hairpin loop, two putative DNA binding domains within this protein family. The transcription of sarU is increased in a sarT mutant. Gel shift and transcriptional fusion studies revealed that SarT can bind to the sarU promoter region, probably acting as a repressor for sarU transcription. The expression of RNAII and RNAIII of agr is decreased in a sarU mutant. As RNAIII expression is up-regulated in a sarT mutant, we hypothesize that sarT may down regulate agr RNAIII expression by repressing sarU, a positive activator of agr expression. We propose that, in addition to the quorum sensing effect of the autoinducing peptide of agr, the sarT-sarU pathway may represent a secondary amplification loop whereby the expression of agr (e.g., those found in vivo) might repress sarT, leading to increased expression of sarU. Elevated sarU expression would result in additional amplification of the original agr signal.

  10. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  11. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  12. Robust Ground Target Detection by SAR and IR Sensor Fusion Using Adaboost-Based Feature Selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Song, Woo-Jin; Kim, So-Hyun

    2016-07-19

    Long-range ground targets are difficult to detect in a noisy cluttered environment using either synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images or infrared (IR) images. SAR-based detectors can provide a high detection rate with a high false alarm rate to background scatter noise. IR-based approaches can detect hot targets but are affected strongly by the weather conditions. This paper proposes a novel target detection method by decision-level SAR and IR fusion using an Adaboost-based machine learning scheme to achieve a high detection rate and low false alarm rate. The proposed method consists of individual detection, registration, and fusion architecture. This paper presents a single framework of a SAR and IR target detection method using modified Boolean map visual theory (modBMVT) and feature-selection based fusion. Previous methods applied different algorithms to detect SAR and IR targets because of the different physical image characteristics. One method that is optimized for IR target detection produces unsuccessful results in SAR target detection. This study examined the image characteristics and proposed a unified SAR and IR target detection method by inserting a median local average filter (MLAF, pre-filter) and an asymmetric morphological closing filter (AMCF, post-filter) into the BMVT. The original BMVT was optimized to detect small infrared targets. The proposed modBMVT can remove the thermal and scatter noise by the MLAF and detect extended targets by attaching the AMCF after the BMVT. Heterogeneous SAR and IR images were registered automatically using the proposed RANdom SAmple Region Consensus (RANSARC)-based homography optimization after a brute-force correspondence search using the detected target centers and regions. The final targets were detected by feature-selection based sensor fusion using Adaboost. The proposed method showed good SAR and IR target detection performance through feature selection-based decision fusion on a synthetic database generated

  13. SARS: a health system's perspective.

    PubMed

    Beard, Leslie; Clark, Caroline

    2003-01-01

    Effective communications with different stakeholders was critical for health systems everywhere during the worldwide SARS outbreak earlier this year. For Capital Health in Edmonton, Alberta, the health system was able to build on its past experiences in dealing with meningococcal outbreaks and its planning for a pandemic flu. PMID:14628532

  14. Further SEASAT SAR coastal ocean wave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.; Meadows, G. A.; Jackson, P. L.; Tseng, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis techniques used to exploit SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data of gravity waves are discussed and the SEASAT SAR's ability to monitor large scale variations in gravity wave fields in both deep and shallow water is evaluated. The SAR analysis techniques investigated included motion compensation adjustments and the semicausal model for spectral analysis of SAR wave data. It was determined that spectra generated from fast Fourier transform analysis (FFT) of SAR wave data were not significantly altered when either range telerotation adjustments or azimuth focus shifts were used during processing of the SAR signal histories, indicating that SEASAT imagery of gravity waves is not significantly improved or degraded by motion compensation adjustments. Evaluation of the semicausal (SC) model using SEASAT SAR data from Rev. 974 indicates that the SC spectral estimates were not significantly better than the FFT results.

  15. Characterization of personal RF electromagnetic field exposure and actual absorption for the general public.

    PubMed

    Joseph, W; Vermeeren, G; Verloock, L; Heredia, Mauricio Masache; Martens, Luc

    2008-09-01

    In this paper, personal electromagnetic field exposure of the general public due to 12 different radiofrequency sources is characterized. Twenty-eight different realistic exposure scenarios based upon time, environment, activity, and location have been defined and a relevant number of measurements were performed with a personal exposure meter. Indoor exposure in office environments can be higher than outdoor exposure: 95th percentiles of field values due to WiFi ranged from 0.36 to 0.58 V m(-1), and for DECT values of 0.33 V m(-1) were measured. The downlink signals of GSM and DCS caused the highest outdoor exposures up to 0.52 V m(-1). The highest total field exposure occurred for mobile scenarios (inside a train or bus) from uplink signals of GSM and DCS (e.g., mobile phones) due to changing environmental conditions, handovers, and higher required transmitted signals from mobile phones due to penetration through windows while moving. A method to relate the exposure to the actual whole-body absorption in the human body is proposed. An application is shown where the actual absorption in a human body model due to a GSM downlink signal is determined. Fiftieth, 95th, and 99 th percentiles of the whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) due to this GSM signal of 0.58 microW kg(-1), 2.08 microW kg(-1), and 5.01 microW kg(-1) are obtained for a 95th percentile of 0.26 V m(-1). A practical usable function is proposed for the relation between the whole-body SAR and the electric fields. The methodology of this paper enables epidemiological studies to make an analysis in combination with both electric field and actual whole-body SAR values and to compare exposure with basic restrictions. PMID:18695413

  16. High-accuracy measurements of OH(•) reaction rate constants and IR and UV absorption spectra: ethanol and partially fluorinated ethyl alcohols.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Vladimir L; Khamaganov, Victor G; Martynova, Larissa E; Kurylo, Michael J

    2011-08-11

    Rate constants for the gas phase reactions of OH(•) radicals with ethanol and three fluorinated ethyl alcohols, CH(3)CH(2)OH (k(0)), CH(2)FCH(2)OH (k(1)), CHF(2)CH(2)OH (k(2)), and CF(3)CH(2)OH (k(3)) were measured using a flash photolysis resonance-fluorescence technique over the temperature range 220 to 370 K. The Arrhenius plots were found to exhibit noticeable curvature for all four reactions. The temperature dependences of the rate constants can be represented by the following expressions over the indicated temperature intervals: k(0)(220-370 K) = 5.98 × 10(-13)(T/298)(1.99) exp(+515/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(0)(220-298 K) = (3.35 ± 0.06) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) [for atmospheric modeling purposes, k(0)(T) is essentially temperature-independent below room temperature, k(0)(220-298 K) = (3.35 ± 0.06) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)], k(1)(230-370 K) = 3.47 × 10(-14)(T/298)(4.49) exp(+977/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(2)(220-370 K) = 3.87 × 10(-14)(T/298)(4.25) exp(+578/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and k(3)(220-370 K) = 2.48 × 10(-14)(T/298)(4.03) exp(+418/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The atmospheric lifetimes due to reactions with tropospheric OH(•) were estimated to be 4, 16, 62, and 171 days, respectively, under the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere. UV absorption cross sections of all four ethanols were measured between 160 and 215 nm. The IR absorption cross sections of the three fluorinated ethanols were measured between 400 and 1900 cm(-1), and their global warming potentials were estimated.

  17. Multi-coil approach to reduce electromagnetic energy absorption for wirelessly powered implants

    PubMed Central

    Lazzi, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Near-field inductive coupling is a commonly used technique for wireless power transfer (WPT) in biomedical implants. Owing to the close proximity of the implant coil(s) with the tissue ( ∼1 mm) and high current ( ∼100–300 mA) in the magnetic coil(s), a significant induced electric field can be generated for the operating frequency (1–20 MHz). In this Letter, a multi-coil-based WPT technique is proposed to selectively control the currents in the external and implant coils to reduce the specific absorption rate (SAR). A three-coil WPT system, that can achieve 26% reduction in peak 1-g SAR and 15% reduction in peak 10-g SAR, as compared to a two-coil WPT system with the same dimensions, is implemented and used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. To achieve the seamless design for the external and implant electronics, the multi-coil system achieves the same voltage gain and bandwidth as the two-coil design with 46% improvement in the power transfer efficiency.

  18. Proton Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of L-Ornithine-L-Aspartate on the Development of Encephalopathy, Using Localization Pulses with Reduced Specific Absorption Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slotboom, J.; Vogels, B. A. P. M.; Dehaan, J. G.; Creyghton, J. H. N.; Quack, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.; Bovee, W. M. M. J.

    Using the SADLOVE ( single-shot adiabatic localized volume excitation) localization technique with reduced specific absorption rate phase-compensated 2π pulses for localization, in vivo rat brain spectra were obtained in order to study the possible beneficial effects of L-ornithine-L-aspartate (OA) on the development of encephalopathy induced by hyperammonemia in portacaval shunted rats, an experimental model for subacute hepatic encephalopathy. The in vivo1H spectra were quantified using a conjugate-gradient-based frequency-domain fitting procedure. OA treatment resulted in an about threefold lower increase in train lactate ( P < 0.0001) and a slower increase of brain glutamine ( P = 0.022) concentration. However, these changes in brain metabolism, including a significantly lower ammonia concentration during OA treatment, were not associated with a sig significant improvement in clinical symptoms of encephalopathy, suggesting either insufficient decrease in brain ammonia concentration or another effect of OA treatment counteracting the lowering effect on blood and brain ammonia and on brain glutamine and lactate. It is concluded that localized in vivo1H MRS of the brain in combination with other analytical techniques, such as in vivo microdialysis, is helpful in explaining pathophysiological changes during hyperammonemia-induced encephalopathy.

  19. Prediction and comparison of downlink electric-field and uplink localised SAR values for realistic indoor wireless planning.

    PubMed

    Plets, David; Joseph, Wout; Aerts, Sam; Vanhecke, Kris; Vermeeren, Günter; Martens, Luc

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, for the first time a heuristic network calculator for both whole-body exposure due to indoor base station antennas or access points (downlink exposure) and localised exposure due to the mobile device (uplink exposure) in indoor wireless networks is presented. As an application, three phone call scenarios are investigated (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) macrocell, UMTS femtocell and WiFi voice-over-IP) and compared with respect to the electric-field strength and localised specific absorption rate (SAR) distribution. Prediction models are created and successfully validated with an accuracy of 3 dB. The benefits of the UMTS power control mechanisms are demonstrated. However, dependent on the macrocell connection quality and on the user's average phone call connection time, also the macrocell solution might be preferential from an exposure point of view for the considered scenario. PMID:24553049

  20. Controlling Data Collection to Support SAR Image Rotation

    DOEpatents

    Doerry, Armin W.; Cordaro, J. Thomas; Burns, Bryan L.

    2008-10-14

    A desired rotation of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image can be facilitated by adjusting a SAR data collection operation based on the desired rotation. The SAR data collected by the adjusted SAR data collection operation can be efficiently exploited to form therefrom a SAR image having the desired rotational orientation.

  1. Monitoring of Land Subsidence in Ravenna Municipality Using Integrated SAR - GPS Techniques: Description and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artese, G.; Fiaschi, S.; Di Martire, D.; Tessitore, S.; Fabris, M.; Achilli, V.; Ahmed, A.; Borgstrom, S.; Calcaterra, D.; Ramondini, M.; Artese, S.; Floris, M.; Menin, A.; Monego, M.; Siniscalchi, V.

    2016-06-01

    The Emilia Romagna Region (N-E Italy) and in particular the Adriatic Sea coastline of Ravenna, is affected by a noticeable subsidence that started in the 1950s, when the exploitation of on and off-shore methane reservoirs began, along with the pumping of groundwater for industrial uses. In such area the current subsidence rate, even if lower than in the past, reaches the -2 cm/y. Over the years, local Authorities have monitored this phenomenon with different techniques: spirit levelling, GPS surveys and, more recently, Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR) techniques, confirming the critical situation of land subsidence risk. In this work, we present the comparison between the results obtained with DInSAR and GPS techniques applied to the study of the land subsidence in the Ravenna territory. With regard to the DInSAR, the Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) and the Coherent Pixel Technique (CPT) techniques have been used. Different SAR datasets have been exploited: ERS-1/2, ENVISAT, TerraSAR-X and Sentinel-1. Some GPS campaigns have been also carried out in a subsidence prone area. 3D vertices have been selected very close to existing persistent scatterers in order to link the GPS measurement results to the SAR ones. GPS data were processed into the International reference system and the comparisons between the coordinates, for the first 6 months of the monitoring, provided results with the same trend of the DInSAR data, even if inside the precision of the method.

  2. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: The Case of SARS

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, Olivia C.; Massa, Silvia; Illiano, Elena; De Martinis, Domenico; Chan, Paul K. S.; Di Bonito, Paola; Franconi, Rosella

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the membrane protein (M) using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks. PMID:26904039

  3. Antigen Production in Plant to Tackle Infectious Diseases Flare Up: The Case of SARS.

    PubMed

    Demurtas, Olivia C; Massa, Silvia; Illiano, Elena; De Martinis, Domenico; Chan, Paul K S; Di Bonito, Paola; Franconi, Rosella

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a dangerous infection with pandemic potential. It emerged in 2002 and its aetiological agent, the SARS Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), crossed the species barrier to infect humans, showing high morbidity and mortality rates. No vaccines are currently licensed for SARS-CoV and important efforts have been performed during the first outbreak to develop diagnostic tools. Here we demonstrate the transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of two important antigenic determinants of the SARS-CoV, the nucleocapsid protein (N) and the membrane protein (M) using a virus-derived vector or agro-infiltration, respectively. For the M protein, this is the first description of production in plants, while for plant-derived N protein we demonstrate that it is recognized by sera of patients from the SARS outbreak in Hong Kong in 2003. The availability of recombinant N and M proteins from plants opens the way to further evaluation of their potential utility for the development of diagnostic and protection/therapy tools to be quickly manufactured, at low cost and with minimal risk, to face potential new highly infectious SARS-CoV outbreaks. PMID:26904039

  4. A facile inhibitor screening of SARS coronavirus N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Changhyun

    2012-01-01

    Hundreds of million people worldwide have been infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), and the rate of global death from SARS has remarkably increased. Hence, the development of efficient drug treatments for the biological effects of SARS is highly needed. We have previously shown that quantum dots (QDs)-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide is sensitive to the specific recognition of the SARS-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) nucleocapsid (N) protein. In this study, we found that a designed biochip could analyze inhibitors of the SARS-CoV N protein using nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide. Among the polyphenolic compounds examined, (−)-catechin gallate and (−)-gallocatechin gallate demonstrated a remarkable inhibition activity on SARS-CoV N protein. (−)-catechin gallate and (−)-gallocatechin gallate attenuated the binding affinity in a concentrated manner as evidenced by QDs-conjugated RNA oligonucleotide on a designed biochip. At a concentration of 0.05 μg mL−1, (−)-catechin gallate and (−)-gallocatechin gallate showed more than 40% inhibition activity on a nanoparticle-based RNA oligonucleotide biochip system. PMID:22619553

  5. Large scale study on the variation of RF energy absorption in the head & brain regions of adults and children and evaluation of the SAM phantom conservativeness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshvari, J.; Kivento, M.; Christ, A.; Bit-Babik, G.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the results of two computational large scale studies using highly realistic exposure scenarios, MRI based human head and hand models, and two mobile phone models. The objectives are (i) to study the relevance of age when people are exposed to RF by comparing adult and child heads and (ii) to analyze and discuss the conservativeness of the SAM phantom for all age groups. Representative use conditions were simulated using detailed CAD models of two mobile phones operating between 900 MHz and 1950 MHz including configurations with the hand holding the phone, which were not considered in most previous studies. The peak spatial-average specific absorption rate (psSAR) in the head and the pinna tissues is assessed using anatomically accurate head and hand models. The first of the two mentioned studies involved nine head-, four hand- and two phone-models, the second study included six head-, four hand- and three simplified phone-models (over 400 configurations in total). In addition, both studies also evaluated the exposure using the SAM phantom. Results show no systematic differences between psSAR induced in the adult and child heads. The exposure level and its variation for different age groups may be different for particular phones, but no correlation between psSAR and model age was found. The psSAR from all exposure conditions was compared to the corresponding configurations using SAM, which was found to be conservative in the large majority of cases.

  6. Applying PolSAR and PolInSAR to Forest Structure Information Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, E.; Li, Z.; Li, W.; Feng, Q.; Zhou, W.; Pottier, E.; Hong, W.

    2013-01-01

    The key research activities and achievements in the field of applying PolSAR and PolInSAR to forest structure information extraction in DRAGON 2 are summarized in this paper. The limitation of the ALOS PolInSAR dataset acquired in the Culai test site for forest height extraction because of its long temporal baseline (46 days), and how the PolInSAR coherence optimization methods can help improve the topography inversion accuracy under forest canopy were presented. We have analyzed and evaluated the capability of multiple polarization parameters extracted from different frequency PolSAR data for forest scar mapping in the Shibazhan test site, and developed the land cover classification method based on SVM (Support Vector Machine) using PolSAR data. With the L-band E-SAR PolInSAR data acquired in the test site in Germany, we developed forest above ground biomass (AGB) estimation approach based on polarization coherence tomography (PCT).

  7. 5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SWITCH TOWER AND JUNCTION OF S.A.R. #1 & S.A.R. #2 TRANSMISSION LINES, MARCH 7, 1916. SCE drawing no. 4932. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Transmission Lines, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. Classification of the Gabon SAR Mosaic Using a Wavelet Based Rule Classifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simard, Marc; Saatchi, Sasan; DeGrandi, Gianfranco

    2000-01-01

    A method is developed for semi-automated classification of SAR images of the tropical forest. Information is extracted using the wavelet transform (WT). The transform allows for extraction of structural information in the image as a function of scale. In order to classify the SAR image, a Desicion Tree Classifier is used. The method of pruning is used to optimize classification rate versus tree size. The results give explicit insight on the type of information useful for a given class.

  9. The effect of authentic metallic implants on the SAR distribution of the head exposed to 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz dipole near field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, H.; Keshvari, J.; Lappalainen, R.

    2007-03-01

    As the use of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) fields has increased along with increased use of wireless communication, the possible related health risks have also been widely discussed. One safety aspect is the interaction of medical implants and RF devices like mobile phones. In the literature, effects on active implants like pacemakers have been discussed but the studies of passive metallic (i.e. conductive) implants are rare. However, some studies have shown that the EM power absorption in tissues may be enhanced due to metallic implants. In this study, the effect of authentic passive metallic implants in the head region was examined. A half-wave dipole antenna was used as an exposure source and the specific absorption rate (SAR, W kg-1) in the near field was studied numerically. The idea was to model the presumably worst cases of most common implants in an accurate MRI-based phantom. As exposure frequencies GSM (900 and 1800 MHz) and UMTS (2450 MHz) regions were considered. The implants studied were skull plates, fixtures, bone plates and ear rings. The results indicate that some of the implants, under very rare exposure conditions, may cause a notable enhancement in peak mass averaged SAR.

  10. Parallel strategies for SAR processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segoviano, Jesus A.

    2004-12-01

    This article proposes a series of strategies for improving the computer process of the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) signal treatment, following the three usual lines of action to speed up the execution of any computer program. On the one hand, it is studied the optimization of both, the data structures and the application architecture used on it. On the other hand it is considered a hardware improvement. For the former, they are studied both, the usually employed SAR process data structures, proposing the use of parallel ones and the way the parallelization of the algorithms employed on the process is implemented. Besides, the parallel application architecture classifies processes between fine/coarse grain. These are assigned to individual processors or separated in a division among processors, all of them in their corresponding architectures. For the latter, it is studied the hardware employed on the computer parallel process used in the SAR handling. The improvement here refers to several kinds of platforms in which the SAR process is implemented, shared memory multicomputers, and distributed memory multiprocessors. A comparison between them gives us some guidelines to follow in order to get a maximum throughput with a minimum latency and a maximum effectiveness with a minimum cost, all together with a limited complexness. It is concluded and described, that the approach consisting of the processing of the algorithms in a GNU/Linux environment, together with a Beowulf cluster platform offers, under certain conditions, the best compromise between performance and cost, and promises the major development in the future for the Synthetic Aperture Radar computer power thirsty applications in the next years.

  11. Reflectors for SAR performance testing.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) performance testing and estimation is facilitated by observing the system response to known target scene elements. Trihedral corner reflectors and other canonical targets play an important role because their Radar Cross Section (RCS) can be calculated analytically. However, reflector orientation and the proximity of the ground and mounting structures can significantly impact the accuracy and precision with which measurements can be made. These issues are examined in this report.

  12. Representing SAR complex image pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doerry, A. W.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images are often complex-valued to facilitate specific exploitation modes. Furthermore, these pixel values are typically represented with either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values, with constituent components comprised of integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  13. SAR Image Complex Pixel Representations

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-03-01

    Complex pixel values for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images of uniform distributed clutter can be represented as either real/imaginary (also known as I/Q) values, or as Magnitude/Phase values. Generally, these component values are integers with limited number of bits. For clutter energy well below full-scale, Magnitude/Phase offers lower quantization noise than I/Q representation. Further improvement can be had with companding of the Magnitude value.

  14. Bats, civets and the emergence of SARS.

    PubMed

    Wang, L F; Eaton, B T

    2007-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was the first pandemic transmissible disease of previously unknown aetiology in the twenty-first century. Early epidemiologic investigations suggested an animal origin for SARS-CoV. Virological and serological studies indicated that masked palm civets ( Paguma larvata), together with two other wildlife animals, sampled from a live animal market were infected with SARS-CoV or a closely related virus. Recently, horseshoe bats in the genus Rhinolophus have been identified as natural reservoir of SARS-like coronaviruses. Here, we review studies by different groups demonstrating that SARS-CoV succeeded in spillover from a wildlife reservoir (probably bats) to human population via an intermediate host(s) and that rapid virus evolution played a key role in the adaptation of SARS-CoVs in at least two nonreservoir species within a short period.

  15. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  16. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application.

  17. Spaceborne SAR Imaging Algorithm for Coherence Optimized

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhiwei; Yue, Jianping; Wang, Xueqin; Yue, Shun

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes SAR imaging algorithm with largest coherence based on the existing SAR imaging algorithm. The basic idea of SAR imaging algorithm in imaging processing is that output signal can have maximum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by using the optimal imaging parameters. Traditional imaging algorithm can acquire the best focusing effect, but would bring the decoherence phenomenon in subsequent interference process. Algorithm proposed in this paper is that SAR echo adopts consistent imaging parameters in focusing processing. Although the SNR of the output signal is reduced slightly, their coherence is ensured greatly, and finally the interferogram with high quality is obtained. In this paper, two scenes of Envisat ASAR data in Zhangbei are employed to conduct experiment for this algorithm. Compared with the interferogram from the traditional algorithm, the results show that this algorithm is more suitable for SAR interferometry (InSAR) research and application. PMID:26871446

  18. InSAR Forensics: Tracing InSAR Scatterers in High Resolution Optical Image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, XiaoXiang

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a step towards a better interpretation of the scattering mechanism of different objects and their deformation histories in SAR interferometry (InSAR). The proposed technique traces individual SAR scatterer in high resolution optical images where their geometries, materials, and other properties can be better analyzed and classified. And hence scatterers of a same object can be analyzed in group, which brings us to a new level of InSAR deformation monitoring.

  19. Microstrip antennas for SAR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, H. A.

    1983-01-01

    Current and future microstrip antenna technology development for Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR) are summarized. Some of the electrical and mechanical characteristics of previously and presently developed microstrip SAR antennas are shown. The SEASAT, the SIR-A and presently the SIR-B antennas are all designed for operation at L-band with approximately 22 MHz of bandwidth. The antennas have linear polarization with minimum of 20 dB of polarization purity. Both the SEASAT and SIR-A antennas were designed for a fixed pointing angle of 20.5 deg and 47 deg, respectively. However, the SIR-B has the added feature of mechanical beam steering in elevation (range). With the exception of different mechanical characteristics, it is concluded that present spaceborne SAR antennas have only single frequency and single polarization performance. The lack of large spaceborne antennas operating at the higher degree of fabrication tolerance required for a given performance; and larger feed and radiating element losses.

  20. Building detection in SAR imagery

    SciTech Connect

    Steinbach, Ryan Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Current techniques for building detection in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery can be computationally expensive and/or enforce stringent requirements for data acquisition. I present two techniques that are effective and efficient at determining an approximate building location. This approximate location can be used to extract a portion of the SAR image to then perform a more robust detection. The proposed techniques assume that for the desired image, bright lines and shadows, SAR artifact effects, are approximately labeled. These labels are enhanced and utilized to locate buildings, only if the related bright lines and shadows can be grouped. In order to find which of the bright lines and shadows are related, all of the bright lines are connected to all of the shadows. This allows the problem to be solved from a connected graph viewpoint, where the nodes are the bright lines and shadows and the arcs are the connections between bright lines and shadows. For the first technique, constraints based on angle of depression and the relationship between connected bright lines and shadows are applied to remove unrelated arcs. The second technique calculates weights for the connections and then performs a series of increasingly relaxed hard and soft thresholds. This results in groups of various levels on their validity. Once the related bright lines and shadows are grouped, their locations are combined to provide an approximate building location. Experimental results demonstrate the outcome of the two techniques. The two techniques are compared and discussed.

  1. Comparing The Results Of Terrasar-X And Envisat Sar Images With Ps-InSAR Methods On Slow Motion Landslides: Koyulhisar, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, Mehmet; Poyraz, Fatih; Özgür Hastaoğlu, Kemal; Türk, Tarık; Tatar, Orhan; Birdal, Anıl Can

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, PS-InSAR method has been used widely on monitoring slow motion landslides. The motion amounts obtained by PS-InSAR method is avaliable only in LOS(line of sight) and it can't provide information about three dimensional motions. Nevertheless, motions caused by landslides are usually 3 dimensional and also they are not homogeneous. This is one of the biggest handicaps of monitoring landslides with SAR method. In this study, annual motion rates of the PS points that are located in Koyulhisar landslide region are obtained from differently resolutioned sar images of Envisat and Terrasar-x satellite's frames through PS-InSAR method and by using StaMPS software. Throughout the landslide region a profile has been established in North-South line, and the correlation of the results obtained from the sar images lining on this profile. All results are observed to have %80 correlation with each other. By means of these results a subsidence area has been found in the northern region and an uplifting area has been found in the southern region. Through this study, general information about the landslide mechanism has been obtained.

  2. A Modular and Configurable Instrument Electronics Architecture for "MiniSAR"- An Advanced Smallsat SAR Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Jaime; Pastena, Max; Bierens, Laurens

    2013-08-01

    MiniSAR is a Dutch program focused on the development of a commercial smallsat featuring a SAR instrument, led by SSBV as prime contractor. In this paper an Instrument Electronics (IEL) system concept to meet the MiniSAR demands is presented. This system has several specificities wrt similar initiatives in the European space industry, driven by our main requirement: keep it small.

  3. Multibaseline POLInSAR Module for SAR Data Processing and Analysis in RAT (Radar Tools)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M.; Reiber, A.; Jäger, M.; Guillaso, S.; Hellwich, O.

    2007-03-01

    The combination of SAR Polarimetry (POL- SAR) and SAR Interferometry (InSAR) into Polarimetric SAR Interferometry (POLInSAR) has shown great potential for information extraction from SAR data. Applications have been developed and validated theoretically for POLInSAR data. But due to different reasons these methods are difficult to apply on real data. The SAR observables have to be increased, and the utilization of multiple baselines (MB) is one of the possibilities. There will be a need for data processing and analysis methods and tools to work effectively with multibaseline datasets. In this paper we present the newly developed module for the software package RAT (Radar Tools), which provides these abilities for multibaseline polarimetric interferometric SAR data. It is the first available package of tools for working with MBSAR data. RAT (RAdar Tools [1], [2]) is a collection of tools for advanced image processing of SAR remote sensing data, originally started as a student's project and currently under further development at the Department of Computer Vision and Remote Sensing of the Technical University of Berlin. It is programmed in IDL (Interactive Data Language) and uses IDL widgets as graphical user interface. The purpose of this paper is also to give an overview of the current development status of RAT through addressing the newest structural improvements in RAT as well as recently implemented methods for SAR polarimetry and interferometry.

  4. Mapping ground surface deformation using temporarily coherent point SAR interferometry: Application to Los Angeles Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, L.; Lu, Zhiming; Ding, X.; Jung, H.-S.; Feng, G.; Lee, C.-W.

    2012-01-01

    Multi-temporal interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is an effective tool to detect long-term seismotectonic motions by reducing the atmospheric artifacts, thereby providing more precise deformation signal. The commonly used approaches such as persistent scatterer InSAR (PSInSAR) and small baseline subset (SBAS) algorithms need to resolve the phase ambiguities in interferogram stacks either by searching a predefined solution space or by sparse phase unwrapping methods; however the efficiency and the success of phase unwrapping cannot be guaranteed. We present here an alternative approach - temporarily coherent point (TCP) InSAR (TCPInSAR) - to estimate the long term deformation rate without the need of phase unwrapping. The proposed approach has a series of innovations including TCP identification, TCP network and TCP least squares estimator. We apply the proposed method to the Los Angeles Basin in southern California where structurally active faults are believed capable of generating damaging earthquakes. The analysis is based on 55 interferograms from 32 ERS-1/2 images acquired during Oct. 1995 and Dec. 2000. To evaluate the performance of TCPInSAR on a small set of observations, a test with half of interferometric pairs is also performed. The retrieved TCPInSAR measurements have been validated by a comparison with GPS observations from Southern California Integrated GPS Network. Our result presents a similar deformation pattern as shown in past InSAR studies but with a smaller average standard deviation (4.6. mm) compared with GPS observations, indicating that TCPInSAR is a promising alternative for efficiently mapping ground deformation even from a relatively smaller set of interferograms. ?? 2011.

  5. High resolution SAR applications and instrument design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionisio, C.; Torre, A.

    1993-01-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) has viewed, in the last two years, a huge increment of interest from many preset and potential users. The good spatial resolution associated to the all weather capability lead to considering SAR not only a scientific instrument but a tool for verifying and controlling the daily human relationships with the Earth Environment. New missions were identified for SAR as spatial resolution became lower than three meters: disasters, pollution, ships traffic, volcanic eruptions, earthquake effect are only a few of the possible objects which can be effectively detected, controlled and monitored by SAR mounted on satellites. High resolution radar design constraints and dimensioning are discussed.

  6. Bistatic SAR: Signal Processing and Image Formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the significant processing steps that were used to take the raw recorded digitized signals from the bistatic synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) hardware built for the NCNS Bistatic SAR project to a final bistatic SAR image. In general, the process steps herein are applicable to bistatic SAR signals that include the direct-path signal and the reflected signal. The steps include preprocessing steps, data extraction to for a phase history, and finally, image format. Various plots and values will be shown at most steps to illustrate the processing for a bistatic COSMO SkyMed collection gathered on June 10, 2013 on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

  7. [SARS-CoV infection and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ksiezakowska, Kinga; Laszczyk, Magdalena; Wilczyński, Jan; Nowakowska, Dorota

    2008-01-01

    SARS is a highly contagious infection, caused by new coronavirus SARS-CoV. Immunopathological mechanisms responsible for the reaction to SARS-CoV infection have not yet been fully elucidated. Cytokine profile of SARS patients showed marked elevation of Th1 cytokine, interferon gamma, inflammatory cytokines for at least 2 weeks after the onset of the disease. The clinical manifestation of SARS in patients has been of varied nature. Fever of more then 38 degrees C, lasting more then 24 hours, is the most frequently encountered symptom. Other symptoms are non specific and they may include: sore throat, myalgia and nausea. The results of the radiological investigation may appear normal. Infants born to pregnant women with SARS did not appear to have acquired the infection through vertical transmission. However, direct contact with the maternal body fluid which contained SARS-CoV, has put the infants in great danger of perinatal infection. Ribavirin and corticosteroids are usually suggested for the treatment of SARS. However, the ribavirin therapy increases the risk of teratogenic effects in newborns of pregnant women with SARS. Therefore, the usage of this drug is not recommended during pregnancy and lactation. PMID:18510050

  8. From SARS coronavirus to novel animal and human coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    To, Kelvin K. W.; Hung, Ivan F. N.; Chan, Jasper F. W.

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) caused one of the most devastating epidemics known to the developed world. There were two important lessons from this epidemic. Firstly, coronaviruses, in addition to influenza viruses, can cause severe and rapidly spreading human infections. Secondly, bats can serve as the origin and natural animal reservoir of deadly human viruses. Since then, researchers around the world, especially those in Asia where SARS-CoV was first identified, have turned their focus to find novel coronaviruses infecting humans, bats, and other animals. Two human coronaviruses, HCoV-HKU1 and HCoV-NL63, were identified shortly after the SARS-CoV epidemic as common causes of human respiratory tract infections. In 2012, a novel human coronavirus, now called Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), has emerged in the Middle East to cause fatal human infections in three continents. MERS-CoV human infection is similar to SARS-CoV in having a high fatality rate and the ability to spread from person to person which resulted in secondary cases among close contacts including healthcare workers without travel history to the Middle East. Both viruses also have close relationships with bat coronaviruses. New cases of MERS-CoV infection in humans continue to occur with the origins of the virus still unknown in many cases. A multifaceted approach is necessary to control this evolving MERS-CoV outbreak. Source identification requires detailed epidemiological studies of the infected patients and enhanced surveillance of MERS-CoV or similar coronaviruses in humans and animals. Early diagnosis of infected patients and appropriate infection control measures will limit the spread in hospitals, while social distancing strategies may be necessary to control the outbreak in communities if it remained uncontrolled as in the SARS epidemic. PMID:23977429

  9. SBAS-InSAR analysis of surface deformation at Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casu, F.; Lanari, Riccardo; Sansosti, E.; Solaro, G.; Tizzani, Pietro; Poland, M.; Miklius, Asta

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes, Hawai'i, by exploiting the advanced differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) technique referred to as the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm. In particular, we present time series of line-of-sight (LOS) displacements derived from SAR data acquired by the ASAR instrument, on board the ENVISAT satellite, from the ascending (track 93) and descending (track 429) orbits between 2003 and 2008. For each coherent pixel of the radar images we compute time-dependent surface displacements as well as the average LOS deformation rate. Our results quantify, in space and time, the complex deformation of Mauna Loa and K??lauea volcanoes. The derived InSAR measurements are compared to continuous GPS data to asses the quality of the SBAS-InSAR products. ??2009 IEEE.

  10. Helmand river hydrologic studies using ALOS PALSAR InSAR and ENVISAT altimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Zhiming; Kim, J.-W.; Lee, H.; Shum, C.K.; Duan, J.; Ibaraki, M.; Akyilmaz, O.; Read, C.-H.

    2009-01-01

    The Helmand River wetland represents the only fresh-water resource in southern Afghanistan and one of the least mapped water basins in the world. The relatively narrow wetland consists of mostly marshes surrounded by dry lands. In this study, we demonstrate the use of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) Interferometric SAR (InSAR) to detect the changes of the Helmand River wetland water level. InSAR images are combined with the geocentric water level measurements from the retracked high-rate (18-Hz) Environmental Satellite (Envisat) radar altimetry to construct absolute water level changes over the marshes. It is demonstrated that the integration of the altimeter and InSAR can provide spatio-temporal measurements of water level variation over the Helmand River marshes where in situ measurements are absent. ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  11. InfoTerra/TerraSAR initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahl, Manfred W.

    2004-01-01

    The overarching goal of the InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative is to establish a self-sustaining operational/commercial business built on Europe"s know-how and experience in space-borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology, in SAR data processing as well as in SAR applications. InfoTerra stands for a new business concept based on supplying innovative geo-information products and services. TerraSAR is a space and ground system conceived to consist of an initial deployment and operation of 2 Radar satellites (one in X- and one in L-band) flying in a tandem configuration in the same orbit. The design of TerraSAR is driven by the market and is user-oriented. TerraSAR is key to capturing a significant proportion of the existing market and to opening new market opportunities, when it becomes operational. The InfoTerra/TerraSAR Initiative has evolved gradually. It started in 1997 as a joint venture between German (DSS) and British (MMS-UK) space industry, strongly supported by both space agencies, DLR and BNSC. In early 2001, DLR and BNSC submitted to ESA the Formal Programme Proposal for InfoTerra/TerraSAR to become an essential element of ESA"s Earth Watch Programme. In summer 2001, when it became evident that there was not yet sufficient support from the ESA Member States to allow immediate start entering into TerraSAR Phase C/D, it has been decided to implement first a TerraSAR consolidation phase. In early 2002, in order to avoid further delays, a contract was signed between DLR and Astrium GmbH on the development of one component of TerraSAR, the TerraSAR-X, in the frame of a national programme, governed by a Public Private Partnership Agreement. Even if now the different launch dates for TerraSAR-X and TerraSAR-L are narrowing down the window of common data acquisition, it is a reasonable starting point, but it should always be kept in mind that the utmost goal for the longterm is to achieve self sustainability by supplying geo-information products and services

  12. Bats and emerging zoonoses: henipaviruses and SARS.

    PubMed

    Field, H E

    2009-08-01

    Nearly 75% of all emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) that impact or threaten human health are zoonotic. The majority have spilled from wildlife reservoirs, either directly to humans or via domestic animals. The emergence of many can be attributed to predisposing factors such as global travel, trade, agricultural expansion, deforestation/habitat fragmentation, and urbanization; such factors increase the interface and/or the rate of contact between human, domestic animal, and wildlife populations, thereby creating increased opportunities for spillover events to occur. Infectious disease emergence can be regarded as primarily an ecological process. The epidemiological investigation of EIDs associated with wildlife requires a trans-disciplinary approach that includes an understanding of the ecology of the wildlife species, and an understanding of human behaviours that increase risk of exposure. Investigations of the emergence of Nipah virus in Malaysia in 1999 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in China in 2003 provide useful case studies. The emergence of Nipah virus was associated with the increased size and density of commercial pig farms and their encroachment into forested areas. The movement of pigs for sale and slaughter in turn led to the rapid spread of infection to southern peninsular Malaysia, where the high-density, largely urban pig populations facilitated transmission to humans. Identifying the factors associated with the emergence of SARS in southern China requires an understanding of the ecology of infection both in the natural reservoir and in secondary market reservoir species. A necessary extension of understanding the ecology of the reservoir is an understanding of the trade, and of the social and cultural context of wildlife consumption. Emerging infectious diseases originating from wildlife populations will continue to threaten public health. Mitigating and managing the risk requires an appreciation of the connectedness between human

  13. Development and Validation of New Advanced Ocean Altimetry Products From Cryosat-2 in Conventional and in SAR Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotton, D.; Gommenginger, C.; Andersen, O. B.; Boy, F.; Cancet, M.; Egido, A.; Fernandes, J.; Moreau, T.; Naeije, M.; Garcia, P.; Dinardo, S.; Benveniste, J.

    2013-12-01

    The ESA CryoSat-2 mission is the first space mission to carry a radar altimeter that can operate in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mode, as well as the more conventional Low Rate Mode (LRM), and also the SAR Interferometric mode (SARIN). Although the prime mission objective of CryoSat-2 is to monitor land and marine ice, the SAR mode capability of the CryoSat-2 SIRAL altimeter also presents the opportunity of demonstrating significant potential benefits of SAR altimetry for ocean applications. Expected performance enhancements of SAR mode include improved range precision, finer along track spatial resolution, and an improved ability to provide measurements close to the coast. The 'Cryosat Plus for Oceans' (CP4O) project is supported by ESA under the Support To Science Element Programme. CP4O started in June 2012, and will continue to June 2014. The objectives of CP4O are: to build a sound scientific basis for new scientific and operational applications of CryoSat-2 data over the open ocean, polar ocean, coastal seas and for sea-floor mapping. to generate and evaluate new methods and products that will enable the full exploitation of the capabilities of the CryoSat-2 SIRAL altimeter, and extend their application beyond the initial mission objectives. to ensure that the scientific return of the CryoSat-2 mission is maximised. This work is being carried out within four sub-themes: Open Ocean Altimetry, Coastal Zone Altimetry, Polar Ocean Altimetry, and Sea Floor Altimetry. In this presentation we provide a detailed assessment of the capability of SAR altimeter data to provide improved oceanographic measurements over the open ocean, coastal ocean and polar ocean. We describe different processing schemes applied to Cryosat-2 SAR mode data, to carry out full resolution SAR processing and SAR mode retracking, and to construct LRM-type altimeter waveforms from the SAR bursts, - so called Reduced SAR mode (RDSAR). The latter processing is important to determine if it is

  14. Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Toolbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benveniste, Jerome; Lucas, Bruno; DInardo, Salvatore

    2015-04-01

    The prime objective of the SEOM (Scientific Exploitation of Operational Missions) element is to federate, support and expand the large international research community that the ERS, ENVISAT and the Envelope programmes have build up over the last 20 years for the future European operational Earth Observation missions, the Sentinels. Sentinel-3 builds directly on a proven heritage of ERS-2 and Envisat, and CryoSat-2, with a dual-frequency (Ku and C band) advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar Altimeter (SRAL) that provides measurements at a resolution of ~300m in SAR mode along track. Sentinel-3 will provide exact measurements of sea-surface height along with accurate topography measurements over sea ice, ice sheets, rivers and lakes. The first of the two Sentinels is expected to be launched in early 2015. The current universal altimetry toolbox is BRAT (Basic Radar Altimetry Toolbox) which can read all previous and current altimetry mission's data, but it does not have the capabilities to read the upcoming Sentinel-3 L1 and L2 products. ESA will endeavour to develop and supply this capability to support the users of the future Sentinel-3 SAR Altimetry Mission. BRAT is a collection of tools and tutorial documents designed to facilitate the processing of radar altimetry data. This project started in 2005 from the joint efforts of ESA (European Space Agency) and CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales), and it is freely available at http://earth.esa.int/brat. The tools enable users to interact with the most common altimetry data formats, the BratGUI is the front-end for the powerful command line tools that are part of the BRAT suite. BRAT can also be used in conjunction with Matlab/IDL (via reading routines) or in C/C++/Fortran via a programming API, allowing the user to obtain desired data, bypassing the data-formatting hassle. BRAT can be used simply to visualise data quickly, or to translate the data into other formats such as netCDF, ASCII text files, KML (Google Earth

  15. Cross-calibration between airborne SAR sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Manfred; Olivier, Philippe; Freeman, Anthony

    1993-01-01

    As Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system performance and experience in SAR signature evaluation increase, quantitative analysis becomes more and more important. Such analyses require an absolute radiometric calibration of the complete SAR system. To keep the expenditure on calibration of future multichannel and multisensor remote sensing systems (e.g., X-SAR/SIR-C) within a tolerable level, data from different tracks and different sensors (channels) must be cross calibrated. The 1989 joint E-SAR/DC-8 SAR calibration campaign gave a first opportunity for such an experiment, including cross sensor and cross track calibration. A basic requirement for successful cross calibration is the stability of the SAR systems. The calibration parameters derived from different tracks and the polarimetric properties of the uncalibrated data are used to describe this stability. Quality criteria for a successful cross calibration are the agreement of alpha degree values and the consistency of radar cross sections of equally sized corner reflectors. Channel imbalance and cross talk provide additional quality in case of the polarimetric DC-8 SAR.

  16. SAR Speckle Noise Reduction Using Wiener Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joo, T. H.; Held, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images are degraded by speckle. A multiplicative speckle noise model for SAR images is presented. Using this model, a Wiener filter is derived by minimizing the mean-squared error using the known speckle statistics. Implementation of the Wiener filter is discussed and experimental results are presented. Finally, possible improvements to this method are explored.

  17. Coordinated Response to SARS, Vancouver, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Petric, Martin; Daly, Patricia; Parker, Robert A.; Bryce, Elizabeth; Doyle, Patrick W.; Noble, Michael A.; Roscoe, Diane L.; Tomblin, Joan; Yang, Tung C.; Krajden, Mel; Patrick, David M.; Pourbohloul, Babak; Goh, Swee Han; Bowie, William R.; Booth, Tim F.; Tweed, S. Aleina; Perry, Thomas L.; McGeer, Allison; Brunham, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    Two Canadian urban areas received travelers with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) before the World Health Organization issued its alert. By July 2003, Vancouver had identified 5 cases (4 imported); Toronto reported 247 cases (3 imported) and 43 deaths. Baseline preparedness for pandemic threats may account for the absence of sustained transmission and fewer cases of SARS in Vancouver. PMID:16494736

  18. Electromagnetic power absorption and temperature changes due to brain machine interface operation.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tamer S; Abraham, Doney; Rennaker, Robert L

    2007-05-01

    To fully understand neural function, chronic neural recordings must be made simultaneously from 10s or 100s of neurons. To accomplish this goal, several groups are developing brain machine interfaces. For these devices to be viable for chronic human use, it is likely that they will need to be operated and powered externally via a radiofrequency (RF) source. However, RF exposure can result in tissue heating and is regulated by the FDA/FCC. This paper provides an initial estimate of the amount of tissue heating and specific absorption rate (SAR) associated with the operation of a brain-machine interface (BMI). The operation of a brain machine interface was evaluated in an 18-tissue anatomically detailed human head mesh using simulations of electromagnetics and bio-heat phenomena. The simulations were conducted with a single chip, as well as with eight chips, placed on the surface of the human brain and each powered at four frequencies (13.6 MHz, 1.0 GHz, 2.4 GHz, and 5.8 GHz). The simulated chips consist of a wire antenna on a silicon chip covered by a Teflon dura patch. SAR values were calculated using the finite-difference time-domain method and used to predict peak temperature changes caused by electromagnetic absorption in the head using two-dimensional bio-heat equation. Results due to SAR alone show increased heating at higher frequencies, with a peak temperature change at 5.8 GHz of approximately 0.018 degrees C in the single-chip configuration and 0.06 degrees C in the eight-chip configuration with 10 mW of power absorption (in the human head) per chip. In addition, temperature elevations due to power dissipation in the chip(s) were studied. Results show that for the neural tissue, maximum temperature rises of 3.34 degrees C in the single-chip configuration and 7.72 degrees C in the eight-chip configuration were observed for 10 mW dissipation in each chip. Finally, the maximum power dissipation allowable in each chip before a 1.0 degrees C temperature

  19. Regularization Analysis of SAR Superresolution

    SciTech Connect

    DELAURENTIS,JOHN M.; DICKEY,FRED M.

    2002-04-01

    Superresolution concepts offer the potential of resolution beyond the classical limit. This great promise has not generally been realized. In this study we investigate the potential application of superresolution concepts to synthetic aperture radar. The analytical basis for superresolution theory is discussed. In a previous report the application of the concept to synthetic aperture radar was investigated as an operator inversion problem. Generally, the operator inversion problem is ill posed. This work treats the problem from the standpoint of regularization. Both the operator inversion approach and the regularization approach show that the ability to superresolve SAR imagery is severely limited by system noise.

  20. Advanced antennas for SAR spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gail, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Single and multi-frequency antenna concepts were developed to evaluate the feasibility of building large aperture polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems to be launched in low cost vehicles such as the Delta 2. The antennas are 18.9 m long by 2.6 m wide (L-band) and achieve single polarization imaging to an incidence angle of 55 degrees and dual/quad imaging to 42 degrees. When combined with strawman spacecraft designs, both concepts meet the mass and volume constraints imposed by a Delta 2 launch.

  1. Affordable miniaturized SAR for tactical UAV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, George R.; Dubbert, Dale F.

    2004-08-01

    Sandia"s fielded and experimental SAR systems are well known for their real time, high resolution imagery. Previous designs, such as the Lynx radar, have been successfully demonstrated on medium-payload UAVs, including Predator and Fire Scout. However, fielding a high performance SAR sensor on even smaller (sub-50 pound payload) UAVs will require at least a 5x reduction in size, weight, and cost. This paper gives an overview of Sandia"s system concept and roadmap for near-term SAR miniaturization. Specifically, the "miniSAR" program, which plans to demonstrate a 25 pound system with 4 inch resolution in early 2005, is detailed. Accordingly, the conceptual approach, current status, design tradeoffs, and key facilitating technologies are reviewed. Lastly, future enhancements and directions are described, such as the follow-on demonstration of a sub-20 pound version with multi-mode (SAR/GMTI) capability.

  2. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): epidemiology and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    Hui, D; Chan, M; Wu, A; Ng, P

    2004-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is a newly emerged infectious disease with a significant morbidity and mortality. The major clinical features include persistent fever, chills/rigor, myalgia, malaise, dry cough, headache, and dyspnoea. Older subjects may present without the typical febrile response. Common laboratory features include lymphopenia, thrombocytopenia, raised alanine transaminases, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase. The constellation of compatible clinical and laboratory findings, together with certain characteristic radiological features and lack of clinical response to broad spectrum antibiotics, should arouse suspicion of SARS. Measurement of serum RNA by real time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique has a detection rate of 75%–80% in the first week of the illness. PMID:15254300

  3. Rapid subsidence over oil fields measured by SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fielding, E. J.; Blom, R. G.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    The Lost Hills and Belridge oil felds are in the San Joaquin Valley, California. The major oil reservoir is high porosity and low permeability diatomite. Extraction of large volumes from shallow depths causes reduction in pore pressure and subsequent compaction, forming a surface subsidence bowl. We measure this subsidence from space using interferometric analysis of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected by the European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2). Maximum subsidence rates are as high as 40 mm in 35 days or > 400 mm/yr, measured from interferograms with time separations ranging from one day to 26 months. The 8- and 26-month interferograms contain areas where the subsidence gradient exceeds the measurement possible with ERS SAR, but shows increased detail in areas of less rapid subsidence. Synoptic mapping of subsidence distribution from satellite data powerfully complements ground-based techniques, permits measurements where access is difficult, and aids identification of underlying causes.

  4. Rapid subsidence over oil fields measured by SAR interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Eric J.; Blom, Ronald G.; Goldstein, Richard M.

    The Lost Hills and Belridge oilfields are in the San Joaquin Valley, California. The major oil reservoir is high porosity and low permeability diatomite. Extraction of large volumes from shallow depths causes reduction in pore pressure and subsequent compaction, forming a surface subsidence bowl. We measure this subsidence from space using interferometric analysis of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) data collected by the European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-1 and ERS-2). Maximum subsidence rates are as high as 40 mm in 35 days or >400 mm/yr, measured from interferograms with time separations ranging from one day to 26 months. The 8- and 26-month interferograms contain areas where the subsidence gradient exceeds the measurement possible with ERS SAR, but shows increased detail in areas of less rapid subsidence. Synoptic mapping of subsidence distribution from satellite data powerfully complements ground-based techniques, permits measurements where access is difficult, and aids identification of underlying causes.

  5. InSAR and Numeric Modeling for Land Subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulamu, A.; Grzovic, M.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring land subsidence due to coal mining is a function of several controlling factors, including: depth of the mine, stratigraphy, presence or absence of faults, thickness of mineral seam, mining method used, and hydrogeological conditions. Numerical modeling, e.g., finite element modeling (FEM), provides a comprehensive tool to simulate three-dimensional deformation at specific locations. The basis of the FEM is the representation of a body or a structure by an assemblage of subdivisions called finite elements, which requires the availability of site specific environmental and physical characteristics. The lack of availability of the necessary data leads to large uncertainties in subsidence estimates. With the use of InSAR, many of the needed controlling parameters for improving mine subsidence rate estimates can be identified. Coupling InSAR with FEM can further improve subsidence rate estimates through additional analysis yielding information on the relative importance of various controlling parameters contributing to the mine subsidence, the key mechanisms of failure associated with these parameters, and the surface expressions of these processes. In this contribution, we show that utilizing InSAR and FEM leads to an overall enhanced understanding of mine behavior, including the physical mechanisms that lead to mine subsidence through understanding the rheological behavior of the material over the mine in response to wide range of physical and environmental conditions.

  6. Dynamic mechanical analysis and high strain-rate energy absorption characteristics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube reinforced woven fiber-glass composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dynamic mechanical behavior and energy absorption characteristics of nano-enhanced functionally graded composites, consisting of 3 layers of vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) forests grown on woven fiber-glass (FG) layer and embedded within 10 layers of woven FG, with polyester (PE) and...

  7. SARS and population health technology.

    PubMed

    Eysenbach, Gunther

    2003-01-01

    The recent global outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) provides an opportunity to study the use and impact of public health informatics and population health technology to detect and fight a global epidemic. Population health technology is the umbrella term for technology applications that have a population focus and the potential to improve public health. This includes the Internet, but also other technologies such as wireless devices, mobile phones, smart appliances, or smart homes. In the context of an outbreak or bioterrorism attack, such technologies may help to gather intelligence and detect diseases early, and communicate and exchange information electronically worldwide. Some of the technologies brought forward during the SARS epidemic may have been primarily motivated by marketing efforts, or were more directed towards reassuring people that "something is being done," ie, fighting an "epidemic of fear." To understand "fear epidemiology" is important because early warning systems monitoring data from a large number of people may not be able to discriminate between a biological epidemic and an epidemic of fear. The need for critical evaluation of all of these technologies is stressed. PMID:12857670

  8. Moving from Temporal Coherence to Decorrelation Time of Interferometric Measurements Exploiting ESA's SAR Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foumelis, Michael; Mitraka, Zina; Cuccu, Roberto; Desnos, Yves-Louis; Engdahl, Marcus

    2015-05-01

    Interferometric coherence can be considered as an expression of temporal decorrelation. It is understood that interferometric coherence decreases with time between SAR acquisitions because of changes in surface reflectivity, reducing the quality of SAR phase measurements. This is an intrinsic characteristic of the design of SAR systems that has a significant contribution at longer time scales. Although in the past there was not sufficient amount of SAR data to extract robust statistical metrics for decorrelation, in the present study it is demonstrated that tailored analysis of interferometric coherence exploiting the large SAR archive available by the European Space Agency (ESA), enables the accurate quantification of temporal decorrelation. A methodology to translate the observed rate of coherence loss into decorrelation times over a volcanic landscape, namely the Santorini volcanic complex is the subject treated in this study. Specifically, a sensitivity analysis was performed on a large data stack of interferometric pairs to quantify at a pixel level the time beyond which the interferometric phase becomes practically unusable due to the effect of decorrelation. Though the dependence of decorrelation on various land cover/use types is already documented the provision of additional information regarding the expected time of decorrelation is of practical use especially when EO data are utilized in operational activities. The performed analysis is viewed within the improved capacity of current and future SAR systems, while underlining the necessity for exploitation of archive data.

  9. C/X-band SAR interferometry applied to ground monitoring: examples and new potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutricato, Raffaele; Nitti, Davide O.; Bovenga, Fabio; Refice, Alberto; Wasowski, Janusz; Chiaradia, Maria T.

    2013-10-01

    Classical applications of the MTInSAR techniques have been carried out in the past on medium resolution data acquired by the ERS, Envisat (ENV) and Radarsat sensors. The new generation of high-resolution X-Band SAR sensors, such as TerraSAR-X (TSX) and the COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) constellation allows acquiring data with spatial resolution reaching metric/submetric values. Thanks to the finer spatial resolution with respect to C-band data, X-band InSAR applications result very promising for monitoring single man-made structures (buildings, bridges, railways and highways), as well as landslides. This is particularly relevant where C-band data show low density of coherent scatterers. Moreover, thanks again to the higher resolution, it is possible to infer reliable estimates of the displacement rates with a number of SAR scenes significantly lower than in C-band within the same time span or by using more images acquired in a narrower time span. We present examples of the application of a Persistent Scatterers Interferometry technique, namely the SPINUA algorithm, to data acquired by ENV, TSX and CSK on selected number of sites. Different cases are considered concerning monitoring of both instable slopes and infrastructure. Results are compared and commented with particular attention paid to the advantages provided by the new generation of X-band high resolution space-borne SAR sensors.

  10. Deceptive jamming for countering UWB-SAR based on Doppler frequency phase template of false target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaodong; Tang, Bin

    2016-04-01

    A false target deceptive jamming method for countering ultra-wideband synthetic aperture radar (UWB-SAR) is proposed in this paper, which is based on dechirp processing to intercepted UWB-SAR signal and inverse dechirp to jamming signal. The jammer quadrature down-converts and dechirps the intercepted UWB-SAR signal using a linear frequency modulation (LFM) signal oscillator, which could reduce the bandwidth and sample rate of analog-to-digital converter. Then, the jammer utilises the azimuth direction Doppler frequency phase between the false target and the jammer, and backward reflection coefficient template to modulate the phase of the intercepted UWB-SAR signal, and then delayed the modulated phase and also modulated the range direction Doppler frequency phase to the that. Finally, the jammer uses LFM signal oscillator to up-convert the narrowband jamming signal in order to recover the bandwidth of the signal. Parameter errors analysis and simulation results have shown that the detected parameters and motion characteristic errors reduce the resolution and offset the expected position of the false target, but it still could obtain an expected false target image. Theoretical analysis and simulation results indicated that the jamming signal proposed in this paper could produce a false target in the UWB-SAR image, which provide a feasible method for countering UWB-SAR in real time.

  11. Forest classification using extracted PolSAR features from Compact Polarimetry data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghabalaei, Amir; Maghsoudi, Yasser; Ebadi, Hamid

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the ability of extracted Polarimetric Synthetic Aperture RADAR (PolSAR) features from Compact Polarimetry (CP) data for forest classification. The CP is a new mode that is recently proposed in Dual Polarimetry (DP) imaging system. It has several important advantages in comparison with Full Polarimetry (FP) mode such as reduction ability in complexity, cost, mass, data rate of a SAR system. Two strategies are employed for PolSAR feature extraction. In first strategy, the features are extracted using 2 × 2 covariance matrices of CP modes simulated by RADARSAT-2 C-band FP mode. In second strategy, they are extracted using 3 × 3 covariance matrices reconstructed from the CP modes called Pseudo Quad (PQ) modes. In each strategy, the extracted PolSAR features are combined and optimal features are selected by Genetic Algorithm (GA) and then a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier is applied. Finally, the results are compared with the FP mode. Results of this study show that the PolSAR features extracted from π / 4 CP mode, as well as combining the PolSAR features extracted from CP or PQ modes provide a better overall accuracy in classification of forest.

  12. History of SAR at Lockheed Martin (previously Goodyear Aerospace)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasswell, Stephen W.

    2005-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was invented by Carl Wiley at Goodyear Aircraft Company in Goodyear, Arizona, in 1951. From that time forward, as the company became Goodyear Aerospace Corporation, Loral Corporation, and finally Lockheed Martin Corporation, the Arizona employees past and present played a long and storied role in numerous SAR firsts. These include the original SAR patent (known as Simultaneous Doppler Buildup), the first demonstration SAR and flight test, the first operational SAR system, the first operational SAR data link, the first 5-foot resolution operational SAR system, the first 1-foot resolution SAR system, and the first large scale SAR digital processor. The company has installed and flown over five hundred SAR systems on more than thirty different types of aircraft for numerous countries throughout the world. The company designed and produced all of the evolving high performance SAR systems for the U. S. Air Force SR-71 "Blackbird" spy plane throughout its entire operational history, spanning some twenty-nine years. Recent SAR accomplishments include long-range standoff high performance SAR systems, smaller high resolution podded SAR systems for fighter aircraft, and foliage penetration (FOPEN) SAR. The company is currently developing the high performance SAR/MTI (Moving Target Indication) radar for the Army Aerial Common Sensor (ACS) system.

  13. Temporal Coherence as an Estimate of Decorrelation Time of SAR Interferometric Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foumelis, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Following a plethora of validations and demonstrations Interferometric SAR (InSAR) has been established as a mature space geodetic technique for providing valuable insights for various phenomena related to geohazards. One of the main advantages of space borne SAR systems with respect to GNSS is the continuous spatial coverage. However, the impact of temporal decorrelation especially in repeat-pass interferometry has been observed during the historical development of InSAR applications. Interferometric coherence is considered as the expression of temporal decorrelation. It is understood that interferometric coherence decreases with time between SAR acquisitions because of changes in surface reflectivity, reducing the accuracy and spatial coverage of SAR phase measurements. This is an intrinsic characteristic of the design of SAR systems that has a significant contribution at longer time scales. Since the majority of geohazards rely on long term observation scenarios, the effect of temporal decorrelation is evident as coherence becomes dominated by temporal changes. Although in the past there was not sufficient amount of SAR data to extract robust statistical metrics, in the present study it is demonstrated that tailored analysis of interferometric coherence by exploiting the large archive of SAR data available by the European Space Agency (ESA), enables the accurate quantification of temporal decorrelation. A methodology to translate the observed rate of coherence loss into decorrelation times over a volcanic landscape is the subject treated in this study. Specifically, a sensitivity analysis based on a large data stack of interferometric pairs in order to quantitatively estimate at a pixel level the time beyond which each interferometric phase becomes practically unusable is presented. The estimation and mapping of the spatial distribution of the temporal decorrelation times in an area without a necessary a priori knowledge of its surface characteristics is a

  14. Next generation SAR demonstration on space station

    SciTech Connect

    Edelstein, Wendy; Kim, Yunjin; Freeman, Anthony; Jordan, Rolando

    1999-01-22

    This paper describes the next generation synthetic aperture radar (SAR) that enables future low cost space-borne radar missions. In order to realize these missions, we propose to use an inflatable, membrane, microstrip antenna that is particularly suitable for low frequency science radar missions. In order to mitigate risks associated with this revolutionary technology, the space station demonstration will be very useful to test the long-term survivability of the proposed antenna. This experiment will demonstrate several critical technology challenges associated with space-inflatable technologies. Among these include space-rigidization of inflatable structures, controlled inflation deployment, flatness and uniform separation of thin-film membranes and RF performance of membrane microstrip antennas. This mission will also verify the in-space performance of lightweight, high performance advanced SAR electronics. Characteristics of this SAR instrument include a capability for high resolution polarimetric imaging. The mission will acquire high quality scientific data using this advanced SAR to demonstrate the utility of these advanced technologies. We will present an inflatable L-band SAR concept for commercial and science applications and a P-band design concept to validate the Biomass SAR mission concept. The ionospheric effects on P-band SAR images will also be examined using the acquired data.

  15. SAR image formation toolbox for MATLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, LeRoy A.; Moore, Linda J.

    2010-04-01

    While many synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation techniques exist, two of the most intuitive methods for implementation by SAR novices are the matched filter and backprojection algorithms. The matched filter and (non-optimized) backprojection algorithms are undeniably computationally complex. However, the backprojection algorithm may be successfully employed for many SAR research endeavors not involving considerably large data sets and not requiring time-critical image formation. Execution of both image reconstruction algorithms in MATLAB is explicitly addressed. In particular, a manipulation of the backprojection imaging equations is supplied to show how common MATLAB functions, ifft and interp1, may be used for straight-forward SAR image formation. In addition, limits for scene size and pixel spacing are derived to aid in the selection of an appropriate imaging grid to avoid aliasing. Example SAR images generated though use of the backprojection algorithm are provided given four publicly available SAR datasets. Finally, MATLAB code for SAR image reconstruction using the matched filter and backprojection algorithms is provided.

  16. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide regulates dipeptide absorption in mouse jejunum.

    PubMed

    Coon, Steven D; Schwartz, John H; Rajendran, Vazhaikkurichi M; Jepeal, Lisa; Singh, Satish K

    2013-11-15

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) secreted from jejunal mucosal K cells augments insulin secretion and plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of obesity and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. In recent studies, we have shown GIP directly activates Na-glucose cotransporter-1 (SGLT1) and enhances glucose absorption in mouse jejunum. It is not known whether GIP would also regulate other intestinal nutrient absorptive processes. The present study investigated the effect of GIP on proton-peptide cotransporter-1 (PepT1) that mediates di- and tripeptide absorption as well as peptidomimetic drugs. Immunohistochemistry studies localized both GIP receptor (GIPR) and PepT1 proteins on the basolateral and apical membranes of normal mouse jejunum, respectively. Anti-GIPR antibody detected 50-, 55-, 65-, and 70-kDa proteins, whereas anti-PepT1 detected a 70-kDa proteins in mucosal homogenates of mouse jejunum. RT-PCR analyses established the expression of GIPR- and PepT1-specific mRNA in mucosal cells of mouse jejunum. Absorption of Gly-Sar (a nondigestible dipeptide) measured under voltage-clamp conditions revealed that the imposed mucosal H(+) gradient-enhanced Gly-Sar absorption as an evidence for the presence of PepT1-mediated H(+):Gly-Sar cotransport on the apical membranes of mouse jejunum. H(+):Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by cephalexin (a competitive inhibitor of PepT1) and was activated by GIP. The GIP-activated Gly-Sar absorption was completely inhibited by RP-cAMP (a cAMP antagonist). In contrast to GIP, the ileal L cell secreting glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) did not affect the H(+):Gly-Sar absorption in mouse jejunum. We conclude from these observations that GIP, but not GLP-1, directly activates PepT1 activity by a cAMP-dependent signaling pathway in jejunum.

  17. First Results from an Airborne Ka-band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    NASA/JPL has developed SweepSAR technique that breaks typical Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) trade space using time-dependent multi-beam DBF on receive. Developing SweepSAR implementation using array-fed reflector for proposed DESDynI Earth Radar Mission concept. Performed first-of-a-kind airborne demonstration of the SweepSAR concept at Ka-band (35.6 GHz). Validated calibration and antenna pattern data sufficient for beam forming in elevation. (1) Provides validation evidence that the proposed Deformation Ecosystem Structure Dynamics of Ice (DESDynI) SAR architecture is sound. (2) Functions well even with large variations in receiver gain / phase. Future plans include using prototype DESDynI SAR digital flight hardware to do the beam forming in real-time onboard the aircraft.

  18. Cascades of InSAR in the Cascades - outlook for the use of InSAR and space-based imaging catalogues in a Subduction Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohman, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) has long demonstrated its utility to studies of subduction zone earthquakes, crustal events and volcanic processes, particularly in regions with very good temporal data coverage (e.g., Japan), or arid regions where the timescale of surface change is long compared to the repeat time of the available SAR imagery (e.g., portions of South America). Recently launched and future SAR missions with open data access will increase the temporal sampling rates further over many areas of the globe, resulting in a new ability to lower the detection threshold for earthquakes and, potentially, interseismic motion and transients associated with subduction zone settings. Here we describe some of the anticipated detection abilities for events ranging from earthquakes and slow slip along the subduction zone interface up to landslides, and examine the variations in land use around the circum-Pacific and how that and its changes over time will affect the use of InSAR. We will show the results of an effort to combine Landsat and other optical imagery with SAR data catalogues in the Pacific Northwest to improve the characterization of ground deformation signals, including the identification of "spurious" signals that are not related to true ground deformation. We also describe prospects for working with other communities that are interested in variations in soil moisture and vegetation structure over the same terrain.

  19. NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donovan, N. (Editor); Evans, D. L. (Editor); Held, D. N. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Speaker-supplied summaries of the talks given at the NASA/JPL Aircraft SAR Workshop on February 4 and 5, 1985, are provided. These talks dealt mostly with composite quadpolarization imagery from a geologic or ecologic prespective. An overview and summary of the system characteristics of the L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft are included as supplementary information. Other topics ranging from phase imagery and interferometric techniques classifications of specific areas, and the potentials and limitations of SAR imagery in various applications are discussed.

  20. Primary studies of Chinese spaceborne SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Zhen-Song; Wu, Guo-Xiang; Guo, Hua-Dong; Wei, Zhong-Quan; Zhu, Min-Hui

    1993-01-01

    The primary studies on spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in China are discussed. The SAR will be launched aboard a Chinese satellite and operated at L-band with HH polarization. The purpose of the mission in consideration is dedicated to resources and environment uses, especially to natural disaster monitoring. The ground resolution is designed as 25 m x 25 m for detailed mode and 100 m x 100 m for wide scan-SAR mode. The off-nadir angle can be varied from 20 to 40 deg. The key system concepts are introduced.

  1. SAR observations of coastal zone conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, G. A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Shuchman, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) technology to the observation of coastal zones phenomena are detailed. The conditions observed include gravity wave detection, surf zone location, surface currents, and long-period 'surf beats'. Algorithms have been developed and successfully tested that determine significant wave and current parameters from the sea surface backscatter of microwave energy. Doppler information from the SAR optical correlator allows a rough estimation of near shore surface flow velocities that has been found in agreement with both theory and in situ observations as well. Seasat SAR data of the Scotland and North Carolina coasts are considered, as well as the results of bathymetric updating of coastal area charts.

  2. The Compound and Homologous Eruptions from the SAR 11429

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhakal, Suman Kumar; Zhang, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Super Active Regions (SARs) are ARs which shows extremely high rate of solar eruptions. NOAA AR 11429 was a SAR which produced 47 C-Class, 15 M-Class and 3 X-Class flares and 8 CMEs during its passage from the front disk of the Sun. This SAR had anti-Hale and delta-spot magnetic configuration and many sub-regions of magnetic flux emergence. With the aid of multi-wavelength observations of the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and nonlinear force-free model for the magnetic field in the solar corona, we found the existence of many magnetic flux structures (flux bundles) in the corona of the AR. The energy released by these co-existing flux bundles within short time, resulted in compound erutpions from the AR on March 9 and 10, 2012. In the period of 38 hours, after the CME eruption on March 9, the continuous shearing and cancellation and new magnetic flux emergence resulted in another CME on March 10. Both of the events showed the compound nature and the similarity of the foot-points and EUV dimming made these eruptions homologous.

  3. Similarity measures of full polarimetric SAR images fusion for improved SAR image matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, H.

    2015-06-01

    China's first airborne SAR mapping system (CASMSAR) developed by Chinese Academy of Surveying and Mapping can acquire high-resolution and full polarimetric (HH, HV, VH and VV) Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. It has the ability to acquire X-band full polarimetric SAR data at a resolution of 0.5m. However, the existence of speckles which is inherent in SAR imagery affects visual interpretation and image processing badly, and challenges the assumption that conjugate points appear similar to each other in matching processing. In addition, researches show that speckles are multiplicative speckles, and most similarity measures of SAR image matching are sensitive to them. Thus, matching outcomes of SAR images acquired by most similarity measures are not reliable and with bad accuracy. Meanwhile, every polarimetric SAR image has different backscattering information of objects from each other and four polarimetric SAR data contain most basic and a large amount of redundancy information to improve matching. Therefore, we introduced logarithmically transformation and a stereo matching similarity measure into airborne full polarimetric SAR imagery. Firstly, in order to transform the multiplicative speckles into additivity ones and weaken speckles' influence on similarity measure, logarithmically transformation have to be taken to all images. Secondly, to prevent performance degradation of similarity measure caused by speckles, measure must be free or insensitive of additivity speckles. Thus, we introduced a stereo matching similarity measure, called Normalized Cross-Correlation (NCC), into full polarimetric SAR image matching. Thirdly, to take advantage of multi-polarimetric data and preserve the best similarity measure value, four measure values calculated between left and right single polarimetric SAR images are fused as final measure value for matching. The method was tested for matching under CASMSAR data. The results showed that the method delivered an effective

  4. A low-power SAR ADC for IRFPA ROIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Lei; Ding, Ruijun; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Pan; Chen, Guoqiang

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a low power ADC for the 512*512 infrared focal plane arrays (IRFPA) readout integrated circuit(ROIC). The major structure, the working mode and the simulation result of the readout integrated circuit are shown in this paper. The power supply voltage of 0.35μm standard CMOS process is 3.3V in this design, and then the output range of the Direct Injection (DI) input circuit is reached 2V. Successive-approximation-register (SAR) ADC architecture is used in this readout integrated circuit. And each ADC is shared by one column of the IRFPA. This SAR ADC is made up of a 13-bit digital-analog converter (DAC), a high resolution comparator, and a digital control circuit. The most important part is the voltage-scaling and charge-scaling charge redistribution DAC. In this DAC, charge scaling with a capacitor ladder to determine the least significant bits is combined with voltage scaling with a resister ladder to determine the most significant bits. The comparator uses three-stage operational amplifier structure to get a 77dB differential gain. The Common-Mode input rang of the comparator is 1V to 3V, and minimum resolvable voltage difference is 0.3mV. This SAR ADC has some advantages, especially in low power and high speed. The simulation result shows that the resolution of the ADC is 12 bit and the conversion time of the ADC is 6.5μs, while the power of each ADC is as low as 300μW. Finally, this SAR ADC can satisfy the request of 512*512 IRFPAs ROIC with a 100Hz frame rate.

  5. Atmosphere Observations by Geosynchronous SARs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti guarnieri, Andrea; Rocca, Fabio; Wadge, Geoff; Schulz, Detlef

    2014-05-01

    We analyze different geosynchronous Synthetic Aperture RADAR concepts aimed to get both tropospheric and ionospheric delay maps with a revisit time of minutes and sub-continental coverage. Such products could be used either to compensate the delay in LEO-SAR missions and GNSS, or to generate integrated water-vapor maps to be used for Numerical Weather Forecast. The system exploits the principle of RADAR location, by transmitting a pulse with a suitable bandwidth, and the residual non-zero eccentricity of COMmunication SATellites. Different concepts are proposed as payload in COMSAT, or constellations of small satellites, that is monostatic or bistatic/multistatic RADARS. The selection of the best frequency, from L to Ku, and the analysis of performances is presented.

  6. SEASAT SAR performance evaluation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The performance of the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensor was evaluated using data processed by the MDA digital processor. Two particular aspects are considered the location accuracy of image data, and the calibration of the measured backscatter amplitude of a set of corner reflectors. The image location accuracy was assessed by selecting identifiable targets in several scenes, converting their image location to UTM coordinates, and comparing the results to map sheets. The error standard deviation is measured to be approximately 30 meters. The amplitude was calibrated by measuring the responses of the Goldstone corner reflector array and comparing the results to theoretical values. A linear regression of the measured against theoretical values results in a slope of 0.954 with a correlation coefficient of 0.970.

  7. Precise SAR measurements in the near-field of RF antenna systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakim, Bandar M.

    Wireless devices must meet specific safety radiation limits, and in order to assess the health affects of such devices, standard procedures are used in which standard phantoms, tissue-equivalent liquids, and miniature electric field probes are used. The accuracy of such measurements depend on the precision in measuring the dielectric properties of the tissue-equivalent liquids and the associated calibrations of the electric-field probes. This thesis describes work on the theoretical modeling and experimental measurement of the complex permittivity of tissue-equivalent liquids, and associated calibration of miniature electric-field probes. The measurement method is based on measurements of the field attenuation factor and power reflection coefficient of a tissue-equivalent sample. A novel method, to the best of the authors knowledge, for determining the dielectric properties and probe calibration factors is described and validated. The measurement system is validated using saline at different concentrations, and measurements of complex permittivity and calibration factors have been made on tissue-equivalent liquids at 900MHz and 1800MHz. Uncertainty analysis have been conducted to study the measurement system sensitivity. Using the same waveguide to measure tissue-equivalent permittivity and calibrate e-field probes eliminates a source of uncertainty associated with using two different measurement systems. The measurement system is used to test GSM cell-phones at 900MHz and 1800MHz for Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) compliance using a Specific Anthropomorphic Mannequin phantom (SAM).

  8. Influence of GSM900 electromagnetic fields on the metabolic rate in rodents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouardi, A.; Streckert, J.; Lerchl, A.; Schwarzpaul, K.; Hansen, V.

    2008-05-01

    The development of exposure devices for investigating possible effects of mobile communication systems to non-restrained animals aims at a homogenous field distribution in the area the animals occupy. In the presented 900 MHz exposure device a quite good field homogeneity of 5% (including the standing wave contribution due to internal reflections) is reached in the cage region mainly by flattening the transverse field. For the standard waveguide (WR1150) without dielectric sheets this value reads 14%. The desired maximal whole body specific absorption rate (SAR) of 4 W/kg in the Djungarian hamster model is achieved at an input power of only 3.7 W.

  9. Formation Flying for Distributed InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Murray, Emmanuell A.; Ploen, Scott R.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2006-01-01

    We consider two spacecraft flying in formation to create interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Several candidate orbits for such in InSar formation have been previously determined based on radar performance and Keplerian orbital dynamics. However, with out active control, disturbance-induced drift can degrade radar performance and (in the worst case) cause a collision. This study evaluates the feasibility of operating the InSAR spacecraft as a formation, that is, with inner-spacecraft sensing and control. We describe the candidate InSAR orbits, design formation guidance and control architectures and algorithms, and report the (Delta)(nu) and control acceleration requirements for the candidate orbits for several tracking performance levels. As part of determining formation requirements, a formation guidance algorithm called Command Virtual Structure is introduced that can reduce the (Delta)(nu) requirements compared to standard Leader/Follower formation approaches.

  10. SAR/LANDSAT image registration study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphrey, S. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Temporal registration of synthetic aperture radar data with LANDSAT-MSS data is both feasible (from a technical standpoint) and useful (from an information-content viewpoint). The greatest difficulty in registering aircraft SAR data to corrected LANDSAT-MSS data is control-point location. The differences in SAR and MSS data impact the selection of features that will serve as a good control points. The SAR and MSS data are unsuitable for automatic computer correlation of digital control-point data. The gray-level data can not be compared by the computer because of the different response characteristics of the MSS and SAR images.

  11. An algorithm for segmenting polarimetric SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geaga, Jorge V.

    2015-05-01

    We have developed an algorithm for segmenting fully polarimetric single look TerraSAR-X, multilook SIR-C and 7 band Landsat 5 imagery using neural nets. The algorithm uses a feedforward neural net with one hidden layer to segment different surface classes. The weights are refined through an iterative filtering process characteristic of a relaxation process. Features selected from studies of fully polarimetric complex single look TerraSAR-X data and multilook SIR-C data are used as input to the net. The seven bands from Landsat 5 data are used as input for the Landsat neural net. The Cloude-Pottier incoherent decomposition is used to investigate the physical basis of the polarimetric SAR data segmentation. The segmentation of a SIR-C ocean surface scene into four classes is presented. This segmentation algorithm could be a very useful tool for investigating complex polarimetric SAR phenomena.

  12. Polarimetric SAR Interferometry Evaluation in Mangroves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung-Kuk; Fatoyinbo,Temilola; Osmanoglu, Batuhan; Sun, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    TanDEM-X (TDX) enables to generate an interferometric coherence without temporal decorrelation effect that is the most critical factor for a successful Pol-InSAR inversion, as have recently been used for forest parameter retrieval. This paper presents mangrove forest height estimation only using single-pass/single-baseline/dual-polarization TDX data by means of new dual-Pol-InSAR inversion technique. To overcome a lack of one polarization in a conventional Pol- InSAR inversion (i.e. an underdetermined problem), the ground phase in the Pol-InSAR model is directly estimated from TDX interferograms assuming flat underlying topography in mangrove forest. The inversion result is validated against lidar measurement data (NASA's G-LiHT data).

  13. SAR calculations in an anatomically realistic model of the head for mobile communication transceivers at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz.

    PubMed

    Dimbylow, P J; Mann, S M

    1994-10-01

    A new mathematical model of the head has been constructed from a set of serial MRI slices from one subject. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) calculations of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) have been performed on this model with a 2 mm resolution for a generic mobile communication transceiver represented by a quarter-wavelength monopole on a metal box. The antenna was mounted either at the centre or corner of the top face of the box. The frequencies considered were 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. Three irradiation geometries were considered, a vertical handset in front of the eye and vertical and horizontal orientations at the side of the ear. The effect of a hand grasping the handset was considered. The head model was scaled to represent the head of an infant and a subset of calculations was performed to verify that the SAR deposited in the infant head did not exceed that in the adult. Results are also presented for a half-wavelength dipole. The maximum SAR values produced by the generic transceiver for the horizontal orientation at the side of the head which is the most typical position, averaged over 10 g of tissue at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz, are 2.1 and 3.0 W kg(-1) per W of radiated power. The corresponding values over 1 g of tissue are 2.3 and 4.8 W kg(-1) per W at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz. However, if one were to consider all possible operational conditions, the placement of the transceiver in front of the eye will give 3.1 and 4.6 W kg(-1) per W averaged over 10 g of tissue and 4.7 and 7.7 W kg(-1) per W over 1 g of tissue at 900 MHz and 1.8 GHz, respectively.

  14. SAR Polarimetry for Oil at Sea Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliaccio, M.; Nunziata, F.

    2013-03-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) oil slick observation is a topic of great applicative relevance which has been physically recast by a set of new polarimetric approaches that, exploiting the departure from Bragg scattering, allow observing oil at sea in a very robust and effective way. In this study, these polarimetric approaches are reviewed and their performances are discussed with respect to some thought experiments undertaken on quad-pol full-resolution L- and C-band SAR data.

  15. RADARSAT high throughput SAR processor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, P.

    1986-01-01

    MacDonald Dettwiler & Associates has been involved with the Canadian Radarsat (RSAT) project for a number of years. This included Phase A definition studies and for the past two years, Phase B ground station design and processor prototyping efforts. The current baseline design for the SAR processing facility (SARDPF) is described along with its requirements and functional decomposition. This forms the context for then discussing the prototype SAR processor and extensions necessary to meet current ground station processing requirements.

  16. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-04-07

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate.

  17. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate. PMID:27070606

  18. Accelerating Spaceborne SAR Imaging Using Multiple CPU/GPU Deep Collaborative Computing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Guojun; Li, Wei; Hu, Wei; Hu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    With the development of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technologies in recent years, the huge amount of remote sensing data brings challenges for real-time imaging processing. Therefore, high performance computing (HPC) methods have been presented to accelerate SAR imaging, especially the GPU based methods. In the classical GPU based imaging algorithm, GPU is employed to accelerate image processing by massive parallel computing, and CPU is only used to perform the auxiliary work such as data input/output (IO). However, the computing capability of CPU is ignored and underestimated. In this work, a new deep collaborative SAR imaging method based on multiple CPU/GPU is proposed to achieve real-time SAR imaging. Through the proposed tasks partitioning and scheduling strategy, the whole image can be generated with deep collaborative multiple CPU/GPU computing. In the part of CPU parallel imaging, the advanced vector extension (AVX) method is firstly introduced into the multi-core CPU parallel method for higher efficiency. As for the GPU parallel imaging, not only the bottlenecks of memory limitation and frequent data transferring are broken, but also kinds of optimized strategies are applied, such as streaming, parallel pipeline and so on. Experimental results demonstrate that the deep CPU/GPU collaborative imaging method enhances the efficiency of SAR imaging on single-core CPU by 270 times and realizes the real-time imaging in that the imaging rate outperforms the raw data generation rate. PMID:27070606

  19. Ionospheric Specifications for SAR Interferometry (ISSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pi, Xiaoqing; Chapman, Bruce D; Freeman, Anthony; Szeliga, Walter; Buckley, Sean M.; Rosen, Paul A.; Lavalle, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The ISSI software package is designed to image the ionosphere from space by calibrating and processing polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) data collected from low Earth orbit satellites. Signals transmitted and received by a PolSAR are subject to the Faraday rotation effect as they traverse the magnetized ionosphere. The ISSI algorithms combine the horizontally and vertically polarized (with respect to the radar system) SAR signals to estimate Faraday rotation and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) with spatial resolutions of sub-kilometers to kilometers, and to derive radar system calibration parameters. The ISSI software package has been designed and developed to integrate the algorithms, process PolSAR data, and image as well as visualize the ionospheric measurements. A number of tests have been conducted using ISSI with PolSAR data collected from various latitude regions using the phase array-type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) onboard Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Advanced Land Observing Satellite mission, and also with Global Positioning System data. These tests have demonstrated and validated SAR-derived ionospheric images and data correction algorithms.

  20. SARS: Key factors in crisis management.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Hsin-Chao; Chen, Thai-Form; Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2005-03-01

    This study was conducted at a single hospital selected in Taipei during the SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) outbreak from March to July, 2003 in Taiwan. During this period of time, 104 SARS patients were admitted to the hospital. There were no negative reports related to the selected hospital despite its being located right in the center of an area struck by the epidemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the key factors enabling the hospital to survive SARS unscathed. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with the nursing directors and nursing managers of the SARS units, along with a review of relevant hospital documents. The five key elements identified as survival factors during this SARS crisis are as follows: 1. good control of timing for crisis management, 2. careful decision-making, 3. thorough implementation, 4. effective communication, and 5. trust between management and employees. The results of this study reconfirmed the selected hospital as a model for good crisis management during the SARS epidemic.

  1. Real-time NASBA detection of SARS-associated coronavirus and comparison with real-time reverse transcription-PCR.

    PubMed

    Keightley, Maria Cristina; Sillekens, Peter; Schippers, Wim; Rinaldo, Charles; George, Kirsten St

    2005-12-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) exhibits a high mortality rate and the potential for rapid epidemic spread. Additionally, it has a poorly defined clinical presentation, and no known treatment or prevention methods. Collectively, these factors underscore the need for early diagnosis. Molecular tests have been developed to detect SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) RNA using real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with varying levels of sensitivity. However, RNA amplification methods have been demonstrated to be more sensitive for the detection of some RNA viruses. We therefore developed a real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) test for SARS-CoV. A number of primer/beacon sets were designed to target different regions of the SARS-CoV genome, and were tested for sensitivity and specificity. The performance of the assays was compared with RT-PCR assays. A multi-target real-time NASBA application was developed for detection of SARS-CoV polymerase (Pol) and nucleocapsid (N) genes. The N targets were found to be consistently more sensitive than the Pol targets, and the real-time NASBA assay demonstrates equivalent sensitivity when compared to testing by real-time RT-PCR. A multi-target real-time NASBA assay has been successfully developed for the sensitive detection of SARS-CoV.

  2. Geolocation with error analysis using imagery from an experimental spotlight SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wonnacott, William Mark

    This dissertation covers the development of a geometry-based sensor model for a specific monostatic spotlight synthetic aperture radar (SAR) system---referred to as the ExSAR (for experimental SAR). This sensor model facilitates single- and multiple-image geopositioning with error analysis. It allows for the use of known ground control points in refining the collection geometry parameters (a process called image resection) and for the subsequent geopositioning of other points using the resected image. Theoretically, the model also allows for the potential recovery of bias-like, persistent errors common across multiple images. The model also includes multi-image correspondence equations to aid in the cross-image identification of conjugate points. The sensor model development begins with a generic, theoretical approach to the modeling of spotlight SAR. A closed-form solution to the range and range-rate condition equations and the corresponding error propagation equation are presented. (The SAR condition equations have traditionally been solved iteratively.) The application of the closed-form solution in the image-to-ground and ground-to-image transformations is documented. The theoretical work also includes a preliminary error sensitivity analysis and a treatment of the spotlight SAR resection process. The ExSAR-specific model is established and assessed with an extensive set of images collected using the experimental radar over arrays of ground control points. Using this set, the imagery metadata elements are assessed, and the optimal element set for geopositioning is determined. The ExSAR imagery is shown to be transformed to the ground plane in only one dimension. The eventual ExSAR sensor model is used with known elevations and single-image geopositioning to show a horizontal accuracy of 8.23 m (rms). With resection using five ground-surveyed control points per image, the horizontal accuracy of reserved check points is 0.45 m (rms). Resections using the same

  3. UAVSAR: InSAR and PolSAR Test Bed for the Proposed NI-SAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. E.; Hensley, S.; Lou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    UAVSAR, which first became operational in 2009, has served as an operational testbed for the NI-SAR L-band radar concept and a unique instrument in its own right. UAVSAR supports a broad array of basic and applied geoscience, covering on smaller scale all the disciplines NI-SAR would be able to address on a global scale. Although designed specifically to provide high accuracy repeated flight tracks and precise imaging geometry for InSAR-based solid earth studies, its fully polarimetric operation, low noise, and consistent calibration accuracy has made it a premier instrument for PolSAR-based studies also. Since 2009 it has successfully imaged more than 16 million km2 and >4300 quad-polarimetric data products are now publicly available online. Upgrades made in the last year to automate the repeat track processing serve as a model for generating large volumes of InSAR products: Since January 2014 more than 700 interferometric products have been released, exceeding the output of all previous years combined. Standardly available products now include browse images of all InSAR acquisitions and coregistered single-look complex image stacks suitable for standard time series analysis. Here we present an overview of the wide range of studies utilizing UAVSAR data including those based on polarimetry and pair-wise and times series interferometry, highlighting both the unique capabilities of UAVSAR and the ways in which NI-SAR would be able to dramatically extend the capabilities. This research was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  4. SAR imagery of moving targets: application of time-frequency distributions for estimating motion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, Alexander M.; Peckham, C. D.; Teti, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    It is well known that targets moving along track within a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) field of view are imaged as defocused objects. The SAR stripmap mode is tuned to stationary ground targets and the mismatch between the SAR processing parameters and the target motion parameters causes the energy to spill over to adjacent image pixels, thus not only hindering target feature extraction, but also reducing the probability of detection. The problem can be remedied by generating the image using a filter matched to the actual target motion parameters, effectively focusing the SAR image on the target. For a fixed rate of motion the target velocity can be estimated from the slope of the Doppler frequency characteristic. The processing is carried out on the range compressed data but before azimuth compression. The problem is similar to the classical problem of estimating the instantaneous frequency of a linear FM signal (chirp). This paper investigates the application of three different time-frequency analysis techniques to estimate the instantaneous Doppler frequency of range compressed SAR data. In particular, we compare the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Gabor expansion and the Short-Time Fourier transform with respect to their performance in noisy SAR data. Criteria are suggested to quantify the performance of each method in the joint time- frequency domain. It is shown that these methods exhibit sharp signal-to-noise threshold effects, i.e., a certain SNR below which the accuracy of the velocity estimation deteriorates rapidly. It is also shown that the methods differ with respect to their representation of the SAR data.

  5. Role of Polarimetric SAR data for discrimination/biophysical parameters of crops based on canopy architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, D.; Chakraborty, M.; Manjunath, K. R.; Parihar, J. S.

    2014-11-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) sensors have great potential for a wide range of agricultural applications, owing to their capability of all-weather observation. It is particularly useful in tropical regions in Asia where most of the crops are grown in rainy season. The use of SAR images for the assessment of rice-planted area is in operational stage in Asian countries owing to its characteristic temporal signature however, applications of SAR images for the estimation of biophysical plant variables are challenging, especially for crop scattering and discrimination in case of other tropical crops. Canopy geometry and architecture mainly govern the interaction of microwave signal with the vegetation. In this study evaluation of C-band SAR data at different polarization combinations in linear as well as circular polarimetric imaging modes for rabi crops and other associated landuse has been attempted. Also understanding the scattering response of various crops based on canopy architecture was attempted. The scattering parameters were found to vary for planofiles and erectophiles, partitioning of scattering and absorption were determined.

  6. Online Health Education on SARS to University Students during the SARS Outbreak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Mee Lian; Koh, David; Iyer, Prasad; Seow, Adeline; Goh, Lee Gan; Chia, Sin Eng; Lim, Meng Kin; Ng, Daniel; Ong, Choon Nam; Phua, Kai Hong; Tambyah, Paul; Chow, Vincent T K; Chew, Suok Kai; Chandran, Ravi; Lee, Hin Peng

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how online learning may be used to disseminate health information rapidly and widely to large university populations if there is an infectious disease outbreak. During the SARS outbreak in Singapore in 2003, a six-lesson elearning module on SARS was developed for a large university population of 32,000 students. The module…

  7. 20. OVERVIEW OF SAR3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. OVERVIEW OF SAR-3 COMPLEX, SHOWING FORMER RESIDENTIAL AREA, SAR-3 SWITCH RACK, MAINTENANCE YARD, AND GREENSPOT BRIDGE. NOTE ALSO LARGE PIPE CONDUCTING TAILRACE WATER INTO IRRIGATION SYSTEM. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. Optimisation of Block-Adaptive Quantization for SAR Raw Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parraga Niebla, C.; Krieger, G.

    In SAR systems using a satellite platform, the amount of raw data to be transmitted to ground for processing is huge. Effort has to be spent to reduce the raw data. One technique that can be applied here is block adaptive quantization. For SAR systems, the raw data set is organised as a two-dimensional complex array (in-phase and quadrature) whose axes correspond to range and azimuth of the SAR image, normally using 8 bit coding per pixel, which generates a big amount of data to be transmitted and processed. In the case of satellites with store and forward function, data storage becomes a problem since the buffer capacity downlink bandwidth are limited. Therefore, there is a need to reduce the raw data set to be transmitted. One approach to solve this problem is to reduce the number of levels for amplitude coding. The Block-Adaptive Quantization algorithm consists of (i) dividing the data set in blocks and (ii) the adaptation of the quantization threshold levels and reconstruction values to the statistics of the signal within each block in order to better fit the dynamic margin, reducing this way the required number of bits of each block. Asuming a non-uniform quantization, the knowledge of SAR raw data statistical properties (which can be asumed as complex Gaussian distributed) can be applied to optimise the threshold values and reconstruction leves to the probability density function (pdf) of the signal. As every compression technique, the Block-Adaptive Quantization algorithm is loosing information as long as the number of bits is reduced. The effect of this information loss will be investigated in detail in this paper to find the right balance between compression rate and information loss in order to keep the processing quality for different remote sensing applications (SAR processing, interferometry, polarimetry) at an sufficient level. Furthermore, the selection of an optimum block size to be treated as statistically stationary is an issue for systematic

  9. Aspirin absorption rates and platelet inhibition times with 325-mg buffered aspirin tablets (chewed or swallowed intact) and with buffered aspirin solution.

    PubMed

    Feldman, M; Cryer, B

    1999-08-15

    Large clinical trials such as the second International Study of Infarct Survival routinely gave patients with myocardial infarction a chewed aspirin, yet there are no data to show whether chewing of aspirin is better, or worse, than swallowing a whole tablet. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled study to determine whether chewing aspirin or administering it in solution accelerates its absorption and antiplatelet activity. On separate days, 12 fasting volunteers ingested 325 mg of buffered aspirin, either by chewing a tablet for 30 seconds before swallowing it with 4 ounces of water, swallowing a whole tablet with 4 ounces of water, or drinking 4 ounces of Alka Seltzer. Frequent blood samples were obtained for serum aspirin, salicylate, and thromboxane B2 (TxB2) concentrations. With all formulations of aspirin, serum TxB2 decreased 50% when the plasma aspirin concentration reached approximately 1,000 ng/ml. A 50% and 90% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred more quickly after chewing a tablet than after a tablet was swallowed whole. For example, the t 50% for serum TxB2 inhibition was 5.0 +/- 0.6 minutes with the chewed tablet versus 12.0 +/- 2.3 minutes when the tablet was swallowed (p = 0.01). A 50% decrease in serum TxB2 occurred 7.6 +/- 1.2 minutes after Alka Seltzer solution (p = 0.04 vs chewing a tablet; p = 0.13 vs swallowing a whole tablet). Chewing an aspirin tablet is the most effective way of accelerating absorption of aspirin into the blood and shortening the time required for an antiplatelet effect. PMID:10468077

  10. Landslide Monitoring in Three Gorges Area Using D-InSAR and PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantianuparp, Peraya; Shi, Xuguo; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Landslides are a major hazard in steep mountainous area, like the Three Gorges area. The Three Gorges dam was built on a geologically unstable zone. The geological pressures from the rising water level caused by the dam and the deforestation have further increased the possibility for landslides in the area. Many landslide monitoring techniques are applied to analysis, forecast, and control landslides in this area. D-InSAR and PS-InSAR, the time series InSAR analysis, are used for terrain motion detection and to estimate displacement trends. In this paper, SAR data from systems with different wavelengths, like the C-band ASAR, the L-band PALSAR, and the high-resolution TerraSAR-X X-band data, are used.

  11. Landslide Monitoring in Three Gorges Area Using D-InSAR and PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantianuparp, Peraya; Shi, Xuguo; Liao, Mingsheng; Zhang, Lu; Balz, Timo

    2013-01-01

    Landslides are a major hazard in steep mountainous area. The Three Gorges dam was built on a geologically unstable zone. The geological pressures from the rising water level caused by the dam and the deforestation have increased the possibility for landslides in the area. Many landslide monitoring techniques are applied to analysis, forecast, and control land-slides in this area. D-InSAR and PS-InSAR, the time series InSAR analysis, are used for terrain motion detection and to estimate displacement trends. In this paper, SAR data from systems with different wavelengths, like the C-band ASAR, the L-band ALOS, and the high-resolution TerraSAR-X X-band data, are used.

  12. Interseismic Deformation in the San Francisco Bay Area and Creep Estimates on the Calaveras Fault from InSAR Alone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaussard, E.; Burgmann, R.; Fattahi, H.; Johanson, I. A.; Nadeau, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Evaluation of interseismic strain accumulation and fault creep traditionally relies on GPS, alignment arrays and creepmeters, providing precise, but only horizontal and spatially sparse measurements. These measurements are often extrapolated into a model of the expected long-wavelength deformation, and InSAR data are adjusted to align with this modeled background displacement field. Thus, the InSAR data contributes only to characterization of short-wavelength deformation features. Here, we use InSAR to resolve small-amplitude long-wavelength displacements without an a priori model of deformation. We perform InSAR time-series analysis of ERS and Envisat data to resolve the 1992-2011 ground deformation in the San Francisco Bay Area. We rely on multiple viewing geometries to isolate vertical and horizontal deformation and validate our InSAR velocity field by analyzing adjacent tracks and comparing with GPS, alignment arrays, and creepmeter measurements. We ultimately aim at characterizing creep and strain accumulation rates on the Calaveras Fault. Because the Calaveras Fault separates urban areas from vegetated hillslopes, keeping coherence across the fault can be challenging. Accordingly, we rely on an alternative Small Baseline Subset time series method, in which the image-pair selection is based on the percentage of coherent pixels in each interferogram in an area that spans the fault. Our InSAR velocity field agrees well between adjacent tracks and the InSAR horizontal deformation agrees within ±1 mm/yr with the BAVU3 GPS velocity field. Additionally, InSAR-derived surface creep rates on the Hayward and Calaveras faults are in good agreement with local creep measurements. We thus demonstrate that InSAR enables resolving vertical and horizontal deformation partitioning in the Bay Area for signals as small as 2 mm/yr over both short- and long-wavelengths. We confirm that most of the interseismic deformation is horizontal, the vertical deformation being mostly due

  13. Monitoring delta subsidence with Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, S.; Overeem, I.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Can subsidence in river deltas be monitored in near real-time at the spatial and temporal resolution needed for informing critical management decisions? Interferometric Synthetic Radar Aperture (InSAR) is a satellite-based technique that can map ground deformation with millimeter-scale vertical resolution over thousands of square kilometers. InSAR has enormous potential to shed light on the dynamics of actively subsiding deltas, but the technique is not commonly applied outside of major cities due to the difficulty of performing InSAR in wet, vegetated settings. Given these limitations, how can InSAR best serve the global effort to monitor sinking deltas? Here, an overview of InSAR processing is provided that addresses delta-specific challenges, including frequent cloud-cover in tropical areas; noisy signals in wetlands and flooded fields; dense forests that interact unpredictably with different radar wavelengths; flat landscapes that hinder image stacking algorithms; rapid urban development that can render Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) inaccurate; and a lack of in situ GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers for InSAR calibration. InSAR has unique value for monitoring subsidence in deltas, and some natural and anthropogenic drivers of subsidence can be resolved by InSAR. High-resolution InSAR measurements from the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD) are then presented and validated against GPS data. Surface motion is shown to reflect subsurface stratigraphy, and sediment compaction is shown to be the most important factor in this delta on short (non-tectonic) timescales. Average compaction rates throughout the eastern delta range from 0 to > 18 mm/y, varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on the ages and grain sizes of surface and subsurface sediment layers. Fastest subsidence is observed in Holocene organic-rich mud, and slowest subsidence is observed along the Meghna River and in areas with surface or subsurface sand deposits. Although groundwater

  14. Investigating earthquake scaling relationships from a 15 year archive of InSAR-derived earthquake models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funning, G. J.; Ferreira, A. M.; Parsons, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    In the 15 years since the first InSAR study of the 1992 Landers earthquake, the first event to be studied using InSAR, over 50 events have been studied wholly or jointly using InSAR. This constitutes a rich archive of published studies that can be mined for information on earthquake phenomenology. Empirical earthquake scaling relationships, as can be inferred from estimates of fault dimensions, slip and moment for multiple earthquakes, are extensively used in seismic hazard forecasting, and also constitute a means of placing constraints on the bulk mechanical behaviour of the seismogenic upper crust. As a source of such data, studies that utilise information from InSAR have an advantage over seismic methods in that in many cases, a key parameter, the fault length, can be measured directly from the observations. In addition, in cases of good interferogram coherence, the high spatial density of surface deformation observations that InSAR affords can place tight constraints on fault width and other important parameters. We present here a preliminary survey of earthquake scaling relationships as supported by the existing archive of InSAR earthquake studies. We find that for events with Mw > 6, the data support moment scaling with the square of fault length, in keeping with the studies of Scholz and others, and imply proportionality between fault average slip and fault length. There are currently too few datapoints for great earthquakes (Mw > 8) to assess any proposed change in scaling for such events. Scatterplots of average slip versus fault length show two broad fields -- an area of high slip-to-length ratios (> 2 × 10-5) which are predominantly associated with faults with low long-term slip rates, predominantly from intraplate settings, and an area of lower slip-to-length ratios (< 2 × 10-5) which typically are larger events from faults with higher long-term slip rates (e.g. the North Anatolian and Kunlun faults, and the Peru-Chile subduction zone). In addition

  15. Growth of (1 1 1) and (2 0 0) orientation cubic MgZnO thin films under different oxygen flow rate by PLD method and its difference in element composition and optical absorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Shao, Y.K.; Lu, Y.M. Cao, P.J.; Liu, W.J.; Zeng, Y.X.; Jia, F.; Zhu, D.L.

    2015-04-15

    Under different migration energy of reactive Mg, Zn and O atoms from MgZnO target at different oxygen flow rate, (2 0 0) and (1 1 1) orientations MgZnO thin films with cubic structure were fabricated on fused quartz substrate by PLD method. And MgZnO thin film possesses relatively higher Zn composition and lower Mg composition when deposited more along (1 1 1) orientation. The band gap and UV absorption characteristics of MgZnO thin film do not change completely in accordance with the Mg/Zn atom ratio of MgZnO thin films deposited at different oxygen flow rate, but influenced more by the ratio between Mg and Zn atoms that combined with O atoms in MgZnO crystal lattice and the grain boundary density of MgZnO thin films deposited at different oxygen flow rate.

  16. Performance evaluation of SAR/GMTI algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garber, Wendy; Pierson, William; Mcginnis, Ryan; Majumder, Uttam; Minardi, Michael; Sobota, David

    2016-05-01

    There is a history and understanding of exploiting moving targets within ground moving target indicator (GMTI) data, including methods for modeling performance. However, many assumptions valid for GMTI processing are invalid for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. For example, traditional GMTI processing assumes targets are exo-clutter and a system that uses a GMTI waveform, i.e. low bandwidth (BW) and low pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Conversely, SAR imagery is typically formed to focus data at zero Doppler and requires high BW and high PRF. Therefore, many of the techniques used in performance estimation of GMTI systems are not valid for SAR data. However, as demonstrated by papers in the recent literature,1-11 there is interest in exploiting moving targets within SAR data. The techniques employed vary widely, including filter banks to form images at multiple Dopplers, performing smear detection, and attempting to address the issue through waveform design. The above work validates the need for moving target exploitation in SAR data, but it does not represent a theory allowing for the prediction or bounding of performance. This work develops an approach to estimate and/or bound performance for moving target exploitation specific to SAR data. Synthetic SAR data is generated across a range of sensor, environment, and target parameters to test the exploitation algorithms under specific conditions. This provides a design tool allowing radar systems to be tuned for specific moving target exploitation applications. In summary, we derive a set of rules that bound the performance of specific moving target exploitation algorithms under variable operating conditions.

  17. A novel high resolution wide swath SAR based on waveform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), with "all weather", day or night imaging capabilities, has been playing an important role in the domination of Earth observation. Spaceborne high-resolution wide-swath SAR (HRWS-SAR) can quickly obtain wide range of the earth's surface information, which is of great significance to Earth mapping, geological exploration, vegetation and biomass estimates, marine monitoring, target search, disaster relief, etc. As a result, spaceborne HRWS-SAR has been gaining more and more attention. However, considering the restrictions on pulse repetition frequency (PRF) and power-aperture product, space-based SAR imaging cannot achieve high resolution and wide swath at the same time. Currently existing solutions mainly focus on the antenna system hardware devices, such as MIMO, DBF; other signal-processing-bias solutions, such as Mosaic imaging technology, have higher requirements of the antenna pointing or beam control. These methods adopt more antenna elements or complex beam control method, which greatly increased the demand for hardware performance, and the signal processing method become more complicated as well. In order to relieve the pressure on the system hardware devices, this paper presents a new orthogonal coded waveform method based on the theory of communication. By using this method, the LFM signal is coded by the orthogonal codes to make the inter-pulse waveform irrelevant, which ensures the azimuth sampling rate as well as a wide swath. Theoretically, this method can alleviate the contradiction between PRF and high resolution wide swath imaging.

  18. Scientific goals and technical limitations of the shuttleborne synthetic aperture experiment X-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettl, Herwig

    The capabilities and scientific goals of the X-band SAR being developed for a 1990 Shuttle flight are summarized. The X-SAR will draw 1.4 kW, have a maximum data rate under 46 Mbit/sec, and hav a 12 x 0.4 m antenna. The X-SAR has linear vertical polarization with antenna gain exceeding 43 dBi, emit 40 microsec 9.6 GHz pulses, and have selectable slant range resolutions of 10 and 16 m. Azimuth resolution is to be 25 m and off-nadir viewing angles of 15-60 deg are to be available. From a 255 km altitude polar orbit, the X-SAR will be used to scan geologic formations, penetrate arid or semi-arid areas to detect different layers, and image layers of ice sheets, wet and dry snow status, and iceberg movements. Other goals are monitoring biomass density and waves, eddies, currents and pollution in the ocean. The X-SAR is eventually to be upgraded to include both copolarized and cross-polarized scanning.

  19. Permanent Scatterer InSAR Analysis and Validation in the Gulf of Corinth

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Panagiotis; Kontoes, Charalabos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Kotsis, Ioannis; Marinou, Aggeliki; Paradissis, Dimitris; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    The Permanent Scatterers Interferometric SAR technique (PSInSAR) is a method that accurately estimates the near vertical terrain deformation rates, of the order of ∼1 mm year-1, overcoming the physical and technical restrictions of classic InSAR. In this paper the method is strengthened by creating a robust processing chain, incorporating PSInSAR analysis together with algorithmic adaptations for Permanent Scatterer Candidates (PSCs) and Permanent Scatterers (PSs) selection. The processing chain, called PerSePHONE, was applied and validated in the geophysically active area of the Gulf of Corinth. The analysis indicated a clear subsidence trend in the north-eastern part of the gulf, with the maximum deformation of ∼2.5 mm year-1 occurring in the region north of the Gulf of Alkyonides. The validity of the results was assessed against geophysical/geological and geodetic studies conducted in the area, which include continuous seismic profiling data and GPS height measurements. All these observations converge to the same deformation pattern as the one derived by the PSInSAR technique. PMID:22389587

  20. Permanent Scatterer InSAR Analysis and Validation in the Gulf of Corinth.

    PubMed

    Elias, Panagiotis; Kontoes, Charalabos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Kotsis, Ioannis; Marinou, Aggeliki; Paradissis, Dimitris; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    The Permanent Scatterers Interferometric SAR technique (PSInSAR) is a method that accurately estimates the near vertical terrain deformation rates, of the order of ∼1 mm year(-1), overcoming the physical and technical restrictions of classic InSAR. In this paper the method is strengthened by creating a robust processing chain, incorporating PSInSAR analysis together with algorithmic adaptations for Permanent Scatterer Candidates (PSCs) and Permanent Scatterers (PSs) selection. The processing chain, called PerSePHONE, was applied and validated in the geophysically active area of the Gulf of Corinth. The analysis indicated a clear subsidence trend in the north-eastern part of the gulf, with the maximum deformation of ∼2.5 mm year(-1) occurring in the region north of the Gulf of Alkyonides. The validity of the results was assessed against geophysical/geological and geodetic studies conducted in the area, which include continuous seismic profiling data and GPS height measurements. All these observations converge to the same deformation pattern as the one derived by the PSInSAR technique.

  1. Bridge Deformation Monitoring: Instight From InSAR Time-Series And Finite Element Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamshiri, Roghayeh; Motagh, Mahdi; Baes, Marzieh; Sharifi, Mohammad-Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the capability of advanced InSAR time-series techniques such as Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) for monitoring of civil engineering structures like bridge. Deformation monitoring of bridges are essential to mitigate not only the financial and human losses, but also ecological and environmental-related problems. Assessment of deformation during bridge lifespan can provide invaluable insight for better planning and management. The study area, Lake Urmia Causeway (LUC) in northwest Iran, consists of one bridge and two embankments on both sides of it. The difference between the deformation rate of the embankments on both sides of the bridge may seriously damage the bridge itself, so it is very important to accurately monitor them in space and time in order to assess the state of the bridge concerning deformations. In this study we apply the InSAR time-series technique of SBAS for 58 SAR images including 10 ALOS, 30 Envisat and 18 TerraSAR-X (TSX) to assess deflation of embankments of Urmia bridge during 2003-2013. The InSAR results are used in a 2D Finite Element Model (FEM) to assess structural stability of the embankments.

  2. Resilience of SAR11 bacteria to rapid acidification in the high-latitude open ocean.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Manuela; Hill, Polly G; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P; Leakey, Raymond J G; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitous SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria numerically dominate marine planktonic communities. Because they are excruciatingly difficult to cultivate, there is comparatively little known about their physiology and metabolic responses to long- and short-term environmental changes. As surface oceans take up anthropogenic, atmospheric CO2, the consequential process of ocean acidification could affect the global biogeochemical significance of SAR11. Shipping accidents or inadvertent release of chemicals from industrial plants can have strong short-term local effects on oceanic SAR11. This study investigated the effect of 2.5-fold acidification of seawater on the metabolism of SAR11 and other heterotrophic bacterioplankton along a natural temperature gradient crossing the North Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Uptake rates of the amino acid leucine by SAR11 cells as well as other bacterioplankton remained similar to controls despite an instant ∼50% increase in leucine bioavailability upon acidification. This high physiological resilience to acidification even without acclimation, suggests that open ocean dominant bacterioplankton are able to cope even with sudden and therefore more likely with long-term acidification effects. PMID:26691595

  3. Deformation monitoring in Hanyuan reservoir resettlement of Pubugou Hydropower Station using PS-InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Min; He, Xiufeng

    2011-10-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a very effective technique for measuring surface deformation, but the temporal and geometrical decorrelation and atmospheric disturbances can strongly compromise the accuracy of the results. Persistent scatterer InSAR (PS-InSAR) overcomes the decorrelation and atmospheric disturbances problem by identifying resolution elements whose echo is dominated by a single scatterer in a series of interferograms. The results obtained by PS-InSAR technique are not the field deformation information but persistent scatterers deformation. In this paper, PS-InSAR is used to investigate surface deformation caused by landslide hazards in Hanyuan reservoir resettlement, China. The subsidence map derived from Envisat ASAR data between May 2008 and Oct 2009 reveals the spatial extent of the deformations and subsidence velocity. The experimental results show that there are instable areas which are located in the Middle of new Hanyuan county. The average deformation rate of the instable areas is over - 20mm. The Upper right and Lower left of new Hanyuan county are relatively stable.

  4. Permanent Scatterer InSAR Analysis and Validation in the Gulf of Corinth.

    PubMed

    Elias, Panagiotis; Kontoes, Charalabos; Papoutsis, Ioannis; Kotsis, Ioannis; Marinou, Aggeliki; Paradissis, Dimitris; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    The Permanent Scatterers Interferometric SAR technique (PSInSAR) is a method that accurately estimates the near vertical terrain deformation rates, of the order of ∼1 mm year(-1), overcoming the physical and technical restrictions of classic InSAR. In this paper the method is strengthened by creating a robust processing chain, incorporating PSInSAR analysis together with algorithmic adaptations for Permanent Scatterer Candidates (PSCs) and Permanent Scatterers (PSs) selection. The processing chain, called PerSePHONE, was applied and validated in the geophysically active area of the Gulf of Corinth. The analysis indicated a clear subsidence trend in the north-eastern part of the gulf, with the maximum deformation of ∼2.5 mm year(-1) occurring in the region north of the Gulf of Alkyonides. The validity of the results was assessed against geophysical/geological and geodetic studies conducted in the area, which include continuous seismic profiling data and GPS height measurements. All these observations converge to the same deformation pattern as the one derived by the PSInSAR technique. PMID:22389587

  5. Quantifying sub-pixel urban impervious surface through fusion of optical and inSAR imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, L.; Jiang, L.; Lin, H.; Liao, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we explored the potential to improve urban impervious surface modeling and mapping with the synergistic use of optical and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) imagery. We used a Classification and Regression Tree (CART)-based approach to test the feasibility and accuracy of quantifying Impervious Surface Percentage (ISP) using four spectral bands of SPOT 5 high-resolution geometric (HRG) imagery and three parameters derived from the European Remote Sensing (ERS)-2 Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR image pair. Validated by an independent ISP reference dataset derived from the 33 cm-resolution digital aerial photographs, results show that the addition of InSAR data reduced the ISP modeling error rate from 15.5% to 12.9% and increased the correlation coefficient from 0.71 to 0.77. Spatially, the improvement is especially noted in areas of vacant land and bare ground, which were incorrectly mapped as urban impervious surfaces when using the optical remote sensing data. In addition, the accuracy of ISP prediction using InSAR images alone is only marginally less than that obtained by using SPOT imagery. The finding indicates the potential of using InSAR data for frequent monitoring of urban settings located in cloud-prone areas. Copyright ?? 2009 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All right reserved.

  6. Resilience of SAR11 bacteria to rapid acidification in the high-latitude open ocean.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Manuela; Hill, Polly G; Tynan, Eithne; Achterberg, Eric P; Leakey, Raymond J G; Zubkov, Mikhail V

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitous SAR11 Alphaproteobacteria numerically dominate marine planktonic communities. Because they are excruciatingly difficult to cultivate, there is comparatively little known about their physiology and metabolic responses to long- and short-term environmental changes. As surface oceans take up anthropogenic, atmospheric CO2, the consequential process of ocean acidification could affect the global biogeochemical significance of SAR11. Shipping accidents or inadvertent release of chemicals from industrial plants can have strong short-term local effects on oceanic SAR11. This study investigated the effect of 2.5-fold acidification of seawater on the metabolism of SAR11 and other heterotrophic bacterioplankton along a natural temperature gradient crossing the North Atlantic Ocean, Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Uptake rates of the amino acid leucine by SAR11 cells as well as other bacterioplankton remained similar to controls despite an instant ∼50% increase in leucine bioavailability upon acidification. This high physiological resilience to acidification even without acclimation, suggests that open ocean dominant bacterioplankton are able to cope even with sudden and therefore more likely with long-term acidification effects.

  7. Motion compensation for aircraft-borne interferometric SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullock, Richard John

    This research has studied data driven techniques for roll compensation for aircraft-borne InSAR, for platforms where an accurate Inertial Navigation Unit (INU) is inappropriate due to limitations on weight or cost, such as a low-cost civilian mapping system or a miniature UAV. It is shown that for unknown topography, roll errors cannot simply be filtered from the interferogram due to a fundamental ambiguity between aircraft roll effects and certain types of undulating terrain. The solution to this problem lies in the differential Doppler shifts of the signals received at the two antennas. These are proportional to the aircraft roll rate and can be extracted by incoherent or coherent means and utilised to reconstruct the aircraft roll history. This research analyses, experimentally evaluates and further develops the incoherent Differential Doppler (DD) method for roll compensation, developed to the proof-of-concept stage by A. Currie at QinetiQ (Malvern) and compares this with the two-look method, which is a novel coherent technique developed, analysed and experimentally evaluated as part of this PhD from an original idea proposed by Prof. R. Voles of UCL. By means of empirical analysis, numerical simulation and real test data from the QinetiQ C-Band InSAR, it is shown that the two-look method offers significant advantages in sensitivity, frequency performance, robustness and efficiency of implementation over the DD method, particularly at long range. The experimental results also show that for the QinetiQ C-Band InSAR, the two-look method provides roll compensation to a similar quality or better than provided by the on-board Litton-93 INU, which has a specified accuracy of +/-0.05°. Ambiguities in the roll rate estimates from other motions are also shown to be small for this platform, and could be reduced further by employing differential GPS track compensation.

  8. Millimeter waves thermally alter the firing rate of the Lymnaea pacemaker neuron

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, S.I.; Kochetkova, N.V.; Ziskin, M.C.; Bolshakov, M.A.

    1997-05-01

    The effects of millimeter waves (mm-waves, 75 GHz) and temperature elevation on the firing rate of the BP-4 pacemaker neuron of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis were studied by using microelectrode techniques. The open end of a rectangular waveguide covered with a thin Teflon film served as a radiator. Specific absorption rates (SARs), measured in physiological solution at the radiator outlet, ranged from 600 to 4,200 W/kg, causing temperature rises from 0.3 to 2.2 C, respectively. Irradiation at an SAR of 4,200 W/kg caused a biphasic change in the firing rate, i.e., a transient decrease in the firing rate followed by a gradual increase to a new level that was 68 {+-} 21% above control. The biphasic changes in the firing rate were reproduced by heating under the condition that the magnitude (2 C) and the rate of temperature rise were equal to those produced by the irradiation. The addition of 0.05 mM of ouabain caused the disappearance of transient responses of the neuron to the irradiation. It was shown that the rate of temperature rise played an important role in the development of a transient neuronal response. The threshold stimulus for a transient response of the BP-4 neutron found in warming experiments was a temperature rise of 0.0025 C/s.

  9. APES-based procedure for super-resolution SAR imagery with GPU parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Weiwei; Xu, Xiaojian; Xu, Guangyao

    2015-10-01

    The amplitude and phase estimation (APES) algorithm is widely used in modern spectral analysis. Compared with conventional Fourier transform (FFT), APES results in lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks. However, in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging with large scene, without parallel computation, it is difficult to apply APES directly to super-resolution radar image processing due to its great amount of calculation. In this paper, a procedure is proposed to achieve target extraction and parallel computing of APES for super-resolution SAR imaging. Numerical experimental are carried out on Tesla K40C with 745 MHz GPU clock rate and 2880 CUDA cores. Results of SAR image with GPU parallel computing show that the parallel APES is remarkably more efficient than that of CPU-based with the same super-resolution.

  10. Pre-processing SAR image stream to facilitate compression for transport on bandwidth-limited-link

    SciTech Connect

    Rush, Bobby G.; Riley, Robert

    2015-09-29

    Pre-processing is applied to a raw VideoSAR (or similar near-video rate) product to transform the image frame sequence into a product that resembles more closely the type of product for which conventional video codecs are designed, while sufficiently maintaining utility and visual quality of the product delivered by the codec.

  11. Automated rectification and geocoding of SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, R.; Curlander, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    An automated post-processing system has been developed for rectification and geocoding of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) imagery. The system uses as input a raw uncorrected image from the operational SAR correlator, and produces as a standard output a rectified and geocoded product. The accurate geolocation of SAR image pixels is provided by a spatial transformation model which maps the slant range-azimuth SAR image pixels into their location on a prespecified map grid. This model predicts the geodetic location of each pixel by utilizing: the sensor platform position; a geoid model; the parameters of the data collection system and the processing parameters used in the SAR correlator. Based on their geodetic locations, the pixels are mapped by using the desired cartographic projection equations. This rectification and geocoding technique has been tested with Seasat and SIR-B images. The test results demonstrate absolute location uncertainty of less than 50 m and relative distortion (scale factor and skew) of less than 0.1 percent relative to local variations from the assumed geoid.

  12. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel.

  13. A comparative evaluation of SAR and SLAR

    SciTech Connect

    Mastin, G.A.; Manson, J.J.; Bradley, J.D.; Axline, R.M.; Hover, G.L.

    1993-11-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) was evaluated as a potential technological improvement over the Coast Guard`s existing side-looking airborne radar (SLAR) for oil-spill surveillance applications. The US Coast Guard Research and Development Center (R&D Center), Environmental Branch, sponsored a joint experiment including the US Coast Guard, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Naval Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Hazardous Materials Division. Radar imaging missions were flown on six days over the coastal waters off Santa Barbara, CA, where there are constant natural seeps of oil. Both the Coast Guard SLAR and the Sandia National Laboratories SAR were employed to acquire simultaneous images of oil slicks and other natural sea surface features that impact oil-spill interpretation. Surface truth and other environmental data were also recorded during the experiment. The experiment data were processed at Sandia National Laboratories and delivered to the R&D Center on a computer workstation for analysis by experiment participants. Issues such as optimal spatial resolution, single-look vs. multi-look SAR imaging, and the utility of SAR for oil-spill analysis were addressed. Finally, conceptual design requirements for a possible future Coast Guard SAR were outlined and evaluated.

  14. SARS revisited: managing "outbreaks" with "communications".

    PubMed

    Menon, K U

    2006-05-01

    "Risk communications" has acquired some importance in the wake of our experience of SARS. Handled well, it helps to build mutual respect between a government or an organisation and the target groups with which it is communicating. It helps nurture public trust and confidence in getting over the crisis. The World Health Organization (WHO) has also come to recognise its importance after SARS and organised the first Expert Consultation on Outbreak Communications conference in Singapore in September 2004. This article assesses the context and the key features which worked to Singapore's advantage. Looking at the data now widely available on the Internet of the experience of SARS-infected countries like China, Taiwan, Canada, the article identifies the key areas of strategic communications in which Singapore fared particularly well. Another issue discussed is whether Singapore's experience has universal applicability or whether it is limited because of Singapore's unique cultural, historical and geographical circumstances. Finally, the article also looks at some of the post-SARS enhancements that have been put in place following the lessons learnt from SARS and the need to confront new infectious outbreaks like avian flu. PMID:16830005

  15. An improved MIMO-SAR simulator strategy with ray tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Xingyu; Mo, Zijian; Wang, Zhonghai; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    High resolution and wide-swath imaging can be obtained by Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) with the state of the art technologies. The time division multiple access (TDMA) MIMO SAR mimics the motion of the antenna of SAR systems by switching the array channels to transmit the radar signals at different time slots. In this paper, we develop a simulation tool with ray tracing techniques to retrieve high resolution and accurate SAR images for development of MIMO SAR imaging methods. Without loss of generality, in the proposed simulator, we apply a TDMA MIMO SAR system with 13 transmitting antennas and 8 receiving antennas, where all transmitting antennas share a single transmitter and the receiving antennas share a single receiver. By comparing with the normal simulation MIMO SAR strategies, the simulation image using ray tracing results validate that the proposed method provides more accurate and higher resolution SAR images.

  16. Statistical Approach To Determination Of Texture In SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Kwok, Ronald

    1993-01-01

    Paper presents statistical approach to analysis of texture in synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) images. Objective: to extract intrinsic spatial variability of distributed target from overall spatial variability of SAR image.

  17. Does absorption of ultraviolet B by stratospheric ozone and urban aerosols influence colon and breast cancer mortality rates? Contributions from NASA and NOAA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, Edward D.; Garland, Frank C.; Mohr, Sharif B.; Grant, William B.; Garland, Cedric F.

    2005-08-01

    Although most ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is absorbed by stratospheric ozone, dense anthropogenic sulfate aerosols in the troposphere may further attenuate UVB in some regions. Mortality rates from colon and breast cancer tend to be much higher in areas with low levels of UVB radiation. These high rates may be due in part to inadequate cutaneous photosynthesis of vitamin D. Satellite data on atmospheric aerosols, stratospheric ozone, and cloud cover were obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These data were combined with age-adjusted mortality rates from 175 countries reporting to the World Health Organization. Regression was used to assess the relationship of stratospheric ozone thickness, aerosol optical depth, cloud cover, solar UVB irradiance at the top of the atmosphere, average skin exposure, and a dietary factor with colon and breast cancer mortality rates. Solar UVB irradiance at the top of the atmosphere, total cloud cover, and atmospheric aerosols had the strongest associations with mortality rates, apart from a strong influence of diet. Since 95% of circulating vitamin D is derived from current or stored products of photosynthesis, which may be nonexistent or minimal much of the year above 37°N or below 37°S, attenuation of UVB by atmospheric aerosols and clouds may have a greater than expected adverse effect on human health.

  18. Estimating subtle long-wavelength deformation with InSAR: Application to the Chaman Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattahi, H.; Amelung, F.

    2012-12-01

    error. Results from this study are very promising for InSAR community to explore the Envisat archive to measure long-wavelength deformation using the proposed strategy. We have applied the proposed processing strategy on the Envisat ASAR time-series data to measure the geodetic slip rate along the northern Chaman Fault. The preliminary results show the shallow fault creep along some segments of the fault, north of Chaman city. Velocity map from InSAR combined with seismic information in this area suggests strain partitioning between various known and unknown faults at the western Indian boundary.

  19. Characterizing hydrologic changes of Great Dismal Swamp using SAR/InSAR technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Great Dismal Swamp is one of the largest, northernmost peatlands on the Atlantic Coastal Plain, and the swamp is underlain by a thick water-logged organic soil layer (peat) made up of dead and decaying plant material. The peatlands play a role as the sink of large amount of soil organic carbon and methane. However, the disturbance of the peatland negatively impacted the ecosystem and contributed to the climate change caused by the released greenhouse gas. Our SAR/InSAR methods observed the hydrologic changes in the peatlands, which is a key factor to conserve the wetland, through several methods. First, we compared averaged SAR intensity from C- and L-band SAR sensors with groundwater level changes, and deduced a linear relationship between the SAR backscattering intensity and the groundwater level change. Second, we extracted the inundated area during wet season from InSAR coherence. Third, we measured the relative water level changes in the inundated area using the interferometric phases. Finally, we estimated the groundwater level changes corresponding to the soil moisture changes from time-series InSAR method. Our results can provide the unique opportunity to understand the occurring hydrologic and vegetation changes in the Great Dismal Swamp.

  20. Completing the gaps in Kilauea's Father's Day InSAR displacement signature with ScanSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertran Ortiz, A.; Pepe, A.; Lanari, R.; Lundgren, P.; Rosen, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Currently there are gaps in the known displacement signature obtained with InSAR at Kilauea between 2002 and 2009. InSAR data can be richer than GPS because of denser spatial cover. However, to better model rapidly varying and non-steady geophysical events InSAR is limited because of its less dense time observations of the area under study. The ScanSAR mode currently available in several satellites mitigates this effect because the satellite may illuminate a given area more than once within an orbit cycle. The Kilauea displacement graph below from Instituto per Il Rilevamento Electromagnetico dell'Ambiente (IREA) is a cut in space of the displacement signature obtained from a time series of several stripmap-to-stripmap interferograms. It shows that critical information is missing, especially between 2006 and 2007. The displacement is expected to be non-linear judging from the 2007-2008 displacement signature, thus simple interpolation would not suffice. The gap can be filled by incorporating Envisat stripmap-to-ScanSAR interferograms available during that time period. We propose leveraging JPL's new ROI-PAC ScanSAR module to create stripmap-to-ScanSAR interferograms. The new interferograms will be added to the stripmap ones in order to extend the existing stripmap time series generated by using the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique. At AGU we will present denser graphs that better capture Kilauea's displacement between 2003 and 2009.

  1. Justification of Drug Product Dissolution Rate and Drug Substance Particle Size Specifications Based on Absorption PBPK Modeling for Lesinurad Immediate Release Tablets.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Xavier J H; Flanagan, Talia R; Holt, David J; Eidelman, Anna; Treacy, Don; Rowlings, Colin E

    2016-09-01

    In silico absorption modeling has been performed, to assess the impact of in vitro dissolution on in vivo performance for ZURAMPIC (lesinurad) tablets. The dissolution profiles of lesinurad tablets generated using the quality control method were used as an input to a GastroPlus model to estimate in vivo dissolution in the various parts of the GI tract and predict human exposure. A model was set up, which accounts for differences of dosage form transit, dissolution, local pH in the GI tract, and fluid volumes available for dissolution. The predictive ability of the model was demonstrated by confirming that it can reproduce the Cmax observed for independent clinical trial. The model also indicated that drug product batches that pass the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min are anticipated to be bioequivalent to the clinical reference batch. To further explore the dissolution space, additional simulations were performed using a theoretical dissolution profile below the proposed specification. The GastroPlus modeling indicates that such a batch will also be bioequivalent to standard clinical batches despite having a dissolution profile, which would fail the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min. This demonstrates that the proposed dissolution specification sits comfortably within a region of dissolution performance where bioequivalence is anticipated and is not near an edge of failure for dissolution, providing additional confidence to the proposed specifications. Finally, simulations were performed using a virtual drug substance batch with a particle size distribution at the limit of the proposed specification for particle size. Based on these simulations, such a batch is also anticipated to be bioequivalent to clinical reference, demonstrating that the proposed specification limits for particle size distribution would give products bioequivalent to the pivotal clinical batches. PMID:27438964

  2. Justification of Drug Product Dissolution Rate and Drug Substance Particle Size Specifications Based on Absorption PBPK Modeling for Lesinurad Immediate Release Tablets.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Xavier J H; Flanagan, Talia R; Holt, David J; Eidelman, Anna; Treacy, Don; Rowlings, Colin E

    2016-09-01

    In silico absorption modeling has been performed, to assess the impact of in vitro dissolution on in vivo performance for ZURAMPIC (lesinurad) tablets. The dissolution profiles of lesinurad tablets generated using the quality control method were used as an input to a GastroPlus model to estimate in vivo dissolution in the various parts of the GI tract and predict human exposure. A model was set up, which accounts for differences of dosage form transit, dissolution, local pH in the GI tract, and fluid volumes available for dissolution. The predictive ability of the model was demonstrated by confirming that it can reproduce the Cmax observed for independent clinical trial. The model also indicated that drug product batches that pass the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min are anticipated to be bioequivalent to the clinical reference batch. To further explore the dissolution space, additional simulations were performed using a theoretical dissolution profile below the proposed specification. The GastroPlus modeling indicates that such a batch will also be bioequivalent to standard clinical batches despite having a dissolution profile, which would fail the proposed dissolution specification of Q = 80% in 30 min. This demonstrates that the proposed dissolution specification sits comfortably within a region of dissolution performance where bioequivalence is anticipated and is not near an edge of failure for dissolution, providing additional confidence to the proposed specifications. Finally, simulations were performed using a virtual drug substance batch with a particle size distribution at the limit of the proposed specification for particle size. Based on these simulations, such a batch is also anticipated to be bioequivalent to clinical reference, demonstrating that the proposed specification limits for particle size distribution would give products bioequivalent to the pivotal clinical batches.

  3. Absolute radiometric calibration of the CCRS SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulander, Lars M. H.; Hawkins, Robert K.; Livingstone, Charles E.; Lukowski, Tom I.

    1991-11-01

    Determining the radar scattering coefficients from SAR (synthetic aperture radar) image data requires absolute radiometric calibration of the SAR system. The authors describe an internal calibration methodology for the airborne Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) SAR system, based on radar theory, a detailed model of the radar system, and measurements of system parameters. The methodology is verified by analyzing external calibration data acquired over a 6-month period in 1988 by the C-band radar using HH polarization. The results indicate that the overall error is +/- 0.8 dB (1-sigma) for incidence angles +/- 20 deg from antenna boresight. The dominant error contributions are due to the antenna radome and uncertainties in the elevation angle relative to the antenna boresight.

  4. Calibration of a polarimetric imaging SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Pierce, L. E.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1991-01-01

    Calibration of polarimetric imaging Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR's) using point calibration targets is discussed. The four-port network calibration technique is used to describe the radar error model. The polarimetric ambiguity function of the SAR is then found using a single point target, namely a trihedral corner reflector. Based on this, an estimate for the backscattering coefficient of the terrain is found by a deconvolution process. A radar image taken by the JPL Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) is used for verification of the deconvolution calibration method. The calibrated responses of point targets in the image are compared both with theory and the POLCAL technique. Also, response of a distributed target are compared using the deconvolution and POLCAL techniques.

  5. The Radarsat SAR multi-beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins-Camelo, L.; Cooper, R. T.; Zimcik, D. G.

    1984-10-01

    Radarsat, the Canadian radar imaging satellite, will have a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) antenna as one of its sensors. The requirements on the performance of the SAR antenna are such as to make it a complex system. Radarsat is required to have some unique characteristics which present some new challenges to the antenna designers. The requirements for switchability among 4 shaped beams and high power of transmit operation are major design constraints which strongly impact on the antenna complexity, weight, and cost. A trade-off study was carried out to select the preferred antenna type for the Radarsat SAR function. The antenna types analyzed were planar-array and array-fed reflector. A set of comparison criteria was developed. The antenna concepts studied were then compared against these criteria, and a final decision was reached.

  6. New approaches in interferometric SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Qian; Vesecky, John F.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1992-01-01

    It is well established that interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images can be inverted to perform surface elevation mapping. Among the factors critical to the mapping accuracy are registration of the interfering SAR images and phase unwrapping. A novel registration algorithm is presented that determines the registration parameters through optimization. A new figure of merit is proposed that evaluates the registration result during the optimization. The phase unwrapping problem is approached through a new method involving fringe line detection. The algorithms are tested with two SEASAT SAR images of terrain near Yellowstone National Park. These images were collected on Seasat orbits 1334 and 1420, which were very close together in space, i.e., less than 100 m. The resultant elevation map is compared with the USGS digital terrain elevation model.

  7. Linear Approximation SAR Azimuth Processing Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindquist, R. B.; Masnaghetti, R. K.; Belland, E.; Hance, H. V.; Weis, W. G.

    1979-01-01

    A segmented linear approximation of the quadratic phase function that is used to focus the synthetic antenna of a SAR was studied. Ideal focusing, using a quadratic varying phase focusing function during the time radar target histories are gathered, requires a large number of complex multiplications. These can be largely eliminated by using linear approximation techniques. The result is a reduced processor size and chip count relative to ideally focussed processing and a correspondingly increased feasibility for spaceworthy implementation. A preliminary design and sizing for a spaceworthy linear approximation SAR azimuth processor meeting requirements similar to those of the SEASAT-A SAR was developed. The study resulted in a design with approximately 1500 IC's, 1.2 cubic feet of volume, and 350 watts of power for a single look, 4000 range cell azimuth processor with 25 meters resolution.

  8. Stop outbreak of SARS with infrared cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yigang M.

    2004-04-01

    SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, commonly known as Atypical Pneumonia in mainland China) caused 8422 people affected and resulting in 918 deaths worldwide in half year. This disease can be transmitted by respiratory droplets or by contact with a patient's respiratory secretions. This means it can be spread out very rapidly through the public transportations by the travelers with the syndrome. The challenge was to stop the SARS carriers traveling around by trains, airplanes, coaches and etc. It is impractical with traditional oral thermometers or spot infrared thermometers to screen the tens of travelers with elevated body temperature from thousands of normal travelers in hours. The thermal imager with temperature measurement function is a logical choice for this special application although there are some limitations and drawbacks. This paper discusses the real SARS applications of industrial infrared cameras in China from April to July 2003.

  9. THE ABSORPTION OF ADRENALIN

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, D. Murray

    1923-01-01

    1. Adrenalin solution given subcutaneously is usually rapidly absorbed, probably by lymphatic channels. 2. The speed of this process may be influenced by the circulation rate. 3. The relative amounts of adrenalin at any moment unabsorbed at the site of inoculation, carried in the circulating fluids, and taken up by the reacting tissues can be calculated from figures extracted from the curve of the blood pressure changes. The relative rates of transference of adrenalin into the blood and from the circulation into the tissues can also be estimated. 4. When absorption takes place rapidly a large quantity of the drug comes into action at once and the maximum occurs early, the curve of blood pressure reaches a considerable height, and subsides quickly. When absorption is slow the apex appears later and does not reach so high a level. 5. The response to adrenalin bears a logarithmic relationship to the dose employed and a method of allowing for this is indicated. PMID:19868816

  10. SAR imagery using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojian; Feng, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are getting more and more applications in both civilian and military remote sensing missions. With the increasing deployment of electronic countermeasures (ECM) on modern battlefields, SAR encounters more and more interference jamming signals. The ECM jamming signals cause the SAR system to receive and process erroneous information which results in severe degradations in the output SAR images and/or formation of phony images of nonexistent targets. As a consequence, development of the electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) capability becomes one of the key problems in SAR system design. This paper develops radar signaling strategies and algorithms that enhance the ability of synthetic aperture radar to image targets under conditions of electronic jamming. The concept of SAR using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses (CCFAP-SAR) is first proposed. Then the imaging procedure for CCFAP-SAR is discussed in detail. The ECCM performance of CCFAP-SAR for both depressive noise jamming and deceptive repeat jamming is analyzed. The impact of the carrier frequency agility range on the image quality of CCFAP-SAR is also studied. Simulation results demonstrate that, with adequate agility range of the carrier frequency, the proposed CCFAP-SAR performs as well as conventional radar with linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform in image quality and slightly better in anti-noise depressive jamming; while performs very well in anti-deception jamming which cannot be rejected by LFM-SAR.

  11. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) Prevention in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Hsueh-Erh

    2004-01-01

    Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) is a newly identified respiratory disease that threatened Taiwan between April 14 and July 5, 2003. Chang Gung University experienced various SARS-related episodes, such as the postponement of classes for 7 days, the reporting of probable SARS cases, and the isolation of students under Level A and B…

  12. Progress Toward Demonstrating SAR Monitoring of Chinese Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weigen; Johannessen, Johnny; Alpers, Werner; Yang, Jingsong

    2010-12-01

    "Demonstrating SAR monitoring of Chinese seas" is a project of the ESA-MOST Dragon 2 program. This paper presents the progress of the project. Retrieval algorithms for SAR monitoring of sea surface currents, oceanic internal waves, sea surface winds, oil spills and ships have been advanced. SAR monitoring of Chinese seas in near-real-time is now in demonstration phase.

  13. First Results from an Airborne Ka-Band SAR Using SweepSAR and Digital Beamforming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadowy, Gregory A.; Ghaemi, Hirad; Hensley, Scott C.

    2012-01-01

    SweepSAR is a wide-swath synthetic aperture radar technique that is being studied for application on the future Earth science radar missions. This paper describes the design of an airborne radar demonstration that simulates an 11-m L-band (1.2-1.3 GHz) reflector geometry at Ka-band (35.6 GHz) using a 40-cm reflector. The Ka-band SweepSAR Demonstration system was flown on the NASA DC-8 airborne laboratory and used to study engineering performance trades and array calibration for SweepSAR configurations. We present an instrument and experiment overview, instrument calibration and first results.

  14. Efficacy of various disinfectants against SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Rabenau, H F; Kampf, G; Cinatl, J; Doerr, H W

    2005-10-01

    The recent severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic in Asia and Northern America led to broad use of various types of disinfectant in order to control the public spread of the highly contagious virus. However, only limited data were available to demonstrate their efficacy against SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). We therefore investigated eight disinfectants for their activity against SARS-CoV according to prEN 14476. Four hand rubs were tested at 30s (Sterillium, based on 45% iso-propanol, 30% n-propanol and 0.2% mecetronium etilsulphate; Sterillium Rub, based on 80% ethanol; Sterillium Gel, based on 85% ethanol; Sterillium Virugard, based on 95% ethanol). Three surface disinfectants were investigated at 0.5% for 30 min and 60 min (Mikrobac forte, based on benzalkonium chloride and laurylamine; Kohrsolin FF, based on benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde and didecyldimonium chloride; Dismozon pur, based on magnesium monoperphthalate), and one instrument disinfectant was investigated at 4% for 15 min, 3% for 30 min and 2% for 60 min [Korsolex basic, based on glutaraldehyde and (ethylenedioxy)dimethanol]. Three types of organic load were used: 0.3% albumin, 10% fetal calf serum, and 0.3% albumin with 0.3% sheep erythrocytes. Virus titres were determined by a quantitative test (endpoint titration) in 96-well microtitre plates. With all tested preparations, SARS-CoV was inactivated to below the limit of detection (reduction factor mostly > or =4), regardless of the type of organic load. In summary, SARS-CoV can be inactivated quite easily with many commonly used disinfectants.

  15. Mapping slope movements in Alpine environments using TerraSAR-X interferometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboux, Chloé; Strozzi, Tazio; Delaloye, Reynald; Wegmüller, Urs; Collet, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Mapping slope movements in Alpine environments is an increasingly important task in the context of climate change and natural hazard management. We propose the detection, mapping and inventorying of slope movements using different interferometric methods based on TerraSAR-X satellite images. Differential SAR interferograms (DInSAR), Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI), Short-Baseline Interferometry (SBAS) and a semi-automated texture image analysis are presented and compared in order to determine their contribution for the automatic detection and mapping of slope movements of various velocity rates encountered in Alpine environments. Investigations are conducted in a study region of about 6 km × 6 km located in the Western Swiss Alps using a unique large data set of 140 DInSAR scenes computed from 51 summer TerraSAR-X (TSX) acquisitions from 2008 to 2012. We found that PSI is able to precisely detect only points moving with velocities below 3.5 cm/yr in the LOS, with a root mean squared error of about 0.58 cm/yr compared to DGPS records. SBAS employed with 11 days summer interferograms increases the range of detectable movements to rates up to 35 cm/yr in the LOS with a root mean squared error of 6.36 cm/yr, but inaccurate measurements due to phase unwrapping are already possible for velocity rates larger than 20 cm/year. With the semi-automated texture image analysis the rough estimation of the velocity rates over an outlined moving zone is accurate for rates of "cm/day", "dm/month" and "cm/month", but due to the decorrelation of yearly TSX interferograms this method fails for the observation of slow movements in the "cm/yr" range.

  16. Effects of angiotensin II and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption in the rat proximal tubule

    SciTech Connect

    Chatsudthipong, V.; Chan, Y.L.

    1986-03-01

    Microperfusion of proximal convoluted tubule(PCT) and peritubular capillaries was performed to examine the effects of angiotensin II(Ang II) and ionomycin on fluid and bicarbonate absorption. Bicarbonate was determined by microcalorimetry and C-14 inulin was used as a volume marker. The rates of bicarbonate absorption (JHCO/sub 3/) was 143 peq/min x mm and fluid absorption(Jv) was 2.70 nl/min x mm, when PCT and capillary perfusate contained normal Ringer solution. Addition of Ang II (10/sup -6/M) to the capillary perfusate caused reductions of JHCO/sub 3/ and Jv by 35%. A similar effect was observed when ionomycin was added to the capillary perfusate. Ang II antagonist, (Sar/sup 1/, Ile/sup 8/)-Angiotensin II(10/sup -6/M), completely blocked the inhibitory effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO/sub 3/. Removal of calcium from both luminal and capillary perfusate did not change the effect of Ang II on Jv and JHCO/sub 3/. Our results indicate that Ang II inhibits the sodium-hydrogen exchanger in the proximal tubule via interacting with angiotensin receptor. The mechanism of Ang II action may involve mobilization of intracellular calcium.

  17. The 2010 slow slip event and secular motion at Kilauea, Hawai`i inferred from TerraSAR-X InSAR data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Jingyi; Zebker, Howard A.; Segall, Paul; Miklius, Asta

    2014-01-01

    We present here an Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) algorithm to extract both transient and secular ground deformations on the order of millimeters in the presence of tropospheric noise on the order of centimeters, when the transient is of short duration and known time, and the background deformation is smooth in time. We applied this algorithm to study the 2010 slow slip event as well as the secular motion of Kīlauea's south flank using 49 TerraSAR-X images. We also estimate the tropospheric delay variation relative to a given reference pixel using an InSAR SBAS approach. We compare the InSAR SBAS solution for both ground deformation and tropospheric delays with existing GPS measurements and confirm that the ground deformation signal andtropospheric noise in InSAR data are successfully separated. We observe that the coastal region on the south side of the Hilina Pali moves at a higher background rate than the region north side of the Pali. We also conclude that the 2010 SSE displacement is mainly horizontal and the maximum magnitude of the 2010 SSE vertical component is less than 5 mm.

  18. CCD architecture for spacecraft SAR image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arens, W. E.

    1977-01-01

    A real-time synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image processing architecture amenable to future on-board spacecraft applications is currently under development. Using state-of-the-art charge-coupled device (CCD) technology, low cost and power are inherent features. Other characteristics include the ability to reprogram correlation reference functions, correct for range migration, and compensate for antenna beam pointing errors on the spacecraft in real time. The first spaceborne demonstration is scheduled to be flown as an experiment on a 1982 Shuttle imaging radar mission (SIR-B). This paper describes the architecture and implementation characteristics of this initial spaceborne CCD SAR image processor.

  19. Estimating IMU heading error from SAR images.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-03-01

    Angular orientation errors of the real antenna for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) will manifest as undesired illumination gradients in SAR images. These gradients can be measured, and the pointing error can be calculated. This can be done for single images, but done more robustly using multi-image methods. Several methods are provided in this report. The pointing error can then be fed back to the navigation Kalman filter to correct for problematic heading (yaw) error drift. This can mitigate the need for uncomfortable and undesired IMU alignment maneuvers such as S-turns.

  20. Unsupervised Segmentation Of Polarimetric SAR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rignot, Eric J.; Dubois, Pascale; Van Zyl, Jakob; Kwok, Ronald; Chellappa, Rama

    1994-01-01

    Method of unsupervised segmentation of polarimetric synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) image data into classes involves selection of classes on basis of multidimensional fuzzy clustering of logarithms of parameters of polarimetric covariance matrix. Data in each class represent parts of image wherein polarimetric SAR backscattering characteristics of terrain regarded as homogeneous. Desirable to have each class represent type of terrain, sea ice, or ocean surface distinguishable from other types via backscattering characteristics. Unsupervised classification does not require training areas, is nearly automated computerized process, and provides nonsubjective selection of image classes naturally well separated by radar.

  1. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  2. Mars Mission Concepts: SAR and Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsperman, Michael; Clifford, S.; Lawrence, S.; Klaus, K.; Smith, D.

    2013-10-01

    Introduction: The time has come to leverage technology advances to reduce the cost and increase the flight rate of planetary missions, while actively developing a scientific and engineering workforce to achieve national space objectives. Mission Science at Mars: A SAR imaging radar offers an ability to conduct high resolution investigations of the shallow subsurface of Mars, enabling identification of fine-scale layering within the Martian polar layered deposits (PLD), as well as the identification of pingos, investigations of polygonal terrain, and measurements of the thickness of mantling layers at non-polar latitudes. It would allow systematic near-surface prospecting, which is tremendously useful for human exploration purposes. Limited color capabilities in a notional high-resolution stereo imaging system would enable the generation of false color images, resulting in useful science results, and the stereo data could be reduced into high-resolution Digital Elevation Models uniquely useful for exploration planning and science purposes. Mission Concept: Using a common spacecraft for multiple missions reduces costs. Solar electric propulsion (SEP) provides the flexibility required for multiple mission objectives. Our concept involves using a Boeing 702SP with a highly capable SAR imager that also conducts autonomous rendezvous and docking experiments accomplished from Mars orbit. Summary/Conclusions: A robust and compelling Mars mission can be designed to meet the 2018 Mars launch window opportunity. Using advanced in-space power and propulsion technologies like High Power Solar Electric Propulsion provides enormous mission flexibility to execute the baseline science mission and conduct necessary Mars Sample Return Technology Demonstrations in Mars orbit on the same mission. An observation spacecraft platform like the high power 5Kw) 702SP at Mars also enables the use of a SAR instrument to reveal new insights and understanding of the Mars regolith for both

  3. Sinking Chao Phraya delta plain, Thailand, derived from SAR interferometry time series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, A.; Mio, A.; Saito, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Bangkok Metropolitan region and its surrounding provinces are located in a low-lying delta plain of the Chao Phraya River. Extensive groundwater use from the late 1950s has caused the decline of groundwater levels in the aquifers and Holocene clay compaction beneath the Bangkok Region, resulting in significant subsidence of the ground. This ground deformation has been monitored using leveling surveys since 1978, and differential InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) analysis. It shows that the Bangkok Metropolitan region is subsiding at a rate of about 20 mm/year during the recent years due to law-limited groundwater pumping, although the highest subsidence rate as high as 120 mm/year was recorded in 1981. The subsidence rate in the Bangkok area has significantly decreased since the late 1980s; however, the affected area has spread out to the surrounding areas. The maximum subsidence rate up to 30 mm/year occurred in the outlying southeast and southwest coastal zones in 2002. In this study, we apply a SAR interferometry time series analysis to monitor ground deformations in the lower Chao Phraya delta plain (Lower Central Plain), Thailand, using ALOS (Advanced Land Observing Satellite) PALSAR (Phased Array type L-band SAR) data acquired between July 2007 and September 2010. We derive a single reference time series interferogram from the stacking of unwrapped phases under the assumptions that those phases are smoothly and continuously connected, and apply a smoothness-constrained inversion algorithm that optimizes the displacement from the phase unwrapping of multitemporal differential SAR interferograms. The SAR interferometry time series analysis succeeds to monitor the incremental line-of-sight (LOS)-change between SAR scene acquisitions. LOS displacements are converted to vertical displacements, based on the assumption that the ground displacement in this area occurs only in the vertical directions. This reveals an overall pattern of subsidence

  4. Calculation of SAR and temperature rise in a high-resolution vascularized model of the human eye and orbit when exposed to a dipole antenna at 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flyckt, V. M. M.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Kroeze, H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.

    2007-05-01

    The eye is considered to be a critical organ when determining safety standards for radiofrequency radiation. With a detailed anatomy of the human eye and orbit inserted in a whole-head model, the specific absorption rates (SARs) and thermal effects were determined under exposure to a dipole antenna representing a mobile phone operating at 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz with an output power of 1 W. The temperature rise was calculated by taking the blood flow into account either by the Pennes bioheat model or by including the discrete vasculature (DIVA). In addition, a simple spherical model using constant heat transfer coefficients was used. Peak SARs in the humour are 4.5, 7.7 and 8.4 W kg-1 for 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz respectively. Averaged over the whole eyeball, the SARs are 1.7, 2.5 and 2.2 W kg-1. The maximum temperature rises in the eye due to the exposure are 0.22, 0.27 and 0.25 °C for exposure of 900, 1500 and 1800 MHz, respectively, calculated with DIVA. For the Pennes bioheat model, the temperature rises are slightly lower: 0.19, 0.24, 0.22 °C respectively. For the simple spherical model, the maximum temperature rises are 0.15, 0.22 and 0.20 °C. The peak temperature is located in the anterior part of the lens for 900 MHz and deeper in the eye for higher frequencies, and in the posterior part of the lens for 1500 MHz and close to the centre of the eyeball for 1800 MHz. For these RF safety applications, both DIVA and the Pennes bioheat model could be used to relate the SAR distributions to the resulting temperature distributions. Even though, for these artificial exposure conditions, the SAR values are not in compliance with safety guidelines, the maximum temperature rises in the eye are too small to give harmful effects. The temperature in the eye also remains below body core temperature.

  5. Diminished virulence of a sar-/agr- mutant of Staphylococcus aureus in the rabbit model of endocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, A L; Eberhardt, K J; Chung, E; Yeaman, M R; Sullam, P M; Ramos, M; Bayer, A S

    1994-01-01

    Microbial pathogenicity in Staphylococcus aureus is a complex process involving a number of virulence genes that are regulated by global regulatory systems including sar and agr. To evaluate the roles of these two loci in virulence, we constructed sar-/agr- mutants of strains RN6390 and RN450 and compared their phenotypic profiles to the corresponding single sar- and agr- mutants and parents. The secretion of all hemolysins was absent in the sar-/agr- mutants while residual beta-hemolysin activity remained in single agr- mutants. The fibronectin binding capacity was significantly diminished in both single sar- mutants and double mutants when compared with parents while the reduction in fibrinogen binding capacity in the double mutants was modest. In the rabbit endocarditis model, there was a significant decrease in both infectivity rates and intravegetation bacterial densities with the double mutant as compared to the parent (RN6390) at 10(3)-10(6) CFU inocula despite comparable levels of early bacteremia among various challenge groups. Notably, fewer bacteria in the double mutant group adhered to valvular vegetations at 30 min after challenge (10(6) CFU) than the parent group. These studies suggest that both the sar and agr loci are involved in initial valvular adherence, intravegetation persistence and multiplication of S. aureus in endocarditis. Images PMID:7962526

  6. Using InSAR for Characterizing Pyroclastic Flow Deposits at Augustine Volcano Across Two Eruptive Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpin, D. B.; Meyer, F. J.; Lu, Z.; Beget, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Augustine Island is a small, 8x11 km island in South Central Alaska's lower Cook Inlet. It is approximately 280 km southwest of Anchorage, and occupied entirely by its namesake Augustine Volcano. At Augustine Volcano, SAR data suitable for interferometry is available from 1992 to 2005, from March 2006 to April 2007, and from July 2007 to October 2010. Its last two eruptive episodes, in 1986 and 2006, resulted in substantial pyroclastic flow deposits (PFDs) on the Volcano's north flank. Earlier InSAR analyses of the area, from 1992-1999, identified local subsidence, but no volcano-wide deformation indicative of magma-chamber evacuation. In contrast to previous studies, we use InSAR data to determine a range of geophysical parameters for PFDs emplaced during the Augustine's two most recent eruption cycles. Based on InSAR measurements between 1992 and 2010, we reconstruct the deformation behavior of PFDs emplaced during Augustine's last two eruption cycles. Using a combination of InSAR measurements and modeling, we determine the thickness and long-term deformation of overlaying pyroclastic flow deposits emplaced in 1986 and 2006. Consistent with previous observations of pyroclastic flows, we found that the PFDs on Augustine Island rapidly subsided after emplacement due to an initial compaction of the material. We determined the length of this initial settling period and measured the compaction rate. Subsequent to this initial rapid subsidence, we found that PFD deformation slowed to a more persistent, linear, long-term rate, related to cooling of the deposits. We established that the deposits' contraction rate is linearly related to their thickness and measured the contraction rate. Finally, a study of long term coherence properties of the Augustine PFDs showed remarkable stability of the surface over long time periods. This information provides clues on the structural properties and composition of the emplaced material.

  7. The "Myth" of the Minimum SAR Antenna Area Constraint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, A.; Johnson, W. T. K.; Huneycutt, B.; Jordan, R.; Hensley, S.; Siqueira, P.; Curlander, J.

    1998-01-01

    A design constraint traceable ot the early days of spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is known as the minimum antenna area constraint for SAR. In this paper, it is confirmed that this constraint strictly applies only to the case where both the best possible resolution and the widest possible swath are the design goals. SAR antennas with area smaller than the constraint allows are shown to be possible, have been used on spaceborne SAR missions in the past, and should permit further, lower-cost SAR mission in the future.

  8. Variable Creep on the Concord fault from PS-InSAR and SBAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, I. A.; Burgmann, R.; Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.

    2009-12-01

    The Concord fault (CF) is part of the San Andreas fault (SAF) system in California’s San Francisco Bay Area. Its long-term slip rate of 7 ± 2 mm/yr (geodetically determined) represents about one-fifth of the total SAF system rate. The Concord fault also creeps at a rate of 2.5-3.5 mm/yr, determined from measurements at two alinement arrays (AAs). The AAs were also used to observe time-variable slip, and found that creep events occur every 3-5 years. Measuring creep and its variability on the CF is important, not just for understanding the fault’s earthquake potential, but also because it may give us insight into how slip is transferred onto the Concord fault. The similarity in creep rate between the NCF and CF, noted by Galehouse and Lienkamper (BSSA, 2003) is one line of evidence for linking the two. Block modeling by d’Alessio et al. (JGR 2005) further supports a portion of the CF slip rate coming from the NCF with the majority being transferred from the Greenville fault via the Monte Diablo thrust. We use PS-InSAR (permanent scatterer InSAR) and SBAS (small baseline subset) analysis to construct time series of ground motion around the CF and measure the creep rate along several profiles. The analysis is possible because of the extensive set of ERS and EnviSAT data available through the WInSAR and GeoEarthScope archives. Preliminary results show a good agreement with AA determined creep rates at their locations. Additionally the PS-InSAR data show that the creep rate decreases to the north as the CF approaches the Green Valley fault. South of the AAs, creep continues at rates of 3-4 mm/yr along a fault trace that bends westward toward the NCF, perhaps further suggesting a link between the two structures.

  9. Ambiguity noise analysis of a SAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Haishan; Chang, Wenge; Li, Xiangyang

    2015-12-01

    The presence of range and azimuth (or Doppler) ambiguities in synthetic aperture radars (SARs) is well known. The ambiguity noise is related to the antenna pattern and the value of pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Because a new frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) SAR has the characters of low cost and small size, and the capacity of real-time signal processing, the antenna will likely vibrate or deform due to a lack of the stabilized platform. And the value of PRF cannot be much high because of the high computation burden for the real-time processing. The aim of this study is to access and improve the performance of a new FMCW SAR system based on the ambiguity noise. First, the quantitative analysis of the system's ambiguity noise level is performed; an antenna with low sidelobes is designed. The conclusion is that the range ambiguity noise is small; the azimuth ambiguity noise is somewhat increased, however, it is sufficiently small to have marginal influence on the image quality. Finally, the ambiguity noise level is measured using the imaging data from a Ku-band FMCW SAR. The results of this study show that the measured noise level coincides with the theoretical noise level.

  10. Epidemic Models for SARS and Measles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozema, Edward

    2007-01-01

    Recent events have led to an increased interest in emerging infectious diseases. This article applies various deterministic models to the SARS epidemic of 2003 and a measles outbreak in the Netherlands in 1999-2000. We take a historical approach beginning with the well-known logistic curve and a lesser-known extension popularized by Pearl and Reed…

  11. Acousto-Optical/Electronic Processor For SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bicknell, T. J.; Farr, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight, compact, low-power apparatus processes synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) returns in real time, providing imagery aboard moving aircraft or spacecraft platform. Processor includes optical and electronic subsystems that, together, resolve range and azimuth coordinates of radar targets by combination of spatial and temporal integrations.

  12. SAR Image Despeckling Via Structural Sparse Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Ting; Li, Shutao; Fang, Leyuan; Benediktsson, Jón Atli

    2016-12-01

    A novel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image despeckling method based on structural sparse representation is introduced. The proposed method utilizes the fact that different regions in SAR images correspond to varying terrain reflectivity. Therefore, SAR images can be split into a heterogeneous class (with a varied terrain reflectivity) and a homogeneous class (with a constant terrain reflectivity). In the proposed method, different sparse representation based despeckling schemes are designed by combining the different region characteristics in SAR images. For heterogeneous regions with rich structure and texture information, structural dictionaries are learned to appropriately represent varied structural characteristics. Specifically, each patch in these regions is sparsely coded with the best fitted structural dictionary, thus good structure preservation can be obtained. For homogenous regions without rich structure and texture information, the highly redundant photometric self-similarity is exploited to suppress speckle noise without introducing artifacts. That is achieved by firstly learning the sub-dictionary, then simultaneously sparsely coding for each group of photometrically similar image patches. Visual and objective experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method over the-state-of-the-art methods.

  13. The Seamless SAR Archive (SSARA) Project and Other SAR Activities at UNAVCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Crosby, C. J.; Meertens, C. M.; Fielding, E. J.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Nicoll, J.; Baru, C.

    2014-12-01

    The seamless synthetic aperture radar archive (SSARA) implements a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). SSARA provides a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at the Alaska Satellite Facility and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate ESA's Virtual Archive 4 Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories (GSNL) collections and other archives into the federated query service. SSARA also provides Digital Elevation Model access for topographic correction via a simple web service through OpenTopography and tropospheric correction products through JPL's OSCAR service. Additionally, UNAVCO provides data storage capabilities for WInSAR PIs with approved TerraSAR-X and ALOS-2 proposals which allows easier distribution to US collaborators on associated proposals and facilitates data access through the SSARA web services. Further work is underway to incorporate federated data discovery for GSNL across SAR, GPS, and seismic datasets provided by web services from SSARA, GSAC, and COOPEUS.

  14. Modeling and a correlation algorithm for spaceborne SAR signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C.; Liu, K. Y.; Jin, M.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model of a spaceborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) response is presented. Thhe associated SAR system performance, in terms of the resolution capability, is also discussed. The analysis of spaceborne SAR target response indicates that the SAR correlation problem is a two-dimensional one with a linear shift-variant response function. A new digital processing algorithm is proposed here in order to realize an economical digital SAR correlation system. The proposed algorithm treats the two-dimensional correlation by a combination of frequency domain fast correlation in the azimuth dimension and a time-domain convolver type of operation in the range dimension. Finally, digitally correlated SEASAT satellite SAR imagery is used in an exemplary sense to validate the SAR response model and the new digital processing technique developed.

  15. Detecting Land Subsidence in Shanghai by PS-Networking SAR Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoxiang; Luo, Xiaojun; Chen, Qiang; Huang, Dingfa; Ding, Xiaoli

    2008-01-01

    Existing studies have shown that satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry has two apparent drawbacks, i.e., temporal decorrelation and atmospheric contamination, in the application of deformation mapping. It is however possible to improve deformation analysis by tracking some natural or man-made objects with steady radar reflectivity, i.e., permanent scatterers (PS), in the frame of time series of SAR images acquired over the same area. For detecting land subsidence in Shanghai, China, this paper presents an attempt to explore an approach of PS-neighborhood networking SAR interferometry. With use of 26 ERS-1/2 SAR images acquired 1992 through 2002 over Shanghai, the analysis of subsiding process in time and space is performed on the basis of a strong network which is formed by connecting neighboring PSs according to a distance threshold. The linear and nonlinear subsidence, atmospheric effects as well as topographic errors can be separated effectively in this way. The subsidence velocity field in 10 years over Shanghai is also derived. It was found that the annual subsidence rates in the study area range from -2.1 to -0.6 cm/yr, and the averaged subsidence rate reaches -1.1 cm/yr.

  16. Post-eruptive inflation of Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from InSAR, 2008–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qu, Feifei; Lu, Zhong; Poland, Michael; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Qin; Jung, Hyung-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Okmok, a ~10-km wide caldera that occupies most of the northeastern end of Umnak Island, is one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc. The most recent eruption at Okmok during July-August 2008 was by far its largest and most explosive since at least the early 19th century. We investigate post-eruptive magma supply and storage at the volcano during 2008–2014 by analyzing all available synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of Okmok acquired during that time period using the multi-temporal InSAR technique. Data from the C-band Envisat and X-band TerraSAR-X satellites indicate that Okmok started inflating very soon after the end of 2008 eruption at a time-variable rate of 48-130 mm/y, consistent with GPS measurements. The “model-assisted” phase unwrapping method is applied to improve the phase unwrapping operation for long temporal baseline pairs. The InSAR time-series is used as input for deformation source modeling, which suggests magma accumulating at variable rates in a shallow storage zone at ~3.9 km below sea level beneath the summit caldera, consistent with previous studies. The modeled volume accumulation in the 6 years following the 2008 eruption is ~75% of the 1997 eruption volume and ~25% of the 2008 eruption volume.

  17. Cassini RADAR's first SAR observations of Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, K. L.; West, R. D.; Anderson, Y.; Team, T.

    2011-12-01

    On November 6th, 2011, Cassini RADAR will have its first opportunity to image a non-Titan icy world at close-range, including a 240 m resolution, 16 km wide Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) swath of southern latitudes down to ~66° S. In addition, the spacecraft will obtain moderate resolution (~1-2 km) HiSAR and scatterometric scans for 2 northern hemisphere regions, and low resolution HiSAR & scatterometric scans (>2 km) of both inbound and outbound hemispheres in their entirety. Passive radiometry will also be obtained, co-spatial to the SAR swath at ~12 km resolution, as well as distant full disk observations. The fly-by in its entirely will provide near-global multi-layered products, massively enriching our remotely-sensed dataset for Enceladus. The goals are to: (1) Enrich our remotely-sensed coverage of Enceladus, providing a complementary imaging dataset that's sensitive to ~2.2-cm texture and dielectric properties, revealing previously undiscovered trends and anomalies; (2) Look for textural and compositional trends radial to the south polar sulci indicative of eruption processes; (3) Give moderate resolution radiometry at a wavelength complementary to CIRS to better characterize the thermal environment; (4) Provide a basis for comparison (limited "ground truth") with Titan imagery in an area covered by high resolution optical and thermal imagery; (5) Show how geology differs between Titan and Enceladus, giving insight into how Titan's geological and environmental peculiarities modulate surface landforms; and (6) Reveal surfaces with unusually high RADAR backscatter at similar resolutions to Titan SAR, to inform models of anomalously high backscatter surfaces on Titan (esp. Xanadu). We will present these observations and preliminary interpretations at the meeting, and discuss how they compare and contrast with previous optical and thermal data.

  18. BioSAR Airborne Biomass Sensing System

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.; Johnson, P.

    2007-05-24

    This CRADA was developed to enable ORNL to assist American Electronics, Inc. test a new technology--BioSAR. BioSAR is a an airborne, low frequency (80-120 MHz {approx} FM radio frequencies) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) technology which was designed and built for NASA by ZAI-Amelex under Patrick Johnson's direction. At these frequencies, leaves and small branches are nearly transparent and the majority of the energy reflected from the forest and returned to the radar is from the tree trunks. By measuring the magnitude of the back scatter, the volume of the tree trunk and therefore the biomass of the trunks can be inferred. The instrument was successfully tested on tropical rain forests in Panama. Patrick Johnson, with American Electronics, Inc received a Phase II SBIR grant from DOE Office of Climate Change to further test and refine the instrument. Mr Johnson sought ORNL expertise in measuring forest biomass in order for him to further validate his instrument. ORNL provided ground truth measurements of forest biomass at three locations--the Oak Ridge Reservation, Weyerhaeuser Co. commercial pine plantations in North Carolina, and American Energy and Power (AEP) Co. hardwood forests in southern Ohio, and facilitated flights over these forests. After Mr. Johnson processed the signal data from BioSAR instrument, the processed data were given to ORNL and we attempted to derive empirical relationships between the radar signals and the ground truth forest biomass measurements using standard statistical techniques. We were unsuccessful in deriving such relationships. Shortly before the CRADA ended, Mr Johnson discovered that FM signal from local radio station broadcasts had interfered with the back scatter measurements such that the bulk of the signal received by the BioSAR instrument was not backscatter from the radar but rather was local radio station signals.

  19. Analysis of Multipath Pixels in SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Wu, J. C.; Ding, X. L.; Zhang, L.; Hu, F. M.

    2016-06-01

    As the received radar signal is the sum of signal contributions overlaid in one single pixel regardless of the travel path, the multipath effect should be seriously tackled as the multiple bounce returns are added to direct scatter echoes which leads to ghost scatters. Most of the existing solution towards the multipath is to recover the signal propagation path. To facilitate the signal propagation simulation process, plenty of aspects such as sensor parameters, the geometry of the objects (shape, location, orientation, mutual position between adjacent buildings) and the physical parameters of the surface (roughness, correlation length, permittivity)which determine the strength of radar signal backscattered to the SAR sensor should be given in previous. However, it's not practical to obtain the highly detailed object model in unfamiliar area by field survey as it's a laborious work and time-consuming. In this paper, SAR imaging simulation based on RaySAR is conducted at first aiming at basic understanding of multipath effects and for further comparison. Besides of the pre-imaging simulation, the product of the after-imaging, which refers to radar images is also taken into consideration. Both Cosmo-SkyMed ascending and descending SAR images of Lupu Bridge in Shanghai are used for the experiment. As a result, the reflectivity map and signal distribution map of different bounce level are simulated and validated by 3D real model. The statistic indexes such as the phase stability, mean amplitude, amplitude dispersion, coherence and mean-sigma ratio in case of layover are analyzed with combination of the RaySAR output.

  20. Detecting slow moving targets in SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnehan, Robert; Perlovsky, Leonid; Mutz, Chris W.; Schindler, John

    2004-08-01

    Ground moving target indication (GMTI) radars can detect slow-moving targets if their velocities are high enough to produce distinguishable Doppler frequencies. However, no reliable technique is currently available to detect targets that fall below the minimum detectable velocity (MDV) of GMTI radars. In synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images, detection of moving targets is difficult because of target smear due to motion, which could make low-RCS targets fall below stationary ground clutter. Several techniques for SAR imaging of moving targets have been discussed in the literature. These techniques require sufficient signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) and adequate MDV for pre-detection. Other techniques require complex changes in hardware. Extracting the maximum information from SAR image data is possible using adaptive, model-based approaches. However, these approaches lead to computational complexity, which exceeds current processing power for more than a single object in an image. This combinatorial complexity is due to the need for having to consider a large number of combinations between multiple target models and the data, while estimating unknown parameters of the target models. We are developing a technique for detecting slow-moving targets in SAR images with low signal-to-clutter ratio, without minimal velocity requirements, and without combinatorial complexity. This paper briefly summarizes the difficulties related to current model-based detection algorithms. A new concept, dynamic logic, is introduced along with an algorithm suitable for the detection of very slow-moving targets in SAR images. This new mathematical technique is inspired by the analysis of biological systems, like the human brain, which combines conceptual understanding with emotional evaluation and overcomes the combinatorial complexity of model-based techniques.

  1. Rapid Mapping Of Floods Using SAR Data: Opportunities And Critical Aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulvirenti, Luca; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Chini, Marco

    2013-04-01

    present other critical aspects. Searching for low SAR backscatter areas only may cause inaccuracies because flooded soils do not always act as smooth open water bodies. The presence of wind or of vegetation emerging above the water surface may give rise to an increase of the radar backscatter. In particular, mapping flooded vegetation using SAR data may represent a difficult task since backscattering phenomena in the volume between canopy, trunks and floodwater are quite complex in the presence of vegetation. A typical phenomenon is the double-bounce effect involving soil and stems or trunks, which is generally enhanced by the floodwater, so that flooded vegetation may appear very bright in a SAR image. Even in the absence of dense vegetation or wind, some regions may appear dark because of artefacts due to topography (shadowing), absorption caused by wet snow, and attenuation caused by heavy precipitating clouds (X-band SARs). Examples of the aforementioned effects that may limit the reliability of flood maps will be presented at the conference and some indications to deal with these effects (e.g. presence of vegetation and of artefacts) will be provided.

  2. Development of a video SAR for FMV through clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is developing a Video Synthetic Aperture Radar (ViSAR) system designed to provide a targeting capability for the AC-130 gunship in conditions where the current electro-optic systems will not perform. By using radar, the gunship's availability rises from 35% to 72%, as clouds currently obscure the EO/IR camera's view of the ground. Several technical issues must be addressed in the program in order to be successful. In order to achieve frame rates fast to track maneuvering targets, the radar must operate at frequencies over 170 which requires the development of new electronics. Secondly, as targets move in the FOV of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) their apparent position is translated in the generated imagery. Thirdly, as the imagery generated is range versus azimuth rather than elevation versus azimuth, tall objects appear to be "laid over" unless corrections are made for the true height of the object imaged. This paper will describe the DARPA program striving to overcome these issues and review the approaches be taken to achieve the imagery required for the close air support mission.

  3. Monitoring urban subsidence based on SAR lnterferometric point target analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Jiahua; Gong, W.; Lu, Zhiming

    2009-01-01

    lnterferometric point target analysis (IPTA) is one of the latest developments in radar interferometric processing. It is achieved by analysis of the interferometric phases of some individual point targets, which are discrete and present temporarily stable backscattering characteristics, in long temporal series of interferometric SAR images. This paper analyzes the interferometric phase model of point targets, and then addresses two key issues within IPTA process. Firstly, a spatial searching method is proposed to unwrap the interferometric phase difference between two neighboring point targets. The height residual error and linear deformation rate of each point target can then be calculated, when a global reference point with known height correction and deformation history is chosen. Secondly, a spatial-temporal filtering scheme is proposed to further separate the atmosphere phase and nonlinear deformation phase from the residual interferometric phase. Finally, an experiment of the developed IPTA methodology is conducted over Suzhou urban area. Totally 38 ERS-1/2 SAR scenes are analyzed, and the deformation information over 3 546 point targets in the time span of 1992-2002 are generated. The IPTA-derived deformation shows very good agreement with the published result, which demonstrates that the IPTA technique can be developed into an operational tool to map the ground subsidence over urban area.

  4. Probability of detection of downed aircraft using SAR polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chotoo, Kancham; Huxtable, Barton D.; Mansfield, Arthur W.; Rais, Houra

    2000-08-01

    In developing a beaconless search and rescue capability to quickly locate small aircraft that have crashed in remote areas, NASA's Search and Rescue Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR2) program brings together advanced polarimetric synthetic aperture radar processing, field and laboratory tests, and state-of-the-art automated target detection algorithms. The fundamental idea underlying the search and rescue (S&R) approach is use of an airborne polarimetric radar. The downed aircraft is partly composed of metal, and consists of regular geometric shapes such as flat plates, dihedrals, trihedrals, etc., which produce a polarization signature expected to be distinct from that of surrounding terrain and foliage. Onboard polarimetric SAR image formation combined with automatic image exploitation will ultimately cue the S&R team to candidate crash sites in near real-time. We empirically examine the probability of detection (PD) and false alarm rate (FAR) for crash site detection using polarimetry to discriminate between aircraft target signatures within natural clutter. This briefing will present the latest results from the S&R Program activities, providing an update to the last program presentation to the SPIE Meeting in 1999.

  5. Modeling of channel mismatch in time-interleaved SAR ADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengquan, Li; Liang, Zhang; Zhangming, Zhu; Yintang, Yang

    2015-09-01

    In a time-interleaved analog-to-digital converter (TI ADC), several individual ADCs operate in parallel to achieve a higher sampling rate. Low power consumption as well as good linearity can be obtained by applying successive approximation register (SAR) converters as sub-channel ADCs. In spite of the advantages, this structure suffers from three mismatches, which are offset mismatch, gain mismatch, and time skew. This paper focuses on a TI SAR ADC with a number of channels. The mismatch effects in the frequency domain are analyzed and the derived close form formulas are verified based on Matlab. In addition, we clarify that the standard deviation of DNL and INL of an M-channel TI ADC is reduced by a factor of \\sqrt M compared to a single channel ADC. The formulas can be used to derive the corresponding requirements when designing a TI ADC. Our analysis process is able to inform the study of calibration algorithms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61234002, 61322405, 61306044, 61376033) and the National High-Tech Program of China (No. 2013AA014103).

  6. Performance modeling of feature-based classification in SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boshra, Michael; Bhanu, Bir

    1998-09-01

    We present a novel method for modeling the performance of a vote-based approach for target classification in SAR imagery. In this approach, the geometric locations of the scattering centers are used to represent 2D model views of a 3D target for a specific sensor under a given viewing condition (azimuth, depression and squint angles). Performance of such an approach is modeled in the presence of data uncertainty, occlusion, and clutter. The proposed method captures the structural similarity between model views, which plays an important role in determining the classification performance. In particular, performance would improve if the model views are dissimilar and vice versa. The method consists of the following steps. In the first step, given a bound on data uncertainty, model similarity is determined by finding feature correspondence in the space of relative translations between each pair of model views. In the second step, statistical analysis is carried out in the vote, occlusion and clutter space, in order to determine the probability of misclassifying each model view. In the third step, the misclassification probability is averaged for all model views to estimate the probability-of-correct- identification (PCI) plot as a function of occlusion and clutter rates. Validity of the method is demonstrated by comparing predicted PCI plots with ones that are obtained experimentally. Results are presented using both XPATCH and MSTAR SAR data.

  7. SAR-EDU - An education initiative for applied Synthetic Aperture Radar remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckardt, Robert; Richter, Nicole; Auer, Stefan; Eineder, Michael; Roth, Achim; Hajnsek, Irena; Walter, Diana; Braun, Matthias; Motagh, Mahdi; Pathe, Carsten; Pleskachevsky, Andrey; Thiel, Christian; Schmullius, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Since the 1970s, radar remote sensing techniques have evolved rapidly and are increasingly employed in all fields of earth sciences. Applications are manifold and still expanding due to the continuous development of new instruments and missions as well as the availability of very high-quality data. The trend worldwide is towards operational employment of the various algorithms and methods that have been developed. However, the utilization of operational services does not keep up yet with the rate of technical developments and the improvements in sensor technology. With the enhancing availability and variety of space borne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and a growing number of analysis algorithms the need for a vital user community is increasing. Therefore the German Aerospace Center (DLR) together with the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena (FSU) and the Technical University Munich (TUM) launched the education initiative SAR-EDU. The aim of the project is to facilitate access to expert knowledge in the scientific field of radar remote sensing. Within this effort a web portal will be created to provide seminar material on SAR basics, methods and applications to support both, lecturers and students. The overall intension of the project SAR-EDU is to provide seminar material for higher education in radar remote sensing covering the topic holistically from the very basics to the most advanced methods and applications that are available. The principles of processing and interpreting SAR data are going to be taught using test data sets and open-source as well as commercial software packages. The material that is provided by SAR-EDU will be accessible at no charge from a DLR web portal. The educational tool will have a modular structure, consisting of separate modules that broach the issue of a particular topic. The aim of the implementation of SAR-EDU as application-oriented radar remote sensing educational tool is to advocate the development and wider use of

  8. Light absorption measurements: new techniques.

    PubMed

    Hänel, G; Busen, R; Hillenbrand, C; Schloss, R

    1982-02-01

    A new radiometer is described which simplifies measurement of the radiation supply of solar wavelengths. Two methods of measuring the radiant energy absorbed by aerosol particles are described: A photometric technique is used for particles collected on filters, and a calorimetric technique is used for in situ measurements. Data collected with the radiometer and the light absorption techniques yield the heating rate of the atmosphere due to light absorption by the particles. Sample measurements show substantial atmospheric temperature increases due to absorption, especially in industrial regions.

  9. Climate change effects on Glacier recession in Himalayas using Multitemporal SAR data and Automatic Weather Station observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, V.; Singh, S. K.; Venkataraman, G.

    2009-04-01

    The Himalaya is the highest but the youngest mountain belt (20 to 60 million years B.P.) of the earth running in arc shape for about 2500 km. It has more than 90 peaks above 6000 m and contains about 50% of all glaciers outside of the polar environments (Bahadur, 1993). All glaciers in this region are in general recession since last 150 years (Paul et al.,1979). Gangotri, Siachen, Bara Shigri and Patsio are major glaciers in this region which are showing retreat with different rates and their respective tributary glaciers are completely disconnected from main body of glaciers. Spaceborne synthetic aperture radar data provide an important tool for monitoring the fluctuation of the glaciers. In this paper attempt has been made for quantifying the glacier retreat using multitemporal synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data. SAR intensity and phase information will be exploited separately under SAR intensity tracking and interferometric SAR (InSAR) coherence tracking (Strozzi et al., 2002) respectively. Glacier retreat study have been done using time series coregistered multi temporal SAR images. Simultaneously InSAR coherence thresholding is applied for tracking the snout of Gangotri glacier. It is observed that glacier is retreating at the rate of 21 m/a. Availability of high resolution spotlight mode TerraSAR-X SAR data will supplement the ENVISAT ASAR and ERS-1/2 based observations. The observatory in the proximity of Gangotri glacier has been made functional at Bhojbasa and all weather parameters viz. Snow fall, temperature, pressure, air vector, column water vapor and humidity are recorded twice a day as per WMO standards manually and automatically. Three Automatic Weather Stations (AWS) have been established in the glacier area at Bhojbasa , Kalindipass and Nandaban. Since Himalayan environment is presently under great stress of decay and degeneration, AWS data will be analyzed in the context of climate change effects on fluctuation of glaciers. References 1.Jagdish

  10. Integration of GPS and InSAR Measurements for Kinematic Analysis of Crustal Deformation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, W. L.; Wang, C. C.; Liu, T. Y.; Chiu, C. Y.; Chang, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    GPS (Global Positioning System) and InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) observations have their own characteristic: GPS can measure three-dimensional (East, North, Up) ground motion in high accuracy but has relatively sparse station coverage, while InSAR can provide densely spatial measurements of surface displacement but only in one dimension (LOS direction). In this study we adapt a velocity field method to combine InSAR measurements of LOS velocities with available GPS data. This allows us to form a velocity field in the GPS reference frame with higher spatial resolution than is available from the sparse GPS data alone. We first divide study areas into triangular meshes, and assume that the velocity varies linearly with latitude and longitude (i.e., homogeneous strain) within each triangle. Therefore, the geodetic observations within each triangle are related to the velocities of its vertices by an interpolation shape function. Given observed GPS ENU and InSAR LOS velocities, we can solve a system of linear equations for unknown velocities of the triangular vertices. With this velocity field model, we can get a continuous velocity field by interpolation of the vertex velocities and further calculate the strain rate of each triangular mesh. An additional advantage of this method is that it can provide ground motion (and their uncertainties) even in areas of InSAR incoherence. We apply this method to the Taipei area and the northern Longitudinal Valley (LV) of Taiwan by combining continuous GPS data and PSInSAR (Permanent Scatter InSAR) measurements observed by Envisat and ALOS satellites. Results show that the vertical motion in the Taipei basin is episodic, with the largest strain-rate magnitude shown along the hanging-wall of the Sanchiao normal fault and the south of the Tatun volcano area. In the northern LV, ground subsidence of ~5 mm/yr is revealed, with the largest strain-rate magnitude near 23.4°~23.6°N that is consistent with an area of

  11. InSAR measurements of compaction and subsidence in the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Stephanie A.; Overeem, Irina; Steckler, Michael S.; Syvitski, James P. M.; Seeber, Leonardo; Akhter, S. Humayun

    2014-08-01

    Many of the world's largest river deltas are sinking due to sediment loading, compaction, and tectonics but also recently because of groundwater extraction, hydrocarbon extraction, and reduced aggradation. Little is known, however, about the full spatial variability of subsidence rates in complex delta systems. This study reconstructs subsidence rates in the eastern portion of the Ganges-Brahmaputra Delta (GBD), Bangladesh, covering more than 10,000 km2 at a high spatial resolution of 100 m. The map was produced using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) covering the period 2007 to 2011. Eighteen Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased-Array L-band SAR scenes were used to generate 30 interferograms calibrated with GPS. Interferograms were stacked to yield average subsidence rates over the study period. Small Baseline Subset-InSAR was then applied to validate the results against an additional GPS record from Dhaka, Bangladesh. Land subsidence of 0 to > 10 mm/yr is seen in Dhaka, with variability likely related to local variations in shallow subsurface sediment properties. Outside of the city, rates vary from 0 to > 18 mm/yr, with the lowest rates appearing primarily in Pleistocene Madhupur Clay and the highest rates in Holocene organic-rich muds. Results demonstrate that subsidence in this delta is primarily controlled by local stratigraphy, with rates varying by more than an order of magnitude depending on lithology. The ability of L-band InSAR to differentiate between stratigraphic units in this humid, vegetated subtropical river delta demonstrates the power of interferometry as a tool for studying the subsurface in deltaic environments.

  12. Single-Chip FPGA Azimuth Pre-Filter for SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudim, Mimi; Cheng, Tsan-Huei; Madsen, Soren; Johnson, Robert; Le, Charles T-C; Moghaddam, Mahta; Marina, Miguel

    2005-01-01

    A field-programmable gate array (FPGA) on a single lightweight, low-power integrated-circuit chip has been developed to implement an azimuth pre-filter (AzPF) for a synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system. The AzPF is needed to enable more efficient use of data-transmission and data-processing resources: In broad terms, the AzPF reduces the volume of SAR data by effectively reducing the azimuth resolution, without loss of range resolution, during times when end users are willing to accept lower azimuth resolution as the price of rapid access to SAR imagery. The data-reduction factor is selectable at a decimation factor, M, of 2, 4, 8, 16, or 32 so that users can trade resolution against processing and transmission delays. In principle, azimuth filtering could be performed in the frequency domain by use of fast-Fourier-transform processors. However, in the AzPF, azimuth filtering is performed in the time domain by use of finite-impulse-response filters. The reason for choosing the time-domain approach over the frequency-domain approach is that the time-domain approach demands less memory and a lower memory-access rate. The AzPF operates on the raw digitized SAR data. The AzPF includes a digital in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) demodulator. In general, an I/Q demodulator effects a complex down-conversion of its input signal followed by low-pass filtering, which eliminates undesired sidebands. In the AzPF case, the I/Q demodulator takes offset video range echo data to the complex baseband domain, ensuring preservation of signal phase through the azimuth pre-filtering process. In general, in an SAR I/Q demodulator, the intermediate frequency (fI) is chosen to be a quarter of the range-sampling frequency and the pulse-repetition frequency (fPR) is chosen to be a multiple of fI. The AzPF also includes a polyphase spatial-domain pre-filter comprising four weighted integrate-and-dump filters with programmable decimation factors and overlapping phases. To prevent aliasing of signals

  13. Photochemical properties of trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (trans-CHCl═CHCF3): OH reaction rate constant, UV and IR absorption spectra, global warming potential, and ozone depletion potential.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Vladimir L; Martynova, Larissa E; Kurylo, Michael J

    2014-07-17

    Measurements of the rate constant for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (trans-CHCl═CHCF3) were performed using a flash photolysis resonance-fluorescence technique over the temperature range 220-370 K. The reaction rate constant exhibits a noticeable curvature of the temperature dependence in the Arrhenius plot, which can be represented by the following expression: kt-CFP (220-370 K) = 1.025 × 10(-13) × (T/298)(2.29) exp(+384/T) cm(3 )molecule(-1) s(-1). The room-temperature rate constant was determined to be kt-CFP (298 K) = (3.29 ± 0.10) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both two standard errors (statistical) and the estimated systematic error. For atmospheric modeling purposes, the rate constant below room temperature can be represented by the following expression: kt-CFP (220-298 K) = (7.20 ± 0.46) × 10(-13) exp[-(237 ± 16)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). There was no difference observed between the rate constants determined at 4 kPa (30 Torr) and 40 kPa (300 Torr) at both 298 and 370 K. The UV and IR absorption cross sections of this compound were measured at room temperature. The atmospheric lifetime, global warming potential, and ozone depletion potential of trans-CHCl═CHCF3 were estimated. PMID:24955760

  14. Synergistic measurements of ocean winds and waves from SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Biao; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; He, Yijun

    2015-09-01

    In this study we present a synergistic method to retrieve both ocean surface wave and wind fields from spaceborne quad-polarization (QP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mode data. This algorithm integrates QP-SAR wind vector retrieval model and the wave retrieval model, with consideration to the nonlinear mapping relationship between ocean wave spectra and SAR image spectra, in order to synergistically retrieve wind fields and wave directional spectra. The method does not require a priori information on the sea state. It combines the observed VV-polarized SAR image spectra with the retrieved wind vectors from the VH-polarized SAR image, to estimate the wind-generated wave directional spectra. The differences between the observed SAR spectra and optimal SAR image spectra associated with the wind waves are interpreted as the contributions from the swell waves. The retrieved ocean wave spectra are used to estimate the integrated spectral wave parameters such as significant wave heights, wavelengths, wave directions and wave periods. The wind and wave parameters retrieved by QP-SAR are validated against those measured by the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) directional wave buoys under different sea states. The validation results show that the QP-SAR SAR has potential to simultaneously measure the ocean surface waves and wind fields from space.

  15. Subsidence Detection Using InSAR and Geodetic Measurements in the North-West of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, Morteza

    2010-05-01

    The subsidence of the Earth surface is a phenomenon that occurs in some places in the world which overuse underground sources of water. As Iran has semi-arid and arid climate and the rate of rainfall is lower than the mean rate in the world then nowadays we are encountered by over-exploitation of groundwater in agricultural areas and also for extending the cities and industrial areas. Geodetic measurements i.e., repeated leveling measurements of first order leveling network of Iran and continuous GPS measurements of Iranian Permanent GPS Network of Iran (IPGN), showed that there are subsidence areas in the north-west of Iran. In this paper we try to find the area and rate of subsidence in the north-west of Iran using InSAR and geodetic techniques. The result of InSAR technique shows a better understanding on this phenomenon in these areas and has a good consistency with accurate geodetic measurements.

  16. Federated query services provided by the Seamless SAR Archive project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, S.; Bryson, G.; Buechler, B.; Meertens, C. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Fielding, E. J.; Nicoll, J.; Youn, C.; Baru, C.

    2013-12-01

    The NASA Advancing Collaborative Connections for Earth System Science (ACCESS) seamless synthetic aperture radar (SAR) archive (SSARA) project is a 2-year collaboration between UNAVCO, the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and OpenTopography at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to design and implement a seamless distributed access system for SAR data and derived data products (i.e. interferograms). A major milestone for the first year of the SSARA project was a unified application programming interface (API) for SAR data search and results at ASF and UNAVCO (WInSAR and EarthScope data archives) through the use of simple web services. A federated query service was developed using the unified APIs, providing users a single search interface for both archives (http://www.unavco.org/ws/brokered/ssara/sar/search). A command line client that utilizes this new service is provided as an open source utility for the community on GitHub (https://github.com/bakerunavco/SSARA). Further API development and enhancements added more InSAR specific keywords and quality control parameters (Doppler centroid, faraday rotation, InSAR stack size, and perpendicular baselines). To facilitate InSAR processing, the federated query service incorporated URLs for DEM (from OpenTopography) and tropospheric corrections (from the JPL OSCAR service) in addition to the URLs for SAR data. This federated query service will provide relevant QC metadata for selecting pairs of SAR data for InSAR processing and all the URLs necessary for interferogram generation. Interest from the international community has prompted an effort to incorporate other SAR data archives (the ESA Virtual Archive 4 and the DLR TerraSAR-X_SSC Geohazard Supersites and Natural Laboratories collections) into the federated query service which provide data for researchers outside the US and North America.

  17. Modeling the intracellular pathogen-immune interaction with cure rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Balram; Dubey, Preeti; Dubey, Uma S.

    2016-09-01

    Many common and emergent infectious diseases like Influenza, SARS, Hepatitis, Ebola etc. are caused by viral pathogens. These infections can be controlled or prevented by understanding the dynamics of pathogen-immune interaction in vivo. In this paper, interaction of pathogens with uninfected and infected cells in presence or absence of immune response are considered in four different cases. In the first case, the model considers the saturated nonlinear infection rate and linear cure rate without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells and without immune response. The next model considers the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells while all other terms are same as in the first case. The third model incorporates innate immune response, humoral immune response and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) mediated immune response with cure rate and without absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells. The last model is an extension of the third model in which the effect of absorption of pathogens into uninfected cells has been considered. Positivity and boundedness of solutions are established to ensure the well-posedness of the problem. It has been found that all the four models have two equilibria, namely, pathogen-free equilibrium point and pathogen-present equilibrium point. In each case, stability analysis of each equilibrium point is investigated. Pathogen-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when basic reproduction number is less or equal to unity. This implies that control or prevention of infection is independent of initial concentration of uninfected cells, infected cells, pathogens and immune responses in the body. The proposed models show that introduction of immune response and cure rate strongly affects the stability behavior of the system. Further, on computing basic reproduction number, it has been found to be minimum for the fourth model vis-a-vis other models. The analytical findings of each model have been exemplified by

  18. Simulation of SAR backscatter for forest vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajapati, Richa; Kumar, Shashi; Agrawal, Shefali

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is one of the most recent imaging technology to study the forest parameters. The invincible characteristics of microwave acquisition in cloudy regions and night imaging makes it a powerful tool to study dense forest regions. A coherent combination of radar polarimetry and interferometry (PolInSAR) enhances the accuracy of retrieved biophysical parameters. This paper attempts to address the issue of estimation of forest structural information caused due to instability of radar platforms through simulation of SAR image. The Terai Central Forest region situated at Haldwani area in Uttarakhand state of India was chosen as the study area. The system characteristics of PolInSAR dataset of Radarsat-2 SAR sensor was used for simulation process. Geometric and system specifications like platform altitude, center frequency, mean incidence angle, azimuth and range resolution were taken from metadata. From the field data it was observed that average tree height and forest stand density were 25 m and 300 stems/ha respectively. The obtained simulated results were compared with the sensor acquired master and slave intensity images. It was analyzed that for co-polarized horizontal component (HH), the mean values of simulated and real master image had a difference of 0.3645 with standard deviation of 0.63. Cross-polarized (HV) channel showed better results with mean difference of 0.06 and standard deviation of 0.1 while co-polarized vertical component (VV) did not show similar values. In case of HV polarization, mean variation between simulated and real slave images was found to be the least. Since cross-polarized channel is more sensitive to vegetation feature therefore better simulated results were obtained for this channel. Further the simulated images were processed using PolInSAR inversion modelling approach using three different techniques DEM differencing, Coherence Amplitude Inversion and Random Volume over Ground Inversion. DEM differencing

  19. Compressed Sensing for Millimeter-wave Ground Based SAR/ISAR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yiğit, Enes

    2014-11-01

    Millimeter-wave (MMW) ground based (GB) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and inverse SAR (ISAR) imaging are the powerful tools for the detection of foreign object debris (FOD) and concealed objects that requires wide bandwidths and highly frequent samplings in both slow-time and fast-time domains according to Shannon/Nyquist sampling theorem. However, thanks to the compressive sensing (CS) theory GB-SAR/ISAR data can be reconstructed by much fewer random samples than the Nyquist rate. In this paper, the impact of both random frequency sampling and random spatial domain data collection of a SAR/ISAR sensor on reconstruction quality of a scene of interest was studied. To investigate the feasibility of using proposed CS framework, different experiments for various FOD-like and concealed object-like targets were carried out at the Ka and W band frequencies of the MMW. The robustness and effectiveness of the recommend CS-based reconstruction configurations were verified through a comparison among each other by using integrated side lobe ratios (ISLR) of the images.

  20. Homelessness and the response to emerging infectious disease outbreaks: lessons from SARS.

    PubMed

    Leung, Cheryl S; Ho, Minnie M; Kiss, Alex; Gundlapalli, Adi V; Hwang, Stephen W

    2008-05-01

    During the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in Toronto, the potential introduction of SARS into the homeless population was a serious concern. Although no homeless individual in Toronto contracted SARS, the outbreak highlighted the need to develop an outbreak preparedness plan that accounts for unique issues related to homeless people. We conducted key informant interviews with homeless service providers and public health officials (n = 17) and identified challenges specific to the homeless population in the areas of communication, infection control, isolation and quarantine, and resource allocation. Planning for future outbreaks should take into account the need to (1) develop systems that enable rapid two-way communication between public health officials and homeless service providers, (2) ensure that homeless service providers have access to infection control supplies and staff training, (3) prepare for possible homeless shelter closures due to staff shortages or high attack rates among clients, and (4) plan for where and how clinically ill homeless individuals will be isolated and treated. The Toronto SARS experience provided insights that are relevant to response planning for future outbreaks in cities with substantial numbers of homeless individuals. PMID:18347991

  1. Dynamic Deformation of ETNA Volcano Observed by GPS and SAR Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, P.; Rosen, P.; Webb, F.; Tesauro, M.; Lanari, R.; Sansosi, E.; Puglisi, G.; Bonforte, A.; Coltelli, M.

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry and GPS have shown that during the quiescent period from 1993-1995 Mt. Etna volcano, Italy, inflated. Since the initiation of eruptive activity since late 1995 the deformation has been more contentious. We will explore the detailed deformation during the period from 1995-1996 spanning the late stages of inflation and the beginning of eruptive activity. We use SAR interferometry and GPS data to measure the volcano deformation. We invert the observed deformation for both simple point source. le crack elastic sources or if warranted for a spheroidal pressure So In particular, we will examine the evolution of the inflation and the transition to a lesser deflation observed at the end of 1995. We use ERS-1/2 SAR data from both ascending and descending passes to allow for dense temporal 'sampling of the deformation and to allow us to critically assess atmospheric noise. Preliminary results from interferometry suggest that the inflation rate accelerated prior to resumption of activity in 1995, while GPS data suggest a more steady inflation with some fluctuation following the start of activity. This study will compare and contrast the interferometric SAR and GPS results and will address the strengths and weaknesses of each technique towards volcano deformation studies.

  2. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  3. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients as a function of temperature and IR absorption cross sections for CF3CH=CH2 (HFO-1243zf), potential replacement of CF3CH2F (HFC-134a).

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Jiménez, Elena; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Martínez, Ernesto; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    CF3CH=CH2 (hydrofluoroolefin, HFO-1243zf) is a potential replacement of high global-warming potential (GWP) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC-134a, CF3CFH2). Both the atmospheric lifetime and the radiative efficiency of HFO-1243zf are parameters needed for estimating the GWP of this species. Therefore, the aim of this work is (i) to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1243zf from the reported OH rate coefficients, k OH, determined under tropospheric conditions and (ii) to calculate its radiative efficiency from the reported IR absorption cross sections. The OH rate coefficient at 298 K also allows the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)). The pulsed laser photolysis coupled to a laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to determine k OH for the reaction of OH radicals with HFO-1243zf as a function of pressure (50-650 Torr of He) and temperature (263-358 K). Gas-phase IR spectra of HFO-1243zf were recorded at room temperature using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer between 500 and 4,000 cm(-1). At all temperatures, k OH did not depend on bath gas concentration (i.e., on the total pressure between 50 and 650 Torr of He). A slight but noticeable T dependence of k OH was observed in the temperature range investigated. The observed behavior is well described by the following Arrhenius expression: k OH(T) = (7.65 ± 0.26) × 10(-13) exp [(165 ± 10) / T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Negligible IR absorption of HFO-1243zf was observed at wavenumbers greater than 1,700 cm(-1). Therefore, IR absorption cross sections, [Formula: see text], were determined in the 500-1,700 cm(-1) range. Integrated [Formula: see text] were determined between 650 and 1,800 cm(-1) for comparison purposes. The main diurnal removal pathway for HFO-1243zf is the reaction with OH radicals, which accounts for 64% of the overall loss by homogeneous reactions at 298 K. Globally, the lifetime due to OH reaction (τ OH) was estimated to be 8.7 days under

  4. Hydroxyl radical reaction rate coefficients as a function of temperature and IR absorption cross sections for CF3CH=CH2 (HFO-1243zf), potential replacement of CF3CH2F (HFC-134a).

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Jiménez, Elena; Ballesteros, Bernabé; Martínez, Ernesto; Albaladejo, José

    2015-04-01

    CF3CH=CH2 (hydrofluoroolefin, HFO-1243zf) is a potential replacement of high global-warming potential (GWP) hydrofluorocarbon (HFC-134a, CF3CFH2). Both the atmospheric lifetime and the radiative efficiency of HFO-1243zf are parameters needed for estimating the GWP of this species. Therefore, the aim of this work is (i) to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of HFO-1243zf from the reported OH rate coefficients, k OH, determined under tropospheric conditions and (ii) to calculate its radiative efficiency from the reported IR absorption cross sections. The OH rate coefficient at 298 K also allows the estimation of the photochemical ozone creation potential (ε(POCP)). The pulsed laser photolysis coupled to a laser-induced fluorescence technique was used to determine k OH for the reaction of OH radicals with HFO-1243zf as a function of pressure (50-650 Torr of He) and temperature (263-358 K). Gas-phase IR spectra of HFO-1243zf were recorded at room temperature using a Fourier transform IR spectrometer between 500 and 4,000 cm(-1). At all temperatures, k OH did not depend on bath gas concentration (i.e., on the total pressure between 50 and 650 Torr of He). A slight but noticeable T dependence of k OH was observed in the temperature range investigated. The observed behavior is well described by the following Arrhenius expression: k OH(T) = (7.65 ± 0.26) × 10(-13) exp [(165 ± 10) / T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). Negligible IR absorption of HFO-1243zf was observed at wavenumbers greater than 1,700 cm(-1). Therefore, IR absorption cross sections, [Formula: see text], were determined in the 500-1,700 cm(-1) range. Integrated [Formula: see text] were determined between 650 and 1,800 cm(-1) for comparison purposes. The main diurnal removal pathway for HFO-1243zf is the reaction with OH radicals, which accounts for 64% of the overall loss by homogeneous reactions at 298 K. Globally, the lifetime due to OH reaction (τ OH) was estimated to be 8.7 days under

  5. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging.

    PubMed

    Palsetia, M R; Li, J

    1998-01-01

    We present an adaptive finite impulse response (FIR) filtering approach, which is referred to as the Amplitude and Phase EStimation (APES) algorithm, for interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  6. Non-parametric partitioning of SAR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delyon, G.; Galland, F.; Réfrégier, Ph.

    2006-09-01

    We describe and analyse a generalization of a parametric segmentation technique adapted to Gamma distributed SAR images to a simple non parametric noise model. The partition is obtained by minimizing the stochastic complexity of a quantized version on Q levels of the SAR image and lead to a criterion without parameters to be tuned by the user. We analyse the reliability of the proposed approach on synthetic images. The quality of the obtained partition will be studied for different possible strategies. In particular, one will discuss the reliability of the proposed optimization procedure. Finally, we will precisely study the performance of the proposed approach in comparison with the statistical parametric technique adapted to Gamma noise. These studies will be led by analyzing the number of misclassified pixels, the standard Hausdorff distance and the number of estimated regions.

  7. SAR observations in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheres, David

    1992-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) exhibits a wealth of energetic ocean features; they include the Loop Current with velocities of about 2 m/s and strong shear fronts, mesoscale eddies, double vortices, internal waves, and the outflow of the 'Mighty Mississippi' river. These energetic features can have a strong impact on the economies of the states surrounding the Gulf. Large fisheries, oil and gas production as well as pollution transport are relevant issues. These circulation features in the Gulf are invisible to conventional IR and visible satellite imagery during the Summer months due to cloud cover and uniform surface temperatures. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Gulf does penetrate the cloud cover and shows a rich assembly of features there year-round. Below are preliminary results from GOM SAR imagery taken by SEASAT in 1978 and by the AIRSAR program in 1991.

  8. Joint enhancement of multichannel SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, Naveen; Ertin, Emre; Moses, Randolph L.

    2007-04-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of joint enhancement of multichannel Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. Previous work by Cetin and Karl introduced nonquadratic regularization methods for image enhancement using sparsity enforcing penalty terms. For multichannel data, independent enhancement of each channel is shown to degrade the relative phase information across channels that is useful for 3D reconstruction. We thus propose a method for joint enhancement of multichannel SAR data with joint sparsity constraints. We develop both a gradient-based and a Lagrange-Newton-based method for solving the joint reconstruction problem, and demonstrate the performance of the proposed methods on IFSAR height extraction problem from multi-elevation data.

  9. SAR impulse response with residual chirps.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2009-06-01

    A Linear Frequency-Modulated (LFM) chirp is a function with unit amplitude and quadratic phase characteristic. In a focused Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) image, a residual chirp is undesired for targets of interest, as it coarsens the manifested resolution. However, for undesired spurious signals, a residual chirp is often advantageous because it spreads the energy and thereby diminishes its peak value. In either case, a good understanding of the effects of a residual LFM chirp on a SAR Impulse Response (IPR) is required to facilitate system analysis and design. This report presents an analysis of the effects of a residual chirp on the IPR. As reference, there is a rich body of publications on various aspects of LFM chirps. A quick search reveals a plethora of articles, going back to the early 1950s. We mention here purely as trivia one of the earlier analysis papers on this waveform by Klauder, et al.

  10. Utilization of spaceborne SAR data for mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in automated processing of digital SEASAT SAR imagery have made feasible the generation of large-scale high-resolution maps. Standard preprocessing of raw data into digital images results in geometrically distorted imagery. Computer algorithms have been developed for unsupervised pixel location, geometric rectification, and mosaicking of multiple-image frames without ground control points. These algorithms utilize knowledge of the spacecraft trajectory data, the imaging geometry, and the coherent properties of the sensor to generate the required processing parameters. This paper discusses the advantages as well as the inherent limitations of this technique, analyzes the associated errors, and presents results using SEASAT SAR imagery. Also discussed are the results of the recent shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) experiment as well as a follow-on experiment (SIR-B) planned for 1984.

  11. Snow and glacier mapping with polarimetric SAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shi, Jiancheng; Dozier, Jeff; Rott, Helmut; Davis, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the capability of mapping snow and glaciers in alpine regions using synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery when topographic information is not available. The topographic effects on the received power for a resolution cell can be explained by the change in illumination area and incidence angle in a slant-rante representation of SAR imagery. The specific polarization signatures and phase difference between HH and VV components are relatively independent of the illuminated are, and the incidence angle has only a small effect on these parameters. They provide a suitable measurement data set for snow and glacier mapping in a high-relief area. The results show that the C-band images of the enhancement factor, the phase difference between HH and VV scattering components, and the normalized cross product of VV scattering elements provide the capability to discriminate among snow with different wetnesses, glaciers, and rocky regions.

  12. Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gretebeck, Lisa M; Subbarao, Kanta

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), two strains of animal coronaviruses that crossed the species barrier to infect and cause severe respiratory infections in humans within the last 12 years, have taught us that coronaviruses represent a global threat that does not recognize international borders. We can expect to see other novel coronaviruses emerge in the future. An ideal animal model should reflect the clinical signs, viral replication and pathology seen in humans. In this review, we present factors to consider in establishing an animal model for the study of novel coronaviruses and compare the different animal models that have been employed to study SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. PMID:26184451

  13. Mars Mission Concepts: SAR and Solar Electric Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsperman, M.; Klaus, K.; Smith, D. B.; Clifford, S. M.; Lawrence, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Introduction: The time has come to leverage technology advances (including advances in autonomous operation and propulsion technology) to reduce the cost and increase the flight rate of planetary missions, while actively developing a scientific and engineering workforce to achieve national space objectives. Mission Science at Mars: A SAR imaging radar offers an ability to conduct high resolution investigations of the shallow (<10 m depth) subsurface of Mars, enabling identification of fine-scale layering within the Martian polar layered deposits (PLD), as well as the identification of pingos, investigations of polygonal terrain, and measurements of the thickness of mantling layers at non-polar latitudes. It would allow systematic near-surface prospecting, which is tremendously useful for human exploration purposes (in particular, the identification of accessible ice deposits and quantification of Martian regolith properties). Limited color capabilities in a notional high-resolution stereo imaging system would enable the generation of false color images, resulting in useful science results, and the stereo data could be reduced into high-resolution Digital Elevation Models uniquely useful for exploration planning and science purposes. Since the SAR and the notional high-resolution stereo imaging system would be huge data volume producers - to maximize the science return we are currently considering the usage of laser communications systems; this notional spacecraft represents one pathway to evaluate the utility of laser communications in planetary exploration while providing useful science return.. Mission Concept: Using a common space craft for multiple missions reduces costs. Solar electric propulsion (SEP) provides the flexibility required for multiple mission objectives. SEP provides the greatest payload advantage albeit at the sacrifice of mission time. Our concept involves using a SEP enabled space craft (Boeing 702SP) with a highly capable SAR imager that also

  14. Persistent Scatterer InSAR monitoring of Bratislava urban area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakon, Matus; Perissin, Daniele; Papco, Juraj; Lazecky, Milan

    2014-05-01

    ) technique, covering the target area with 57 Envisat ASAR images from Ascending Track No. 229 (32) and Descending Track No. 265 (25) captured between years 2002 and 2010. Processing involves Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) a powerful software solution for obtaining differential interferograms and performing PSInSAR methodology. The area of interest to investigate the deformation phenomena is covering approximately 16 by 16 kilometers (256 sqkm). For evaluation of PSInSAR potential to detect and monitor ground displacements, PS derived time series of deformation signal were compared to the field GNSS data from three GNSS stations coded PIL1, BRAT and GKU4. By the detailed look on the deformation maps the investigated urban area of Bratislava is relatively stable with the deformation rates within the few (±5) millimeters. The comparison of PSInSAR derived time series with GNSS data indicates good correlation and confirms achievable precision and applicability of InSAR measurements for ground stability monitoring purposes. Data for this work were provided by European Space Agency within the Category-1 project ID 9981: "Detection of ground deformation using radar interferometry techniques". The authors are grateful to the Tatrabanka Foundation and The National Scholarship Programme of the Slovak Republic for the opportunity to work together. Data have been processed by the Sarproz (Copyright (c) 2009 Daniele Perissin) and visualised in Google Earth. This paper is also the result of the implementation of the project: the National Centre of Earth's Surface Deformation Diagnostic in the area of Slovakia, ITMS 26220220108 supported by the Research and Development Operational Programme funded by the ERDF and the grant No. 1/0642/13 of the Slovak Grant Agency VEGA.

  15. Soil moisture estimation using synergy of optical, SAR, and topographic data with Gaussian Process Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamenkovic, J.; Notarnicola, C.; Spindler, N.; Cuozzo, G.; Bertoldi, G.; Della Chiesa, S.; Niedrist, G.; Greifeneder, F.; Tuia, D.; Borgeaud, M.; Thiran, J.-Ph.

    2014-10-01

    In this work we address the synergy of optical, SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) and topographic data in soil moisture retrieval over an Alpine area. As estimation technique, we consider Gaussian Process Regression (GPR). The test area is located in South Tyrol, Italy where the main land types are meadows and pastures. Time series of ASAR Wide Swath - SAR, optical, topographic and ancillary data (meteorological information and snow cover maps) acquired repetitively in 2010 were examined. Regarding optical data, we used both, daily MODIS reflectances, and daily NDVI, interpolated from the 16-day MODIS composite. Slope, elevation and aspect were extracted from a 2.5 m DEM (Digital Elevation Model) and resampled to 10 m. Daily soil moisture measurements were collected in the three fixed stations (two located in meadows and one located in pasture). The snow maps were used to mask the points covered by snow. The best performance was obtained by adding MODIS band 6 at 1640 nm to SAR and DEM features. The corresponding coefficient of determination, R2, was equal to 0.848, and the root mean square error, RMSE, to 5.4 % Vol. Compared to the case when no optical data were considered, there was an increase of ca. 0.05 in R2 and a decrease in RMSE of ca. 0.7 % Vol. This work showed that the joint use of NDVI or water absorption reflectance with SAR and topographic data can improve the estimation of soil moisture in specific Alpine area and that GPR is an effective method for estimation.

  16. Interferometric SAR coherence classification utility assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yocky, D.A.

    1998-03-01

    The classification utility of a dual-antenna interferometric synthetic aperture radar (IFSAR) is explored by comparison of maximum likelihood classification results for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) intensity images and IPSAR intensity and coherence images. The addition of IFSAR coherence improves the overall classification accuracy for classes of trees, water, and fields. A threshold intensity-coherence classifier is also compared to the intensity-only classification results.

  17. Alaska SAR Facility mass storage, current system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddy, David; Chu, Eugene; Bicknell, Tom

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines the mass storage systems that are currently in place at the Alaska SAR Facility (SAF). The architecture of the facility will be presented including specifications of the mass storage media that are currently used and the performances that we have realized from the various media. The distribution formats and media are also discussed. Because the facility is expected to service future sensors, the new requirements and possible solutions to these requirements are also discussed.

  18. Processing of polarametric SAR images. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Warrick, A.L.; Delaney, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    The objective of this work was to develop a systematic method of combining multifrequency polarized SAR images. It is shown that the traditional methods of correlation, hard targets, and template matching fail to produce acceptable results. Hence, a new algorithm was developed and tested. The new approach combines the three traditional methods and an interpolation method. An example is shown that demonstrates the new algorithms performance. The results are summarized suggestions for future research are presented.

  19. A 3-D SAR approach to IFSAR processing

    SciTech Connect

    DOERRY,ARMIN W.; BICKEL,DOUGLAS L.

    2000-03-01

    Interferometric SAR (IFSAR) can be shown to be a special case of 3-D SAR image formation. In fact, traditional IFSAR processing results in the equivalent of merely a super-resolved, under-sampled, 3-D SAR image. However, when approached as a 3-D SAR problem, a number of IFSAR properties and anomalies are easily explained. For example, IFSAR decorrelation with height is merely ordinary migration in 3-D SAR. Consequently, treating IFSAR as a 3-D SAR problem allows insight and development of proper motion compensation techniques and image formation operations to facilitate optimal height estimation. Furthermore, multiple antenna phase centers and baselines are easily incorporated into this formulation, providing essentially a sparse array in the elevation dimension. This paper shows the Polar Format image formation algorithm extended to 3 dimensions, and then proceeds to apply it to the IFSAR collection geometry. This suggests a more optimal reordering of the traditional IFSAR processing steps.

  20. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss.

    PubMed

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel; Nath, Sangeeta; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Burns, Andrew S; Ranjan, Piyush; Sarode, Neha; Malmstrom, Rex R; Padilla, Cory C; Stone, Benjamin K; Bristow, Laura A; Larsen, Morten; Glass, Jennifer B; Thamdrup, Bo; Woyke, Tanja; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T; Stewart, Frank J

    2016-08-11

    Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. SAR11 bacteria are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes have vital roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Anaerobic metabolism has not yet been observed in SAR11, and it remains unknown how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling. Here, genomic analysis of single cells from the world's largest OMZ revealed previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages with adaptations for life without oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalysing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the anoxic zone of maximum nitrate reduction activity. These results link SAR11 to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss, redefining the ecological niche of Earth's most abundant organismal group.

  1. Determination of the rate constants of molecular processes regulating the level of induced absorption in a laser based on an aqueous-micellar solution of rhodamine 6G with lamp pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.B.; Snegov, M.I.; Cherkasov, A.S.

    1987-03-01

    A method of determining the average lifetime tau of the products responsible for inverse induced absorption in aqueous--micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G (R6G) on lamp pumping based on a comparison of threshold intensities of excitation (W/sub th/) in the resonators of a laser with a different Q is proposed. Using the value of tau found (0.2 ..mu..sec) and experimental data on the change in W/sub th/ with the concentration of cyclooctatetraene (COT) added to the solution the rate constant of quenching of the absorbing products by COT molecules (K/sub q/ = 2.6 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/sec/sup -1/) was determined. In the assumption that the absorbing products are triplet dye molecules, the value of the rate constant of interconversion (K/sub 32/) of R6G into an aqueous--micellar solution (K/sub 32/ = 1.3 x 10/sup 7/ sec/sup -1/) was determined. A comparison was made of the values of the constants found with the corresponding values known from the literature.

  2. When animal viruses attack: SARS and avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul J; Krilov, Leonard R

    2005-01-01

    SARS and avian influenza have many common features. They both arose in Asia and originated from animal viruses. They both have the potential to become pandemics because human beings lack antibodies to the animal-derived antigens present on the viral surface and rapid dissemination can occur from the relative ease and availability of high speed and far-reaching transportation methods. Pediatricians, in particular, should remain alert about the possibility of pandemic illnesses in their patients. Annual rates of influenza in children may be 1.5 to 3 times those in the adult population, and infection rates during a community epidemic may exceed 40% in preschool-aged children and 30% in school-aged children. Infected children also play a central role in disseminating influenza, as they are the major point of entry for the virus into the household, from which adults spread disease into the community. Of course, children younger than 24 months also are at high risk for complications from influenza. A 1999 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention projection of an influenza pandemic in the US paints a grim picture: 89,000 to 207,000 deaths, 314,000 to 734,000 hospitalizations, 18 million to 42 million outpatient visits, and 20 million to 47 million additional illnesses, at a cost to society of at least dollars 71.3 billion to dollars 166.5 billion. High-risk patients (15% of the population) would account for approximately 84% of all deaths. Although SARS has been kind to the pediatric population so far, there are no guarantees that future outbreaks would be as sparing. To aid readers in remaining up-to-date with SARS and avian influenza, some useful websites are listed in the Sidebar. Two masters of suspense, Alfred Hitchcock and Stephen King, may have been closer to the truth than they ever would have believed. Both birds and a super flu could bring about the end of civilization as we know it. But all is not lost--to paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, the price of health is

  3. Formation geometries for multistatic SAR tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, Giancarmine; Renga, Alfredo; D'Errico, Marco

    2014-03-01

    This paper analyzes relative orbit design for multi-satellite radar missions aimed at multistatic SAR tomography. To this end, formation requirements and performance parameters are derived by adapting existing models for SAR tomography to single pass techniques. Then, relative trajectory design is carried out on the basis of an analytical relative motion model including secular J2 effects. By properly scaling the differences in orbital parameters, different formation geometries enable uniform sampling of the effective baseline along the whole orbit. The difference among the possible choices lies in latitude coverage, formation stability, and collision avoidance aspects. A numerical example of relative trajectory design is discussed considering L-band as operating frequency. In particular, achievable height resolution and unambiguous height along the orbit are pointed out for a multi-cartwheel, a multi-pendulum, and a multi-helix formation. In view of future implementation of a multi-satellite SAR tomography mission, new concepts aimed at the reduction of required satellites, and long term evolution of designed formations, are also discussed.

  4. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.; Gurrola, Eric; Sacco, Gian Franco; Zebker, Howard

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a flexible and extensible Interferometric SAR (InSAR) Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) for geodetic image processing. ISCE was designed from the ground up as a geophysics community tool for generating stacks of interferograms that lend themselves to various forms of time-series analysis, with attention paid to accuracy, extensibility, and modularity. The framework is python-based, with code elements rigorously componentized by separating input/output operations from the processing engines. This allows greater flexibility and extensibility in the data models, and creates algorithmic code that is less susceptible to unnecessary modification when new data types and sensors are available. In addition, the components support provenance and checkpointing to facilitate reprocessing and algorithm exploration. The algorithms, based on legacy processing codes, have been adapted to assume a common reference track approach for all images acquired from nearby orbits, simplifying and systematizing the geometry for time-series analysis. The framework is designed to easily allow user contributions, and is distributed for free use by researchers. ISCE can process data from the ALOS, ERS, EnviSAT, Cosmo-SkyMed, RadarSAT-1, RadarSAT-2, and TerraSAR-X platforms, starting from Level-0 or Level 1 as provided from the data source, and going as far as Level 3 geocoded deformation products. With its flexible design, it can be extended with raw/meta data parsers to enable it to work with radar data from other platforms

  5. Using APES for interferometric SAR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Palsetia, Marzban

    1996-06-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive FIR filtering approach, which is referred to as the APES (amplitude and phase estimation of a sinusoid) algorithm, for interferometric SAR imaging. We apply the APES algorithm on the data obtained from two vertically displaced apertures of a SAR system to obtain the complex amplitude and the phase difference estimates, which are proportional to the radar cross section and the height of the scatterer, respectively, at the frequencies of interest. We also demonstrate how the APES algorithm can be applied to data matrices with large dimensions without incurring high computational overheads. We compare the APES algorithm with other FIR filtering approaches including the Capon and FFT methods. We show via both numerical and experimental examples that the adaptive FIR filtering approaches such as Capon and APES can yield more accurate spectral estimates with much lower sidelobes and narrower spectral peaks than the FFT method. We show that although the APES algorithm yields somewhat wider spectral peaks than the Capon method, the former gives more accurate overall spectral estimates and SAR images than the latter and the FFT method.

  6. Extended fractal feature for first-stage SAR target detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Lance M.; Murenzi, Romain; Namuduri, Kameswara R.

    1999-08-01

    The Extended Fractal (EF) feature has been shown to lower the false alarm rate for the focus of attention (FOA) stage of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) automatic target recognition (ATR) system. The feature is both contrast and size sensitive, and thus, can discriminate between targets and many types of cultural clutter at the earliest stages of the ATR. In this paper we modify the EF feature so that one can 'tune' the size sensitivity to the specific targets of interest. We show how to optimize the EF feature using target chip data from the public MSTAR database. We demonstrate improvements in performance for FOA algorithms that include the new feature by comparing the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves for all possible combinations of FOA algorithms incorporating EF, two-parameter CFAR, and variance features. Finally, we perform timing experiments on the fused detector to demonstrate the feasibility for implementation of the detector in a real system.

  7. Investigating Persistent and Distributed Scatterers to Better Resolve Low Amplitude Deformation with InSAR in Vegetated Terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, X.; Schmidt, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Multi-temporal InSAR methods are successful at revealing low amplitude surface deformation by reducing the noise from the atmosphere and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The Persistent Scatters (PS) InSAR and Small baseline (SBAS) methods are used widely by the InSAR community. However, it is still challenging to recover low deformation rates in highly vegetated mountainous areas. Our goal is to explore different approaches to identifying PS or stable Distributed Scatterers (DS) for multi-temporal InSAR processing. We are investigating the following methods: 1) amplitude dispersion (Ferretti et al., 2001); 2) average correlation; 3) spatial correlation of phase (Hooper et al., 2004); 4) comparison of phase against a known mathematical model (Shanker and Zebker, 2007); 5) statistical analysis of the coherence matrix (Ferretti et al., 2011); 6) polarimetric bounce characteristics. We first align the SAR images to form a stack of Single Look Complex (SLC) using "batch processing". We work with this 3-dimensional SLC stack to identify high-quality PS and DS using the aforementioned methods. Next we design a filter based on the characteristics of the scatterers to form interferograms. This comparative study on identifying and filtering PS and DS can be integrated with interferogram stacking or time-series approaches like PSInSAR, SBAS or wavelet-based methods. We are working with the ERS-1, ERS-2 and ALOS-1 SAR data to study landslides and volcano deformation over various terrains in the Cascade Range. From these observations we will be able to construct better physical models to explain various deformation processes.

  8. Forming rotated SAR images by real-time motion compensation.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2012-12-01

    Proper waveform parameter selection allows collecting Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) phase history data on a rotated grid in the Fourier Space of the scene being imaged. Subsequent image formation preserves the rotated geometry to allow SAR images to be formed at arbitrary rotation angles without the use of computationally expensive interpolation or resampling operations. This should be useful where control of image orientation is desired such as generating squinted stripmaps and VideoSAR applications, among others.

  9. Control Measures for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Shiing-Jer; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Chen, Chien-Jen; Olsen, Sonja J.; Lee, Long-Teng; Fisk, Tamara; Hsu, Kwo-Hsiung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Chen, Kow-Tong; Chiang, I-Hsin; Wu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Jiunn-Shyan

    2003-01-01

    As of April 14, 2003, Taiwan had had 23 probable cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), all imported. Taiwan isolated these first 23 patients with probable SARS in negative-pressure rooms; extensive personal protective equipment was used for healthcare workers and visitors. For the first 6 weeks of the SARS outbreak, recognized spread was limited to one healthcare worker and three household contacts. PMID:12781013

  10. A parametric study of rate of advance and area coverage rate performance of synthetic aperture radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Raynal, Ann Marie; William H. Hensley, Jr.; Burns, Bryan L.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2014-11-01

    The linear ground distance per unit time and ground area covered per unit time of producing synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery, termed rate of advance (ROA) and area coverage rate (ACR), are important metrics for platform and radar performance in surveillance applications. These metrics depend on many parameters of a SAR system such as wavelength, aircraft velocity, resolution, antenna beamwidth, imaging mode, and geometry. Often the effects of these parameters on rate of advance and area coverage rate are non-linear. This report addresses the impact of different parameter spaces as they relate to rate of advance and area coverage rate performance.

  11. Predicting human intestinal absorption of diverse chemicals using ensemble learning based QSAR modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Basant, Nikita; Gupta, Shikha; Singh, Kunwar P

    2016-04-01

    Human intestinal absorption (HIA) of the drugs administered through the oral route constitutes an important criterion for the candidate molecules. The computational approach for predicting the HIA of molecules may potentiate the screening of new drugs. In this study, ensemble learning (EL) based qualitative and quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) models (gradient boosted tree, GBT and bagged decision tree, BDT) have been established for the binary classification and HIA prediction of the chemicals, using the selected molecular descriptors. The structural diversity of the chemicals and the nonlinear structure in the considered data were tested by the similarity index and Brock-Dechert-Scheinkman statistics. The external predictive power of the developed SAR models was evaluated through the internal and external validation procedures recommended in the literature. All the statistical criteria parameters derived for the performance of the constructed SAR models were above their respective thresholds suggesting for their robustness for future applications. In complete data, the qualitative SAR models rendered classification accuracy of >99%, while the quantitative SAR models yielded correlation (R(2)) of >0.91 between the measured and predicted HIA values. The performances of the EL-based SAR models were also compared with the linear models (linear discriminant analysis, LDA and multiple linear regression, MLR). The GBT and BDT SAR models performed better than the LDA and MLR methods. A comparison of our models with the previously reported QSARs for HIA prediction suggested for their better performance. The results suggest for the appropriateness of the developed SAR models to reliably predict the HIA of structurally diverse chemicals and can serve as useful tools for the initial screening of the molecules in the drug development process.

  12. InSAR Analysis of North American Periglacial Phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, N.; Gomez, F. G.

    2010-12-01

    Periglacial processes of North America are climate-dependent, and as such serve as useful indicators of local climate change. This study focuses on surface deformations associated with arctic permafrost and alpine rock glacier flow. These phenomena produce surface displacements ranging from several to tens of centimeters, respectively. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is an effective tool to measure displacements of these magnitudes. In addition to its sensitivity to small motions, InSAR also offers the potential to image the spatial extents of ground motions. Arctic permafrost undergoes seasonal heaving and settlement of the surface that is generally associated with freezing and thawing of the active layer. Magnitudes of vertical motion should generally be proportional to the active layer’s thickness. Assuming soil properties are constant over short time scales, this thickness is a function of ambient air temperature. Analysis of L-Band PALSAR data of Prudhoe Bay, on the Alaskan North Slope, resulted in two six-month interferograms between December 2008 and December 2009. Preliminary results suggest amplitudes of oscillation on the order of eight to ten centimeters. At lower latitudes (e.g., the continental U.S.), periglacial features are limited to alpine regions. Rock glacier flow rates are partially controlled by ice content, and will be sensitive to changes in ambient air temperature. Historic and recent measurements of flow rates for rock glaciers in the Colorado Front Range (CFR) are well documented, and will provide a basis for comparison. Analysis of PALSAR data of the CFR produced eleven interferograms, providing coverage from June 2007 to January 2009. Preliminary results indicate peak movements of the Taylor rock glacier as approximately 12 cm/y, and 7 cm/yr of movement on the Arapaho rock glacier. Although comparing these results with historic measurements may suggest changes in climate, it is important to recognize these changes as

  13. Geometric registration and rectification of spaceborne SAR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curlander, J. C.; Pang, S. N.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the development of automated location and geometric rectification techniques for digitally processed synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. A software package has been developed that is capable of determining the absolute location of an image pixel to within 60 m using only the spacecraft ephemeris data and the characteristics of the SAR data collection and processing system. Based on this location capability algorithms have been developed that geometrically rectify the imagery, register it to a common coordinate system and mosaic multiple frames to form extended digital SAR maps. These algorithms have been optimized using parallel processing techniques to minimize the operating time. Test results are given using Seasat SAR data.

  14. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:22573992

  15. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions.

  16. Crop identification of SAR data using digital textural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuesch, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    After preprocessing SEASAT SAR data which included slant to ground range transformation, registration to LANDSAT MSS data and appropriate filtering of the raw SAR data to minimize coherent speckle, textural features were developed based upon the spatial gray level dependence method (SGLDM) to compute entropy and inertia as textural measures. It is indicated that the consideration of texture features are very important in SAR data analysis. The SEASAT SAR data are useful for the improvement of field boundary definitions and for an earlier season estimate of corn and soybean area location than is supported by LANDSAT alone.

  17. Epipolar geometry comparison of SAR and optical camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong; Zhang, Yunhua

    2016-03-01

    In computer vision, optical camera is often used as the eyes of computer. If we replace camera with synthetic aperture radar (SAR), we will then enter a microwave vision of the world. This paper gives a comparison of SAR imaging and camera imaging from the viewpoint of epipolar geometry. The imaging model and epipolar geometry of the two sensors are analyzed in detail. Their difference is illustrated, and their unification is particularly demonstrated. We hope these may benefit researchers in field of computer vision or SAR image processing to construct a computer SAR vision, which is dedicated to compensate and improve human vision by electromagnetically perceiving and understanding the images.

  18. Applications of SAR Interferometry in Earth and Environmental Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobing; Chang, Ni-Bin; Li, Shusun

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a review of the progress in regard to the InSAR remote sensing technique and its applications in earth and environmental sciences, especially in the past decade. Basic principles, factors, limits, InSAR sensors, available software packages for the generation of InSAR interferograms were summarized to support future applications. Emphasis was placed on the applications of InSAR in seismology, volcanology, land subsidence/uplift, landslide, glaciology, hydrology, and forestry sciences. It ends with a discussion of future research directions. PMID:22573992

  19. Relationships between autofocus methods for SAR and self-survey techniques for SONAR. [Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, D.E.; Jakowatz, C.V. Jr.; Ghiglia, D.C.; Eichel, P.H.

    1991-01-01

    Autofocus methods in SAR and self-survey techniques in SONAR have a common mathematical basis in that they both involve estimation and correction of phase errors introduced by sensor position uncertainties. Time delay estimation and correlation methods have been shown to be effective in solving the self-survey problem for towed SONAR arrays. Since it can be shown that platform motion errors introduce similar time-delay estimation problems in SAR imaging, the question arises as to whether such techniques could be effectively employed for autofocus of SAR imagery. With a simple mathematical model for motion errors in SAR, we will show why such correlation/time-delay techniques are not nearly as effective as established SAR autofocus algorithms such as phase gradient autofocus or sub-aperture based methods. This analysis forms an important bridge between signal processing methodologies for SAR and SONAR. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  20. InSAR Scientific Computing Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurrola, E. M.; Rosen, P. A.; Sacco, G.; Zebker, H. A.; Simons, M.; Sandwell, D. T.

    2010-12-01

    The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment (ISCE) is a software development effort in its second year within the NASA Advanced Information Systems and Technology program. The ISCE will provide a new computing environment for geodetic image processing for InSAR sensors that will enable scientists to reduce measurements directly from radar satellites and aircraft to new geophysical products without first requiring them to develop detailed expertise in radar processing methods. The environment can serve as the core of a centralized processing center to bring Level-0 raw radar data up to Level-3 data products, but is adaptable to alternative processing approaches for science users interested in new and different ways to exploit mission data. The NRC Decadal Survey-recommended DESDynI mission will deliver data of unprecedented quantity and quality, making possible global-scale studies in climate research, natural hazards, and Earth's ecosystem. The InSAR Scientific Computing Environment is planned to become a key element in processing DESDynI data into higher level data products and it is expected to enable a new class of analyses that take greater advantage of the long time and large spatial scales of these new data, than current approaches. At the core of ISCE is both legacy processing software from the JPL/Caltech ROI_PAC repeat-pass interferometry package as well as a new InSAR processing package containing more efficient and more accurate processing algorithms being developed at Stanford for this project that is based on experience gained in developing processors for missions such as SRTM and UAVSAR. Around the core InSAR processing programs we are building object-oriented wrappers to enable their incorporation into a more modern, flexible, extensible software package that is informed by modern programming methods, including rigorous componentization of processing codes, abstraction and generalization of data models, and a robust, intuitive user interface with