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Sample records for absorption response wr

  1. Accumulation of Amino Acids in Rhizobium sp. Strain WR1001 in Response to Sodium Chloride Salinity

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Sui-Sheng T.; Tsai, Victor Y.; Lichens, Georgia M.; Noma, Amy T.

    1982-01-01

    Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001, isolated from the Sonoran Desert by Eskew and Ting, was found to be able to grow in defined medium containing NaCl up to 500 mM, a concentration approaching that of sea water. Therefore, it is a valuable strain for studying the biochemical basis of salt tolerance. Intracellular free glutamate was found to increase rapidly in response to osmotic stress by NaCl. It accounted for 88% of the amino acid pool when the bacterium was grown in 500 mM NaCl. The role of glutamate dehydrogenase in glutamate biosynthesis was examined in several Rhizobium strains. Both NADH- and NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase activities in various Rhizobium strains were observed. The range of activity differed considerably depending on the particular strain. KCl (500 mM) did not stimulate glutamate dehydrogenase activity, as reported in a number of bacterial strains by Measures. The low activity of glutamate dehydrogenase in Rhizobium sp. strain WR1001 apparently cannot fulfill a biosynthetic function of glutamate formation in response to medium NaCl concentrations. PMID:16346049

  2. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. |; Carnes, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL {times} BALB/c F{sub 1} female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a {sup 60}Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  3. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Carnes, B.A. )

    1993-01-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL [times] BALB/c F[sub 1] female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a [sup 60]Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  4. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton observations of the massive WR+O binary WR 22

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, E.; Nazé, Y.; Sana, H.; Rauw, G.; Vreux, J.-M.

    2009-12-01

    Aims. To better understand the phenomenon of colliding winds in massive binary stars, we study the X-ray lightcurve of a WR+O system of the Carina region, a system well known for the high mass of its primary. Methods: Phase-resolved X-ray observations of the massive WR+O binary system WR 22 were performed with the XMM-Newton facility. We observed the object at seven different phases from near apastron to near periastron. Results: The X-ray spectrum can be represented by a two-component, optically thin, thermal plasma model with a first one at a typical temperature of 0.6 keV and a second hotter one in the range 2.0-4.5 keV. The hot component is indicative of a colliding wind phenomenon, but its flux is remarkably constant with time despite the high eccentricity of the orbit. Although surprising at first, this actually does not contradict the results of the hydrodynamical simulations of the wind collision that we performed. When the system goes from apastron to periastron, the soft part of the X-ray flux is progressively lowered by an increasing intervening absorbing column. This behaviour can be interpreted in terms of an X-ray emitting plasma located near the O star, but not fully intrinsic to it, and accompanying the star when it dives into the wind of the WR component. A model is presented that interprets most of the observational constraints. This model suggests that the mass-loss rate of dot{M}WR 1.6 × 10-5 {M}⊙ yr-1 assumed for the WR could still be slightly too high, whereas it is already lower than other published values. From the comparison of the observed and the expected absorptions at phases near periastron, we deduce that the hard X-ray emitting collision zone should at least have a typical size of 50-60 R⊙, but that the size for the soft X-ray emitting region could reach 244 R⊙ if the assumed mass-loss rate is correct. We also present an upper limit to the X-ray luminosity of the WR component that further questions the existence of intrinsic X

  5. A Phenanthrene Methanol (WR 33063) for Treatment of Acute Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J. D.; Martin, D. C.; Carson, P. E.; Rieckmann, K. H.; Willerson, D.; Clyde, D. F.; Miller, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    WR 33063, a phenanthrene methanol, was studied in human volunteers for tolerance and toxicity. In normal volunteers, it was possible to give 4.6 g in four divided doses without adverse effect for 10 days. At this dose level, there was neither evidence of photosensitivity nor adverse renal or cardiac effect. At a dose level of 1.6 g in four divided doses for 6 days, WR 33063 cured 18 of 23 nonimmune volunteers infected with the Smith strain of Plasmodium falciparum from Vietnam. In addition, infections due to the Marks and Braithwaite Vietnam strains were also treated because these strains represent a major therapeutic challenge to chloroquine; six of six and two of three volunteers, respectively, were cured. With the Malayan Camp strain, 1.6 g in four divided doses for 6 days cured all of five volunteers. The African Uganda I strain of chloroquine-responsive malaria was even more responsive to WR 33063; all of six men who received 1.6 g in four divided doses for 6 days were cured, and all of three men who received this same dosage for 3 days were cured. One subject infected with a Haitian strain of P. falciparum was treated and cured. Blood-induced infections with the Chesson strain of P. vivax also responded well to WR 33063 with four of five men cured. In all, 52 men received WR 33063 in tolerance trials, and 59 men with experimental malaria and one man with clinical malaria were treated with WR 33063. PMID:4597714

  6. Influence of WR 2721 on the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, J.J.; Johnson, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of WR2721 on the response of tumors to radiation, antineoplastic alkylating drugs, and DNA binding agents was evaluated and compared to the degree of normal tissue protection provided by WR 2721 against these agents. WR 2721 administered to mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma was found to reduce the radiosensitivity of the leukemia and lung tumor by dose modifying factors of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. WR 2721 protected bone marow, intestine, and skin from radiation by factors of 1.9. 1.4 and 1.8. WR 2721 protected mice from the lethality of cyclophosphamide by a factor of only 1.2 whereas protection from melphalan toxicity was more dramatic with a dose modifying factor of 1.6. In chemotherapy studies of established M5076 ovarian tumor, the combination of WR 2721 plus cyclophosphamide was equivalent in activity to cyclophosphamide alone. WR 2721 did not modify the antitumor activity of melphalan in early Lewis lung carcinoma did not decrease the antileukemic effects of this agent by a factor of 2.6 indicating tumor protection greater than host protection in the leukemia. The antitumor activity of the DNA binding agents etoposide (VP16-213) and mitoxantrone against systemic P388 leukemia was not diminished by WR 2721, while a substantial increase in host toxicity was noted for the combinations. The protective effects of WR 2721 against radiation and drug damage were, therefore, not entirely selective for normal tissues. In some cases the degree of tumor protection can be similar to, or greater than, normal tissue protection.

  7. Radioprotective Thiolamines WR-1065 and WR-33278 Selectively Denature Nonhistone Nuclear Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Valerie K.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Warters, Raymond L.; Wilmore, Britta H.; Lepock, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the interactions of nuclei isolated from Chinese hamster V79 cells with the radioprotector WR-1065, other thiol compounds, and polyamines. Differential scanning calorimetry monitors denaturation of macromolecules and resolves the major nuclear components (e.g. constrained and relaxed DNA, nucleosome core, and nuclear matrix) of intact nuclei on the basis of thermal stability. WR-1065 treatment (0.5-10 mM) of isolated nuclei led to the irreversible denaturation of nuclear proteins, a fraction of which are nuclear matrix proteins. Denaturation of 50% of the total nonhistone nuclear protein content of isolated nuclei occurred after exposure to 4.7 mM WR-1065 for 20 min at 23 C. In addition, a 22% increase in the insoluble protein content of nuclei isolated from V79 cells that had been treated with 4 mM WR-1065 for 30 min at 37 C was observed, indicating that WR-1065-induced protein denaturation occurs not only in isolated nuclei but also in the nuclei of intact cells. From the extent of the increase in insoluble protein in the nucleus, protein denaturation by WR-1065 is expected to contribute to drug toxicity at concentrations greater than approximately 4 mM. WR-33278, the disulfide form of WR1065, was approximately twice as effective as the free thiol at denaturing nuclear proteins. The proposed mechanism for nucleoprotein denaturation is through direct interactions with protein cysteine groups with the formation of destabilizing protein-WR-1065 disulfides. In comparison to its effect on nuclear proteins in isolated nuclei, WR-1065 had only a very small effect on non-nuclear proteins of whole cells, isolated nuclear matrix, or the thiol-rich Ca (2+) ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum, indicating that WR-1065 can effectively denature protein only inside an intact nucleus, probably due to the increased concentration of the positively charged drug in the vicinity of DNA.

  8. Long-term Observations of Wolf-Rayet Type Binary Systems WR 127 and WR 141

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akoz, Ibrahim; Yakut, Kadri

    2016-07-01

    New UBVRI long-term photometric observations of the Wolf-Rayet systems WR 127 and WR 141 are obtained at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory with the 60cm Robotic telescope. Our new observations are combined with the earlier observations. We analyzed all the available light variation of the systems and revised the orbital parameters of the systems.

  9. Protection by WR-2721 and WR-151327 against late effects of gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grdina, D. J.; Garnes, B. A.; Nagy, B.

    Two thiophosphoroate compounds WR-2721 and WR-151327 were assessed for their ability to modify the deleterious effects (life shortening and carcinogenesis) of fission-spectrum neutrons (kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.85 MeV) or gamma rays on B6CF1 hybrid mice. Male and female mice, 200 of each sex per experimental group, were irradiated individually at 110 days of age. Radioprotectors (400 mg/kg of WR-2721 or 580 mg/kg of WR-151327) were administered intraperitoneally 30 min prior to irradiation. Neutron doses were 10 cGy or 40 cGy and gamma ray doses were 206 cGy or 417 cGy. Animals were housed five to a cage; cage locations in the holding rooms were randomized by computer. Animals were checked daily and all deceased animals were necropsied. WR-2721 afforded protection against both neutron- and gamma-ray-induced carcinogenesis and subsequent life shortening. Cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice of either sex were unaffected by protectors. WR-2721 protected irradiated groups against life shortening by approximately 10 cGy of neutrons or 100 cGy of gamma rays. WR-151327 was as effective as WR-2721 against neutron irradiation.

  10. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. II. Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Mooteri, S.N.; Podolski, J.L.; Drab, E.A.; Saclarides, T.J.

    1996-02-01

    Although the aminothiol WR-1065 protects normal tissues, its direct effect on the damage and restoration of the vascular endothelium is not clear. In endothelial cells, WR-1065 attenuates both the DNA damage and the G{sub 1}-phase arrest induced by radiation. After the destruction of nearby endothelial cells, the survivors rearrange their cytoskeleton, migrate and replicate. To determine the effect of radiation on morphology and migration, portions of bovine aortic endothelial cell cultures were denuded with a pipette tip and irradiated ({sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays). The following observations were noted after 5 Gy: within 10 min, there was increased formation of protein-mixed disulfides including actin-mixed disulfide; after 30 min, {alpha}{sub 5}{Beta}{sub 1}, the integrin receptor for fibronectin, was up-regulated on the apical membrane surface. Within 5 h, actin-containing stress fibers reorganized, although there was no change in the total filamentous (F-)actin content within the cells. Compared to controls after 24 h, the irradiated cells had migrated 15% farther (P < 0.01), and at the leading edge covered twice the surface area (P < 0.0001). The addition of 2 mM WR-1065 for 2 h before 5 Gy inhibited the increased expression of {alpha}{sub 5}{Beta}{sub 1}, promoted retention of stress fibers and prevented the enhanced cell migration and spreading. These results indicate that WR-1065 prevents radiation-induced morphological responses. This effect appears to be mediated by an impact on both adhesion molecule expression and cytoskeletal reorganization. 61 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Is the Stellar System WR 11 a Gamma-Ray Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Many early-type stars are in systems; some of them have been indicated as putative high-energy emitters. The radiation would be produced at the region where two stellar winds collide. Compelling evidence of such emission was found only for the colliding-wind binary (CWB) Eta Car, which was associated to a GeV source. Very recently, the closest CWB, WR 11, was proposed as a counterpart of a 6σ emission excess, measured with the Fermi LAT satellite. We sought evidence to support or reject the hypothesis that WR 11 is responsible of the gamma-ray excess. Archive radio interferometric data at 1.4 and 2.5 GHz taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array along 16 dates were reduced. The sizes of the field-of-view at 2.5 GHz and of the central region of the Fermi LAT excess are alike. We analysed the emission of the WR 11 field, characterised the radio sources detected and derived their spectral indices, to investigate their nature. Eight sources with fluxes above 10 mJy were detected at both frequencies. All but one (WR 11) showed negative spectral indices. Four of them were identified with known objects, including WR 11. A fifth source, labeled here S6, is a promising candidate to produce gamma-ray emission, besides the CWB WR 11.

  12. A Chandra grating observation of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 48a

    SciTech Connect

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Gagné, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L. E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu

    2014-04-10

    We present results of a Chandra High-Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) observation of the carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 48a. These are the first high-resolution spectra of this object in X-ray. Blueshifted centroids of the spectral lines of ∼ – 360 km s{sup –1} and line widths of 1000-1500 km s{sup –1} (FWHM) were deduced from the analysis of the line profiles of strong emission lines. The forbidden line of Si XIII is strong and not suppressed, indicating that the rarified 10-30 MK plasma forms far from strong sources of far-ultraviolet emission, most likely in a wind collision zone. Global spectral modeling showed that the X-ray spectrum of WR 48a suffered higher absorption in the 2012 October Chandra observation compared with a previous 2008 January XMM-Newton observation. The emission measure of the hot plasma in WR 48a decreased by a factor ∼3 over the same period of time. The most likely physical picture that emerges from the analysis of the available X-ray data is that of colliding stellar winds in a wide binary system with an elliptical orbit. We propose that the unseen secondary star in the system is another WR star or perhaps a luminous blue variable.

  13. Hypothermia induced by WR-2721 in the rat.

    PubMed

    Benova, D; Kiradzhiev, G; Nikolova, M A

    1987-01-01

    Hypothermic response to a range of doses of WR-2721 (S-2-/3 aminopropylamino/-ethylthiophosphate) was studied in the rat. Time of hypothermia appearance, time and extent of maximum hypothermia, and pattern of body temperature recovery were all observed to depend upon the level of drug dose administered. The role of such hypothermia in systemic toxicity of the drug is discussed. The authors believe it to result from insufficiency of thermoregulation in small mammals, and to be of no practical importance for clinical application of the drug. PMID:2834914

  14. Interaction of radiosensitizers and WR-2721. I. Modification of skin radioprotection.

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, A.; Stewart, F. A.; Denekamp, J.

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the radiomodifying action in mouse skin of WR-2721 and misonidazole (MISO) when used alone or in combination. The radioprotection with WR-2721 was drug-dose dependent and highly influenced by the O2 concentration at the time of irradiation. Significant sensitizaton was observed with MISO, especially in air-breathing mice. The combination of WR-2721 and MISO produced a radiation response intermediate between the resistant and sensitive responses to either drug alone. The precise degree of sensitivity was dependent on the relative doses of protector and sensitizer. We have also studied the interaction of both drugs in terms of drug-induced lethality, which showed a clear toxic interaction. The WR-2721 LD50 was reduced by a factor of 1.4 with only 200 mg/kg of MISO. We conclude that the combination of WR-2721 and MISO shows an interaction in terms of drug toxicity and radiation response, such that the radioprotection of skin is reduced or even abolished with low doses of MISO. PMID:6282299

  15. pH-Responsive Micelle Sequestrant Polymers Inhibit Fat Absorption.

    PubMed

    Qian, Jian; Sullivan, Bradley P; Berkland, Cory

    2015-08-10

    Current antiobesity therapeutics are associated with side effects and/or poor long-term patient compliance, necessitating development of more efficacious and safer alternatives. Herein, we designed and engineered a new class of orally acting pharmaceutical agents, or micelle sequestrant polymers (MSPs), that could respond to the pH change in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and potentially sequester lipid micelles; inhibiting lipid absorption through a pH-triggered flocculation process. These MSPs, derived from poly(2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate) and poly(2-(dibutylamino)ethyl methacrylate), were soluble in acidic media, but they transitioned to become insoluble around pH 7.2 and 6.1, respectively. MSPs showed substantial bile acid and triglyceride sequestration capacity with fast pH response tested in vitro. In vivo study showed that orally dosed MSPs significantly enhanced fecal elimination of triglycerides and bile acids. Several MSPs increased fecal elimination of triglycerides by 9-10 times compared with that of the control. In contrast, fecal concentration of bile acids, but not triglycerides, was increased by cholestyramine or Welchol. Importantly, fecal elimination of bile acids and triglycerides was unaltered by addition of control dietary fibers. MSPs may serve as a novel approach to weight loss that inhibits excess caloric intake by preventing absorption of excess dietary triglycerides. PMID:26133544

  16. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  17. Calcium Absorption Response to Cholecalciferol Supplementation in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Zena, Mohsen; Lund, Richard; Heaney, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Recent understanding of extrarenal production of calcitriol has led to the use of more vitamin D supplementation in CKD populations. This paper reports the effect of cholecalciferol supplementation on calcium absorption. Design, setting, participants, & measurements Paired calcium absorption tests were done before and after 12–13 weeks of 20,000 IU weekly cholecalciferol supplementation in 30 participants with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis. The study was conducted from April to December of 2011. Calcium absorption was tested with a standardized meal containing 300 mg calcium carbonate intrinsically labeled with 45Ca; 25-hydroxyvitamin D and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D were measured. Results 25-Hydroxyvitamin D rose from 14.2 ng/ml (11.5–18.5) at baseline to 49.3 ng/ml (42.3–58.1) at the end of the study (P<0.001). 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D rose from 15.1 (10.5–18.8) pg/ml at baseline to 20.5 (17.0–24.7) pg/ml at the end of the study (P<0.001). The median baseline calcium absorption was 12% (7%–17%) and 12% (7%–16%) at the end of study. Conclusions Patients with stage 5 CKD on hemodialysis had very low calcium absorption values at baseline, and cholecalciferol supplementation that raised 25(OH)D levels to 50 ng/ml had no effect on calcium absorption. PMID:23411428

  18. The Puzzle of HD 104994 (WR 46)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, Sergey V.; Arias, Julia; Barbá, Rodolfo; Balona, Luis; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Niemela, Virpi S.; Shara, Michael M.; Sterken, Christiaan

    2000-10-01

    Intense coordinated spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the suspected Wolf-Rayet binary WR 46 in 1999 reveals clear periodic variations, P=0.329+/-0.013 days, in the radial velocities of the emission lines of highest ionization potential, O VI and N V, found deepest in the Wolf-Rayet wind and thus least likely to be perturbed by a companion. These are accompanied by coherent variability in the profiles of lines with lower ionization/excitation potential and in the continuum flux. Most probably originating from orbital motion of the Wolf-Rayet component of the binary, this periodic radial velocity signal disappears from time to time, thus creating a puzzle yet to be solved. We show that the entangled patterns of the line profile variability are mainly governed by transitions between high and low states of the system's continuum flux. Based in part on observations obtained at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (ESO program 62.H-0110).

  19. Temperature dependences of mechanisms responsible for the water-vapor continuum absorption. II. Dimers and collision-induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Leforestier, C; Tipping, R H; Ma, Q

    2010-04-28

    We investigated the magnitude and temperature dependence (T dependence) of the dimer absorption in the region of 0-600 cm(-1) and the collision-induced absorption (CIA) in the region of 0-1150 cm(-1). Together with our previous study of the self water-vapor continuum contributions resulting from far-wing line shapes of the allowed H(2)O lines in the infrared window between 800 and 1150 cm(-1), we find that the three mechanisms have completely different T dependence behaviors. The dimer absorption has the strongest negative T dependence and the continuum absorption from far wings of the allowed lines has a moderately strong negative one. Meanwhile, the CIA exhibits a mild T dependence. In addition, their T dependence patterns are quite different. The T dependence of the far-wing theory varies significantly as the frequency of interest omega varies. For CIA, in general, its T dependence is mildly negative, but becomes slightly positive in the window region between the H(2)O bands. In contrast, the T dependence of the dimer absorption varies slightly as omega varies. In the microwave and submillimeter region, its T dependence becomes uniform. Concerning the relative importance for each of these three mechanisms, we find that in the infrared widow, the far-wing contributions are the dominant source of the self-continuum. Within the band, its contributions are definitely responsible for the measured continuum data. But, it is impossible to draw quantitatively conclusions on its relative importance unless one is able to improve the accuracy of the local line calculations significantly. On the other hand, within the pure rotational band, the dimer absorptions are a minor contributor to the self-continuum measurements, and its role becomes more important in the microwave and submillimeter regions. Finally, based on our study we conclude that contributions to the self-continuum from CIA in the frequency region of 0-1150 cm(-1) are negligible. PMID:20441270

  20. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  1. Determination of the water vapor continuum absorption by THz-TDS and Molecular Response Theory.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yihong; Mandehgar, Mahboubeh; Grischkowsky, D

    2014-02-24

    Determination of the water vapor continuum absorption from 0.35 to 1 THz is reported. The THz pulses propagate though a 137 m long humidity-controlled chamber and are measured by THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The average relative humidity along the entire THz path is precisely obtained by measuring the difference between transit times of the sample and reference THz pulses to an accuracy of 0.1 ps. Using the measured total absorption and the calculated resonance line absorption with the Molecular Response Theory lineshape, based on physical principles and measurements, an accurate continuum absorption is obtained within four THz absorption windows, that agrees well with the empirical theory. The absorption is significantly smaller than that obtained using the van Vleck-Weisskopf lineshape with a 750 GHz cut-off. PMID:24663762

  2. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  3. Radioprotector WR-2721 and mitigating peptidoglycan synergistically promote mouse survival through the amelioration of intestinal and bone marrow damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Qiu; Wu, Shu; Xia, Xiaochun; Wu, Anqing; Cui, Fengmei; Gu, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Xueguang; Cao, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    The identification of an agent effective for the treatment of intestinal and bone marrow injury following radiation exposure remains a major issue in radiological medicine. In this study, we evaluated the therapeutic impact of single agent or combination treatments with 2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylsulphanyl phosphonic acid (WR-2721) and peptidoglycan (PGN, a toll-like receptor 2 (TLR-2) agonist) on radiation-induced injury of the intestine and bone marrow in lethally irradiated male C57BL/6 mice. A dose of 3 mg of WR-2721 per mouse (167 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was given 30 min before irradiation, and 30 μg of PGN per mouse (1.7 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 24 h after 10 Gy irradiation. Bone marrow cluster of differentiation (CD)45(+) and CD34(+) markers of multiple haematopoietic lineages, number of granulocyte-erythroid-macrophage-megakaryocyte (GEMM) progenitor colonies, bone marrow histopathology, leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) expression in the intestines, xylose absorption and intestinal histopathology were all assessed at various time-points after irradiation. Furthermore, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65 protein in the ileum was stained by immunofluorescent labelling. PGN-treated irradiated mice showed an increase in CD45(+)CD34(+) cells compared with untreated mice 1.25 days after 10 Gy ionizing radiation (IR) (P < 0.05). Furthermore, combined PGN and WR-2721 treatment had an obviously synergistic radio-protective effect in nucleated cells in the bone marrow, including GEMM progenitors and CD45(+)CD34(+) cells 4 days after 10 Gy IR. Single agent PGN or WR-2721 treatment after 10 Gy IR clearly increased Lgr5-positive pit cells (P < 0.05) and xylose absorption (P < 0.05). However only PGN and WR-2721 combination treatment markedly increased villus height (P < 0.05), number of crypts (P < 0.05) and whole-body weights after 10 Gy whole-body irradiation (WBI). The NF-κB p65 subunit was translocated to the

  4. Tropospheric ozone and plants: absorption, responses, and consequences.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoungwon; Tiwari, Supriya; Agrawal, S B; Torres, N L; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Sarkar, Abhijit; Shibato, Junko; Agrawal, Ganesh K; Kubo, Akihiro; Rakwal, Randeep

    2011-01-01

    Ozone is now considered to be the second most important gaseous pollutant in our environment. The phytotoxic potential of O₃ was first observed on grape foliage by B.L. Richards and coworkers in 1958 (Richards et al. 1958). To date, unsustainable resource utilization has turned this secondary pollutant into a major component of global climate change and a prime threat to agricultural production. The projected levels to which O₃ will increase are critically alarming and have become a major issue of concern for agriculturalists, biologists, environmentalists and others plants are soft targets for O₃. Ozone enters plants through stomata, where it disolves in the apoplastic fluid. O₃ has several potential effects on plants: direct reaction with cell membranes; conversion into ROS and H₂O₂ (which alters cellular function by causing cell death); induction of premature senescence; and induction of and up- or down-regulation of responsive components such as genes , proteins and metabolites. In this review we attempt to present an overview picture of plant O₃ interactions. We summarize the vast number of available reports on plant responses to O₃ at the morphological, physiological, cellular, biochemical levels, and address effects on crop yield, and on genes, proteins and metabolites. it is now clear that the machinery of photosynthesis, thereby decreasing the economic yield of most plants and inducing a common morphological symptom, called the "foliar injury". The "foliar injury" symptoms can be authentically utilized for biomonitoring of O₃ under natural conditions. Elevated O₃ stress has been convincingly demonstrated to trigger an antioxidative defense system in plants. The past several years have seen the development and application of high-throughput omics technologies (transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics) that are capable of identifying and prolifiling the O₃-responsive components in model and nonmodel plants. Such studies have been

  5. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of WR-1065 in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, D.J.; Huelle, B.K.; Miller, M.A.; Geary, R.S.; Sanchez-Barona, D.O.; Swynnerton, N.F.; Fleckenstein, L.; Ludden, T.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol) were investigated following iv, intraduodenal, and intraportal administrations in the rhesus monkey. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by compartmental modeling of plasma concentration data from 10-min and 120-min iv infusions. Higher apparent volumes of distribution (Vc and Vss) and higher mean residence time (MRT) were observed at the slower infusion rate but a constant total dose. The values reflect a change in the distribution of WR-1065, possibly due to to saturation of binding in plasma and tissue. However, clearance remained unchanged. For a monkey administered approximately twice the 60 mg/kg dose infused over 120 min, data analysis indicates a disproportional increase in AUC and a substantial decrease in clearance. Low and erratic plasma concentrations of free drug (analytically determined without reductive cleavage) were observed following intraduodenal administration of WR-1065, demonstrating the drug's poor oral bioavailability. Results of intraduodenal administrations of radiolabeled drug indicated than an appreciable amount of the radiolabel in the dose reached the systemic circulation. However, after either intraduodenal or iv administration, only 31% of the AUC (radiolabel) could be accounted for as total (free and disulfide-bound) WR-1065 by specific analysis in separate experiments. Low levels of total cysteamine strongly suggest it to be a minor contributor to the disposition of the drug. Free WR-1065 AUC values following intraportal administration were similar to values obtained after iv administration.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of WR-1065 in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Mangold, D J; Huelle, B K; Miller, M A; Geary, R S; Sanchez-Barona, D O; Swynnerton, N F; Fleckenstein, L; Ludden, T M

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol] were investigated following iv, intraduodenal, and intraportal administrations in the rhesus monkey. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by compartmental modeling of plasma concentration data from 10-min and 120-min iv infusions. Higher apparent volumes of distribution (Vc and Vss) and higher mean residence time (MRT) were observed at the slower infusion rate but a constant total dose. The values reflect a change in the distribution of WR-1065, possibly due to to saturation of binding in plasma and tissue. However, clearance remained unchanged. For a monkey administered approximately twice the 60 mg/kg dose infused over 120 min, data analysis indicates a disproportional increase in AUC and a substantial decrease in clearance. Low and erratic plasma concentrations of free drug (analytically determined without reductive cleavage) were observed following intraduodenal administration of WR-1065, demonstrating the drug's poor oral bioavailability. Results of intraduodenal administrations of radiolabeled drug indicated than an appreciable amount of the radiolabel in the dose reached the systemic circulation. However, after either intraduodenal or iv administration, only 31% of the AUC (radiolabel) could be accounted for as total (free and disulfide-bound) WR-1065 by specific analysis in separate experiments. Low levels of total cysteamine strongly suggest it to be a minor contributor to the disposition of the drug. Free WR-1065 AUC values following intraportal administration were similar to values obtained after iv administration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1974187

  7. A BINARY ORBIT FOR THE MASSIVE, EVOLVED STAR HDE 326823, A WR+O SYSTEM PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu

    2011-12-15

    The hot star HDE 326823 is a candidate transition-phase object that is evolving into a nitrogen-enriched Wolf-Rayet star. It is also a known low-amplitude, photometric variable with a 6.123 day period. We present new, high- and moderate-resolution spectroscopy of HDE 326823, and we show that the absorption lines show coherent Doppler shifts with this period while the emission lines display little or no velocity variation. We interpret the absorption line shifts as the orbital motion of the apparently brighter star in a close, interacting binary. We argue that this star is losing mass to a mass gainer star hidden in a thick accretion torus and to a circumbinary disk that is the source of the emission lines. HDE 326823 probably belongs to a class of objects that produce short-period WR+O binaries.

  8. Evolution of Planetary Nebulae with WR-type Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, Ashkbiz

    2014-04-01

    This thesis presents a study of the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical abundances for a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and weak emission-line stars (wels), based on optical integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University 2.3 telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, and complemented by spectra from the literature. PNe surrounding WR-type stars constitute a particular study class for this study. A considerable fraction of currently well-identified central stars of PNe exhibit 'hydrogen-deficient' fast expanding atmospheres characterized by a large mass-loss rate. Most of them were classified as the carbon-sequence and a few of them as the nitrogen-sequence of the WR-type stars. What are less clear are the physical mechanisms and evolutionary paths that remove the hydrogen-rich outer layer from these degenerate cores, and transform it into a fast stellar wind. The aim of this thesis is to determine kinematic structure, density distribution, thermal structure and elemental abundances for a sample of PNe with different hydrogen-deficient central stars, which might provide clues about the origin and formation of their hydrogen-deficient stellar atmospheres. Hα and [N II] emission features have been used to determine kinematic structures. Based on spatially resolved observations of these emission lines, combined with archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging for compact PNe, morphological structures of these PNe have been determined. Comparing the velocity maps from the IFU spectrograph with those provided by morpho-kinematic models allowed disentangling of the different morphological components of most PNe, apart from the compact objects. The results indicate that these PNe have axisymmetric morphologies, either bipolar or elliptical. In many cases, the associated kinematic maps for PNe around hot WR-type stars also show the presence of so-called fast

  9. Evolution of Planetary Nebulae with WR-type Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, Ashkbiz

    2014-04-01

    This thesis presents a study of the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical abundances for a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and weak emission-line stars (wels), based on optical integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University 2.3 telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, and complemented by spectra from the literature. PNe surrounding WR-type stars constitute a particular study class for this study. A considerable fraction of currently well-identified central stars of PNe exhibit 'hydrogen-deficient' fast expanding atmospheres characterized by a large mass-loss rate. Most of them were classified as the carbon-sequence and a few of them as the nitrogen-sequence of the WR-type stars. What are less clear are the physical mechanisms and evolutionary paths that remove the hydrogen-rich outer layer from these degenerate cores, and transform it into a fast stellar wind. The aim of this thesis is to determine kinematic structure, density distribution, thermal structure and elemental abundances for a sample of PNe with different hydrogen-deficient central stars, which might provide clues about the origin and formation of their hydrogen-deficient stellar atmospheres. Hα and [N II] emission features have been used to determine kinematic structures. Based on spatially resolved observations of these emission lines, combined with archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging for compact PNe, morphological structures of these PNe have been determined. Comparing the velocity maps from the IFU spectrograph with those provided by morpho-kinematic models allowed disentangling of the different morphological components of most PNe, apart from the compact objects. The results indicate that these PNe have axisymmetric morphologies, either bipolar or elliptical. In many cases, the associated kinematic maps for PNe around hot WR-type stars also show the presence of so-called fast

  10. A Simple Experiment Demonstrating the Relationship between Response Curves and Absorption Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chia-yu

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording two individual spectrophotometer response curves. The two curves are directly related to the power of transmitted beams that pass through a solvent and solution. An absorption spectrum of the solution can be constructed from the calculated rations of the curves as a function of wavelength. (JN)

  11. Absorption in Music: Development of a Scale to Identify Individuals with Strong Emotional Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Russo, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the rise in research investigating music and emotion over the last decade, there are no validated measures of individual differences in emotional responses to music. We created the Absorption in Music Scale (AIMS), a 34-item measure of individuals' ability and willingness to allow music to draw them into an emotional experience. It was…

  12. Multi-Epoch Observations of Dust Formed around WR140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Ohsawa, R.; Asano, K.; Mori, T. I.; Onaka, T.; Nozawa, T.; Kozasa, T.; Fujiyoshi, T.

    2012-08-01

    We present results of the mid-infrared multi-epoch observations of periodically dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary WR140 with Subaru/COMICS. Based on the N- and Q-bands photometric observations, the mass evolution of dust in the expanding concentric arc structures formed during the 2001 and 2009 periastron events is investigated. Our results show that at most 1.0×10-8M⊙ of dust survives per periastron later than an orbital phase, suggesting that such WR binary systems may not be the major dust budget in the early universe unless the grain growth later on should not take place.

  13. Absorption coefficients of GeSn extracted from PIN photodetector response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Kaiheng; Zhang, Wogong; Oehme, Michael; Schmid, Marc; Gollhofer, Martin; Kostecki, Konrad; Widmann, Daniel; Körner, Roman; Kasper, Erich; Schulze, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    In this paper the optical absorption of the GeSn PIN photodetector was investigated. The vertical GeSn PIN photodetectors were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and dry etching. By means of current density-voltage (J-V) and capacity-voltage (C-V) measurements the photodetector device was characterized. The absorption coefficients of GeSn material were finally extracted from the optical response of PIN structure. With further direct bandgap analysis the influences of device structure was proved negligible.

  14. Ozone absorption into excised porcine and sheep tracheae by a bolus-response method.

    PubMed

    Ben-Jebria, A; Hu, S C; Kitzmiller, E L; Ultman, J S

    1991-12-01

    The absorption of ozone (O3) into excised porcine and sheep tracheae was characterized by a bolus-response experiment in which a bolus with a peak O3 concentration of 1 ppm was rapidly injected into a steadily flowing airstream entering the trachea. Using a fast-responding chemiluminescent analyzer of our design, the O3 concentration curves at the proximal end (i.e., the bolus input) and at the distal end (i.e., the response) of the trachea were monitored. Each concentration curve was numerically integrated, and the fraction of O3 absorbed in the trachea was obtained by subtracting from unity the ratio of the response integral to the bolus input integral. Average values of ozone-absorbed fraction decreased from about 0.50 to 0.15 at increasing airflows from 50 to 200 ml/sec. A diffusion theory that includes the effects of bulk convection, axial dispersion, and first-order absorption was developed to relate the fractional absorption to an overall mass transfer coefficient (K). The results indicate that K is independent of airflow, suggesting that the diffusion resistance in mucus is much greater than that in the gas phase. The time-weighted integrals of the concentration curves were also computed, allowing the mean residence time of O3 in the trachea (delta tau) to be determined. As predicted by the diffusion theory, delta tau was inversely related to the rate of O3 absorption. PMID:1769361

  15. Modeling the diffusion/absorption response of a nanopore coated microporous silicon interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, C.; Laminack, W.; Gole, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    We outline a modeling study of an extrinsic semiconductor interface formed from the interaction of nanostructured metal oxide decorated porous silicon and used for sensing gas phase analytes. We consider simple conductometric sensors that operate at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Nanostructured metal oxide deposition provides a matrix of responses to various analytes, facilitating the extraction of ambient gas concentrations from sensor responses. The sensors are simulated in four stages with an emphasis to the continual improvement of the modeling effort. Stage 1 focuses solely on the diffusion mechanics of an analyte gas into and out of a micro/nanoporous interface and the observed linear response at low concentrations. Stage 2 focuses on the non-linearity resulting primarily from the quenching of sensor response at higher concentrations and introduces an absorption response mechanism. Here, stage 3 demonstrates how the consideration of charge carrier density leads to the development of a new Fermi-distribution based response mechanism. Stage 4 establishes a combined absorption-Fermi-distribution response mechanism.

  16. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond

    2015-10-06

    We present two iterative algorithms for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within linear response of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. These methods do not attempt to compute eigenvalues or eigenvectors of the linear response matrix. They are designed to approximate the absorption spectrum as a function directly. They take advantage of the special structure of the linear response matrix. Neither method requires the linear response matrix to be constructed explicitly. They only require a procedure that performs the multiplication of the linear response matrix with a vector. These methods can also be easily modified to efficiently estimate the density of states (DOS) of the linear response matrix without computing the eigenvalues of this matrix. We show by computational experiments that the methods proposed in this paper can be much more efficient than methods that are based on the exact diagonalization of the linear response matrix. We show that they can also be more efficient than real-time TDDFT simulations. We compare the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost.

  17. Direct and Semi-direct Radiative Responses to Observation-Constrained Aerosol Absorption over S Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Manoharan, V.

    2013-12-01

    Climate impacts of aerosols over S. Asia have been studied extensively in both models and observations. However, discrepancies between observed and modeled aerosol concentrations and optical properties have hindered our understanding of the aerosol influences on the regional monsoon circulation and rainfall. We present an in-depth examination of direct and semi-direct radiative responses due to aerosols on the latitudinal heating gradient and cloud distribution, with observational constraints on solar absorption by aerosols. Regional distributions of aerosol concentration are simulated with a 12-km regional climate model (WRF-Chem) driven by the NCEP analysis data from August 2011 to March 2012. During this time period, the ground-based measurements of aerosols and clouds, surface radiation, water vapor, and temperature were taken at Nainital (29.38°N, 79.45°E) during the DOE Ganges Valley Experiment (GVAX). This data set, which is available at high temporal resolution (hourly), is used to evaluate and constrain the simulated wavelength dependence of aerosol absorption and the correlation with changes in surface radiation, cloud base height and liquid water content for the entire post-monsoon period. The analysis is extended to a regional scale by comparing with satellite observation of absorbing aerosol optical depth (OMI) and cloud properties (MODIS). Preliminary results show good agreement in monthly variations of simulated and observed aerosol optical depth (AOD) except during periods of high observed AOD. Initial analysis indicates a possible local origin for the aerosols that is not captured in the model at present. Furthermore, analysis of the spectrally resolved aerosol absorption measurements indicates that these local aerosols exhibit strong absorption in near-UV and visible wavelengths. A large fraction of increased absorption during October and November (local fall harvest season) is attributable to the super-micron sized aerosol particles. In

  18. Absorption and related optical dispersion effects on the spectral response of a surface plasmon resonance sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakkach, Mohamed; Lecaruyer, Pierre; Bardin, Fabrice; Sakly, Jaouhar; Lakhdar, Zohra Ben; Canva, Michael

    2008-11-20

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing is an optical technique that allows real time detection of small changes in the physical properties, in particular in the refractive index, of a dielectric medium near a metal film surface. One way to increase the SPR signal shift is then to incorporate a substance possessing a strong dispersive refractive index in the range of the plasmon resonance band. In this paper, we investigate the impact of materials possessing a strong dispersive index integrated to the dielectric medium on the SPR reflectivity profile. We present theoretical results based on chromophore absorption spectra and on their associated refractive index obtained from the Lorentz approach and Kramers-Kroenig equations. As predicted by the theory, the experimental results show an enhancement of the SPR response, maximized when the chromophore absorption band coincides with the plasmon resonant wavelength. This shows that chromophores labeling can provide a potential way for SPR response enhancement.

  19. The X-ray light curve of the massive colliding wind Wolf-Rayet + O binary WR 21a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, Eric; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-05-01

    Our dedicated XMM-Newton monitoring, as well as archival Chandra and Swift datasets, were used to examine the behaviour of the WN5h+O3V binary WR 21a at high energies. For most of the orbit, the X-ray emission exhibits few variations. However, an increase in strength of the emission is seen before periastron, following a 1 /D relative trend, where D is the separation between both components. This increase is rapidly followed by a decline due to strong absorption as the Wolf-Rayet (WR) comes in front. The fitted local absorption value appears to be coherent with a mass-loss rate of about 1 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 for the WR component. However, absorption is not the only parameter affecting the X-ray emission at periastron as even the hard X-ray emission decreases, suggesting a possible collapse of the colliding wind region near to or onto the photosphere of the companion just before or at periastron. An eclipse may appear as another potential scenario, but it would be in apparent contradiction with several lines of evidence, notably the width of the dip in the X-ray light curve and the absence of variations in the UV light curve. Afterwards, the emission slowly recovers, with a strong hysteresis effect. The observed behaviour is compatible with predictions from general wind-wind collision models although the absorption increase is too shallow. Based on observations collected at ESO as well as with Swift, Chandra, and the ESA science mission XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  20. UV-responsive nano-sponge for oil absorption and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Jung, Min Chan; Cho, So-Hye; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Heon Ju; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2015-08-01

    Controlled surface wettability for oil has been intensively studied to remove industrial oil waste or oil spill pollution from seas or rivers. In particular, external stimuli-induced special wetting materials, such as photo-responsive TiO2, have attracted considerable attention for oil-water separation. In this study, a novel method is reported to fabricate a nano-sponge which is composed of hydrophobic hydrocarbon and hydrophilic TiO2 nanoparticles for oil absorption or desorption that are responsive to UV irradiation. The hydrocarbon in the nano-sponge could selectively absorb oil from water, whereas the absorbed oil is released into the water by TiO2 in response to UV irradiation. The nano-sponge functionalized porous polydimethylsiloxane released more than 98% of the absorbed crude oil with UV irradiation and air-bubbling. It could be continuously reused while maintaining a high absorption capacity and desorption efficiency without incurring secondary air or water pollution. This smart oil absorption/desorption methodology with excellent selectivity and recyclability with almost perfect removal of absorbed oil can be applied for oil-water separation, oil spill cleanup and reuse of spilled oil.

  1. UV-responsive nano-sponge for oil absorption and desorption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Jung, Min Chan; Cho, So-Hye; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Heon Ju; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Controlled surface wettability for oil has been intensively studied to remove industrial oil waste or oil spill pollution from seas or rivers. In particular, external stimuli-induced special wetting materials, such as photo-responsive TiO2, have attracted considerable attention for oil-water separation. In this study, a novel method is reported to fabricate a nano-sponge which is composed of hydrophobic hydrocarbon and hydrophilic TiO2 nanoparticles for oil absorption or desorption that are responsive to UV irradiation. The hydrocarbon in the nano-sponge could selectively absorb oil from water, whereas the absorbed oil is released into the water by TiO2 in response to UV irradiation. The nano-sponge functionalized porous polydimethylsiloxane released more than 98% of the absorbed crude oil with UV irradiation and air-bubbling. It could be continuously reused while maintaining a high absorption capacity and desorption efficiency without incurring secondary air or water pollution. This smart oil absorption/desorption methodology with excellent selectivity and recyclability with almost perfect removal of absorbed oil can be applied for oil-water separation, oil spill cleanup and reuse of spilled oil. PMID:26260470

  2. Possible atomic structures responsible for the sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke-Fan; Shao, Hezhu; Liu, Kong; Qu, Shengchun E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhanguo; Wang, Yuanxu E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    Single-crystal silicon was hyperdoped with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium using ion implantation and nanosecond laser melting. The hyperdoping of such chalcogen elements led to strong and wide sub-bandgap light absorption. Annealing the hyperdoped silicon, even at low temperatures (such as 200–400 °C), led to attenuation of the sub-bandgap absorption. To explain the attenuation process, we modeled it as chemical decomposition reaction from an optically absorbing structure to a non-absorbing structure. Attenuation of the experimental absorption coefficient was fit using the Arrhenius equation. From the fitted data, we extracted the reaction activation energies of S-, Se-, and T-hyperdoped silicon as 0.338 ± 0.029 eV, 0.471 ± 0.040 eV, and 0.357 ± 0.028 eV, respectively. We discuss these activation energies in terms of the bond energies of chalcogen–Si metastable bonds, and suggest that several high-energy interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites, are candidates for the atomic structures that are responsible for the strong sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen hyperdoped silicon.

  3. Suzaku monitoring of the Wolf-Rayet binary WR 140 around periastron passage: An approach for quantifying the wind parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugawara, Yasuharu; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Tsuboi, Yohko; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael; Pollock, Andy M. T.; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Williams, Peredur M.; Dougherty, Sean; Pittard, Julian

    2015-12-01

    Suzaku observations of the Wolf-Rayet (W-R) binary WR 140 (WC7pd+O5.5fc) were made at four different times around periastron passage in 2009 January. The spectra changed in shape and flux with the phase. As periastron approached, the column density of the low-energy absorption increased, which indicates that the emission from the wind-wind collision plasma was absorbed by the dense W-R wind. The spectra can be mostly fitted with two different components: a warm component with kBT = 0.3-0.6 keV and a dominant hot component with kBT ˜ 3 keV. The emission measure of the dominant, hot component is not inversely proportional to the distance between the two stars. This can be explained by the O star wind colliding before it has reached its terminal velocity, leading to a reduction in its wind momentum flux. At phases closer to periastron, we discovered a cool plasma component in a recombining phase, which is less absorbed. This component may be a relic of the wind-wind collision plasma, which was cooled down by radiation, and may represent a transitional stage in dust formation.

  4. Accelerated two-wave mixing response in erbium-doped fibers with saturable optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Eliseo; Stepanov, Serguei; Plata Sanchez, Marcos

    2016-08-01

    The contribution of the spatially uniform variation of average optical absorption to the dynamics of the transient two-wave mixing (TWM) response is considered. It is shown theoretically and confirmed experimentally that this transient effect, via dynamic population gratings in erbium-doped fibers (EDFs) can ensure a response nearly two times faster in such gratings as compared to the growth rate of fluorescence uniformly excited under similar conditions, and can also result in an additional overshot in the tail of the TWM response. This additional ‘accelerating’ contribution is of even type, and does not influence the odd transient TWM response for the refractive index component of such gratings in the EDFs reported earlier. It is also shown that this effect can be utilized to monitor the formation of the dynamic grating with an auxiliary probe wave of the essentially different non-Bragg wavelength.

  5. A High-Resolution Spectrophotometric Study of the WR Binary System V444 Cygni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underhill, Anne B.

    1984-07-01

    The binary system V444 Cygni (P = 4.212424 day) is an important object for determining the sizes and masses of 0 and WR stars. However, no spectrographic studies of its orbit have been made since 1950. The orbital elements given by Munch (1950) require confirmation, especially the elements describing the motion of the WR star. Spectrophotometric observations from the ground by Kuhi (1968) indicate that the system is enveloped in high-temperature gas which may be streaming between the stars. Review of the four (3 SWP, I LWR) high-resolution spectrograms of this system taken previously by others indicates that absorption lines attributable to the O star occur in the wavelength range from 1700 to 1900A, and that rather sharp absorption components associated with the C II resonance lines and with N IV 1718 occur on some of the spectrograms, but not on others. It is planned to follow V444 Cygni through one orbital cycle obtaining spectra throughout both eclipses and at the elongations. Observations will be made with the SWP camera using the spectrograph in the highresolution mode and with the large aperture. The resulting series of spectra will permit us to confirm and improve the orbital elements of Munch, and to track what, if any, streams of gas occur in the system. Improved orbital elements will allow us to deduce improved sizes and masses for the two stars. Analysis of the blended spectra and comparisons with the spectra of single stars having equivalent spectral types to those of the components of V444 Cygni will allow us to infer information about the physical state of the atmosphere of each star. Appropriate comparison spectra of single stars exist in NSSDC. The P.I. has copies of some of them.

  6. Polymer complex of WR 2721. Synthesis and radioprotective efficiency.

    PubMed

    Koseva, Neli; Tsacheva, Ivelina; Mitova, Violeta; Vodenicharova, Elitsa; Molkentine, Jessica; Mason, Kathy; Troev, Kolio

    2014-12-18

    Polymer complex constructed from WR 2721 and poly(hydroxyoxyethylene phosphate) was synthesized. The structure of complex formed was elucidated by (1)H-, (13)C, (31)P NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The radioprotector was immobilized via ionic bonds. Radioprotective efficacy was evaluated by clonal survival of stem cells in crypts of mouse small intestine, and incidence and latency of the acute radiation induced bone marrow syndrome. Protection factors were assessed for WR 2721 and for the polymer complex. Protection factors for the polymer complex ranged from 2.6 for intestinal stem cell survival to 1.35 for 30 day survival (LD50) following whole body radiation exposure. In all cases, the polymer complex was a significantly better radiation protector than the parent compound. PMID:25159838

  7. High power windows for WR650 waveguide couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Mircea Stirbet; Robert Rimmer; Thomas Elliott; Edward Daly; Katherine Wilson; Lynn Vogel; Haipeng Wang; Brian Carpenter; Karl Smith; Thomas Powers; Michael Drury; Robert Nichols; G. Davis

    2007-06-01

    Based on the robust, pre-stressed planar window concept successfully tested for PEP II and LEDA, a new design for planar ceramic windows to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. These windows should operate in pulsed or CW mode and sustain at least 100 kW average power levels. This paper describes an overview of the simulations performed to match the ceramics in WR650 waveguides, design details, as well as the RF measurements and performance assessed by RF power tests on several high power windows manufactured at JLAB. Funding Agency: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by The Office of Naval Research under contract to the Dept. of Energy.

  8. The mass of the very massive binary WR21a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramper, F.; Sana, H.; Fitzsimons, N. E.; de Koter, A.; Kaper, L.; Mahy, L.; Moffat, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present multi-epoch spectroscopic observations of the massive binary system WR21a, which include the 2011 January periastron passage. Our spectra reveal multiple SB2 lines and facilitate an accurate determination of the orbit and the spectral types of the components. We obtain minimum masses of 64.4 ± 4.8 M⊙ and 36.3 ± 1.7 M⊙ for the two components of WR21a. Using disentangled spectra of the individual components, we derive spectral types of O3/WN5ha and O3Vz ((f*)) for the primary and secondary, respectively. Using the spectral type of the secondary as an indication for its mass, we estimate an orbital inclination of i = 58.8 ± 2.5° and absolute masses of 103.6 ± 10.2 M⊙ and 58.3 ± 3.7 M⊙, in agreement with the luminosity of the system. The spectral types of the WR21a components indicate that the stars are very young (1-2 Myr), similar to the age of the nearby Westerlund 2 cluster. We use evolutionary tracks to determine the mass-luminosity relation for the total system mass. We find that for a distance of 8 kpc and an age of 1.5 Myr, the derived absolute masses are in good agreement with those from evolutionary predictions.

  9. Analysis of the WN star WR 102c, its WR nebula, and the associated cluster of massive stars in the Sickle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, M.; Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sander, A.; Liermann, A.; Todt, H.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The massive Wolf-Rayet type star WR 102c is located near the Quintuplet Cluster, one of the three massive star clusters in the Galactic centre region. Previous studies indicated that WR 102c may have a dusty circumstellar nebula and is among the main ionising sources of the Sickle Nebula associated with the Quintuplet Cluster. Aims: The goals of our study are to derive the stellar parameters of WR 102c from the analysis of its spectrum and to investigate its stellar and nebular environment. Methods: We obtained observations with the ESO VLT integral field spectrograph SINFONI in the K-band, extracted the stellar spectra, and analysed them by means of stellar atmosphere models. Results: Our new analysis supersedes the results previously reported for WR 102c. We significantly decrease its bolometric luminosity and hydrogen content. We detect four early OB type stars close to WR 102c. These stars have radial velocities similar to that of WR 102c. We suggest that together with WR 102c these stars belong to a distinct star cluster with a total mass of ~ 1000 M⊙. We identify a new WR nebula around WR 102c in the SINFONI map of the diffuse Brγ emission and in the HST Paα images. The Brγ line at different locations is not significantly broadened and similar to the width of nebular emission elsewhere in the H ii region around WR 102c. Conclusions: The massive star WR 102c located in the Galactic centre region resides in a star cluster containing additional early-type stars. The stellar parameters of WR 102c are typical for hydrogen-free WN6 stars. We identify a nebula surrounding WR 102c that has a morphology similar to other nebulae around hydrogen-free WR stars, and propose that the formation of this nebula is linked to interaction of the fast stellar wind with the matter ejected at a previous evolutionary stage of WR 102c. The scientific results reported in this article are based on observations obtained during the ESO VLT program 383.D-0323(A).

  10. The role of absorption in women's sexual response to erotica: a cognitive-affective investigation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Jade; Koukounas, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of absorption on women's emotional and cognitive processing of erotic film. Absorption was experimentally manipulated using 2 different sets of test session instructions. The first, participant-oriented, instruction set directed participants to absorb themselves in the erotic film presentation, imagining that they were active participants in the sexual activities depicted. The second, spectator-oriented, instruction set directed participants to observe and assess the erotic film excerpt as impartial spectators. The participant-oriented instruction set was found to elicit greater subjective absorption in women than the spectator-oriented instruction set, and women reported greater subjective sexual arousal in the former set compared with the latter. Thus, it appears that the degree to which a woman becomes absorbed in an erotic stimulus may affect her subsequent subjective sexual arousal. Also, women reported greater degrees of positive affect when they took a participant-oriented perspective than when they viewed the erotic materials as impartial spectators. Thus, participants who were highly absorbed in the erotic film excerpt were more likely to view the stimulus favorably. By contrast, the degree to which women became absorbed in the stimulus had no effect on their reported negative affect. Future directions for examining female response patterns are suggested. PMID:19253136

  11. Non-starch polysaccharides extracted from seaweed can modulate intestinal absorption of glucose and insulin response in the pig.

    PubMed

    Vaugelade, P; Hoebler, C; Bernard, F; Guillon, F; Lahaye, M; Duee, P H; Darcy-Vrillon, B

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the possible effects of algal polysaccharides on postprandial blood glucose and insulin responses in an animal model, the pig. Three seaweed fibres of different viscosities, extracted from Palmaria palmata (PP), Eucheuma cottonii (EC), or Laminaria digitata (LD), were compared to purified cellulose (CEL). Blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were monitored and intestinal absorption quantified for 8 h following a high carbohydrate test-meal supplemented with 5% fibre. Digestive contents were also sampled, 5 h postprandial. As compared to CEL, PP had no effect on glucose and insulin responses. The latter decreased with EC, but glucose absorption balance was not modified. LD addition resulted in a dramatically reduced glucose absorption balance, accompanied by a higher amount of starch left in the small intestine. Among polysaccharides tested, only the highly viscous alginates could affect intestinal absorption of glucose and insulin response. PMID:10737549

  12. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF THE SHORT-TERM CYCLICAL VARIABILITY OF THE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 46

    SciTech Connect

    Henault-Brunet, V.; St-Louis, N.; Marchenko, S. V.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Talavera, A.; Carpano, S. E-mail: stlouis@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: andy.pollock@esa.int E-mail: scarpano@rssd.esa.int

    2011-07-01

    The Wolf-Rayet star WR 46 is known to exhibit a very complex variability pattern on relatively short timescales of a few hours. Periodic but intermittent radial velocity shifts of optical lines as well as multiple photometric periods have been found in the past. Non-radial pulsations, rapid rotational modulation, or the presence of a putative low-mass companion have been proposed to explain the short-term behavior. In an effort to unveil its true nature, we observed WR 46 with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) over several short-term variability cycles. We found significant variations on a timescale of {approx}8 hr in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) continuum, in the blue edge of the absorption trough of the O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1038 doublet P Cygni profile and in the S VI {lambda}{lambda}933, 944 P Cygni absorption profile. We complemented these observations with X-ray and UV light curves and an X-ray spectrum from archival X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton Space Telescope (XMM-Newton) data. The X-ray and UV light curves show variations on a timescale similar to the variability found in the FUV. We discuss our results in the context of the different scenarios suggested to explain the short-term variability of this object and reiterate that non-radial pulsations is the scenario most likely to occur.

  13. New Constraints on the Origin of the Short-term Cyclical Variability of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénault-Brunet, V.; St-Louis, N.; Marchenko, S. V.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Carpano, S.; Talavera, A.

    2011-07-01

    The Wolf-Rayet star WR 46 is known to exhibit a very complex variability pattern on relatively short timescales of a few hours. Periodic but intermittent radial velocity shifts of optical lines as well as multiple photometric periods have been found in the past. Non-radial pulsations, rapid rotational modulation, or the presence of a putative low-mass companion have been proposed to explain the short-term behavior. In an effort to unveil its true nature, we observed WR 46 with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) over several short-term variability cycles. We found significant variations on a timescale of ~8 hr in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) continuum, in the blue edge of the absorption trough of the O VI λλ1032, 1038 doublet P Cygni profile and in the S VI λλ933, 944 P Cygni absorption profile. We complemented these observations with X-ray and UV light curves and an X-ray spectrum from archival X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton Space Telescope (XMM-Newton) data. The X-ray and UV light curves show variations on a timescale similar to the variability found in the FUV. We discuss our results in the context of the different scenarios suggested to explain the short-term variability of this object and reiterate that non-radial pulsations is the scenario most likely to occur.

  14. Protection of Mice against Brucellosis by Vaccination with Brucella melitensis WR201(16MΔpurEK)

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, David L.; Crawford, Robert M.; Van De Verg, Lillian L.; Izadjoo, Mina J.; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K.; Paranavitana, Chrysanthi M.; Warren, Richard L.; Nikolich, Mikeljon P.; Hadfield, Ted L.

    1999-01-01

    Human brucellosis can be acquired from infected animal tissues by ingestion, inhalation, or contamination of the conjunctiva or traumatized skin by infected animal products. A vaccine to protect humans from occupational exposure or from zoonotic infection in areas where the disease is endemic would reduce an important cause of morbidity worldwide. Vaccines currently used in animals are unsuitable for human use. We tested a live, attenuated, purine-auxotrophic mutant strain of Brucella melitensis, WR201, for its ability to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses and to protect mice against intranasal challenge with B. melitensis 16M. Mice inoculated intraperitoneally with WR201 made serum antibody to lipopolysaccharide and non-O-polysaccharide antigens. Splenocytes from immunized animals released interleukin-2 (IL-2), gamma interferon, and IL-10 when cultured with Brucella antigens. Immunization led to protection from disseminated infection but had only a slight effect on clearance of the challenge inoculum from the lungs. These studies suggest that WR201 should be further investigated as a vaccine to prevent human brucellosis. PMID:10531243

  15. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16–42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  16. Effects of hypertonic stimuli and arginine vasotocin (AVT) on water absorption response in Japanese treefrog, Hyla japonica.

    PubMed

    Maejima, Sho; Yamada, Toshiki; Hamada, Takayuki; Matsuda, Kouhei; Uchiyama, Minoru

    2008-06-01

    Anuran amphibians do not drink orally but absorb water osmotically through the highly permeable ventral skin. In this cutaneous water absorption, roles of the putative cerebral osmoreceptors and functions of arginine vasotocin (AVT) were examined in the central nervous system of the Japanese treefrog, Hyla japonica. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) or intralymphatic sac (ILS) administration of various hypertonic solutions (NaCl, mannitol and urea) significantly extended the residence time in water in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting facilitation of water absorption in frogs. ICV injection of AVT also increased significantly the residence time in a dose-dependent manner. The water absorption effect of AVT was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of ICV OPC-21268, a vasopressin V(1) receptor antagonist. But pre-ICV injection of OPC-31260, a vasopressin V(2) receptor antagonist, did not block the water absorption effect of AVT. Extension of the residence time induced by hyperosmotic NaCl (1000 mOsm) ICV injection was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of ICV OPC-21268. The present results showed that increases of osmotic pressure in plasma and/or cerebrospinal fluid stimulate water absorption response, suggesting that osmoreceptors are certainly present in the central nervous system and AVT may directly stimulate water absorption in the treefrog. It is also suggested that AVT activates cellular mechanisms via V(1)-like but not V(2)-like receptors in the central nervous system and facilitates water absorption response in the treefrog. PMID:18555070

  17. Estudio de HI en torno a la estrella WR 85

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vásquez, J.; Cappa, C.; McClure-Griffiths, N.

    We present a study of the neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm-line emission distribution in the environment of the Wolf-Rayet star LSS 3982 (= WR 85, WN6+OB?) linked to the optical ring nebula RCW 118 with the aim of investigating the presence of an HI interstellar bubble. The HI data base belongs to the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS), obtained using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Parkes radiotelescope, with an angular resolution of 2.6×2.1 arc minutes, a velocity resolution of 0.82 km s-1 and a rms noise level of 2.4 K. We detected an HI shell related to WR 85 and RCW 118 which has probably originated in the action of the strong stellar wind on the surrounding interstellar medium. The HI structure is about 26 arc minutes in radius, corresponding to a linear radius of 21±5 pc at 2.8±0.7 kpc. The expansion velocity is 9±2 km s-1 and the associated ionized and neutral mass amount to 1900 M⊙. The HI bubble is in the momentun conserving stage.

  18. Cisplatin neuropathy. Risk factors, prognosis, and protection by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Mollman, J.E.; Glover, D.J.; Hogan, W.M.; Furman, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    A prospective study of patients receiving cis-diaminedichloroplatin II (DDP) was carried out to determine if risk factors could be identified related to the patient's living habits or past medical history that would predict in which patients DDP neuropathy might develop. Sixty-nine patients receiving six different combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, including DDP were examined. Twenty-eight of these patients received DDP in combination with the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosporothioic acid (WR 2721). No risk factors were identified relating to personal habits or past medical history of the patients. However, patients receiving DDP (40 mg/m2) on 5 consecutive days had a significantly higher incidence of neuropathy. Patients receiving DDP in combination with WR 2721 had a significantly lower incidence of neuropathy, and the mean dose at onset was significantly higher than the mean dose at onset of neuropathy for all other groups. In addition, five of six patients who were available for long-term follow-up demonstrated nearly complete reversal of the signs and symptoms of neuropathy.

  19. Molecular response in one-photon absorption via natural thermal light vs. pulsed laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brumer, Paul; Shapiro, Moshe

    2012-11-27

    Photoinduced biological processes occur via one-photon absorption in natural light, which is weak, continuous wave, and incoherent, but are often studied in the laboratory using pulsed coherent light. Here, we compare the response of a molecule to these two very different sources within a quantized radiation field picture. The latter is shown to induce coherent time evolution in the molecule, whereas the former does not. As a result, the coherent time dependence observed in the laboratory experiments will not be relevant to the natural biological process. Emphasis is placed on resolving confusions regarding this issue that are shown to arise from aspects of quantum measurement and from a lack of appreciation of the proper description of the absorbed photon. PMID:23150567

  20. Visible-absorption spectroscopy as a biomarker to predict treatment response and prognosis of surgically resected esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Wen; Hsu, I-Jen; Chang, Chun-Wei; Wang, Yu-Chia; Hsieh, Ching-Yueh; Shih, Kuan-Hui; Wong, Li-Fan; Shih, Nai-Yu; Hsieh, Min-Shu; Hou, Max Ti-Kuang; Lee, Jang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The application of optical absorption spectra in prognostic prediction has hardly been investigated. We developed and evaluated a novel two dimensional absorption spectrum measurement system (TDAS) for use in early diagnosis, evaluating response to chemoradiation, and making prognostic prediction. The absorption spectra of 120 sets of normal and tumor tissues from esophageal cancer patients were analyzed with TDAS ex-vivo. We demonstrated the cancerous tissue, the tissue from patients with a poor concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) response, and the tissue from patients with an early disease progression each had a readily identifiable common spectral signature. Principal component analysis (PCA) classified tissue spectra into distinct groups, demonstrating the feasibility of using absorption spectra in differentiating normal and tumor tissues, and in predicting CCRT response, poor survival and tumor recurrence (efficiencies of 75%, 100% and 85.7% respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that patients identified as having poor-response, poor-survival and recurrence spectral signatures were correlated with increased risk of poor response to CCRT (P = 0.012), increased risk of death (P = 0.111) and increased risk of recurrence (P = 0.030) respectively. Our findings suggest that optical absorption microscopy has great potential to be a useful tool for pre-operative diagnosis and prognostic prediction of esophageal cancer. PMID:27624872

  1. The very massive X-ray bright binary system Wack2134 (= WR21a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemela, V. S.; Gamen, R. C.; Barbá, R. H.; Fernández Lajús, E.; Benaglia, P.; Solivella, G. R.; Reig, P.; Coe, M. J.

    2008-09-01

    From the radial velocities of the NIV λ4058 and HeII λ4686 emission lines, and the NV λ4604-20 absorption lines, determined in digital spectra, we report the discovery that the X-ray bright emission line star Wack2134 (= WR21a) is a spectroscopic binary system with an orbital period of 31.673 +/- 0.002d. With this period, the NIV and HeII emission and NV absorption lines, which originate in the atmosphere of the primary component, define a rather eccentric binary orbit (e = 0.64 +/- 0.03). The radial velocity variations of the NV absorptions have a lower amplitude than those of the HeII emission. Such a behaviour of the emission line radial velocities could be due to distortions produced by a superimposed absorption component from the companion. High-resolution echelle spectra observed during the quadrature phases of the binary show H and HeII absorptions of both components with a radial velocity difference of about 541kms-1. From this difference, we infer quite high values of the minimum masses, of about 87 and 53Msolar for the primary and secondary components, respectively, if the radial velocity variations of the HeII emission represent the true orbit of the primary. No HeI absorption lines are observed in our spectra. Thus, the secondary component in the Wack2134 binary system appears to be an early O-type star. From the presence of H, HeII and NV absorptions, and NIV and CIV emissions, in the spectrum of the primary component, it most clearly resembles those of Of/WNLha-type stars. Based partially on data collected at SAAO, CASLEO, LCO, CTIO and La Silla (under programme ID 68.D-0073) Observatories. In memoriam (1936-2006). ‡ E-mail: rgamen@casleo.gov.ar § Member of Carrera del Investigador CONICET, Argentina. Visiting Astronomer, Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, Chile, and CASLEO, Argentina. ¶ Member of Carrera del Investigador CONICET, Argentina. Visiting Astronomer, Las Campanas Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter

  2. Characterizing the spatio-temporal and energy-dependent response of riometer absorption to particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerman, Adam; Makarevich, Roman; Spanswick, Emma; Donovan, Eric; Shprits, Yuri

    2016-07-01

    Energetic electrons in the 10's of keV range precipitate to the upper D- and lower E-region ionosphere, and are responsible for enhanced ionization. The same particles are important in the inner magnetosphere, as they provide a source of energy for waves, and thus relate to relativistic electron enhancements in Earth's radiation belts.In situ observations of plasma populations and waves are usually limited to a single point, which complicates temporal and spatial analysis. Also, the lifespan of satellite missions is often limited to several years which does not allow one to infer long-term climatology of particle precipitation, important for affecting ionospheric conditions at high latitudes. Multi-point remote sensing of the ionospheric plasma conditions can provide a global view of both ionospheric and magnetospheric conditions, and the coupling between magnetospheric and ionospheric phenomena can be examined on time-scales that allow comprehensive statistical analysis. In this study we utilize multi-point riometer measurements in conjunction with in situ satellite data, and physics-based modeling to investigate the spatio-temporal and energy-dependent response of riometer absorption. Quantifying this relationship may be a key to future advancements in our understanding of the complex D-region ionosphere, and may lead to enhanced specification of auroral precipitation both during individual events and over climatological time-scales.

  3. Scintillation response of Xe gas studied by gamma-ray absorption and Compton electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiderski, L.; Chandra, R.; Curioni, A.; Davatz, G.; Friederich, H.; Gendotti, A.; Gendotti, U.; Goeltl, L.; Iwanowska-Hanke, J.; Moszyński, M.; Murer, D.; Resnati, F.; Rubbia, A.; Szawlowski, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this study we report on the scintillation response of Xe gas under irradiation of gamma-rays in the energy range between 50 keV and 1.5 MeV. Xe gas was pressurized to 50 bar and tested as a detector for gamma spectroscopy. The gas was confined in a titanium vessel of 200 mm length and 101 mm diameter with 2.5 mm thick walls. The vessel was sealed with two 3 inch diameter UV transparent windows. The inner surface of the vessel was covered with a reflecting wavelength shifter. Two photomultipliers coupled to both windows at the end of the vessel allowed for registration of 3700 photoelectrons/MeV, which resulted in 7.0% energy resolution registered for 662 keV γ-rays from a 137Cs source. The non-proportionality of the photoelectron yield and intrinsic resolution was studied with gamma photoabsorption peaks. Due to the thickness of the detector vessel, the response of the Xe gas as a scintillator in the low energy range was performed by means of a Compton Coincidence Technique and compared with the gamma absorption results. The shape of the non-proportionality characteristics of Xe gaseous scintillator was compared to the results obtained for NaI:Tl, LaBr3:Ce and LYSO:Ce. A correlation between non-proportionality and intrinsic resolution of Xe gaseous scintillator was pointed out.

  4. Development of a Fast-Response Ultraviolet Absorption Ozone Sensor: Design and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, L. M.; Kalnajs, L. E.

    2005-12-01

    Ozone is one of the most important trace gases in the atmosphere. In the stratosphere it absorbs solar ultraviolet radiation, serving a dual role by protecting life on earth from UV damage and by influencing the temperature structure of that part of the atmosphere. In the lower troposphere, ozone is a pollutant formed by photochemical transformations of anthropogenic emissions such as nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. In the tropopause region, ozone serves as a powerful greenhouse gas by virtue of its absorption feature at 9.6 μm. Hence, gaining a better understanding of the distribution and variability of ozone abundances and the chemical and dynamical processes that determine the distributions is a critical scientific objective. We have designed a fast-response sensor to measure ozone by ultraviolet absorption. An early version of this instrument flew on two airborne campaigns - COBRA (1999, UND Cessna Citation) and SOLVE (1999/00, DC-8, Arctic) - where it provided 10-second measurements of ozone throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Recent laboratory work has resulted in vastly improved instrument electronics, allowing for 10 Hz measurements with a precision of better than 20 ppb. Instrument performance and sensitivity have been demonstrated with ground-based measurements in the Antarctic and airborne measurements from the NASA WB-57F during the Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition (PUMA) project. The instrument is compact, lightweight (less than 35 lbs), and power-efficient (less than 100 W), so it is also ideally suited to the UAV environment where power and payload weight are restricted. In this presentation we describe the instrument design and illustrate its performance throughout the troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  5. Differential antimutagenicity of WR-1065 added after irradiation in L5178Y cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; McCoy, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the antimutagenicity of WR-1065 added after irradiation of cells of cell lines differing in their ability to rejoin radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The postirradiation antimutagenicity of WR-1065 at the thymidine kinase locus was demonstrated for L5178Y (LY)-S1 cells that are deficient in repair of DNA DSBs. Less postirradiation antimutagenicity of WR-1065 was observed in LY-R16 and LY-SR1 cells, which are relatively efficient in DSB repair. Postirradiation treatment with WR-1065 had only a small stimulatory effect on DSB rejoining. A 3-h incubation of irradiated LY cells with WR-1065 caused slight changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle that differed between LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cells. Both LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cells were protected against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation when WR-1065 was present 30 min before and during the irradiation. We conclude that the differential postirradiation effects of WR-1065 in the LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cells are not caused by differences in cellular uptake of the radioprotector or in its radical scavenging activity. Possible mechanisms for the postirradiation antimutagenicity of WR-1065 are discussed.

  6. The effect of 2-[(aminopropyl)amino] ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation induced DNA double strand damage and repair in V79 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sigdestad, C. P.; Treacy, S. H.; Knapp, L. A.; Grdina, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation induced DNA double strand breaks are believed to be important lesions involved in processes related to cell killing, induction of chromosome aberrations and carcinogenesis. This paper reports the effects of the radioprotector 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) on radiation-induced DNA damage and repair in V79 cells using the neutral elution method performed at pH 7.2 or pH 9.6. WR-1065 (4 mM) was added to the culture medium either 30 minutes prior to and during irradiation with Cobalt-60 gamma rays (for dose response experiments) or during the repair times tested (for DNA rejoining experiments). The results indicate that WR-1065 is an effective protector against the formation of radiation-induced double-strand breaks in DNA as measured using a neutral elution technique at either pH. The protector reduced the strand scission factors by 1.44 and 1.77 in experiments run at pH 9.6 and pH 7.2, respectively. The kinetics of DNA double-strand rejoining were dependent upon the pH at which the neutral elution procedure was performed. Unlike the results obtained with alkaline elution, rejoining of DNA breaks was unaffected by the presence of WR-1065 at either pH. PMID:3606941

  7. Stimuli-Responsive Shape Switching of Polymer Colloids by Temperature-Sensitive Absorption of Solvent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huaguang; Li, Binghui; Yodh, Arjun G; Zhang, Zexin

    2016-08-16

    The dynamic manipulation of colloidal particle shape offers a novel design mechanism for the creation of advanced responsive materials. To this end, we introduce a versatile new strategy for shape control of anisotropic polymeric colloidal particles. The concept utilizes temperature-sensitive absorption of a suitable solvent from a binary mixture. Specifically, increasing the temperature in the vicinity of the demixing transition of a binary mixture causes more solvent to be absorbed into the polymeric colloidal particle, which, in turn, lowers the glass transition temperature of the polymer inside the particle, with a concomitant decrease in viscosity. The balance between the internal viscosity and surface tension of the particle is thus disrupted, and the anisotropic shape of the particle shifts to become more spherical. Subsequent rapid temperature quenching can halt the process, leaving the particle with an intermediate anisotropy. The resultant shape anisotropy control provides new routes for studies of the phase transitions of anisotropic colloids and enables the fabrication of unique particles for materials applications. PMID:27409766

  8. Model of yield response of corn to plant population and absorption of solar energy.

    PubMed

    Overman, Allen R; Scholtz, Richard V

    2011-01-01

    Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha(-1) and g plant(-1)) on plant population (plants m(-2)). Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L.) grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Y(m) (Mg ha(-1)) for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m(2) plant(-1)) for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, x(c) = 1/c (plants m(-2)). The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of x(c) were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species. PMID:21297960

  9. Analytic model of energy-absorption response functions in compound X-ray detector materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    The absorbed energy distribution (AED) in X-ray imaging detectors is an important factor that affects both energy resolution and image quality through the Swank factor and detective quantum efficiency. In the diagnostic energy range (20-140 keV), escape of characteristic photons following photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter photons are primary sources of absorbed-energy dispersion in X-ray detectors. In this paper, we describe the development of an analytic model of the AED in compound X-ray detector materials, based on the cascaded-systems approach, that includes the effects of escape and reabsorption of characteristic and Compton-scatter photons. We derive analytic expressions for both semi-infinite slab and pixel geometries and validate our approach by Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic model provides the energy-dependent X-ray response function of arbitrary compound materials without time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. We believe this model will be useful for correcting spectral distortion artifacts commonly observed in photon-counting applications and optimal design and development of novel X-ray detectors. PMID:23744671

  10. Model of Yield Response of Corn to Plant Population and Absorption of Solar Energy

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Allen R.; Scholtz, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha−1 and g plant−1) on plant population (plants m−2). Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L.) grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Ym (Mg ha−1) for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m2 plant−1) for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, xc = 1/c (plants m−2). The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of xc were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species. PMID:21297960

  11. Absorption spectrum and ultrafast response of monolayer and bilayer transition-metal dichalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Ramirez-Torres, Alfredo; Rahman, Talat S.

    2015-03-01

    We apply a combined time-dependent density functional theory and many-body theory approach to examine the absorption spectrum and nonequilibrium response of monolayer and bilayer MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2 systems. In particular, we evaluate the possibility of existence of bound states - excitons and trions in the undoped systems. In a previous work we have already demonstrated that the binding energies of these states in the monolayer systems are large which makes them available for room temperature applications. We analyze the possibility of ultrafast electron-hole separation in bilayer systems through inter-layer hole transfer, and show that such a possibility exists, in agreement with experimental observations. For doped systems we consider the possibility of Mahan excitonic states in monolayers and show that the binding energy for these states is of the order of 10 meV. We perform a detailed analysis of the relaxation of doped monolayers excited by ultrafast laser pulse by taking into account electron-phonon scattering effects, and demonstrate that ultrafast (10-100fs) processes, including luminescence, may be relevant for these materials. Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354.

  12. Central angiotensin II induces thirst-related responses in an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Propper, C R; Hillyard, S D; Johnson, W E

    1995-03-01

    Angiotensin II (A-II), a potent inducer of thirst-related behavior in many vertebrate species, was injected into the third ventricle of the brain of the spadefoot toad, Scaphiopus couchii. Following injection of 10 ng A-II the animals demonstrated a significant increase in water absorption response (WR) behavior, in which toads press their ventral skin to a moist surface and absorb water by osmosis. This increase in the frequency of WR behavior was positively correlated with an increase in water gain during a 2-hr period indicating that centrally injected A-II stimulates water intake by this amphibian species. We have previously demonstrated that WR behavior is also induced by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of A-II in several anuran species, including S. couchii. Thus, amphibians, like other vertebrates, demonstrate an increase in water intake in response to either centrally administered or circulating A-II. A second series of experiments was conducted to determine whether the above response to A-II might be secondary to increases in the circulating levels of aldosterone (ALDO) or antidiuretic hormone because the release of both of these hormones has been shown by others to be stimulated by A-II. Scaphiopus couchii injected i.p. with either ALDO or arginine vasotocin in dosages of 1, 10, and 100 micrograms/100 g body weight showed no increase in WR behavior relative to toads injected with saline alone. These results suggest that A-II acts directly on the brain of S. couchii to induce WR behavior. PMID:7782064

  13. WR-1065 and radioprotection of vascular endothelial cells. I. Cell proliferation, DNA synthesis and damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, D.B.; Drab, E.A.; Kang, H.J.; Baumann, F.E.; Blazek, E.R.

    1996-02-01

    Normal tissue toxicity limits radiation therapy and could depend on the extent of damage to the vascular endothelium. Aminothiols such as WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] provide radioprotection for normal tissues, but little is known about how the aminothiols specifically affect the endothelium. Bovine aortic endothelial cells in culture were exposed to WR-1065 for 2 h before irradiation ({sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, 1 Gy/min). Alone, WR-1065 demonstrated an antiproliferative effect that was related to dose (0.5-4 mM) and was evident by lowered counts of adherent cells 48 h after exposure. WR-1065 was clearly radioprotective when assessed by colony formation and incorporation of [{sup 3}H]thymidine. However, when the number of adherent cells was evaluated, radioprotection appeared to be slight and evident only in logarithmically growing cells. WR-1065 at 2 mM suppressed single-strand DNA breaks after 3 Gy by 22% and double-strand breaks after 9 Gy by 47%. Also in the irradiated cells, WR-1065 more than doubled the rate of progression of cells from G{sub 1} to S phase. WR-1065 pretreatment elevated cellular glutathione (GSH) content more than twofold. Although pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine inhibited the elevation of GSH, the radioprotective impact of WR-1065 on total DNA strand breaks and colony formation was unaffected. These results suggest that WR-1065 may enable tissue recovery from irradiation by promoting the replication of endothelial cells, possibly by mechanisms independent of GSH. 46 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. NONINVASIVE DETERMINATION OF RESPIRATORY OZONE ABSORPTION: THE BOLUS-RESPONSE METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. James Ultman and colleagues used a fast-responding ozone measurement system, which they had developed with previous HEI support, to noninvasively measure the absorption of inhaled ozone in different regions of the respiratory tract of healthy adult men. While the subjec...

  16. Oral Vaccination with Brucella melitensis WR201 Protects Mice against Intranasal Challenge with Virulent Brucella melitensis 16M

    PubMed Central

    Izadjoo, Mina J.; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K.; Paranavitana, Chrysanthi M.; Hadfield, Ted L.; Hoover, David L.

    2004-01-01

    Human brucellosis can be acquired from infected animal tissues by ingestion, inhalation, or contamination of conjunctiva or traumatized skin by infected animal products. In addition, Brucella is recognized as a biowarfare threat agent. Although a vaccine to protect humans from natural or deliberate infection could be useful, vaccines presently used in animals are unsuitable for human use. We tested orally administered live, attenuated, purine auxotrophic B. melitensis WR201 bacteria for their ability to elicit cellular and humoral immune responses and to protect mice against intranasal challenge with B. melitensis 16M bacteria. Immunized mice made serum antibody to lipopolysaccharide and non-O-polysaccharide antigens. Splenocytes from immunized animals released interleukin-2 and gamma interferon when grown in cultures with Brucella antigens. Immunization led to protection from disseminated infection and enhanced clearance of the challenge inoculum from the lungs. Optimal protection required administration of live bacteria, was related to immunizing dose, and was enhanced by booster immunization. These results establish the usefulness of oral vaccination against respiratory challenge with virulent Brucella and suggest that WR201 should be further investigated as a vaccine to prevent human brucellosis. PMID:15213148

  17. SOD2-Mediated Effects Induced by WR1065 and Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on Micronucleus Formation in RKO Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Murley, Jeffrey S.; Kataoka, Yasushi; Miller, Richard C.; Li, Jian Jian; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.

    2010-01-01

    RKO36 cells exposed to either WR1065 or 10 cGy X rays show elevated SOD2 gene expression and SOD2 enzymatic activity. Cells challenged at this time with 2 Gy exhibit enhanced radiation resistance. This phenomenon has been identified as a delayed radioprotective effect or an adaptive response when induced by thiols or low-dose radiation, respectively. In this study we investigated the relative effectiveness of both WR1065 and low-dose radiation in reducing the incidence of radiation-induced micronucleus formation in binucleated RKO36 human colon carcinoma cells. The role of SOD2 in this process was assessed by measuring changes in enzymatic activity as a function of the inducing agent used, the level of protection afforded, and the inhibitory effects of short interfering RNA (SOD2 siRNA). Both WR1065 and 10 cGy X rays effectively induced a greater than threefold elevation in SOD2 activity 24 h after exposure. Cells irradiated at this time with 2 Gy exhibited a significant resistance to micronucleus formation (P < 0.05; Student’s two-tailed t test). This protective effect was significantly inhibited in cells transfected with SOD2 siRNA. SOD2 played an important role in the adaptive/delayed radioprotective response by inhibiting the initiation of a superoxide anion-induced ROS cascade leading to enhanced mitochondrial and nuclear damages. PMID:21175348

  18. Examination of some factors responsible for a food-induced increase in absorption of atovaquone.

    PubMed Central

    Rolan, P E; Mercer, A J; Weatherley, B C; Holdich, T; Meire, H; Peck, R W; Ridout, G; Posner, J

    1994-01-01

    1. Atovaquone is a potent antiprotozoal slowly and irregularly absorbed after administration as tablets to fasting volunteers. A series of studies was performed to investigate the effects of food, bile and formulation on atovaquone absorption. 2. In 18 healthy male volunteers, a high-fat breakfast administered 45 min before 500 mg atovaquone as tablets increased AUC by 3.3-fold (95% CI 2.8-4.0) and Cmax 5.3-fold (4.3-6.6) compared with fasting. 3. The absorption of atovaquone from tablets was examined in 12 healthy male volunteers after an overnight fast, following toast alone, toast with 28 g butter (LOFAT), or toast with 56 g butter (HIFAT). Compared with absorption when fasted, toast had no significant effect but LOFAT increased AUC 3.0-fold (2.1-4.2) and Cmax 3.9-fold (2.6-5.8). HIFAT increased AUC 3.9-fold (2.7-5.5) and Cmax 5.6-fold (3.8-8.4). 4. The absorption of atovaquone was examined in nine healthy fasting male volunteers from tablets, an aqueous suspension, and an oily solution/suspension in miglyol (fractionated coconut oil). Compared with tablets, AUC following the aqueous suspension was increased 1.7-fold (1.0-2.7) and Cmax 2.4-fold (1.7-3.5). Following miglyol, AUC was increased to the same extent but Cmax was only increased 1.8-fold (1.2-2.6). 5. Atovaquone absorption was examined in eight healthy fasting male volunteers following an i.v. infusion of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-OP) which decreased gallbladder volume by 82% (73%-90%) on occasion 1 or saline on occasion 2. AUC(0,12) was increased following CCK-OP by 1.6-fold (1.1-2.4) and Cmax by 1.5-fold (0.98-2.4).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8148213

  19. WR 110: A Single Wolf-Rayet Star with Corotating Interaction Regions in its Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Cameron, C.; Fahed, R.; Gamen, R. C.; Lefèvre, L.; Rowe, J. F.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; De La Chevrotière, A.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2011-07-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 ± 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ≈ 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ~0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ~two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly

  20. WR 110: A SINGLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WITH COROTATING INTERACTION REGIONS IN ITS WIND?

    SciTech Connect

    Chene, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Fahed, R.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; Chevrotiere, A. De La; Cameron, C.; Matthews, J. M.; Gamen, R. C.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Weiss, W. W.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D. E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca

    2011-07-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 {+-} 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n {approx} 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude {approx}0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs {approx}two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods.

  1. Antimutagenicity of WR-1065 in L5178Y cells exposed to accelerated (56)Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Evans, T. E.; Horng, M. F.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the aminothiol WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] to protect L5178Y (LY) cells against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of exposure to accelerated (56)Fe ions (1.08 GeV/nucleon) was determined. It was found that while WR-1065 reduced the mutagenicity in both cell lines when it was present during the irradiation, the addition of WR-1065 after the exposure had no effect on the mutagenicity of the radiation in either cell line. No marked protection against the cytotoxic effects of exposure to (56)Fe ions was provided by WR-1065 when added either during or after irradiation in either cell line. We reported previously that WR-1065 protected the LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cell lines against both the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of X radiation when present during exposure, but that its protection when administered after exposure was limited to the mutagenic effects in the radiation-hypersensitive cell line, LY-S1. The results indicate that the mechanisms involved differ in the protection against cytotoxic compared to mutagenic effects and in the protection against damage caused by accelerated (56)Fe ions compared to X radiation.

  2. Effect of radioprotectant WR 2721 on cyclic nucleotides, prostaglandins, and lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Trocha, P.J.; Catravas, G.N.

    1983-05-01

    Within 1 hr after ip injection of the radioprotectant WR 2721 into rats, splenic cGMP levels dropped and remained suppressed for 6 hr before returning to normal. However, if rats were exposed to ionizing radiation 30-40 min after WR 2721 treatment, they had higher cGMP levels at 3 hr postirradiation than the nonirradiUted, drug-treated controls, but the cGMP content was still found to be lower than that of the irradiated nondrug-treated controls. Radiation exposure of animals pretreated with WR 2721 also resulted in higher liver and spleen levels of cAMP and additional elevations in spleen prostaglandin content, compared with irradiated controls at 3-6 hr after radiation treatment. The secondary fluctuations of lysosomal enzyme activities, prostaglandin content, and cyclic nucleotide levels were also altered in irradiated rats pretreated with WR 2721 when compared with irradiated controls. Liver and spleen lysosomal ..beta..-glucuronidase activities, spleen cAMP and cGMP levels, and spleen prostaglandin concentrations were closer to physiological levels at 3 days postirradiation in rats given WR 2721 before the radiation treatment.

  3. Direct Observation of the Coherent Nuclear Response after the Absorption of a Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebel, M.; Schnedermann, C.; Bassolino, G.; Taylor, G.; Watts, A.; Kukura, P.

    2014-06-01

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  4. Transdermal absorption of radioprotectors using permeation-enhancing vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Sodicoff, M.; Lamperti, A.; Ziskin, M.C. )

    1990-02-01

    Radioprotectors are not currently used clinically due to concerns regarding toxicity and uncertainties regarding tumor protection. Topical radioprotection of skin might find clinical applications with protectors such as WR-2721, but laboratory studies in which protectors have been applied in water have not been promising. We have studied the absorption of 14C-WR-2721 and ({sup 14}C)cysteine dissolved in skin permeation-enhancing vehicles through the skin of hairless mice and compared the absorption to that in water. Skin concentration of WR-2721 was increased most by dimethylformamide (DMF), but only propylene glycol increased absorption as far as the dermis, as measured by plasma concentration. Skin concentration of cysteine was improved by DMF, 2-pyrrolidone (2-P), and methyl-2-pyrrolidone (M-2-P); only dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) resulted in increased plasma levels of the protector. Pretreating skin with DMSO before application of WR-2721, irrespective of the vehicle, improved its concentration within the skin. Plasma levels were improved (10 and 12 times) only with 2-P and DMF. Therefore, by choosing the appropriate vehicle, it is possible to breach the barrier of the stratum corneum and enhance the presence of the protector in all layers of the skin.

  5. Photochromism induced nonlinear optical absorption enhancement and ultrafast responses of several dithienylethene compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaochuan; Yan, Yongli; Liu, Dajun; Wang, Guiqiu; Pu, Shouzhi

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear optical properties and ultrafast dynamics of three dithienylethene photochromic derivatives (i.e., P1, P2, and P3) were investigated by two-photon fluorescence, open-aperture Z-scan, and femtosecond pump-probe experiments. Photoinduced ring-closure and ring-opening phenomena, as well as a photochromism induced nonlinear optical property enhancement, were observed. For both the ring-opening and ring-closure state, the curve exhibited an ultrafast absorption peak approximately 200 fs followed by a fast decay process (i.e., ˜1 ps) and a long decay process that had a duration longer than 5 ps. The ultrafast peak followed by a fast decay process and the long decay process were attributable to a special two-photon absorption process, the formation of a charge separation state, and the relaxation of the charge separation state, respectively. However, the magnitude of the signal under the ring-closure state is approximately fivefold greater than that of the ring-opening state, which is in good agreement with nonlinear optical results. Intramolecular charge transfer processes were observed in the dynamics curves of the P2' and P3' isomers with D- π-A and D- π-D structures.

  6. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent 4-(tert-butyl)-2-(tert-butylaminomethyl)-6-(4-chlorophenyl)phenol dihydrogen phosphate (WR 194,965 phosphate).

    PubMed

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1988-04-01

    WR 194,965 phosphate, a new antimalarial agent containing a biphenyl ring structure active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, crystallized in ionic form with a positive charge on the quaternary nitrogen atom. The oxygen and nitrogen atoms of WR 194,965 were hydrogen bonded to the same phosphate group. The nitrogen atom was also hydrogen bonded to a second phosphate group. The phosphate ions formed discrete clusters of four phosphate moieties. The phosphate clusters contained fourfold inversion symmetry. The intramolecular N-O distance in WR 194,965 of 3.073 A (1 A = 0.1 nm) was close to the reported values for N-O distances in the active cinchona alkaloids and may be important for activity. A comparison of the crystalline structure of WR 194,965 with those of mefloquine and quinidine sulfate demonstrated that the regions of the three molecules in the vicinity of the aliphatic nitrogen atom and the oxygen atom superimpose. Much of the remainder of the WR 194,965 molecule spatially overlapped with the combined three-dimensional space defined by quinidine and mefloquine. The crystallographic parameters were: C21H29ClNO+.H2PO4-; Mr = 443.9; symmetry of unit cell, tetragonal; space group, I41/a; parameters of unit cell, a = b = 24.305 +/- 0.002 A, c = 17.556 +/- 0.003 A; V (volume of unit cell) = 10370.9 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 16; Dx (calculated density) = 1.137 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu (absorption coefficient) = 21.3 cm-1; F(000) (sum of atomic scattering factors at zero scattering angle) = 3,440; room temperature; final R = 8.2% for 2,508 reflections with [F0] greater than 3 sigma. PMID:3288114

  7. Spectroscopy of the archetype colliding-wind binary WR 140 during the 2009 January periastron passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahed, R.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Zorec, J.; Eversberg, T.; Chené, A. N.; Alves, F.; Arnold, W.; Bergmann, T.; Corcoran, M. F.; Correia Viegas, N. G.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fernando, A.; Frémat, Y.; Gouveia Carreira, L. F.; Hunger, T.; Knapen, J. H.; Leadbeater, R.; Marques Dias, F.; Martayan, C.; Morel, T.; Pittard, J. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Rauw, G.; Reinecke, N.; Ribeiro, J.; Romeo, N.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Stahl, O.; Stober, Ba.; Stober, Be.; Vollmann, K.; Williams, P. M.

    2011-11-01

    We present the results from the spectroscopic monitoring of WR 140 (WC7pd + O5.5fc) during its latest periastron passage in 2009 January. The observational campaign consisted of a constructive collaboration between amateur and professional astronomers. It took place at six locations, including Teide Observatory, Observatoire de Haute Provence, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory and Observatoire du Mont Mégantic. WR 140 is known as the archetype of colliding-wind binaries and it has a relatively long period (?8 yr) and high eccentricity (?0.9). We provide updated values for the orbital parameters, new estimates for the WR and O star masses and new constraints on the mass-loss rates and colliding-wind geometry.

  8. Delay or inhibition of rat lens opacification using pantethine and WR-77913.

    PubMed

    Clark, J I; Livesey, J C; Steele, J E

    1996-01-01

    Pantethine and the amino phosphorothioate, WR-77913, protected lenses against increased light scattering and opacification during cataract formation in five animal models: (1) radiation, (2) selenite, (3) galactose, (4) streptozotocin and (5) Royal College of Surgeons. In the radiation or selenite models, each test reagent was administered 15 to 30 min prior to initiation of cataract by a single injection of Na2SeO3 or a single exposure to 15 Gy (gray) gamma radiation. In the galactose, streptozotocin and Royal College of Surgeons models where the cataractogenic insult was continuous, repeated administrations of pantethine and WR-77913 were necessary. The results suggested that protein aggregation and lens opacification associated with a variety of physiological and biochemical mechanisms can be delayed or inhibited using a systemic administration of pantethine or WR-77913. PMID:8674515

  9. Effect of WR-1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced catalepsy and IL-6 level in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza Mohajjel; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress play a key role in pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger WR-1065 on catalepsy and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of interleukin 6(IL-6) and striatum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced experimental model of PD. Materials and Methods: Seventy two male Wistar rats were divided into 9 equal groups and 6-OHDA (8 μg/2 μl/rat) was infused unilaterally into substantia nigra pars copmacta (SNc) to induce PD. Catalepsy was measured by standard bar test, CSF level of IL-6 was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and SOD activity measured by spectrophotometric method. In pre-treatment groups WR-1065 (20, 40 and 80 μg/2 μl/rat/day, for 3 days) was infused into the SNc before 6-OHDA administration and 21 days later, as a recovery period, behavioral and molecular assay tests were done. Results: Our results showed that pre-treatment with WR-1065 improved (P<0.001) 6-OHDA-induced catalepsy in a dose dependent manner. In 6-OHDA-lesioned animals SOD activity in SNc and CSF level of IL-6 was decreased markedly (P<0.001) when compared with non-lesioned group, while pre-treatment with WR-1065(P<0.001) restored their levels up to the normal range. Conclusion: Our study indicated that pre-treatment with WR-1065 could modulate catalepsy and IL-6 level in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Also WR1065 could increase SOD activity up to normal range. It can be regarded as an anti-oxidative drug in prevention or adjunctive therapy of PD. PMID:27403255

  10. Calcium absorption following small bowel resection in man. Evidence for an adaptive response.

    PubMed

    Colette, C; Gouttebel, M C; Monnier, L H; Saint-Aubert, B; Joyeux, H

    1986-08-01

    Seventeen patients who had undergone extensive small bowel resection were studied for calcium absorption (FACa) and plasma vitamin D metabolites. FACa was measured by a double radio-tracer technique and expressed as percentage of total oral dose. FACa was decreased compared with controls (34%, range: 3-46 v 65%, range: 57-73, P less than 0.01). A positive correlation (r = 0.49, P = 0.05) was found between FACa and the remaining length of small bowel (SBL). As wide variations in both SBL and duration after surgery were observed among the seventeen investigated patients, we were led to individualize less heterogeneous subgroups of patients. Better correlations were found when the patients were divided into two subgroups according to whether the time interval between the resection and the investigation was shorter (r = 0.75, n = 11, P less than 0.02) or longer (r = 0.89, n = 6, P = 0.05) than 2 years. In thirteen patients who had a SBL shorter than 100 cm, a positive correlation was observed between FACa and the time interval after surgery (months): r = 0.65, P less than 0.05. Plasma 1,25 (OH)2D was markedly reduced in the whole group (31 pmol l-1, range: 8-108) compared with controls (103 pmol-1, range: 59-134, P less than 0.01). The present study shows that in extensively small bowel resected patients, calcium absorption is reduced, the alteration being dependent both on the length of the remnant small bowel and on the time after surgery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3093239

  11. LARGE-SCALE PERIODIC VARIABILITY OF THE WIND OF THE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 1 (HD 4004)

    SciTech Connect

    Chene, A.-N.

    2010-06-20

    We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 1 = HD 4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P = 16.9{sup +0.6}{sub -0.3} days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR 1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out, i.e., v{sub rot} = 6.5, 40, 70, and 275 km s{sup -1} for WR 1, WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137, respectively.

  12. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Shigematsu, N.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention.

  13. Acoustic wave absorption as a probe of dynamical geometrical response of fractional quantum Hall liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun

    2016-04-01

    We show that an acoustic crystalline wave gives rise to an effect similar to that of a gravitational wave to an electron gas. Applying this idea to a two-dimensional electron gas in the fractional quantum Hall regime, this allows for experimental study of its intra-Landau level dynamical response in the long-wavelength limit. To study such response we generalize Haldane's geometrical description of fractional quantum Hall states to situations where the external metric is time dependent. We show that such time-dependent metric (generated by acoustic wave) couples to collective modes of the system, including a quadrapolar mode at long wavelength, and magnetoroton at finite wavelength. Energies of these modes can be revealed in spectroscopic measurements, controlled by strain-induced Fermi velocity anisotropy. We argue that such geometrical probe provides a potentially highly useful alternative probe of quantum Hall liquids, in addition to the usual electromagnetic response.

  14. Aquaporins in ovine amnion: responses to altered amniotic fluid volumes and intramembranous absorption rates.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F; Brace, Robert A

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are transmembrane channel proteins that facilitate rapid water movement across cell membranes. In amniotic membrane, the AQP-facilitated transfer of water across amnion cells has been proposed as a mechanism for amniotic fluid volume (AFV) regulation. To investigate whether AQPs modulate AFV by altering intramembranous absorption (IMA) rate, we tested the hypothesis that AQP gene expression in the amnion is positively correlated with IMA rate during experimental conditions when IMA rate and AFV are modified over a wide range. The relative abundances of AQP1, AQP3, AQP8, AQP9, and AQP11 mRNA and protein were determined in the amnion of 16 late-gestation ovine fetuses subjected to 2 days of control conditions, urine drainage, urine replacement, or intraamniotic fluid infusion. AQP mRNA levels were determined by RT-qPCR and proteins by western immunoblot. Under control conditions, mRNA levels among the five AQPs differed more than 20-fold. During experimental treatments, mean IMA rate in the experimental groups ranged from 100 ± 120 mL/day to 1370 ± 270 mL/day. The mRNA levels of the five AQPs did not change from control and were not correlated with IMA rates. The protein levels of AQP1 were positively correlated with IMA rates (r(2) = 38%, P = 0.01) while the remaining four AQPs were not. These findings demonstrate that five AQPs are differentially expressed in ovine amnion. Our study supports the hypothesis that AQP1 may play a positive role in regulating the rate of fluid transfer across the amnion, thereby participating in the dynamic regulation of AFV. PMID:27440743

  15. Infrared Imaging of the Galaxies Responsible for z ~ 0.5O VI Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, Jason X.; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Mulchaey, John

    2001-02-01

    A comparison of the baryonic mass density inferred from BBN with a census of visible baryonic components (i.e. galaxies, clusters, HI gas) indicates a significant fraction of the universe's baryons are hidden in a dark component. Theoretical investigations into these 'missing' baryons suggest the majority lie in a hot (T ~ 10^6 K), low density medium which can only be efficiently detected through surveys for O VI absorption. Interestingly, recent STIS and FUSE searches for O VI are consistent with this gas comprising a significant fraction of the missing baryons. Establishing the physical nature of these O VI absorbers, therefore, may have large impact on our understanding of the distribution of baryons in the universe. In particular, it is important to determine if these systems arise in individual galactic halos, the intragroup or intracluster medium, the low density 'cosmic web' which connects collapsed objects, or a different region of the universe altogether. We are currently pursuing a program to search for galaxies associated with O VI absorbers at moderate redshift (z ~ 0.5). To accomplish this project, we must estimate photometric redshifts of the galaxies in the field (~ 8' × 8') surrounding the O VI absorbers in order to efficiently select candidates for follow-up spectroscopy. To this end, near-IR images are essential. With this proposal, we intend to obtain J and H band images of three fields surrounding four O VI absorbers in one night of observation with the Flamingos instrument. The results of this pilot program will help us to refine and focus our survey as well as double the number of O VI systems previously observed at z > 0.5.

  16. Pati-Salam unification from noncommutative geometry and the TeV-scale WR boson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydemir, Ufuk; Minic, Djordje; Sun, Chen; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the compatibility of the unified left-right symmetric Pati-Salam models motivated by noncommutative geometry and the TeV-scale right-handed W boson suggested by recent LHC data. We find that the unification/matching conditions place conflicting demands on the symmetry breaking scales and that generating the required WR mass and coupling is nontrivial.

  17. Prophylactic activity of mefloquine hydrochloride (WR 142 490) in drug-resistant malaria*

    PubMed Central

    Rieckmann, K. H.; Trenholme, G. M.; Williams, R. L.; Carson, P. E.; Frischer, H.; Desjardins, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    In preliminary studies with mefloquine (WR 142 490) a single dose exerted prolonged suppressive activity against a drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Development of patent parasitaemia was prevented when nonimmune persons were exposed to infected mosquitos 2 weeks after medication, and it was delayed when exposure occurred 3 weeks after drug administration. PMID:4619059

  18. Protection of normal tissue against late radiation injury by WR-2721. [/sup 60/Co; rats

    SciTech Connect

    Utley, J.F.; Quinn, C.A.; White, F.C.; Seaver, N.A.; Bloor, C.M.

    1981-02-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect against late radiation damage has been studied in skin, muscle, and vascular tissues of rats. Animals treated with and without WR-2721 received irradiation to the left hind limb; representative groups were killed at intervals ranging from 72 h to 6 months. Comparison of all drug-treated and non-drug-treated animals showed significant protection (P = less than or equal to 0.05). The time pattern of injury in non-drug-treated rats was biphasic, with significant damage occurring at 72 h and 1 week, returning to normal between 1 and 3 months, but showing significant late damage at 6 months (P = less than or equal to 0.001). Again, this injury pattern did not appear in WR-2721-treated rats. Thus the ability of WR-2721 to protect against acute and chronic radiation injury in vessels, skin, and muscle indicates that an increased therapeutic gain can be expected when this drug is used in clinical radiation therapy.

  19. Antimony orthophosphate glasses with large nonlinear refractive indices, low two-photon absorption coefficients, and ultrafast response

    SciTech Connect

    Falcao-Filho, E.L.; Araujo, Cid B. de; Bosco, C.A.C.; Maciel, G.S.; Acioli, L.H.; Nalin, M.; Messaddeq, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Antimony glasses based on the composition Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SbPO{sub 4} were prepared and characterized. The samples present high refractive index, good transmission from 380 to 2000 nm, and high thermal stability. The nonlinear refractive index, n{sub 2}, of the samples was studied using the optical Kerr shutter technique at 800 nm. The third-order correlation signals between pump and probe pulses indicate ultrafast response (<100 fs) for all compositions. Enhancement of n{sub 2} was observed by adding lead oxide to the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SbPO{sub 4} composition. Large values of n{sub 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/W and negligible two-photon absorption coefficients (smaller than 0.01 cm/GW) were determined for all samples. The glass compositions studied present appropriate figure-of-merit for all-optical switching applications.

  20. Ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response of large-size topological insulator and application in low-threshold bulk pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin-Long; Sun, Yi-Jian; He, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhao-Jie; You, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jian-Fu; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Tu, Chao-Yang

    2015-10-01

    Dirac-like topological insulators have attracted strong interest in optoelectronic application because of their unusual and startling properties. Here we report for the first time that the pure topological insulator Bi2Te3 exhibited a naturally ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response to photoexcitation. The Bi2Te3 sheets with lateral size up to a few micrometers showed extremely low saturation absorption intensities of only 1.1 W/cm2 at 1.0 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Benefiting from this sensitive response, a Q-switching pulsed laser was achieved in a 1.0 μm Nd:YVO4 laser where the threshold absorbed pump power was only 31 mW. This is the lowest threshold in Q-switched solid-state bulk lasers to the best of our knowledge. A pulse duration of 97 ns was observed with an average power of 26.1 mW. A Q-switched laser at 1.3 μm was also realized with a pulse duration as short as 93 ns. Moreover, the mode locking operation was demonstrated. These results strongly exhibit that Bi2Te3 is a promising optical device for constructing broadband, miniature and integrated high-energy pulsed laser systems with low power consumption. Our work clearly points out a significantly potential avenue for the development of two-dimensional-material-based broadband ultrasensitive photodetector and other optoelectronic devices.

  1. Ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response of large-size topological insulator and application in low-threshold bulk pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Long; Sun, Yi-Jian; He, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhao-Jie; You, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jian-Fu; Chou, Mitch M C; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Tu, Chao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dirac-like topological insulators have attracted strong interest in optoelectronic application because of their unusual and startling properties. Here we report for the first time that the pure topological insulator Bi2Te3 exhibited a naturally ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response to photoexcitation. The Bi2Te3 sheets with lateral size up to a few micrometers showed extremely low saturation absorption intensities of only 1.1 W/cm(2) at 1.0 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Benefiting from this sensitive response, a Q-switching pulsed laser was achieved in a 1.0 μm Nd:YVO4 laser where the threshold absorbed pump power was only 31 mW. This is the lowest threshold in Q-switched solid-state bulk lasers to the best of our knowledge. A pulse duration of 97 ns was observed with an average power of 26.1 mW. A Q-switched laser at 1.3 μm was also realized with a pulse duration as short as 93 ns. Moreover, the mode locking operation was demonstrated. These results strongly exhibit that Bi2Te3 is a promising optical device for constructing broadband, miniature and integrated high-energy pulsed laser systems with low power consumption. Our work clearly points out a significantly potential avenue for the development of two-dimensional-material-based broadband ultrasensitive photodetector and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:26442909

  2. Ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response of large-size topological insulator and application in low-threshold bulk pulsed lasers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin-Long; Sun, Yi-Jian; He, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhao-Jie; You, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jian-Fu; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Tu, Chao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dirac-like topological insulators have attracted strong interest in optoelectronic application because of their unusual and startling properties. Here we report for the first time that the pure topological insulator Bi2Te3 exhibited a naturally ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response to photoexcitation. The Bi2Te3 sheets with lateral size up to a few micrometers showed extremely low saturation absorption intensities of only 1.1 W/cm2 at 1.0 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Benefiting from this sensitive response, a Q-switching pulsed laser was achieved in a 1.0 μm Nd:YVO4 laser where the threshold absorbed pump power was only 31 mW. This is the lowest threshold in Q-switched solid-state bulk lasers to the best of our knowledge. A pulse duration of 97 ns was observed with an average power of 26.1 mW. A Q-switched laser at 1.3 μm was also realized with a pulse duration as short as 93 ns. Moreover, the mode locking operation was demonstrated. These results strongly exhibit that Bi2Te3 is a promising optical device for constructing broadband, miniature and integrated high-energy pulsed laser systems with low power consumption. Our work clearly points out a significantly potential avenue for the development of two-dimensional-material-based broadband ultrasensitive photodetector and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:26442909

  3. Catalog of Narrow C IV Absorption Lines in BOSS. II. For Quasars with Z em > 2.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Qin, Yi-Ping; Qin, Ming; Pan, Cai-Juan; Pan, Da-Sheng

    2014-11-01

    As the second work in a series of papers aiming to detect absorption systems in the quasar spectra of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, we continue the analysis of Paper I by expanding the quasar sample to those quasars with z em > 2.4. This yields a sample of 21,963 appropriate quasars to search for narrow C IV λλ1548, 1551 absorptions with Wr >= 0.2 Å for both lines. There are 9708 quasars with at least one appropriate absorption system imprinted on their spectra. From these spectra, we detect 13,919 narrow C IV absorption systems whose absorption redshifts cover a range of z abs = 1.8784-4.3704. In this paper and Paper I, we have selected 37,241 appropriate quasars with median S/N >= 4 and 1.54 <~ z em <~ 5.16 to visually analyze narrow C IV λλ1548, 1551 absorption doublets one by one. A total of 15,999 quasars are found to have at least one appropriate absorption system imprinted on their spectra. From these 15,999 quasar spectra, we have detected 23,336 appropriate C IV λλ1548, 1551 absorption systems with Wr >= 0.2 Å whose absorption redshifts cover a range of z abs = 1.4544-4.3704. The largest values of Wr are 3.19 Å for the λ1548 absorption line and 2.93 Å for the λ1551 absorption line, respectively. We find that only a few absorbers show large values of Wr . About 1.1% of the total absorbers have Wr λ1548 >= 2.0 Å.

  4. 76 FR 10899 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the W.R. Grace and... class of employees from the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, Maryland, to be included in the Special... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: W.R. Grace and Company. Location: Curtis, Maryland. Job Titles...

  5. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 142 of Oxygen Subtype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Feldmeier, A.; Ignace, R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2009-03-01

    We report the discovery of weak yet hard X-ray emission from the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 142 with the XMM-Newton X-ray telescope. Being of spectral subtype WO2, WR 142 is a massive star in a very advanced evolutionary stage shortly before its explosion as a supernova or γ-ray burst. This is the first detection of X-ray emission from a WO-type star. We rule out any serendipitous X-ray sources within ≈1'' of WR 142. WR 142 has an X-ray luminosity of L X ≈ 7 × 1030 erg s-1, which constitutes only lsim10-8 of its bolometric luminosity. The hard X-ray spectrum suggests a plasma temperature of about 100 MK. Commonly, X-ray emission from stellar winds is attributed to embedded shocks due to the intrinsic instability of the radiation driving. From qualitative considerations we conclude that this mechanism cannot account for the hardness of the observed radiation. There are no hints for a binary companion. Therefore the only remaining, albeit speculative explanation must refer to magnetic activity. Possibly related, WR 142 seems to rotate extremely fast, as indicated by the unusually round profiles of its optical emission lines. Our detection implies that the wind of WR 142 must be relatively transparent to X-rays, which can be due to strong wind ionization, wind clumping, or nonspherical geometry from rapid rotation.

  6. Predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption: from nutrient requirement to animal response and environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, J; Kebreab, E; Mills, J A N; Pellikaan, W F; López, S; Bannink, A; France, J

    2007-02-01

    Current feed evaluation systems for dairy cattle aim to match nutrient requirements with nutrient intake at pre-defined production levels. These systems were not developed to address, and are not suitable to predict, the responses to dietary changes in terms of production level and product composition, excretion of nutrients to the environment, and nutrition related disorders. The change from a requirement to a response system to meet the needs of various stakeholders requires prediction of the profile of absorbed nutrients and its subsequent utilisation for various purposes. This contribution examines the challenges to predicting the profile of nutrients available for absorption in dairy cattle and provides guidelines for further improved prediction with regard to animal production responses and environmental pollution.The profile of nutrients available for absorption comprises volatile fatty acids, long-chain fatty acids, amino acids and glucose. Thus the importance of processes in the reticulo-rumen is obvious. Much research into rumen fermentation is aimed at determination of substrate degradation rates. Quantitative knowledge on rates of passage of nutrients out of the rumen is rather limited compared with that on degradation rates, and thus should be an important theme in future research. Current systems largely ignore microbial metabolic variation, and extant mechanistic models of rumen fermentation give only limited attention to explicit representation of microbial metabolic activity. Recent molecular techniques indicate that knowledge on the presence and activity of various microbial species is far from complete. Such techniques may give a wealth of information, but to include such findings in systems predicting the nutrient profile requires close collaboration between molecular scientists and mathematical modellers on interpreting and evaluating quantitative data. Protozoal metabolism is of particular interest here given the paucity of quantitative data

  7. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and swift observations of WR 25

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2014-06-10

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ∼10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ∼2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  8. On two WR stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud - The high velocity of BR 52 and a newly discovered WN star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, A. P.; Crampton, D.; Hutchings, J. B.; Thompson, I. B.

    1984-12-01

    Measurements of BR 52 (= FDA 47, = HV 5947) over three years show it to have a constant high radial velocity (within the measuring errors), in spite of the expectation (from the initial observations and its known photometric variations) that it might be a spectroscopic binary of large radial-velocity amplitude. Hydrogen absorption-line components, which have been thought to be due to a hot companion, appear rather to be formed in a variable stellar wind from the WR star. The high velocity (about +470 km/s) of BR 52 with respect to the LMC (about +270 km/s) is noted. A new WN5 star, designated W0536-67, has been found near the X-ray source CAL 60, although it does not appear to be the optical identification for this source. Some details about its spectrum and velocity are given.

  9. Acyclic High-Energy Variability in Eta Carinae and WR 140

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Eta Carinae and WR 140 are similar long-period colliding wind binaries in which X-ray emission is produced by a strong shock due to the collision of the powerful stellar winds. The change in the orientation and density of this shock as the stars revolve in their orbits influences the X-ray flux and spectrum in a phase dependent way. Monitoring observations with RXTE and other X-ray satellite observatories since the 1990s have detailed this variability but have also shown significant deviations from strict phase dependence (short-term brightness changes or "flares", and cyc1e-to-cyc1e average flux differences). We examine these acylic variations in Eta Car and WR 140 and discuss what they tell us about the stability of the wind-wind collision shock.

  10. A search for WR and heavy majorana neutrino in dimuon channel with the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoosoofmiya, Reza

    This thesis describes a search for hypothetical heavy neutrinos, N, and right-handed gauge bosons, WR, in events with two high transverse momentum muons and at least one high transverse momentum hadronic jet. The results were obtained from data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1 collected in proton-proton collisions at s =7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. No excess above the Standard Model background expectation is observed. Excluded mass regions for Majorana neutrinos are presented in the framework of Left-Right Symmetric Model which introduces interactions that violate lepton and lepton- avor numbers. The results described in this thesis represent limits on the masses of heavy neutrinos and WR bosons obtained in direct searches.

  11. Large-scale Periodic Variability of the Wind of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 1 (HD 4004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; St-Louis, N.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 1 = HD 4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P = 16.9+0.6 -0.3 days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR 1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out, i.e., v rot = 6.5, 40, 70, and 275 km s-1 for WR 1, WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137, respectively. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Also based on observations obtained at the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic with is operated by the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec and the Observatoire de

  12. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D...

  13. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  14. CHANDRA DETECTS THE RARE OXYGEN-TYPE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 142 AND OB STARS IN BERKELEY 87

    SciTech Connect

    Sokal, Kimberly R.; Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Guedel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner E-mail: stephen.skinner@colorado.ed

    2010-06-01

    We present first results of a Chandra X-ray observation of the rare oxygen-type Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 142 (= Sand 5 = St 3) harbored in the young, heavily obscured cluster Berkeley 87. Oxygen-type WO stars are thought to be the most evolved of the WRs and progenitors of supernovae or gamma-ray bursts. As part of an X-ray survey of supposedly single WR stars, we observed WR 142 and the surrounding Berkeley 87 region with Chandra ACIS-I. We detect WR 142 as a faint yet extremely hard X-ray source. Due to weak emission, its nature as a thermal or non-thermal emitter is unclear and thus we discuss several emission mechanisms. Additionally, we report seven detections and eight non-detections by Chandra of massive OB stars in Berkeley 87, two of which are bright yet soft X-ray sources whose spectra provide a dramatic contrast to the hard emission from WR 142.

  15. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line. PMID:25910116

  16. Transport mechanisms responsible for the absorption of loracarbef, cefixime, and cefuroxime axetil into human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, A H; Duckworth, D C; Tabas, L B

    1994-04-20

    Loracarbef, cefixime and cefuroxime axetil are beta-lactam antibiotics that are administered orally. Oral absorption of loracarbef is nearly complete, while that of cefixime and cefuroxime axetil is 30-50%. To investigate this we used the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 that possesses the proton-dependent peptide transporter that takes up cephalexin and cefaclor. Drug uptake was measured at pH 6 by high performance liquid chromatography or with radioactively labelled drug. The initial uptake rate of 1 mM cefixime was lower than that of 1 mM loracarbef. By 2 h both drugs were concentrated intracellularly against a gradient; however, the accumulation of cefixime was only 40% of that of loracarbef. The uptake rate of both drugs was sodium-independent, temperature- and energy-dependent, and was inhibited by dipeptides, cephalexin, cefaclor, but not by amino acids. Kinetic analysis of the concentration-dependence of the uptake rates for loracarbef and cefixime indicated that diffusion and a single transport system were responsible for uptake. The kinetic parameters for loracarbef and cefixime, respectively, were: Km values of 8 and 17 mM and Vmax values of 6.5 and 2 nmol/min per mg protein. Loracarbef and cefixime were competitive inhibitors of each other's uptake. By contrast, cefuroxime axetil was taken up and rapidly hydrolyzed to cefuroxime by Caco-2 cells. Cefuroxime axetil uptake was not dependent on energy and was not affected by dipeptides. Thus, cefuroxime axetil apparently enters Caco-2 cells by simple diffusion. By contrast, loracarbef and cefixime share a common transport mechanism, the proton-dependent dipeptide transporter. Cefixime was taken up less well than loracarbef due to a substantial reduction in the turnover rate and decreased affinity of the transporter for cefixime. PMID:8155686

  17. A 10-h period revealed in optical spectra of the highly variable WN8 Wolf-Rayet star WR 123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Foellmi, C.; Marchenko, S. V.; St-Louis, N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ballereau, D.; Chauville, J.; Zorec, J.; Poteet, C. A.

    2011-06-01

    Aims: What is the origin of the large-amplitude variability in Wolf-Rayet WN8 stars in general and WR123 in particular? A dedicated spectroscopic campaign targets the ten-hour period previously found in the high-precision photometric data obtained by the MOST satellite. Methods: In June-August 2003 we obtained a series of high signal-to-noise, mid-resolution spectra from several sites in the λλ 4000-6940 Å domain. We also followed the star with occasional broadband (Johnson V) photometry. The acquired spectroscopy allowed a detailed study of spectral variability on timescales from ~5 min to months. Results: We find that all observed spectral lines of a given chemical element tend to show similar variations and that there is a good correlation between the lines of different elements, without any significant time delays, save the strong absorption components of the Hei lines, which tend to vary differently from the emission parts. We find a single sustained periodicity, P ~ 9.8 h, which is likely related to the relatively stable pulsations found in MOST photometry obtained one year later. In addition, seemingly stochastic, large-amplitude variations are also seen in all spectral lines on timescales of several hours to several days. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Concil of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Based also on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Observatory, under programme ID 271.D-5025.Photometric data presented in Fig. 1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/530/A151

  18. Oral vaccination of African catfish with Vibrio anguillarum O2: effect on antigen uptake and immune response by absorption enhancers in lag time coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Vervarcke, Stefaan; Ollevier, Frans; Kinget, Renaat; Michoel, Armand

    2004-03-01

    The impact on antigen uptake and antibody response by the addition of absorption enhancers to Vibrio anguillarum O2 antigen was studied in oral vaccination trials of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). Oral vaccination was achieved by feeding lag time coated pellets. The lag time coat prevents premature release of the encapsulated vaccine in the tank, before ingestion of the pellets by the fish. To monitor the antigen uptake, a competitive ELISA was used. The antibody response was measured using an indirect ELISA. Feeding of bacterin-layered pellets without absorption enhancers resulted in a rather low antigen uptake and antibody levels. The addition of absorption enhancers such as sodium salicylate, sodium caprate and vitamin E TPGS increased the serum antigen levels and specific antibody levels in the systemic circulation. Skin mucus antibody levels were higher after oral vaccination compared to the IP and control group. The addition of absorption enhancers in the oral groups further increased the antibody levels obtained in the skin mucus. PMID:15123307

  19. Inhibition of topoisomerase II{alpha} activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. |; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.; Murley, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis.

  20. A phase I study of WR-2721 in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in patients with refractory lymphoid malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Coia, L.; Krigel, R.; Hanks, G.; Comis, R.; Algazy, K.; Peters, R.; McCulloch, W.; Schien, P. )

    1992-01-01

    This Phase I study was designed to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of WR-2721 when given twice weekly with total body irradiation (TBI) in the treatment of patients with advanced refractory lymphoid malignancies and to define the toxicities of this combination and schedule. Patients eligible for this study had advanced recurrent indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients had symptomatic or progressive disease, a performance status of 0, 1, or 2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic, and renal function. Only patients failing one or two regimens of prior chemotherapy were eligible. Patients who had received prior extended field irradiation were ineligible. Patients received TBI twice weekly (Tuesday and Friday) to a total of 10 doses at 15 cGy/fx. WR-2721 was given intravenously over 15 min beginning 30 min before irradiation. The escalation of WR-2721 was Level 1: 740 mg/m2 and Level 2: 910 mg/m2. The MTD of WR-2721 was that dose which produced predictable and reversible toxicity and would not interfere with patient well-being. Seven patients were entered onto the study, three at 740 mg/m2 and four at 910 mg/m2. Five patients had CLL and two patients small lymphocytic NHL. No patient had hypotension or nausea requiring reduction in dose level or even interruption of infusion of WR-2721. At 740 mg/m2 no grade 3 or 4 toxicities related to WR-2721 were observed, but two patients could not complete treatment because of TBI-induced prolonged thrombocytopenia following treatments 5 and 8. One patient completed all 10 treatments. At 910 mg/m2 of WR-2721, two patients requested removal from study because of malaise, one after 5 cycles and one after 7 cycles. One patient completed all 10 treatments.

  1. WR-2721 protects against cytoxan-induced hprt mutagenesis without affecting therapeutic effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Yasushi; Perrin, J.; Hunter, N.; Milas, L.; Grdina, D. ||

    1995-12-31

    The radioprotector S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) was evaluated for its ability to protect against cytoxan-induced mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in mouse splenocytes under conditions that would not interfere with the therapeutic effectiveness of cytoxan in the treatment of fibrosarcoma lung tumors. Mutations at the hprt locus increase in frequency as a function of the dose of cytoxan used. With a spontaneous mutation frequency in C3H mice of 1.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}, mutation frequencies increased from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} as the dose of cytoxan increased from 50 to 200 mg/kg. C3H male mice were injected in their tail veins with 3.5 {times} 10{sup 5} viable fibrosarcoma (FSa) cells. This protocol gave rise to an average of 68 tumor colonies per mouse. Four days following injection animals were treated with cytoxan at a dose of 100 mg/kg, which gave rise to significant tumor cell killing and a reduction in tumor colony number to less than an average of one per animal. WR-2721 at a concentration of 100 mg/kg did not affect on cytoxan`s therapeutic effectiveness. However, a 100 mg/kg dose of WR-2721 was effective in reducing the cytoxan induced hprt mutation frequency in mice from 160 to 35 per 10{sup 5} viable cells regardless of whether it was administered 30 min before or 2 h following cytoxan treatment.

  2. Ionization properties of the radiation-protective and chemoprotective drug, WR-1065, and related aminoalkylthiols

    SciTech Connect

    Winnike, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the clinical application of the pro-drug WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid) as a radiation protective and chemoprotective agent for normal tissue cells. The primary objective of this investigation was to resolve the deprotonation scheme for WR-1065, and to compare and contrast this with other related aminoalkythiols. By utilizing nonlinear least squares regression, macroscopic and microscopic deprotonation constants for the dominating ionization scheme of WR-1065 were solved for by employing the methods of titration calorimetry, UV spectrophotometry, and titration potentiometry. These techniques have proved to be quite complimentary for this study. Titration calorimetry can provide reliable estimates for macro-pK{sub a} values falling in the middle of the pH range, where calorimetric estimates are prone to error, can be obtained from potentiometric data, and these estimates corroborate those obtained spectrophotometrically. It was necessary to develop an efficient and reliable system of data analysis for application to the titration calorimetry data. This included the development of software for correcting each raw thermogram for extraneous heat effects. The model compounds, tromethamine (THAM) and glycine, were analyzed to confirm the validity of this numerical procedure. From this work it appears that titration calorimetry can be used to obtain highly accurate estimates of equilibrium constants which lie between approximately 100 and 30,000 M{sup {minus}1}. This range corresponds to pK{sub a} values between ca. 2 to 4.5 and between ca. 9.5 and 12.

  3. Effects of ethiofos (WR-2721) and radiation on monkey visual-discrimination performance

    SciTech Connect

    Bogo, V.; Franz, C.G.; Jacobs, A.J.; Weiss, J.F.; Young, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    WR-2721 (ethiofos) is a promising protector against radiation-induced lethality and may be useful in cancer radiotherapy (Davidson et al., 1980). However, ethiofos also produces nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and hypotension, which implies severe behavioral consequences (Bogo et al., 1985). The effects of ethiofos on behavior in monkeys and its ability to mitigate early transient incapacitation (ETI) were studied. ETI is the abrupt cessation of performance (for at least 1/min) following rapidly delivered, high doses of radiation and usually occurs 5-10 min after irradiation and lasts for 1-5 min (Bogo, 1988a).

  4. The inhibition of radiation-induced mutagenesis by the combined effects of selenium and the aminothiol WR-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P. |

    1997-08-01

    In order to evaluate the anti-mutagenic effects of the potential chemoprotective compounds selenium and S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-1065), CHO AA8 cells were exposed to both compounds either individually or in combination prior to irradiation. Mutation frequency following exposure to 8 Gy was evaluated by quantitation of the mutations detected at the hprt locus of these cells. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was observed for both 30 nM sodium selenite or 4 mM WR-1065. In addition, the protection against mutation induction provided by the combination of these agents appeared additive. In contrast, sodium selenite did not provide protection against radiation toxicity when provided either alone or in conjunction with WR-1065. In order to evaluate the possible mechanisms of the anti-mutagenic effects observed in these cells, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was evaluated following exposure to the chemopreventative compounds. The addition of sodium selenite to the culture media resulted in a 5-fold increase in GPX activity, which was unaltered by the presence of the WR-1065. Northern analysis of RNA derived from these cells indicated that selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in the mRNA for the cytosolic GPx (GSHPx-1) which was insufficient to account for the stimulation of GPx activity observed in cellular extracts. These results suggest that selenium and WR-1065 offer protection via independent mechanisms and that GPX stimulation remains a possible mechanism of the anti-mutagenic effect of selenium.

  5. Effects of WR1065 on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced motor imbalance: Possible involvement of oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Afshin; Nayebi, Alireza M; Jorjani, Masoumeh; Khalifeh, Solmaz; Haddadi, Rasool

    2016-08-01

    Over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is postulated to be the main contributor in degeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. In this study we investigated the effects of WR1065, a free radical scavenger, on motor imbalance, oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory cytokines in CSF and brain of hemi-parkinsonian rats. Lesion of dopaminergic neurons was done by unilateral infusion of 6-hydroxydopamine into the central region of the substentia nigra pars compacta (SNc) to induce hemi-parkinsonism and motor imbalance in rats. WR1065 (20, 40 and 80μg/2μl/rat) was administered three days before 6-OHDA administration. After three weeks behavioral study was performed and then brain and CSF samples were collected to assess tumor necrosis factor (TNFα), interlukin (IL-1β), reduced glutathione (GSH), and malondialdehyde (MDA). WR1065 pre-treatment in rats before receiving 6-OHDA, improved significantly motor impairment and caused reduction of MDA and inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-1β levels, while GSH level significantly increased when compared with lesioned rats. Our study indicated that WR1065 could improve 6-OHDA-induced motor imbalance. Furthermore, it decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory cytokines and restored the level of GSH up to normal range. We suggest that WR1065 can be proposed as a potential neuroprotective agent in motor impairments of PD. However to prove this hypothesis more clinical trial studies should be done. PMID:27222379

  6. Radioprotector WR1065 reduces radiation-induced mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase locus in V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Hill, C.K.; Peraino, C. ); Biserka, N. ); Wells, R.L. . Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1985-06-01

    N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR1065) protects against radiation-induced cell killing and mutagenesis at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus in V79 Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cells. WR1065 (4 mm) was found to be effective in protecting against radiation-induced cell lethality only if present during irradiation. No protective effect was observed if the protector was added within 5 min after irradiation or 3 h later. The effect of WR1065 on radiation-induced mutation, expressed as resistance to the cytotoxic purine analogue 6-thioguanine (HGPRT), was also investigated. This agent was effective in reducing radiation-induced mutations regardless of when it was administered. Following 10 Gy of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays, the mutation frequencies observed per 10/sup 6/ survivors were 77 +- 8, 27 +- 6, 42 +- 7, and 42 +- 7 for radiation only, and WR1065 present during, immediately after, or 3 h after irradiation. These data suggest that although a segment of radiation-induced damage leading to reproductive death cannot be modulated through the postirradiation action of WR1065, processes leading to the fixation of gross genetic damage and mutation induction in surviving cells can be effectively altered and interfered with leading to a marked reduction in mutation frequency.

  7. POPULATION I WOLF-RAYET RUNAWAY STARS: THE CASE OF WR124 AND ITS EXPANDING NEBULA M1-67

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, S. V.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Crowther, P. A. E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.c

    2010-11-20

    In 1997 and 2008 we used the WFPC2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain two sets of narrow-band H{alpha} images of the runaway Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 124 surrounded by its nebula M1-67. This two-epoch imaging provides an expansion parallax and thus a practically assumption-free geometric distance to the nebula, d = 3.35 {+-} 0.67 kpc. Combined with the global velocity distribution in the ejected nebula, this confirms the extreme runaway status of WR 124. WR stars embedded within such ejection nebulae at the point of core collapse would produce different supernova characteristics from those expected for stars surrounded by wind-filled cavities. In galaxies with extremely low ambient metallicity, Z {<=} 10{sup -3} Z {sub sun}, {gamma}-ray bursts originating from fast-moving runaway WR stars may produce afterglows which appear to be coming from regions with a relatively homogeneous circumburst medium.

  8. The singlet-triplet absorption and photodissociation of the HOCl, HOBr, and HOI molecules calculated by the MCSCF quadratic response method

    SciTech Connect

    Minaev, B.F.

    1999-09-09

    The molecular absorption spectra of hypochlorous, hypobromous, and hypoiodous acids have been studied by multiconfiguration self-consistent field (MCSCF) calculations with linear and quadratic response techniques. The complete form of the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) operator is accounted. The singlet-triplet transition to the lowest triplet state {sup 3}A{double{underscore}prime} {l{underscore}arrow} X{sup 1}A{prime} is shown to be responsible for the weak long-wavelength tail absorption and photodissociation in these molecules. The transition is polarized along the O-X bond (X = Cl, Br, I) and has an oscillator strength equal 6 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 8 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 2 x 10{sup {minus}4} for hypochlorous, hypobromous, and hypoiodous acids, respectively. The second singlet-triplet transition {sup 3}A{prime} {l{underscore}arrow} X{sup 1}A{prime} comes to the region of the first singlet-singlet {sup 1}A{double{underscore}prime} {l{underscore}arrow} X{sup 1}A{prime} absorption and contributes significantly to the total cross-section at wavelengths {lambda} {approx} 300--320 nm (X = Cl), {lambda} {approx} 340--360 nm (X = Br), and {lambda} {approx} 400 nm (X = I). In the last case the singlet-triplet transition {sup 3}A{prime} {l{underscore}arrow} X{sup 1}A{prime} produces predominant contribution to HOI absorption in the visible region. All states are dissociative, so the singlet-triplet absorption contributes to the yield of photolysis in the important near-UV and visible region close to the intense solar actinic flux. Contributions to the removal mechanisms for atmospheric HOCl, HOBr, and HOI species are shortly discussed. The minor loss process of ozone in troposphere because of the HOI reservoir sink is getting evident on the ground of this calculations. The importance of SOC accounting for atmospheric photochemistry problems is stressed.

  9. Survival of irradiated mice treated with WR-151327, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate, or ofloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledney, G. D.; Elliott, T. B.; Landauer, M. R.; Vigneulle, R. M.; Henderson, P. L.; Harding, R. A.; Tom, S. P.

    1994-10-01

    Spaceflight personnel need treatment options that would enhance survival from radiation and would not disrupt task performance. Doses of prophylactic or therapeutic agents known to induce significant short-term (30-day) survival with minimal behavioral (locomotor) changes were used for 180-day survival studies. In protection studies, groups of mice were treated with the phosphorothioate WR-151327 (200 mg/kg, 25% of the LD10) or the immunomodulator, synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM; 8 mg/kg), before lethal irradiation with reactor-generated fission neutrons and γ-rays (n/γ = 1) or 60Co γ-rays. In therapy studies, groups of mice received either S-TDCM, the antimicrobial ofloxacin, or S-TDCM plus ofloxacin after irradiation. For WR-151327 treated-mice, survival at 180 days for n/γ = 1 and γ-irradiated mice was 90% and 92%, respectively; for S-TDCM (protection), 57% and 78%, respectively; for S-TDCM (therapy), 20% and 25%, respectively; for ofloxacin, 38% and 5%, respectively; for S-TDCM combined with ofloxacin, 30% and 30%, respectively; and for saline, 8% and 5%, respectively. Ofloxacin or combined ofloxacin and S-TDCM increased survival from the gram-negative bacterial sepsis that predominated in n/γ = 1) irradiated mice. The efficacies of the treatments depended on radiation quality, treatment agent and its mode of use, and microflora of the host.

  10. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of WR ring nebulae. I - NGC 2359 and RCW 78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Manchado, A.; Edmunds, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    We report detailed spatially resolved spectroscopy of the WR nebulae NGC 2359 and RCW 78 surrounding the WN 5 HD 56925 and WN 8 HD 117688 stars. The aim of this work has been to study possible abundance inhomogeneities and the ionization structure of the nebulae, as well as to derive reliable values for the degree of self-enrichment. In NGC 2359 the derived ratio O2+/O+ shows localized variations resulting from the compression of the gas in the filaments with respect to the shell gas. Effective temperatures for the central stars of both nebulae have been estimated on the basis of the ionization structure; the values found appear appropriate for their spectral types. Abundances of O/H, NIH, Ne/H, and He/H have been determined in twelve different positions in NGC 2359, covering its different morphological zones. No significant differences in the N/H and O/H abundances across the nebula have been found, although He/H shows marginal evidence for localized enhancements. In the case of RCW 78 the derived value of O/H is roughly solar, but He/H and NIH may be slightly overabundant. The results suggest that the amount of chemical self-enrichment of these WR nebulae is, at most, small.

  11. Analysis of S-35 labeled WR-2721 and its metabolites in biological fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, K.W.; Krohn, K.A.; Grunbaum, Z.; Phillips, R.B.; Mahler, P.A.; Menard, T.W.; Spence, A.M.; Rasey, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    Studies with WR-2721 and related compounds have been hindered by the lack of a suitable assay for the drug and its major metabolites. A chromatographic method which requires no derivation for the separation and detection of WR-2721, the free thiol, its symmetrical disulfide and other mixed disulfides has been developed. The procedure involves ion-pairing for separation of ionizable compounds by causing polar molecules to become more lipophilic and hence separable using reverse phase HPLC. Detection is based upon liquid scintillation counting of S-35 incorporated during the synthesis of the parent compound. This method requires no pre-column preparation of samples and, by detecting the S-35 label, eliminates the chance that a coeluting species could interfere with detection, as might occur with post-column derivatization. This analytical technique employing radiotracers can be used to study radioprotective mechanisms by time dependent measurements of the tissue distribution and chemical form of labeled drug. Such chemical information can then be correlated with biological measures of radiation protection.

  12. The XMM-Newton/EPIC X-Ray Light Curve Analysis of WR 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Oskinova, L. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-01

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds. Based on observations obtained with XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and NASA.

  13. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  14. The changing wind structure of the WR/LBV star in HD 5980

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsberger, Gloria

    2013-10-01

    HD 5980 is an extraordinary system of massive stars that is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud. It contains an eclipsing binary {P=19.3 d} consisting of a luminous blue variable {LBV} and its Wolf-Rayet {WR} companion. The LBV underwent a major eruptive event in 1994 during which its bolometric luminosity increased by a factor of 5 and it is currently approaching its minimum state of activity. The primary objective of this proposal is to determine the wind velocity and mass-loss rate of the LBV in its current state. With these observations and our earlier observations and analyses, HD 5980 offers the unprecedented opportunity of deriving all the fundamental parameters of an LBV system throughout its activity cycle, parameters which are required in order to constrain the sources of the instabilities that lead to the eruptive phenomena. To accomplish these goals, we request 2 HST orbits to observe HD 5980 with STIS in order to obtain one set of FUV MAMA and CCD spectra at the eclipse, when the LBV occults its WR companion.The study of HD 5980 and the UV spectrum that we propose to acquire are relevant to a broad range of problems including wind-wind collision phenomena, the formation of circumstellar structures powered by stellar winds and the evolution of supernova progenitors.

  15. Relationship of W-R star numbers and subclass distribution to OB star numbers and metallicity in galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.F.

    1988-04-01

    The population of W-R stars in local group galaxies are compared on the basis of quantities expected to be little affectrd by incompleteness of the surveys. The ratio of the number of strong line W-R stars to the number of OB stars with M(V) less than -4.5 is found to range from less than 1/1000 to more than 1/10 and correlates with metallicity. The low-metallicity galaxies have lower numbers of W-R stars, and all of these may be binaries. The ratio between number of stars in the two sequences WC/WNE (single) also correlates with metallicity. The presence of later subclasses of WC stars is strongly correlated with metallicity; WC 7-9 stars occur only in the inner part of M33 and in the metal-rich galaxies MWG and M31. 81 references.

  16. REVEALING THE ASYMMETRY OF THE WIND OF THE VARIABLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR1 (HD 4004) THROUGH SPECTROPOLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    St-Louis, N.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, high quality spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1 (HD 4004) obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are presented. All major emission lines present in the spectrum show depolarization in the relative Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I. From the behavior of the amount of line depolarization as a function of line strength, the intrinsic continuum light polarization of WR1 is estimated to be P/I = 0.443% ± 0.028% with an angle of θ = –26.°2. Although such a level of polarization could in principle be caused by a wind flattened by fast rotation, the scenario in which it is a consequence of the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind is preferred. This is supported by previous photometric and spectroscopic observations showing periodic variations with a period of 16.9 days. This is now the third WR star thought to exhibit CIRs in its wind that is found to have line depolarization. Previous authors have found a strong correlation between line depolarization and the presence of an ejected nebula, which they interpret as a sign that the star has relatively recently reached the WR phase since the nebula are thought to dissipate very fast. In cases where the presence of CIRs in the wind is favored to explain the depolarization across spectral lines, the above-mentioned correlation may indicate that those massive stars have only very recently transited from the previous evolutionary phase to the WR phase.

  17. Revealing the Asymmetry of the Wind of the Variable Wolf-Rayet Star WR1 (HD 4004) through Spectropolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Louis, N.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, high quality spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1 (HD 4004) obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are presented. All major emission lines present in the spectrum show depolarization in the relative Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I. From the behavior of the amount of line depolarization as a function of line strength, the intrinsic continuum light polarization of WR1 is estimated to be P/I = 0.443% ± 0.028% with an angle of θ = -26.°2. Although such a level of polarization could in principle be caused by a wind flattened by fast rotation, the scenario in which it is a consequence of the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind is preferred. This is supported by previous photometric and spectroscopic observations showing periodic variations with a period of 16.9 days. This is now the third WR star thought to exhibit CIRs in its wind that is found to have line depolarization. Previous authors have found a strong correlation between line depolarization and the presence of an ejected nebula, which they interpret as a sign that the star has relatively recently reached the WR phase since the nebula are thought to dissipate very fast. In cases where the presence of CIRs in the wind is favored to explain the depolarization across spectral lines, the above-mentioned correlation may indicate that those massive stars have only very recently transited from the previous evolutionary phase to the WR phase.

  18. Nonlinear absorption properties of 5,10-A2B2 porphyrins--correlation of molecular structure with the nonlinear responses.

    PubMed

    Zawadzka, Monika; Wang, Jun; Blau, Werner J; Senge, Mathias O

    2013-06-01

    The nonlinear absorption properties of two series of novel free base and metalated meso 5,10-A2B2 substituted porphyrins, both bearing p-tolyl as an A substituent and TMS-ethynyl or bromine as a B substituent, were investigated with the open Z-scan technique at 532 nm in the ns time regime. Most of the compounds exhibited a transmission drop with increasing input fluence. This behavior is desirable for their applications in optical limiting. More complex responses: a drop in transmission followed by an increase in transmission or an increase in transmission followed by a transmission drop, with increasing input fluence, were detected for certain compounds. All of the recorded responses were successfully fitted with a four-level model with simultaneous two-photon absorption arising from the higher excited states (consecutive one- + one- + two-photon absorption). The TMS-ethynyl group was found to be a more efficient meso substituent in optical limiting than the bromine atom. Indium, lead and zinc complexes with TMS-ethynyl substituents were the strongest positive nonlinear absorbers amongst compounds studied which makes them the most interesting candidates for optical limiting application. PMID:23503655

  19. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  20. Orbitally modulated dust formation by the WC7+O5 colliding-wind binary WR140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, P. M.; Marchenko, S. V.; Marston, A. P.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Varricatt, W. P.; Dougherty, S. M.; Kidger, M. R.; Morbidelli, L.; Tapia, M.

    2009-05-01

    We present high-resolution infrared (2-18 μm) images of the archetypal periodic dust-making Wolf-Rayet binary system WR140 (HD 193793) taken between 2001 and 2005, and multi-colour (J - [19.5]) photometry observed between 1989 and 2001. The images resolve the dust cloud formed by WR140 in 2001, allowing us to track its expansion and cooling, while the photometry allows tracking the average temperature and total mass of the dust. The combination of the two data sets constrains the optical properties of the dust, and suggests that they differ from those of the dust made by the WC9 dust-makers, including the classical `pinwheel', WR104. The photometry of individual dust emission features shows them to be significantly redder in (nbL'-[3.99]), but bluer in ([7.9]-[12.5]), than the binary, as expected from the spectra of heated dust and the stellar wind of a Wolf-Rayet star. The most persistent dust features, two concentrations at the ends of a `bar' of emission to the south of the star, were observed to move with constant proper motions of 324 +/- 8 and 243 +/- 7 mas yr-1. Longer wavelength (4.68 and 12.5 μm) images show dust emission from the corresponding features from the previous (1993) periastron passage and dust formation episode, showing that the dust expanded freely in a low-density void for over a decade, with dust features repeating from one cycle to the next. A third persistent dust concentration to the east of the binary (the `arm') was found to have a proper motion ~320 mas yr-1, and a dust mass about one-quarter that of the `bar'. Extrapolation of the motions of the concentrations back to the binary suggests that the eastern `arm' began expansion four to five months earlier than those in the southern `bar', consistent with the projected rotation of the binary axis and wind-collision region (WCR) on the sky. A comparison of model dust images and the observations constrains the intervals when the WCR was producing sufficiently compressed wind for dust

  1. In vivo percutaneous absorption of acetochlor in the rhesus monkey: dose-response and exposure risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Melendres, J L; Maibach, H I

    1996-10-01

    Percutaneous absorption of three topical dose levels of [14C]acetochlor in the rhesus monkey were determined for exposure risk assessment. The topical doses were 30.7, 0.43 and 0.03 mg acetochlor in 40 microliters commercial formulation and aqueous dilutions thereof, spread over 10 cm3 skin surface area (lower abdominal). The dosing area was not covered. The skin application time was 24 hr. The dosed skin surface area was washed with 50% soap (Ivory Liquid) and water at the end of the 24-hr dosing period. An intravenous dose of 0.43 mg was also administered to determine the excretory kinetics of acetochlor in the rhesus monkey. The same four monkeys were used for all dose administrations. Bioavailability was determined by radioactivity disposition in blood, urine and faeces. Percutaneous absorption was 23.1 +/- 8.7, 17.3 +/- 5.9 and 4.9 +/- 1.4% for 0.03, 0.43 and 30.7 mg doses, respectively. Assuming a constant state of absorption, the hourly exposure flux (microgram/cm2/hr) was 0.03 +/- 0.01 for the 0.03 mg dose (3 micrograms/cm2). Increasing the dose approximately 15-fold to 0.43 mg (43 micrograms/cm2) resulted in a 10-fold increase in flux to 0.3 microgram/cm2/hr. Increasing the dose a further 70-fold to 30.7 mg (3070 micrograms/cm2) resulted in only another 21-fold increase in flux (6.3 +/- 1.8 micrograms/cm2/hr). Thus, the efficiency of absorption (%) decreased with increased topical dose, but the amount (mass/flux) of acetochlor absorbed always increased with increased dose. Plasma levels of topical acetochlor at the high dose were detectable at 1 hr and continued at a relatively steady level through the 24-hr dosing period. After the skin surface wash (24 hr) plasma levels decreased but were still detectable at the last 168-hr sampling period. Acetochlor, recently EPA approved as an herbicide for corn crops, is carcinogenic; however, farmers will use half as much acetochlor/acre as other herbicides. The percutaneous absorption of acetochlor is equal to that

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NIR spectroscopy of Galactic WR stars. III (Kanarek+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanarek, G.; Shara, M.; Faherty, J.; Zurek, D.; Moffat, A.

    2016-02-01

    This survey was previously described in Paper I (Shara et al., 2009AJ....138..402S). More than 88000 exposures were taken of the Galactic plane on the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) 1.5-m telescope over approximately 200 nights during 2005-2006. IRTF: at the 3m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), we obtained NIR spectra of 150 candidate WR stars, selected using the criteria above, with the SpeX spectrograph. MDM 2011: during a run of excellent weather over the seven nights in 2011 June, we obtained 113 NIR spectra of candidate stars using TIFKAM in spectroscopic mode on the 2.4m Hiltner telescope at MDM Observatory. MDM 2012: during early 2012, the original survey data were reduced again, using different methods to produce better images. (10 data files).

  3. The first orbital solution for the massive colliding-wind binary HD 93162 (≡ WR 25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamen, R.; Gosset, E.; Morrell, N. I.; Niemela, V. S.; Sana, H.; Nazé, Y.; Rauw, G.; Barbá, R. H.; Solivella, G. R.

    2008-08-01

    Since the discovery, with EINSTEIN, of strong X-ray emission associated with HD 93162, this object was recurrently predicted by some authors to be a colliding-wind binary system. However, radial-velocity variations that would prove the suspected binary nature have never been found so far. We spectroscopically monitored this object in order to investigate its possible variability and to provide an answer to the above-mentioned discordance. We derived radial velocities from spectroscopic data acquired mainly between 1994 and 2006, and searched for periodicities. For the first time, periodic radial-velocity variations are detected. Our analysis definitively shows that the Wolf-Rayet star WR 25 is actually an eccentric binary system with a probable period of about 208 days.

  4. Protection by WR-151327 against late-effect damage from fission-spectrum neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop chemical agents capable of modifying radiation-induced damage to biological systems. The authors describe here differences in the radioprotective effect of WR-151327, depending on the sex of the animal and the post-irradiation time interval considered. The greatest effect in female animals is prior to 805 days post irradiation. The greater protection in male animals is seen during the time increment following 850 days after irradiation. While it is difficult at present to ascribe these effects to a particulate model, it is suggestive that hormonal factors may play a role in aminothiol protection against radiation-induced life shortening and concomitant tumor induction in the B6CF{sub 1} hybrid mouse system. With respect to subsequent tumor induction, their preliminary findings to be published elsewhere suggest that tumors of lymphoreticular origin are the class of tumors most affected by the administration of a radioprotector prior to irradiation. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Biochemical characterization of a novel laccase from the basidiomycete fungus Cerrena sp. WR1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Wu, Po-Hung; Su, Yu-Chang; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wei, Yun-Syuan; Wang, Nai-Chen; Hsu, Chih-An; Wang, Andrew H-J; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-11-01

    This study reports a new white-rot fungus Cerrena sp. WR1, identified based on an 18S rDNA sequence, which can secrete extracellular forms of laccase with a maximal activity reaching 202 000 U l⁻¹ in a 5-l fermenter. A laccase protein, designated Lcc3, was purified and shown to be N-linked glycosylated by PNGase F and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses. The respective full-length cDNA gene (lcc3) of the Lcc3 protein was obtained using polymerase chain reaction-based methods. Kinetic studies showed that the K(m) and k(cat) of the native Lcc3 were 3.27 μM and 934.6 s⁻¹ for 2,2'-Azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), 849.1 μM and 147.9 s⁻¹ for guaiacol, 392.7 μM and 109.2 s⁻¹ for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, and 881 μM and 115.5 s⁻¹ for catechol, respectively. The T(m) of Lcc3 was determined at 73.9°C and it showed a long t(½) (120 min) at 50°C. The laccase was highly ethanol resistant, with 80% of its original activity was detected when incubated in 25% ethanol for 14 days. Furthermore, crude enzyme broth or Lcc3 could degrade lignin in kraft paper (26.5%), and showed high decoloration efficiency (90%) on synthetic dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R. Together, these data demonstrate that Cerrena sp. WR1 Lcc3 possesses novel biochemical and kinetic properties that may aid its application in industry. PMID:23081836

  6. A Homunculus Around the Star NaSt1 {WR122}?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhan, Jon

    2012-10-01

    Eruptive mass loss during the LBV phase is the most puzzling aspect of massive stellar evolution, posing a serious limitation to theoretical models. Yet we know this is the key channel by which massive stars lose their hydrogen envelopes and become Wolf-Rayet stars. LBV eruptions also explain the phenomenon of supernova "impostors", and are the origin of luminous Type IIn supernovae. Our ignorance has partly persisted because there are so few Galactic examples for detailed study. Eta Car is only object to have recently experienced a giant eruption that is still embedded in a dense, massive, and highly CNO-processed outflow. Because of the compact size, most of what we know about Eta Car has been the result of HST observations. There is no known Galactic analog of this extremeness, so we do not know whether Eta Car represents a unusual or universal occurrence. NaSt1 {aka WR 122} is an evolved, luminous, hot star that is also embedded in a dense CNO-processed outflow. The system shares more characteristics with Eta Car than any other object known. The main difference appears to be the fact that the central star is suspected to be a hot WR, so the system could represent what Eta Car will look like after it experiences another giant eruption. Like Eta Car, NaSt1's nebula is very bright in the light of [NII]. Although it exhibits a hint of bipolarity, it is very compact {7" diameter}. Thus, ground-based imaging is unable to elucidate the object's nature. We propose a simple, narrow-band imaging experiment with HST/WFC3 to determine the precise morphology of NaSt1's [NII] nebula. The data will reveal whether NaSt1 is truly an Eta Car analog, or something entirely different.

  7. Impact of ZnO substitution on magnetic response and microwave absorption capability of strontium-natural nanoferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widanarto, W.; Rahayu, F. M.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Effendi, M.; Cahyanto, W. T.

    Ferrite being a compound derived from iron oxides including magnetite and hematite possesses similar properties as ceramics which are hard and brittle. Certainly, the mounting demand for electronics has been a major factor driving the exponential growth of ferrite based materials. ZnO doped strontium-natural nanoferrites of composition (80 - x)Fe2O3:xZnO:20SrCO3, where x = 0, 10, 20 mol% are synthesized and sintered via the solid state reaction scheme. Samples are characterized by SEM, XRD, VSM, and VNA measurements to determine the impact of ZnO contents' variation on the surface morphology, structure, magnetic and microwave absorption properties. The Nicolson-Ross-Weir method is applied to evaluate samples' reflection loss. The average grain size of the strontium ferrite is found to reduce with the increase in ZnO concentration. Materials sintered at 1100 °C without ZnO incorporation are composed of hexagonal SrFe12O19. Meanwhile, the addition of ZnO produces cubic ZnFe2O4 and SrFeO2 phases. Insertion of ZnO results in reduction of magnetic parameters and reflection loss. Furthermore, the anisotropy magnetic field of strontium natural ferrites displays a rapid drop from 350 kA/m to 79.6 kA/m with the increase in ZnO. Strontium ferrite containing 20 mol% of ZnO exhibits superior microwave absorption with reflection loss within -45 dB to -55.94 dB in the frequency range of 7-13 GHz. This facilely synthesized a new class of materials which is believed to be economically promising for microwave absorption applications in the GHz range.

  8. Detached dust shell around Wolf-Rayet star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036

    SciTech Connect

    Borissova, J.; Amigo, P.; Kurtev, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Chené, A.-N.; Minniti, D.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a detached dust shell around the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036 is reported. This shell is uncovered through the Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm image, where it appears brightest, and it is invisible at shorter wavelengths. Using new APEX observations and other data available from the literature, we have estimated some of the shell parameters: the inner and outer radii of 0.15 and 0.90 pc, respectively; the overall systemic velocity of the molecular {sup 12}CO(3 → 2) emission of –45.7 ± 2.3 km s{sup –1}; an expansion velocity of the gas of 16.3 ± 1 km s{sup –1}; the dust temperature and opacity of 122 ± 12 K and 1.04, respectively; and an age of 2.8 × 10{sup 4} yr. The WR star displays some cyclic variability. The mass computed for the WR60-6 nebula indicates that the material was probably ejected during its previous stages of evolution. In addition, we have identified a bright spot very close to the shell, which can be associated with the Midcourse Space Experiment source G312.13+00.20.

  9. Detached Dust Shell around Wolf-Rayet Star WR60-6 in the Young Stellar Cluster VVV CL036

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borissova, J.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Amigo, P.; Chené, A.-N.; Kurtev, R.; Minniti, D.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a detached dust shell around the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036 is reported. This shell is uncovered through the Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm image, where it appears brightest, and it is invisible at shorter wavelengths. Using new APEX observations and other data available from the literature, we have estimated some of the shell parameters: the inner and outer radii of 0.15 and 0.90 pc, respectively; the overall systemic velocity of the molecular 12CO(3 → 2) emission of -45.7 ± 2.3 km s-1 an expansion velocity of the gas of 16.3 ± 1 km s-1 the dust temperature and opacity of 122 ± 12 K and 1.04, respectively; and an age of 2.8 × 104 yr. The WR star displays some cyclic variability. The mass computed for the WR60-6 nebula indicates that the material was probably ejected during its previous stages of evolution. In addition, we have identified a bright spot very close to the shell, which can be associated with the Midcourse Space Experiment source G312.13+00.20. Based on observations gathered as part of observing programs 179.B-2002, VIRCAM, VISTA at ESO, Paranal Observatory, NTT at ESO, and APEX C-090.F-9705B-2012.

  10. Protein binding of N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane via mixed disulfide formation after oral administration of WR 2721

    SciTech Connect

    Tabachnik, N.F.; Blackburn, P.; Peterson, C.M.; Cerami, A.

    1982-02-01

    Earlier studies have shown that WR 2721 (H2N-(CH2)3-NH(CH2)2SPO3H2) is converted to its free thiol form, N-2-mercaptoethyl-1,3-diaminopropane (MDP), at the acidic pH of the stomach. MDP is a radioprotective compound and a mucolytic agent capable of decreasing sputum viscosity in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. Conversion of WR 2721 and MDP to the corresponding sulfonic acid (MDP-SO3H) permits quantitative determination of these compounds in physiological fluids by use of an automatic amino acid analyzer. After oral administration of WR 2721 to human patients and rabbits it is converted to MDP and the free thiol form of the drug associates with plasma proteins by mixed disulfide linkage. The plasma proteins serve as a depot and reservoir of MDP for potential exchange at the tissues. When incubated with whole sputum or with purified mucin solutions in vitro, MDP decreased the viscosity of these solutions by reduction of the accessible disulfide bonds of the mucin molecule and was subsequently found in mixed disulfide association with the mucin molecule. The association of MDP with proteins via mixed disulfide linkage has important implications for the development of optimal dose regimens for administration of WR 2721 to patients.

  11. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  12. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  13. Beyond the electric-dipole approximation: A formulation and implementation of molecular response theory for the description of absorption of electromagnetic field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    List, Nanna Holmgaard Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Saue, Trond

    2015-06-28

    We present a formulation of molecular response theory for the description of a quantum mechanical molecular system in the presence of a weak, monochromatic, linearly polarized electromagnetic field without introducing truncated multipolar expansions. The presentation focuses on a description of linear absorption by adopting the energy-loss approach in combination with the complex polarization propagator formulation of response theory. Going beyond the electric-dipole approximation is essential whenever studying electric-dipole-forbidden transitions, and in general, non-dipolar effects become increasingly important when addressing spectroscopies involving higher-energy photons. These two aspects are examined by our study of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of the alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra) as well as the trans-polyenes. In following the series of alkaline earth metals, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed with respect to increasing photon energies and a detailed assessment of results is made in terms of studying the pertinent transition electron densities and in particular their spatial extension in comparison with the photon wavelength. Along the series of trans-polyenes, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed for X-ray spectroscopies on organic molecules with respect to the spatial extension of the chromophore.

  14. Beyond the electric-dipole approximation: A formulation and implementation of molecular response theory for the description of absorption of electromagnetic field radiation.

    PubMed

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Kauczor, Joanna; Saue, Trond; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Norman, Patrick

    2015-06-28

    We present a formulation of molecular response theory for the description of a quantum mechanical molecular system in the presence of a weak, monochromatic, linearly polarized electromagnetic field without introducing truncated multipolar expansions. The presentation focuses on a description of linear absorption by adopting the energy-loss approach in combination with the complex polarization propagator formulation of response theory. Going beyond the electric-dipole approximation is essential whenever studying electric-dipole-forbidden transitions, and in general, non-dipolar effects become increasingly important when addressing spectroscopies involving higher-energy photons. These two aspects are examined by our study of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of the alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra) as well as the trans-polyenes. In following the series of alkaline earth metals, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed with respect to increasing photon energies and a detailed assessment of results is made in terms of studying the pertinent transition electron densities and in particular their spatial extension in comparison with the photon wavelength. Along the series of trans-polyenes, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed for X-ray spectroscopies on organic molecules with respect to the spatial extension of the chromophore. PMID:26133414

  15. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. I. METHODS AND FIRST RESULTS: 41 NEW WR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Gerke, Jill; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Villar-Sbaffi, Alfredo; Stanonik, Kathryn; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jgerke@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: alfredovs@hotmail.com E-mail: eartigau@gemini.edu

    2009-08-15

    The discovery of new Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in our Galaxy via large-scale narrowband optical surveys has been severely limited by dust extinction. Recent improvements in infrared technology have made narrowband-broadband imaging surveys viable again. We report a new J, K, and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, spanning 150 degrees in Galactic longitude and reaching 1 degree above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 173 WR star candidates we have discovered 41 new WR stars, 15 of type WN and 26 of type WC. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with K-band spectra, and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. A few of the new WR stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new WR stars is seen to follow that of previously known WR stars along the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Tentative radial velocities were also measured for most of the new WR stars.

  16. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS REVEAL VERY HIGH X-RAY LUMINOSITY FROM THE CARBON-RICH WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 48a

    SciTech Connect

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Gagne, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L. E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu

    2011-01-20

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the dusty Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star WR 48a. This is the first detection of this object in X-rays. The XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are heavily absorbed and the presence of numerous strong emission lines indicates a thermal origin of the WR 48a X-ray emission, with dominant temperature components at kT{sub cool} {approx} 1 keV and kT{sub hot} {approx} 3 keV, the hotter component dominating the observed flux. No significant X-ray variability was detected on timescales {<=}1 day. Although the distance to WR 48a is uncertain, if it is physically associated with Open clusters Danks 1 and 2 at d {approx}4 kpc, then the resultant X-ray luminosity L{sub X}{approx} 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} makes it the most X-ray luminous W-R star in the Galaxy detected so far, after the black hole candidate Cyg X-3. We assume the following scenarios as the most likely explanation for the X-ray properties of WR 48a: (1) colliding stellar winds in a wide WR+O binary system, or in a hierarchical triple system with non-degenerate stellar components and (2) accretion shocks from the WR 48a wind onto a close companion (possibly a neutron star). More specific information about WR 48a and its wind properties will be needed to distinguish between the above possibilities.

  17. Electronic excited states responsible for dimer formation upon UV absorption directly by thymine strands: joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Douki, Thierry; Improta, Roberto; Gustavsson, Thomas; Onidas, Delphine; Vayá, Ignacio; Perron, Marion; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2012-09-12

    The study addresses interconnected issues related to two major types of cycloadditions between adjacent thymines in DNA leading to cyclobutane dimers (T<>Ts) and (6-4) adducts. Experimental results are obtained for the single strand (dT)(20) by steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy, as well as by HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. Calculations are carried out for the dinucleoside monophosphate in water using the TD-M052X method and including the polarizable continuum model; the reliability of TD-M052X is checked against CASPT2 calculations regarding the behavior of two stacked thymines in the gas phase. It is shown that irradiation at the main absorption band leads to cyclobutane dimers (T<>Ts) and (6-4) adducts via different electronic excited states. T<>Ts are formed via (1)ππ* excitons; [2 + 2] dimerization proceeds along a barrierless path, in line with the constant quantum yield (0.05) with the irradiation wavelength, the contribution of the (3)ππ* state to this reaction being less than 10%. The formation of oxetane, the reaction intermediate leading to (6-4) adducts, occurs via charge transfer excited states involving two stacked thymines, whose fingerprint is detected in the fluorescence spectra; it involves an energy barrier explaining the important decrease in the quantum yield of (6-4) adducts with the irradiation wavelength. PMID:22894169

  18. Antimutagenic properties of WR 2721 and of a radioprotective mixture, ATP-AET-serotonin, with regard to X ray induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia

    SciTech Connect

    Benova, D.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment by intraperitoneal administration of WR 2721 at 400 mg/kg body weight in mice receiving 4.0 Gy X rays was found to have an appreciable antimutagenic effect with regard to reciprocal translocation induction in spermatogonia. The effectiveness of the product tested proved superior to that of a radioprotective mixture of ATP-AET-serotonin given at optimal dose ratio--360, 24, and 8 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The RF (Reduction Factor) was 2.4 for WR 2721 and 1.8 for the mixture. The effect observed indicated WR 2721 to have potential capabilities for reducing the genetic risk of radiation in male individuals.

  19. Antimutagenic properties of WR 2721 and of a radioprotective mixture, ATP-AET-serotonin, with regard to X ray induced reciprocal translocations in mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Benova, D

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment by intraperitoneal administration of WR 2721 at 400 mg/kg body weight in mice receiving 4.0 Gy X rays was found to have an appreciable antimutagenic effect with regard to reciprocal translocation induction in spermatogonia. The effectiveness of the product tested proved superior to that of a radioprotective mixture of ATP-AET-serotonin given at optimal dose ratio--360, 24, and 8 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The RF (Reduction Factor) was 2.4 for WR 2721 and 1.8 for the mixture. The effect observed indicated WR 2721 to have potential capabilities for reducing the genetic risk of radiation in male individuals. PMID:3027009

  20. Photothermal response of CVD synthesized carbon (nano)spheres/aqueous nanofluids for potential application in direct solar absorption collectors: a preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Shah, Monaliben; Laava, Iafeta; Fawcett, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Direct-absorption solar collectors have the potential to offer an unlimited source of renewable energy with minimal environmental impact. Unfortunately, their performance is limited by the absorption efficiency of the working fluid. Nanoparticles of functionalized carbon nanospheres (CNS) have the potential to improve the photothermal properties of the working fluid. CNS are produced by the pyrolysis of acetylene gas in a tube-based electric furnace/chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The reaction takes place at 1000°C in the presence of nitrogen gas without the use of a catalyst. The synthesized CNS were examined and characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and ultraviolet-visible analysis. The CNS powders with a mean particle size of 210 nm were then functionalized using tetraethylammonium hydroxide ([C2H5]4 N[OH]) and used to produce a series of aqueous nanofluids with varying mass content. The photothermal response of both the nanofluids and films composed of CNS were investigated under 1000 W/m2 solar irradiation. PMID:24198496

  1. Differences in Copper Absorption and Accumulation between Copper-Exclusion and Copper-Enrichment Plants: A Comparison of Structure and Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Xishi; Li, Shuhuan; Guo, Pan; Shen, Zhenguo; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Yahua

    2015-01-01

    Differences in copper (Cu) absorption and transport, physiological responses and structural characteristics between two types of Cu-resistant plants, Oenothera glazioviana (Cu-exclusion type) and Elsholtzia haichowensis (Cu-enrichment type), were investigated in the present study. The results indicated the following: (1) After 50 μM Cu treatment, the Cu ratio in the xylem vessels of E. haichowensis increased by 60%. A Cu adsorption experiment indicated that O. glazioviana exhibited greater resistance to Cu, and Cu absorption and the shoot/root ratio of Cu were significantly lower in O. glazioviana than in E. haichowensis. (2) An analysis of the endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) variance and exogenous ABA treatment demonstrated that the ABA levels of both plants did not differ; exogenous ABA treatment clearly reduced Cu accumulation in both plants. (3) The leaf stomatal density of O. glazioviana was significantly less than that of E. haichowensis. Guard cells in E. haichowensis plants were covered with a thick cuticle layer, the epidermal hair was more numerous and longer, and the number of xylem conduits in the root was small. (4) The transpiration rate and the stomatal conductance of O. glazioviana were both significantly lower than those of E. haichowensis, regardless of whether the plants were treated with Cu. Taken together, these results indicate that the differences in the structural characteristics between these two plant species, particularly in the characteristics related to plant transpiration, are important factors that govern whether plants acquire or exclude Cu. PMID:26207743

  2. Photothermal response of CVD synthesized carbon (nano)spheres/aqueous nanofluids for potential application in direct solar absorption collectors: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Shah, Monaliben; Laava, Iafeta; Fawcett, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Direct-absorption solar collectors have the potential to offer an unlimited source of renewable energy with minimal environmental impact. Unfortunately, their performance is limited by the absorption efficiency of the working fluid. Nanoparticles of functionalized carbon nanospheres (CNS) have the potential to improve the photothermal properties of the working fluid. CNS are produced by the pyrolysis of acetylene gas in a tube-based electric furnace/chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The reaction takes place at 1000°C in the presence of nitrogen gas without the use of a catalyst. The synthesized CNS were examined and characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and ultraviolet-visible analysis. The CNS powders with a mean particle size of 210 nm were then functionalized using tetraethylammonium hydroxide ([C2H5]4 N[OH]) and used to produce a series of aqueous nanofluids with varying mass content. The photothermal response of both the nanofluids and films composed of CNS were investigated under 1000 W/m(2) solar irradiation. PMID:24198496

  3. High Power RF Tests on WR650 Pre-Stressed Planar Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, Mircea; Davis, G. Kirk; Elliott, Thomas S.; King, Larry; Powers, Thomas J.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Walker, Richard L.

    2009-11-01

    A new planar, ceramic window intended to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. It is based on the pre-stressed planar window concept tested in PEP II and LEDA. A test stand that made use of the 100kW CW 1500 MHz RF system in the JLAB FEL was commissioned and used to apply up to 80 kW traveling wave (TW)to the windows. Two different types of RF windows (brazed and diffusion bonded ceramics) with design specification of 50 kW CW in TW mode were successfully tested both as a gas barrier (intended to operate up to 2 psi) and as a vacuum barrier. The vacuum windows were able to maintain UHV quality vacuum and were successfully operated in the 10{sup -9} mbar range. An overview of the pre-stressed power windows, RF test stand, procedures and RF power testing results will be presented.

  4. Erratum: The 2.27 day period of WR-134 (HD 191765)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandliss, Stephan R.; Bohannan, Bruce; Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The original temporal analysis of a 12 night spectral timeseries of Wolf-Rayet (WR)-134 has been found to be flawed and a re-analysis shows that the line profile variations are indeed periodic. When combined with a 4 night timeseries taken 45 days earlier, a period near 2.27 d is found in periodograms of the He II lambda 5412 line centroid, rms line width, and line skew variations. When the emission line residuals are ordered as a function of phase, a sinuous feature appears to 'snake' about the line center with an amplitude of +/-500 km/s. This is approximately equal to 20 larger than the line centroid amplitude; the calculation of which is heavily weighted by static portions of the line profile. In addition to the 'snake,' emission residuals appear that move away from line center on unbound trajectories and are thought to result from the interaction of a periodic driver with the unstable flow of the radiation driven wind.

  5. Protection of Saururus Chinensis Extract against Liver Oxidative Stress in Rats of Triton WR-1339-induced Hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Bae Jin

    2014-01-01

    Saururus chinensis has been reported to contain compounds such as lignans, alkaloids, diterpenes, flavonoids, tannins, steroids, and lipids. Fermentation is commonly used to break down certain undesirable compounds, to induce effective microbial conversion, and to improve the potential nutraceutical values. Previous studies have reported that the fermentation process could modify naturally occurring constituents, including isoflavons, saponins, phytosterols, and phenols, and could enhance biological activities, specifically antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. The probiotic strains used for fermentation exert beneficial effects and are safe. In this study, the antioxidative effects of the Bacillus subtilis fermentation of Saururus chinensis were investigated in a rat model with Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia by comparing the measured antioxidative biological parameters of fermented Saururus chinensis extract to those of nonfermented Saururus chinensis extract. Fermentation played a more excellent role than nonfermentation in ultimately protecting the body from oxidative stress in the liver of the experimental rats with Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia. PMID:25584149

  6. The first orbital solution for the massive colliding-wind binary HD 93162 (≡WR 25)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamen, R.; Gosset, E.; Morrell, N.; Niemela, V.; Sana, H.; Nazé, Y.; Rauw, G.; Barbá, R.; Solivella, G.

    2006-12-01

    Context: Since the discovery, with the EINSTEIN satellite, of strong X-ray emission associated with HD 93162 (≡WR 25), this object has been predicted to be a colliding-wind binary system. However, radial-velocity variations that would prove the suspected binary nature have yet to be found. Aims: We spectroscopically monitored this object to investigate its possible variability to address this discordance. Methods: We compiled the largest available radial-velocity data set for this star to look for variations that might be due to binary motion. We derived radial velocities from spectroscopic data acquired mainly between 1994 and 2006, and searched these radial velocities for periodicities using different numerical methods. Results: For the first time, periodic radial-velocity variations are detected. Our analysis definitively shows that the Wolf-Rayet star WR 25 is an eccentric binary system with a probable period of about 208 days.

  7. Organ-specific gene expression in maize: The P-wr allele. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.A.

    1997-06-01

    The ultimate aim of our work is to understand how a regulatory gene produces a specific pattern of gene expression during plant development. Our model is the P-wr gene of maize, which produces a distinctive pattern of pigmentation of maize floral organs. We are investigating this system using a combination of classical genetic and molecular approaches. Mechanisms of organ-specific gene expression are a subject of intense research interest, as it is the operation of these mechanisms during eukaryotic development which determine the characteristics of each organism Allele-specific expression has been characterized in only a few other plant genes. In maize, organ-specific pigmentation regulated by the R, B, and Pl genes is achieved by differential transcription of functionally conserved protein coding sequences. Our studies point to a strikingly different mechanism of organ-specific gene expression, involving post-transcriptional regulation of the regulatory P gene. The novel pigmentation pattern of the P-wr allele is associated with differences in the encoded protein. Furthermore, the P-wr gene itself is present as a unique tandemly amplified structure, which may affect its transcriptional regulation.

  8. Dynamic linear response of atoms in plasmas and photo-absorption cross-section in the dipole approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caizergues, C.; Blenski, T.; Piron, R.

    2016-03-01

    We report results on the self-consistent linear response theory of quantum average-atoms in plasmas. The approach is based on the two first orders of the cluster expansion of the plasma susceptibility. A change of variable is applied, which allows us to handle the diverging free-free transitions contribution in the self-consistent induced electron density and potential. The method is first tested on the case of rare gas isolated neutral atoms. A test of the Ehrenfest-type sum rule is then performed in a case of an actual average-atom in a plasma. At frequencies much higher than the plasma frequency, the sum rule seems to be fulfilled within the accuracy of the numerical methods. Close to the plasma frequency, the method seems not to account for the cold-plasma dielectric function renormalization in the sum rule, which was correctly reproduced in the case of the Thomas-Fermi-Bloch self-consistent linear response. This suggests the need for a better accounting for the outgoing waves in the asymptotic boundary conditions.

  9. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Gerke, Jill; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: gerke@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.ca

    2012-06-15

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150 Degree-Sign in Galactic longitude and reaches 1 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  10. Simultaneous modeling of the pharmacokinetics and methemoglobin pharmacodynamics of an 8-aminoquinoline candidate antimalarial (WR 238605).

    PubMed

    Brueckner, R P; Fleckenstein, L

    1991-12-01

    Methemoglobin (MHb) formation can be a clinically significant and dose-limiting side effect of 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials. MHb may also protect against cyanide poisoning. A two-compartment pharmacokinetic model, linked to a sigmoid Emax pharmacodynamic model, was developed to predict the MHb levels after administration of 8-[(4-amino-1-methylbutyl)amino]-2,6-dimethoxy-4-methyl-5-[(3- trifluoromethyl)phenoxy] quinoline succinate (WR 238605 succinate), a primaquine analogue. Six healthy male beagle dogs received four daily doses of 6.0 mg/kg (base) orally. Forty plasma drug concentrations and 19 MHb levels (effect) were determined over 7 weeks on each dog. Compartmental and noncompartmental pharmacokinetic and parametric and nonparametric pharmacodynamic analyses were performed. Model parameters (mean +/- SD) included a Vss/f of 18.5 +/- 2.8 L/kg, CL/f of 83 +/- 24 ml/hr/kg, terminal elimination t1/2 of 169.7 +/- 52.0 hr, t1/2keo of 123.0 +/- 22.4 hr, an Emax of 31.3 +/- 15.9% MHb, an EC50 of 596 +/- 128 ng/ml, and a sigmoidicity coefficient (n) of 1.94 +/- 0.47. The model was then validated in three additional dogs given three different dosing regimens. It predicted the peak plasma concentrations and MHb levels and the times of their occurrence well. This model could be useful for dose and sampling time selection in further animal studies and initial human phase I clinical testing. PMID:1808614

  11. Multiplasmon Absorption in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablan, Marinko; Chang, Darrick E.

    2015-06-01

    We show that graphene possesses a strong nonlinear optical response in the form of multiplasmon absorption, with exciting implications in classical and quantum nonlinear optics. Specifically, we predict that graphene nanoribbons can be used as saturable absorbers with low saturation intensity in the far-infrared and terahertz spectrum. Moreover, we predict that two-plasmon absorption and extreme localization of plasmon fields in graphene nanodisks can lead to a plasmon blockade effect, in which a single quantized plasmon strongly suppresses the possibility of exciting a second plasmon.

  12. Changes in bile acids, FGF-19 and sterol absorption in response to bile salt hydrolase active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242.

    PubMed

    Martoni, Christopher J; Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L

    2015-01-01

    The size and composition of the circulating bile acid (BA) pool are important factors in regulating the human gut microbiota. Disrupted regulation of BA metabolism is implicated in several chronic diseases. Bile salt hydrolase (BSH)-active Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 30242, previously shown to decrease LDL-cholesterol and increase circulating BA, was investigated for its dose response effect on BA profile in a pilot clinical study. Ten otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic adults, recruited from a clinical trial site in London, ON, were randomized to consume delayed release or standard release capsules containing L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 in escalating dose over 4 weeks. In another aspect, 4 healthy normocholesterolemic subjects with LDL-C below 3.4 mmol/l received delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 at a constant dose over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in plasma BA profile over the intervention period. Additional outcomes included circulating fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-19, plant sterols and LDL-cholesterol as well as fecal microbiota and bsh gene presence. After one week of intervention subjects receiving delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 increased total BA by 1.13 ± 0.67 μmol/l (P = 0.02), conjugated BA by 0.67 ± 0.39 μmol/l (P = 0.02) and unconjugated BA by 0.46 ± 0.43 μmol/l (P = 0.07), which represented a greater than 2-fold change relative to baseline. Increases in BA were largely maintained post-week 1 and were generally correlated with FGF-19 and inversely correlated with plant sterols. This is the first clinical support showing that a BSH-active probiotic can significantly and rapidly influence BA metabolism and may prove useful in chronic diseases beyond hypercholesterolemia. PMID:25612224

  13. Changes in bile acids, FGF-19 and sterol absorption in response to bile salt hydrolase active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242

    PubMed Central

    Martoni, Christopher J; Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L

    2015-01-01

    The size and composition of the circulating bile acid (BA) pool are important factors in regulating the human gut microbiota. Disrupted regulation of BA metabolism is implicated in several chronic diseases. Bile salt hydrolase (BSH)-active Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 30242, previously shown to decrease LDL-cholesterol and increase circulating BA, was investigated for its dose response effect on BA profile in a pilot clinical study. Ten otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic adults, recruited from a clinical trial site in London, ON, were randomized to consume delayed release or standard release capsules containing L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 in escalating dose over 4 weeks. In another aspect, 4 healthy normocholesterolemic subjects with LDL-C below 3.4 mmol/l received delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 at a constant dose over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in plasma BA profile over the intervention period. Additional outcomes included circulating fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-19, plant sterols and LDL-cholesterol as well as fecal microbiota and bsh gene presence. After one week of intervention subjects receiving delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 increased total BA by 1.13 ± 0.67 μmol/l (P = 0.02), conjugated BA by 0.67 ± 0.39 μmol/l (P = 0.02) and unconjugated BA by 0.46 ± 0.43 μmol/l (P = 0.07), which represented a greater than 2-fold change relative to baseline. Increases in BA were largely maintained post-week 1 and were generally correlated with FGF-19 and inversely correlated with plant sterols. This is the first clinical support showing that a BSH-active probiotic can significantly and rapidly influence BA metabolism and may prove useful in chronic diseases beyond hypercholesterolemia. PMID:25612224

  14. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows. PMID:24871934

  15. MAGIICAT III. Interpreting Self-similarity of the Circumgalactic Medium with Virial Mass Using Mg II Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.

    2013-12-01

    In Churchill et al., we used halo abundance matching applied to 182 galaxies in the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT) and showed that the mean Mg II λ2796 equivalent width follows a tight inverse-square power law, Wr (2796)vprop(D/R vir)-2, with projected location relative to the galaxy virial radius and that the Mg II absorption covering fraction is effectively invariant with galaxy virial mass, M h, over the range 10.7 <= log M h/M ⊙ <= 13.9. In this work, we explore multivariate relationships between Wr (2796), virial mass, impact parameter, virial radius, and the theoretical cooling radius that further elucidate self-similarity in the cool/warm (T = 104-104.5 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) with virial mass. We show that virial mass determines the extent and strength of the Mg II absorbing gas such that the mean Wr (2796) increases with virial mass at fixed distance while decreasing with galactocentric distance for fixed virial mass. The majority of the absorbing gas resides within D ~= 0.3 R vir, independent of both virial mass and minimum absorption threshold; inside this region, and perhaps also in the region 0.3 < D/R vir <= 1, the mean Wr (2796) is independent of virial mass. Contrary to absorber-galaxy cross-correlation studies, we show there is no anti-correlation between Wr (2796) and virial mass. We discuss how simulations and theory constrained by observations support self-similarity of the cool/warm CGM via the physics governing star formation, gas-phase metal enrichment, recycling efficiency of galactic scale winds, filament and merger accretion, and overdensity of local environment as a function of virial mass.

  16. Four-Component Damped Density Functional Response Theory Study of UV/Vis Absorption Spectra and Phosphorescence Parameters of Group 12 Metal-Substituted Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Saue, Trond; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    The influences of group 12 (Zn, Cd, Hg) metal-substitution on the valence spectra and phosphorescence parameters of porphyrins (P) have been investigated in a relativistic setting. In order to obtain valence spectra, this study reports the first application of the damped linear response function, or complex polarization propagator, in the four-component density functional theory framework [as formulated in Villaume et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2010 , 133 , 064105 ]. It is shown that the steep increase in the density of states as due to the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling yields only minor changes in overall computational costs involved with the solution of the set of linear response equations. Comparing single-frequency to multifrequency spectral calculations, it is noted that the number of iterations in the iterative linear equation solver per frequency grid-point decreases monotonously from 30 to 0.74 as the number of frequency points goes from one to 19. The main heavy-atom effect on the UV/vis-absorption spectra is indirect and attributed to the change of point group symmetry due to metal-substitution, and it is noted that substitutions using heavier atoms yield small red-shifts of the intense Soret-band. Concerning phosphorescence parameters, the adoption of a four-component relativistic setting enables the calculation of such properties at a linear order of response theory, and any higher-order response functions do not need to be considered-a real, conventional, form of linear response theory has been used for the calculation of these parameters. For the substituted porphyrins, electronic coupling between the lowest triplet states is strong and results in theoretical estimates of lifetimes that are sensitive to the wave function and electron density parametrization. With this in mind, we report our best estimates of the phosphorescence lifetimes to be 460, 13.8, 11.2, and 0.00155 s for H2P, ZnP, CdP, and HgP, respectively, with the corresponding transition

  17. Using historical woodland creation to construct a long-term, large-scale natural experiment: the WrEN project.

    PubMed

    Watts, Kevin; Fuentes-Montemayor, Elisa; Macgregor, Nicholas A; Peredo-Alvarez, Victor; Ferryman, Mark; Bellamy, Chloe; Brown, Nigel; Park, Kirsty J

    2016-05-01

    Natural experiments have been proposed as a way of complementing manipulative experiments to improve ecological understanding and guide management. There is a pressing need for evidence from such studies to inform a shift to landscape-scale conservation, including the design of ecological networks. Although this shift has been widely embraced by conservation communities worldwide, the empirical evidence is limited and equivocal, and may be limiting effective conservation. We present principles for well-designed natural experiments to inform landscape-scale conservation and outline how they are being applied in the WrEN project, which is studying the effects of 160 years of woodland creation on biodiversity in UK landscapes. We describe the study areas and outline the systematic process used to select suitable historical woodland creation sites based on key site- and landscape-scale variables - including size, age, and proximity to other woodland. We present the results of an analysis to explore variation in these variables across sites to test their suitability as a basis for a natural experiment. Our results confirm that this landscape satisfies the principles we have identified and provides an ideal study system for a long-term, large-scale natural experiment to explore how woodland biodiversity is affected by different site and landscape attributes. The WrEN sites are now being surveyed for a wide selection of species that are likely to respond differently to site- and landscape-scale attributes and at different spatial and temporal scales. The results from WrEN will help develop detailed recommendations to guide landscape-scale conservation, including the design of ecological networks. We also believe that the approach presented demonstrates the wider utility of well-designed natural experiments to improve our understanding of ecological systems and inform policy and practice. PMID:27217949

  18. The hypolipidemic activity of Ayurvedic medicine, Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemic rats: A comparison with fenofibrate

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gajendra; Srivastava, Amita; Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hyperlipidemia is a major risk factor of coronary heart disease. Currently available hypolipidemic drugs have been associated with number of side effects. Arogyavardhini vati, an Ayurvedic polyherbal formulation has been used for liver disorders. Therefore, present study was designed to evaluate the effect of Arogyavardhini vati in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Objectives: Anti-hyperlipidemic activity evaluation of Arogyavardhini vati against Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidemia in rats. Materials and Methods: Overnight fasted male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomly divided into normal control group [4% Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO), i.p.], positive control group (Triton WR-1339 in 4% DMSO, 400 mg/kg, i.p.), standard drug treated (fenofibrate 65 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia) and Arogyavardhini vati treated (50, 100, 200 mg/kg, p.o. for 7 days after inducing hyperlipidemia). Rat doses were calculated by extrapolating the equivalent human dose (therapeutic dose, sub-maximum, and maximum dose). Serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein HDL, liver malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) levels were estimated at end of experiments. Results: Arogyavardhini vati significantly decreased serum cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and significantly increased serum HDL in a dose-dependent manner. Decreased MDA and increased GSH levels in liver were observed at all doses of Arogyavardhini vati (50, 100, 200 mg/kg) and fenofibrate-treated groups when compared with Triton-treated group. Atherogenic Index (AI) level was significantly decreased in fenofibrate and Arogyavardhini vati (200 mg/kg) treated rats when compared with normal control. Conclusion: Arogyavardhini vati, a traditionally used Ayurvedic medicine may be a useful therapy for hypercholesterolemia through reducing oxidative stress (decreasing MDA and increasing GSH) and lipid levels

  19. Narrow absorption lines with two observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Cao, Yue

    2015-07-01

    We assemble 3524 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with repeated observations to search for variations of the narrow C IV λ λ 1548,1551 and Mg II λ λ 2796,2803 absorption doublets in spectral regions shortward of 7000 Å in the observed frame, which corresponds to time-scales of about 150-2643 d in the quasar rest frame. In these quasar spectra, we detect 3580 C IV absorption systems with zabs = 1.5188-3.5212 and 1809 Mg II absorption systems with zabs = 0.3948-1.7167. In term of the absorber velocity (β) distribution in the quasar rest frame, we find a substantial number of C IV absorbers with β < 0.06, which might be connected to absorption of quasar outflows. The outflow absorption peaks at υ ≈ 2000 km s^{-1} and drops rapidly below this peak value. Among 3580 C IV absorption systems, 52 systems (˜1.5 per cent) show obvious variations in equivalent widths in the absorber rest frame (Wr): 16 enhanced, 16 emerged, 12 weakened and 8 disappeared systems, respectively. We find that changes in Wrλ1548 are related neither to the time-scales of the two SDSS observations nor to absorber velocities in the quasar rest frame. Variable absorption in low-ionization species is important to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbing gas. There are two variable Mg II absorption systems measured from SDSS spectra detected by Hacker et al. However, in our Mg II absorption sample, we find that neither shows variable absorption with confident levels of >4σ for λ2796 lines and >3σ for λ2803 lines.

  20. Modification of the nonlinear optical absorption and optical Kerr response exhibited by nc-Si embedded in a silicon-nitride film.

    PubMed

    López-Suárez, A; Torres-Torres, C; Rangel-Rojo, R; Reyes-Esqueda, J A; Santana, G; Alonso, J C; Ortiz, A; Oliver, A

    2009-06-01

    We studied the absorptive and refractive nonlinearities at 532 nm and 26 ps pulses for silicon-nitride films containing silicon nanoclusters (nc-Si) prepared by remote plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RPECVD). Using a self-diffraction technique, we measured for the as-grown sample beta=7.7x10(-9)m/W, n(2)=1.8x10(-16)m(2)/W, and /chi(3)1111/ = 4.6x10(-10)esu; meanwhile, when the sample was exposed to an annealing process at 1000 degrees C during one hour in a nitrogen atmosphere, we obtained beta=-5x10(-10)m/W, n2=9x10(-17)m(2)/W, and /chi(3)1111/=1.1x10(-10)esu. A pure electronic nonlinear refraction was identified and a large threshold ablation of 41 J/cm(-2) was found for our films. By fitting nonlinear optical transmittance measurements, we were able to estimate that the annealed sample exhibits a response time close to 1 fs. We report an enhancement in the photoluminescence (PL) signal after the annealing process, as well as a red-shift due to an increment in size of the nc-Si during the thermal process. PMID:19506657

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Avian Tembusu-Related Virus Strain WR Isolated from White Kaiya Ducks in Fujian, China

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Chunhe; Fu, Guanghua; Shi, Shaohua; Cheng, Longfei; Chen, Hongmei

    2012-01-01

    Avian tembusu-related virus, which was first identified in China, is an emerging virus causing serious economic loss to the Chinese poultry industry. We report here the complete genome sequences of avian tembusu-related virus strain WR, isolated from a White Kaiya duck with disease characterized by an abrupt decrease in egg laying with ovarian hemorrhage, which will help in further understanding the molecular and evolutionary characteristics and pathogenesis of avian tembusu-related virus, the new flavivirus affecting ducks in Southern China. PMID:22966199

  2. Transcriptional analysis of porcine intestinal mucosa infected with Salmonella Typhimurium revealed a massive inflammatory response and disruption of bile acid absorption in ileum.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juber Herrera; Collado-Romero, Melania; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Arce, Cristina; Bautista, Rocío; Carvajal, Ana; Cirera, Susanna; Claros, M Gonzalo; Garrido, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Infected pork meat is an important source of non-typhoidal human salmonellosis. Understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is important for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies. Thus, hereby we study the transcriptional profiles along the porcine intestine during infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as post-transcriptional gene modulation by microRNAs (miRNA). Sixteen piglets were orally challenged with S. Typhimurium. Samples from jejunum, ileum and colon, collected 1, 2 and 6 days post infection (dpi) were hybridized to mRNA and miRNA expression microarrays and analyzed. Jejunum showed a reduced transcriptional response indicating mild inflammation only at 2 dpi. In ileum inflammatory genes were overexpressed (e.g., IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL1RAP, TNFα), indicating a strong immune response at all times of infection. Infection also down-regulated genes of the FXR pathway (e.g., NR1H4, FABP6, APOA1, SLC10A2), indicating disruption of the bile acid absorption in ileum. This result was confirmed by decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum of infected pigs. Ileal inflammatory gene expression changes peaked at 2 dpi and tended to resolve at 6 dpi. Furthermore, miRNA analysis of ileum at 2 dpi revealed 62 miRNAs potentially regulating target genes involved in this inflammatory process (e.g., miR-374 and miR-451). In colon, genes involved in epithelial adherence, proliferation and cellular reorganization were down-regulated at 2 and 6 dpi. In summary, here we show the transcriptional changes occurring at the intestine at different time points of the infection, which are mainly related to inflammation and disruption of the bile acid metabolism. PMID:26738723

  3. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN∶TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN∶TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0–9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%–5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  4. Novel Genetic Loci Control Calcium Absorption and Femur Bone Mass as Well as Their Response to Low Calcium Intake in Male BXD Recombinant Inbred Mice.

    PubMed

    Reyes Fernandez, Perla C; Replogle, Rebecca A; Wang, Libo; Zhang, Min; Fleet, James C

    2016-05-01

    Low dietary calcium (Ca) intake during growth limits peak bone mass but physiological adaptation can prevent this adverse effect. To assess the genetic control on the physiologic response to dietary Ca restriction (RCR), we conducted a study in 51 BXD lines fed either 0.5% (basal) or 0.25% (low) Ca diets from ages 4 to 12 weeks (n = 8/line/diet). Ca absorption (CaAbs), femur bone mineral density (BMD), and bone mineral content (BMC) were examined. ANCOVA with body size as covariate was used to detect significant line and diet main effects, and line-by-diet interactions. Body size-corrected residuals were used for linkage mapping and to estimate heritability (h(2) ). Loci controlling the phenotypes were identified using composite interval mapping on each diet and for the RCR. h(2) of basal phenotypes (0.37-0.43) and their RCR (0.32-0.38) was moderate. For each phenotype, we identified multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL) on each diet and for the RCR. Several loci affected multiple traits: Chr 1 (88.3-90.6 cM, CaAbs, BMC), Chr 4 (45.8-49.2 cM, CaAbs, BMD, BMC), Chr 8 (28.6-31.6 cM, CaAbs, BMD, RCR), and Chr 15 (13.6-24 cM, BMD, BMC; 32.3-36 cM, CaAbs RCR, BMD). This suggests that gene clusters may regulate interdependent bone-related phenotypes. Using in silico expression QTL (eQTL) mapping and bioinformatic tools, we identified novel candidates for the regulation of bone under Ca stress (Ext1, Deptor), and for the first time, we report genes modulating Ca absorption (Inadl, Sc4mol, Sh3rf1, and Dennd3), and both Ca and bone metabolism (Tceanc2, Tll1, and Aadat). Our data reveal gene-by-diet interactions and the existence of novel relationships between bone and Ca metabolism during growth. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26636428

  5. ADAPTATION IN ZINC ABSORPTION FROM WHOLE DIETS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited evidence suggests that humans increase zinc (Zn) absorption in response to low Zn intake. Aim: To assess human Zn absorption from whole diets varying in Zn content, and short-term adaptation to meet apparent Zn requirements. Method: Using 65Zn and whole body counting, Zn absorption by 83 hea...

  6. [Protective effects of WR2721 on early bone marrow hematopoietic function in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy of (60)Co γ-rays].

    PubMed

    Deng, Zi-Liang; Zhang, Liu-Zhen; Cong, Yue; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Yu, Zu-Ying; Shan, Ya-Jun; Cui, Yu; Wang, Li-Mei; Xing, Shuang; Cong, Yu-Wen; Luo, Qing-Liang

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of WR2721(amifostine) against bone marrow hematopoietic damage of mice exposed to 6.5 Gy of (60)Co-γ ray. A total of 60 C57/BL6J mice was divided into 3 groups:normal group (mice were injected with physiological salt solution), irradiation group (mice were injected with physiologic salt solution before irradiation) and WR2721 group (mice were injected with WR2721 before irradiation). The WBC, neutrophil (Neut), Plt and RBC levels in peripheral blood of 3 group mice were counted within 60 days after irradiation; the bone marrow nuclear cells (BMNC) were counted at 2 and 24 hours after irradiation; the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (LK/LSK) level and colony formation capability were detected by flow cytometry at 2 and 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that the counts of WBC and neut at 4 and 18 days, Plt at 7-18 days and RBC at 10-30 day after irradiation in WR2721 group were higher than those in irradiation group (P < 0.05); the BMNC, LSK and LK levels obviously increased at 24 hours after irradiation (P < 0.05), the CFU-GEMM, CFU-GM, CFU-MK BFU-E and CFU-E all significantly increased at 2 and 24 hours after irradiation (P < 0.01), as compared with irradiation group. It is concluded that WR2721 can effectively alleviate early hematopoietic damage and promote the fast recovery of peripheral blood cells in mice exposed to γ-ray, suggesting that the WR2721 has significant radioprotective effect on hematopoietic system. PMID:24989296

  7. Using the orbiting companion to trace WR wind structures in the 29d WC8d + O8-9IV binary CV Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Uraz, Alexandre; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2011-07-01

    We have used continuous, high-precision, broadband visible photometry from the MOST satellite to trace wind structures in the WR component of CV Ser over more than a full orbit. Most of the small-scale light-curve variations are likely due to extinction by clumps along the line of sight to the O companion as it orbits and shines through varying columns of the WR wind. Parallel optical spectroscopy from the Mont Megantic Observatory is used to refine the orbital and wind-collision parameters, as well as to reveal line emission from clumps.

  8. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  9. Relación física entre el cúmulo abierto Hogg 15 y la estrella Wolf-Rayet WR 47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Bica, E.; Santos, J. F. C., Jr.; Clariá, J. J.

    We revise the fundamental parameters of the faint open cluster Hogg 15, for which two recent colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) studies have obtained significantly different ages (Sagar et al. 2001, MNRAS, 327, 23; Piatti & Clariá 2001, A&A, 370, 931). In the present study, we combine a series of methods trying to constrain age, together with other fundamental parameters. We employ spatial extractions to construct the CMDs, and the cluster integrated spectrum to compare the latter with those of templates of known age. For Hogg 15 we derive an age of (20 ± 10) Myr, a reddening of (1.10 ± 0.05) mag, and a distance of (3.1 ± 0.5) kpc. We conclude that the estimation of an older age in the study of Piatti & Clariá can be accounted for in terms of main sequence/turnoff curvature being blurred in the CMDs, an effect mainly caused by field contamination. To clarify the issue of whether the Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WR 47), known to be a WN6 + O5V binary system, is associated or not with Hogg 15, we discuss its fundamental parameters, particularly its distance. Based on the WR 47 spectrum and available photometry, we assume that the underestimated distance implied by the Hipparcos parallax (216 pc) is affected by its binary character. By comparing the WR 47 spectrum with those of WR stars of a similar type, we conclude that WR 47 is not affected by a E(B-V) colour excess much higher than that associated with Hogg 15, namely E(B-V) = 1.10. On the basis of the WR 47's resulting distance of (5.2 ± 0.9) kpc, which largely surpasses that of the cluster, we conclude that WR 47 is not related to Hogg 15 from the point of view of origin, since the cluster and the star do not belong to the same formation event.

  10. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines.

  11. Factors responsible for the patchy distribution of natural soil water repellency in Mediterranean semiarid forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, E.; Jiménez-Pinilla, P.; Mataix-Solera, J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; García-Orenes, F.; Torres, M. P.; Arcenegui, V.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is commonly observed in forest areas showing wettable and water repellent patches with high spatial variability. This has important hydrological implications; in semiarid areas where water supply is limited, even slight WR may play an important role in infiltration patterns and distribution of water into the soil (Mataix-Solera et al., 2007). It has been proposed that the origin of WR is the release of organic compounds from different plants species and sources (due to waxes and other organic substances in their tissues; Doerr et al., 1998). However, the relationship between WR and plants may not always be a direct one: a group of fungi (mainly mycorrhizal fungi) and microorganisms could be also responsible for WR. The aim of this research is to study the relationships between WR in soils under different plant cover with selected soil properties and the quantity of fungi and their exudates. The study area is located in Southeast Spain, "Sierra de la Taja" near Pinoso (Alicante)), with a semiarid Mediterranean climate (Pm=260mm). Samples were taken in September 2011, when WR is normally strongest after summer drought. Soil samples were collected from the first 2.5cm of the mineral A horizon at microsites beneath each of the four most representative species (Pinus halepensis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Quercus. rotundifolia and Cistus albidus; n=15 per specie) and 5 samples from bare soil with no influence of any species. Different soil parameters were analyzed; water content, soil organic mater content (SOM), pH, WR, easily extractable glomalin (EEG), total mycelium and extractable lipids. The occurrence of WR was higher under P. halepensis (87% of samples) and Q. rotundifolia (60% of samples). Positive significant correlations were found between WR and SOM content for all species, with the best correlations for Pinus and Quercus (r=0.855**, r= 0.934** respectively). In addition, negative significant correlations were found between WR and p

  12. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Schwartz, J.L. |; Shigematsu, N.

    1993-06-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested.

  13. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  14. Herschel observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vamvatira-Nakou, C.; Hutsemékers, D.; Royer, P.; Waelkens, C.; Groenewegen, M. A. T.; Barlow, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    Infrared Herschel imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula M1-67 around the Wolf-Rayet star WR 124 have been obtained along with optical imaging observations. The infrared images reveal a clumpy dusty nebula that extends up to 1 pc. The comparison with the optical images shows that the ionized gas nebula coincides with the dust nebula, the dust and the gas being mixed together. A photodissociation region is revealed from the infrared spectroscopic analysis. The analysis of the infrared spectrum of the nebula, where forbidden emission lines of ionized elements were detected, showed that the nebula consists of mildly processed material with the calculated abundance number ratios being N/O = 1.0 ± 0.5 and C/O = 0.46 ± 0.27. Based on a radiative transfer model, the dust mass of the nebula was estimated to be 0.22 M⊙ with a population of large grains being necessary to reproduce the observations. The comparison of the mass-loss rate and the abundance ratios to theoretical models of stellar evolution led to the conclusion that the nebular ejection took place during a RSG/YSG evolutionary phase of a central star with an initial mass of 32 M⊙. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Based in part on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile.

  15. Marker rescue of temperature-sensitive mutations of vaccinia virus WR: correlation of genetic and physical maps.

    PubMed Central

    Ensinger, M J; Rovinsky, M

    1983-01-01

    The physical map locations of 62 temperature-sensitive mutations of vaccinia virus WR have been determined by marker rescue experiments, using cloned HindIII fragments of wild-type DNA. Since vaccinia virus DNA is not infectious, marker rescue was performed by infecting monolayers of cells at the nonpermissive temperature with a low multiplicity of the mutant to be rescued and transfecting with calcium phosphate-precipitated recombinant DNA. Wild-type recombinants were measured by using either a direct plaque assay technique or a two-step procedure in which the final yield of virus from the transfected cells was assayed at the permissive and nonpermissive temperatures. Mutants that had been previously assigned to the same complementation-recombination group were rescued by the same HindIII fragment, with the exception of three mutants in one group that were rescued by either one of two adjacent fragments. A comparison between the genetic linkage map of the temperature-sensitive mutations in 30 mutants with their physical locations demonstrated that not only was the order of the genetic map correct but also recombination frequencies generally reflected actual physical distances. PMID:6312100

  16. Purification and characterization of the extracellular laccase produced by Trametes polyzona WR710-1 under solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chairin, Thanunchanok; Nitheranont, Thitinard; Watanabe, Akira; Asada, Yasuhiko; Khanongnuch, Chartchai; Lumyong, Saisamorn

    2014-01-01

    Laccase from Trametes polyzona WR710-1 was produced under solid-state fermentation using the peel from the Tangerine orange (Citrus reticulata Blanco) as substrate, and purified to homogeneity. This laccase was found to be a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of about 71 kDa estimated by SDS-PAGE. The optimum pH was 2.0 for ABTS, 4.0 for L-DOPA, guaiacol, and catechol, and 5.0 for 2,6-DMP. The K(m) value of the enzyme for the substrate ABTS was 0.15 mM, its corresponding V(max) value was 1.84 mM min(-1), and the k(cat)/K(m) value was about 3960 s(-1)  mM(-1). The enzyme activity was stable between pH 6.0 and 8.0, at temperatures of up to 40 °C. The laccase was inhibited by more than 50% in the presence of 20 mM NaCl, by 95% at 5 mM of Fe(2+), and it was completely inhibited by 0.1 mM NaN(3). The N-terminal amino acid sequence of this laccase is AVTPVADLQISNAGISPDTF, which is highly similar to those of laccases from other white-rot basidiomycetes. PMID:23775771

  17. Species differences in the handling of lysosomotropic metals and Triton WR 1339 by rat and Chinese hamster liver.

    PubMed

    Seidel, A; Heumann, H G; Sütterlin, U; Wiener, M; Haffner, H

    1985-05-01

    The study was undertaken in order to understand the reasons for the distinct differences in the elimination rate of lanthanides and transuranium elements from the liver of different mammalian species. The binding of monomeric 239Pu in livers of rats and Chinese hamsters was analyzed by density gradient centrifugation and electrophoresis. It was concluded that this nuclide is initially bound to lysosomes in liver of rats and Chinese hamsters. The influence of Triton WR 1339 (TWR) on the density of lysosomal marker enzymes from rat and Chinese hamster liver at day 4 was very similar for both animal species but the TWR induced shift persisted in Chinese hamsters up to day 60 whereas in rat liver the lysosomal density increased again with time. Electron microscopic inspection confirmed the similarity of the initial reaction of hepatocyte lysosomes. However, after 60 to 70 days typical TWR induced "tritosomes" were absent from rat hepatocytes but could be found regularly in hepatocytes from Chinese hamsters. The elimination rate of 3H-activity from liver injection of 3H-TWR was lower in Chinese hamsters than in rats. It was concluded that the differences in elimination rate of lanthanides and transuranium elements from liver of various mammalian species and the differences observed after TWR injection might reflect differences in the composition or function of the lysosomal system in the livers of different mammalian species. With respect to the transport of certain heavy metals the rat liver is not a reliable model for human liver. PMID:4029172

  18. Search for Heavy Neutrinos and WR Bosons with Right-Handed Couplings in a Left-Right Symmetric Model in pp Collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Sprenger, D.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Caudron, J.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Olschewski, M.; Papacz, P.; Pieta, H.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Steggemann, J.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Bontenackels, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Castro, E.; Costanza, F.; Dammann, D.; Diez Pardos, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Flucke, G.; Geiser, A.; Glushkov, I.; Gunnellini, P.; Habib, S.; Hauk, J.; Hellwig, G.; Jung, H.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, H.; Knutsson, A.; Krämer, M.; Krücker, D.; Kuznetsova, E.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Marienfeld, M.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Novgorodova, O.; Olzem, J.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Riedl, C.; Ron, E.; Rosin, M.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Sen, N.; Spiridonov, A.; Stein, M.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Enderle, H.; Erfle, J.; Gebbert, U.; Görner, M.; Gosselink, M.; Haller, J.; Hermanns, T.; Höing, R. S.; Kaschube, K.; Kaussen, G.; Kirschenmann, H.; Klanner, R.; Lange, J.; Nowak, F.; Peiffer, T.; Pietsch, N.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schröder, M.; Schum, T.; Seidel, M.; Sibille, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Thomsen, J.; Vanelderen, L.; Barth, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Chwalek, T.; De Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Feindt, M.; Guthoff, M.; Hackstein, C.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, T.; Heinrich, M.; Held, H.; Hoffmann, K. H.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Martschei, D.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th.; Niegel, M.; Nürnberg, A.; Oberst, O.; Oehler, A.; Ott, J.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Ratnikov, F.; Ratnikova, N.; Röcker, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schott, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Troendle, D.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weiler, T.; Zeise, M.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Kesisoglou, S.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Manolakos, I.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mavrommatis, C.; Ntomari, E.; Gouskos, L.; Mertzimekis, T. J.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Evangelou, I.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Patras, V.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Molnar, J.; Palinkas, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Karancsi, J.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Dhingra, N.; Gupta, R.; Kaur, M.; Mehta, M. Z.; Nishu, N.; Saini, L. K.; Sharma, A.; Singh, J. B.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S.; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, V.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Gomber, B.; Jain, Sa.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Dutta, D.; Kailas, S.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Aziz, T.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sudhakar, K.; Wickramage, N.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.; Arfaei, H.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Hashemi, M.; Hesari, H.; Jafari, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Calabria, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marangelli, B.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pacifico, N.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Singh, G.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Meneghelli, M.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Perrotta, A.; Primavera, F.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Gallo, E.; Gonzi, S.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.; Tosi, S.; Benaglia, A.; De Guio, F.; Di Matteo, L.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Martelli, A.; Massironi, A.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Sala, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Cavallo, N.; De Cosa, A.; Dogangun, O.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellan, P.; Bisello, D.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Nespolo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Vanini, S.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Gabusi, M.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vitulo, P.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Nappi, A.; Romeo, F.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Taroni, S.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Kraan, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Fanelli, C.; Grassi, M.; Longo, E.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Sigamani, M.; Soffi, L.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Demaria, N.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Marone, M.; Montanino, D.; Penzo, A.; Schizzi, A.; Kim, T. Y.; Nam, S. K.; Chang, S.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kong, D. J.; Park, H.; Son, D. C.; Son, T.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Zero J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Moon, D. H.; Park, S. K.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C.; Park, I. C.; Park, S.; Ryu, G.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, M. S.; Kwon, E.; Lee, B.; Lee, J.; Lee, S.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Bilinskas, M. J.; Grigelionis, I.; Janulis, M.; Juodagalvis, A.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Villasenor-Cendejas, L. M.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Reyes-Santos, M. A.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Butler, P. H.; Doesburg, R.; Reucroft, S.; Silverwood, H.; Ahmad, M.; Asghar, M. I.; Butt, J.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Almeida, N.; Bargassa, P.; David, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Seixas, J.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Smirnov, V.; Volodko, A.; Zarubin, A.; Evstyukhin, S.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, An.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Erofeeva, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Kossov, M.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Shreyber, I.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Markina, A.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Petrushanko, S.; Popov, A.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Vinogradov, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Grishin, V.; Kachanov, V.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Djordjevic, M.; Ekmedzic, M.; Krpic, D.; Milosevic, J.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Arce, P.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Ferrando, A.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Merino, G.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Willmott, C.; Albajar, C.; Codispoti, G.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Brun, H.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Chuang, S. H.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Felcini, M.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Graziano, A.; Jorda, C.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benitez, J. F.; Bernet, C.; Bianchi, G.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Cerminara, G.; Christiansen, T.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; De Roeck, A.; Di Guida, S.; Dobson, M.; Dupont-Sagorin, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Frisch, B.; Funk, W.; Georgiou, G.; Giffels, M.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Giunta, M.; Glege, F.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Govoni, P.; Gowdy, S.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Hansen, M.; Harris, P.; Hartl, C.; Harvey, J.; Hegner, B.; Hinzmann, A.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kaadze, K.; Karavakis, E.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lee, Y.-J.; Lenzi, P.; Lourenço, C.; Magini, N.; Mäki, T.; Malberti, M.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moser, R.; Mozer, M. U.; Mulders, M.; Musella, P.; Nesvold, E.; Orimoto, T.; Orsini, L.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Perez, E.; Perrozzi, L.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Pimiä, M.; Piparo, D.; Polese, G.; Quertenmont, L.; Racz, A.; Reece, W.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Rolandi, G.; Rovelli, C.; Rovere, M.; Sakulin, H.; Santanastasio, F.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Segoni, I.; Sekmen, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Spiga, D.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wöhri, H. K.; Worm, S. D.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Gabathuler, K.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; König, S.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, F.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bäni, L.; Bortignon, P.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Deisher, A.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eugster, J.; Freudenreich, K.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Mohr, N.; Moortgat, F.; Nägeli, C.; Nef, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Ronga, F. J.; Rossini, M.; Sala, L.; Sanchez, A. K.; Starodumov, A.; Stieger, B.; Takahashi, M.; Tauscher, L.; Thea, A.; Theofilatos, K.; Treille, D.; Urscheler, C.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Wehrli, L.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; De Visscher, S.; Favaro, C.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Kilminster, B.; Millan Mejias, B.; Otiougova, P.; Robmann, P.; Snoek, H.; Tupputi, S.; Verzetti, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Singh, A. P.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Bartalini, P.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Kao, K. Y.; Lei, Y. J.; Lu, R.-S.; Majumder, D.; Petrakou, E.; Shi, X.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Wan, X.; Wang, M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Srimanobhas, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Cerci, S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Eskut, E.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Karaman, T.; Karapinar, G.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Polatoz, A.; Sogut, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, L. N.; Vergili, M.; Akin, I. V.; Aliev, T.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Deniz, M.; Gamsizkan, H.; Guler, A. M.; Ocalan, K.; Ozpineci, A.; Serin, M.; Sever, R.; Surat, U. E.; Yalvac, M.; Yildirim, E.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isildak, B.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Cankocak, K.; Levchuk, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Frazier, R.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Kreczko, L.; Metson, S.; Newbold, D. M.; Nirunpong, K.; Poll, A.; Senkin, S.; Smith, V. J.; Williams, T.; Basso, L.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Jackson, J.; Kennedy, B. W.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Tomalin, I. R.; Womersley, W. J.; Bainbridge, R.; Ball, G.; Beuselinck, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Cutajar, M.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Ferguson, W.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Gilbert, A.; Guneratne Bryer, A.; Hall, G.; Hatherell, Z.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Jarvis, M.; Karapostoli, G.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Marrouche, J.; Mathias, B.; Nandi, R.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Pioppi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Rogerson, S.; Rose, A.; Ryan, M. J.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sparrow, A.; Stoye, M.; Tapper, A.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Wardle, N.; Whyntie, T.; Chadwick, M.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Martin, W.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Scarborough, T.; Charaf, O.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Heister, A.; St. John, J.; Lawson, P.; Lazic, D.; Rohlf, J.; Sperka, D.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Jabeen, S.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Houtz, R.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Mall, O.; Miceli, T.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-tam, F.; Rutherford, B.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Yohay, R.; Andreev, V.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Duris, J.; Erhan, S.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Traczyk, P.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Babb, J.; Clare, R.; Dinardo, M. E.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Giordano, F.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Liu, H.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Nguyen, H.; Paramesvaran, S.; Sturdy, J.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Mangano, B.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Petrucciani, G.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yoo, J.; Barge, D.; Bellan, R.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Danielson, T.; Flowers, K.; Geffert, P.; Golf, F.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Kalavase, P.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Lowette, S.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mccoll, N.; Pavlunin, V.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Chen, Y.; Di Marco, E.; Duarte, J.; Gataullin, M.; Ma, Y.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Veverka, J.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Yang, Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carroll, R.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Jang, D. W.; Liu, Y. F.; Paulini, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Eggert, N.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Kreis, B.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Vaughan, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Chetluru, V.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Green, D.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kunori, S.; Kwan, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Park, M.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Hewamanage, S.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; O'Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Kenny, R. P., Iii; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Lusito, L.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Walker, M.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Friis, E.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-12-01

    Results are presented from a search for heavy, right-handed muon neutrinos, Nμ, and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model. The analysis is based on a 5.0fb-1 sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence is observed for an excess of events over the standard model expectation. For models with exact left-right symmetry, heavy right-handed neutrinos are excluded at 95% confidence level for a range of neutrino masses below the WR mass, dependent on the value of MWR. The excluded region in the two-dimensional (MWR, MNμ) mass plane extends to MWR=2.5TeV.

  19. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  20. Multiwavelength observations of NaSt1 (WR 122): equatorial mass loss and X-rays from an interacting Wolf-Rayet binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhan, Jon; Smith, Nathan; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Males, Jared R.; Rodigas, Timothy J.

    2015-07-01

    NaSt1 (aka Wolf-Rayet 122) is a peculiar emission-line star embedded in an extended nebula of [N II] emission with a compact dusty core. The object was previously characterized as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star cloaked in an opaque nebula of CNO-processed material, perhaps analogous to η Car and its Homunculus nebula, albeit with a hotter central source. To discern the morphology of the [N II] nebula we performed narrow-band imaging using the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide-field Camera 3. The images reveal that the nebula has a disc-like geometry tilted ≈12° from edge-on, composed of a bright central ellipsoid surrounded by a larger clumpy ring. Ground-based spectroscopy reveals radial velocity structure (±10 km s-1) near the outer portions of the nebula's major axis, which is likely to be the imprint of outflowing gas. Near-infrared adaptive-optics imaging with Magellan AO has resolved a compact ellipsoid of Ks-band emission aligned with the larger [N II] nebula, which we suspect is the result of scattered He I line emission (λ2.06 μm). Observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed an X-ray point source at the core of the nebula that is heavily absorbed at energies <1 keV and has properties consistent with WR stars and colliding-wind binaries. We suggest that NaSt1 is a WR binary embedded in an equatorial outflow that formed as the result of non-conservative mass transfer. NaSt1 thus appears to be a rare and important example of a stripped-envelope WR forming through binary interaction, caught in the brief Roche lobe overflow phase.

  1. Effect of diet on triolein absorption in weanling rats

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, C.A.; Brannon, P.M.; Wells, M.A.; Morrill, M.; Koldovsky, O. )

    1990-01-01

    To determine the effect of altered dietary fat intake on the rate of fat absorption in the intact animal, we fed male weanling rats either a high fat-low carbohydrate (HF-LC) (calories: 67% fat, 10% carbohydrate, 20% protein) or low fat-high carbohydrate (LF-HC) (calories: 10% fat, 67% carbohydrate, 20% protein) diet for 8 days. Absorption of ({sup 14}C)triolein was estimated by determining (1) {sup 14}CO{sub 2} expiration in breath, (2) intestinal triglyceride output using Triton WR-1339, an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, and (3) quantitating the disappearance of labeled triolein from the gastrointestinal tract. Changes in the activity of pancreatic lipase and amylase confirmed the adaptation to altered fat and carbohydrate intake. Animals fed the HF-LC diet exhibited approximately twofold greater triolein disappearance, oxidation, and intestinal triglyceride output compared with animals fed LF-HC. There was also a highly significant linear relationship between {sup 14}CO{sub 2} excretion and intestinal triglyceride output in both diet groups. These data show that high dietary fat content markedly enhances in vivo fat absorption in the weanling rat.

  2. The WR/LBV system HD 5980: wind-velocity - brightness correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenigsberger, Gloria; Georgiev, Leonid; Hillier, D. John; Morrell, Nidia; Barbá, Rodolfo; Gamen, Roberto

    2011-07-01

    The massive eclipsing system HD 5980 in the Small Magellanic Cloud presented sudden ~1-3 mag eruptive events in 1993-1994, the nature of which is still unexplained. We recently showed that these brief eruptions occurred at the beginning of an extended high state of activity which is characterized by large emission-line intensities and that this high state is currently ending (Koenigsberger et al. 2010). Star A, the more massive member of the 19-day binary, is responsible for the spectacular spectral variations observed over the past 3 decades (see Figure 1). It has a He-enriched stellar wind and is over-luminous for its mass, implying an advanced evolutionary state (Koenigsberger et al. 1998). Data obtained over the past 3 decades show that Star A's wind speed slowed down as the system brightened. Also present in these data is a correlated increase in emission-line strength, visual and UV brigthness. The latter suggests that the high activity state in HD 5980 may be attributed to a bolometric luminosity increase, consistent with the results of Drissen et al. (2001). Hence, HD 5980 may be providing the important clues needed for understanding the behavior of other luminous blue variables and for understainding the evolutionary transition between massive O-type stars and Wolf-Rayet stars.

  3. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  4. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  5. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  6. Influence of muscle metabolic heterogeneity in determining the V̇o2p kinetic response to ramp-incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Keir, Daniel A; Benson, Alan P; Love, Lorenzo K; Robertson, Taylor C; Rossiter, Harry B; Kowalchuk, John M

    2016-03-01

    The pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) response to ramp-incremental (RI) exercise increases linearly with work rate (WR) after an early exponential phase, implying that a single time constant (τ) and gain (G) describe the response. However, variability in τ and G of V̇o2p kinetics to different step increments in WR is documented. We hypothesized that the "linear" V̇o2p-WR relationship during RI exercise results from the conflation between WR-dependent changes in τ and G. Nine men performed three or four repeats of RI exercise (30 W/min) and two step-incremental protocols consisting of four 60-W increments beginning from 20 W or 50 W. During testing, breath-by-breath V̇o2p was measured by mass spectrometry and volume turbine. For each individual, the V̇o2p RI response was characterized with exponential functions containing either constant or variable τ and G values. A relationship between τ and G vs. WR was determined from the step-incremental protocols to derive the variable model parameters. τ and G increased from 21 ± 5 to 98 ± 20 s and from 8.7 ± 0.6 to 12.0 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·W(-1) for WRs of 20-230 W, respectively, and were best described by a second-order (τ) and a first-order (G) polynomial function of WR (lowest Akaike information criterion score). The sum of squared residuals was not different (P > 0.05) when the V̇o2p RI response was characterized with either the constant or variable models, indicating that they described the response equally well. Results suggest that τ and G increase progressively with WR during RI exercise. Importantly, these relationships may conflate to produce a linear V̇o2p-WR response, emphasizing the influence of metabolic heterogeneity in determining the apparent V̇o2p-WR relationship during RI exercise. PMID:26679614

  7. P-glycoprotein is responsible for the poor intestinal absorption and low toxicity of oral aconitine: In vitro, in situ, in vivo and in silico studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Cuiping Zhang, Tianhong Li, Zheng Xu, Liang Liu, Fei Ruan, Jinxiu Liu, Keliang Zhang, Zhenqing

    2013-12-15

    Aconitine (AC) is a highly toxic alkaloid from bioactive plants of the genus Aconitum, some of which have been widely used as medicinal herbs for thousands of years. In this study, we systematically evaluated the potential role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the mechanisms underlying the low and variable bioavailability of oral AC. First, the bidirectional transport of AC across Caco-2 and MDCKII-MDR1 cells was investigated. The efflux of AC across monolayers of these two cell lines was greater than its influx. Additionally, the P-gp inhibitors, verapamil and cyclosporin A, significantly decreased the efflux of AC. An in situ intestinal perfusion study in rats showed that verapamil co-perfusion caused a significant increase in the intestinal permeability of AC, from 0.22 × 10{sup −5} to 2.85 × 10{sup −5} cm/s. Then, the pharmacokinetic profile of orally administered AC with or without pre-treatment with verapamil was determined in rats. With pre-treatment of verapamil, the maximum plasma concentration (C{sub max}) of AC increased sharply, from 39.43 to 1490.7 ng/ml. Accordingly, a 6.7-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC{sub 0–12} {sub h}) of AC was observed when co-administered with verapamil. In silico docking analyses suggested that AC and verapamil possess similar P-gp recognition mechanisms. This work demonstrated that P-gp is involved in limiting the intestinal absorption of AC and attenuating its toxicity to humans. Our data indicate that potential P-gp-mediated drug–drug interactions should be considered carefully in the clinical application of aconite and formulations containing AC. - Highlights: • Verapamil and cyclosporin A decreased the efflux of aconitine across Caco-2 cells. • Both inhibitors decreased the efflux of aconitine across MDCKII-MDR1 cells. • Co-perfusion with verapamil increased the intestinal permeability of aconitine. • Co-administration with verapamil sharply increased the C{sub max

  8. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  9. Radioprotective effects of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide combined with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on radiation-injured mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shuqi; Shen, Xianrong; Liu, Yuming; He, Ying; Jiang, Dingwen; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the radioprotective effect of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide (SNP) in combination with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on irradiated mice. A total of 70 Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice were divided into seven groups: the control group, the model group and five administration groups. All groups, except the control group, were exposed to a 5 Gy (60)Co γ-ray beam. Blood parameters [including white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet counts and hemoglobin level] were assessed three days before irradiation, and the on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after irradiation. Spleen, thymus and testicular indices, DNA contents of bone marrow cells, bone marrow nucleated cells, sperm counts, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), testosterone and estradiol levels in the serum were assessed on the 14th day after irradiation. The combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF exerted synergistic recovery effects on peripheral blood WBC, RBC and platelet counts and hemoglobin levels in irradiated mice, and synergistic promotion effects on spleen, thymus, testicle, bone marrow nucleated cells and sperm counts in irradiated mice. The synergistic administration increased the serum SOD activities and serum testosterone content of irradiated mice, but synergy decreased the content of serum MDA and estradiol in irradiated mice. These results suggest that the combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF should increase the efficacy of these drugs for acute radiation sickness, protect immunity, hematopoiesis and the reproductive organs of irradiated-damaged mice, and improve oxidation resistance in the body. PMID:25852150

  10. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  11. Radioprotective effects of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide combined with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on radiation-injured mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shuqi; Shen, Xianrong; Liu, Yuming; He, Ying; Jiang, Dingwen; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the radioprotective effect of Sipunculus nudus L. polysaccharide (SNP) in combination with WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF on irradiated mice. A total of 70 Imprinting Control Region (ICR) mice were divided into seven groups: the control group, the model group and five administration groups. All groups, except the control group, were exposed to a 5 Gy 60Co γ-ray beam. Blood parameters [including white blood cell (WBC), red blood cell (RBC) and platelet counts and hemoglobin level] were assessed three days before irradiation, and the on the 3rd, 7th and 14th days after irradiation. Spleen, thymus and testicular indices, DNA contents of bone marrow cells, bone marrow nucleated cells, sperm counts, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), testosterone and estradiol levels in the serum were assessed on the 14th day after irradiation. The combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF exerted synergistic recovery effects on peripheral blood WBC, RBC and platelet counts and hemoglobin levels in irradiated mice, and synergistic promotion effects on spleen, thymus, testicle, bone marrow nucleated cells and sperm counts in irradiated mice. The synergistic administration increased the serum SOD activities and serum testosterone content of irradiated mice, but synergy decreased the content of serum MDA and estradiol in irradiated mice. These results suggest that the combined administration of SNP, WR-2721, rhIL-11 and rhG-CSF should increase the efficacy of these drugs for acute radiation sickness, protect immunity, hematopoiesis and the reproductive organs of irradiated-damaged mice, and improve oxidation resistance in the body. PMID:25852150

  12. Tracing WR wind structures by using the orbiting companion in the 29d WC8d + O8-9IV binary CV Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Uraz, Alexandre; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Chené, André Nicolas; Lange, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained continuous, high-precision, broadband visible photometry from the MOST satellite of CV Ser over more than a full orbit in order to link the small-scale light-curve variations to extinction due to wind structures in the WR component, thus permitting us to trace these structures. The light-curve presented unexpected characteristics, in particular eclipses with a varying depth. Parallel optical spectroscopy from the Mont Megantic Observatory and Dominion Astrophysical Observatory was obtained to refine the orbital and wind-collision parameters, as well as to reveal line emission from clumps.

  13. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  14. Optical absorption in trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Niu, Qian

    2013-03-01

    We use a low energy effective model to analyze the optical responses of trilayer graphene samples. We first show that optical absorption of the ABA-stacked trilayer has strong dependence on both the Fermi energy and optical frequency, which is in sharp contrast to that of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. Secondly, we are able to determine the possible existence of trigonal warping effects in the bandstructure of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene by a divergence in the absorption spectra at around 10 meV. In addition, we can partially distinguish the vairious broken symmetry states driven by electron-electron interactions in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. In particular, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is sensitive to the polarization of the incident light, giving a way to detect its possible existence.

  15. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  16. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  17. Absorption of Montelukast is Transporter Mediated: a Common Variant of OATP2B1 is Associated with Reduced Plasma Concentrations and Poor Response

    PubMed Central

    Mougey, Edward B.; Feng, Hua; Castro, Mario; Irvin, Charles G.; Lima, John J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives (i) determine if montelukast undergoes carrier mediated uptake; (ii) classify the carrier protein(s) responsible for uptake; (iii) identify specific transporters that mediate transport of montelukast; (iv) evaluate whether variation in the gene encoding the transport protein(s) influences the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of montelukast. Methods In vitro permeability studies of montelukast are conducted using Caco-2 cell culture, a standard model of human intestinal drug transport. In vivo plasma concentrations of montelukast in an asthmatic population are determined by HPLC, and genotyping of transport proteins is by LightTyper analysis. Results Permeability of montelukast has an activation energy of 13.7±0.7 kcal/mol, consistent with carrier mediated transport. Permeability is saturable at high concentrations of montelukast and follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Permeability is subject to competition by sulfobromophthalein, estrone 3-sulfate, pravastatin, taurocholic acid, and cholic acid (p<0.05, % of control; 72±7 – 86±7) and is inhibited by 5–10% citrus juice (p<0.05, maximal inhibition % of control; 31±2). An MDCKII cell line expressing OATP2B1 (coded for by the SLCO2B1 gene) displays significantly increased permeability of montelukast (p<0.05, % of control; 140±20). A nonsynonymous polymorphism in SLCO2B1, (rs12422149; SLCO2B1{NM_007256.2}:c.935G>A) associates with significantly reduced plasma concentration in subjects measured on the morning after an evening dose (p<0.025, square root mean transformed plasma concentration ± SE; c.[935G>A]+[935G]=3±1, c.[935G]+[935G]=7.0±0.9) and differential response as assessed by change in baseline Asthma Symptom Utility Index scores following one month of therapy (delta mean Asthma Symptom Utility Index; c.[935G>A]+[935G] = 0.02±0.01, p=1.0; c.[935G]+[935G] = 1.0±0.3, p<0.0001). Conclusions Together these observations suggest that the genetics of SLCO2B1 may be an important variable in

  18. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  19. Kinetic modeling of Fluorine vacancy/F center creation in LiF:Mg,Ti including vacancy-interstitial recombination: Evaluating the factors leading to the lack of supralinearity in the optical absorption F center concentration dose response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliyahu, I.; Horowitz, Y. S.; Oster, L.; Mardor, I.; Druzhyna, S.; Biderman, S.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic model simulations of charge carrier transport following irradiation of LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) including Fluorine vacancy/F center creation by the radiation and dose-dependent vacancy-interstitial recombination are presented which describe the experimentally measured linear/exponentially saturating optical absorption dose response of the electron trapping centers at 4.0 eV, 4.77 eV, 5.08 eV (F band) and 5.45 eV. Linear/exponentially saturating dose response is commonly observed for centers which are not created by the radiation. The creation of Fluorine vacancies by the radiation could therefore be expected to lead to a supralinear dose response of the F center before the onset of saturation. Nonetheless, the dose response is linear from 10 Gy to 500 Gy and can be fitted with a dose-filling constant β = 6.1 · 10-5 Gy-1 corresponding to a 5% and 25% decrease from linearity at 103 Gy and 5 · 103 Gy respectively. The model attempts to resolve a central question concerning the mechanisms leading to the linear/exponentially saturating dose response of the F band even though Fluorine vacancies are being continuously created during the irradiation. The electron-trapping characteristics of the created vacancies are assumed to differ somewhat from the vacancies originally present in un-irradiated samples due to differences in their immediate environment. Vacancy-interstitial recombination for separation distances less than a critical distance, dc is demonstrated to be significant for D > 500 Gy (dc = 36 Å) and is an important mechanism contributing to the F center saturation at high dose-levels. The kinetic model accurately simulates the experimentally observed F center dose response over the entire investigated dose range of 10-105 Gy under the following conditions: (i) The concentration of vacancies initially present is unexpectedly high at ∼1023 m-3, possibly due to the highly doped, non-crystalline and hot-pressed nature of the LiF:Mg,Ti samples. (ii) The

  20. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and Development of W&R Bi-2212 HighField Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon,S.O.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2006-12-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magnetic fields (H)of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field(Hc2) limitationof 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb3Sn magnets are beingdeveloped which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb3Sn dipole technologyis practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high fieldpinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to Hc2 limitations.Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, amaterial is required with a higher Hc2 and sufficient high field pinningcapacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which isavailable in roundwires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication ofcoils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to developthe required technology to construct accelerator magnets from'windand-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complicationsthat arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths toaddress these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212sub-scale magnets.

  1. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Determination of Amifostine and/or Its Metabolite (WR-1065) In Human Plasma Using OPA Derivatization and UV Detection.

    PubMed

    Samiei, Nasim; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen; Shafaati, Alireza; Zarghi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible HPLC method was developed and validated for the analysis of amifostine (AMF) and/or its metabolite, WR-1065 in human plasma. The method involves the alkylation of free sulfydryl group with iodoacetic acid followed by derivatization of the drug and its metabolite with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and UVdetection at 340 nm. The derivatized AMF and WR-1065 were eluted in less than 11 min, and in the case of the metabolite with no interferences from the endogenous plasma peaks. Cystein was used as the internal standard. Analysis was carried out on a Eurosphere Performance (RP-18e, 100 × 4.6 mm) analytical column. The mobile phase was a mixture of methanol and phosphate buffer 0.03 M pH = 2.7 at a ratio of 40: 60v/v, respectively, with a flow rate of 1.5 mLmin(-1). Limit of detection was 0.5 µgmL(-1). The method involved a simple extraction procedure for AMF and/or its metabolite and analytical recovery was 90 ± 0.9%.The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 1-200 µgmL(-1). The coefficients of variation for intra-day and inter-day assays were less than 10%. PMID:26664371

  2. Limits of NbTi and Nb3Sn, and Development of W&R Bi-2212 HighField Accelerator Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Godeke, A.; Cheng, D.; Dietderich, D.R.; Ferracin, P.; Prestemon,S.O.; Sa bbi, G.; Scanlan, R.M.

    2006-09-01

    NbTi accelerator dipoles are limited to magneticfields (H)of about 10 T, due to an intrinsic upper critical field (Hc2) limitationof 14 T. To surpass this restriction, prototype Nb3Sn magnets are beingdeveloped which have reached 16 T. We show that Nb3Sn dipole technologyis practically limited to 17 to 18 T due to insufficient high fieldpinning, and intrinsically to 20 to 22 T due to Hc2 limitations.Therefore, to obtain magnetic fields approaching 20 T and higher, amaterial is required with a higher Hc2 and sufficient high field pinningcapacity. A realistic candidate for this purpose is Bi-2212, which isavailable in roundwires and sufficient lengths for the fabrication ofcoils based on Rutherford-type cables. We initiated a program to developthe required technology to construct accelerator magnets from'windand-react' (W&R) Bi-2212 coils. We outline the complicationsthat arise through the use of Bi-2212, describe the development paths toaddress these issues, and conclude with the design of W&R Bi-2212sub-scale magnets.

  3. The effect of binary evolution on the theoretically predicted distribution of WR and O-type stars in starburst regions and in abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.; van Bever, J.; De Donder, E.

    1997-01-01

    We first discuss in detail the massive close binary evolutionary model and how it has to be used in a population number synthesis study. We account for the evolution of case A, case B and case C systems, the effect of stellar wind during core hydrogen burning, hydrogen shell burning, the red supergiant phase and the WR phase, the effect of common envelope evolution in binaries with large periods, the consequences of spiral-in in binaries with small mass ratio, the effect of an asymmetric supernova explosion on binary system parameters using recent studies of pulsar velocities, the evolution of binaries with a compact companion. The parameters entering the population model where close binaries are included, are constrained by comparing predictions and observations of the massive star content in regions of continuous star formation. We then critically investigate the influence of massive close binary evolution on the variation of the massive star content in starburst regions. We separately consider regions where, after a long period of continuous star formation, the star formation rate decreases sharply (we propose to call this an abruptly-terminated star formation region) and we show that also in these regions WR/O number ratios are reached which are significantly larger than in regions of continuous star formation. The most important conclusion of the study is that within our present knowledge of observations of massive stars, massive close binary evolution plays an ESSENTIAL role in the evolution of starbursts and abruptly-terminated star formation regions.

  4. Development and Validation of an HPLC Method for Determination of Amifostine and/or Its Metabolite (WR-1065) In Human Plasma Using OPA Derivatization and UV Detection

    PubMed Central

    Samiei, Nasim; Foroutan, Seyed Mohsen; Shafaati, Alireza; Zarghi, Afshin

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible HPLC method was developed and validated for the analysis of amifostine (AMF) and/or its metabolite, WR-1065 in human plasma. The method involves the alkylation of free sulfydryl group with iodoacetic acid followed by derivatization of the drug and its metabolite with o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) and UVdetection at 340 nm. The derivatized AMF and WR-1065 were eluted in less than 11 min, and in the case of the metabolite with no interferences from the endogenous plasma peaks. Cystein was used as the internal standard. Analysis was carried out on a Eurosphere Performance (RP-18e, 100 × 4.6 mm) analytical column. The mobile phase was a mixture of methanol and phosphate buffer 0.03 M pH = 2.7 at a ratio of 40: 60v/v, respectively, with a flow rate of 1.5 mLmin-1. Limit of detection was 0.5 µgmL-1. The method involved a simple extraction procedure for AMF and/or its metabolite and analytical recovery was 90 ± 0.9%.The calibration curve was linear over the concentration range of 1-200 µgmL-1. The coefficients of variation for intra-day and inter-day assays were less than 10%. PMID:26664371

  5. Bulk Velocities, Chemical Composition and Ionization Structure of the X-ray Shocks in WR140 near Periastron as Revealed by the Chandra Gratings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, A. M. T.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Stevens, Ian R.; Williams, P. M.

    2005-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet WC7+O4.5 binary WR140 went through the periastron passage of its 8-year eccentric binary orbit in early 2001 as the two stars made their closest approach. Both stars have powerful supersonic stellar winds which crash into each other between the stars to produce X-rays. Chandra grating observations were made when the X-rays were at their brightest making WR140 the brightest hot-star X-ray source in the sky and giving the opportunity to study the velocity profiles of lines, all of which were resolved and blue-shifted. In the general context of shock physics, the measurements constrain the flow of hot gas and where different ions were made. The lower velocity widths of cool ions imply a plasma that was not in equilibrium. The brightness of lines relative to the strong continuum in conjunction with plasma models gives interim abundance estimates for eight different elements in WC-type material including an Ne/S ratio in good agreement with earlier long-wavelength measurements.

  6. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  7. Cholesterol lowering effect of SG-GN3, the extract of salted and fermented small shrimps, Acetes japonicus, in Triton WR-1339 or high cholesterol-diet induced hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Park, Jong-Hwan; Cho, Sun-A; Choi, Song-Am; Park, Jae-Hak

    2004-04-01

    The cholesterol lowering effect of SG-GN3, the extract of salted and fermented small shrimps, Acetes japonicus, was investigated in hypercholesterolemic animal models. Hypercholesterolemia was induced with Triton WR-1339 (nonionic detergent) or high cholesterol (HC)-diet. SG-GN3 significantly decreased total cholesterol (TC) in Triton WR-1339 model at 30 post-treatment hour (549.80 +/- 152.46 mg/dl) compared to the control which induced by only Triton WR-1339 (798.84 +/- 94.98 mg/dl), whereas high-density lipoprotein (HDL) content did not decrease (P < 0.05). In HC-diet model, TC content significantly decreased by SG-GN3 treatment at 3 post-treatment day (P < 0.05). These results suggest that SG-GN3 effectively decreased serum TC level in hypercholesterolemic animal models. PMID:15120444

  8. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  9. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  10. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  11. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  12. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  13. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  14. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  15. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  16. Multiphoton absorption in amyloid protein fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanczyc, Piotr; Samoc, Marek; Norden, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Fibrillization of peptides leads to the formation of amyloid fibres, which, when in large aggregates, are responsible for diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Here, we show that amyloids have strong nonlinear optical absorption, which is not present in native non-fibrillized protein. Z-scan and pump-probe experiments indicate that insulin and lysozyme β-amyloids, as well as α-synuclein fibres, exhibit either two-photon, three-photon or higher multiphoton absorption processes, depending on the wavelength of light. We propose that the enhanced multiphoton absorption is due to a cooperative mechanism involving through-space dipolar coupling between excited states of aromatic amino acids densely packed in the fibrous structures. This finding will provide the opportunity to develop nonlinear optical techniques to detect and study amyloid structures and also suggests that new protein-based materials with sizable multiphoton absorption could be designed for specific applications in nanotechnology, photonics and optoelectronics.

  17. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  18. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  19. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems. PMID:27136720

  20. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  1. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  2. Dilution cycle control for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A dilution cycle control system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The control system includes a time delay relay for sensing shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system and for generating a control signal only after expiration of a preselected time period measured from the sensed shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system, during which the absorption refrigeration system is not restarted. A dilution cycle for the absorption refrigeration system is initiated in response to generation of a control signal by the time delay relay. This control system is particularly suitable for use with an absorption refrigeration system which is frequently cycled on and off since the time delay provided by the control system prevents needless dilution of the absorption refrigeration system when the system is turned off for only a short period of time and then is turned back on.

  3. Chaotic Systems with Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions Dq obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D1 in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results.

  4. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  5. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  6. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  7. Total absorption Cherenkov spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovski, E. I.

    2015-05-01

    A short review of 50 years of work done with Cherenkov detectors in laboratories at the Lebedev Physical Institute is presented. The report considers some issues concerning the use of Cherenkov total absorption counters based on lead glass and heavy crystals in accelerator experiments.

  8. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  9. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  10. ZINC ABSORPTION BY INFANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc absorption, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...

  11. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  12. Light-induced changes in subband absorption in a-Si:H using photoluminescence absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S. Q.; Taylor, P. C.; Nitta, S.

    1991-08-01

    We have used the photoluminescence (PL) generated in a thin-film sample of a-Si:H to probe low absorption levels by measuring the absorption of the PL as it travels down the length of the film in a waveguide mode. This technique, which we have called PL absorption spectroscopy of PLAS, allows the measurement of values of the absorption coefficient α down to about 0.1 cm-1. Because this technique probes the top and bottom surfaces of the a-Si:H sample, it is important to separate surface from bulk absorption mechanisms. An improved sample geometry has been employed to facilitate this separation. One sample consisted of an a-Si1-xNix:H/a-Si:H/ a-Si1-xNx:H/NiCr layered structure where the silicon nitride layers served as the cladding layers for the waveguide. In a second sample the a-Si:H layer was interrupted near the middle for two separate, thin (100 Å) layers of a-Si1-xNx:H in order to check for the importance of the absorption at the silicon/silicon nitride interfaces in these PLAS measurements. Changes in the below-gap absorption on light soaking were examined using irradiation from an Ar+ laser (5145 Å, ˜200 mW/cm2 for 5.5 hours at 300 K). The silicon/silicon nitride interface is responsible for an absorption which has a shoulder near 1.2 eV while the bulk a-Si:H absorption exhibits no such shoulder. The metastable, optically-induced increase in the below gap absorption appears to come entirely from the bulk of the a-Si:H. These low temperature PLAS measurements are compared with those obtained at 300 K by photothermal deflection spectroscopy.

  13. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  14. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  15. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  16. Chaotic systems with absorption.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Portela, Jefferson S E; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions D(q) obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D(1) in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results. PMID:24138240

  17. Transient simulation of absorption machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, D. K.; Allen, R. W.; Kumar, B.

    A model for a water-cooled Lithium-Bromide/water absorption chiller is presented. Its transient response both during the start-up phase and during the shut-off period is predicted. The simulation model incorporates such influencing factors as the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid, the absorbent, the heat-transfer configuration of different components of the chiller and related physical data. The time constants of different components are controlled by a set of key parameters that have been identified. The results show a variable but at times significant amount of time delay before the chiller capacity gets close to its steady-state value. The model is intended to provide an insight into the mechanism of build-up to steady-state performance. By recognizing the significant factors contributing to transient degradation, steps can be taken to reduce such degradation.

  18. Pathways of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N

    2002-01-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal absorptive cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of absorptive cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224

  19. Overexpression of transcription factor OsWR2 1 regulates wax/cutin biosynthesis and enhances drought tolerance in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is the major abiotic stress limiting crop production. Plant cuticle represents the outer-most layer of the epidermis and previous studies demonstrate its association with plant response to climatological drought. We report here the functional characterization of the rice ((Oryza sativa L.) W...

  20. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  1. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy on a smartphone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Ast, Sandra; Rutledge, Peter J.; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    A self-powered smartphone-based field-portable "dual" spectrometer has been developed for both absorption and fluorescence measurements. The smartphone's existing flash LED has sufficient optical irradiance to undertake absorption measurements within a 3D-printed case containing a low cost nano-imprinted polymer diffraction grating. A UV (λex ~ 370 nm) and VIS (λex ~ 450 nm) LED are wired into the circuit of the flash LED to provide an excitation source for fluorescence measurements. Using a customized app on the smartphone, measurements of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using pH-sensitive and Zn2+-responsive probes. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel spectral resolution is demonstrated. Despite the low cost and small size of the portable spectrometer, the results compare well with bench top instruments.

  2. Subwavelength total acoustic absorption with degenerate resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Li, Yong; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-09-01

    We report the experimental realization of perfect sound absorption by sub-wavelength monopole and dipole resonators that exhibit degenerate resonant frequencies. This is achieved through the destructive interference of two resonators' transmission responses, while the matching of their averaged impedances to that of air implies no backscattering, thereby leading to total absorption. Two examples, both using decorated membrane resonators (DMRs) as the basic units, are presented. The first is a flat panel comprising a DMR and a pair of coupled DMRs, while the second one is a ventilated short tube containing a DMR in conjunction with a sidewall DMR backed by a cavity. In both examples, near perfect absorption, up to 99.7%, has been observed with the airborne wavelength up to 1.2 m, which is at least an order of magnitude larger than the composite absorber. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment is obtained.

  3. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  4. What Drives the Outflows in Broad Absorption Line QSOs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We have made progress in the areas related to the propulsion and confinement of gas responsible for broad absorption troughts in QSOs: Radiative Acceleration in BALQSOs; The "Ghost" of Lyman (alpha); and Magnetic Confinement of Absorbing Gas.

  5. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration. PMID:24743971

  6. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  7. Absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of absorption heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the absorption heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of absorption heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.

  8. Scattering with absorptive interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.

    1982-07-01

    The S matrix for a wide class of complex and nonlocal potentials is studied, with special attention given to the motion of singularities in the complex k plane as a function of the imaginary coupling strength. Modifications of Levinson's theorem are obtained and discussed. Analytic approximations to the S matrix in the vicinity of narrow resonances are exhibited and compared to numerical results of resonating-group calculations. The problem of defining resonances in the case of complex interactions is discussed, making contact with the usual analysis of scattering in terms of Argand diagrams. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for absorptive potentials.

  9. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  10. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  11. Effects of Triton WR 1339 and heparin on the transfer of surface lipids from triglyceride-rich emulsions to high density lipoproteins in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Maranhao, R.C.; Roland, I.A.; Hirata, M.H. )

    1990-11-01

    The influence of lipolytic mechanisms on the transfer of phospholipids and unesterified cholesterol from artificial emulsions, serving as chylomicron models to other plasma lipoproteins, mainly high density lipoproteins (HDL) were tested in vivo. The emulsions labeled with radioactive lipids were injected into the bloodstream of rats (controls) and the results were compared with those obtained from rats that had previously been treated with Triton WR 1339 or heparin. Plasma clearance and the distribution of cholesteryl esters, phospholipids and unesterified cholesterol in the different plasma lipoprotein fractions were then determined. Whereas virtually no cholesteryl esters were found in d greater than 1.006 g/mL density fraction of the three experimental groups, 2.8 +/- 1.3% of the injected phospholipids were in the 1.063-1.210 g/L density fraction of the Triton treated rats, and 12.6 +/- 5.4% of the heparin treated rats, as compared to 10.1 +/- 1.7% in controls. This indicates that lipolysis directly influences phospholipid transfer to HDL. In contrast, free-cholesterol transfer to HDL, besides being less pronounced than phospholipid transfer, was enhanced by Triton and diminished by heparin, indicating that lipolytic mechanisms were not important determinants in this process.

  12. Antihypercholesterolemic and Antioxidative Potential of an Extract of the Plant, Piper betle, and Its Active Constituent, Eugenol, in Triton WR-1339-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Experimental Rats

    PubMed Central

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Ruban, Vasanthakumar Vasantha; Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Anandhi, Ramalingam; Thomas, Philip A.; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a dominant risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the putative antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were evaluated in experimental hypercholesterolemia induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg b.wt) in Wistar rats. Saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats revealed significantly higher mean blood/serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and of serum hepatic marker enzymes; in addition, significantly lower mean serum levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and significantly lower mean activities of enzymatic antioxidants and nonenzymatic antioxidants were noted in hepatic tissue samples from saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats, compared to controls. However, in hypercholesterolemic rats receiving the Piper betle extract (500 mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol (5 mg/kg b.wt) for seven days orally, all these parameters were significantly better than those in saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. The hypercholesterolemia-ameliorating effect was better defined in eugenol-treated than in Piper betle extract-treated rats, being as effective as that of the standard lipid-lowering drug, lovastatin (10 mg/kg b.wt). These results suggest that eugenol, an active constituent of the Piper betle extract, possesses antihypercholesterolemic and other activities in experimental hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats. PMID:24523820

  13. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  14. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  15. Absorption spectrum of DNA for wavelengths greater than 300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.

    1981-06-01

    Although DNA absorption at wavelengths greater than 300 nm is much weaker than that at shorter wavelengths, this absorption seems to be responsible for much of the biological damage caused by solar radiation of wavelengths less than 320 nm. Accurate measurement of the absorption spectrum of DNA above 300 nm is complicated by turbidity characteristic of concentrated solutions of DNA. We have measured the absorption spectra of DNA from calf thymus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, salmon testis, and human placenta using procedures which separate optical density due to true absorption from that due to turbidity. Above 300 nm, the relative absorption of DNA increases as a function of guanine-cytosine content, presumably because the absorption of guanine is much greater than the absorption of adenine at these wavelengths. This result suggests that the photophysical processes which follow absorption of a long-wavelength photon may, on the average, differ from those induced by shorter-wavelength photons. It may also explain the lower quantum yield for the killing of cells by wavelengths above 300 nm compared to that by shorter wavelengths.

  16. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  17. Cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was developed to measure spectrally how light is scattered by clouds and to determine the single scattering albedo, important to meteorology and climate studies, with unprecedented accuracy. This measurement is based on ratios of downwelling to upwelling radiation within clouds, and so is not strongly dependent upon absolute radiometric calibration of the instrument. The CAR has a 5-inch aperture and 1 degree IFOV, and spatially scans in a plane orthogonal to the flight vector from the zenith to nadir at 1.7 revolutions per second. Incoming light is measured in 13 spectral bands, using silicon, germanium, and indium-antimonide detectors. Data from each channel is digitally recorded in flight with 10-bit (0.1 percent) resolution. The instrument incorporates several novel features. These features are briefly detailed.

  18. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  19. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  20. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  1. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  2. Transfection of Babesia bovis by Double Selection with WR99210 and Blasticidin-S and Its Application for Functional Analysis of Thioredoxin Peroxidase-1.

    PubMed

    Asada, Masahito; Yahata, Kazuhide; Hakimi, Hassan; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo; Kaneko, Osamu; Suarez, Carlos E; Kawazu, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation is an essential technique to analyze gene function; however, limited methods are available for Babesia bovis, a causative pathogen of the globally important cattle disease, bovine babesiosis. To date, two stable transfection systems have been developed for B. bovis, using selectable markers blasticidin-S deaminase (bsd) or human dihydrofolate reductase (hdhfr). In this work, we combine these two selectable markers in a sequential transfection system. Specifically, a parent transgenic B. bovis line which episomally expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR), was transfected with a plasmid encoding a fusion protein consisting of red fluorescent protein (RFP) and blasticidin-S deaminase (BSD). Selection with WR99210 and blasticidin-S resulted in the emergence of parasites double positive for GFP and RFP. We then applied this method to complement gene function in a parasite line in which thioredoxin peroxidase-1 (Bbtpx-1) gene was knocked out using hDHFR as a selectable marker. A plasmid was constructed harboring both RFP-BSD and Bbtpx-1 expression cassettes, and transfected into a Bbtpx-1 knockout (KO) parasite. Transfectants were independently obtained by two transfection methods, episomal transfection and genome integration. Complementation of Bbtpx-1 resulted in full recovery of resistance to nitrosative stress, via the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, which was impaired in the Bbtpx-1 KO parasites. In conclusion, we developed a sequential transfection method in B. bovis and subsequently applied this technique in a gene complementation study. This method will enable broader genetic manipulation of Babesia toward enhancing our understanding of the biology of this parasite. PMID:25962142

  3. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. deg of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: We present the fourth article in a series of papers focussed on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the cluster VVV CL041, which contains a new very massive star candidate, WR 62-2. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters (distance, reddening, mass, age) of VVV CL041. Results: We confirm that the cluster VVV CL041 is a young (less than 4 Myr) and massive (3 ± 2 × 103 M⊙) cluster, and not a simple asterism. It is located at a distance of 4.2 ± 0.9 kpc, and its reddening is AV = 8.0 ± 0.2 mag, which is slightly lower than the average for the young clusters towards the centre of the Galaxy. Spectral analysis shows that the most luminous star of the cluster, of the WN8h spectral type, is a candidate to have an initial mass larger than 100 M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002, and on observations with VLT/ISAAC at ESO (programme 087.D.0341A) and Flamingos-2 at Gemini (programme GS-2014A-Q-72).The photometric catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A31

  4. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, É.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Kubát, J.; Kubátová, B.; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Muñoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferrière, A.; Sablowski, D. P.; Simón-Díaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F. M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Küsters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschläger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-08-01

    During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analysed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analysing the variability of the He II λ5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 ± 0.008 (s.d.) d. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 ± 6 d, or ˜18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grey-scale difference images with theoretical grey-scales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of Δφ ≃ 90° was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV λλ5802,5812 and He I λ5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I λ5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.

  5. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, É.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Kubát, J.; Kubátová, B.; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Muñoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferrière, A.; Sablowski, D. P.; Simón-Díaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F. M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Küsters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschläger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-08-01

    During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analyzed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analyzing the variability of the He II $\\lambda$5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 $\\pm$ 0.008 (s.d.) days. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 $\\pm$ 6 days, or $\\sim$ 18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grayscale difference images with theoretical grayscales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of $\\Delta \\phi \\simeq$ 90$^{\\circ}$ was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV $\\lambda\\lambda$5802,5812 and He I $\\lambda$5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I $\\lambda$5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.

  6. An extensive spectroscopic time-series of three Wolf-Rayet stars. I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, É.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Kubát, J.; Kubátová, B.; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Muñoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferrière, A.; Sablowski, D. P.; Simón-Díaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F. M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Küsters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschläger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-05-01

    During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analyzed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analyzing the variability of the He II λ5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 ± 0.008 (s.d.) days. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 ± 6 days, or ˜ 18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grayscale difference images with theoretical grayscales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of Δφ ≃ 90° was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV λλ5802,5812 and He I λ5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I λ5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.

  7. Production of silicon modified to have enhanced infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weld, E.; Ayachitula, R.; de La Harpe, K.; Brandt, L.; Chilton, M.; Knize, R. J.; Patterson, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced optical properties of silicon microstructures formed by irradiation of a silicon wafer by a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser beam in the presence of SF6. The microstructures are doped with about 0.6% sulfur, which extends the absorption well below the 1.1um bandgap of crystalline silicon and results in a 60% increase in the absorption of infrared radiation. The microstructured silicon produced using microsecond pulses of CW light demonstrates comparable infrared absorption enhancement to black silicon made using more expensive and complicated laser systems. This enhanced absorption as a result of these microstructures has been studied over the past decade in an effort to create high responsivity detectors and night vision goggles and improve the efficiency of solar cells. We will also discuss additional methods that allow tunability and scalability in the production of silicon modified to demonstrate increased infrared absorption.

  8. Transient simulation of absorption machines

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, D.K.; Allen, R.W.; Kumar, B.

    1982-08-01

    This paper presents a model for a water-cooled Lithium-Bromide/water absorption chiller and predicts its transient response both during the start-up phase and during the shutoff period. The simulation model incorporates such influencing factors as the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid, the absorbent, the heat-transfer configuration of different components of the chiller and related physical data. The time constants of different components are controlled by a set of key parameters that have been identified in this study. The results show a variable but at times significant amount of time delay before the chiller capacity gets close to its steadystate value. The model is intended to provide an insight into the mechanism of build-up to steady-state performance. By recognizing the significant factors contributing to transient degradation, steps can be taken to reduce such degradation. The evaluation of the residual capacity in the shut-off period will yield more realistic estimates of chiller COP for a chiller satisfying dynamic space cooling load.

  9. Transient simulation of absorption machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, D. K.; Allen, R. W.; Kumar, B.

    1982-08-01

    This paper presents a model for a water-cooled Lithium-Bromide/water absorption chiller and predicts its transient response both during the start-up phase and during the shutoff period. The simulation model incorporates such influencing factors as the thermodynamic properties of the working fluid, the absorbent, the heat-transfer configuration of different components of the chiller and related physical data. The time constants of different components are controlled by a set of key parameters that have been identified in this study. The results show a variable but at times significant amount of time delay before the chiller capacity gets close to its steady-state value. The model is intended to provide an insight into the mechanism of build-up to steady-state performance. By recognizing the significant factors contributing to transient degradation, steps can be taken to reduce such degradation. The evaluation of the residual capacity in the shut-off period will yield more realistic estimates of chiller COP for a chiller satisfying dynamic space cooling load.

  10. Intestinal folate absorption

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Williamson; Nixon, Peter F.; Bertino, Joseph B.; Binder, Henry J.

    1971-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of the monoglutamate form of the principal dietary and circulating folate compound, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-MTHF), was studied in the rat utilizing a synthetic highly purified radiolabeled diastereoisomer. Chromatography confirmed that the compound was not altered after transfer from the mucosa to the serosa. Accumulation against a concentration gradient was not observed in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal segments at 5-MTHF concentration from 0.5 to 500 nmoles/liter. Unidirectional transmural flux determination also did not indicate a significant net flux. Mucosal to serosal transfer of 5-MTHF was similar in all segments of the intestine and increased in a linear fashion with increased initial mucosal concentrations. Further, no alteration in 5-MTHF transfer was found when studied in the presence of metabolic inhibitors or folate compounds. These results indicate that 5-MTHF is not absorbed by the rat small intestine by a carrier-mediated system and suggest that 5-MTHF transfer most likely represents diffusion. Images PMID:5564397

  11. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  12. Atlas of Infrared Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    This atlas of infrared absorption line contains absorption line parameters (line strength vs. wavenumber) from 500 to 7000 cm(exp-1) for 15 gases: H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, SO2, NO, NO2, NH3, HCl, HF, HNO3 and CH3Cl.

  13. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  14. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  15. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  16. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and its analogue, long-R3-IGF-I, on intestinal absorption of 3-O-methyl-D-glucose are less pronounced than gut mucosal growth responses.

    PubMed

    Garnaut, Sonja M; Howarth, Gordon S; Read, Leanna C

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) peptide-induced increases in bowel mass and functional improvement is unclear. We utilised three independent methods to investigate the effects of IGF-I peptides on intestinal absorption of the glucose analogue, 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3MG) in rats. Rats received vehicle, IGF-I or the more potent analogue, long-R3-IGF-I via subcutaneously implanted mini-pump, for 7 days, at which time intestinal absorption was assessed by: (1) plasma 3MG appearance following oral gavage, (2) single-pass- or (3) recirculating-perfusion of a jejunal segment. 3MG (320 or 800 mg) was gavaged on day 7 to rats treated with vehicle, IGR-I or long-R3-IGF-I. With the lower 3MG dose, only long-R3-IGF-I increased (40%) the initial rate of 3MG appearance in plasma. IGF-I had no significant effect, whilst at the higher 3MG dose neither peptide was effective. Utilising perfusion techniques, long-R3-IGF-I, but not IGF-I, significantly increased 3MG uptake per cm of jejunum by up to 69%, although significance was lost when expressed as a function of tissue weight. Long-R3-IGF-I, but not native IGF-I, enhanced 3MG absorption from the intestinal lumen, presumably reflecting an increased mucosal mass rather than an up-regulation of specific epithelial glucose transporters. PMID:11999215

  17. O VI absorption in interstellar cloud surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; Jenkins, E. B.; Songaila, A.; York, D. G.

    1979-01-01

    The velocity profiles of O VI absorption lines of 24 stars, observed in early Copernicus surveys, have been compared with the line profiles of Si III (1206.51 A) and N II (1083.99 A). The velocity structures of the O VI lines appear to be correlated with those of the material in the lower ionization stages. It is argued that the O VI absorption arises in the coronal gas of the conductive interface between hot gas, responsible for extended, soft X-ray emission, and cooler interstellar clouds. The velocity broadening of both sets of lines is attributed to motions of the cloud surfaces induced by pressure fluctuations in the interstellar medium.

  18. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  20. Terahertz absorption of dilute aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyden, Matthias; Tobias, Douglas J.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2012-12-01

    Absorption of terahertz (THz) radiation by aqueous solutions of large solutes reports on the polarization response of their hydration shells. This is because the dipolar relaxation of the solute is dynamically frozen at these frequencies, and most of the solute-induced absorption changes, apart from the expulsion of water, are caused by interfacial water. We propose a model expressing the dipolar response of solutions in terms of a single parameter, the interface dipole moment induced in the interfacial water by electromagnetic radiation. We apply this concept to experimental THz absorption of hydrated sugars, amino acids, and proteins. None of the solutes studied here follow the expectations of dielectric theories, which predict a negative projection of the interface dipole on the external electric field. We find that this prediction is not able to describe the available experimental data, which instead suggests a nearly zero interface dipole for sugars and a more diverse pattern for amino acids. Hydrophobic amino acids, similarly to sugars, give rise to near zero interface dipoles, while strongly hydrophilic ones are best described by a positive projection of the interface dipole on the external field. The sign of the interface dipole is connected to the slope of the absorption coefficient with the solute concentration. A positive slope, implying an increase in the solution polarity relative to water, mirrors results frequently reported for protein solutions. We therefore use molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated glucose and lambda repressor protein to calculate the interface dipole moments of these solutes and the concentration dependence of the THz absorption. The absorption at THz frequencies increases with increasing solute concentration in both cases, implying a higher polarity of the solution compared to bulk water. The structure of the hydration layer, extracted from simulations, is qualitatively similar in both cases, with spatial correlations

  1. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  2. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  3. Percutaneous absorption of Octopirox.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Kamat, V B

    1988-01-01

    containing 1% Octopirox is 29,400, so that the possibility of systemic effects due to absorption through the skin is remote. PMID:3345970

  4. Resonant Absorption of Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    1999-11-01

    We report the first observation of enhanced laser-plasma optical absorption in a subcritical density plasma resulting from spatial resonances, here in the laser breakdown of a gas with a Bessel beam. The enhancement in absorption is directly correlated to enhancements both in confinement of laser radiation to the plasma and in its heating. Under certain conditions, azimuthal asymmetry in the laser beam is essential for efficient gas breakdown. Simulations of this absorption consistently explain the experimental observations. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9515509) and the US Department of Energy (DEF G0297 ER 41039).

  5. Residential solar-absorption chiller thermal dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, J.M.; Wood, B.D.; McNeill, B.W.

    1981-03-01

    Research is reported on the transient performance of a commercial residential 3 ton lithium bromide-water absorption chiller designed for solar firing. Emphasis was placed on separating the chiller response from that of the entire test facility so that its transient response could solely be observed and quantified. It was found that the entire system time response and thermal capacitance has a major impact on performance degradation due to transient operation. Tests run to ascertain computer algorithms which simulate system isolated chiller performance, revealed processes hitherto undocumented. Transient operation is simulated by three distinct algorithms associated with the three phases of chiller operation. The first phase is start up time. It was revealed during testing that the time required to reach steady state performance values, when the chiller was turned on, was a linear function of steady state water supply temperatures. The second phase is quasi steady state performance. Test facility's performance compared favorably with the manufacturer's published data. The third phase is the extra capacity produced during spin down. Spin down occurs when the hot water supply pump is turned off while the other system pumps remain operating for a few minutes, thus allowing extra chiller capacity to be realized. The computer algorithms were used to generate plots which show the operational surface of an isolated absorption chiller subjected to off design and transient operation.

  6. Nonlinear Terahertz Absorption of Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; König-Otto, Jacob C; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-04-13

    Subwavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, subwavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a terahertz pump-terahertz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results. The model shows that the observed strong linearity is caused by an unexpected red shift of plasmon resonance together with a broadening and weakening of the resonance caused by the transient increase in electron temperature. The model further predicts that even greater resonant enhancement of the nonlinear response can be expected in high-mobility graphene, suggesting that nonlinear graphene plasmonic devices could be promising candidates for nonlinear optical processing. PMID:26978242

  7. Stepwise Transition of the Tetra-Manganese Complex of Photosystem II to a Binuclear Mn2(μ-O)2 Complex in Response to a Temperature Jump: A Time-Resolved Structural Investigation Employing X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšil, Pavel; Michael, Haumann; Dittmer, Jens; Solé, V. Armando; Dau, Holger

    2003-01-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, water is oxidized at a protein-cofactor complex comprising four Mn atoms and, presumably, one calcium. Using multilayers of Photosystem II membrane particles, we investigated the time course of the disassembly of the Mn complex initiated by a temperature jump from 25°C to 47°C and terminated by rapid cooling after distinct heating periods. We monitored polarographically the oxygen-evolution activity, the amount of the YDox radical and of released Mn2+ by EPR spectroscopy, and the structure of the Mn complex by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS, EXAFS). Using a novel approach to analyze time-resolved EXAFS data, we identify three distinct phases of the disassembly process: (1) Loss of the oxygen-evolution activity and reduction of YDox occur simultaneously (k1 = 1.0 min−1). EXAFS spectra reveal the concomitant loss of an absorber-backscatterer interaction between heavy atoms separated by ∼3.3 Å, possibly related to Ca release. (2) Subsequently, two Mn(III) or Mn(IV) ions seemingly separated by ∼2.7 Å in the native complex are reduced to Mn(II) and released (k2 = 0.18 min−1). The x-ray absorption spectroscopy data is highly suggestive that the two unreleased Mn ions form a di-μ-oxo bridged Mn(III)2 complex. (3) Finally, the tightly-bound Mn2(μ-O)2 unit is slowly reduced and released (k3 = 0.014 min−1). PMID:12547817

  8. Absorption Features in Soil Spectra Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vašát, Radim; Kodešová, Radka; Borůvka, Luboš; Jakšík, Ondřej; Klement, Aleš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    From a wide range of techniques appropriate to relate spectra measurements with soil properties, partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machines (SVM) are most commonly used. This is due to their predictive power and the availability of software tools. Both represent exclusively statistically based approaches and, as such, benefit from multiple responses of soil material in the spectrum. However, physical-based approaches that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as simple linear regression using selected continuum-removed spectra values as a predictor variable, often provide accurate estimates. Furthermore, if this approach extends to multiple cases by taking into account three basic absorption feature parameters (area, width, and depth) of all occurring features as predictors and subjecting them to best subset selection, one can achieve even higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression. Here, we attempt to further extend this approach by adding two additional absorption feature parameters (left and right side area), as they can be important diagnostic markers, too. As a result, we achieved higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression and SVM for exchangeable soil pH, slightly higher or comparable for dithionite-citrate and ammonium oxalate extractable Fe and Mn forms, but slightly worse for oxidizable carbon content. Therefore, we suggest incorporating the multiple linear regression approach based on absorption feature parameters into existing working practices. PMID:26555184

  9. The rediscovery of absorption chillers

    SciTech Connect

    Katzel, J.

    1992-04-23

    Absorption chillers are back - and for two very good reasons: they are environmentally sound and, in many cases, economically attractive. One factor fueling this resurgence is the outlook for natural gas, the energy source of most absorption systems. Deregulation has spurred exploration, and forecasts indicate an abundant supply and relatively low prices through 2050. Threats of global warming and depletion of the ozone layer also are forces driving the absorption chiller market. Being a good corporate citizen today means minimizing or eliminating the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the basis of many refrigerants used in mechanical chillers. Even as chemical and chiller manufacturers alike work to develop substitute refrigerants, the perfect alternative has yet to be found. Absorption units are free of these problems, a benefit that appeals to many people.

  10. Diode laser absorption sensors for combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Zhou

    Combustion is the most widely used energy conversion technique in the world. Diode-laser absorption sensors offer significant opportunities and advantages for in situ measurements of multiple combustion parameters such as temperature and species concentration due to their high sensitivity, high spectral resolution, fast time response, robustness and non-intrusive character. The overall objective of this thesis is to design and develop time-resolved and real-time tunable diode laser sensors with the potential for combustion control. A crucial element in the design of a tunable-diode-laser optical-absorption-based sensor is the selection of optimum transitions. The strategy and spectroscopic criteria for selecting optimum wavelength regions and absorption line combinations are developed. The development of this design-rule approach establishes a new paradigm to optimize tunable diode laser sensors for target applications. The water vapor spectrum in the 1-2 mum near-infrared region is systematically analyzed to find the best absorption transition pairs for sensitive measurement of temperature in the target combustion environment using a single tunable diode laser. Two sensors are developed in this work. The first sensor is a 1.8 mum, single-laser temperature sensor based on direct absorption scans. Successful time-resolved measurements in a variety of laboratory and practical devices are presented and used to identify potential improvements, and design rules for a second-generation sensor are developed based on the lessons learned. The second generation sensor is a 1.4 mum, single-laser temperature sensor using water vapor absorption detected by wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS), which facilitates rapid data analysis and a 2 kHz real-time data rate in the combustion experiments reported here. Demonstration experiments in a heated cell and a forced Hencken burner confirm the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensors. The first application of TDL thermometry to a

  11. Rapid Levothyroxine Absorption Testing: A Case Series of Nonadherent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Mamtha; Jhingan, Ram M.; Rubin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonadherence to levothyroxine therapy is one cause of persistent hypothyroidism. To distinguish nonadherence from malabsorption, a levothyroxine absorption test is required. Typically, this test measures the serum free thyroxine (FT4) response to 1000 mcg of oral levothyroxine over 4 to 24 hours. Published data indicate that serum levels of FT4 are at or near their peak 2 hours after levothyroxine ingestion. Objectives: We present the successful completion of 2-hour levothyroxine absorption testing in 3 patients as a retrospective case series. Patients and Methods: Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), FT4, and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were drawn at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after 1000 mcg of oral levothyroxine. Results: In all 3 cases, baseline thyroid function indicated the patients had taken their prescribed doses of levothyroxine prior to the absorption test. Despite high baseline levels both FT3 and FT4 increased during each absorption test, providing more evidence of adequate levothyroxine absorption. Subsequently, patients achieved normal TSH levels on lower doses of levothyroxine. Conclusions: Levothyroxine absorption testing over 2 hours may offer a more rapid alternative to the commonly used longer protocols to rule out malabsorption. Scheduling a levothyroxine absorption test may induce some patients to start adhering to levothyroxine therapy. PMID:26633982

  12. Reactivation of sub-bandgap absorption in chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Bonna K.; Buonassisi, Tonio; Sher, Meng-Ju; Mazur, Eric

    2011-06-20

    Silicon doped with nonequilibrium concentrations of chalcogens using a femtosecond laser exhibits near-unity absorption of sub-bandgap photons to wavelengths of at least 2500 nm. Previous studies have shown that sub-bandgap absorptance decreases with thermal annealing up to 1175 K and that the absorption deactivation correlates with chalcogen diffusivity. In this work, we show that sub-bandgap absorptance can be reactivated by annealing at temperatures between 1350 and 1550 K followed by fast cooling (>50 K/s). Our results suggest that the defects responsible for sub-bandgap absorptance are in equilibrium at high temperatures in hyperdoped Si:chalcogen systems.

  13. Enhanced absorption of Ag diamond-type nanoantenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zong-heng; Li, Xiao-nan; Guo, Ya-dong; Huang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The optical metal nanoantenna on thin film solar cell is effective to enhance light absorption. In this paper, the diamond-type Ag nanoantenna arrays are proposed for increasing the efficiency of solar cells by localized surface plasmons resonance (LSPR). The effect of metal nanoantenna on the absorption enhancement is theoretically investigated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Broadband absorption enhancements in both visible and near-infrared regions are demonstrated in case of solar cell with diamond-type Ag nanoantennas. The spectral response is manipulated by geometrical parameters of the nanoantennas. The maximum enhancement factor of 1.51 for solar cell is obtained. For comparison, the other three nanoantennas are also analyzed. The results show that the solar cell with optimized diamond-type nanoantenna arrays is more efficient in optical absorption.

  14. Search for heavy neutrinos and W(R) bosons with right-handed couplings in a left-right symmetric model in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=7  TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Aguilo, E; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Vilela Pereira, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G

    2012-12-28

    Results are presented from a search for heavy, right-handed muon neutrinos, N(μ), and right-handed W(R) bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model. The analysis is based on a 5.0  fb(-1) sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence is observed for an excess of events over the standard model expectation. For models with exact left-right symmetry, heavy right-handed neutrinos are excluded at 95% confidence level for a range of neutrino masses below the W(R) mass, dependent on the value of M(W(R)). The excluded region in the two-dimensional (M(W(R)), M(N(μ)) mass plane extends to M(W(R))=2.5  TeV. PMID:23368549

  15. Absorption of different lead compounds

    PubMed Central

    Barltrop, D.; Meek, F.

    1975-01-01

    A rapid method for the determination of relative absorption of dietary lead by rats is described. The influence of age, weight and dose rate has been determined and using standard conditions the tissue lead content of blood, kidney and femur are significantly correlated with each other and are a function of ingested lead. Eight lead compounds were evaluated using this technique and the findings related to lead acetate as a reference compound. Of the inorganic preparations studied, lead carbonate (basic) and metallic lead showed a twelve-fold difference in absorption, with the remaining compounds giving intermediate values. The absorption of lead from four organic compounds was determined from diets containing 7·5% corn oil added to the standard diet. Lead tallate was absorbed to the same degree as lead acetate, but lesser absorptions resulted from lead octoate, naphthenate and alsynate. The addition of corn oil to a final concentration of 7·5% of the diet enhanced the absorption of lead acetate. PMID:1208290

  16. Thermodynamic derivatives of infrared absorptance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broersma, S.; Walls, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    Calculation of the concentration, pressure, and temperature dependence of the spectral absorptance of a vibrational absorption band. A smooth thermodynamic dependence was found for wavelength intervals where the average absorptance is less than 0.65. Individual rotational lines, whose parameters are often well known, were used as bases in the calculation of medium resolution spectra. Two modes of calculation were combined: well-separated rotational lines plus interaction terms, or strongly overlapping lines that were represented by a compound line of similar shape plus corrections. The 1.9- and 6.3-micron bands of H2O and the 4.3-micron band of CO2 were examined in detail and compared with experiment.

  17. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-15

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: •The absorption rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. •The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. •The absorption properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions.

  18. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  19. Solar powered absorption air conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardon, J. M.

    1980-04-01

    Artificial means of providing or removing heat from the building are discussed along with the problem of the appropriate building design and construction for a suitable heat climate inside the building. The use of a lithium bromide-water absorption chiller, powered by a hot water store heated by an array of stationary flat collectors, is analyzed. An iterative method of predicting the cooling output from a LiBr-water absorption refrigeration plant having variable heat input is described and a model allowing investigation of the performance of a solar collector and thermal storage system is developed.

  20. Periodic microwave absorption in superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Martinek, J.; Stankowski, J. )

    1994-08-01

    A model explaining the presence of a periodic train of microwave absorption lines in the magnetic modulated microwave absorption (MMMA) spectra of high- and low-temperature superconductors is proposed. The model assumes the occurrence of regular superconducting current loops, closed by Josephson junctions, in these materials. The system of such loops is considered within the basic model of the rf superconducting quantum interference device taking into account the effect of thermal fluctuations. The magnetic-field and temperature dependencies of the MMMA obtained on the basis of the proposed model are in qualitative agreement with experimental data.

  1. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  2. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  3. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  4. Vitamin D supplementation increases calcium absorption without a threshold effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maximal calcium absorption in response to vitamin D has been proposed as a biomarker for vitamin D sufficiency. Our objective was to determine whether there is a threshold beyond which increasing doses of vitamin D, or concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], no longer increase cal...

  5. "Absorption": Personality Correlate or Expectancy-Mediated Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council, James R.; Kirsch, Irving

    Scales assessing absorption, or a predisposition to become highly involved in sensory and imaginative experiences in non-hypnotic contexts, have predicted hypnotic responsivity as well. To examine the effects of expectancy on hypnotic responding by measuring expectancies at different points in the hypnotic experience, and to test for possible…

  6. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  7. X-Ray Absorption of High- Redshift Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Ehud; Eitan, Assaf

    2012-09-01

    Soft X-ray absorption of high-z quasars has been known for more than a decade, but its astrophysical context remains a mystery. In order to better understand this absorption, we have constructed the largest to date high-S/N sample of high-z quasars (z > 0.5) from the XMM-Newton archive. We find that generally, z<2 and radio quiet objects provide only upper limits for the 0.5 keV optical depth (tau). Thus, we use censored statistics methods to seek correlations between tau and other quasar parameters. We find a dramatic increase of tau with z [(1+z)^{2.5}], although the correlation is rather weak. The correlation of tau with radio luminosity (or loudness) is even weaker. We also compare the absorption behavior with redshift with a large sample of GRBs, and with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We find that although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with a diffuse IGM effect and with the high-z GRB opacities, absorption of intermediate z (0.5 < z < 2) quasars is too low for this scenario, which leads to the conclusion that a simple IGM origin for this absorption is unlikely.

  8. Gastrointestinal absorption of uranium compounds--a review.

    PubMed

    Konietzka, Rainer

    2015-02-01

    Uranium occurs naturally in soil and rocks, and therefore where it is present in water-soluble form it also occurs naturally in groundwater as well as in drinking water obtained from groundwater. Animal studies suggest that the toxicity of uranium is mainly due to its damage to kidney tubular cells following exposure to soluble uranium compounds. The assessments of the absorption of uranium via the gastrointestinal tract vary, and this has consequences for regulation, in particular the derivation of e.g. drinking water limit values. Absorption rates vary according to the nature and solubility of the compound in which uranium is presented to the test animals and depending on the animal species used in the test. No differences for sex have been observed for absorption in either animals or humans. However, human biomonitoring data do show that boys excrete significantly more uranium than girls. In animal studies neonates took up more uranium than adults or older children. Nutritional status, and in particular the iron content of the diet, have a marked influence on absorption, and higher uranium levels in food intake also appear to increase the absorption rate. If the pointers to an absorption mechanism competing with iron are correct, these mechanisms could also explain the relatively high concentration and chemical toxicity of uranium in the kidneys. It is here (and in the duodenum) that divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1), which is primarily responsible for the passage of iron (or uranium?) through the cell membranes, is most strongly expressed. PMID:25263405

  9. Nanowire antenna absorption probed with time-reversed fourier microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grzela, Grzegorz; Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Barten, Tommy; van Dam, Dick; Sánchez-Gil, José A; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2014-06-11

    Understanding light absorption in individual nanostructures is crucial for optimizing the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Here, we introduce a technique named time-reversed Fourier microscopy that enables the measurement of the angle-dependent light absorption in dilute arrays of uncoupled semiconductor nanowires. Because of their large separation, the nanowires have a response that can be described in terms of individual nanostructures. The geometry of individual nanowires makes them behave as nanoantennas that show a strong interaction with the incident light. The angle-dependent absorption measurements, which are compared to numerical simulations and Mie scattering calculations, show the transition from guided-mode to Mie-resonance absorption in individual nanowires and the relative efficiency of these two absorption mechanisms in the same nanostructures. Mie theory fails to describe the absorption in finite-length vertical nanowires illuminated at small angles with respect to their axis. At these angles, the incident light is efficiently absorbed after being coupled to guided modes. Our findings are relevant for the design of nanowire-based photodetectors and solar cells with an optimum efficiency. PMID:24810791

  10. Intestinal calcium absorption of women during lactation and after weaning.

    PubMed

    Kalkwarf, H J; Specker, B L; Heubi, J E; Vieira, N E; Yergey, A L

    1996-04-01

    We investigated whether intestinal calcium absorption and serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (calcitriol) concentrations are higher in women during lactation and after weaning to compensate for calcium lost in breast milk. Measurements were obtained at 4.6 mo postpartum in 24 lactating women and 24 nonlactating women, at 9.6 mo postpartum in 24 lactating women (2.6 mo after complete weaning) and 24 nonlactating women. One-half of the women in each group were randomly assigned to receive 1 g supplemental Ca/d as calcium carbonate. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by using stable isotopic tracers 42Ca and 44Ca. Fractional absorption was 0.32+/-0.02 (+/-SEM) in both lactating and nonlactating women, but was higher in lactating women after weaning (0.37+/-0.02) compared with nonlactating postpartum control subjects (0.31+/-0.02). These effects were independent of calcium intake. Changes in serum calcitriol paralleled changes in fractional absorption. There were no differences in calcitriol concentrations between lactating and nonlactating women, but calcitriol was greater in women after weaning compared with postpartum control subjects. Lactating women who had resumed menses had higher fractional absorption and serum calcitriol than did lactating women who had not. Serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations were greater in lactating compared with nonlactating women; there were no differences between groups after weaning. We conclude that lactation stimulates increases in fractional calcium absorption and serum calcitriol, but the responses are only apparent after weaning or the resumption of menses. PMID:8599316

  11. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  12. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  13. Migrant labor absorption in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nayagam, J

    1992-01-01

    The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and absorption of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process." PMID:12285766

  14. Aerosol Absorption and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Philip; Seinfeld, J. H.; Kinne, Stefan; Boucher, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006) significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the shortwave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing clear-sky from -0.79 to -0.53 W m(sup -2) (33%) and all-sky from -0.47 to -0.13W m(sup -2 (72%). Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19W m(sup -2) (36%) clear-sky and of 0.12W m(sup -2) (92%) all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05W m(sup -2) and a positive TOA forcing perturbation of 0

  15. Transient effects on the performance of a residential solar absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Guertin, J.M.; Wood, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The transient performance of a commercial residential 3 ton lithium-bromide/water absorption chiller is studied. Emphasis was placed on separating the chiller response from that of the entire test facility so that its transient response could solely be observed and quantified. It was found that the entire system time response and thermal capacitance has a major impact on performance degradation due to transient operation. Isolation of the absorption chiller from system effects showed time to steady state performance to be a linear function of steady state water supply temperatures. These findings summarized in computer algorithms were used to map the integrated performance of a 3 ton absorption chiller.

  16. Atomistic Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Ropes and Hydrogen Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ju; Yip, Sidney; Fujiwara, Joshua

    2001-06-01

    Atomistic Simulation of Carbon Nanotube Ropes and Hydrogen Absorption Ju Li, Sidney Yip, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Cambridge, MA 02139; Joshua Fujiwara, Honda R&D Co., Ltd., Wako Research Center, JAPAN. Using Brenner type Reactive Empirical Bond Order (REBO) interatomic potentials, we perform atomistic simulations to calculate the optimized structures, tensile and bending strengths, and thermal conductivities of both straight and twisted single-walled nanotube ropes (bundles) where results from direct simulation are checked against those from the Green-Kubo linear response theory. Preliminary calculations are performed to study hydrogen absorption by SWNTs at room temperature and 77K.

  17. Absorption of a laser light pulse in a dense plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlman-Balloffet, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of the absorption of a laser light pulse in a transient, high-density, high-temperature plasma is presented. The plasma is generated around a metallic anode tip by a fast capacitive discharge occurring in vacuum. The amount of transmitted light is measured for plasmas made of different metallic ions in the regions of the discharge of high electronic density. Variation of the transmission during the laser pulse is also recorded. Plasma electrons are considered responsible for the very high absorption observed.

  18. The Soil Chemical Response to Decreases in Atmospheric Sulfate deposition Across the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, M. R.; Siemion, J.; Lawrence, G. B.; Mast, A.

    2012-12-01

    the WR site in northwestern Maine, which had the highest precipitation pH and the lowest stream-water pH, there were no clear changes in soil pH in the A- or B-horizons at either the ridge top or the mid slope sampling locations. Soil chemical analyses indicate that chemistry of the B-horizon had the greatest influence on stream water chemistry. WR A-horizon soils had the highest base saturation of the three sites, but WR B-horizon soils had the lowest base saturation. As a result although WR had the highest precipitation pH during the study period, it also had the lowest stream-water pH. In addition, soil pH did not change during the 10-year period when acid deposition was decreasing. During a 10-year period of decreasing acid deposition B-horizon soil chemistry from the mid and lower slope locations appeared to control the response of soil and water chemistry at all of the study sites.

  19. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  20. The intestinal absorption of folates.

    PubMed

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  1. Maximum entropy and drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Charter, M K; Gull, S F

    1991-10-01

    The application of maximum entropy to the calculation of drug absorption rates was introduced in an earlier paper. Here it is developed further, and the whole procedure is presented as a problem in scientific inference to be solved using Bayes' theorem. Blood samples do not need to be taken at equally spaced intervals, and no smoothing, interpolation, extrapolation, or other preprocessing of the data is necessary. The resulting input rate estimates are smooth and physiologically realistic, even with noisy data, and their accuracy is quantified. Derived quantities such as the proportion of the dose absorbed, and the mean and median absorption times, are also obtained, together with their error estimates. There are no arbitrarily valued parameters in the analysis, and no specific functional form, such as an exponential or polynomial, is assumed for the input rate functions. PMID:1783989

  2. Surface Enhance Infrared Absorption in nanogap structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yajing; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Natelson, Douglas

    Understanding the energy dissipation at the interface of molecules and metal nanostructures is of interest. We fabricate self-aligned gold nanostructures with nanometer-scale interelectrode spacing. Those gold nanostructures support highly hybridized plasmon modes with great enhanced local electric field. Previous studies have proven those structures to be suitable substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy with single-molecule sensitivity, which enables the study of molecular vibrational and electronic physics. We propose those structures as possible probes of the energy dissipation at the nanometer gap. By measuring the absorption spectrum of molecules assembled in the junction, we can estimate the local filed intensity at the gap and discuss the plasmonic responses of these self-aligned structures under infrared excitation.

  3. Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion.

    PubMed

    Kiela, Pawel R; Ghishan, Fayez K

    2016-04-01

    Virtually all nutrients from the diet are absorbed into blood across the highly polarized epithelial cell layer forming the small and large intestinal mucosa. Anatomical, histological, and functional specializations along the gastrointestinal tract are responsible for the effective and regulated nutrient transport via both passive and active mechanisms. In this chapter, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism of intestinal absorption of key nutrients such as sodium, anions (chloride, sulfate, oxalate), carbohydrates, amino acids and peptides, lipids, lipid- and water-soluble vitamins, as well as the major minerals and micronutrients. This outline, including the molecular identity, specificity, and coordinated activities of key transport proteins and genes involved, serves as the background for the following chapters focused on the pathophysiology of acquired and congenital intestinal malabsorption, as well as clinical tools to test and treat malabsorptive symptoms. PMID:27086882

  4. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  5. Photodetector with enhanced light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Kane, James

    1985-01-01

    A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the absorption of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.

  6. Absorption properties of identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sancho, Pedro

    2013-09-01

    Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the absorption probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.

  7. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  8. Multiphonon infrared absorption in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, M. M.; Garg, R. K.; Arora, M.

    1987-01-01

    Investigations have been carried out on silicon crystals, grown by float zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) methods, of infrared absorption bands using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. Multiphonon bands are identified in the light of recent theoretical calculations based on the total energy of silicon crystal lattice. Theoretical results of Ihm et al. (1) and Yin and Cohen (2,3) are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations of multiphonon infrared bands.

  9. Effect of nonlinear absorption on electric field applied lead chloride by Z-scan technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejeena, I.; Lillibai, Rahimkutty, M. H.; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.

    2014-10-01

    The preparation, spectral response and optical nonlinearity of gel grown lead chloride single crystals subjected to electric field of 20V using parallel plate arrangements have been investigated. Optical band gap of the samples were determined using linear absorption spectra. Open aperture z-scan was employed for the determination of nonlinear absorption coefficient of PbCl2 solution. The normalized transmittance curve exhibits a valley shows reverse saturable absorption. The non linear absorption at different input fluences were recorded using a single Gaussian laser beam in tight focus geometry. The RSA nature of the sample makes it suitable for optical limiting applications.

  10. Enhanced near-infrared absorption in graphene with multilayer metal-dielectric-metal nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tang, Linlong; Wei, Wei; Cheng, Xinlu; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    A multilayer metal-dielectric-metal nanostructure is proposed to enhance the absorption in graphene in a near-infrared region. The main feature of the structure is the generation of strong magnetic response within the dielectric spacer, which is directly related to absorption enhancement in graphene to over 22 times higher than that of free-standing monolayer graphene. We also show that absorption enhancement in graphene can be easily controlled by adjusting the geometry of the propose structure. The simple structural configuration and the flexible tunability in absorption enhancement are beneficial for practical fabrication and future applications in graphene-based active optoelectronic devices. PMID:27607608

  11. Nonlinear absorption coefficient of pulsed laser deposited MgZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Arpana Dar, Tanveer A.; Solanki, Ravi; Sen, Pratima; Phase, D. M.

    2015-06-24

    We report the imaginary part of 3{sup rd} order nonlinear susceptibility and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of Mg doped ZnO thin film using standard Z-scan technique. The origin of nonlinear absorption is attributed to the two photon absorption followed by the free carrier absorption because of the presence of oxygen vacancy defects. We have also confirmed the experimental results with the theoretical results obtained by considering the steady state response of a two level atom with the monochromatic field models.

  12. Effect of nonlinear absorption on electric field applied lead chloride by Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rejeena, I.; Lillibai,; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Rahimkutty, M. H.

    2014-10-15

    The preparation, spectral response and optical nonlinearity of gel grown lead chloride single crystals subjected to electric field of 20V using parallel plate arrangements have been investigated. Optical band gap of the samples were determined using linear absorption spectra. Open aperture z-scan was employed for the determination of nonlinear absorption coefficient of PbCl{sub 2} solution. The normalized transmittance curve exhibits a valley shows reverse saturable absorption. The non linear absorption at different input fluences were recorded using a single Gaussian laser beam in tight focus geometry. The RSA nature of the sample makes it suitable for optical limiting applications.

  13. GAX absorption cycle design process

    SciTech Connect

    Priedeman, D.K.; Christensen, R.N.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents an absorption system design process that relies on computer simulations that are validated by experimental findings. An ammonia-water absorption heat pump cycle at 3 refrigeration tons (RT) and chillers at 3.3 RT and 5 RT (10.5 kW, 11.6 kW, and 17.6 kW) were initially modeled and then built and tested. The experimental results were used to calibrate both the cycle simulation and the component simulations, yielding computer design routines that could accurately predict component and cycle performance. Each system was a generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle, and all were sized for residential and light commercial use, where very little absorption equipment is currently used. The specific findings of the 5 RT (17.6 kW) chiller are presented. Modeling incorporated a heat loss from the gas-fired generator and pressure drops in both the evaporator and absorber. Simulation results and experimental findings agreed closely and validated the modeling method and simulation software.

  14. Purge needs in absorption chillers

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Absorption chillers are regaining a significant share of large tonnage chiller sales, such as they had 20 years ago. Gas-fired chillers are now available that have a base energy (ultimate fuel usage) consumption rate per ton comparable to that in electric units. Effective purging in an absorption chiller is an absolute necessity to achieve the low chilled water temperature needed for dehumidification and to fully benefit from the energy savings offered by double-effect cycles. Although the purge system is usually not shown on the typical cycle schematic, its proper functioning is a key requirement for satisfactory machine operation. This article discusses the effect of noncondensible (N/C) gases on the absorption cooling process and the basics of purge systems. In addition, the article discusses the rationale for the important design step of selecting the location of the N/C probe, and discusses purge systems applicable to the direct-fired, double-effect machines now entering the marketplace.

  15. Formaldehyde absorption toward W51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Petuchowski, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) absorption toward the H II region complex W51A (G49.5 - 0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions has been measured with angular resolution of about 0.15 pc. The continuum H II region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping throughout the map than previous maps at lower resolution; in particular, two narrow regions of enhanced opacity are observed. The absorption in the velocity range 64-67 km/s LSR extends over most of the region, with an observed velocity gradient of 5.2 km/s pc. The opacity structure largely parallels the velocity structure, with a ridge of enhanced opacity to the north of the highest velocity feature. The S/N of the maps allows accurate modeling of the spectral profiles. Nine distinct clumps in the foreground clouds have been identified and parametrized, and column densities for the 1(11) and 2(12) rotational levels of orthoformaldehyde have been derived.

  16. Two-Photon Absorption of Metal-Assisted Chromophores.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ågren, Hans

    2014-12-01

    Aiming to understand the effect of a metal surface on nonlinear optical properties and the combined effects of surface and solvent environments on such properties, we present a multiscale response theory study, integrated with dynamics of the two-photon absorption of 4-nitro-4'-amino-trans-stilbene physisorbed on noble metal surfaces, considering two such surfaces, Ag(111) and Au(111), and two solvents, cyclohexane and water, as cases for demonstration. A few conclusions of general character could be drawn: While the geometrical change of the chromophore induced by the environment was found to notably alter (diminish) the two-photon absorption cross section in the polar medium, the effects of the metal surface and solvent on the electronic structure of the chromophore surpasses the geometrical effects and leads to a considerably enhanced two-photon absorption cross section in the polar solvent. This enhancement of two-photon absorption arises essentially from the metal charge image induced enlargement of the difference between the dipole moment of the excited state and the ground state. The orientation-dependence of the two-photon absorption is found to connect with the lateral rotation of the chromophore, where the two-photon absorption reaches its maximum when the polarization of the incident light coincides with the long-axis of the chromophore. Our results demonstrate a distinct enhancement of the two-photon absorption by a metal surface and a polar medium and envisage the employment of metal-chromophore composite materials for future development of nonlinear optical materials with desirable properties. PMID:26583246

  17. Sub-bandgap absorptance in chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Bonna

    2011-03-01

    ~It has been shown that optical doping with pulsed lasers~can achieve non-equilibrium concentrations up to one atomic % of heavy chalcogens in silicon.~~Compared to intrinsic silicon, this material exhibits near-unity absorption of sub-bandgap photons and has potential use in silicon infrared photodetectors and high-efficiency photovoltaics.~~Successful application of this material, however, requires better understanding of the exact mechanism responsible for sub-bandgap absorptance.~~Using a variety of techniques, we probe the chemical structure of this material system.~~We find that the short range structure of the dopant atom is correlated to the amount of sub-bandgap absorptance.~~We also compare the structure of different dopant species (S and Se) as well as different hyperdoping mechanisms (fs-laser doping vs. ion implantation followed by pulsed laser melting).~~In conjunction with theoretical modeling of expected chalcogen defect states, we identify dominant structural characteristics related to the observation of sub-bandgap absorptance. ~ Expanding on previous results, we demonstrate control of sub-bandgap absorptance through thermal processing. ~~In addition to suggesting a method to engineer the optical properties of the material, this result provides further insight into the thermodynamics of formation of a possible dopant-related defect state.~~We compare the thermodynamics measurements to the dopant structural measurements and posit a model of sub-bandgap absorptance and defect dynamics. ~These results provide a better understanding of the phenomena of sub-bandgap absorptance in chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon and a pathway to explore other hyperdoped semiconductors. ~~ We acknowledge the support of the Clare B. Luce Foundation and the Chesonis Family Foundation.

  18. Absorption Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of absorption spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on absorption spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)

  19. Transdermal absorption of radioprotectors in the rat using permeation-enhancing vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Lamperti, A.; Ziskin, M.C.; Bergey, E.; Gorlowski, J.; Sodicoff, M. )

    1990-11-01

    Topical radioprotection of rat skin with WR-2721 has not been effective presumably because the drug does not cross the stratum corneum to reach the epidermis and dermis. Earlier, we showed in the mouse that WR-2721 and cysteine dissolved in permeation-enhancing vehicles passed through the skin more readily than when in water. However, the most effective vehicles in the mouse were not necessarily as effective in the rat. Here we report that the most effective transport vehicles in the rat were (1) water with WR-2721, (2) water and dimethylformamide (DMF) with cysteine, and (3) water and DMF with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pretreatment of the skin with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) further improved the transfer of the radioprotectors across the skin in most cases. After pretreatment with DMSO, the most effective vehicles were (1) water for WR-2721, (2) water and methyl-2-pyrrolidone (M-2-P) for cysteine, and (3) DMF for PGE2.

  20. Disorder-induced enhancement of indirect absorption in a GeSn photodetector grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, H.; Chang, C.; Cheng, H. H.; Sun, G.; Soref, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report an investigation on the absorption mechanism of a GeSn photodetector with 2.4% Sn composition in the active region. Responsivity is measured and absorption coefficient is calculated. Square root of absorption coefficient linearly depends on photon energy indicating an indirect transition. However, the absorption coefficient is found to be at least one order of magnitude higher than that of most other indirect materials, suggesting that the indirect optical absorption transition cannot be assisted only by phonon. Our analysis of absorption measurements by other groups on the same material system showed the values of absorption coefficient on the same order of magnitude. Our study reveals that the strong enhancement of absorption for the indirect optical transition is the result of alloy disorder from the incorporation of the much larger Sn atoms into the Ge lattice that are randomly distributed.

  1. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  2. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear. PMID:22935997

  3. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  4. Physiological Importance and Mechanisms of Protein Hydrolysate Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhanghi, Brian M.; Matthews, James C.

    Understanding opportunities to maximize the efficient digestion and assimilation by production animals of plant- and animal-derived protein products is critical for farmers, nutritionists, and feed manufacturers to sustain and expand the affordable production of high quality animal products for human consumption. The challenge to nutritionists is to match gastrointestinal tract load to existing or ­inducible digestive and absorptive capacities. The challenge to feed manufacturers is to develop products that are efficient substrates for digestion, absorption, and/or both events. Ultimately, the efficient absorption of digesta proteins depends on the mediated passage (transport) of protein hydrosylate products as dipeptides and unbound amino acids across the lumen- and blood-facing membranes of intestinal absorptive cells. Data testing the relative efficiency of supplying protein as hydrolysates or specific dipeptides versus as free amino acids, and the response of animals in several physiological states to feeding of protein hydrolysates, are presented and reviewed in this chapter. Next, data describing the transport mechanisms responsible for absorbing protein hydrolysate digestion products, and the known and putative regulation of these mechanisms by their substrates (small peptides) and hormones are presented and reviewed. Several conclusions are drawn regarding the efficient use of protein hydrolysate-based diets for particular physiological states, the economically-practical application of which likely will depend on technological advances in the manufacture of protein hydrolysate products.

  5. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  6. Sign-reversed and magnitude-enhanced nonlinear absorption of Au-CdS core-shell hetero-nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Fan; Liang, Shan; Liu, Xiao-Li; Peng, Xiao-Niu; Li, Min; Yang, Zhong-Jian; Zhou, Li; Hao, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2013-04-01

    We synthesis uniform Au-CdS core-shell hetero-nanorods and demonstrate the effective plasmon-exciton interaction induced optical nonlinear enhancement in metal-semiconductor hetero-nanostructures. After growing CdS semiconductor shell onto the Au nanorods, the longitudinal plasmon resonance exhibits considerable red-shift with enlarged absorption intensity. Nonlinear absorption responses transform from saturable absorption to reverse saturable absorption, and effective nonlinear absorption coefficient β is increased from -7.7 to +22.2 cm/GW. The observed behaviors indicate strong plasmon-exciton interaction and great local field enhancement.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  8. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  9. Save by absorption heat pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, W.F.; Campagne, W.V.L.

    1987-12-01

    The author compares absorption heat pumping (AHP) to mechanical vapor compressor (MVC) heat pumping. The moving part of the AHP is a pump easy to maintain and inexpensive to spare. The mechanical component of the MVC is a vapor compressor which requires more maintenance and is cost-prohibitive to spare. Also, in the MVC system, a purified product stream is heat pumped in an open compressor, thus risking product contamination. In the AHP system, the cold and hot utilities are heat pumped. Therefore, product integrity with an AHP system is well protected as in a conventional fractionation column.

  10. Visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Edward T.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    1981-01-01

    The visible absorption spectrum of liquid ethylene at ≈ 108 K from 5500 Å to 7200 Å was measured by using a pulsed tunable dye laser, immersed-transducer, gated-detection opto-acoustic spectroscopy technique. The absorption features show the strongest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈2 × 10-2 cm-1 and the weakest band with an absorption coefficient of ≈1 × 10-4 cm-1. Proposed assignments of the observed absorption peaks involve combinations of overtones of local and normal modes of vibration of ethylene. PMID:16592978

  11. X-RAY ABSORPTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, Assaf; Behar, Ehud E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.il

    2013-09-01

    The soft X-ray photoelectric absorption of high-z quasars has been known for two decades, but has no unambiguous astrophysical context. We construct the largest sample to date of 58 high-redshift quasars (z > 0.45) selected from the XMM-Newton archive based on a high photon count criterion (>1800). We measure the optical depth {tau} at 0.5 keV and find that 43% of the quasars show significant absorption. We aim to find which physical parameters of the quasars, e.g., redshift, radio luminosity, radio loudness, or X-ray luminosity, drive their observed absorption. We compare the absorption behavior with redshift with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We also compare the absorption with a comparison sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows. Although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with diffuse IGM absorption, many intermediate-z (0.45 < z < 2) quasars are not sufficiently absorbed for this scenario, and are appreciably less absorbed than GRBs. Only 10/37 quasars at z < 2 are absorbed, and only 5/30 radio-quiet quasars are absorbed. We find a weak correlation between {tau} and z, and an even weaker correlation between {tau} and radio luminosity. These findings lead to the conclusion that although a diffuse IGM origin for the quasar absorption is unlikely, the optical depth does seem to increase with redshift, roughly as (1 + z){sup 2.2{+-}0.6}, tending to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 at high redshifts, similar to the high-z GRBs. This result can be explained by an ionized and clumpy IGM at z < 2, and a cold, diffuse IGM at higher redshift. If, conversely, the absorption occurs at the quasar, and owing to the steep L{sub x} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 7.1{+-}0.5} correlation in the present sample, the host column density scales as N{sub H}{proportional_to}L{sub x}{sup 0.7{+-}0.1}.

  12. Percutaneous absorption of selenium sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Farley, J.; Skelly, E.M.; Weber, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine selenium levels in the urine of Tinea patients before and after overnight application of a 2.5% selenium sulfide lotion. Selenium was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Hydride generation and carbon rod atomization were studied. It was concluded from this study that selenium is absorbed through intact skin. Selenium is then excreted, at least partially, in urine, for at least a week following treatment. The data show that absorption and excretion of selenium vary on an individual basis. Selenium levels in urine following a single application of selenium sulfide lotion do not indicate that toxic amounts of selenium are being absorbed. Repeated treatments with SeS/sub 2/ result in selenium concentrations in urine which are significantly higher than normal. Significant matrix effects are observed in the carbon rod atomization of urine samples for selenium determinations, even in the presence of a matrix modifier such as nickel. The method of standard additions is required to obtain accurate results in the direct determination of selenium in urine by carbon rod AAS.

  13. Formaldehyde Absorption toward W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G.F.; Bennett, C.L.; Petuchowski, S.J.

    1988-04-01

    We have measured formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) absorption toward the HII region complex W51A (G49.5-0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions with angular resolution of approximately 4 inch. The continuum HII region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. We observe no H{sub 2}CO emission in regions of low continuum intensity. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping than previous maps at lower resolution. The good S/N of the maps allows accurate estimation of the complicated line profiles, showing some of the absorbing clouds to be quite patchy. We list the properties of the opacity spectra for a number of positions both in the clumps and in the more diffuse regions of the absorbing clouds, and derive column densities for the 1{sub 11} and 2{sub 12} rotational levels of ortho-formaldehyde.

  14. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M.

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N -2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  16. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration. PMID:24827213

  17. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators. PMID:24492860

  18. Energy absorption by polymer crazing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pang, S. S.; Zhang, Z. D.; Chern, S. S.; Hsiao, C. C.

    1983-01-01

    During the past thirty years, a tremendous amount of research was done on the development of crazing in polymers. The phenomenon of crazing was recognized as an unusual deformation behavior associated with a process of molecular orientation in a solid to resist failure. The craze absorbs a fairly large amount of energy during the crazing process. When a craze does occur the surrounding bulk material is usually stretched to several hundred percent of its original dimension and creates a new phase. The total energy absorbed by a craze during the crazing process in creep was calculated analytically with the help of some experimental measurements. A comparison of the energy absorption by the new phase and that by the original bulk uncrazed medium is made.

  19. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  20. Graphene intracavity spaser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovik, Yu. E.; Nechepurenko, I. A.; Dorofeenko, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    We propose an intracavity plasmon absorption spectroscopy method based on graphene active plasmonics. It is shown that the plasmonic cavity contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to the quality factor Q of the graphene plasmonic cavity and reaches two orders of magnitude. The addition of gain medium into the cavity increases the sensitivity of method. Maximum sensitivity is reached in the vicinity of the plasmon generation threshold. The gain contribution to the sensitivity is proportional to Q1/2. The giant amplification of sensitivity in the graphene plasmon generator is associated with a huge path length, limited only by the decoherence processes. An analytical estimation of the sensitivity to loss caused by analyzed particles (molecules, nanoparticles, etc.) normalized by the single pass plasmon scheme is derived. Usage of graphene nanoflakes as plasmonic cavity allows a high spatial resolution to be reached, in addition to high sensitivity.

  1. Computer programs for absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N

    1969-03-01

    Brief descriptions are given of twenty-two modular computer programs for performing the basic numerical computations of absorption spectrophotometry. The programs, written in Fortran IV for card input and output, are available from the National Research Council of Canada. The input and output formats are standardized to permit easy interfacing to yield more complex data processing systems. Though these programs were developed for ir spectrophotometry, they are readily modified for use with digitized visual and uv spectrophotometers. The operations covered include ordinate and abscissal unit and scale interconversions, ordinate addition and subtraction, location of band maxima and minima, smoothing and differentiation, slit function convolution and deconvolution, band profile analysis and asymmetry quantification, Fourier transformation to time correlation curves, multiple overlapping band separation in terms of Cauchy (Lorentz), Gauss, Cauchy-Gauss product, and Cauchy-Gauss sum functions and cell path length determination from fringe spacing analysis. PMID:20072266

  2. Neutron scattering and absorption properties

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-12-01

    The Table in this report presents an evaluated set of values for the experimental quantities, which characterize the properties for scattering and absorption of neutrons. The neutron cross section is given for room temperature neutrons, 20.43{degree}C, corresponds to a thermal neutron energy of 0.0253 electron volts (eV) or a neutron velocity of 2200 meters/second. The neutron resonance integral is defined over the energy range from 0.5 eV to 0.1 {times} 10{sup 6} eV, or 0.1 MeV. A list of the major references used is given below. The literature cutoff data is October 1993. Uncertainties are given in parentheses. Parentheses with two or more numbers indicate values to the excited states(s) and to the ground state of the product nucleus.

  3. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  4. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  5. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  6. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators.

  7. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A; Palao, José P; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators. PMID:24492860

  8. Olefin recovery via chemical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Barchas, R.

    1998-06-01

    The recovery of fight olefins in petrochemical plants has generally been accomplished through cryogenic distillation, a process which is very capital and energy intensive. In an effort to simplify the recovery process and reduce its cost, BP Chemicals has developed a chemical absorption technology based on an aqueous silver nitrate solution. Stone & Webster is now marketing, licensing, and engineering the technology. The process is commercially ready for recovering olefins from olefin derivative plant vent gases, such as vents from polyethylene, polypropylene, ethylene oxide, and synthetic ethanol units. The process can also be used to debottleneck C{sub 2} or C{sub 3} splinters, or to improve olefin product purity. This paper presents the olefin recovery imp technology, discusses its applications, and presents economics for the recovery of ethylene and propylene.

  9. Infrared absorption modeling of VOx microbolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggoun, Mehdi; Jiang, Jianliang; Khan, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The absorption model plays an important role in the design of the microbolometer structure regarding the determination of the optimum thickness of the structure layers. Moreover, the infrared absorption depends on the wavelength of the radiation and the material properties. In this paper, we presented an Infrared absorption model with absorption coefficient of 96% at maximum absorption wavelength of 9.89μm which is very close to the expected value 10μm. This model was established by using MATLAB so that the simulation of the infrared absorption of the VOx microbolometer could be accomplished. In order to confirm the role of this modeling in the design of the device structure, comparison with other structures is also studied in this paper.

  10. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  11. Nonlinear optical absorption tuning in Bi3.15Nd0.85Ti3O12 ferroelectric thin films by thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Zhong, X. L.; Cheng, G. H.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, J. B.; Song, H. J.; Tan, C. B.; Li, B.

    2015-04-01

    The tunability of nonlinear optical (NLO) absorption in Bi3.15Nd0.85Ti3O12 (BNT) ferroelectric thin films was investigated through the open aperture Z-scan method with femtosecond laser pulses at the wavelength of 800 nm. NLO absorption responses of the BNT films were observed to be highly sensitive to the film thickness. As the film thickness increases from 106.8 to 139.7 nm, the NLO absorption changes from saturable absorption (SA) to reverse saturable absorption (RSA). When the film thickness further increases to 312.9 nm, the RSA effect is enhanced. A band-gap-related competition between the ground-state excitation and the two-photon absorption is responsible for the absorption switching behavior. Such a tunable NLO absorption can widen the photonic application of the BNT thin films.

  12. Absorption enhancement and sensing properties of Ag diamond nanoantenna arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yu-Yang; Yuan, Zong-Heng; Li, Xiao-Nan; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Wen-Tao; Ye, Song

    2015-07-01

    Noble metal nanoantenna could effectively enhance light absorption and increase detection sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a periodic Ag diamond nanoantenna array to increase the absorption of thin-film solar cells and to improve the detection sensitivity via localized surface plasmon resonance. The effect of nanoantenna arrays on the absorption enhancement is theoretically investigated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with manipulating the spectral response by geometrical parameters of nanoantennas. A maximum absorption enhancement factor of 1.51 has been achieved in this study. In addition, the relation between resonant wavelength (intensity reflectivity) and refractive index is discussed in detail. When detecting the environmental index using resonant wavelengths, a maximum detection sensitivity of about 837 nm/RIU (refractive index unit) and a resolution of about 10-3 RIU can be achieved. Moreover, when using the reflectivity, the sensitivity can be as high as 0.93 AU/RIU. Furthermore, we also have theoretically studied the effectiveness of nanoantennas in distinguishing chemical reagents, solution concentrations, and solution allocation ratios by detecting refractive index. From the results presented in this paper, we conclude that this work might be useful for biosensor detection and other types of detections. Project supported by the International Scientific and Technological Cooperation Projects of Guizhou Province, China (Grant No. 20117035) and the Program for Innovative Research Team of Guilin University of Electronic Technology, China (Grant No. IRTGUET).

  13. Adopting steam-driven absorption cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.T.; Perez-Blanco, H.; Ryan, W.A.

    1995-10-01

    Proper installation, water quality, and maintenance are essential to operating a cost-effective absorption system. Concerns about energy efficiency and the use of chlorofluorocarbons have led to the greater use of absorption machines for cooling applications. These machines, which reclaim condenser or exhaust-gas heat, are used in the most advanced cogeneration systems. Although absorption technology has a long history--with mixed success--its versatility has only recently begun to payoff.

  14. Conditions and drugs interfering with thyroxine absorption.

    PubMed

    Liwanpo, Llanyee; Hershman, Jerome M

    2009-12-01

    Food, dietary fibre and espresso coffee interfere with the absorption of levothyroxine. Malabsorptive disorders reported to affect the absorption of levothyroxine include coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, lactose intolerance as well as Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and atrophic gastritis. Many commonly used drugs, such as bile acid sequestrants, ferrous sulphate, sucralfate, calcium carbonate, aluminium-containing antacids, phosphate binders, raloxifene and proton-pump inhibitors, have also been shown to interfere with the absorption of levothyroxine. PMID:19942153

  15. Interstellar MG II Absorption Lines from Low-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Blades, J. Chris; Pettini, Max

    1995-08-01

    population as the higher redshift absorbers, although the sample is too small to permit a definitive analysis. There is some evidence for a sharp cutoff in equivalent width as p' increases, suggesting that low-redshift galaxies may be sharply bounded beyond ˜30 h-1 kpc. The luminosities of most of the absorbers in our program are such that the source sight lines pass through the predicted (Holmberg) optical radii of the galaxies. Hence the region between the optical radius and the gas radius of the z > 0.2 Mg II absorbers, ≍10 kpc to 30 h-1 kpc, remains unexplored at low redshift. Although our data do not enable us to determine whether the outer regions of galaxy disks are responsible for Mg II absorption systems, we note that 21 cm measurements currently available show that H I disks of the brightest spiral galaxies are already close to the sizes of higher redshift Mg II absorbers. We have found a correlation between the absolute blue magnitude of spiral galaxies and their H I radii measured at the N(H I) = 1019 and 1020 cm-2 level, and there is evidence that the correlation tends to that of the intermediate-redshift Mg II absorbing galaxies at lower N(H I) limits. Hence the outer regions of galaxy disks may well have sufficient column densities to produce Mg II absorption lines.

  16. Nutrient absorption and intestinal adaptation with ageing.

    PubMed

    Woudstra, Trudy; Thomson, Alan B R

    2002-02-01

    Malabsorption of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, minerals and vitamins has been described in the elderly. The ability of the intestine to adapt may be impaired in the elderly and this may lead to further malnutrition. Dietary manipulation may prove to be useful to enhance the needed intestinal absorption with ageing. There is an age-associated increase in the prevalence of dyslipidaemia as well as diabetes. These conditions may benefit from nutritional intervention targeted at reducing the absorption of some nutrients. With the continued characterization of the proteins involved in sterol and fatty acid absorption, therapeutic interventions to modify absorption may become available in the future. PMID:11977925

  17. Absorption Characteristics of Vertebrate Non-Visual Opsin, Opn3

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, Tomohiro; Nagata, Takashi; Mason, Benjamin; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    Most animals possess multiple opsins which sense light for visual and non-visual functions. Here, we show spectral characteristics of non-visual opsins, vertebrate Opn3s, which are widely distributed among vertebrates. We successfully expressed zebrafish Opn3 in mammalian cultured cells and measured its absorption spectrum spectroscopically. When incubated with 11-cis retinal, zebrafish Opn3 formed a blue-sensitive photopigment with an absorption maximum around 465 nm. The Opn3 converts to an all-trans retinal-bearing photoproduct with an absorption spectrum similar to the dark state following brief blue-light irradiation. The photoproduct experienced a remarkable blue-shift, with changes in position of the isosbestic point, during further irradiation. We then used a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay to investigate light-dependent cAMP responses in cultured cells expressing zebrafish, pufferfish, anole and chicken Opn3. The wild type opsins did not produce responses, but cells expressing chimera mutants (WT Opn3s in which the third intracellular loops were replaced with the third intracellular loop of a Gs-coupled jellyfish opsin) displayed light-dependent changes in cAMP. The results suggest that Opn3 is capable of activating G protein(s) in a light-dependent manner. Finally, we used this assay to measure the relative wavelength-dependent response of cells expressing Opn3 chimeras to multiple quantally-matched stimuli. The inferred spectral sensitivity curve of zebrafish Opn3 accurately matched the measured absorption spectrum. We were unable to estimate the spectral sensitivity curve of mouse or anole Opn3, but, like zebrafish Opn3, the chicken and pufferfish Opn3-JiL3 chimeras also formed blue-sensitive pigments. These findings suggest that vertebrate Opn3s may form blue-sensitive G protein-coupled pigments. Further, we suggest that the method described here, combining a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay with chimeric opsins possessing the third

  18. Demonstration That Calibration of the Instrument Response to Polarizations Parallel and Perpendicular to the Object Space Projected Slit of an Imaging Spectrometer Enable Measurement of the Atmospheric Absorption Spectrum in Region of the Weak CO2 Band for the Case of Arbitrary Polarization: Implication for the Geocarb Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Polonsky, I. N.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (TIMS) unit rebuilt to operate in a narrow spectral region, approximately 1603 to 1615 nm, of the weak CO2 band as described by Kumer et al. (2013, Proc. SPIE 8867, doi:10.1117/12.2022668) was used to conduct the demonstration. An integrating sphere (IS), linear polarizers and quarter wave plate were used to confirm that the instrument's spectral response to unpolarized light, to 45° linearly polarized light and to circular polarized light are identical. In all these cases the intensity components Ip = Is where Ip is the component parallel to the object space projected slit and Is is perpendicular to the slit. In the circular polarized case Ip = Is in the time averaged sense. The polarizer and IS were used to characterize the ratio Rθ of the instrument response to linearly polarized light at the angle θ relative to parallel from the slit, for increments of θ from 0 to 90°, to that of the unpolarized case. Spectra of diffusely reflected sunlight passed through the polarizer in increments of θ, and divided by the respective Rθ showed identical results, within the noise limit, for solar spectrum multiplied by the atmospheric transmission and convolved by the Instrument Line Shape (ILS). These measurements demonstrate that unknown polarization in the diffusely reflected sunlight on this small spectral range affect only the slow change across the narrow band in spectral response relative to that of unpolarized light and NOT the finely structured / high contrast spectral structure of the CO2 atmospheric absorption that is used to retrieve the atmospheric content of CO2. The latter is one of the geoCARB mission objectives (Kumer et al, 2013). The situation is similar for the other three narrow geoCARB bands; O2 A band 757.9 to 768.6 nm; strong CO2 band 2045.0 to 2085.0 nm; CH4 and CO region 2300.6 to 2345.6 nm. Polonsky et al have repeated the mission simulation study doi:10.5194/amt-7-959-2014 assuming no use of a geo

  19. Absorption Optics of Aqueous Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Ranjini; Gittings, Alex; Durian, D. J.

    2002-11-01

    Aqueous foams are composed of gas bubbles packed together in a small volume of soapy water. The large number of gas-liquid interfaces in foams results in very strong scattering of light, which explains the opaque nature of conventional aqueous foams such as shaving foams and mousse. For dry foams, the interfaces can take the following three forms: the soap films where two bubbles meet, the triangular plateau borders where three soap films meet and the vertices where four plateau borders meet. Previous experiments have shown that most of the scattering occurs from the plateau borders 2,3 and the transport mean free path of light (l*), the bubble radius (R) and the liquid fraction of foam (epsilon) is related through the relation l*=R/(epsilon0.5). To understand the reflection and scattering of light at the gas-bubble interfaces, we study the absorption of photons in the liquid network as a function of the foam absorptivity. We do this to confirm if the time spent by the photons in the liquid phase is proportional to the liquid fraction of the foam. Our results indicate that for a specific range of liquid fractions (0.05 is less than e is less than 0.1), the photons seem to get trapped in the liquid network. This result is independent of the absorptivity of the foam and leads us to conclude that under appropriate conditions, an aqueous foam behaves very much like an optical fiber network. Aqueous foam is generated in the lab by the method of turbulent mixing of N2 gas with a jet of alpha-olefin-sulfonate (AOS) solution. The foam has been made absorbing by dissolving small quantities of rhodamine dye (R = 0.005 g/l, R = 0.01 g/l and R = 0.0124 g/l) in the AOS solution. The transmission of photons through the foams of liquid fractions 0.0297 is less than e is less than 0.35 has been studied using Diffuse Transmission Spectroscopy (DTS). For each liquid fraction, the transport mean free path l* (the length over which the photon travels before it gets completely

  20. Effect of water absorption on pollen adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Carson Meredith, J

    2015-03-15

    Pollens possess a thin liquid coating, pollenkitt, which plays a major role in adhesion by forming capillary menisci at interfaces. Unfortunately, the influence of humidity on pollenkitt properties and capillary adhesion is unknown. Because humidity varies widely in the environment, the answers have important implications for better understanding plant reproduction, allergy and asthma, and pollen as atmospheric condensation nuclei. Here, pollenkitt-mediated adhesion of sunflower pollen to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of humidity. The results quantify for the first time the significant water absorption of pollenkitt and the resulting complex dependence of adhesion on humidity. On hydrophilic Si, adhesion increased with increasing RH for pollens with or without pollenkitt, up to 200nN at 70% RH. In contrast, on hydrophobic PS, adhesion of pollenkitt-free pollen is independent of RH. Surprisingly, when pollenkitt was present adhesion forces on hydrophobic PS first increased with RH up to a maximum value at 35% RH (∼160nN), and then decreased with further increases in RH. Independent measurement of pollenkitt properties is used with models of capillary adhesion to show that humidity-dependent changes in pollenkitt wetting and viscosity are responsible for this complex adhesion behavior. PMID:25524008

  1. Influence of meal composition on canine jejunal water and electrolyte absorption.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, J A; Zinner, M J; Bastidas, J A; Orandle, M S; Yeo, C J

    1992-02-01

    The absorption of water and electrolytes from the proximal jejunal lumen increases immediately after a meal. This meal-induced jejunal absorption occurs in jejunal segments out of normal gastrointestinal continuity. This study was designed to characterize the jejunal absorptive response to a series of isovolumetric gavage-delivered stimuli. Twenty-five-centimeter canine proximal jejunal Thiry-Vella fistulas were constructed, and jejunal absorption studies (n = 66) were performed by luminal perfusion of the jejunal segments with an isotonic buffer containing 14C-labeled polyethylene glycol. Each study consisted of a 1-hour basal period, followed by a 3-hour experimental period. Nine groups were studied, each receiving one of the following isovolumetric stimuli delivered via the gavage route: water, 0.9% saline, mixed meal, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mannitol (150 mmol/L, 300 mmol/L, and 600 mmol/L). The water and 0.9% saline gavage groups showed no significant changes in integrated postprandial water and electrolyte absorption above basal. The isocaloric mixed meal, protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and mannitol groups all had significantly increased integrated postprandial jejunal water and electrolyte absorption above basal (P less than 0.05). These results indicate that a proabsorptive signal for meal-induced jejunal absorption originates from or distal to the stomach. Meal-induced jejunal absorption occurs in response to nutrients of diverse composition and is also responsive to nonnutritive solutes such as mannitol. These findings support a new role for gastric or intestinal chemo- or osmo-receptors in stimulating the neurohumoral mechanisms that mediate meal-induced jejunal absorption. PMID:1732119

  2. Fluid absorption solar energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A conventional solar dynamic system transmits solar energy to the flowing fluid of a thermodynamic cycle through structures which contain the gas and thermal energy storage material. Such a heat transfer mechanism dictates that the structure operate at a higher temperature than the fluid. This investigation reports on a fluid absorption receiver where only a part of the solar energy is transmitted to the structure. The other part is absorbed directly by the fluid. By proportioning these two heat transfer paths the energy to the structure can preheat the fluid, while the energy absorbed directly by the fluid raises the fluid to its final working temperature. The surface temperatures need not exceed the output temperature of the fluid. This makes the output temperature of the gas the maximum temperature in the system. The gas can have local maximum temperatures higher than the output working temperature. However local high temperatures are quickly equilibrated, and since the gas does not emit radiation, local high temperatures do not result in a radiative heat loss. Thermal radiation, thermal conductivity, and heat exchange with the gas all help equilibrate the surface temperature.

  3. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  4. Gastrointestinal absorption of metallic mercury.

    PubMed

    Sandborgh-Englund, Gunilla; Einarsson, Curt; Sandström, Magnus; Ekstrand, Jan

    2004-09-01

    The absorption of mercury from the gastrointestinal systems of 7 subjects, of whom none had any amalgam fillings, was examined in this study. The authors obtained quantitative information about mercury concentration in plasma and duodenal fluid after the gastrointestinal systems of the subjects were exposed to liquid elemental mercury enclosed in rubber balloons (i.e., approximately 20 g of mercury), using a standard procedure followed for the sampling of bile. Plasma samples were collected prior to exposure, as well as up to 10 d following exposure, and duodenal fluid was collected 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, and 6 h during the intubation process. The authors studied the kinetics of dissolution in vitro by leaching elemental liquid mercury and mercuric chloride. The results of this study supported the hypothesis that metallic mercury is oxidized in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, the authors determined that duodenal intubation, while using liquid metallic mercury in rubber bags, resulted in the diffusion of minor amounts of atomic elemental mercury through the rubber walls. The absorbed amount of mercury that reached the central circulation was comparable to a daily dose of mercury from dental amalgam in the amalgam-bearing population. PMID:16381485

  5. Light absorption in distorted graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Ortiz, Saúl; Valenzuela, David; Raya, Alfredo; Sánchez-Madrigal, Saúl

    2016-04-01

    We model the low energy dynamics of graphene in the continuum in terms of a version of reduced quantum electrodynamics (QED) restricting fermions to a (2 + 1)-dimensional brane, while photons remain within the (3 + 1)-dimensional bulk. For charge carriers, besides the Dirac mass gap, we consider a Haldane mass term which is induced by parametrizing an effective parity 𝒫 and time-reversal 𝒯 symmetry breaking that occurs on the brane when distortions of the honeycomb array are such that the equivalence between sublattices is lost. We make use of the relativistic Kubo formula and carry out an explicit calculation of the transverse conductivity. As expected, the filling factor is a half (in natural units) for each fermion species. Furthermore, assuming that a sample of this material is radiated perpendicularly with polarized monochromatic light of frequency ω, from the modified Maxwell’s equations we address the problem of light absorption in graphene in terms of the said conductivity. We observe that light penetrating the sample changes its angle of polarization solely by effect of the induced mass, in analogy to the Faraday effect but in absence of magnetic fields. This effect might be relevant for the development of optic filters based on mechanical stretching of graphene flakes.

  6. Experimental measurements of the spectral absorption coefficient of pure fused silica optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Moore, Travis J; Jones, Matthew R

    2015-02-20

    Knowledge of the spectral absorption coefficient of fused silica optical fibers is important in modeling heat transfer in the processes and applications in which these fibers are used. An experimental method used to measure the spectral absorption coefficient of optical fibers is presented. Radiative energy from a blackbody radiator set at different temperatures is directed through the optical fibers and into an FTIR spectrometer. Spectral instrument response functions are calculated for different fiber lengths. The ratios of the slopes of the instrument response functions for the different lengths of fibers are used to solve for the spectral absorption coefficient of the fibers. The spectral absorption coefficient of low OH pure fused silica optical fibers is measured between the wavelengths 1.5 and 2.5 μm. PMID:25968202

  7. On the dynamic and static manifestation of molecular absorption in thin films probed by a microcantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Finot, Eric; Fabre, Arnaud; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical resonators shaped like microcantilevers have been demonstrated as a platform for very sensitive detection of chemical and biological analytes. However, its use as an analytical tool will require fundamental understanding of the molecular absorption-induced effects in the static and dynamic sensor response. The effect of absorption-induced surface stress on the microcantilever response is here investigated using palladium hydride formation. It is shown that the resonance and deformation states of the cantilever monitored simultaneously exhibit excellent correlation with the phase of the hydride formation. However, the associated frequency shifts and quasistatic bending are observed to be independent during solid solution phase. Importantly, absorption-induced changes in the elastic parameters of the palladium film are found to play a dominant role in the static and dynamic response. The presented results help in discerning the parameters that control the cantilever response as well as the relationships between these parameters.

  8. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  9. Predicting Moisture Absorption in Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Heat transport programs adaptable for absorption analysis. Lightweight sandwich panel specimen used for comparison of water absorption measurements with program predictions. In program model, moisture -- like heat in heat-transport problem moves through variety of materials and structures along complex paths.

  10. High-Absorptance Radiative Heat Sink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cafferty, T.

    1983-01-01

    Absorptance of black-painted open-cell aluminum honeycomb improved by cutting honeycomb at angle or bias rather than straight across. This ensures honeycomb cavities escapes. At each reflection radiation attenuated by absorption. Applications include space-background simulators, space radiators, solar absorbers, and passive coolers for terrestrial use.

  11. Cosmic ray variations during PCA type absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozin, I. D.

    1972-01-01

    It is shown based on data on the cosmic-ray neutron component, ionospheric soundings, and measurements of cosmic radio-emission absorption at Vostok station (Antarctica) that the ionization of the lower ionosphere increases during low intensity of Forbush-type cosmic rays. This is manifested in increased absorption and the appearance of strong sporadic layers in the E-region.

  12. The electronic absorption edge of petroleum

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, O.C.; Mitra-Kirtley, S.; Zhu, Yifu

    1992-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectra of more than 20 crude oils and asphaltenes are examined. The spectral location of the electronic absorption edge varies over a wide range, from the near-infrared for heavy oils and asphaltenes to the near-UV for gas condensates. The functional form of the electronic absorption edge for all crude oils (measured) is characteristic of the {open_quotes}Urbach tail,{close_quotes} a phenomenology which describes electronic absorption edges in wide-ranging materials. The crude oils all show similar Urbach widths, which are significantly larger than those generally found for various materials but are similar to those previously reported for asphaltenes. Monotonically increasing absorption at higher photon energy continues for all crude oils until the spectral region is reached where single-ring aromatics dominate absorption. However, the rate of increasing absorption at higher energies moderates, thereby deviating from the Urbach behavior. Fluorescence emission spectra exhibit small red shifts from the excitation wavelength and small fluorescence peak widths in the Urbach regions of different crude oils, but show large red shifts and large peak widths in spectral regions which deviate from the Urbach behavior. This observation implies that the Urbach spectral region is dominated by lowest-energy electronic absorption of corresponding chromophores. Thus, the Urbach tail gives a direct measure of the population distribution of chromophores in crude oils. Implied population distributions are consistent with thermally activated growth of large chromophores from small ones. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Iron absorption from intrinsically-labeled lentils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low iron (Fe) absorption from important staple foods may contribute to Fe deficiency in developing countries. To date, there are few studies examining the Fe bioavailability of pulse crops as commonly prepared and consumed by humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the Fe absorpt...

  14. Photoelectric absorption cross sections with variable abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balucinska-Church, Monika; Mccammon, Dan

    1992-01-01

    Polynomial fit coefficients have been obtained for the energy dependences of the photoelectric absorption cross sections of 17 astrophysically important elements. These results allow the calculation of X-ray absorption in the energy range 0.03-10 keV in material with noncosmic abundances.

  15. On the absorption of alendronate in rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, J H; Chen, I W; deLuna, F A

    1994-12-01

    Alendronate is an antiosteolytic agent under investigation for the treatment of a number of bone disorders. Since the compound is a zwitterion with five pKa values and is completely ionized in the intestine at the physiological pH, absorption is poor; less than 1% of an oral dose is available systemically in rats. In the present studies, absorption was found to be predominantly in the upper part of the small intestine. Administration of buffered solutions of alendronate (pH 2-11) did not improve absorption. Whereas food markedly impaired the absorption of alendronate, EDTA enhanced absorption in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of rats with ulcerogenic agents, mepirizole, acetylsalicylic acid, or indomethacin, resulted in a 3-7-fold increase in the oral absorption of alendronate. The absorption of phenol red, added as an indicator of intestinal tissue damage, was also increased in rats with experimental peptic ulcers. The enhanced absorption of alendronate observed in rats with experimental peptic ulcers was attributed to the alteration of the integrity of the intestinal membrane. PMID:7891304

  16. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  17. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  18. A Low-Cost Quantitative Absorption Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Daniel R.; Todt, Michael A.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to make absorption spectrophotometry available to high school chemistry and physics classes, we have designed an inexpensive visible light absorption spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer was constructed using LEGO blocks, a light emitting diode, optical elements (including a lens), a slide-mounted diffraction grating, and a…

  19. VAPID: Voigt Absorption-Profile [Interstellar] Dabbler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Ian D.

    2015-06-01

    VAPID (Voigt Absorption Profile [Interstellar] Dabbler) models interstellar absorption lines. It predicts profiles and optimizes model parameters by least-squares fitting to observed spectra. VAPID allows cloud parameters to be optimized with respect to several different data set simultaneously; those data sets may include observations of different transitions of a given species, and may have different S/N ratios and resolutions.

  20. Absorption of ozone by porous particles

    SciTech Connect

    Afanas'ev, V.P.; Dorofeev, S.B.; Sinitsyn, V.I.; Smirnov, B.M.

    1981-11-01

    The absorption of ozone by porous zeolite, silica gel, and activated carbon particles has been studied experimentally. It was shown that in addition to absorption, dissociation of ozone on the surface plays an important and sometimes decisive role. The results obtained were used to analyze the nature of ball lightning.

  1. Low absorptance porcelain-on-aluminum coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, H.

    1979-01-01

    Porcelain thermal-control coating for aluminum sheet and foil has solar absorptance of 0.22. Specially formulated coating absorptance is highly stable, changing only 0.03 after 1,000 hours of exposure to simulated sunlight and can be applied by standard commercial methods.

  2. NICKEL ABSORPTION AND KINETICS IN HUMAN VOLUNTEERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical modelling was performed of the kinetics of nickel absorption, distribution and elimination in healthy human volunteers, who ingested NiS04 in drinking water or added food. ickel was analyzed by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrophotometry in serum, urine, and f...

  3. Direct and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Different strategies of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for direct and absolute absorption measurements are presented. Besides selected strategies for bulk and coating absorption measurements, respectively, a new strategy is introduced allowing the transfer of the LID technique to very small samples and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with a very weak photo-thermal response. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure. The electrical calibration of the LID setup is compared to two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples in combination with numerical simulations. Applying the LID technique, we report on the characterization of AR coated LBO crystals used in high power NIR/VIS laser applications. The comparison of different LBO crystals shows that there are significant differences in both, the AR coating and the LBO bulk absorption. These differences are much larger at 515 nm than at 1030 nm. Absorption spectroscopy measurements combining LID technique with a high power OPO laser system indicate that the coating process affects the LBO bulk absorption properties. Furthermore, the change of the absorption upon 1030 nm laser irradiation of a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal is investigated and compared to recent results. Finally, Ytterbium doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers are characterized with respect to the absorption induced attenuation at 1550 nm in order to compare these data with the total attenuation obtained for the subsequently manufactured laser active fibers.

  4. Direct and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Different strategies of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for direct and absolute absorption measurements are presented. Besides selected strategies for bulk and coating absorption measurements, respectively, a new strategy is introduced allowing the transfer of the LID technique to very small samples and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with a very weak photo-thermal response. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure. The electrical calibration of the LID setup is compared to two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples in combination with numerical simulations. Applying the LID technique, we report on the characterization of AR coated LBO crystals used in high power NIR/VIS laser applications. The comparison of different LBO crystals shows that there are significant differences in both, the AR coating and the LBO bulk absorption. These differences are much larger at 515 nm than at 1030 nm. Absorption spectroscopy measurements combining LID technique with a high power OPO laser system indicate that the coating process affects the LBO bulk absorption properties. Furthermore, the change of the absorption upon 1030 nm laser irradiation of a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal is investigated and compared to recent results. Finally, Ytterbium doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers are characterized with respect to the absorption induced attenuation at 1550 nm in order to compare these data with the total attenuation obtained for the subsequently manufactured laser active fibers.

  5. Side chain directly participates in the solar absorption of fullerene derivative PC61BM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xiu-Na; Chen, Guang-Hua; Du, Ying-Ying; Li, Wen-Jie; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian; Li, Wei-Yin; Chen, Fu-Yi

    2014-11-01

    We have studied the role of the phenyl-butyric-acid-methyl-ester side chain in the solar absorption of fullerene derivatives PC61BM. The UV-Vis-NIR spectra are calculated with the linear response theory within time-dependent density functional theory. The initial and final orbitals of the optical transitions in solar spectrum range are analyzed in detail. The electronic states of the side chain hybridize with the states of C60 cage, increasing the number of the initial orbitals of the solar absorption. So the side chain directly participates in the solar absorption. A distortion or length change of the side chain has obvious effects on the photoabsorption.

  6. Peak, multi-peak and broadband absorption in graphene-based one-dimensional photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloua, R.; Kebbab, Z.; Chiker, F.; Khadraoui, M.; Sahraoui, K.; Bouzidi, A.; Medles, M.; Mathieu, C.; Benramdane, N.

    2014-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the possibility of enhancing light absorption in graphene-based one dimensional photonic crystal. We demonstrate that it is possible to achieve total light absorption at technologically important wavelengths using one-dimensional graphene-based photonic crystals. By means of the transfer matrix method, we investigate the effect of refractive indices and layer numbers on the optical response of the structure. We found that it is possible to achieve one peak, multi-peak or broadband, and complete optical absorption. As a result, the proposed photonic structures enable myriad potential applications such as photodetection, shielding and optical sensing.

  7. Coherent perfect absorption induced by the nonlinearity of a Helmholtz resonator.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, V; Richoux, O; Theocharis, G

    2016-07-01

    In this work, coherent perfect absorption of sound waves induced by the nonlinear response of a Helmholtz Resonator side loaded to a waveguide, is reported. It is shown that this two-port system can perfectly absorb two high amplitude symmetric incident waves under a certain condition. For the one-sided incidence configuration, this condition leads to an absorption equal to 0.5. Experiments verify these results and are in agreement with an analytical nonlinear impedance model for the resonator. The nonlinear control of perfect absorption opens new possibilities in the design of high amplitude sound attenuators for aero-engine applications. PMID:27475220

  8. Ultraviolet absorption of common spacecraft contaminants. [to control effects of contaminants on optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Organic contamination of ultraviolet optical systems is discussed. Degradation of signal by reflection, scattering, interference, and absorption is shown. The first three processes depend on the physical state of the contaminant while absorption depends on its chemical structure. The latter phenomenon is isolated from the others by dissolving contaminants in cyclohexane and determining absorption spectra from 2100A to 3600A. A variety of materials representing the types of contaminants responsible for most spaceflight hardware problems is scanned and the spectra is presented. The effect of thickness is demonstrated for the most common contaminant, di(2 ethyl hexyl)phthalate, by scanning successive dilutions.

  9. Binary TLBO algorithm assisted for designing plasmonic nano bi-pyramids-based absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Emami, Farzin; Nozhat, Najmeh

    2014-07-01

    A new efficient binary optimization method based on Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization (TLBO) algorithm is proposed to design an array of plasmonic nano bi-pyramids in order to achieve maximum absorption coefficient spectrum. In binary TLBO, a group of learners consisting of a matrix with binary entries controls the presence ('1') or the absence ('0') of nanoparticles in the array. Simulation results show that absorption coefficient strongly depends on the localized position of plasmonic nanoparticles. Non-periodic structures have more appropriate response in term of absorption coefficient. This approach is useful in optical applications such as solar cells and plasmonic nano antenna.

  10. Operating data on a novel absorption refrigeration cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, R.J.

    1993-12-23

    This report describes the modifications and repairs made to the 200 ton absorption refrigeration pilot plant since April 1992, when Clarkson University assumed responsibility for it. Current operating problems and the performance of the plant, achieved to date, are detailed. Performance has been limited by small air leaks into the absorption section of the plant and by plugging in a heat exchanger which has limited the flow of purified glycol to the absorber. Nonetheless, the plant has been operated for periods of over eight hours with sustained cooling loads of 40 tons. Chilled water has been produced at a temperature as low as 38 degrees Fahrenheit. The principal leak sources have been pinpointed. Plans are described for achieving plant operation at designed levels.

  11. Nonlinear dynamics of absorption and photobleaching of dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, Francesca; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2008-06-01

    The celebrated Lambert-Beer law of light absorption in photochromic media is only valid at low intensities of incident light and low concentration of chromophore. Here we address the generic problem of photoabsorption dynamics, experimentally studying the case of azobenzene isomerization. We show that the nonlinear regime is very common and easy to achieve in many practical situations, especially in thick samples where the light depletes the chromophore in the first layers and can propagate through the medium with a subexponential law. This result holds not only for azobenzene isomerization but for all photochromic processes. Importantly, the crossover into the nonlinear absorption regime only weakly depends on the dye concentration and solution viscosity. We experimentally quantify the characteristics of this peculiar optical response and determine the key transition rate constants.

  12. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  13. Extremely fast hydrogen absorption/desorption through platinum overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Połczyński, Piotr; Jurczakowski, Rafał

    2016-02-01

    The hydrogen electrosorption in thin palladium films (50-1000 nm) was investigated at palladium electrodes covered with platinum overlayers. The results for this model system show that the rates of the hydrogen sorption/desorption are orders of magnitude higher for platinized samples with respect to pure palladium. The highest absorption kinetics have been observed for Pd electrodes fully covered with 1-3 platinum monolayers. By means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) we have shown that the process is diffusion limited at platinized Pd layers. Diffusion coefficient, DH, determined in EIS, is two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for thin palladium films and approaches DH for bulk palladium. The system stability after hydrogen absorption was assessed and the sorption mechanism was discussed. Surprisingly high durability of the platinized palladium enables its use in a variety of applications where fast and selective response in the presence of hydrogen is required.

  14. Extent of propionate metabolism during absorption from the bovine ruminoreticulum

    PubMed Central

    Weigand, Edgar; Young, Jerry W.; McGilliard, A. Dare

    1972-01-01

    1. Solutions containing acetate, [2-14C]propionate and butyrate were placed into the ruminoreticulum of calves to measure the extent to which propionate is metabolized by ruminoreticulum epithelium. In response to five different combinations of pH and total volatile fatty acid concentrations, propionate absorption rates ranged from 89 to 341mmol/h. 2. The extent of propionate conversion into lactate, calculated from both concentration and specific radioactivity in portal and arterial blood, averaged 4.9 (range 2.5–9.1)%. 3. Circulating glucose synthesized from propionate had a higher specific radioactivity than arterial lactate and was converted into lactate by gastrointestinal tissues. Thus conversion of propionate into lactate was overestimated but was corrected to average 2.3 (1.0–4.6)%. 4. The estimates of propionate conversion into lactate were negatively correlated with its rate of absorption. PMID:5075230

  15. Effects of alpha- and beta-tigogenin cellobiosides on cholesterol absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Malinow, M.R.; Gardner, J.O.; Nelson, J.T.; McLaughlin, P.; Upson, B.; Aigner-Held, R.

    1986-09-01

    We have synthesized alpha- and beta-anomers of tigogenin cellobioside and have determined their effects on intestinal absorption of (1,2-/sup 3/H)cholesterol in rats. We demonstrated that the loss of tritium label likely to occur in the conversion of cholesterol to coprostanone was minimal. Dose response studies showed that both anomers depressed intestinal absorption of cholesterol but the depression was greater with the beta-anomer.

  16. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  17. Single-molecule imaging by optical absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celebrano, Michele; Kukura, Philipp; Renn, Alois; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    To date, optical studies of single molecules at room temperature have relied on the use of materials with high fluorescence quantum yield combined with efficient spectral rejection of background light. To extend single-molecule studies to a much larger pallet of substances that absorb but do not fluoresce, scientists have explored the photothermal effect, interferometry, direct attenuation and stimulated emission. Indeed, very recently, three groups have succeeded in achieving single-molecule sensitivity in absorption. Here, we apply modulation-free transmission measurements known from absorption spectrometers to image single molecules under ambient conditions both in the emissive and strongly quenched states. We arrive at quantitative values for the absorption cross-section of single molecules at different wavelengths and thereby set the ground for single-molecule absorption spectroscopy. Our work has important implications for research ranging from absorption and infrared spectroscopy to sensing of unlabelled proteins at the single-molecule level.

  18. Absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghawas, H.A.; Ruiz-Ibanez, G.; Sandall, O.C. )

    1988-01-01

    The absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was studied over a range of temperatures and MDEA concentrations. MDEA is commonly used for selective absorption of hydrogen sulfide in the presence of carbon dioxide. However, sulfur in the form of COS may also be present and it is necessary that estimates of absorption rates of this compound be made. The objective of this study is to determine the physiochemical properties needed to predict COS absorption rates in aqueous MDEA. Free gas solubility and the diffusivity of COS in MDEA solutions were measured over the temperature range 15 to 40{sup 0}C for MDEA concentrations up to 30 weight per cent using the nitrous oxide analogy method. Solubilities were measured volumetrically in an equilibrium cell and diffusivities were measured using a laminar liquid jet absorber. The kinetics of the reaction between COS and MDEA were studied by measuring absorption rates in a single wetted-sphere absorber.

  19. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  20. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  1. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  2. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  3. Direct Measurement of Aerosol Absorption Using Photothermal Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Efforts to bound the contribution of light absorption in aerosol radiative forcing is still very much an active area of research in large part because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering. In response to this and other technical issues, the aerosol community has actively pursued the development of new instruments to measure aerosol absorption (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP)). In this poster, we introduce the technique of photothermal interferometry (PTI), which combines the direct measurement capabilities of photothermal spectroscopy (PTS) with high-sensitivity detection of the localized heating brought about by the PT process through interferometry. At its most fundamental level, the PTI technique measures the optical pathlength change that one arm of an interferometer (referred to as the 'probe' arm) experiences relative to the other arm of the interferometer (called the 'reference' arm). When the two arms are recombined at a beamsplitter, an interference pattern is created. If the optical pathlength in one arm of the interferometer changes, a commensurate shift in the interference pattern will take place. For the specific application of measuring light absorption, the heating of air surrounding the light- absorbing aerosol following laser illumination induces the optical pathlength change. This localized heating creates a refractive index gradient causing the probe arm of the interferometer to take a slightly different optical pathlength relative to the unperturbed reference arm. This effect is analogous to solar heating of a road causing mirages. As discussed above, this altered optical pathlength results in a shift in the interference pattern that is then detected as a change in the signal intensity by a single element detector. The current optical arrangement utilizes a folded Jamin interferometer design (Sedlacek, 2006) that provides a platform that is robust with respect to sensitivity

  4. Absorption chillers: Technology for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.W.; Garland, R.W.

    1997-12-31

    In an era of heightened awareness of energy efficiency and the associated environmental impacts, many industries worldwide are exploring ``environmentally friendly`` technologies that provide equivalent or improved performance while reducing or eliminating harmful side-effects. The refrigeration and air-conditioning industry, due to its reliance on CFCs and HCFCs, has invested in research in alternatives to the industry standard vapor compression machines. One alternative technology with great promise is chemical absorption. Absorption chillers offer comparable refrigeration output with reduced SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} emissions. Absorption chillers do not use CFCs or HCFCs, refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Additionally, gas-fired absorption chillers can save significant amounts in energy costs when used in combination with a vapor compression chiller in a hybrid system. The hybrid system can take advantage of the comparatively low price of natural gas (per unit ton) and rely on the high performance of vapor compression when electricity prices are lower. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction for those new to absorption technology as well as a discussion of selected high efficiency cycles, a discussion on the technology of coupling absorption with vapor compression systems to form a hybrid system, and the environmental impacts of absorption.

  5. On the statistics of quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderwijk, E. J.

    1984-12-01

    The distribution of absorption lines in 13 quasar spectra is analyzed and shown to be fully consistent with the hypothesis of randomly, but not uniformly, distributed absorption features. The analysis by Libby et al. (1984), in which it is claimed that the number of wavelength coincidences among absorption lines in different quasar spectra (as measured in the rest frame of the quasars) is much larger than expected, implying absorbers in the quasars themselves, is totally invalid. Instead, the number of these coincidences is fully commensurate with the expected one on the assumption of randomness.

  6. Coherent Absorption of N00N States.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thomas; Restuccia, Sara; Lyons, Ashley; Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Jeffers, John; Padgett, Miles; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Recent results in deeply subwavelength thickness films demonstrate coherent control and logical gate operations with both classical and single-photon light sources. However, quantum processing and devices typically involve more than one photon and nontrivial input quantum states. Here we experimentally investigate two-photon N00N state coherent absorption in a multilayer graphene film. Depending on the N00N state input phase, it is possible to selectively choose between single- or two-photon absorption of the input state in the graphene film. These results demonstrate that coherent absorption in the quantum regime exhibits unique features, opening up applications in multiphoton spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:27447505

  7. Strong terahertz absorption using thin metamaterial structures

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Fabio; Kearney, Brian; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Lavrik, Nickolay V; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2012-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers with nearly 100% absorption in the terahertz (THz) spectral band have been designed and fabricated using a periodic array of aluminum (Al) squares and an Al ground plane separated by a thin silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) dielectric film. The entire structure is less than 1.6 mm thick making it suitable for the fabrication of microbolometers or bi-material sensors for THz imaging. Films with different dielectric layer thicknesses exhibited resonant absorption at 4.1, 4.2, and 4.5 THz with strengths of 98%, 95%, and 88%, respectively. The measured absorption spectra are in good agreement with simulations using finite element modeling.

  8. Coherent perfect absorption in chiral metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yuqian; Hay, Darrick; Shi, Zhimin

    2016-07-15

    We study the coherent perfect absorption (CPA) of a chiral structure and derive analytically the CPA condition for transversely isotropic chiral structures in circular polarization bases. The coherent absorption of such a chiral system is generally polarization dependent and can be tuned by the relative phase between the coherent input beams. To demonstrate our theoretical predictions, a chiral metamaterial absorber operating in the terahertz frequency range is optimized. We numerically demonstrate that a coherent absorption of 99.5% can be achieved. Moreover, we show that an optimized CPA chiral structure can be used as an interferometric control of polarization state of the output beams with constant output intensity. PMID:27420535

  9. Coherent Absorption of N00N States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Thomas; Restuccia, Sara; Lyons, Ashley; Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Jeffers, John; Padgett, Miles; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Recent results in deeply subwavelength thickness films demonstrate coherent control and logical gate operations with both classical and single-photon light sources. However, quantum processing and devices typically involve more than one photon and nontrivial input quantum states. Here we experimentally investigate two-photon N00N state coherent absorption in a multilayer graphene film. Depending on the N00N state input phase, it is possible to selectively choose between single- or two-photon absorption of the input state in the graphene film. These results demonstrate that coherent absorption in the quantum regime exhibits unique features, opening up applications in multiphoton spectroscopy and imaging.

  10. Total absorption by degenerate critical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, Jessica R. Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-06-23

    We consider a mirror-symmetric resonator with two ports. We show that, when excited from a single port, complete absorption can be achieved through critical coupling to degenerate resonances with opposite symmetry. Moreover, any time two resonances with opposite symmetry are degenerate in frequency and absorption is always significantly enhanced. In contrast, when two resonances with the same symmetry are nearly degenerate, there is no absorption enhancement. We numerically demonstrate these effects using a graphene monolayer on top of a photonic crystal slab, illuminated from a single side in the near-infrared.

  11. Selective coherent perfect absorption in metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-17

    We show multi-band coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in simple bilayered asymmetrically split ring metamaterials. The selectivity of absorption can be accomplished by separately excited electric and magnetic modes in a standing wave formed by two coherent counterpropagating beams. In particular, each CPA can be completely switched on/off by the phase of a second coherent wave. We propose a practical scheme for realizing multi-band coherent perfect absorption of 100% that is allowed to work from microwave to optical frequency.

  12. Broadband enhancement of infrared absorption in microbolometers using Ag nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Jerome K.; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Woo Choong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Hyun, Moon Seop; Kim, Hee Yeoun E-mail: jhpark@nnfc.re.kr; Park, Jae Hong E-mail: jhpark@nnfc.re.kr; Lee, Won-Oh

    2015-12-21

    High performance microbolometers are widely sought for thermal imaging applications. In order to increase the performance limits of microbolometers, the responsivity of the device to broadband infrared (IR) radiation needs to be improved. In this work, we report a simple, quick, and cost-effective approach to modestly enhance the broadband IR response of the device by evaporating Ag nanocrystals onto the light entrance surface of the device. When irradiated with IR light, strong fields are built up within the gaps between adjacent Ag nanocrystals. These fields resistively generate heat in the nanocrystals and underlying substrate, which is transduced into an electrical signal via a resistive sensing element in the device. Through this method, we are able to enhance the IR absorption over a broadband spectrum and improve the responsivity of the device by ∼11%.

  13. Comparison of the effects of maximal dose atorvastatin and rosuvastatin therapy on cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured plasma markers of cholesterol synthesis (lathosterol) and absorption (campesterol, sitosterol, and cholestanol) in order to compare the effects of maximal doses of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin and investigate the basis for the significant individual variation in lipid lowering response...

  14. Simultaneous Two-Photon Absorption to Gerade Excited Singlet States of Diphenylacetylene and Diphenylbutadiyne Using Optical-Probing Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Tasuku; Oba, Hikari; Ikoma, Tadaaki; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2016-08-11

    Simultaneous two-photon absorption to one-photon forbidden electronically excited states of diphenylacetylene (DPA) and diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) was investigated by means of highly sensitive optical-probing photoacoustic spectroscopy. The incident laser power dependencies on photoacoustic signal intensity indicate that the signals are dominated by the two-photon absorption regime. Two-photon absorption is responsible for transitions to gerade excited states based on the selection rule. The two-photon absorption bands observed in the heat action spectra were assigned with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The relative magnitude of the two-photon absorption cross sections of DPA and DPB was estimated, and the larger two-photon absorption cross section of DPB was related to the resonance effect with the red-shifted one-photon allowed 1(1)B1u ← 1(1)Ag transition of DPB. PMID:27410388

  15. Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar Algorithm Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Sophie; Carswell, Allen I.; Donovan, David P.; Claude, Hans; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; McDermid, I. Stuart; McGee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael R.; Nakane, Hideaki; Swart, Daan P. J.; Bergwerff, Hans B.; Uchino, Osamu; von der Gathen, Peter; Neuber, Roland

    1999-10-01

    An intercomparison of ozone differential absorption lidar algorithms was performed in 1996 within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Changes (NDSC) lidar working group. The objective of this research was mainly to test the differentiating techniques used by the various lidar teams involved in the NDSC for the calculation of the ozone number density from the lidar signals. The exercise consisted of processing synthetic lidar signals computed from simple Rayleigh scattering and three initial ozone profiles. Two of these profiles contained perturbations in the low and the high stratosphere to test the vertical resolution of the various algorithms. For the unperturbed profiles the results of the simulations show the correct behavior of the lidar processing methods in the low and the middle stratosphere with biases of less than 1% with respect to the initial profile to as high as 30 km in most cases. In the upper stratosphere, significant biases reaching 10% at 45 km for most of the algorithms are obtained. This bias is due to the decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio with altitude, which makes it necessary to increase the number of points of the derivative low-pass filter used for data processing. As a consequence the response of the various retrieval algorithms to perturbations in the ozone profile is much better in the lower stratosphere than in the higher range. These results show the necessity of limiting the vertical smoothing in the ozone lidar retrieval algorithm and questions the ability of current lidar systems to detect long-term ozone trends above 40 km. Otherwise the simulations show in general a correct estimation of the ozone profile random error and, as shown by the tests involving the perturbed ozone profiles, some inconsistency in the estimation of the vertical resolution among the lidar teams involved in this experiment.

  16. Two-Photon-Absorption Scheme for Optical Beam Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Farr, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A new optical beam tracking approach for free-space optical communication links using two-photon absorption (TPA) in a high-bandgap detector material was demonstrated. This tracking scheme is part of the canonical architecture described in the preceding article. TPA is used to track a long-wavelength transmit laser while direct absorption on the same sensor simultaneously tracks a shorter-wavelength beacon. The TPA responsivity was measured for silicon using a PIN photodiode at a laser beacon wavelength of 1,550 nm. As expected, the responsivity shows a linear dependence with incident power level. The responsivity slope is 4.5 x 10(exp -7) A/W2. Also, optical beam spots from the 1,550-nm laser beacon were characterized on commercial charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imagers with as little as 13.7 microWatts of optical power (see figure). This new tracker technology offers an innovative solution to reduce system complexity, improve transmit/receive isolation, improve optical efficiency, improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reduce cost for free-space optical communications transceivers.

  17. Involvement of active sodium transport in the rectal absorption of gentamicin sulfate in the presence and absence of absorption-promoting adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Fix, J A; Porter, P A; Leppert, P S

    1983-06-01

    The involvement of active sodium transport in the rectal absorption of gentamicin sulfate was examined in rats, employing aqueous microenemas of known total ionic strength (mu) in the presence or absence of absorption-promoting adjuvants. Rectal gentamicin bio-availability, which is negligible (1 +/- 1.2%) at an ionic strength of 0.15 without adjuvants, is significantly (p less than 0.01) increased by including adjuvants in the formulation (sodium salicylate, 12 +/- 4.0%; sodium-5-bromosalicylate, 59 +/- 15.1%; disodium ethylene (dinitrilo)tetraacetate, 24 +/- 9.3%). Pretreating the rectal mucosa cells with ouabain, a specific inhibitor of active sodium transport, significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced gentamicin absorption in response to all three adjuvants. In contrast to previous findings with sodium chloride, high ionic strength choline chloride (mu = 1.056) did not promote gentamicin absorption. The data indicate that active sodium transport is an integral component of rectal absorption of water-soluble compounds and may be involved in the mechanism of action of absorption-promoting adjuvants. PMID:6875833

  18. Intestinal Cgi-58 deficiency reduces postprandial lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Guo, Feng; Ma, Yinyan; Zhu, Hongling; Wang, Freddy; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Yang, Jian; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58), a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, promotes intracellular triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis in vitro. Mutations in human CGI-58 cause TG accumulation in numerous tissues including intestine. Enterocytes are thought not to store TG-rich LDs, but a fatty meal does induce temporary cytosolic accumulation of LDs. Accumulated LDs are eventually cleared out, implying existence of TG hydrolytic machinery in enterocytes. However, identities of proteins responsible for LD-TG hydrolysis remain unknown. Here we report that intestine-specific inactivation of CGI-58 in mice significantly reduces postprandial plasma TG concentrations and intestinal TG hydrolase activity, which is associated with a 4-fold increase in intestinal TG content and large cytosolic LD accumulation in absorptive enterocytes during the fasting state. Intestine-specific CGI-58 knockout mice also display mild yet significant decreases in intestinal fatty acid absorption and oxidation. Surprisingly, inactivation of CGI-58 in intestine significantly raises plasma and intestinal cholesterol, and reduces hepatic cholesterol, without altering intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, intestinal CGI-58 is required for efficient postprandial lipoprotein-TG secretion and for maintaining hepatic and plasma lipid homeostasis. Our animal model will serve as a valuable tool to further define how intestinal fat metabolism influences the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24618586

  19. Measurements of Scattering and Absorption Changes in Muscle and Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio; Franceschini, Maria Angela; Gratton, Gabriele; Fabiani, Monica

    1997-06-01

    Non-invasive techniques for the study of human brain function based on changes of the haemoglobin content or on changes of haemoglobin saturation have recently been proposed. Among the new methods, near-infrared transmission and reflection measurements may have significant advantages and complement well-established methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Near-infrared measurements can be very fast, comparable in speed to electrophysiological measurements, but are better localized. We will present the demonstration of measurements of millisecond signals due to brain activity in humans following stimulation of the visual cortex. However, major unresolved questions remain about the origin of the signals observed. Optical measurements on exposed cortex in animals show that both the absorption and the scattering coefficient are affected by neural activity. Model calculations show that the signals we detected may originate from rapid changes of the scattering coefficient in a region about 1 to 2 cm below the scalp. We discuss our measurement protocol, which is based on a frequency-domain instrument, and the algorithm to separate the absorption from the scattering contribution in the overall optical response. Our method produces excellent separation between scattering and absorption in relatively homogeneous masses such as large muscles. The extrapolation of our measurement protocol to a complex structure such as the human head is critically evaluated.

  20. Magnetospheres of hot Jupiters: hydrodynamic models and ultraviolet absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, R. D.; Wynn, G. A.; Mohammed, H.; Nichols, J. D.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-03-01

    We present hydrodynamic simulations of stellar wind-magnetosphere interactions in hot Jupiters such as WASP-12b. For fiducial stellar wind rates, we find that a planetary magnetic field of a few G produces a large magnetospheric cavity, which is typically 6-9 planetary radii in size. A bow shock invariably forms ahead of the magnetosphere, but the pre-shock gas is only mildly supersonic (with typical Mach numbers of ≃1.6-1.8) so the shock is weak. This results in a characteristic signature in the ultraviolet (UV) light curve: a broad absorption feature that leads the optical transit by 10-20 per cent in orbital phase. The shapes of our synthetic light curves are consistent with existing observations of WASP-12b, but the required near-UV optical depth (τ ˜ 0.1) can only be achieved if the shocked gas cools rapidly. We further show that radiative cooling is inefficient, so we deem it unlikely that a magnetospheric bow shock is responsible for the observed near-UV absorption. Finally, we apply our model to two other well-studied hot Jupiters (WASP-18b and HD 209458b), and suggest that UV observations of more massive short-period planets (such as WASP-18b) will provide a straightforward test to distinguish between different models of circumplanetary absorption.

  1. Regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Overton, J.H.; Kimbell, J.S.; Russell, M.L.

    1992-06-29

    Highly reactive gases present unique problems due to the number of factors which must be taken into account to determine regional respiratory tract uptake. The authors reviewed some of the physical, chemical, and biological factors that affect dose and that must be understood to interpret toxicological data, to evaluate experimental dosimetry studies, and to develop dosimetry models. Selected dosimetry experiments involving laboratory animals and humans were discussed, showing the variability and uptake according to animal species and respiratory tract region for various reactive gases. New experimental dosimetry approaches, such as those involving isotope ratio mass spectroscopy and cyclotron generation reactive gases, were discussed that offer great promise for improving the ability to study regional respiratory tract absorption of reactive gases. Various dosimetry modeling applications were discussed which demonstrate: the importance of airflow patterns for site-specific dosimetry in the upper respiratory tract, the influence of the anatomical model used to make inter- and intraspecies dosimetric comparisons, the influence of tracheobronchial path length on predicted dose curves, and the implications of ventilatory unit structure and volume on dosimetry and response. Collectively, these examples illustrate important aspects of regional respiratory tract absorption of inhaled reactive gases. Given the complex nature of extent and pattern of injury in the respiratory tract from exposure to reactive gases, understanding interspecies differences in the absorption of reactive gases will continue to be an important area for study.

  2. Performance Analysis of Solution Transportation Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Behdad; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Thermally activated advanced absorption cycles are considered promising candidates to replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs for residential and commercial applications. In such absorption systems, it is desirable to utilize the waste heat from industries for heating and cooling applications in commercial and residential sectors. For this purpose, it is necessary to transport energy over some distance because the waste heat source and demand are generally located apart from each other. Transportation of steam, hot water or chilled water requires high construction costs for insulation. There is an efficient method of energy transportation using absorption system called “ Solution Transportation Absorption System (STA)”. The solution is transported at an ambient temperature so that tube-insulations not required. This paper shows the simulation of the abovementioned system and the optimal result, using mathematical optimization. The optimum system with industry‧s waste heat utilization is obtained. At the end, the effect on the pollution emission and energy conservation is obtained.

  3. Triple-effect absorption chiller cycles

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, R.C.; Grossman, G.

    1992-06-01

    Gas-fired absorption chillers are widely used for air-conditioning buildings. Even the highest efficiency double-effect absorption chillers used more primary energy for air-conditioning buildings than the better electric chillers. Two different triple-effect absorption chiller cycles are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. One cycle uses two condensers and two absorbers to achieve the ``triple effect.`` A second cycle, the Double-Condenser Coupled Triple-Effect, uses three condensers as well as a third condenser subcooler (which exchanges heat with the lowest temperature first-effect generator). These triple-effect absorption cycles have the potential to be as energy efficient (on a primary fuel basis) as the best electric chillers. 19 refs.

  4. Triple-effect absorption chiller cycles

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, R.C. ); Grossman, G. )

    1992-01-01

    Gas-fired absorption chillers are widely used for air-conditioning buildings. Even the highest efficiency double-effect absorption chillers used more primary energy for air-conditioning buildings than the better electric chillers. Two different triple-effect absorption chiller cycles are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. One cycle uses two condensers and two absorbers to achieve the triple effect.'' A second cycle, the Double-Condenser Coupled Triple-Effect, uses three condensers as well as a third condenser subcooler (which exchanges heat with the lowest temperature first-effect generator). These triple-effect absorption cycles have the potential to be as energy efficient (on a primary fuel basis) as the best electric chillers. 19 refs.

  5. Absorption chillers: Part of the solution

    SciTech Connect

    Occhionero, A.J. ); Hughes, P.J. ); Reid, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, and implementation economics are considered as they relate to the advisability of expanding the application of absorption chillers. Introductory and background information are provided to put the discussion in the proper context. Then all four issues are discussed separately as they relate to absorption chillers. Acid rain and ozone depletion concerns, and implementation economics, are found to support the expanded use of absorption chillers. The global warming concern is found to be more of a gray area, but the areas of benefit correspond well with the conditions of greatest economic advantage. All things considered, absorption chillers are believed to be part of the environmental and economic solution. It is further believed that integrated resource planning (IRP) processes that consider electric and gas technologies on an equal footing would come to the same conclusion for many regions of the United States. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. Narrow Absorption Components in Be Star Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    The stars omega Ori (B2 IIIe), 66 Oph (B2 IVe), and 59 Cyg (B1.5 IVe) are discussed. The extent to which the narrow absorption components in these Be stars differs from narrow components in the O stars and gamma Cas is explored. Any models or mechanisms for the formation of narrow absorption features in the UV resonance lines of Be star spectra must account for the presence of multiple narrow absorption features which are variable in number, radial velocity, and strength. Models predicting a high and low density structure to the stellar wind caused by instabilities in a flow driven by radiation pressure or by variable mass loss may be more successful in describing the behavior of winds in early Be stars. These models appear to be capable of producing single absorption components in the velocity range observed for O stars and very early Be stars.

  7. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  8. Absorption enhancement in graphene photonic crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Khaleque, Abdul; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2016-04-10

    Graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, is attracting significant interest because of its potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Although graphene exhibits almost uniform absorption within a large wavelength range, its interaction with light is weak. In this paper, the enhancement of the optical absorption in graphene photonic crystal structures is studied: the structure is modified by introducing scatterers and mirrors. It is shown that the absorption of the graphene photonic crystal structure can be enhanced about four times (nearly 40%) with respect to initial reference absorption of 9.8%. The study can be a useful tool for investigating graphene physics in different optical settings. PMID:27139857

  9. Absorption cross section of canonical acoustic holes

    SciTech Connect

    Crispino, Luis C. B.; Oliveira, Ednilton S.; Matsas, George E. A.

    2007-11-15

    We compute numerically the absorption cross section of a canonical acoustic hole for sound waves with arbitrary frequencies. Our outputs are in full agreement with the expected low- and high-frequency limits.

  10. Impedance Characteristics of the Plasma Absorption Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazawa, Yohei

    2009-10-01

    The plasma absorption probe (PAP) is a diagnostics for determination of spatially resolved electron density.footnotetextH. Kokura, et al., Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 38 5262 (1999). PAP has attracted considerable interest because of its applicability in a reactive plasma. The simple structure of the probe allows us a robust measurement while the mechanism of the absorption is complicated and there are still some uncertainty.footnotetextM. Lapke, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 121502 (2007) In this study, we focus on the frequency characteristics of the impedance instead of the absorption spectrum. An electromagnetic field simulation reveals that there is only one parallel resonance in the impedance characteristics even in a case there are many peaks in absorption spectrum. Thus, the impedance characteristics provide a clue to understanding the mechanism.

  11. Absorption refrigeration machine driven by solar heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, C.; Liem, S. H.

    1980-04-01

    A mathematical model of a single and a two stage solar absorption refrigeration system is developed in which data of collectors and weather data can be implicated. The influence of the generator, the absorber efficiencies, and the cooling temperature on the coefficient of performance (COP) of a single and two stage absorption refrigeration process are investigated. For low generator temperatures the absorber efficiency has more influence on COP than the generator efficiency. Only spectral selective double window and high performance collectors can be used for air cooled solar absorption refrigeration systems at an evaporator temperature of -5 C. It is concluded that a water cooled solar absorption refrigeration system in combination with a solar tapwater installation for household use can be achieved with 6 to 8 square meters high performance collector area.

  12. Seasonal Solar Thermal Absorption Energy Storage Development.

    PubMed

    Daguenet-Frick, Xavier; Gantenbein, Paul; Rommel, Mathias; Fumey, Benjamin; Weber, Robert; Gooneseker, Kanishka; Williamson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a thermochemical seasonal storage with emphasis on the development of a reaction zone for an absorption/desorption unit. The heat and mass exchanges are modelled and the design of a suitable reaction zone is explained. A tube bundle concept is retained for the heat and mass exchangers and the units are manufactured and commissioned. Furthermore, experimental results of both absorption and desorption processes are presented and the exchanged power is compared to the results of the simulations. PMID:26842331

  13. Percutaneous absorption in diseased skin: an overview.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Audris; Tudela, Emilie; Maibach, Howard I

    2012-08-01

    The stratum corneum's (SC) functions include protection from external hazardous environments, prevention of water loss and regulation of body temperature. While intact skin absorption studies are abundant, studies on compromised skin permeability are less common, although products are often used to treat affected skin. We reviewed literature on percutaneous absorption through abnormal skin models. Tape stripping is used to disrupt water barrier function. Studies demonstrated that physicochemical properties influence the stripping effect: water-soluble drugs are more affected. Abrasion did not affect absorption as much. Freezing is commonly used to preserve skin. It does not seem to modify water absorption, but still increases the penetration of compounds. Comparatively, heating the skin consistently increased percutaneous absorption. Removing SC lipids may increase percutaneous absorption of drugs. Many organic solvents are employed to delipidize. Delipidization with chloroform-methanol increased hydrophilic compound permeability, but not lipophilic. Acetone pre-treatment enhanced hydrophilic compound penetration. More data is needed to determine influence on highly lipophilic compound penetration. Sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) induces irritant dermatitis and is frequently used as a model. Studies revealed that SLS increases hydrophilic compound absorption, but not lipophilic. However, skin irritation with other chemicals increases lipophilic penetration as much as hydrophilic. Animal studies show that UV exposure increases percutaneous absorption whereas human studies do not. Human studies show increased penetration in psoriatic and atopic dermatitis skin. The data summarized here begin to characterize flux alteration associated with damaged skin. Understanding the degree of alteration requires interpretation of involved conditions and the enlarging of our database to a more complete physicochemical spectrum. PMID:22912973

  14. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  15. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  16. Geometric absorption of electromagnetic angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konz, C.; Benford, Gregory

    2003-10-01

    Circularly polarized electromagnetic fields carry both energy and angular momentum. We investigate the conditions under which a circularly polarized wave field transfers angular momentum to a perfectly conducting macroscopic object, using exact electromagnetic wave theory in a steady-state calculation. We find that axisymmetric perfect conductors cannot absorb or radiate angular momentum when illuminated. However, any asymmetry allows absorption. A rigorous, steady-state solution of the boundary value problem for the reflection from a perfectly conducting infinite wedge shows that waves convey angular momentum at the edges of asymmetries. Conductors can also radiate angular momentum, so their geometric absorption coefficient for angular momentum can be negative. Such absorption or radiation depends solely on the specific geometry of the conductor. The geometric absorption coefficient can be as high as 0.8, and the coefficient for radiation can be -0.4, larger than typical material absorption coefficients. We apply the results to recent experiments which spun roof-shaped aluminum sheets with polarized microwave beams. Applications of geometric, instead of material, absorption can be quite varied. Though experiments testing these ideas will be simpler at microwavelengths, the ideas work for optical ones as well.

  17. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  18. Lyman-α Absorption from Heliotail ENAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Izmodenov, Vladislav V.

    2010-12-01

    The energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is currently studying are messengers from the termination shock and beyond. Ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provide another way to study these ENAs, which are capable of producing detectable absorption signatures in HST Lyman-α spectra of nearby stars. This broad, shallow absorption is only observed within 20° of the downwind direction. Only the lengthy downwind lines of sight through the long heliotail build up enough column density of ENAs to yield detectable absorption. The absorption therefore represents the first real observational detection of the heliotail. We try to connect ENA fluxes observed by IBEX with the Lyman-α absorption observed by HST. In the downwind direction, IBEX observes ENA fluxes that increase towards lower energies, at least to 0.2 keV, but consistency with the HST measurements seems to require that the ENA fluxes at least flatten if not decrease below 0.2 keV. The ``ribbon'' of ENAs detected by IBEX is not detected in Lyman-α absorption, which may be a problem for any explanation of the ribbon that proposes a source beyond our heliosphere.

  19. Spectral Absorption Properties of Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstrom, R. W.; Pilewskie, P.; Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Bond, T. C.; Quinn, P. K.; Sierau, B.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the solar spectral absorption optical depth of atmospheric aerosols for specific case studies during several field programs (three cases have been reported previously; two are new results). We combined airborne measurements of the solar net radiant flux density and the aerosol optical depth with a detailed radiative transfer model for all but one of the cases. The field programs (SAFARI 2000, ACE Asia, PRIDE, TARFOX, INTEX-A) contained aerosols representing the major absorbing aerosol types: pollution, biomass burning, desert dust and mixtures. In all cases the spectral absorption optical depth decreases with wavelength and can be approximated with a power-law wavelength dependence (Absorption Angstrom Exponent or AAE). We compare our results with other recent spectral absorption measurements and attempt to briefly summarize the state of knowledge of aerosol absorption spectra in the atmosphere. We discuss the limitations in using the AAE for calculating the solar absorption. We also discuss the resulting spectral single scattering albedo for these cases.

  20. Influence of Inflammatory Disorders and Infection on Iron Absorption and Efficacy of Iron- Fortified Foods

    PubMed Central

    Hurrell, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    The provision of iron- fortified foods is a common strategy to prevent iron deficiency; however, ensuring adequate iron absorption is a challenge. Iron bioavailability depends on the choice of iron compound, the presence enhancers and inhibitors of absorption in the food matrix, and the physiological state of the consumer, including iron status, other nutritional deficiencies and inflammatory disorders. Inflammation associated with infections and inflammatory disorders would be expected to decrease iron absorption and reduce the efficacy of iron- fortified foods. The decreased absorption is due to an increase in circulating hepcidin in response to inflammatory cytokines. Hepcidin degrades ferroportin and blocks the passage of iron from the intestinal cell to the plasma. This is the innate immune response to infections and aims to restrict pathogen growth by restricting iron supply. Stable isotope studies have reported women and children with chronic malaria parasitemia or febrile malaria to have increased inflammatory cytokines, increased hepcidin and much decreased iron absorption. No studies have specifically investigated the efficacy of iron- fortified foods in the absence and presence of infections. In contrast, inflammation and increased hepcidin associated with adiposity in overweight have been linked to both lower iron absorption and the decreased efficacy of iron- fortified foods. PMID:25762975

  1. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha; Dash, P.; Singh, C.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-03-28

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15 nm diameter with 0.5 nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  2. Mechanistic and regulatory aspects of intestinal iron absorption

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Anderson, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace mineral that plays a number of important physiological roles in humans, including oxygen transport, energy metabolism, and neurotransmitter synthesis. Iron absorption by the proximal small bowel is a critical checkpoint in the maintenance of whole-body iron levels since, unlike most other essential nutrients, no regulated excretory systems exist for iron in humans. Maintaining proper iron levels is critical to avoid the adverse physiological consequences of either low or high tissue iron concentrations, as commonly occurs in iron-deficiency anemia and hereditary hemochromatosis, respectively. Exquisite regulatory mechanisms have thus evolved to modulate how much iron is acquired from the diet. Systemic sensing of iron levels is accomplished by a network of molecules that regulate transcription of the HAMP gene in hepatocytes, thus modulating levels of the serum-borne, iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin decreases intestinal iron absorption by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin 1 on the basolateral surface of duodenal enterocytes, causing its internalization and degradation. Mucosal regulation of iron transport also occurs during low-iron states, via transcriptional (by hypoxia-inducible factor 2α) and posttranscriptional (by the iron-sensing iron-regulatory protein/iron-responsive element system) mechanisms. Recent studies demonstrated that these regulatory loops function in tandem to control expression or activity of key modulators of iron homeostasis. In health, body iron levels are maintained at appropriate levels; however, in several inherited disorders and in other pathophysiological states, iron sensing is perturbed and intestinal iron absorption is dysregulated. The iron-related phenotypes of these diseases exemplify the necessity of precisely regulating iron absorption to meet body demands. PMID:24994858

  3. Resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption in short, intense laser irradiated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Z. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Zhou, C. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 ; Peng, X. J.

    2013-07-15

    An analytical model for laser-plasma interaction during the oblique incidence by an ultrashort ultraintense p-polarized laser on a solid-density plasma is proposed. Both the resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption are self-consistently included. Different from the previous theoretical works, the physics of resonant absorption is found to be valid in more general conditions as the steepening of the electron density profile is considered. Even for a relativistic intensity laser, resonant absorption can still exist under certain plasma scale length. For shorter plasma scale length or higher laser intensity, the not-so-resonant absorption tends to be dominant, since the electron density is steepened to a critical level by the ponderomotive force. The laser energy absorption rates for both mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the difference and transition between these two mechanisms are presented.

  4. Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

  5. Tunable ultranarrow spectrum selective absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Complete absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency through the critical coupling effect is investigated. It is achieved by sandwiching the graphene monolayer between a dielectric grating and a Bragg grating. The designed graphene absorber exhibits near-unity absorption at resonance but with an ultranarrow spectrum and antenna-like response, which is attributed to the combined effects of guided mode resonance with dielectric grating and the photonic band gap with Bragg grating. In addition to numerical simulation, the electric field distributions are also illustrated to provide a physical understanding of the perfect absorption effect. Furthermore, the absorption performance can be tuned by only changing the Fermi level of graphene, which is beneficial for real application. It is believed that this study may be useful for designing next-generation graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  6. Photocarrier dynamics in anatase TiO{sub 2} investigated by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Matsui, Y.; Uchida, R.; Yada, H.; Terashige, T.; Li, B.-S.; Sawa, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Okamoto, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-07

    The dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes in undoped anatase TiO{sub 2} were studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy from the visible to mid-infrared region (0.1–2.0 eV). The transient absorption spectra exhibited clear metallic responses, which were well reproduced by a simple Drude model. No mid-gap absorptions originating from photocarrier localization were observed. The reduced optical mass of the photocarriers obtained from the Drude-model analysis is comparable to theoretically expected one. These results demonstrate that both photogenerated holes and electrons act as mobile carriers in anatase TiO{sub 2}. We also discuss scattering and recombination dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes on the basis of the time dependence of absorption changes.

  7. Two-photon-induced excited-state absorption in high-index fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shensky, William M., III; Cohanoschi, Ion; Sevian, Armen; Hagan, David J.; Van Stryland, Eric W.

    2004-06-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties of a high-index (n = 1.82) glass that is used as the core material in a commercially available fiber optic inverter, which is a coherent fiber bundle twisted 180 degrees to produce an inverted image. We have determined through open aperture Z-scan the two-photon absorption coefficient of the glass to be 0.8 cm/GW using 23 ps pulses (FWHM) at 532 nm, far from the linear absorption edge of 320 nm. For 5 ns (FWHM) pulses the nonlinear absorption is much larger, and is dominated by two-photon induced excited-state absorption. These effects contribute to the nanosecond optical limiting response that we have observed for the inverter using an F/5 focusing geometry.

  8. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  9. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  10. Optical absorption components of light-modulated absorption spectrum of CdS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, E. J.; Long, E. R.

    1975-01-01

    The amplitude and decay coefficient of light-induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) was measured as a function of wavelength from 535 to 850 nm for single-crystal CdS. The decay coefficient exhibited a discontinuous resonance at 710 nm which was due to the overlap and cancellation of two opposing absorption changes. A method was developed to separate these opposing absorption changes using the measured decay coefficients. The discrete-level-to-band energy for one absorption change was found to be 1.64 eV. An improved model was developed which contains two associated levels in the band gap separated by 0.32 eV.

  11. The ALFALFA HI Absorption Pilot Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Erin; Darling, J.; ALFALFA Team

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot project to search for HI 21 cm absorption in the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFALFA) Survey. This project is the first to conduct a "blind" wide-area search for HI absorption in the local universe. The search covered 517.0 deg2 spanning 10.9h < α < 14.95h and +7.7o < δ < +16.3o. The ALFALFA survey covers -650 km s-1 < cz < 17,500 km s-1, for a Δz = 0.054 along each line of sight (11% of the cz span is lost to radio frequency interference and Galactic HI emission). There are 243 sources toward which all damped Lyα systems (N(HI) > 2x1020 cm-2) could be detected, and 3282 sources toward which N(HI) > 2x1021 cm-2 columns could be detected (assuming 100 K spin temperature, 30 km s-1 line width, and unity filling factor). We performed Green Bank Telescope follow-up observations of 13 possible absorption lines and the 250 strong sources (> 220 mJy) in our survey region. One previously known intrinsic HI absorption line in UGC 6081 was re-detected, but no additional lines were identified in the survey region. Nevertheless, this pilot project demonstrates the value and feasibility of large-area absorption line searches commensal with emission line surveys. An absorption line search of the entire 7000 deg2 ALFALFA Survey is a worthwhile undertaking, not only to identify HI absorption systems in the local universe, but to measure the fraction of HI gas not accounted for by emission line surveys. ALFALFA is a legacy survey at the Arecibo Observatory supported by NAIC and NSF.

  12. Intestinal scavenger receptors are involved in vitamin K1 absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-31

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  13. Intestinal Scavenger Receptors Are Involved in Vitamin K1 Absorption*

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Margier, Marielle; Roi, Stéphanie; Collet, Xavier; Niot, Isabelle; Goupy, Pascale; Caris-Veyrat, Catherine; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K1 (phylloquinone) intestinal absorption is thought to be mediated by a carrier protein that still remains to be identified. Apical transport of vitamin K1 was examined using Caco-2 TC-7 cell monolayers as a model of human intestinal epithelium and in transfected HEK cells. Phylloquinone uptake was then measured ex vivo using mouse intestinal explants. Finally, vitamin K1 absorption was compared between wild-type mice and mice overexpressing scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) in the intestine and mice deficient in cluster determinant 36 (CD36). Phylloquinone uptake by Caco-2 cells was saturable and was significantly impaired by co-incubation with α-tocopherol (and vice versa). Anti-human SR-BI antibodies and BLT1 (a chemical inhibitor of lipid transport via SR-BI) blocked up to 85% of vitamin K1 uptake. BLT1 also decreased phylloquinone apical efflux by ∼80%. Transfection of HEK cells with SR-BI and CD36 significantly enhanced vitamin K1 uptake, which was subsequently decreased by the addition of BLT1 or sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (CD36 inhibitor), respectively. Similar results were obtained in mouse intestinal explants. In vivo, the phylloquinone postprandial response was significantly higher, and the proximal intestine mucosa phylloquinone content 4 h after gavage was increased in mice overexpressing SR-BI compared with controls. Phylloquinone postprandial response was also significantly increased in CD36-deficient mice compared with wild-type mice, but their vitamin K1 intestinal content remained unchanged. Overall, the present data demonstrate for the first time that intestinal scavenger receptors participate in the absorption of dietary phylloquinone. PMID:25228690

  14. Inversion of instantaneous equivalent absorption coefficient and its application

    SciTech Connect

    Weihua, W. )

    1992-01-01

    Absorption coefficient is an important parameter for reservoir description. The major troubles in extracting absorption coefficient from seismic data are amplitude and waveform distortions; they greatly restrict the inversion which is based on reflection amplitude variation or reflection frequency variation. This paper presents a new method which avoids amplitude and uses waveform variation gradient in wave propagation to make the inversion of absorption coefficient. Apparent absorption coefficient and pseudo absorption coefficient are adopted so as to remove the influence which the waveform distortion due to thin bed tuning brings to absorption coefficient extraction. The final instantaneous equivalent absorption coefficient, a true absorption coefficient which reflects real absorptive character of a seismic medium, can be obtained by subtracting the pseudo absorption coefficient (inversely calculated using maximum entropy) from the apparent absorption coefficient the authors have calculated.

  15. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  16. Modeled Aeromagnetic Anomalies, Controlled By Radar Ice Sounding, As Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) Beneath the Area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Thwaites and Pine Island ice shelves, buttressing the WAIS, have passed the turning point as they are eaten away by warmer ocean waters (Joghin et al., 2014; Rignot et al., 2014). There is an increasing evidence (aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, high heat flow, subglacial volcanic seismicity, and several exposed and subglacial active volcanoes), for volcanic activity in the WR beneath the WAIS, which flows through it. The 5-km, orthogonally line spaced, central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey defined >400 high amplitude volcanic magnetic anomalies correlated with glacial bed topography. Modeled anomalies defined magnetic properties; interpreted volcanic edifices were mostly removed by the moving ice into which they were erupted. Very high apparent susceptibility contrasts (.001->.3 SI) are typical of measured properties from volcanic exposures in the WAIS area. About 90% of the magnetic sources have normal magnetization in the present field direction. Two explanations as to why the anomalies are not approximately 50% negative: (1) Volcanic activity resulting in these anomalies occurred in a predominantly normal field (unlikely). (2) Sources are a combination of induced and remanent magnetization resulting in anomalies of low amplitude (induced cancels remanent) and are not recognized because they are <100 nT (most probable). About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) "volcanic centers" beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent; nine of these are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. A 70-km wide, ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks may define a volcanic caldera underlying thedivide (Behrendt et al., 1998). A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78o30'S, 111oW) ~ 100 km north of the WAISCORE, could be the source an ash layer observed in the core. Models by Tulaczyk and Hossainzadeh (2011) indicate >4mm/yr basal melting beneath the WAIS, supportive of high heat flow

  17. NOTE: Visible absorption spectra of radiation exposed SIRAD dosimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butson, Martin J.; Cheung, Tsang; Yu, Peter K. N.

    2006-12-01

    SIRAD badge dosimeters are a new type of personal dosimeter designed to measure radiation exposure up to 200 R and give a visual qualitative measurement of exposure. This is performed using the active dosimeter window, which contains a radiochromic material amalgamated in the badge assembly. When irradiated, the badges active window turns blue, which can be matched against the given colour chart for a qualitative assessment of the exposure received. Measurements have been performed to analyse the absorption spectra of the active window, and results show that the window automatically turns a blue colour upon irradiation and produces two peaks in the absorption spectra located at 617 nm and 567 nm. When analysed with a common computer desktop scanner, the optical density response of the film to radiation exposure is non-linear but reproducible. The net OD of the film was 0.21 at 50 R exposure and 0.31 at 200 R exposure when irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray energy beam. When compared to the calibration colour strips at 6 MV x-ray energy the film's OD response matches relatively well within 3.5%. An approximate 8% reduction in measured OD to exposure was seen for 250 kVp x-rays compared to 6 MV x-rays. The film provides an adequate measurement and visually qualitative assessment of radiation exposure for levels in the range of 0 to 200 R.

  18. Compartmentation of Malate in Relation to Ion Absorption in Beet

    PubMed Central

    Osmond, C. B.; Laties, George G.

    1969-01-01

    Malate in beet discs treated in different salt solutions was labeled by a 30 min pulse of 14CO2, and subsequent changes in specific activity were followed for several hr. In treatments which resulted in net acid synthesis in response to excess cation absorption, malate specific activity fell slowly after removal of 14CO2. In solutions where no net acid synthesis occurred, and from which cation and anion were absorbed equally, malate specific activity fell rapidly when 14CO2 was removed. The foregoing suggests that the net synthesis of organic acids in response to excess cation absorption leads to the removal of organic anions from cytoplasmic metabolic pools as counter-ions in salt transport to the vacuole. The latter hypothesis was further examined by direct measurement of the distribution of labeled malate between cytoplasm and vacuole using the wash-exchange method of compartmental analysis, previously described for inorganic ions. The method satisfied the criterion of exchange specificity necessary for this purpose. Much higher retention of label in the cytoplasm was observed in KCl solutions (no net synthesis) than in K2SO4 solutions (net synthesis) after 3 hr 14CO2 fixation and subsequent wash-exchange. The observed distribution is consistent with the rapid removal of organic anions to the vacuole during net acid synthesis. The significance of organic acid transport in relation to metabolism is discussed. PMID:16657035

  19. Simulating a 4-effect absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Zaltash, A.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1995-06-01

    Absorption chillers are heat-operated refrigeration machines that operate on one of the earliest known principles of refrigeration. Current absorption chillers typically use either steam or a gas-fired burner as the energy source. All current gas-fired absorption cooling systems are based on the well known single-effect or double-effect cycles. To further improve utilization of the high temperature heat available from natural gas, a variety of triple-effect cycles have been proposed and are being developed that are capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. This article describes a study that investigated the possibility of even further improving utilization of the high temperature heat available from natural gas combustion. During the study, performance simulation was conducted for a 4-effect lithium bromide/water cycle. From an environmental perspective, absorption chillers provide several benefits. They use absorption pairs (such as lithium bromide/water) as the working fluids, rather than chlorofluorocarbons or hydrochlorofluorocarbons, which contribute to ozone depletion and global warming.

  20. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.