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Sample records for absorption response wr

  1. Modification of the radiation response of the mouse kidney by misonidazole and WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.V.; Denekamp, J.

    1983-11-01

    The radiation response of the mouse kidney has been assayed after a range of x ray doses given with or without the nitroimidazole misonidazole or the aminothiol WR-2721. Sensitization and protection of the kidney were investigated by comparing the x ray dose needed to achieve a particular level of injury in the presence or absence of the drug. Two functional assays and kidney weight at sacrifice were used to obtain dose response curves. Urine output and /sup 51/Chromium EDTA excretion were used as functional assays at 25 and 49 weeks after irradiation. They demonstrated no radio-sensitization by misonidazole with 1, 2 or 5 fractions of x rays. Significant radioprotection was seen when 400 mg kg /sup 1/WR-2721 was given before single x ray doses (PF = 1.34). Similar radioprotection was observed when renal weight at 1 year after irradiation was used as the third assay of damage. These results confirm that the kidney responds as a well-oxygenated normal tissue with only a small protection being afforded against radiation injury by WR-2721.

  2. Studies in the Rat and Monkey on Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Pharmacokinetics of WR-180,409.H3PO4.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-04-01

    investigational new drugs prior to clinical trial, the author undertook studies on WR-180,409.H3PO4 (Threo-a-(2-piperidyl)-2-trifluoromethyl-6-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-pyridine methanol phosphate).

  3. Macroclumping in WR 136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubátová, B.; Hamann, W.-R.; Todt, H.; Sander, A.; Steinke, M.; Hainich, R.; Shenar, T.

    Macroclumping proved to resolve the discordance between different mass-loss rate diagnostics for O-type stars, in particular between Hα and the P v resonance lines. In this paper, we report first results from a corresponding investigation for WR stars. We apply our detailed 3-D Monte Carlo (MC) line formation code to the P v resonance doublet and show, for the Galactic WNL star WR136, that macroclumping is require to bring this line in accordance with the mass-loss rate derived from the emission-line spectrum.

  4. [R74W;R1070W;D1270N]: a new complex allele responsible for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    de Prada Merino, Ana; Bütschi, Florence Niel; Bouchardy, Isabelle; Beckmann, Jacques S; Morris, Michael A; Hafen, Gaudenz M; Fellmann, Florence

    2010-12-01

    Since the beginning of population screening for CF carriers, it has become apparent that complex CFTR alleles are not uncommon. Deciphering their impact in disease pathogenesis remains a challenge for both clinicians and researchers. We report the observation of a new complex allele p.[R74W+R1070W+D1270N] found in trans with a type 1 mutation and associated with clinical diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in a one year-old Moroccan patient. This case underlines the difficulties in counseling patients with uncommon mutations and the necessity of functional studies to evaluate the structure-function relationships, since the association of several variations in cis can dramatically alter CFTR function.

  5. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Carnes, B.A. )

    1993-01-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL [times] BALB/c F[sub 1] female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a [sup 60]Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  6. Chemoprevention by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. |; Carnes, B.A.

    1993-05-01

    WR-2721 [S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid] is an effective chemopreventive agent. C57BL {times} BALB/c F{sub 1} female mice, were exposed to a single whole-body dose of 206 cGy from a {sup 60}Co photon source. Those groups treated with VATR-2721 (400 mg/kg) were administered the agent i.p. 30 min prior to irradiation. Over 90% of deaths were determined to be due to tumor involvement. WR-2721 afforded significant protection against life shortening due to radiation-induced tumors of connective tissue and epithelial tissue origins. Subsequent survival time in WR-2721-treated and irradiated animals as compared to matched irradiated-only controls was extended up to 59 days. A single exposure of animals to VVR-2721 did not affect the cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice. WR-2721 possesses chemopreventive properties which can be clinically exploited to reduce the risk to therapy-induced secondary cancers in patients who otherwise would have an excellent prognosis for cure and long-term survival.

  7. WR 7a: a V Sagittae or a qWR star?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. S.; Steiner, J. E.; Cieslinski, D.

    2003-12-01

    The star WR 7a, also known as SPH 2, has a spectrum that resembles that of V Sagittae stars although no OVI emission has been reported. The Temporal Variance Spectrum - TVS - analysis of our data shows weak but strongly variable emission of OVI lines which is below the noise level in the intensity spectrum. Contrary to what is seen in V Sagittae stars, optical photometric monitoring shows very little, if any, flickering. We found evidence of periodic variability. The most likely photometric period is Pphot= 0.227(+/-14) d, while radial velocities suggest a period of Pspec= 0.204(+/-13) d. One-day aliases of these periods can not be ruled out. We call attention to similarities with HD 45166 and DI Cru (= WR 46), where multiple periods are present. They may be associated to the binary motion or to non-radial oscillations. In contrast to a previous conclusion by Pereira et al., we show that WR 7a contains hydrogen. The spectrum of the primary star seems to be detectable as the NV 4604Åabsorption line is visible. If so, it means that the wind is optically thin in the continuum and that it is likely to be a helium main sequence star. Given the similarity to HD 45166, we suggests that WR 7a may be a qWR - quasi Wolf-Rayet - star. Its classification is WN4h/CE in the Smith, Shara & Moffat three-dimensional classification system.

  8. Adverse effects of the radioprotector WR2721

    SciTech Connect

    Cairnie, A.B.

    1983-04-01

    S-2-(3-Aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR2721) has radioprotective properties, but it is also toxic - in man it causes nausea and vomiting. Since radiation also causes nausea and vomiting it is important to know whether WR2721 would increase or decrease the likelihood of nausea and vomiting after radiation. This question was investigated in rats using the phenomenon of aversion to the taste of saccharin, which is readily inducible and is understood to be controlled in rats by the same pathways that control nausea and vomiting in man. The taste aversion was induced by giving 0.2 Gy /sup 60/Co ..gamma.. radiation 30 min after drinking 0.1% saccharin, or WR2721 immediately after the saccharin, or giving both radiation and WR2721. There were appropriate controls. In sham-irradiated rats, WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg, but not 8 mg/kg) produced a significant taste aversion. When WR2721 (40 or 200 mg/kg) was given immediately after the saccharin to irradiated rats it increased the taste aversion significantly, but it did not have any effect at 8 mg/kg. It was concluded that at doses which were optimal for radioprotection (approx.200 mg/kg) or lower, WR2721 increased in rats the taste aversion induced by radiation. By inference if conditioned taste aversion is an appropriate paradigm, WR2721 would increase nausea and vomiting in man induced by radiation.

  9. Protection from radiation nephropathy by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, S.S.; Moskowitz, P.S.; Evans, J.W.; Fajardo, L.F.

    1984-02-01

    The efficacy of WR-2721 pretreatment against radiation injury to the growing kidney was evaluated in the weanling mouse. Immediately following unilateral nephrectomy, animals received intraperitoneal injections of saline or WR-2721 (220 mg/kg). Thirty minutes later both nonprotected (saline-treated) control animals and protected (WR-2721-treated) animals received 1000-rad single-fraction radiation to the remaining kidney. Other animals received WR-2721 immediately following unilateral nephrectomy but no radiation. Animals were sacrificed at 3 and 24 weeks. Nonirradiated animals treated with WR-2721 only showed normal compensatory renal growth, body growth, and renal function at 24 weeks. The nonprotected, irradiated animals exhibited renal growth inhibition without body growth inhibition, and renal functional abnormalities including elevation of serum BUN and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Pretreatment with WR-2721 prior to 1000 rad prevented the renal growth inhibition and functional abnormalities seen in the nonprotected irradiated animals. Within the observation period there were no differences in renal morphology by light and electron microscopy between protected and nonprotected groups; only mild glomerular and tubular abnormalities compatible with radiation injury were seen. The dose reduction factor for WR-2721 renal growth protection is between 1.16 and 1.2.

  10. WR-2721 inhibits parathyroid adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.E.; Morrissey, J.; McConkey, C. Jr.; Goldfarb, S.; Slatopolsky, E.; Martin, K.J.

    1987-02-01

    WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid) is a chemoprotective and radioprotective agent that has been shown to lower serum calcium in dogs and in humans. This is secondary both to impaired release of CaS from bone and diminished secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) from parathyroid glands. Because cAMP plays a role in the regulation of PTH secretion and WR-2721 has been shown to lower cAMP levels in radiated mouse spleen, the authors investigated the effects of WR-2721 on cAMP production in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Additional, they studied the adenylate cyclase in plasma membranes from normal bovine parathyroid glands after exposure to WR-2721. With parathyroid cells incubated at 0.5 mM CaS , addition of Wr-2721 in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 2.0 mM resulted in a progressive decrease in intracellular cAMP measured by radioimmunoassay. In plasma membranes of bovine parathyroid cells a dose-dependent decrease in adenylate cyclase activity was noted. Inhibition of the cyclase was seen over a wide range of MgS concentrations. WR-2721 inhibited both basal and NaF, Gpp(NH)(, forskolin, and pertussin toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. These data suggest that WR-2721 inhibits the activity of parathyroid adenylate cyclase.

  11. Acute Oral and Intraperitoneal Toxicity Study of WR242511 and WR269410 in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    survivors were also necropsied. The acute oral LD50 of WR242511 tartrate in male rats, administered in 1% Methylcellulose/O.4% Tween 80 by gavage, was...administered orally. The acute oral LDS0 of WR269410 in male rats, administered in 1% Methylcellulose/O.4% Tween 80 by gavage, was approximately four-fold...formulations in 0.1% Methylcellulose/O.4% Tween 80 at high enough concentrations to produce lethality, WR269410 was administered intraperitoneally as a

  12. Radioprotective Thiolamines WR-1065 and WR-33278 Selectively Denature Nonhistone Nuclear Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, Valerie K.; Roberts, Jeanette C.; Warters, Raymond L.; Wilmore, Britta H.; Lepock, James R.

    2000-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry was used to study the interactions of nuclei isolated from Chinese hamster V79 cells with the radioprotector WR-1065, other thiol compounds, and polyamines. Differential scanning calorimetry monitors denaturation of macromolecules and resolves the major nuclear components (e.g. constrained and relaxed DNA, nucleosome core, and nuclear matrix) of intact nuclei on the basis of thermal stability. WR-1065 treatment (0.5-10 mM) of isolated nuclei led to the irreversible denaturation of nuclear proteins, a fraction of which are nuclear matrix proteins. Denaturation of 50% of the total nonhistone nuclear protein content of isolated nuclei occurred after exposure to 4.7 mM WR-1065 for 20 min at 23 C. In addition, a 22% increase in the insoluble protein content of nuclei isolated from V79 cells that had been treated with 4 mM WR-1065 for 30 min at 37 C was observed, indicating that WR-1065-induced protein denaturation occurs not only in isolated nuclei but also in the nuclei of intact cells. From the extent of the increase in insoluble protein in the nucleus, protein denaturation by WR-1065 is expected to contribute to drug toxicity at concentrations greater than approximately 4 mM. WR-33278, the disulfide form of WR1065, was approximately twice as effective as the free thiol at denaturing nuclear proteins. The proposed mechanism for nucleoprotein denaturation is through direct interactions with protein cysteine groups with the formation of destabilizing protein-WR-1065 disulfides. In comparison to its effect on nuclear proteins in isolated nuclei, WR-1065 had only a very small effect on non-nuclear proteins of whole cells, isolated nuclear matrix, or the thiol-rich Ca (2+) ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum, indicating that WR-1065 can effectively denature protein only inside an intact nucleus, probably due to the increased concentration of the positively charged drug in the vicinity of DNA.

  13. Protection by WR-2721 and WR-151327 against late effects of gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grdina, D. J.; Garnes, B. A.; Nagy, B.

    Two thiophosphoroate compounds WR-2721 and WR-151327 were assessed for their ability to modify the deleterious effects (life shortening and carcinogenesis) of fission-spectrum neutrons (kerma-weighted mean energy of 0.85 MeV) or gamma rays on B6CF1 hybrid mice. Male and female mice, 200 of each sex per experimental group, were irradiated individually at 110 days of age. Radioprotectors (400 mg/kg of WR-2721 or 580 mg/kg of WR-151327) were administered intraperitoneally 30 min prior to irradiation. Neutron doses were 10 cGy or 40 cGy and gamma ray doses were 206 cGy or 417 cGy. Animals were housed five to a cage; cage locations in the holding rooms were randomized by computer. Animals were checked daily and all deceased animals were necropsied. WR-2721 afforded protection against both neutron- and gamma-ray-induced carcinogenesis and subsequent life shortening. Cumulative survival curves for unirradiated mice of either sex were unaffected by protectors. WR-2721 protected irradiated groups against life shortening by approximately 10 cGy of neutrons or 100 cGy of gamma rays. WR-151327 was as effective as WR-2721 against neutron irradiation.

  14. Influence of WR 2721 on the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy of murine tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Clement, J.J.; Johnson, R.K.

    1982-03-01

    The effect of WR2721 on the response of tumors to radiation, antineoplastic alkylating drugs, and DNA binding agents was evaluated and compared to the degree of normal tissue protection provided by WR 2721 against these agents. WR 2721 administered to mice bearing P388 leukemia or Lewis lung carcinoma was found to reduce the radiosensitivity of the leukemia and lung tumor by dose modifying factors of 1.4 and 1.3, respectively. WR 2721 protected bone marow, intestine, and skin from radiation by factors of 1.9. 1.4 and 1.8. WR 2721 protected mice from the lethality of cyclophosphamide by a factor of only 1.2 whereas protection from melphalan toxicity was more dramatic with a dose modifying factor of 1.6. In chemotherapy studies of established M5076 ovarian tumor, the combination of WR 2721 plus cyclophosphamide was equivalent in activity to cyclophosphamide alone. WR 2721 did not modify the antitumor activity of melphalan in early Lewis lung carcinoma did not decrease the antileukemic effects of this agent by a factor of 2.6 indicating tumor protection greater than host protection in the leukemia. The antitumor activity of the DNA binding agents etoposide (VP16-213) and mitoxantrone against systemic P388 leukemia was not diminished by WR 2721, while a substantial increase in host toxicity was noted for the combinations. The protective effects of WR 2721 against radiation and drug damage were, therefore, not entirely selective for normal tissues. In some cases the degree of tumor protection can be similar to, or greater than, normal tissue protection.

  15. Developmental Toxicity (Segment II) Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-11-04

    vehicle control or WR238605 Succinate treated groups. The use of Vitamin A (Retinol Palmitate) as a positive control agent was effective in producing a...ACCESSION NO. 073 [11. TITLE ( Include Security Classification) Developmental Toxicity (Segment II) Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rats ]\\2...ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Unclassified i 22a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE INDIVIDUAL Barrv S. IPvinP 22b. TELEPHONE ( Include Area Code) (312

  16. The possible biperiodicity of WR 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, E.; Vreux, J.-M.

    1990-05-01

    Strong arguments are presented in favor of the simultaneous presence of two periodicities in the variability of the Wolf-Rayet star WR 40. The frequencies are nu(A) = 0.16/d and nu(B) = 0.40/d. Some uncertainties remain concerning the choice of the actual one-year alias. On the basis of a detailed statistical analysis, reliable evidence that the variability related to nu(B) could be coherent is also presented: this points out nu(B) as a possible fundamental frequency linked to the 'core' of WR 40. No firm conclusion could be drawn about nu(A), suggesting that it could be a recurrent quasi-periodicity or a second order periodicity (e.g., a beat frequency). The two frequencies are sometimes hidden by the white noise, or slightly correlated, random process that constitutes the third component of the variability of WR 40.

  17. Pinwheel Nebula around WR 98a.

    PubMed

    Monnier; Tuthill; Danchi

    1999-11-10

    We present the first near-infrared images of the dusty Wolf-Rayet star WR 98a. Aperture-masking interferometry has been utilized to recover images at the diffraction limit of the Keck I telescope, less, similar50 mas at 2.2 µm. Multiepoch observations spanning about 1 yr have resolved the dust shell into a "pinwheel" nebula, the second example of a new class of dust shell first discovered around WR 104 by Tuthill, Monnier, & Danchi. Interpreting the collimated dust outflow in terms of an interacting winds model, the binary orbital parameters and apparent wind speed are derived: a period of 565+/-50 days, a viewing angle of 35&j0;+/-6 degrees from the pole, and a wind speed of 99+/-23 mas yr-1. This period is consistent with a possible approximately 588 day periodicity in the infrared light curve, linking the photometric variation to the binary orbit. Important implications for binary stellar evolution are discussed by identifying WR 104 and WR 98a as members of a class of massive, short-period binaries whose orbits were circularized during a previous red supergiant phase. The current component separation in each system is similar to the diameter of a red supergiant, which indicates that the supergiant phase was likely terminated by Roche lobe overflow, leading to the present Wolf-Rayet stage.

  18. Is the Stellar System WR 11 a Gamma-Ray Source?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaglia, Paula

    2016-04-01

    Many early-type stars are in systems; some of them have been indicated as putative high-energy emitters. The radiation would be produced at the region where two stellar winds collide. Compelling evidence of such emission was found only for the colliding-wind binary (CWB) Eta Car, which was associated to a GeV source. Very recently, the closest CWB, WR 11, was proposed as a counterpart of a 6σ emission excess, measured with the Fermi LAT satellite. We sought evidence to support or reject the hypothesis that WR 11 is responsible of the gamma-ray excess. Archive radio interferometric data at 1.4 and 2.5 GHz taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array along 16 dates were reduced. The sizes of the field-of-view at 2.5 GHz and of the central region of the Fermi LAT excess are alike. We analysed the emission of the WR 11 field, characterised the radio sources detected and derived their spectral indices, to investigate their nature. Eight sources with fluxes above 10 mJy were detected at both frequencies. All but one (WR 11) showed negative spectral indices. Four of them were identified with known objects, including WR 11. A fifth source, labeled here S6, is a promising candidate to produce gamma-ray emission, besides the CWB WR 11.

  19. Hypnotic responsiveness: expectancy, attitudes, fantasy proneness, absorption, and gender.

    PubMed

    Green, Joseph P; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the effect of providing information linking participants' attitudes toward hypnosis with later hypnotic performance. Using total scale scores from McConkey's Opinions About Hypnosis scale, as well as subscale scores, the authors found a weak association between attitudes and performance among 460 student participants; however, the correlation was unaffected by prehypnotic information specifically connecting attitudes and performance. A brief, 3-item measure of hypnotic expectancies generated the strongest correlation with hypnotic responsiveness. The authors also found that the association between fantasy proneness and hypnotizability was unaffected by the order of scale administration. Finally, the study highlighted gender differences across measures of fantasy proneness, absorption, expectancy, and hypnotizability.

  20. Regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giménez Benitez, S.; Niemela, V.

    En base a observaciones espectroscópicas en el rango óptico, obtenidas en el CASLEO, se estudian las condiciones físicas de tres regiones H II alrededor de estrellas WR: N76 en el entorno de Ab7, en la Nube Menor de Magallanes, N79 alrededor de Br 2, en la Nube Mayor de Magallanes y G2.4+1.4 alrededor de WR 102, en nuestra Galaxia. Estas regiones presentan una alta ionización. Se observa la línea nebular de HeII en 4686 Å . Utilizando líneas nebulares de diagnóstico, se derivan los valores de la densidad y la temperatura electrónica, así como también las abundancias de algunos de los elementos químicos nebulares.

  1. Antimalarial activity of WR 243251, a Dihydroacridinedione.

    PubMed Central

    Berman, J; Brown, L; Miller, R; Andersen, S L; McGreevy, P; Schuster, B G; Ellis, W; Ager, A; Rossan, R

    1994-01-01

    WR 243251 is a dihydroacridinedione that was evaluated for antimalarial blood schizonticidal activity in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro doses calculated to kill 50% of organisms were 11 nM for a chloroquine-susceptible, mefloquine-resistant standard strain and 25 nM for a chloroquine- and pyrimethamine-resistant standard strain. The total dose needed to cure 100% of mice infected with a drug-susceptible strain of Plasmodium berghei was 12 to 20 mg/kg of body weight for both oral and subcutaneous administration. The regimen needed to cure 100% of Aotus monkeys infected with Plasmodium falciparum was 8 mg/kg/day for 3 days (chloroquine-susceptible strain) and 16 mg/kg/day for 3 days (chloroquine-resistant strain). The 100% curative doses for Aotus monkeys did not increase for parasites previously exposed to subcurative doses. The absolute value of the curative doses of WR 243251 was comparable to or lower than the values for clinical antimalarial agents. The high absolute activity, comparability of activities against susceptible and resistant parasites, and inability to induce resistance by exposure to subcurative doses suggest that WR 243251 has strong potential as a blood schizonticidal agent. PMID:7986005

  2. Characterization of oxidized carbon materials with photoinduced absorption response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uklein, A. V.; Diyuk, V. E.; Grishchenko, L. M.; Kozhanov, V. O.; Boldyrieva, O. Yu.; Lisnyak, V. V.; Multian, V. V.; Gayvoronsky, V. Ya.

    2016-12-01

    An efficient application of fast remote diagnostics for carbon material (CM) bulk particles was demonstrated. Porous layers of CM particles with different oxidation levels were characterized by self-action of picosecond laser pulses at 1064 nm. Nitrogen adsorption, Boehm titration, and thermal analysis of the oxidized CMs revealed diverse specific surface area S_{BET}, reasonable surface acidity, and high concentration of surface oxygen-containing groups. Dense CM porous layers showed a monotonous reduction of the absorptive nonlinear optical (NLO) response efficiency versus the oxidation level with characteristic magnitude Im(χ _C^{(3)})˜ 10^{-10} esu for the carbon particles fraction. The obtained Im(χ _C^{(3)})/S_{BET} ratio remains approximately constant, which indicates the certain proportion between the absorptive NLO response efficiency and the specific surface area. We suggest to use Im(χ _C^{(3)}) as a figure of merit for carbons subjected to the oxidation—the route to enhance the CM surface reactivity.

  3. Thiol WR-1O65 and DisuLphide WR-33278, Two Metabolites of the Drug Ethyol (WR-2721), Protect DNA against Fast Neutron-Induced Strand Breakage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Charles we have shown that cysteamine protects less effici- Sadron, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2, France. e hom f at t s t a n rom l-ray-i ci- tApplied...Solutions of cysteamine , cystamine (Merck), The effects of WR-1065 and WR-33278 are corn- WR-1065 and WR-33278 (Walter Reed Army pared with those of... cysteamine and cystamine. Institute, Washington, DC, USA) were prepared in The radiation-induced strand breakage of DNA in 1 mmol dm -3 potassium

  4. The dipeptide H-Trp-Arg-OH (WR) Is a PPARα agonist and reduces hepatic lipid accumulation in lipid-loaded H4IIE cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yaoyao; Kim, Jong-Ho; Nam, Bora; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Ji Hae; Kim, Kyung Ok; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Dipeptides absorbed by the intestinal epithelium are delivered to circulation, but their metabolic roles are not yet clearly understood. We investigated the biological activities of a dietary dipeptide, H-Trp-Arg-OH (WR), on the regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) α activity. Reporter gene assays revealed that WR dose-dependently induced PPARα transactivation. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated that WR interacts directly with the PPARα ligand binding domain, and time-resolved fluorescence energy transfer analyses revealed recruitment of a co-activator peptide, fluorescein-PGC1α, to PPARα, confirming the direct binding of WR to PPARα and occurrence of conformational changes. WR induced cellular fatty acid uptake and the expression of PPARα response genes in fatty acid oxidation, thus reducing intracellular triglyceride accumulation in lipid-loaded hepatocytes. In conclusion, the dietary dipeptide WR activates PPARα and reduces hepatic lipid accumulation in lipid-loaded hepatocytes.

  5. The CHARA Array resolves the long-period Wolf-Rayet binaries WR 137 and WR 138

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; Shenar, Tomer; Roy-Loubier, Olivier; Schaefer, Gail; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; St-Louis, Nicole; Gies, Douglas R.; Farrington, Chris; Hill, Grant M.; Williams, Peredur M.; Gordon, Kathryn; Pablo, Herbert; Ramiaramanantsoa, Tahina

    2016-10-01

    We report on interferometric observations with the CHARA Array of two classical Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in suspected binary systems, namely WR 137 and WR 138. In both cases, we resolve the component stars to be separated by a few milliarcseconds. The data were collected in the H band, and provide a measure of the fractional flux for both stars in each system. We find that the WR star is the dominant H-band light source in both systems (fWR,137 = 0.59 ± 0.04; fWR,138 = 0.67 ± 0.01), which is confirmed through both comparisons with estimated fundamental parameters for WR stars and O dwarfs, as well as through spectral modelling of each system. Our spectral modelling also provides fundamental parameters for the stars and winds in these systems. The results on WR 138 provide evidence that it is a binary system which may have gone through a previous mass-transfer episode to create the WR star. The separation and position of the stars in the WR 137 system together with previous results from the IOTA interferometer provides evidence that the binary is seen nearly edge-on. The possible edge-on orbit of WR 137 aligns well with the dust production site imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope during a previous periastron passage, showing that the dust production may be concentrated in the orbital plane.

  6. Opposite effects of WR-2721 and WR-1065 on radiation-induced hypothermia: possible correlation with oxygen uptake. Scientific report

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Kumar, K.S.; Hunt, W.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces hypothermia in guinea pigs. While systemic injection of the radioprotectant S-2-(3-aminopropylamimo)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) did not block hypothermia induced by exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, central administration did attenuate it. The dephosphorylated metabolite of WR-2721, N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065), accentuated radiation-induced hypothermia by both routes of administration. In brain homogenates, oxygen uptake was inhibited by WR-2721 but elevated by WR-1065. These results suggest that the antagonism of radiation-induced hypothermia found only after central administration of WR-2721 is due to its direct actions and not in its dephosphorylated metabolite, and that this effect may be correlated with the inhibition by WR-2721 of oxygen uptake.

  7. Opposite effects of WR-2721 and WR-1065 on radiation-induced hypothermia: possible correlation with oxygen uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Kandasamy, S.B.; Kumar, K.S.; Hunt, W.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1988-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induces hypothermia in guinea pigs. While systemic injection of the radioprotectant S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721) did not block hyperthermia induced by exposure to 10 Gy of gamma radiation, central administration did attenuate it. The dephosphorylated metabolite of WR-2721, N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065), accentuated radiation-induced hypothermia by both routes of administration. In brain homogenates, oxygen uptake was inhibited by WR-2721 but elevated by WR-1065. These results suggest that the antagonism of radiation-induced hypothermia found only after central administration of WR-2721 is due to its direct actions and not to its dephosphorylated metabolite and that this effect may be correlated with the inhibition by WR-2721 of oxygen uptake.

  8. Phase I controlled trials of WR-2721 and cyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Glick, J.H.; Glover, D.; Weiler, C.; Norfleet, L.; Yuhas, J.; Kligerman, M.M.

    1984-09-01

    WR-2721 is an organic thiophosphate compound which in the animal model selectively protects against the hematologic toxicity of cyclophosphamide by factors of 1.5 to 2.0. Controlled Phase I trials of WR-2721 and cyclophosphamide were initiated to determine if WR-2721 protected against cyclophosphamide's hematolgic toxicity. Fifteen patients received WR-2721 prior to cyclophosphamide and were subsequently retreated 4 weeks later with the same cyclophosphamide dose alone. With WR-2721 pretreatment, 11/15 (73%) patients had improved WBC counts. In the second trial, 25 patients received the reverse sequence: an initial dose of cyclophosphamide alone, followed 4 weeks later by WR-2721 prior to the same dose of cyclophosphamide. With WR-2721 pretreatment, 12/25 (48%) patients had improved nadir WBC counts. No patient developed microscopic or gross hematuria or inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion. These data suggest that WR-2721 provides significant protection against cyclophosphamide-induced granulocytopenia, but the dose modification factors and degree of clinical benefit remain to be established. The current recommended WR-2721 dose for Phase II trials is 740 mg/m/sup 2/ administered over 15 minutes.

  9. Antiretroviral activity of the aminothiol WR1065 against Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in vitro and Simian Immunodeficiency virus (SIV) ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Miriam C; Olivero, Ofelia A; Hardy, Andrew W; Franchini, Genoveffa; Borojerdi, Jennifer P; Walker, Vernon E; Walker, Dale M; Shearer, Gene M

    2009-01-01

    Background WR1065 is the free-thiol metabolite of the cytoprotective aminothiol amifostine, which is used clinically at very high doses to protect patients against toxicity induced by radiation and chemotherapy. In an earlier study we briefly reported that the aminothiol WR1065 also inhibits HIV-1 replication in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human T-cell blasts (TCBs) infected in culture for 2 hr before WR1065 exposure. In this study we expanded the original observations to define the dose-response curve for that inhibition, and address the question of additive effects for the combination of WR1065 plus Zidovudine (AZT). Here we also explored the effect of WR1065 on SIV by examining TCBs taken from macaques with well-established infections several months with SIV. Results TCBs from healthy human donors were infected for 2 hr with HIV-1, and viral replication (p24) was measured after 72 hr of incubation with or without WR1065, AZT, or both drugs. HIV-1 replication, in HIV-1-infected human TCBs, was inhibited by 50% at 13 μM WR1065, a dose at which 80% of the cells were viable. Cell cycle parameters were the same or equivalent at 0, 9.5 and 18.7 μM WR1065, showing no drug-related toxicity. Combination of AZT with WR1065 showed that AZT retained antiretroviral potency in the presence of WR1065. Cultured CD8+ T cell-depleted PHA-stimulated TCBs from Macaca mulatta monkeys chronically infected with SIV were incubated 17 days with WR1065, and viral replication (p27) and cell viability were determined. Complete inhibition (100%) of SIV replication (p27) was observed when TCBs from 3 monkeys were incubated for 17 days with 18.7 μM WR1065. A lower dose, 9.5 μM WR1065, completely inhibited SIV replication in 2 of the 3 monkeys, but cells from the third macaque, with the highest viral titer, only responded at the high WR1065 dose. Conclusion The study demonstrates that WR1065 and the parent drug amifostine, the FDA-approved drug Ethyol, have antiretroviral activity

  10. Postirradiation glucan administration enhances the radioprotective effects of WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Jackson, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    Based on murine survival studies, endogenous hemopoietic spleen colony formation (E-CFU), and recovery of bone marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (GM-CFC), it was demonstrated that the postirradiation administration of glucan, an immunomodulator and hemopoietic stimulant, enhances the radioprotective effects of WR-2721. LD50/30 dose reduction factors for mice treated with WR-2721 (200 mg/kg approximately 30 min before irradiation), glucan (250 mg/kg approximately 1 h after irradiation), or both agents were 1.37, 1.08, and 1.52, respectively. Enhanced survival in mice treated with both agents appeared to be due in part to glucan's ability to accelerate hemopoietic regeneration from stem cells initially protected from radiation-induced lethality by WR-2721. Following a 10-Gy radiation exposure, E-CFU numbers in mice treated with saline, WR-2721, glucan, or both WR-2721 and glucan were 0.05 +/- 0.03, 6.70 +/- 1.05, 0.95 +/- 0.24, and 33.90 +/- 2.96, respectively. Similarly, bone marrow and splenic GM-CFC numbers were greater in mice treated with both WR-2721 and glucan than in mice treated with either agent alone. These results demonstrated at least additive radioprotective effects when mice were given WR-2721 prior to irradiation and glucan following irradiation. These effects appeared to depend on the sequential cell protection mediated by WR-2721 and hemopoietic repopulation mediated by glucan.

  11. Molecular shock response of explosives: electronic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrne, Shawn D; Moore, David S; Whitley, Von H; Bolme, Cindy A; Eakins, Daniel E

    2009-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the question of the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference from the shock front as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation hypotheses and the need for time dependent absorption data (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  12. Molecular Shock Response of Explosives: Electronic Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, S. D.; Moore, D. S.; Whitley, V. H.; Bolme, C. A.; Eakins, D. E.

    2009-12-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy in the range 400-800 nm was coupled to ultrafast laser generated shocks to begin addressing the extent to which electronic excitations are involved in shock induced reactions. Data are presented on shocked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) thin films and single crystal pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). Shocked PMMA exhibited thin film interference effects from the shock front. Shocked PETN exhibited interference as well as broadband increased absorption. Relation to shock initiation and the need for time dependent absorption (future experiments) is briefly discussed.

  13. The Galactic hybrid Wolf-Rayet WN7o/CE + O7V((f)) binary system WR145

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, V.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Chené, A. N.; de La Chevrotière, A.

    2009-11-01

    A spectroscopic study of the binary Wolf-Rayet (WR)+O system WR145 is performed, in order to determine the radial velocity orbits of the individual stars, the angle of orbital inclination and the stellar masses. The emission and absorption components are separated from the original spectra, allowing us to confirm the spectral classification WN7o/CE of the hybrid WR component and to derive a spectral classification O7V((f)) for the O star. A study of the wind-collision properties is performed. Fitting the radial velocity and full width at half-maximum of the excess emission with Lührs' model results in an inclination angle of i = 63°, leading to estimates of the stellar masses: MWR = 18Msolar and MO = 31Msolar. Both of these masses are compatible with those of other stars of similar types.

  14. Temperature dependences of mechanisms responsible for the water-vapor continuum absorption. II. Dimers and collision-induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Leforestier, C; Tipping, R H; Ma, Q

    2010-04-28

    We investigated the magnitude and temperature dependence (T dependence) of the dimer absorption in the region of 0-600 cm(-1) and the collision-induced absorption (CIA) in the region of 0-1150 cm(-1). Together with our previous study of the self water-vapor continuum contributions resulting from far-wing line shapes of the allowed H(2)O lines in the infrared window between 800 and 1150 cm(-1), we find that the three mechanisms have completely different T dependence behaviors. The dimer absorption has the strongest negative T dependence and the continuum absorption from far wings of the allowed lines has a moderately strong negative one. Meanwhile, the CIA exhibits a mild T dependence. In addition, their T dependence patterns are quite different. The T dependence of the far-wing theory varies significantly as the frequency of interest omega varies. For CIA, in general, its T dependence is mildly negative, but becomes slightly positive in the window region between the H(2)O bands. In contrast, the T dependence of the dimer absorption varies slightly as omega varies. In the microwave and submillimeter region, its T dependence becomes uniform. Concerning the relative importance for each of these three mechanisms, we find that in the infrared widow, the far-wing contributions are the dominant source of the self-continuum. Within the band, its contributions are definitely responsible for the measured continuum data. But, it is impossible to draw quantitatively conclusions on its relative importance unless one is able to improve the accuracy of the local line calculations significantly. On the other hand, within the pure rotational band, the dimer absorptions are a minor contributor to the self-continuum measurements, and its role becomes more important in the microwave and submillimeter regions. Finally, based on our study we conclude that contributions to the self-continuum from CIA in the frequency region of 0-1150 cm(-1) are negligible.

  15. Temperature Dependences of Mechanisms Responsible for the Water-Vapor Continuum Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Qiancheng

    2014-01-01

    The water-vapor continuum absorption plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H2O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: far-wings of allowed transition lines, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of absorptions from the far-wings of the strong allowed transition lines. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed, and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the continuum characters mentioned above. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the continuum absorption.

  16. Four Week Oral Dose Range-Finding Study of WR242511 in Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-09

    Laboratory, Model No. 282). The assay was performed within one-hour of sample collection. The specimens were kept on wet ice prior to analysis...this protein, which is synthesized by hepatocytes, is indicative of an inflammatory response, i.e. an acute phase reaction . Dose-dependent anemia, as...apparent decreases in the A/G ratio, and increases in serum haptoglobin levels, indicative of an acute phase reaction . In the lung, WR242511 resulted in

  17. Four Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Dogs. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    reaction , were observed in mid dose males and high dose animals. Because the aforementioned toxic responses were limited to the mid and high dose...suggests that WR242511 is marginally hepatotoxic. Additionally, increased serum haptoglobin levels, indicative of an acute phase reaction , were...count ’Measured with a Co-oximeter (Instrumentation Laboratory, Model No. 282). The assay was performed within one-hour of sample collection. The

  18. Characterization of Photon-Counting Detector Responsivity for Non-Linear Two-Photon Absorption Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sburlan, S. E.; Farr, W. H.

    2011-01-01

    Sub-band absorption at 1550 nm has been demonstrated and characterized on silicon Geiger mode detectors which normally would be expected to have no response at this wavelength. We compare responsivity measurements to singlephoton absorption for wavelengths slightly above the bandgap wavelength of silicon (approx. 1100 microns). One application for this low efficiency sub-band absorption is in deep space optical communication systems where it is desirable to track a 1030 nm uplink beacon on the same flight terminal detector array that monitors a 1550 nm downlink signal for pointingcontrol. The currently observed absorption at 1550 nm provides 60-70 dB of isolation compared to the response at 1064 nm, which is desirable to avoid saturation of the detector by scattered light from the downlink laser.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and disposition of WR-1065 in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Mangold, D.J.; Huelle, B.K.; Miller, M.A.; Geary, R.S.; Sanchez-Barona, D.O.; Swynnerton, N.F.; Fleckenstein, L.; Ludden, T.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics of WR-1065 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethanethiol) were investigated following iv, intraduodenal, and intraportal administrations in the rhesus monkey. Pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated by compartmental modeling of plasma concentration data from 10-min and 120-min iv infusions. Higher apparent volumes of distribution (Vc and Vss) and higher mean residence time (MRT) were observed at the slower infusion rate but a constant total dose. The values reflect a change in the distribution of WR-1065, possibly due to to saturation of binding in plasma and tissue. However, clearance remained unchanged. For a monkey administered approximately twice the 60 mg/kg dose infused over 120 min, data analysis indicates a disproportional increase in AUC and a substantial decrease in clearance. Low and erratic plasma concentrations of free drug (analytically determined without reductive cleavage) were observed following intraduodenal administration of WR-1065, demonstrating the drug's poor oral bioavailability. Results of intraduodenal administrations of radiolabeled drug indicated than an appreciable amount of the radiolabel in the dose reached the systemic circulation. However, after either intraduodenal or iv administration, only 31% of the AUC (radiolabel) could be accounted for as total (free and disulfide-bound) WR-1065 by specific analysis in separate experiments. Low levels of total cysteamine strongly suggest it to be a minor contributor to the disposition of the drug. Free WR-1065 AUC values following intraportal administration were similar to values obtained after iv administration.

  20. Evolution of Planetary Nebulae with WR-type Central Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danehkar, Ashkbiz

    2014-04-01

    This thesis presents a study of the kinematics, physical conditions and chemical abundances for a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with Wolf-Rayet (WR) and weak emission-line stars (wels), based on optical integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy obtained with the Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the Australian National University 2.3 telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, and complemented by spectra from the literature. PNe surrounding WR-type stars constitute a particular study class for this study. A considerable fraction of currently well-identified central stars of PNe exhibit 'hydrogen-deficient' fast expanding atmospheres characterized by a large mass-loss rate. Most of them were classified as the carbon-sequence and a few of them as the nitrogen-sequence of the WR-type stars. What are less clear are the physical mechanisms and evolutionary paths that remove the hydrogen-rich outer layer from these degenerate cores, and transform it into a fast stellar wind. The aim of this thesis is to determine kinematic structure, density distribution, thermal structure and elemental abundances for a sample of PNe with different hydrogen-deficient central stars, which might provide clues about the origin and formation of their hydrogen-deficient stellar atmospheres. Hα and [N II] emission features have been used to determine kinematic structures. Based on spatially resolved observations of these emission lines, combined with archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging for compact PNe, morphological structures of these PNe have been determined. Comparing the velocity maps from the IFU spectrograph with those provided by morpho-kinematic models allowed disentangling of the different morphological components of most PNe, apart from the compact objects. The results indicate that these PNe have axisymmetric morphologies, either bipolar or elliptical. In many cases, the associated kinematic maps for PNe around hot WR-type stars also show the presence of so-called fast

  1. Protection and potentiation of nitrogen mustard cytotoxicity by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Valeriote, F.; Tolen, S.

    1982-11-01

    The radioprotective agent WR-2721 was examined for its effects on modifying the cytotoxicity of HN2 against normal and tumor cells in the AKR mouse. Quantitation was carried out by the spleen colony assay for both normal hematopoietic stem cells and AKR leukemia cells. Protection from drug toxicity and normal cell cytotoxicity was noted. Potentiation of cytotoxicity to AKR leukemia was found.

  2. A Simple Experiment Demonstrating the Relationship between Response Curves and Absorption Spectra.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Chia-yu

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment for recording two individual spectrophotometer response curves. The two curves are directly related to the power of transmitted beams that pass through a solvent and solution. An absorption spectrum of the solution can be constructed from the calculated rations of the curves as a function of wavelength. (JN)

  3. Absorption in Music: Development of a Scale to Identify Individuals with Strong Emotional Responses to Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandstrom, Gillian M.; Russo, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the rise in research investigating music and emotion over the last decade, there are no validated measures of individual differences in emotional responses to music. We created the Absorption in Music Scale (AIMS), a 34-item measure of individuals' ability and willingness to allow music to draw them into an emotional experience. It was…

  4. Oral Fertility and Early Embryonic Development Study of WR242511 Tartrate in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-12-21

    ORAL FERTILITY AND EARLY EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT STUDY OF WR242511 TARTRATE IN RATS PRECOHABITATION AND COHABITATION PHASES [ DMH SUMMARY OF WEIGHT...Classification) Oral Fertility and Early Embryonic Development Study of WR242511 Tartrate in Rats 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Levine, Barry S...This study evaluated the toxic potential of WR242511 Tartrate on reproductive capability in CD® male and female rats . WR242511 Tartrate is being

  5. Ozone absorption into excised porcine and sheep tracheae by a bolus-response method

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Jebria, A.; Hu, S.C.; Kitzmiller, E.L.; Ultman, J.S. )

    1991-12-01

    The absorption of ozone (O3) into excised porcine and sheep tracheae was characterized by a bolus-response experiment in which a bolus with a peak O3 concentration of 1 ppm was rapidly injected into a steadily flowing airstream entering the trachea. Using a fast-responding chemiluminescent analyzer of the authors design, the O3 concentration curves at the proximal end (i.e., the bolus input) and at the distal end (i.e., the response) of the trachea were monitored. Each concentration curve was numerically integrated, and the fraction of O3 absorbed in the trachea was obtained by subtracting from unity the ratio of the response integral to the bolus input integral. Average values of ozone-absorbed fraction decreased from about 0.50 to 0.15 at increasing airflows from 50 to 200 ml/sec. A diffusion theory that includes the effects of bulk convection, axial dispersion, and first-order absorption was developed to relate the fractional absorption to an overall mass transfer coefficient (K). The results indicate that K is independent of airflow, suggesting that the diffusion resistance in mucus is much greater than that in the gas phase. The time-weighted integrals of the concentration curves were also computed, allowing the mean residence time of O3 in the trachea (delta tau) to be determined. As predicted by the diffusion theory, delta tau was inversely related to the rate of O3 absorption.

  6. The X-ray light curve of the massive colliding wind Wolf-Rayet + O binary WR 21a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, Eric; Nazé, Yaël

    2016-05-01

    Our dedicated XMM-Newton monitoring, as well as archival Chandra and Swift datasets, were used to examine the behaviour of the WN5h+O3V binary WR 21a at high energies. For most of the orbit, the X-ray emission exhibits few variations. However, an increase in strength of the emission is seen before periastron, following a 1 /D relative trend, where D is the separation between both components. This increase is rapidly followed by a decline due to strong absorption as the Wolf-Rayet (WR) comes in front. The fitted local absorption value appears to be coherent with a mass-loss rate of about 1 × 10-5 M⊙ yr-1 for the WR component. However, absorption is not the only parameter affecting the X-ray emission at periastron as even the hard X-ray emission decreases, suggesting a possible collapse of the colliding wind region near to or onto the photosphere of the companion just before or at periastron. An eclipse may appear as another potential scenario, but it would be in apparent contradiction with several lines of evidence, notably the width of the dip in the X-ray light curve and the absence of variations in the UV light curve. Afterwards, the emission slowly recovers, with a strong hysteresis effect. The observed behaviour is compatible with predictions from general wind-wind collision models although the absorption increase is too shallow. Based on observations collected at ESO as well as with Swift, Chandra, and the ESA science mission XMM-Newton, an ESA Science Mission with instruments and contributions directly funded by ESA Member States and the USA (NASA).

  7. High power windows for WR650 waveguide couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Mircea Stirbet; Robert Rimmer; Thomas Elliott; Edward Daly; Katherine Wilson; Lynn Vogel; Haipeng Wang; Brian Carpenter; Karl Smith; Thomas Powers; Michael Drury; Robert Nichols; G. Davis

    2007-06-01

    Based on the robust, pre-stressed planar window concept successfully tested for PEP II and LEDA, a new design for planar ceramic windows to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. These windows should operate in pulsed or CW mode and sustain at least 100 kW average power levels. This paper describes an overview of the simulations performed to match the ceramics in WR650 waveguides, design details, as well as the RF measurements and performance assessed by RF power tests on several high power windows manufactured at JLAB. Funding Agency: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by The Office of Naval Research under contract to the Dept. of Energy.

  8. Polymer complex of WR 2721. Synthesis and radioprotective efficiency.

    PubMed

    Koseva, Neli; Tsacheva, Ivelina; Mitova, Violeta; Vodenicharova, Elitsa; Molkentine, Jessica; Mason, Kathy; Troev, Kolio

    2014-12-18

    Polymer complex constructed from WR 2721 and poly(hydroxyoxyethylene phosphate) was synthesized. The structure of complex formed was elucidated by (1)H-, (13)C, (31)P NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. The radioprotector was immobilized via ionic bonds. Radioprotective efficacy was evaluated by clonal survival of stem cells in crypts of mouse small intestine, and incidence and latency of the acute radiation induced bone marrow syndrome. Protection factors were assessed for WR 2721 and for the polymer complex. Protection factors for the polymer complex ranged from 2.6 for intestinal stem cell survival to 1.35 for 30 day survival (LD50) following whole body radiation exposure. In all cases, the polymer complex was a significantly better radiation protector than the parent compound.

  9. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT

    SciTech Connect

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond

    2015-10-06

    We present two iterative algorithms for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within linear response of time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. These methods do not attempt to compute eigenvalues or eigenvectors of the linear response matrix. They are designed to approximate the absorption spectrum as a function directly. They take advantage of the special structure of the linear response matrix. Neither method requires the linear response matrix to be constructed explicitly. They only require a procedure that performs the multiplication of the linear response matrix with a vector. These methods can also be easily modified to efficiently estimate the density of states (DOS) of the linear response matrix without computing the eigenvalues of this matrix. We show by computational experiments that the methods proposed in this paper can be much more efficient than methods that are based on the exact diagonalization of the linear response matrix. We show that they can also be more efficient than real-time TDDFT simulations. We compare the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost.

  10. UV-responsive nano-sponge for oil absorption and desorption

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Jung, Min Chan; Cho, So-Hye; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Heon Ju; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2015-01-01

    Controlled surface wettability for oil has been intensively studied to remove industrial oil waste or oil spill pollution from seas or rivers. In particular, external stimuli-induced special wetting materials, such as photo-responsive TiO2, have attracted considerable attention for oil-water separation. In this study, a novel method is reported to fabricate a nano-sponge which is composed of hydrophobic hydrocarbon and hydrophilic TiO2 nanoparticles for oil absorption or desorption that are responsive to UV irradiation. The hydrocarbon in the nano-sponge could selectively absorb oil from water, whereas the absorbed oil is released into the water by TiO2 in response to UV irradiation. The nano-sponge functionalized porous polydimethylsiloxane released more than 98% of the absorbed crude oil with UV irradiation and air-bubbling. It could be continuously reused while maintaining a high absorption capacity and desorption efficiency without incurring secondary air or water pollution. This smart oil absorption/desorption methodology with excellent selectivity and recyclability with almost perfect removal of absorbed oil can be applied for oil-water separation, oil spill cleanup and reuse of spilled oil. PMID:26260470

  11. UV-responsive nano-sponge for oil absorption and desorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Jung, Min Chan; Cho, So-Hye; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Ho-Young; Lee, Heon Ju; Oh, Kyu Hwan; Moon, Myoung-Woon

    2015-08-01

    Controlled surface wettability for oil has been intensively studied to remove industrial oil waste or oil spill pollution from seas or rivers. In particular, external stimuli-induced special wetting materials, such as photo-responsive TiO2, have attracted considerable attention for oil-water separation. In this study, a novel method is reported to fabricate a nano-sponge which is composed of hydrophobic hydrocarbon and hydrophilic TiO2 nanoparticles for oil absorption or desorption that are responsive to UV irradiation. The hydrocarbon in the nano-sponge could selectively absorb oil from water, whereas the absorbed oil is released into the water by TiO2 in response to UV irradiation. The nano-sponge functionalized porous polydimethylsiloxane released more than 98% of the absorbed crude oil with UV irradiation and air-bubbling. It could be continuously reused while maintaining a high absorption capacity and desorption efficiency without incurring secondary air or water pollution. This smart oil absorption/desorption methodology with excellent selectivity and recyclability with almost perfect removal of absorbed oil can be applied for oil-water separation, oil spill cleanup and reuse of spilled oil.

  12. Possible atomic structures responsible for the sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Ke-Fan; Shao, Hezhu; Liu, Kong; Qu, Shengchun E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Wang, Zhanguo; Wang, Yuanxu E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    Single-crystal silicon was hyperdoped with sulfur, selenium, and tellurium using ion implantation and nanosecond laser melting. The hyperdoping of such chalcogen elements led to strong and wide sub-bandgap light absorption. Annealing the hyperdoped silicon, even at low temperatures (such as 200–400 °C), led to attenuation of the sub-bandgap absorption. To explain the attenuation process, we modeled it as chemical decomposition reaction from an optically absorbing structure to a non-absorbing structure. Attenuation of the experimental absorption coefficient was fit using the Arrhenius equation. From the fitted data, we extracted the reaction activation energies of S-, Se-, and T-hyperdoped silicon as 0.338 ± 0.029 eV, 0.471 ± 0.040 eV, and 0.357 ± 0.028 eV, respectively. We discuss these activation energies in terms of the bond energies of chalcogen–Si metastable bonds, and suggest that several high-energy interstitial sites, rather than substitutional sites, are candidates for the atomic structures that are responsible for the strong sub-bandgap absorption of chalcogen hyperdoped silicon.

  13. Plasma and brain angiotensin concentrations associated with water response behavior in the desert anuran, Scaphiopus couchii under natural conditions in the field.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William E; Hillyard, Stanley D; Propper, Catherine R

    2010-12-01

    Terrestrial amphibians obtain water by absorption across a specialized region of the ventral skin and exhibit a behavior, the water absorption response (WR) to place that region in contact with moist surfaces. Spadefoot toads (Scaphiopus couchii) spend dry months of the year in burrows, then emerge during brief periods of summer rainfall and seek water sources for rehydration and reproduction. We tested the hypothesis that these toads have changes in plasma and/or central angiotensin concentrations that are associated with seasonal emergence and WR behavior. Immunoreactive concentrations of combined angiotensin II and III (ir-ANG) were measured in plasma samples and microdissected regions of brain tissue taken from toads moving across the road or toads showing WR behavior in shallow puddles on the road. Plasma ir-ANG concentrations were not significantly different between these groups, but were significantly higher in the periventricular region of the hypothalamus in toads showing WR behavior. Concentrations in other brain regions, while highly variable among individuals, were not different between groups. Within the context of the natural history of a specialized desert toad, these results support the hypothesis that ir-ANG is associated with WR behavior in spadefoot toads in a manner analogous to oral drinking exhibited by other vertebrate clades.

  14. Protection of cultured mammalian cells by S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721)

    SciTech Connect

    Antoku, S.

    1983-10-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect cultured mammalian cells against radiation-induced killing was nearly the same as that of cysteamine when WR-2721 was activated by mouse liver extract. Without the liver extract, protection by WR-2721 required long incubations with the cells prior to irradiation. The protective activity increased in proportion to the cell concentration. The dose reduction factor at a concentration of 4 mM WR-2721 was 1.11 and 1.41 for 1.5 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml and 15 x 10/sup 5/ cells/ml of cultured cells, respectively. A non-protein bound sulfhydryl group was detected in cell suspensions after incubation with WR-2721, but it was not a dephosphorylated product of WR-2721.

  15. Open-ended response theory with polarizable embedding: multiphoton absorption in biomolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Steindal, Arnfinn Hykkerud; Beerepoot, Maarten T P; Ringholm, Magnus; List, Nanna Holmgaard; Ruud, Kenneth; Kongsted, Jacob; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2016-10-12

    We present the theory and implementation of an open-ended framework for electric response properties at the level of Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham density functional theory that includes effects from the molecular environment modeled by the polarizable embedding (PE) model. With this new state-of-the-art multiscale functionality, electric response properties to any order can be calculated for molecules embedded in polarizable atomistic molecular environments ranging from solvents to complex heterogeneous macromolecules such as proteins. In addition, environmental effects on multiphoton absorption (MPA) properties can be studied by evaluating single residues of the response functions. The PE approach includes mutual polarization effects between the quantum and classical parts of the system through induced dipoles that are determined self-consistently with respect to the electronic density. The applicability of our approach is demonstrated by calculating MPA strengths up to four-photon absorption for the green fluorescent protein. We show how the size of the quantum region, as well as the treatment of the border between the quantum and classical regions, is crucial in order to obtain reliable MPA predictions.

  16. Identification of a galaxy responsible for a high-redshift Lyman-α absorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Pahre, M. A.; Bechtold, J.; Elston, R.

    1996-07-01

    DAMPEDLyman-α systems are high-column-density intergalactic clouds of hydrogen, the existence of which is inferred from absorption lines appearing in the emission spectra of distant quasars. The galaxies believed to be responsible for these absorption systems have been suggested as possible progenitors of the normal disk galaxies observed in the local Universe1. Indeed, Lyman-α systems appear to contain a substantial fraction of the baryons known to exist in galaxies today2,3. Here we report the optical detection of a galaxy (designated DLA2233 + 131) associated with a known4 damped Lyman-α absorption system at a redshift of z = 3.150. The properties of this galaxy correspond closely to those expected of a young disk galaxy in the early stages of formation, and show no evidence for an active nucleus. This finding gives strong support to the idea that damped Lyman-α systems represent a population of young galaxies at high red-shifts.

  17. The role of absorption in women's sexual response to erotica: a cognitive-affective investigation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Jade; Koukounas, Eric

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of absorption on women's emotional and cognitive processing of erotic film. Absorption was experimentally manipulated using 2 different sets of test session instructions. The first, participant-oriented, instruction set directed participants to absorb themselves in the erotic film presentation, imagining that they were active participants in the sexual activities depicted. The second, spectator-oriented, instruction set directed participants to observe and assess the erotic film excerpt as impartial spectators. The participant-oriented instruction set was found to elicit greater subjective absorption in women than the spectator-oriented instruction set, and women reported greater subjective sexual arousal in the former set compared with the latter. Thus, it appears that the degree to which a woman becomes absorbed in an erotic stimulus may affect her subsequent subjective sexual arousal. Also, women reported greater degrees of positive affect when they took a participant-oriented perspective than when they viewed the erotic materials as impartial spectators. Thus, participants who were highly absorbed in the erotic film excerpt were more likely to view the stimulus favorably. By contrast, the degree to which women became absorbed in the stimulus had no effect on their reported negative affect. Future directions for examining female response patterns are suggested.

  18. Cisplatin neuropathy. Risk factors, prognosis, and protection by WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Mollman, J.E.; Glover, D.J.; Hogan, W.M.; Furman, R.E.

    1988-06-01

    A prospective study of patients receiving cis-diaminedichloroplatin II (DDP) was carried out to determine if risk factors could be identified related to the patient's living habits or past medical history that would predict in which patients DDP neuropathy might develop. Sixty-nine patients receiving six different combinations of chemotherapeutic agents, including DDP were examined. Twenty-eight of these patients received DDP in combination with the radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosporothioic acid (WR 2721). No risk factors were identified relating to personal habits or past medical history of the patients. However, patients receiving DDP (40 mg/m2) on 5 consecutive days had a significantly higher incidence of neuropathy. Patients receiving DDP in combination with WR 2721 had a significantly lower incidence of neuropathy, and the mean dose at onset was significantly higher than the mean dose at onset of neuropathy for all other groups. In addition, five of six patients who were available for long-term follow-up demonstrated nearly complete reversal of the signs and symptoms of neuropathy.

  19. High Resolution X-Ray Spectra of WR 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huenemoerder, D.; Gayley, K.; Hamann, W.-R.; Ignace, R.; Nichols, J.; Oskinova, L. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Schulz, N.

    As WR 6 is a putatively single WN4 star, and is relatively bright (V = 6.9), it is an ideal case for studying the wind mechanisms in these extremely luminous stars. To obtain higher resolution spectra at higher energy (above 1 keV) than previously obtained with the XMM/Newton RGS, we have observed WR 6 with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer for 450 ks. We have resolved emission lines of S, Si, Mg, Ne, and Fe, which all show a “fin"-shaped prole, characteristic of a self-absorbed uniformly expanding shell. Steep blue edges gives robust maximal expansion velocities of about 2000 km/s, somewhat larger than the 1700km/s derived from UV lines. The He-like lines all indicate that X-ray emitting plasmas are far from the photosphere - even at the higher energies where opacity is lowest { as was also the case for the longer wavelength lines observed with XMM-Newton/RGS. Abundances determined from X-ray spectral modeling indicate enhancements consistent with nucleosynthesis. The star was also variable in X-rays and in simultaneous optical photometry obtained with Chandra aspect camera, but not coherently with the optically known period of 3.765 days.

  20. Surface acoustic wave response to optical absorption by graphene composite film.

    PubMed

    Chivukula, Venkata S; Ciplys, Daumantas; Kim, Jin Ho; Rimeika, Romualdas; Xu, Jimmy M; Shur, Michael S

    2012-02-01

    Propagation of surface acoustic waves in YZ LiNbO3 overlaid with graphene flakes has been investigated and its optical response to illumination by 633-nm light from a He-Ne laser was studied. The heating of the sample surface caused by optical absorption by the graphene led to a downshift in the transmitted SAW phase caused by the wave velocity's dependence on temperature. The proposed simple model based on optothermal SAW phase modulation was found to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Rats. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-14

    Nucleated RBCs Platelet count Reticulocyte count ’Measured with a Co-oximeter (Instrumentation Laboratory Model 282). The assay was performed...Part I: Part II: Part III: Part IV: Identity and Purity Study of WR242511 Assay Precision and Accuracy for the Quantitation of WR2425U Stability...standard deviation - 0.02%, terminal 99.59% ± 0.02%. The assay results are presented in Tables 1 and 2. FIGURE 1 MASS SPECTRUM OF WR2425U SAMPLE 8

  2. NEW CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF THE SHORT-TERM CYCLICAL VARIABILITY OF THE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 46

    SciTech Connect

    Henault-Brunet, V.; St-Louis, N.; Marchenko, S. V.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Talavera, A.; Carpano, S. E-mail: stlouis@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: andy.pollock@esa.int E-mail: scarpano@rssd.esa.int

    2011-07-01

    The Wolf-Rayet star WR 46 is known to exhibit a very complex variability pattern on relatively short timescales of a few hours. Periodic but intermittent radial velocity shifts of optical lines as well as multiple photometric periods have been found in the past. Non-radial pulsations, rapid rotational modulation, or the presence of a putative low-mass companion have been proposed to explain the short-term behavior. In an effort to unveil its true nature, we observed WR 46 with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) over several short-term variability cycles. We found significant variations on a timescale of {approx}8 hr in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) continuum, in the blue edge of the absorption trough of the O VI {lambda}{lambda}1032, 1038 doublet P Cygni profile and in the S VI {lambda}{lambda}933, 944 P Cygni absorption profile. We complemented these observations with X-ray and UV light curves and an X-ray spectrum from archival X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission-Newton Space Telescope (XMM-Newton) data. The X-ray and UV light curves show variations on a timescale similar to the variability found in the FUV. We discuss our results in the context of the different scenarios suggested to explain the short-term variability of this object and reiterate that non-radial pulsations is the scenario most likely to occur.

  3. Induction of apoptosis in bone marrow cells after treatment of mice with WR-2721 and gamma-rays: relationship to the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Mazur, L; Augustynek, A; Halicka, H D; Deptała, A

    2003-02-01

    Apoptosis and cell proliferation are accepted to be responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis in the hematopoietic system. Understanding of the mechanisms of action of the aminothiols and ionizing radiation on normal hematopoietic cells requires determination of the correlation between apoptotic cell death and cell cycle distribution. The effects of WR-2721 ((S)-2-/3-aminopropylamino/ethylphosphorothioic acid; Amifostine) and 60Co gamma-rays on apoptosis and cell cycle progression in the mouse bone marrow were determined. Adult male Swiss mice were exposed to 6 Gy gamma-rays only, or pretreated with WR-2721, at a dose of 400 mg/kg body weight, 30 min before gamma-irradiation. The laser scanning cytometry APO-BRDU assay based on simultaneous analysis of cellular DNA content and the in situ detection of DNA strand breaks was used to identify apoptotic cells and to reveal the cell cycle position of apoptotic and nonapoptotic cells. Temporary changes in the frequency of apoptotic cells with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeling of DNA strand breaks, and all bone marrow cells including apoptotic and nonapoptotic ones, whose DNA stained with propidium iodide, were observed in the particular phases of the cell cycle throughout the 96-h period after WR-2721 application and gamma-irradiation. The cell cycle phase specificity of WR-2721 and 60Co gamma-irradiation was shown in terms of induction of apoptosis in bone marrow cells. The patterns of alterations in the frequency of apoptotic cells and all bone marrow cells with respect to their cell cycle position were dependent on the agent(s) applied and the time interval after treatment of mice with WR-2721 and/or gamma-rays. A modulatory, suppressive action of WR-2721 on apoptosis induction and the cell cycle perturbation caused in normal cells of the mouse bone marrow by gamma-rays was found.

  4. Differential antimutagenicity of WR-1065 added after irradiation in L5178Y cell lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Horng, M. F.; Ricanati, M.; McCoy, E. C.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the antimutagenicity of WR-1065 added after irradiation of cells of cell lines differing in their ability to rejoin radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The postirradiation antimutagenicity of WR-1065 at the thymidine kinase locus was demonstrated for L5178Y (LY)-S1 cells that are deficient in repair of DNA DSBs. Less postirradiation antimutagenicity of WR-1065 was observed in LY-R16 and LY-SR1 cells, which are relatively efficient in DSB repair. Postirradiation treatment with WR-1065 had only a small stimulatory effect on DSB rejoining. A 3-h incubation of irradiated LY cells with WR-1065 caused slight changes in the distribution of cells in the phases of the cell cycle that differed between LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cells. Both LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cells were protected against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of radiation when WR-1065 was present 30 min before and during the irradiation. We conclude that the differential postirradiation effects of WR-1065 in the LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cells are not caused by differences in cellular uptake of the radioprotector or in its radical scavenging activity. Possible mechanisms for the postirradiation antimutagenicity of WR-1065 are discussed.

  5. Colliding winds in five WR+O systems of the Southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahed, R.; Moffat, A. F. J.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of an optical spectroscopic follow-up of five WR+O systems of the Southern hemisphere that have not been studied so far for wind-wind collisions: WR 12 (WN8h), WR 21 (WN5o+O7V), WR 30 (WC6+O7.5V), WR 31 (WN4o+O8) and WR 47 (WN6o+O5). Observations were made over an entire contiguous month using the Garrison spectrograph attached to the 0.6-m Helen Sawyer Hogg telescope at Complejo Astronomico El Leoncito. We obtain improved orbital elements for these five systems and provide an estimation of the orbital inclination and shock-cone opening angle for four of them by analysing excess emission profiles with the geometrical model of Lührs. We argue that line variability in one of the stars (WR 12) might be dominated by some dynamic instabilities in the shocked plasma, making the model inappropriate in this case. A sixth star, WR 69 (WC9d+OB), was observed in the programme based on its published photometric period of 2.293 ± 0.005 d. While we found a probable spectroscopic period of 2.15 ± 0.04 d compatible with that of Marchenko et al. (1998), the period is unlikely related to orbital effects, rather to (relatively fast) rotation of the WC9d component of a much longer binary system.

  6. Polarisation response of delay dependent absorption modulation in strong field dressed helium atoms probed near threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, E. R.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, A.; Austin, D. R.; Diveki, Z.; Hutchinson, S. E. E.; Siegel, T.; Ruberti, M.; Averbukh, V.; Miseikis, L.; Strüber, C. S.; Chipperfield, L.; Marangos, J. P.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the vectorial response of strongly dressed helium atoms probed by an attosecond pulse train (APT) polarised either parallel or perpendicular to the dressing field polarisation. The transient absorption is probed as a function of delay between the APT and the linearly polarised 800 nm field of peak intensity 1.3× {10}14 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. The APT spans the photon energy range 16-42 eV, covering the first ionisation energy of helium (24.59 eV). With parallel polarised dressing and probing fields, we observe modulations with periods of one half and one quarter of the dressing field period. When the polarisation of the dressing field is altered from parallel to perpendicular with respect to the APT polarisation we observe a large suppression in the modulation depth of the above ionisation threshold absorption. In addition to this we present the intensity dependence of the harmonic modulation depth as a function of delay between the dressing and probe fields, with dressing field peak intensities ranging from 2 × 1012 to 2 × 1014 {{W}} {{cm}}-2. We compare our experimental results with a full-dimensional solution of the single-atom time-dependent (TD) Schrödinger equation obtained using the recently developed abinitio TD B-spline ADC method and find good qualitative agreement for the above threshold harmonics.

  7. Efficient Algorithms for Estimating the Absorption Spectrum within Linear Response TDDFT.

    PubMed

    Brabec, Jiri; Lin, Lin; Shao, Meiyue; Govind, Niranjan; Yang, Chao; Saad, Yousef; Ng, Esmond G

    2015-11-10

    We present a special symmetric Lanczos algorithm and a kernel polynomial method (KPM) for approximating the absorption spectrum of molecules within the linear response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework in the product form. In contrast to existing algorithms, the new algorithms are based on reformulating the original non-Hermitian eigenvalue problem as a product eigenvalue problem and the observation that the product eigenvalue problem is self-adjoint with respect to an appropriately chosen inner product. This allows a simple symmetric Lanczos algorithm to be used to compute the desired absorption spectrum. The use of a symmetric Lanczos algorithm only requires half of the memory compared with the nonsymmetric variant of the Lanczos algorithm. The symmetric Lanczos algorithm is also numerically more stable than the nonsymmetric version. The KPM algorithm is also presented as a low-memory alternative to the Lanczos approach, but the algorithm may require more matrix-vector multiplications in practice. We discuss the pros and cons of these methods in terms of their accuracy as well as their computational and storage cost. Applications to a set of small and medium-sized molecules are also presented.

  8. Characterization of power absorption response of periodic three-dimensional structures to partially coherent fields.

    PubMed

    Tihon, Denis; Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N; Craeye, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    In many applications of absorbing structures it is important to understand their spatial response to incident fields, for example in thermal solar panels, bolometric imaging, and controlling radiative heat transfer. In practice, the illuminating field often originates from thermal sources and is only partially spatially coherent when it reaches the absorbing device. In this paper, we present a method to fully characterize the way a structure can absorb such partially coherent fields. The method is presented for any three-dimensional material and accounts for the partial coherence and partial polarization of the incident light. This characterization can be achieved numerically using simulation results or experimentally using the energy absorption interferometry that has been described previously in the literature. The absorbing structure is characterized through a set of absorbing functions onto which any partially coherent field can be projected. This set is compact for any structure of finite extent, and the absorbing function is discrete for periodic structures.

  9. Single-Dose Absorption and Pharmacokinetics of WR 6026. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    INTRODUCTION Visceral leishmaniasis is a serious disease caused by the parasite Leishmania donovani (1). Though it is ordinarily a zoonosis transmitted...an animal and an in vitro test system. Like primaquine, it is an 8-aminoquinoline. In hamsters infected with L. donovani , it produced significant...Trop Med Hyg 27:751-757, 1978. i 4. Berman JD and Lee LS: Activity of 8-aminoquinolines against Leishmania tropica within human macrophages in vitro. Am

  10. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-01

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  11. Vibrational absorption spectra from vibrational coupled cluster damped linear response functions calculated using an asymmetric Lanczos algorithm.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Bo; Hansen, Mikkel Bo; Seidler, Peter; Christiansen, Ove

    2012-03-28

    We report the theory and implementation of vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) damped response functions. From the imaginary part of the damped VCC response function the absorption as function of frequency can be obtained, requiring formally the solution of the now complex VCC response equations. The absorption spectrum can in this formulation be seen as a matrix function of the characteristic VCC Jacobian response matrix. The asymmetric matrix version of the Lanczos method is used to generate a tridiagonal representation of the VCC response Jacobian. Solving the complex response equations in the relevant Lanczos space provides a method for calculating the VCC damped response functions and thereby subsequently the absorption spectra. The convergence behaviour of the algorithm is discussed theoretically and tested for different levels of completeness of the VCC expansion. Comparison is made with results from the recently reported [P. Seidler, M. B. Hansen, W. Györffy, D. Toffoli, and O. Christiansen, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 164105 (2010)] vibrational configuration interaction damped response function calculated using a symmetric Lanczos algorithm. Calculations of IR spectra of oxazole, cyclopropene, and uracil illustrate the usefulness of the new VCC based method.

  12. Anomalous absorption line in the magneto-optical response of graphene.

    PubMed

    Gusynin, V P; Sharapov, S G; Carbotte, J P

    2007-04-13

    The intensity as well as position in energy of the absorption lines in the infrared conductivity of graphene, both exhibit features that are directly related to the Dirac nature of its quasiparticles. We show that the evolution of the pattern of absorption lines as the chemical potential is varied encodes the information about the presence of the anomalous lowest Landau level. The first absorption line related to this level always appears with full intensity or is entirely missing, while all other lines disappear in two steps. We demonstrate that if a gap develops, the main absorption line splits into two provided that the chemical potential is greater than or equal to the gap.

  13. Model of yield response of corn to plant population and absorption of solar energy.

    PubMed

    Overman, Allen R; Scholtz, Richard V

    2011-01-31

    Biomass yield of agronomic crops is influenced by a number of factors, including crop species, soil type, applied nutrients, water availability, and plant population. This article is focused on dependence of biomass yield (Mg ha(-1) and g plant(-1)) on plant population (plants m(-2)). Analysis includes data from the literature for three independent studies with the warm-season annual corn (Zea mays L.) grown in the United States. Data are analyzed with a simple exponential mathematical model which contains two parameters, viz. Y(m) (Mg ha(-1)) for maximum yield at high plant population and c (m(2) plant(-1)) for the population response coefficient. This analysis leads to a new parameter called characteristic plant population, x(c) = 1/c (plants m(-2)). The model is shown to describe the data rather well for the three field studies. In one study measurements were made of solar radiation at different positions in the plant canopy. The coefficient of absorption of solar energy was assumed to be the same as c and provided a physical basis for the exponential model. The three studies showed no definitive peak in yield with plant population, but generally exhibited asymptotic approach to maximum yield with increased plant population. Values of x(c) were very similar for the three field studies with the same crop species.

  14. Analytic model of energy-absorption response functions in compound X-ray detector materials.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Youn, Hanbean; Tanguay, Jesse; Cunningham, Ian A

    2013-10-01

    The absorbed energy distribution (AED) in X-ray imaging detectors is an important factor that affects both energy resolution and image quality through the Swank factor and detective quantum efficiency. In the diagnostic energy range (20-140 keV), escape of characteristic photons following photoelectric absorption and Compton scatter photons are primary sources of absorbed-energy dispersion in X-ray detectors. In this paper, we describe the development of an analytic model of the AED in compound X-ray detector materials, based on the cascaded-systems approach, that includes the effects of escape and reabsorption of characteristic and Compton-scatter photons. We derive analytic expressions for both semi-infinite slab and pixel geometries and validate our approach by Monte Carlo simulations. The analytic model provides the energy-dependent X-ray response function of arbitrary compound materials without time-consuming Monte Carlo simulations. We believe this model will be useful for correcting spectral distortion artifacts commonly observed in photon-counting applications and optimal design and development of novel X-ray detectors.

  15. Development of a Gastric Absorptive, Immediate Responsive, Oral Protein-Loaded Versatile Polymeric Delivery System.

    PubMed

    Kondiah, Pierre P D; Choonara, Yahya E; Tomar, Lomas K; Tyagi, Charu; Kumar, Pradeep; du Toit, Lisa C; Marimuthu, Thashree; Modi, Girish; Pillay, Viness

    2017-02-15

    A multifunctional platform to deliver three diverse proteins of insulin, interferon beta (INF-β) and erythropoietin (EPO), using a novel copolymeric microparticulate system of TMC-PEGDMA-MAA, was synthesised as an intelligent pH-responsive 2-fold gastric and intestinal absorptive system. Physiochemical and physicomechanical studies proved the degree of crystallinity that supported the controlled protein delivery of the microparticulate system. The copolymer was tableted before undertaking in vitro and in vivo analysis. After 2.5 h in simulated gastric fluid (SGF), insulin showed a fractional release of 3.2% in comparison to simulated intestinal fluid (SIF), in which a maximum of 83% of insulin was released. Similarly, INF-β and EPO released 3 and 9.7% in SGF and a maximum of 74 and 81.3% in SIF, respectively. In vivo studies demonstrated a significant decrease in blood glucose by 54.19% within 4 h post-dosing, and the comparator formulation provided 74.6% decrease in blood glucose within the same time period. INF-β peak bioavailable dose in serum was calculated to be 1.3% in comparison to an SC formulation having a peak concentration of 0.9%, demonstrating steady-state release for 24 h. EPO-loaded copolymeric microparticles had a 1.6% peak bioavailable concentration, in comparison to the 6.34% peak concentration after 8 h from the SC comparator formulation.

  16. A diffusive virus infection dynamic model with nonlinear functional response, absorption effect and chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Ma, Wanbiao; Lai, Xiulan

    2017-01-01

    From a biological perspective, a diffusive virus infection dynamic model with nonlinear functional response, absorption effect and chemotaxis is proposed. In the model, the diffusion of virus consists of two parts, the random diffusion and the chemotactic movement. The chemotaxis flux of virus depends not only on their own density, but also on the density of infected cells, and the density gradient of infected cells. The well posedness of the proposed model is deeply investigated. For the proposed model, the linear stabilities of the infection-free steady state E0 and the infection steady state E* are extensively performed. We show that the threshold dynamics can be expressed by the basic reproduction number R0 of the model without chemotaxis. That is, the infection-free steady state E0 is globally asymptotically stable if R0 < 1, and the virus is uniformly persistent if R0 > 1. In addition, we use the cross iteration method and the Schauder's fixed point theorem to prove the existence of travelling wave solutions connecting the infection-free steady state E0 and the infection steady state E* by constructing a pair of upper-lower solutions. At last, numerical simulations are presented to confirm theoretical findings.

  17. The WR / OB Number Ratio Within 2.5-KPC from the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanbeveren, D.

    Comparing the observed and theoretical HR diagram for massive stars, it is concluded that at least 34% of the stars within 2.5 kpc from the sun with initial ZAMS mass larger than 35 M_sun; have not yet been detected. It is argued that the number of core helium burning pop I WR stars within 2.5 kpc from the sun may be as low as 26. If the progenitors of WR stars have initial ZAMS masses larger than 35 M_sun;, it is then concluded that the observed number ratio (core helium burning pop I WR stars)/(WR progenitors) within 2.5 kpc from the sun ranges between 0.05 and 0.09.

  18. Radioprotection by WR-151327 against the late normal tissue damage in mouse hind legs from gamma ray radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Satoru; Ando, Koichi; Koike, Sachiko

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the protective effect of WR-151327 on late radiation-induced damaged to normal tissues in mice, the right hind legs of mice with or without WR-151327 administration (400 mg/kg) were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays. Leg contracture and skin shrinkage assays were performed at 380 days after irradiation. The mice were killed on day 400 postirradiation and histological sections of the legs were made. The thickness of the dermis, epidermis, and skin (dermis plus epidermis) was measured. The muscular area of the legs and the posterior knee angle between the femur and tibia were also measured. The left hind legs were similarly assessed as nonirradiated controls. Group means and standard deviations were calculated and dose-response curves were drawn for every endpoint. Then, the dose modifying factor (DMF) for each endpoint and the correlations among endpoints were determined. Latae damage assayed by leg contracture and skin shrinkage progressed with increasing radiation dose. However, it was reduced by drug treatment. The significant effect was indicated for skin shrinkage by a DMF of 1.8 at 35%. The DMF for leg contracture was 1.3 at 6 mm. In the irradiated legs, epidermal hyperplasia and dermal fibrosis in the skin, muscular atrophy, and extension disturbance of the knee joint were observed. These changes progressed with increasing radiation dose. Skin damage assayed by the present endpoints was also reduced by drug treatment by DMFs of 1.4 to 1.7. However, DMFs for damage to the muscle and knee were not determined because no isoeffect was observed. There were good correlations between leg contracture or skin shrinkage and the other endpoints in both untreated and drug-treated mice. WR-151327 has the potential to protect against radiation-induced late normal tissue damage. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Enhancement of topoisomerase I-mediated unwinding of supercoiled DNA by the radioprotector WR-33278

    SciTech Connect

    Holwitt, E.A.; Koda, E.; Swenberg, C.E. )

    1990-10-01

    The radioprotector WR-33278, the disulfide of WR-1065 (N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane), is shown to stimulate eukaryotic topoisomerase I unwinding of negatively supercoiled DNA. This observation suggests the possibility that some protection may be conferred to DNA either by a decrease in its supercoiled state or by altering directly other enzymatic processes. This is the first report of a radioprotective compound stimulating an enzyme involved in DNA structure and synthesis.

  20. CD8 knockout mice are protected from challenge by vaccination with WR201, a live attenuated mutant of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Yingst, Samuel L; Izadjoo, Mina; Hoover, David L

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T cells have been reported to play an important role in defense against B. abortus infection in mouse models. In the present report, we use CD8 knockout mice to further elucidate the role of these cells in protection from B. melitensis infection. Mice were immunized orally by administration of B. melitensis WR201, a purine auxotrophic attenuated vaccine strain, then challenged intranasally with B. melitensis 16M. In some experiments, persistence of WR201 in the spleens of CD8 knockout mice was slightly longer than that in the spleens of normal mice. However, development of anti-LPS serum antibody, antigen-induced production of γ-interferon (IFN-γ) by immune splenic lymphocytes, protection against intranasal challenge, and recovery of nonimmunized animals from intranasal challenge were similar between normal and knockout animals. Further, primary Brucella infection was not exacerbated in perforin knockout and Fas-deficient mice and these animals' anti-Brucella immune responses were indistinguishable from those of normal mice. These results indicate that CD8+ T cells do not play an essential role as either cytotoxic cells or IFN-γ producers, yet they do participate in a specific immune response to immunization and challenge in this murine model of B. melitensis infection.

  1. Combined modality radioprotection: The use of glucan and selenium with WR-2721

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Weiss, J.F. )

    1990-05-01

    Glucan, WR-2721, and selenium, three agents with distinct radioprotective mechanisms, were evaluated in C3H/HeN mice for survival-enhancing and hemopoietic-regenerating effects when administered alone or in combinations before exposure to 60Co radiation. At LD50/30 radiation doses (radiation doses lethal for 50% of mice within 30 days postexposure), dose reduction factors of 1.21, 1.02, 1.37, 1.51, and 1.66 were obtained following glucan (75 mg/kg i.v., -20 hr), selenium (0.8 mg/kg, i.p., -20 hr), WR-2721 (200 mg/kg, i.p., -30 min), glucan + WR-2721, and glucan + selenium + WR-2721 treatments, respectively. All treatments increased numbers of hemopoietic stem cells as measured by the day 12 endogenous spleen colony-forming unit (E-CFU) assay; the most significant E-CFU effects, however, were observed following glucan + WR-2721 and glucan + selenium + WR-2721 treatments. Combined modality treatments were also more effective than single-agent treatments at accelerating bone marrow and splenic granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) regeneration. These results demonstrate the value of multiple-agent radioprotectants.

  2. Differential protection by WR2721 of skin versus growing cartilage following irradiation in weanling rats

    SciTech Connect

    Constine, L.S.; Rubin, P.; Gregory, P.

    1987-04-01

    The potential for radioprotection of growing cartilage by the thiophosphate WR2721 was evaluated in weanling rats using single fractions of irradiation. Protection of acute skin toxicity was monitored simultaneously. Single doses of 600, 1200, 1800, or 2400 cGy were administered to the left tibia of CrL:CD(SD)BR female rats in groups of 12. Identically treated groups were injected with 310 mg/kg WR2721 (2/3 the determined LD50/30) in a concentration of 26 mg/ml intraperitoneally 15 min prior to irradiation. Rats untreated or given WR2721 without radiation served as control groups. Radiographs of the irradiated and unirradiated tibiae for each animal were obtained weekly to the date of sacrifice at 80 days following the initial treatment. Skin toxicity was assessed weekly starting on the second week using Moulder's scale. No significant difference in bone growth as measured by tibial lengths for the WR2721-treated or untreated animals was observed. Skin toxicity including moist desquamation occurred in irradiated limbs and was substantially less in rats treated with WR2721. As opposed to previous work with cysteamine, WR2721 as administered had no significant radioprotective effect on tibial growth in weanling rats but substantially reduced the accompanying skin toxicity.

  3. Behavioral and neural responses of toads to salt solutions correlate with basolateral membrane potential of epidermal cells of the skin.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Baula, Victor; Tuttle, Wendy; Willumsen, Niels J; Larsen, Erik H

    2007-10-01

    Dehydrated toads initiated water absorption response (WR) behavior and absorbed water from dilute NaCl solutions. With 200-250 mM NaCl, WR behavior and water absorption were both suppressed. With 200-250 mM Na-gluconate, WR initiation was significantly greater than with NaCl but water loss was greater. Neural recordings from spinal nerve #6 showed a greater integrated response to 250 mM NaCl than to 250 mM Na-gluconate, whereas a larger rinse response was seen with Na-gluconate. Studies with isolated epithelium showed a large increase in conductance (G(t)) when 250 mM NaCl replaced NaCl Ringer's as the apical bathing solution that was accompanied by depolarization of the transepithelial potential (V(t)) and basolateral membrane potential (V(b)). Depolarization of V(b) corresponded with the neural response to 250 mM NaCl. When 250 mM Na-gluconate replaced Ringer's as the apical solution G(t) remained low, V(b) transiently hyperpolarized to values near the equilibrium potential for K(+) and corresponded with the reduced neural response. These results support the hypothesis that chemosensory function of the skin is analogous to that of mammalian taste cells but utilizes paracellular ion transport to a greater degree.

  4. Small molecule absorption by PDMS in the context of drug response bioassays.

    PubMed

    van Meer, B J; de Vries, H; Firth, K S A; van Weerd, J; Tertoolen, L G J; Karperien, H B J; Jonkheijm, P; Denning, C; IJzerman, A P; Mummery, C L

    2017-01-08

    The polymer polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used to build microfluidic devices compatible with cell culture. Whilst convenient in manufacture, PDMS has the disadvantage that it can absorb small molecules such as drugs. In microfluidic devices like "Organs-on-Chip", designed to examine cell behavior and test the effects of drugs, this might impact drug bioavailability. Here we developed an assay to compare the absorption of a test set of four cardiac drugs by PDMS based on measuring the residual non-absorbed compound by High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). We showed that absorption was variable and time dependent and not determined exclusively by hydrophobicity as claimed previously. We demonstrated that two commercially available lipophilic coatings and the presence of cells affected absorption. The use of lipophilic coatings may be useful in preventing small molecule absorption by PDMS.

  5. Temperature dependences of mechanisms responsible for the water-vapor continuum absorption. I. Far wings of allowed lines.

    PubMed

    Ma, Q; Tipping, R H; Leforestier, C

    2008-03-28

    It is well known that the water-vapor continuum plays an important role in the radiative balance in the Earth's atmosphere. This was first discovered by Elsasser almost 70 years ago, and since that time there has been a large body of work, both experimental and theoretical, on this topic. It has been experimentally shown that for ambient atmospheric conditions, the continuum absorption scales quadratically with the H(2)O number density and has a strong, negative temperature dependence (T dependence). Over the years, there have been three different theoretical mechanisms postulated: Far wings of allowed transitions, water dimers, and collision-induced absorption. Despite the improvements in experimental data, at present there is no consensus on which mechanism is primarily responsible for the absorption. The first mechanism proposed was the accumulation of the far-wing absorption of the strong allowed transitions. Later, absorption by water dimers was proposed and this mechanism provides a qualitative explanation for the strong, negative T dependence. Recently, some atmospheric modelers have proposed that collision-induced absorption is one of the major contributors. However, based on improvements in the theoretical calculation of accurate far-wing line shapes, ab initio dimer calculations, and theoretical collision-induced absorptions, it is now generally accepted that the dominant mechanism for the absorption in the infrared (IR) windows is that due to the far wings. Whether this is true for other spectral regions is not presently established. Although all these three mechanisms have a negative T dependence, their T dependences will be characterized by individual features. To analyze the characteristics of the latter will enable one to assess their roles with more certainty. In this paper, we present a detailed study of the T dependence of the far-wing absorption mechanism. We will then compare our theoretical calculations with the most recent and accurate

  6. WR 110: A Single Wolf-Rayet Star with Corotating Interaction Regions in its Wind?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Cameron, C.; Fahed, R.; Gamen, R. C.; Lefèvre, L.; Rowe, J. F.; St-louis, N.; Muntean, V.; De La Chevrotière, A.; Guenther, D. B.; Kuschnig, R.; Matthews, J. M.; Rucinski, S. M.; Sasselov, D.; Weiss, W. W.

    2011-07-01

    A 30 day contiguous photometric run with the Microvariability and Oscillations of STars (MOST) satellite on the WN5-6b star WR 110 (HD 165688) reveals a fundamental periodicity of P = 4.08 ± 0.55 days along with a number of harmonics at periods P/n, with n ≈ 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6, and a few other possible stray periodicities and/or stochastic variability on timescales longer than about a day. Spectroscopic radial velocity studies fail to reveal any plausible companion with a period in this range. Therefore, we conjecture that the observed light-curve cusps of amplitude ~0.01 mag that recur at a 4.08 day timescale may arise in the inner parts, or at the base, of a corotating interaction region (CIR) seen in emission as it rotates around with the star at constant angular velocity. The hard X-ray component seen in WR 110 could then be a result of a high velocity component of the CIR shock interacting with the ambient wind at several stellar radii. Given that most hot, luminous stars showing CIRs have two CIR arms, it is possible that either the fundamental period is 8.2 days or, more likely in the case of WR 110, there is indeed a second weaker CIR arm for P = 4.08 days, that occurs ~two-thirds of a rotation period after the main CIR. If this interpretation is correct, WR 110 therefore joins the ranks with three other single WR stars, all WN, with confirmed CIR rotation periods (WR 1, WR 6, and WR 134), albeit with WR 110 having by far the lowest amplitude photometric modulation. This illustrates the power of being able to secure intense, continuous high-precision photometry from space-based platforms such as MOST. It also opens the door to revealing low-amplitude photometric variations in other WN stars, where previous attempts have failed. If all WN stars have CIRs at some level, this could be important for revealing sources of magnetism or pulsation in addition to rotation periods. Based on data from the MOST satellite, a Canadian Space Agency mission, jointly

  7. FIRST VISUAL ORBIT FOR THE PROTOTYPICAL COLLIDING-WIND BINARY WR 140

    SciTech Connect

    Monnier, J. D.; Zhao Ming; Pedretti, E.; Baron, F.; Kraus, S.; Tannirkulam, A.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Berger, J.-P.; Ten Brummelaar, T.; McAlister, H.; Sturmann, L.; Sturmann, J.; Turner, N.; Ridgway, S.; Williams, P. M.

    2011-11-20

    Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars represent one of the final stages of massive stellar evolution. Relatively little is known about this short-lived phase and we currently lack reliable mass, distance, and binarity determinations for a representative sample. Here we report the first visual orbit for WR 140 (= HD193793), a WC7+O5 binary system known for its periodic dust production episodes triggered by intense colliding winds near periastron passage. The Infrared-Optical Telescope Array and Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy interferometers resolved the pair of stars in each year from 2003 to 2009, covering most of the highly eccentric, 7.9 year orbit. Combining our results with the recently improved double-line spectroscopic orbit of Fahed et al., we find the WR 140 system is located at a distance of 1.67 {+-} 0.03 kpc, composed of a WR star with M{sub WR} = 14.9 {+-} 0.5 M{sub Sun} and an O star with M{sub O} = 35.9 {+-} 1.3 M{sub Sun }. Our precision orbit yields key parameters with uncertainties {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign smaller than previous work and paves the way for detailed modeling of the system. Our newly measured flux ratios at the near-infrared H and Ks bands allow a spectral energy distribution decomposition and analysis of the component evolutionary states.

  8. Aminothiol WR-1065 protects endothelial cell morphology against alterations induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Podolski, J L; Mooteri, S N; Drab-Weiss, E A; Onoda, J M; Saclarides, T J; Rubin, D B

    1998-12-01

    In septic patients, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) damages the vascular endothelium, which manifests as tissue edema and impaired healing. This pathology occurs when LPS distorts endothelial cell morphology partly by generating free radicals. A radioprotector that scavenges free radicals, the aminothiol WR-1065 ([N-2-mercaptoethyl]-1-3-diaminopropane) was found in a prior study to normalize the morphology of irradiated endothelial cells (Mooteri SN, Podolski JL, Drab EA, et al: Radiat Res 145:217-224, 1996). The aim of this study was to determine whether WR-1065 also normalized endothelial cell morphology following exposure to LPS. For this aim, portions of bovine aortic endothelial cell cultures were denuded and exposed to LPS at 1 ng/mL. After 30 min, the apical membrane expressed increased integrin receptor to fibronectin, alpha5beta1. After 5 h, the morphology of the cells at the leading edge was distorted, and cell-cell contact was lessened. Also, filamentous actin-containing stress fibers were dissipated; however, filamentous actin content per cell was unchanged. Treatment with 2 mM WR-1065 for 2 h prior to LPS exposure attenuated the increased expression of alpha5beta1 and promoted cell-cell contact in the migrating endothelial cells. WR-1065 also promoted the retention of stress fibers and actin cytoskeletal shape in cells treated with LPS. Thus, LPS distorted endothelial cell morphology after increasing apical membrane expression of alpha5beta1 and dissipating stress fibers, effects prevented by WR-1065.

  9. Antimutagenicity of WR-1065 in L5178Y cells exposed to accelerated (56)Fe ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, H. H.; Evans, T. E.; Horng, M. F.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of the aminothiol WR-1065 [N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane] to protect L5178Y (LY) cells against the cytotoxic and mutagenic effects of exposure to accelerated (56)Fe ions (1.08 GeV/nucleon) was determined. It was found that while WR-1065 reduced the mutagenicity in both cell lines when it was present during the irradiation, the addition of WR-1065 after the exposure had no effect on the mutagenicity of the radiation in either cell line. No marked protection against the cytotoxic effects of exposure to (56)Fe ions was provided by WR-1065 when added either during or after irradiation in either cell line. We reported previously that WR-1065 protected the LY-S1 and LY-SR1 cell lines against both the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of X radiation when present during exposure, but that its protection when administered after exposure was limited to the mutagenic effects in the radiation-hypersensitive cell line, LY-S1. The results indicate that the mechanisms involved differ in the protection against cytotoxic compared to mutagenic effects and in the protection against damage caused by accelerated (56)Fe ions compared to X radiation.

  10. Double frequency absorption induced by Al-Si Schottky barrier potential and mechanism of two-photon response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yanjun; Chen, Zhanguo; Jia, Gang; Liu, Yunlong; Liu, Xiuhuan; Zh, Yuhong

    2006-01-01

    By observing two-photon response and anisotropy of the light-induced voltage in Si-Al Schottky barrier potential of the Si MSM (Metal-Semiconductor-Metal) planar structure two-photon response optical detector. It is certified from the experimental and theoretical analysis that the built-in electric field generated by the Schottky barrier potential will induce the phenomena of optical rectification in Si photodiode. Thus, it is deduced that there must be double-frequency absorption (DFA) caused by phase-mismatch in the mechanism of two-photon response of Si photodiode. If the intensity of the built-in electric field is strong enough, the DFA will be the main feature of the two-photon response.

  11. Spectroscopy of the archetype colliding-wind binary WR 140 during the 2009 January periastron passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahed, R.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Zorec, J.; Eversberg, T.; Chené, A. N.; Alves, F.; Arnold, W.; Bergmann, T.; Corcoran, M. F.; Correia Viegas, N. G.; Dougherty, S. M.; Fernando, A.; Frémat, Y.; Gouveia Carreira, L. F.; Hunger, T.; Knapen, J. H.; Leadbeater, R.; Marques Dias, F.; Martayan, C.; Morel, T.; Pittard, J. M.; Pollock, A. M. T.; Rauw, G.; Reinecke, N.; Ribeiro, J.; Romeo, N.; Sánchez-Gallego, J. R.; Dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Stahl, O.; Stober, Ba.; Stober, Be.; Vollmann, K.; Williams, P. M.

    2011-11-01

    We present the results from the spectroscopic monitoring of WR 140 (WC7pd + O5.5fc) during its latest periastron passage in 2009 January. The observational campaign consisted of a constructive collaboration between amateur and professional astronomers. It took place at six locations, including Teide Observatory, Observatoire de Haute Provence, Dominion Astrophysical Observatory and Observatoire du Mont Mégantic. WR 140 is known as the archetype of colliding-wind binaries and it has a relatively long period (?8 yr) and high eccentricity (?0.9). We provide updated values for the orbital parameters, new estimates for the WR and O star masses and new constraints on the mass-loss rates and colliding-wind geometry.

  12. Gas flow and generation of x ray emission in WR+OB binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usov, V. V.

    1991-01-01

    The supersonic flow of the ionized gas in WR+OB binaries and X-ray generation are considered. X-ray emission is caused by gas heating up to temperatures of 10(exp 7) to 10(exp 8) K behind the front of shock waves. These are found in the collision of gas flowing out from the WR star with either the OB star's surface or the gas of the OB star's wind. The distribution of temperature and concentration behind the shock front are obtained. Using these distributions, the spectral power of bremsstrahlung X-ray emission of hot gas is calculated. Possible reasons that lead to a considerable difference between the observed parameters of X-ray emission of the WR binary of V 444 Cygni and the theoretically expected are discussed.

  13. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and Swift Observations of WR 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2014-06-01

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ~10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ~2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  14. Initial glucose kinetics and hormonal response to a gastric glucose load in unrestrained post-absorptive and starved rats.

    PubMed

    Smadja, C; Morin, J; Ferré, P; Girard, J

    1990-09-01

    A gastric [U-14C]glucose load (4.8 mg/g body wt.) was delivered to unrestrained post-absorptive or 30 h-starved rats bearing peripheral and portal vein catheters and continuously perfused with [3-3H]glucose, in order to compare their metabolic and hormonal responses. In the basal state, portal and peripheral glycaemia were less in starved rats than in rats in the post-absorptive period (P less than 0.01), whereas blood lactate was similar. Portal insulinaemia (P less than 0.05) and protal glucagonaemia (P less than 0.005) were lower in starved rats, but insulin/glucagon ratio was higher in post-absorptive rats (P less than 0.005). The glucose turnover rate was decreased by starvation (P less than 0.005). After glucose ingestion, blood glucose was similar in post-absorptive and starved rats. A large portoperipheral gradient of lactate appeared in starved rats. Portal insulinaemia reached a peak at 9 min, and was respectively 454 +/- 68 and 740 +/- 65 mu-units/ml in starved and post-absorptive rats. Portal glucagonaemia remained stable, but was higher in post-absorptive rats (P less than 0.05). At 60 min after the gastric glucose load, 30% of the glucose was delivered at the periphery in both groups. The total glucose appearance rate was higher in starved rats (P less than 0.05), as was the glucose utilization rate (P less than 0.05), whereas the rate of appearance of exogenous glucose was similar. This was due to a non-suppressed hepatic glucose production in the starved rats, whereas it was totally suppressed in post-absorptive rats. At 1 h after the glucose load, the increase in both liver and muscle glycogen concentration was greater in starved rats. Thus short-term fasting induces an increased portal lactate concentration after a glucose load, and produces a state of liver insulin unresponsiveness for glucose production, whereas the sensitivity of peripheral tissues for glucose utilization is unchanged or even increased. This might allow preferential

  15. Crystal and molecular structure of the antimalarial agent 4-(tert-butyl)-2-(tert-butylaminomethyl)-6-(4-chlorophenyl)phenol dihydrogen phosphate (WR 194,965 phosphate).

    PubMed Central

    Karle, J M; Karle, I L

    1988-01-01

    WR 194,965 phosphate, a new antimalarial agent containing a biphenyl ring structure active against chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum, crystallized in ionic form with a positive charge on the quaternary nitrogen atom. The oxygen and nitrogen atoms of WR 194,965 were hydrogen bonded to the same phosphate group. The nitrogen atom was also hydrogen bonded to a second phosphate group. The phosphate ions formed discrete clusters of four phosphate moieties. The phosphate clusters contained fourfold inversion symmetry. The intramolecular N-O distance in WR 194,965 of 3.073 A (1 A = 0.1 nm) was close to the reported values for N-O distances in the active cinchona alkaloids and may be important for activity. A comparison of the crystalline structure of WR 194,965 with those of mefloquine and quinidine sulfate demonstrated that the regions of the three molecules in the vicinity of the aliphatic nitrogen atom and the oxygen atom superimpose. Much of the remainder of the WR 194,965 molecule spatially overlapped with the combined three-dimensional space defined by quinidine and mefloquine. The crystallographic parameters were: C21H29ClNO+.H2PO4-; Mr = 443.9; symmetry of unit cell, tetragonal; space group, I41/a; parameters of unit cell, a = b = 24.305 +/- 0.002 A, c = 17.556 +/- 0.003 A; V (volume of unit cell) = 10370.9 A3; Z (number of molecules per unit cell) = 16; Dx (calculated density) = 1.137 g cm-3; source of radiation, CuK alpha (lambda = 1.54178 A); mu (absorption coefficient) = 21.3 cm-1; F(000) (sum of atomic scattering factors at zero scattering angle) = 3,440; room temperature; final R = 8.2% for 2,508 reflections with [F0] greater than 3 sigma. PMID:3288114

  16. Direct Observation of the Coherent Nuclear Response after the Absorption of a Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebel, M.; Schnedermann, C.; Bassolino, G.; Taylor, G.; Watts, A.; Kukura, P.

    2014-06-01

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  17. Molecular scale shock response: electronic absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrane, Shawn; Whitley, Von; Moore, David; Bolme, Cindy; Eakins, Daniel

    2009-06-01

    Single shot spectroscopies are being employed to answer questions fundamental to shock initiation of explosives. The goals are to: 1) determine the extent to which electronic excitations are, or are not, involved in shock induced reactions, 2) test the multiphonon up-pumping hypothesis in explosives, and 3) provide data on the initial evolution of temperature and chemistry following the shock loading of explosives on scales amenable to comparison to molecular dynamics simulations. The data presented in this talk are focused on answering the first question. Recent experimental results measuring the time history of ultraviolet/visible absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosive thin films and single crystals will be discussed.

  18. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation.

    PubMed

    Dawson-Hughes, Bess; Harris, Susan S; Palermo, Nancy J; Ceglia, Lisa; Rasmussen, Helen

    2013-08-01

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D absorption or the 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] response to supplemental vitamin D3 . Based on earlier studies in rats we postulated that absorption would be greatest in the low-fat meal group. Sixty-two healthy older men and women were randomly assigned to one of three meal groups: no meal, high-fat meal, or low-fat meal; each was given a monthly 50,000 IU vitamin D3 supplement with the test breakfast meal (or after a fast for the no-meal group) and followed for 90 days. Plasma vitamin D3 was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) before and 12 hours after the first dose; plasma 25(OH)D was measured by radioimmunoassay at baseline and after 30 and 90 days. The mean 12-hour increments in vitamin D3 , after adjusting for age and sex, were 200.9 nmol/L in the no-meal group, 207.4 nmol/L in the high-fat meal group, and 241.1 nmol/L in the low-fat meal group (p = 0.038), with the increase in the low-fat group being significantly greater than the increases in the other two groups. However, increments in 25(OH)D levels at 30 and 90 days did not differ significantly in the three groups. We conclude that absorption was increased when a 50,000 IU dose of vitamin D was taken with a low-fat meal, compared with a high-fat meal and no meal, but that the greater absorption did not result in higher plasma 25(OH)D levels in the low-fat meal group.

  19. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278). WR-33278 and spermine protect against mutation induction

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Shigematsu, N.; Schwartz, J.L.

    1994-08-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). Because of their reported structural and functional similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of WR-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents (at concentrations of 0.01 mM and 0.001 mM) were electroporated into cells. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction, with the sequence of irradiation followed 3 h later by electroporation being the more toxic protocol. Enhanced cell survival was observed following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278 30 min prior to irradiation; protection factors (PF) of 1.3 and 1.8, respectively. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested. These data suggest that the properties of radioprotection and chemoprevention exhibited by the phosphorothioate (WR-2721) and associated aminothiol (WR-1065) and disulfide (WR-33278) metabolites may be mediated via endogenous spermine-like polyamine processes. Such a mechanism would have important implications with respect to the design and development of new generation drugs for use in radioprotection and chemoprevention.

  20. Protection of normal tissue against late radiation injury by WR-2721. [/sup 60/Co; rats

    SciTech Connect

    Utley, J.F.; Quinn, C.A.; White, F.C.; Seaver, N.A.; Bloor, C.M.

    1981-02-01

    The ability of WR-2721 to protect against late radiation damage has been studied in skin, muscle, and vascular tissues of rats. Animals treated with and without WR-2721 received irradiation to the left hind limb; representative groups were killed at intervals ranging from 72 h to 6 months. Comparison of all drug-treated and non-drug-treated animals showed significant protection (P = less than or equal to 0.05). The time pattern of injury in non-drug-treated rats was biphasic, with significant damage occurring at 72 h and 1 week, returning to normal between 1 and 3 months, but showing significant late damage at 6 months (P = less than or equal to 0.001). Again, this injury pattern did not appear in WR-2721-treated rats. Thus the ability of WR-2721 to protect against acute and chronic radiation injury in vessels, skin, and muscle indicates that an increased therapeutic gain can be expected when this drug is used in clinical radiation therapy.

  1. Influence of ICRF 159 and trition WR 1339 on metastases of a rat epithelioma.

    PubMed Central

    Pimm, M. V.; Baldwin, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    ICRF 159 and Triton WR 1339 have been examined for their ability to suppress subcutaneous growth and pulmonary metastases from a transplanted rat epithelioma. Neither compound influenced subcutaneous tumour development or reduced the propensity to metastasize when administered in regimens reported to suppress pulmonary, lymph node or intracerebral metastases in other experimental system. PMID:1156509

  2. Characterization of in vivo metabolites of WR319691, a novel compound with activity against Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Milner, Erin; Sousa, Jason; Pybus, Brandon; Melendez, Victor; Gardner, Sean; Grauer, Kristina; Moon, Jay; Carroll, Dustin; Auschwitz, Jennifer; Gettayacamin, Montip; Lee, Patricia; Leed, Susan; McCalmont, William; Norval, Suzanne; Tungtaeng, Anchalee; Zeng, Qiang; Kozar, Michael; Read, Kevin D; Li, Qigui; Dow, Geoffrey

    2011-09-01

    WR319691 has been shown to exhibit reasonable Plasmodium falciparum potency in vitro and exhibits reduced permeability across MDCK cell monolayers, which as part of our screening cascade led to further in vivo analysis. Single-dose pharmacokinetics was evaluated after an IV dose of 5 mg/kg in mice. Maximum bound and unbound brain levels of WR319691 were 97 and 0.05 ng/g versus approximately 1,600 and 3.2 ng/g for mefloquine. The half-life of WR319691 in plasma was approximately 13 h versus 23 h for mefloquine. The pharmacokinetics of several N-dealkylated metabolites was also evaluated. Five of six of these metabolites were detected and maximum total and free brain levels were all lower after an IV dose of 5 mg/kg WR319691 compared to mefloquine at the same dose. These data provide proof of concept that it is feasible to substantially lower the brain levels of a 4-position modified quinoline methanol in vivo without substantially decreasing potency against P. falciparum in vitro.

  3. Selective protection of zidovudine-induced DNA-damage by the antioxidants WR-1065 and tempol.

    PubMed

    Olivero, Ofelia A; Ongele, Michael O; Braun, Hannan M; Marrogi, Ariadna; Divi, Kathyiani; Mitchell, James B; Poirier, Miriam C

    2014-08-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome (CBMN) assay, introduced by Fenech, was used to demonstrate different types of DNA damage in MOLT-3 human lymphoblastoid cells exposed to 10 μM zidovudine (AZT). In addition, we explored the cytoprotective potential of two antioxidants, WR-1065 and Tempol, to decrease AZT-induced genotoxicity. Binucleated cells, arrested by Cytochalasin B (Cyt B), were evaluated for micronuclei (MN), caused by DNA damage or chromosomal loss, and chromatin nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs), caused by telomere attrition. Additionally, nuclear buds (NBUDs), caused by amplified DNA, and apoptotic and necrotic (A/N) cells were scored. We hypothesized that AZT exposure would increase the frequency of genotoxic end points, and that the antioxidants Tempol and WR-1065 would protect against AZT-induced genotoxicity. MOLT-3 cells were exposed to 0 or 10 µM AZT for a total of 76 hr. After the first 24 hr, 0 or 5 µM WR-1065 and/or 0 or 200 µM Tempol were added for the remainder of the experiment. For the last 28 hr (of 76 hr), Cyt B was added to arrest replication after one cell division, leaving a predominance of binucleated cells. The nuclear division index (NDI) was similar for all treatment groups, indicating that the exposures did not alter cell viability. MOLT-3 cells exposed to AZT alone had significant (P < 0.05) increases in MN and NBs, compared to unexposed cells. Both Tempol and WR-1065 protected against AZT-induced MN formation (P < 0.003 for both), and WR-1065, but not Tempol, reduced the levels of A/N (P = 0.041). In cells exposed to AZT/Tempol there were significantly reduced levels of NBUDs, compared to cells exposed to AZT alone (P = 0.015). Cells exposed to AZT/WR-1065 showed reduced levels of NPBs, compared to cells exposed to AZT alone (P = 0.037). Thus WR-1065 and Tempol protected MOLT-3 cells against specific types of AZT-induced DNA damage.

  4. Noninvasive determination of respiratory ozone absorption: the bolus-response method.

    PubMed

    Ultman, J S; Ben-Jebria, A; Hu, S C

    1994-08-01

    Morphometric studies in animals exposed to ozone (O3), and mathematical simulations of O3 transport in human lungs indicate that O3 toxicity is focal in nature, causing tissue damage that is more pronounced in the proximal alveolar region (the proximal end of the respiratory airspaces in our compartment models) than in other airways. These findings suggest that the internal distribution of O3 uptake must be known in order to assess health risk reliably. In previous work (Ultman and Ben-Jebria 1990), we developed a fast-responding chemiluminescent O3 analyzer and a small-scale O3 generator, both of which are suitable for respiratory measurements. The objective of the current research was to integrate these instruments into a bolus inhalation system capable of noninvasively measuring the longitudinal distribution of O3 absorption in intact human lungs. With this system we aimed to carry out baseline experiments in healthy men during quiet oral breathing at a respiratory flow rate of 250 mL/sec, determine the effect of alternative respiratory flow rates between 150 and 1,000 mL/sec, compare the absorption distribution during quiet oral breathing with that during quiet nasal breathing, and ascertain the influence of a peak inspired concentration between 0.3 and 4.0 parts per million (ppm). Ozone uptake (lambda) was expressed as the amount of O3 absorbed during a single breath relative to the amount in the inhaled bolus. Measurements of lambda were correlated with the penetration volume (VP) of the bolus into the respiratory tract. Values of VP less than 70 mL were considered to be associated with the upper airways, values between 70 and 180 mL were associated with the lower conducting airways, and values greater than 180 mL were associated with the respiratory airspaces. During quiet oral breathing, lambda increased smoothly with VP, with 50% of the inhaled O3 absorbed in the upper airways and the balance absorbed within the lower conducting airways. This compares

  5. Stagnant Shells in the Vicinity of the Dusty Wolf–Rayet–OB Binary WR 112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, R. M.; Hankins, M. J.; Schödel, R.; Sanchez-Bermudez, J.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Ressler, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    We present high spatial resolution mid-infrared images of the nebula around the late-type carbon-rich Wolf–Rayet (WC)–OB binary system WR 112 taken by the recently upgraded VLT spectrometer and imager for the mid-infrared (VISIR) with the PAH1, Ne ii_2, and Q3 filters. The observations reveal a morphology resembling a series of arc-like filaments and broken shells. Dust temperatures and masses are derived for each of the identified filamentary structures, which exhibit temperatures ranging from {179}-6+8 K at the exterior W2 filament to {355}-25+37 K in the central 3″. The total dust mass summed over the features is 2.6 ± 0.4 × 10‑5 M⊙. A multi-epoch analysis of mid-IR photometry of WR 112 over the past ∼20 years reveals no significant variability in the observed dust temperature and mass. The morphology of the mid-IR dust emission from WR 112 also exhibits no significant expansion from imaging data taken in 2001, 2007, and 2016, which disputes the current interpretation of the nebula as a high expansion velocity (∼1200 km s‑1) “pinwheel”-shaped outflow driven by the central WC–OB colliding-wind binary. An upper limit of ≲120 km s‑1 is derived for the expansion velocity assuming a distance of 4.15 kpc. The upper limit on the average total mass-loss rate from the central 3″ of WR 112 is estimated to be ≲8 × 10‑6 M⊙ year‑1. We leave its true nature as an open question, but propose that the WR 112 nebula may have formed in the outflow during a previous red or yellow supergiant phase of the central Wolf–Rayet star.

  6. Stagnant Shells in the Vicinity of the Dusty Wolf-Rayet-O/B Binary WR 112

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Ryan M.; Hankins, Matthew; Schoedel, R.; Sanchez-Bermudez, Joel; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Ressler, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    We present high spatial resolution mid-infrared images of the nebula around the late-type carbon-rich Wolf-Rayet (WC)-O/B binary system WR 112 taken by the recently upgraded VLT spectrometer and imager for the mid-infrared (VISIR) with the PAH1, NeII_2, and Q3 filters. The observations reveal a morphology resembling a series of arc-like filaments and broken shells. Dust temperatures and masses are derived for each of the identified filamentary structures, which exhibit temperatures ranging from 179 ± 8 K at the exterior W2 filament to 355 ± 37 K in the central 3''. The total dust mass summed over all the features is 2.6 ± 0.4 × 10-5 M⊙. A multi-epoch analysis of previous mid-IR photometry of WR 112 over the past ~20 yr reveals no significant variability in the observed dust temperature and mass. The morphology of the mid-IR dust emission from WR 112 also exhibits no significant expansion between archival imaging data taken in 2007 May 7, which disputes the current interpretation of the nebula as a high expansion velocity (~1200 km s-1) "pinwheel"-shaped outflow driven by the colliding winds of the central WC-O/B system. An upper limit of <120 km s-1 is derived for the expansion velocity assuming a distance of 4.15 kpc. The upper limit on the average mass-loss rate from the central 3'' of WR 112 is estimated to be < 8 × 10-6 M⊙ yr-1. Based on these constraints, we suggest that the WR 112 nebula formed in the slow, dense outflow during a previous red supergiant (RSG) phase of the central Wolf-Rayet star.

  7. Phase-resolved XMM-Newton and swift observations of WR 25

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, J. C.; Pandey, S. B.; Karmakar, Subhajeet

    2014-06-10

    We present an analysis of long-term X-ray and optical observations of the Wolf-Rayet binary, WR 25. Using archival data from observations with the XMM-Newton and the Swift observatories, spanning over ∼10 yr, we show that WR 25 is a periodic variable in X-rays with a period of 208 ± 3 days. X-ray light curves in the 0.5-10.0 keV energy band show phase-locked variability, where the flux increased by a factor of ∼2 from minimum to maximum, being maximum near periastron passage. The light curve in the soft energy band (0.5-2.0 keV) shows two minima indicating the presence of two eclipses. However, the light curve in the hard energy band (2.0-10.0 keV) shows only one minimum during the apastron passage. The X-ray spectra of WR 25 were explained by a two-temperature plasma model. Both the cool and the hot plasmas were constant at 0.628 ± 0.008 and 2.75 ± 0.06 keV throughout an orbital cycle, where the cooler plasma could be due to small scale shocks in a radiation-driven outflow and the high temperature plasma could be due to the collision of winds. The column density varied with the orbital phase and was found to be maximum after the periastron passage, when the WN star is in front of the O star. The abundances of WR 25 were found to be non-solar. Optical V-band data of WR 25 also show the phase-locked variability, being at maximum near periastron passage. The results based on the present analysis indicate that WR 25 is a colliding wind binary where the presence of soft X-rays is attributed to individual components; however, hard X-rays are due to the collision of winds.

  8. Studies of the disposition and metabolism of mefloquine HCl (WR 142,490), a quinolinemethanol antimalarial, in the rat. Limited studies with an analog, WR 30,090.

    PubMed

    Mu, J Y; Israili, Z H; Dayton, P G

    1975-01-01

    The overall fate of the quinolinemethanol antimalarial, mefloquine-HCl [WR 142,490, erythro-DL-alpha-(2-piperidyl)-2,9-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4-quinolinemethanol hydrochloride] was investigated in the rat with 14C-labeled drug. Despite its extensive binding to plasma proteins, high tissue/plasma concentration ratios were found. Fecal excretion accounted for most of the drug and metabolites. This fate was rationalized on the basis of physical properties of mefloquine (and its metabolites) and extensive biliary and gastric secretion, followed by reabsorption. Evidence was obtained for the formation of several metabolites. Limited studies were carried out in rats, dogs, and one human subject with another quinolinemethanol, WR 30,090-14C [DL-6,8-dichloro-2-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-alpha-(di-n-butylaminomethyl)-4-quinolinemethanol hydrochloride]. Its general fate and physical properties were similar to mefloquine. The disposition of the two quinoline compounds studied was compared to that of quinine and quinidine reported in the literature. This revealed that modification of the quinine molecule resulted in new drugs which were more highly bound and exhibited longer half-lives than quinine.

  9. Ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response of large-size topological insulator and application in low-threshold bulk pulsed lasers.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Long; Sun, Yi-Jian; He, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhao-Jie; You, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jian-Fu; Chou, Mitch M C; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Tu, Chao-Yang

    2015-10-07

    Dirac-like topological insulators have attracted strong interest in optoelectronic application because of their unusual and startling properties. Here we report for the first time that the pure topological insulator Bi2Te3 exhibited a naturally ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response to photoexcitation. The Bi2Te3 sheets with lateral size up to a few micrometers showed extremely low saturation absorption intensities of only 1.1 W/cm(2) at 1.0 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Benefiting from this sensitive response, a Q-switching pulsed laser was achieved in a 1.0 μm Nd:YVO4 laser where the threshold absorbed pump power was only 31 mW. This is the lowest threshold in Q-switched solid-state bulk lasers to the best of our knowledge. A pulse duration of 97 ns was observed with an average power of 26.1 mW. A Q-switched laser at 1.3 μm was also realized with a pulse duration as short as 93 ns. Moreover, the mode locking operation was demonstrated. These results strongly exhibit that Bi2Te3 is a promising optical device for constructing broadband, miniature and integrated high-energy pulsed laser systems with low power consumption. Our work clearly points out a significantly potential avenue for the development of two-dimensional-material-based broadband ultrasensitive photodetector and other optoelectronic devices.

  10. Ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response of large-size topological insulator and application in low-threshold bulk pulsed lasers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jin-Long; Sun, Yi-Jian; He, Jing-Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Zhao-Jie; You, Zhen-Yu; Li, Jian-Fu; Chou, Mitch M. C.; Lee, Chao-Kuei; Tu, Chao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Dirac-like topological insulators have attracted strong interest in optoelectronic application because of their unusual and startling properties. Here we report for the first time that the pure topological insulator Bi2Te3 exhibited a naturally ultrasensitive nonlinear absorption response to photoexcitation. The Bi2Te3 sheets with lateral size up to a few micrometers showed extremely low saturation absorption intensities of only 1.1 W/cm2 at 1.0 and 1.3 μm, respectively. Benefiting from this sensitive response, a Q-switching pulsed laser was achieved in a 1.0 μm Nd:YVO4 laser where the threshold absorbed pump power was only 31 mW. This is the lowest threshold in Q-switched solid-state bulk lasers to the best of our knowledge. A pulse duration of 97 ns was observed with an average power of 26.1 mW. A Q-switched laser at 1.3 μm was also realized with a pulse duration as short as 93 ns. Moreover, the mode locking operation was demonstrated. These results strongly exhibit that Bi2Te3 is a promising optical device for constructing broadband, miniature and integrated high-energy pulsed laser systems with low power consumption. Our work clearly points out a significantly potential avenue for the development of two-dimensional-material-based broadband ultrasensitive photodetector and other optoelectronic devices. PMID:26442909

  11. PROBING WOLF–RAYET WINDS: CHANDRA/HETG X-RAY SPECTRA OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Schulz, N. S.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L.; Shenar, T.; Nichols, J. S.; Pollock, A. M. T. E-mail: ken.gayley@gmail.com E-mail: lida@astro.physik.uni-potsdam.de E-mail: ignace@mail.etsu.edu

    2015-12-10

    With a deep Chandra/HETGS exposure of WR 6, we have resolved emission lines whose profiles show that the X-rays originate from a uniformly expanding spherical wind of high X-ray-continuum optical depth. The presence of strong helium-like forbidden lines places the source of X-ray emission at tens to hundreds of stellar radii from the photosphere. Variability was present in X-rays and simultaneous optical photometry, but neither were correlated with the known period of the system or with each other. An enhanced abundance of sodium revealed nuclear-processed material, a quantity related to the evolutionary state of the star. The characterization of the extent and nature of the hot plasma in WR 6 will help to pave the way to a more fundamental theoretical understanding of the winds and evolution of massive stars.

  12. Two Week Oral Dose Range-Finding Toxicity Study of WR242511 in Rats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-08

    oximeter (Instrumentation Laboratory Model 282). The assay was performed within one hour of sample collection. The specimens were kept on wet ice prior...were observed. Percent purity of initial WR242511 sample was found to be 99.51%, standard deviation - 0.02%, follow 99.59% ± 0.04%. The assay results...Ciba-Corning 550 Express Clinical Chemistry System Larsen. K. Clin. Chem. Acta, 41, 209, 1972 Total Protein Biuret technique Ciba-Corning 550

  13. Oral Prenatal and Postnatal Development Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rats. Volume 2 of 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-18

    washing on any cohabitation day) HT = Hematoma NP = Not pregnant |A = Decreased activity N-2 ORAL DRENATAL AND POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT STUDY OF WR238605...N = Normal SP- = Sperm negative (i.e.. sperm not observed in the vaginal washing on any cohabitation day) HT = Hematoma NP = Not pregnant JA...washing on any cohabitation day) |A = NP = Not pregnant N-4 Palpated pregnant Normal • Hematoma i Decreased activity ORAL PRENATAL AND POSTNATAL

  14. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  15. Proper Motions of New Dust in the Colliding Wind Binary WR 140

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monnier, J. D.; Tuthill, P. G.; Danchi, W. C.

    2002-03-01

    The eccentric W-R + O binary system WR 140 produces dust for a few months at intervals of 7.94 yr coincident with periastron passage. We present the first resolved images of this dust shell, at binary phases φ~0.039 and ~0.055, using aperture masking techniques on the Keck I telescope to achieve diffraction-limited resolution. Proper motions of approximately 1.1 mas per day were detected, implying a distance <~1.5 kpc from the known wind speed. The dust plume observed is not as simple as the ``pinwheel'' nebulae seen around other W-R colliding wind binaries, indicating the orbital plane is highly inclined to our line of sight and/or the dust formation is very clumpy. Follow-up imaging in the mid-infrared and with adaptive optics is urgently required to track the dust motion further, necessary for unambiguously determining the orbital geometry, which we only partially constrain here. With full knowledge of the orbital elements, these infrared images can be used to reconstruct the dust distribution along the colliding wind interface, providing a unique tool for probing the postshock physical conditions of violent astrophysical flows.

  16. Large-scale Periodic Variability of the Wind of the Wolf-Rayet Star WR 1 (HD 4004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; St-Louis, N.

    2010-06-01

    We present the results of an intensive photometric and spectroscopic monitoring campaign of the WN4 Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 1 = HD 4004. Our broadband V photometry covering a timespan of 91 days shows variability with a period of P = 16.9+0.6 -0.3 days. The same period is also found in our spectral data. The light curve is non-sinusoidal with hints of a gradual change in its shape as a function of time. The photometric variations nevertheless remain coherent over several cycles and we estimate that the coherence timescale of the light curve is of the order of 60 days. The spectroscopy shows large-scale line-profile variability which can be interpreted as excess emission peaks moving from one side of the profile to the other on a timescale of several days. Although we cannot unequivocally exclude the unlikely possibility that WR 1 is a binary, we propose that the nature of the variability we have found strongly suggests that it is due to the presence in the wind of the WR star of large-scale structures, most likely corotating interaction regions (CIRs), which are predicted to arise in inherently unstable radiatively driven winds when they are perturbed at their base. We also suggest that variability observed in WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137 is of the same nature. Finally, assuming that the period of CIRs is related to the rotational period, we estimate the rotation rate of the four stars for which sufficient monitoring has been carried out, i.e., v rot = 6.5, 40, 70, and 275 km s-1 for WR 1, WR 6, WR 134, and WR 137, respectively. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii. Also based on observations obtained at the Observatoire du Mont Mégantic with is operated by the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique du Québec and the Observatoire de

  17. Resistant starch and arabinoxylan augment SCFA absorption, but affect postprandial glucose and insulin responses differently.

    PubMed

    Ingerslev, Anne Krog; Theil, Peter Kappel; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Bach Knudsen, Knud Erik

    2014-05-01

    The effects of increased colonic fermentation of dietary fibres (DF) on the net portal flux (NPF) of carbohydrate-derived metabolites (glucose, SCFA and, especially, butyrate), hormones (insulin, C-peptide, glucagon-like peptide 1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide) and NEFA were studied in a healthy catheterised pig model. A total of six pigs weighing 59 (SEM 1·6) kg were fitted with catheters in the mesenteric artery and in the portal and hepatic veins, and a flow probe around the portal vein, and included in a double 3 × 3 cross-over design with three daily feedings (at 09.00, 14.00 and 19.00 hours). Fasting and 5 h postprandial blood samples were collected after 7 d adaptation to each diet. The pigs were fed a low-DF Western-style control diet (WSD) and two high-DF diets (an arabinoxylan-enriched diet (AXD) and a resistant starch-enriched diet (RSD)). The NPF of insulin was lower (P= 0·04) in AXD-fed pigs (4·6 nmol/h) than in RSD-fed pigs (10·5 nmol/h), despite the lowest NPF of glucose being observed in RSD-fed pigs (203 mmol/h, P= 0·02). The NPF of total SCFA, acetate, propionate and butyrate were high, intermediate and low (P< 0·01) in AXD-, RSD- and WSD-fed pigs, respectively, with the largest relative increase being observed for butyrate in response to arabinoxylan supplementation. In conclusion, the RSD and AXD had different effects on the NPF of insulin and glucose, suggesting different impacts of arabinoxylan and resistant starch on human health.

  18. The role of cholesterol absorption and hepatic cholesterol content in high and low responses to dietary cholesterol and fat in pedigreed baboons (Papio species).

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, R S; Rice, K S; Lewis, D S; McGill, H C; Carey, K D

    1993-06-01

    Selective breeding has produced baboon families with low and high plasma cholesterol responses to dietary cholesterol and fat. We used 12 high- and 12 low-responding (mainly in low-density lipoprotein [LDL] cholesterol) pedigreed baboons to determine whether cholesterol absorption and hepatic cholesterol concentration are associated with these responses. We measured cholesterol absorption first on the chow diet, which was low in cholesterol and fat, and after 3 and 13 weeks on the challenge diets, which contained 0.45 mg cholesterol/kcal and 40% of calories as either coconut oil or corn oil. Plasma, lipoprotein, and hepatic cholesterol concentrations were measured 1 week after cholesterol absorption measurements. High-responding baboons had higher percentage cholesterol absorption than low-responding baboons on both chow and challenge diets, regardless of the type of dietary fat. Both high and low responders had higher percentage cholesterol absorption with corn oil than with coconut oil. High responders also had higher hepatic cholesterol concentrations than low responders on chow and after consuming the challenge diets for 4 weeks. After consuming the challenge diets for 14 weeks, low responders fed coconut oil had hepatic cholesterol levels equal to those of high responders, while low responders fed corn oil continued to have low hepatic cholesterol levels. Thus, percentage cholesterol absorption is consistently higher in high-responding baboons regardless of diet, but hepatic cholesterol concentration varies with duration of challenge and type of fat. The results suggest that both cholesterol absorption and hepatic cholesterol concentration regulate cholesterolemic responses to diet, but by different mechanisms.

  19. Meal conditions affect the absorption of supplemental vitamin D3 but not the plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is sometimes assumed that dietary fat is required for vitamin D absorption, although the impact of different amounts of dietary fat on vitamin D absorption is not established. This study was conducted to determine whether the presence of a meal and the fat content of the meal influences vitamin D...

  20. A phase I study of WR-2721 in combination with total body irradiation (TBI) in patients with refractory lymphoid malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Coia, L.; Krigel, R.; Hanks, G.; Comis, R.; Algazy, K.; Peters, R.; McCulloch, W.; Schien, P. )

    1992-01-01

    This Phase I study was designed to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of WR-2721 when given twice weekly with total body irradiation (TBI) in the treatment of patients with advanced refractory lymphoid malignancies and to define the toxicities of this combination and schedule. Patients eligible for this study had advanced recurrent indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients had symptomatic or progressive disease, a performance status of 0, 1, or 2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic, and renal function. Only patients failing one or two regimens of prior chemotherapy were eligible. Patients who had received prior extended field irradiation were ineligible. Patients received TBI twice weekly (Tuesday and Friday) to a total of 10 doses at 15 cGy/fx. WR-2721 was given intravenously over 15 min beginning 30 min before irradiation. The escalation of WR-2721 was Level 1: 740 mg/m2 and Level 2: 910 mg/m2. The MTD of WR-2721 was that dose which produced predictable and reversible toxicity and would not interfere with patient well-being. Seven patients were entered onto the study, three at 740 mg/m2 and four at 910 mg/m2. Five patients had CLL and two patients small lymphocytic NHL. No patient had hypotension or nausea requiring reduction in dose level or even interruption of infusion of WR-2721. At 740 mg/m2 no grade 3 or 4 toxicities related to WR-2721 were observed, but two patients could not complete treatment because of TBI-induced prolonged thrombocytopenia following treatments 5 and 8. One patient completed all 10 treatments. At 910 mg/m2 of WR-2721, two patients requested removal from study because of malaise, one after 5 cycles and one after 7 cycles. One patient completed all 10 treatments.

  1. Inhibition of topoisomerase II{alpha} activity in CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. |; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.; Murley, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector and antimutagenic agent when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure to Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells at a concentration of 4 mM. Under these exposure conditions, topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and associated protein contents were measured in the K1 cell line using the DNA relaxation assay, the P4 unknotting assay, and immunoblotting, respectively. WR-1065 was ineffective in modifying topo I activity, but it did reduce topo IIa activity by an average of 50 percent. The magnitude of topo IIa protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. Cell cycle effects were monitored by the method of flow cytometry. Exposure of cells to 4 mM WR-1065 for a period of up to 6 h resulted in a buildup of cells in the G2 compartment. However, in contrast to topo II inhibitors used in chemotherapy, WR-1065 is an effective radioprotector agent capable of protecting against both radiation-induced cell lethality and mutagenesis. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds such as WR-1065 has been their ability to affect endogenous enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results are consistent with such a proposed mechanism and demonstrate in particular a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on type II topoisomerase, which is involved in DNA synthesis.

  2. NANTEN 12CO (J = 1 → 0) observations around the star WR 55

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duronea, N. U.; Arnal, E. M.; Testori, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Context. We present a complete study of the molecular and ionized gas in the environs of the nebula RCW 78 around WR 55. Aims: We investigate the spatial distribution, physical characteristics, and kinematical properties of the molecular gas linked to the galactic nebula RCW 78 to obtain a clearer understanding of its interaction with both the star and the ionized gas. Methods: Our study is based on 12CO(1-0) fully sampled observations of a region of ~0.45 ° size around the star WR 55 and the nebula RCW 78 obtained with the 4-m NANTEN telescope, radio continuum archival data at 1.4 and 4.85 GHz, obtained from the SGPS and PMNRAO Southern Radio Survey, respectively, and available infrared MIPSGAL images at 24 μm. Results: A molecular gas component in the velocity range from ~-58 km s-1 to -45 km s-1, which is compatible with the velocity of the ionized gas, was found to be associated with the optical nebula. Adopting a distance of ~5 kpc, the mass of this molecular component is about 3.4 × 104 M⊙. Our analysis of the molecular data reveals a velocity gradient that is consistent with that found for the Hα line. New radio-continuum flux-density determinations confirm the thermal nature of RCW 78. This indicates that the ionized gas in RCW 78 arises from the photoionization of the molecular gas component in the velocity range from -58 km s-1 to -45 km s-1. A molecular concentration at a velocity of -56.1 km s-1(identified as C1) is likely associated with the star HD 117797 and with an ensemble of candidate YSOs, lying at a distance of 3.9 kpc, while the rest of the molecular gas at velocities between -56 km s-1 and -46 km s-1 constitute an incomplete ring-like structure expanding around WR 55 at a velocity of about ~5 km s-1. Mechanical energy and time requirements indicate that WR 55 is very capable of sustaining the expansion of the nebula.

  3. Metabolic Disposition of Labeled WR-158,122 in a Bile Duct Cannulated Rhesus Monkey.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-18

    and diluted to 124.08 g. It contained 2.50 mg WR-158,122/ml and 1.86 ;Ci/ml. The suspension was stored at 4°C. Assay of the suspension gave the...of BF2* powder and nitrofurazone ointment. SMA 12/60 assays were run on plasma samples at I day after surgery, just prior to the first and second...penicillin G, 250 mg dihydrostreptomycin, 10 mg chlorpheniramine maleate, and 25 mg diphemanil- methylsulfate. Preservatives are 20 mg procaine HCl

  4. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  5. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line.

  6. Multiple responses of TPP-assisted near-perfect absorption in metal/Fibonacci quasiperiodic photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yongkang; Liu, Xueming; Wang, Leiran; Lu, Hua; Wang, Guoxi

    2011-05-09

    Absorption properties in one-dimensional quasiperiodic photonic crystal composed of a thin metallic layer and dielectric Fibonacci multilayers are investigated. It is found that a large number of photonic stopbands can occur at the dielectric Fibonacci multilayers. Tamm plasmon polaritons (TPPs) with the frequencies locating at each photonic stopband are excited at the interface between the metallic layer and the dielectric layer, leading to almost perfect absorption for the energy of incident wave. By adjusting the length of dielectric layer with higher refractive-index or the Fibonacci order, the number of absorption peaks can be tuned effectively and enlarged significantly.

  7. The inhibition of radiation-induced mutagenesis by the combined effects of selenium and the aminothiol WR-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, A.M.; Murray, J.L.; Dale, P. |

    1997-08-01

    In order to evaluate the anti-mutagenic effects of the potential chemoprotective compounds selenium and S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-1065), CHO AA8 cells were exposed to both compounds either individually or in combination prior to irradiation. Mutation frequency following exposure to 8 Gy was evaluated by quantitation of the mutations detected at the hprt locus of these cells. Protection against radiation-induced mutation was observed for both 30 nM sodium selenite or 4 mM WR-1065. In addition, the protection against mutation induction provided by the combination of these agents appeared additive. In contrast, sodium selenite did not provide protection against radiation toxicity when provided either alone or in conjunction with WR-1065. In order to evaluate the possible mechanisms of the anti-mutagenic effects observed in these cells, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity was evaluated following exposure to the chemopreventative compounds. The addition of sodium selenite to the culture media resulted in a 5-fold increase in GPX activity, which was unaltered by the presence of the WR-1065. Northern analysis of RNA derived from these cells indicated that selenium supplementation resulted in a marginal increase in the mRNA for the cytosolic GPx (GSHPx-1) which was insufficient to account for the stimulation of GPx activity observed in cellular extracts. These results suggest that selenium and WR-1065 offer protection via independent mechanisms and that GPX stimulation remains a possible mechanism of the anti-mutagenic effect of selenium.

  8. POPULATION I WOLF-RAYET RUNAWAY STARS: THE CASE OF WR124 AND ITS EXPANDING NEBULA M1-67

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, S. V.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Crowther, P. A. E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.c

    2010-11-20

    In 1997 and 2008 we used the WFPC2 camera on board the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain two sets of narrow-band H{alpha} images of the runaway Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR 124 surrounded by its nebula M1-67. This two-epoch imaging provides an expansion parallax and thus a practically assumption-free geometric distance to the nebula, d = 3.35 {+-} 0.67 kpc. Combined with the global velocity distribution in the ejected nebula, this confirms the extreme runaway status of WR 124. WR stars embedded within such ejection nebulae at the point of core collapse would produce different supernova characteristics from those expected for stars surrounded by wind-filled cavities. In galaxies with extremely low ambient metallicity, Z {<=} 10{sup -3} Z {sub sun}, {gamma}-ray bursts originating from fast-moving runaway WR stars may produce afterglows which appear to be coming from regions with a relatively homogeneous circumburst medium.

  9. Volatile organic compounds produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WR-1 restrict the growth and virulence traits of Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Raza, Waseem; Ling, Ning; Liu, Dongyang; Wei, Zhong; Huang, Qiwei; Shen, Qirong

    2016-11-01

    The volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by soil microbes have a significant role in the control of plant diseases and plant growth promotion. In this study, we examined the effect of VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain WR-1 on the growth and virulence traits of tomato wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. The VOCs produced by P. fluorescens WR-1 exhibited concentration dependent bacteriostatic effect on the growth of R. solanacearum on agar medium and in infested soil. The VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 also significantly inhibited the virulence traits of R. solanacearum. The proteomics analysis showed that the VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 downregulated cellular proteins of R. solanacearum related to the antioxidant activity, virulence, inclusion body proteins, carbohydrate and amino acid synthesis and metabolism, protein folding and translation, methylation and energy transfer, while the proteins involved in the ABC transporter system, detoxification of aldehydes and ketones, protein folding and translation were upregulated. This study revealed the significance of VOCs of P. fluorescens WR-1 to control the tomato wilt pathogen R. solanacearum. Investigation of the modes of action of biocontrol agents is important to better comprehend the interactions mediated by VOCs in nature to design better control strategies for plant pathogens.

  10. THE XMM-NEWTON/EPIC X-RAY LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS OF WR 6

    SciTech Connect

    Ignace, R.; Gayley, K. G.; Hamann, W.-R.; Oskinova, L. M.; Huenemoerder, D. P.; Pollock, A. M. T.; McFall, M.

    2013-09-20

    We obtained four pointings of over 100 ks each of the well-studied Wolf-Rayet star WR 6 with the XMM-Newton satellite. With a first paper emphasizing the results of spectral analysis, this follow-up highlights the X-ray variability clearly detected in all four pointings. However, phased light curves fail to confirm obvious cyclic behavior on the well-established 3.766 day period widely found at longer wavelengths. The data are of such quality that we were able to conduct a search for event clustering in the arrival times of X-ray photons. However, we fail to detect any such clustering. One possibility is that X-rays are generated in a stationary shock structure. In this context we favor a corotating interaction region (CIR) and present a phenomenological model for X-rays from a CIR structure. We show that a CIR has the potential to account simultaneously for the X-ray variability and constraints provided by the spectral analysis. Ultimately, the viability of the CIR model will require both intermittent long-term X-ray monitoring of WR 6 and better physical models of CIR X-ray production at large radii in stellar winds.

  11. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate

  12. Radioprotection by Biological Response Modifiers Alone and in Combination with WR-2721

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    reasons related to cancer therapy rather 247 CH2 OH CH 2OH CH 2 0H H H H OH H OH H OH H OH FI(; . Chemical structure of glucan . a polgl~can consisting...2. GLUCAN : BACKGROUND AND GENERAL IMMUNOLOGIC AND HEMOPOIETIC EFFECTS Glucan (Fig. 1) is a beta -l,3-polyglucose isolated from the inner cell wall of...Adju’an, Therapy. pp. 183- 194. CH iiGOS. M. A led ) Ra%.en Press. New York Ciop. J. K. and AtSTiN. K. F 11985) A beta - glucan inhibitable receptor on human

  13. Comparative behavioral toxicity of four sulfhydryl radioprotective compounds in mice: Wr2721, cysteamine, diethyldithiocarbamate, and n-acetylcysteine

    SciTech Connect

    Landauer, M.R.; Davis, H.D.; Dominitz, J.A.; Weiss, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    A number of sulfhydryl compounds have been shown to protect against ionizing radiation. One of the most effective radioprotectors is S-2(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid, also known aas ethiofos, gammaphos, or WR-2721 (Davidson, 1980; Giambarresi and Jacobs, 1987). This drug is currently under clinical investigation for its potential in protecting normal tissue during radiation treatment and chemotherapy (Blumberg et al., 1982; Glover et al., 1988; Yuhas et al., 1980). B-Mercaptoethylamine (MEA, cysteamine) was for years the standard against which the effectiveness of other radioprotectors was judged, but is more toxic than WR-2721 (Giambarresi and Jacobs, 1987). Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are other compounds shown to have radioprotective properties (Milas et al., 1988; Weiss et al., 1984). Studies in a variety of animal species have shown significant behavioral toxicity after administration of WR-2721 (Bogo et al., 1985; Bogo, 1988; Landauer et al., 1987b, 1988).

  14. REVEALING THE ASYMMETRY OF THE WIND OF THE VARIABLE WOLF-RAYET STAR WR1 (HD 4004) THROUGH SPECTROPOLARIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    St-Louis, N.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, high quality spectropolarimetric observations of the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR1 (HD 4004) obtained with ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope are presented. All major emission lines present in the spectrum show depolarization in the relative Stokes parameters Q/I and U/I. From the behavior of the amount of line depolarization as a function of line strength, the intrinsic continuum light polarization of WR1 is estimated to be P/I = 0.443% ± 0.028% with an angle of θ = –26.°2. Although such a level of polarization could in principle be caused by a wind flattened by fast rotation, the scenario in which it is a consequence of the presence of corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind is preferred. This is supported by previous photometric and spectroscopic observations showing periodic variations with a period of 16.9 days. This is now the third WR star thought to exhibit CIRs in its wind that is found to have line depolarization. Previous authors have found a strong correlation between line depolarization and the presence of an ejected nebula, which they interpret as a sign that the star has relatively recently reached the WR phase since the nebula are thought to dissipate very fast. In cases where the presence of CIRs in the wind is favored to explain the depolarization across spectral lines, the above-mentioned correlation may indicate that those massive stars have only very recently transited from the previous evolutionary phase to the WR phase.

  15. Synchrotron radiation and absence of linear polarization in the colliding wind binary WR 146

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hales, C. A.; Benaglia, P.; del Palacio, S.; Romero, G. E.; Koribalski, B. S.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Several massive early-type binaries exhibit non-thermal emission which has been attributed to synchrotron radiation from particles accelerated by diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) in the wind-collision region (WCR). If the magnetic field in the strong shocks is ordered, its component parallel to the shock front should be enhanced, and the resultant synchrotron radiation would be polarized. However, such polarization has never been measured. Aims: We aim to determine the percentage of linearly polarized emission from the well-known non-thermal radio emitter WR 146, a WC6+O8 system. Methods: We performed spatially-unresolved radio continuum observations of WR 146 at 5 cm and 20 cm with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. We constructed a numerical model to investigate a scenario where particles are accelerated by turbulent magnetic reconnection (MR), and we performed a quantitative analysis of possible depolarization effects. Results: No linearly polarized radio emission was detected. The data constrain the fractional linear polarization to less than 0.6% between 1 to 8 GHz. This is compatible with a high level of turbulence and a dominant random component in the magnetic field. In this case the relativistic particles could be produced by turbulent magnetic reconnection. In order for this scenario to satisfy the required non-thermal energy budget, the strength of the magnetic field in the WCR must be as high as 150 mG. However, if the magnetic field is ordered and DSA is ongoing, then a combination of internal and external Faraday rotation could equally account for the depolarization of the emission. Conclusions: The absence of polarization could be caused by a highly turbulent magnetic field, other depolarization mechanisms such as Faraday rotation in the stellar wind, or a combination of these processes. It is not clear whether it is possible to develop the high level of turbulence and strong magnetic fields required for efficient MR in a long

  16. Evaluation of 3D printed materials used to print WR10 horn antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Elof; Rahiminejad, Sofia; Enoksson, Peter

    2016-10-01

    A WR10 waveguide horn antenna is 3D printed with three different materials. The antennas are printed on a fusion deposition modeling delta 3D printer built in house at Chalmers University of Technology. The different plastic materials used are an electrically conductive Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), a thermally conductive polylactic acid containing 35% copper, and a tough Amphora polymer containing at least 20% carbon fiber. The antennas are all printed with a 0.25 mm nozzle and 100 μm layer thickness and the software settings are tuned to give maximum quality for each material. The three 3D printed horn antennas are compared when it comes to cost, time and material properties.

  17. Oral Prenatal and Postnatal Development Study of WR238605 Succinate in Rats. Volume 1 of 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-18

    0.003 101.8 0 394 ± 0.005 1.144 ± 0.029 96 8 99.6 1.149 ±0.039 95.8 3.646 ±0.131 101.3 3.714 ±0.031 101.9 Page 23 Table 3 0 r- s n ORAL PRENATAL ...Whitney U test (p < 0.05) Page 30 Table 8.1 ORAL PRENATAL AND POSTNATAL DEVELOPMENT STUDY OF WR23 8605 SUCCINATE IN RATS i_.- *.-. L» U...Calculated dai ly food consumption for successive period intervals. "Baseline is GD6. D-2 * I <i •— s n r-i , , ORAL PRENATAL

  18. Protection by WR-151327 against late-effect damage from fission-spectrum neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A. )

    1990-01-01

    Considerable effort has been expended to develop chemical agents capable of modifying radiation-induced damage to biological systems. The authors describe here differences in the radioprotective effect of WR-151327, depending on the sex of the animal and the post-irradiation time interval considered. The greatest effect in female animals is prior to 805 days post irradiation. The greater protection in male animals is seen during the time increment following 850 days after irradiation. While it is difficult at present to ascribe these effects to a particulate model, it is suggestive that hormonal factors may play a role in aminothiol protection against radiation-induced life shortening and concomitant tumor induction in the B6CF{sub 1} hybrid mouse system. With respect to subsequent tumor induction, their preliminary findings to be published elsewhere suggest that tumors of lymphoreticular origin are the class of tumors most affected by the administration of a radioprotector prior to irradiation. 23 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Biochemical characterization of a novel laccase from the basidiomycete fungus Cerrena sp. WR1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Chung; Wu, Po-Hung; Su, Yu-Chang; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Wei, Yun-Syuan; Wang, Nai-Chen; Hsu, Chih-An; Wang, Andrew H-J; Shyur, Lie-Fen

    2012-11-01

    This study reports a new white-rot fungus Cerrena sp. WR1, identified based on an 18S rDNA sequence, which can secrete extracellular forms of laccase with a maximal activity reaching 202 000 U l⁻¹ in a 5-l fermenter. A laccase protein, designated Lcc3, was purified and shown to be N-linked glycosylated by PNGase F and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analyses. The respective full-length cDNA gene (lcc3) of the Lcc3 protein was obtained using polymerase chain reaction-based methods. Kinetic studies showed that the K(m) and k(cat) of the native Lcc3 were 3.27 μM and 934.6 s⁻¹ for 2,2'-Azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), 849.1 μM and 147.9 s⁻¹ for guaiacol, 392.7 μM and 109.2 s⁻¹ for 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, and 881 μM and 115.5 s⁻¹ for catechol, respectively. The T(m) of Lcc3 was determined at 73.9°C and it showed a long t(½) (120 min) at 50°C. The laccase was highly ethanol resistant, with 80% of its original activity was detected when incubated in 25% ethanol for 14 days. Furthermore, crude enzyme broth or Lcc3 could degrade lignin in kraft paper (26.5%), and showed high decoloration efficiency (90%) on synthetic dye Remazol Brilliant Blue R. Together, these data demonstrate that Cerrena sp. WR1 Lcc3 possesses novel biochemical and kinetic properties that may aid its application in industry.

  20. 76 FR 10899 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From the W.R. Grace and Company...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... Company in Curtis, MD, To Be Included in the Special Exposure Cohort AGENCY: National Institute for... class of employees from the W.R. Grace and Company in Curtis, Maryland, to be included in the Special... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: W.R. Grace and Company. Location: Curtis, Maryland. Job Titles...

  1. Effects of area postrema lesions on taste aversions produced by treatment with WR-2721 in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Lee, J.

    1986-01-01

    The conditioned taste aversion procedure was used to further assess some behavioral effects of treatment with the putative radioprotectant WR-2721 and the role of the area postrema in mediating the behavioral effects of treatment. Treatment with 40, 150 or 300 mg/kg WR-2721 produced dose-dependent changes in sucrose intake in both control rats and rats with area postrema lesions. The effectiveness of the lesion in disrupting the acquisition of an aversion varied as a function of the dose administered, with the lesions producing the greatest disruption of aversion learning at the lowest dose and little disruption at the highest dose tested. At all dose levels, sucrose intake was greater for the rats with area postrema lesions than for the sham-operated control rats. Treatment with WR-2721 also produced significant decreases in total fluid intake, particularly at the higher dose levels. The results are discussed as indicating that treatment with WR-2721 produces highly toxic effects on behavior and that the use of the compound as a radioprotectant for radiotherapy requires additional assessment of its effects on brain function and behavior.

  2. Detached dust shell around Wolf-Rayet star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036

    SciTech Connect

    Borissova, J.; Amigo, P.; Kurtev, R.; Kumar, M. S. N.; Chené, A.-N.; Minniti, D.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a detached dust shell around the Wolf-Rayet (WR) star WR60-6 in the young stellar cluster VVV CL036 is reported. This shell is uncovered through the Spitzer-MIPS 24 μm image, where it appears brightest, and it is invisible at shorter wavelengths. Using new APEX observations and other data available from the literature, we have estimated some of the shell parameters: the inner and outer radii of 0.15 and 0.90 pc, respectively; the overall systemic velocity of the molecular {sup 12}CO(3 → 2) emission of –45.7 ± 2.3 km s{sup –1}; an expansion velocity of the gas of 16.3 ± 1 km s{sup –1}; the dust temperature and opacity of 122 ± 12 K and 1.04, respectively; and an age of 2.8 × 10{sup 4} yr. The WR star displays some cyclic variability. The mass computed for the WR60-6 nebula indicates that the material was probably ejected during its previous stages of evolution. In addition, we have identified a bright spot very close to the shell, which can be associated with the Midcourse Space Experiment source G312.13+00.20.

  3. A revision of the fundamental parameters of the open cluster Hogg 15 and the projected star WR 47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Bica, E.; Santos, J. F. C., Jr.; Clariá, J. J.

    2002-05-01

    We revise the fundamental parameters of the faint open cluster Hogg 15, for which two recent colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) studies have obtained significantly different ages. In the present study, we combine a series of methods trying to constrain age, together with other fundamental parameters. We employ spatial extractions to construct the CMDs, and the cluster integrated spectrum to compare it with those of templates of known age. We derive fundamental parameters, in particular, distance, of the closely projected Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WR 47) - often proposed to be physically related to Hogg 15. Based on the WR 47 spectrum and available photometry, we conclude that the short distance implied by the Hipparcos parallax (216 pc) is affected by binary motion. From the WR 47 spectrum we estimate a reddening E(B-V) and a distance of 1.10 +/- 0.05 and 5.2 +/- 0.9 kpc, respectively. For Hogg 15 we derive an age of 20 +/- 10 Myr, a reddening of 1.10 +/- 0.05, and a distance of 3.1 +/- 0.5 kpc. We conclude that Hogg 15 is not related to WR 47 from the point of view of origin, since the cluster and the star do not belong to the same formation event.

  4. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  5. Microwave absorption properties of polypyrrole-SrFe12O19-TiO2-epoxy resin nanocomposites: Optimization using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyed Dorraji, M. S.; Rasoulifard, M. H.; Amani-Ghadim, A. R.; Khodabandeloo, M. H.; Felekari, M.; Khoshrou, M. R.; hajimiri, I.

    2016-10-01

    At a few works are discussed about formation of heterogeneous composites with different distribution of particle shape and size that are used for electromagnetic absorption purposes. In this study a novel heterogeneous nanocpmposites is investigated. The nanocomposite has been successfully prepared based on epoxy resin including various nano-metal oxides (TiO2, SrFe12O19) and polypyrrole (PPy) by sol-gel and the solution chemistry method, respectively. The performance of prepared nanocomposite in absorption of microwave in X-band range was investigated and transmission line method by X-band waveguide straight was used to measure EM parameters of nanocomposites. The Response surface methodology (RSM) with central composite design (CCD) was utilized to study the effects of the wt.% TiO2 in SrFe12O19, wt.% Tio2-SrFe12O19 in PPy and wt.% TiO2-SrFe12O19-PPy in epoxy resin, on the microwave absorption properties with the absorber thickness of only 2 mm. The proposed quadratic model was in accordance with the experimental results with correlation coefficient of 96.5%. The optimum condition for maximum microwave absorption efficiency were wt.% TiO2 in SrFe12O19 of 70, wt.% TiO2-SrFe12O19 in PPy of 10 and wt.% TiO2-SrFe12O19-PPy in epoxy of 25. The sample prepared in optimal conditions indicated reflection loss of -15 dB corresponding to 97% absorption, at the range of 9.2-10.8 GHz.

  6. Spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sayantan; Chatterjee, Avigyan; Biswas, Ashim Kumar; Sinha, Amitabha

    2016-10-01

    Recently, attempts have been made by some researchers to improve the efficiency of quantum dot solar cells by incorporating different types of quantum dots. In this paper, the photocurrent density has been obtained considering the absorption spectra of ideal cubic dots. The effects of quantum dot size dispersion on the spectral response of the intrinsic region of a GaAs-InAs quantum dot solar cell have been studied. The dependence of the spectral response of this region on the size of quantum dots of such solar cell has also been investigated. The investigation shows that for smaller quantum dot size dispersion, the spectral response of the intrinsic region of the cell increases significantly. It is further observed that by enlarging the quantum dot size it is possible to enhance the spectral response of such solar cells as it causes better match between absorption spectra of the quantum dots and the solar spectrum. These facts indicate the significant role of quantum dot size and size dispersion on the performance of such devices. Also, the power conversion efficiency of such solar cell has been studied under 1 sun, AM 1.5 condition.

  7. Aerosol light absorption measurements during the Reno Aerosol Optics Experiment: Photoacoustic measurements and a multiple-scattering model for the aethalometer response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Moosmueller, H.; Sheridan, P. J.; Ogren, J. A.

    2002-12-01

    The filter used on the aethalometer is a multiple scattering substrate, yet the current parameterization of the instrument simply uses Beer's law for its analysis when obtaining black carbon concentration. Specific characterizations of the instrument response, where filter attenuation was obtained as a function of wavelength, gave the following impressions. 1. Filter attenuation generally increases inversely with wavelength for all aerosol types. 2. When subjected to a constant flow of low single scattering albedo aerosol, the instrument shows a non-constant response. The response is highest when the filter single scattering albdeo is highest, and it decreases as the filter blackens. 3. When subjected to a constant flow of essentially unity single scattering albedo aerosol, the instrument shows a non-zero response, even though it should do so. A few percent of scattering is converted to absorption, because the addition of purely scattering aerosol is analogous to a simple thickening of the filter. The effect is more pronounced at shorter wavelengths, and is related to item 1. The multiple scattering model reproduces these behaviors. The photoacoustic instrument light absorption calibration with nitrogen dioxide gas will be presented along with closure data from extinction minus scattering as evaluations of its measurement accuracy.

  8. Noninvasive determination of respiratory ozone absorption: The bolus-response method. Research report, July 1990-September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ultman, J.S.; Ben-Jebria, A.; Hu, S.C.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of the current research was to integrate into a bolus inhalation system capable of noninvasively measuring the longitudinal distribution of O3 absorption in intact human lungs. Ozone uptake was expressed as the amount of O3 absorbed during a single breath relative to the amount in the inhaled bolus. Measurements of ozone uptake were correlated with the penetration volume (Vp) of the bolus into the respiratory tract. During quiet oral breathing, ozone uptake increased smoothly with Vp, with 50% of the inhaled O3 absorbed in the upper airways and the balance absorbed within the lower conducting airways. The effect of increasing the respiratory flow, which occurs when people exercise, was to shift the ozone uptake-Vp distribution distally so that significantly less O3 was absorbed in the upper airways and more reached the respiratory airspaces. Compared with oral breathing, nasal breathing caused a proximal shift in the ozone uptake-Vp distribution to the extent that absorption in the upper airways increased from 50% to 80% flow. The peak O3 concentration of an inhaled bolus did not have a significant effect on the ozone uptake-Vp distributon. This implies that the diffusion and chemical reaction process dictating O3 absorption are linear.

  9. Response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot interferometer to refractive index and absorption changes: modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pluciński, Jerzy; Karpienko, Katarzyna

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes how the refractive index and the absorption of investigated substances change the spectrum of the optical radiation at the output of the fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot interferometer. The modeling of the operation of the interferometer takes into account not only the spectra of the refractive index and the absorption of the medium that is inside the cavity, but also spectra of the refractive indices of the core and the cladding of the optical fiber connected to the interferometer cavity and the parameters of the mirrors forming the cavity. The physical phenomena related to the beam diffraction inside the cavity (i.e. the beam divergence, the curvature of the wavefront, and the phase shift caused by the Gouy effect) are taken into account, too. The spectra obtained from simulations were compared to the spectra registered during measurements. The preliminary results indicate that the fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot interferometer can measure both the refractive index and the absorption of investigated substances with high accuracy.

  10. Insights into Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Study Sites GC955 and WR313 from New Multicomponent and High-Resolution 2D Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, S. S.; Hart, P. E.; Collett, T. S.; Shedd, W. W.; Frye, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition expedition in the Gulf of Mexico, acquiring multicomponent data and high-resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) data at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313). Based on previously collected logging-while-drilling (LWD) borehole data, these gas hydrate study sites are known to include high concentrations of gas hydrate within sand layers. At GC955 our new 2D data reveal at least three features that appear to be fluid-flow pathways (chimneys) responsible for gas migration and thus account for some aspects of the gas hydrate distribution observed in the LWD data. Our new data also show that the main gas hydrate target, a Pleistocene channel/levee complex, has an areal extent of approximately 5.5 square kilometers and that a volume of approximately 3 x 107 cubic meters of this body lies within the gas hydrate stability zone. Based on LWD-inferred values and reasonable assumptions for net sand, sand porosity, and gas hydrate saturation, we estimate a total equivalent gas-in-place volume of approximately 8 x 108 cubic meters for the inferred gas hydrate within the channel/levee deposits. At WR313 we are able to map the thin hydrate-bearing sand layers in considerably greater detail than that provided by previous data. We also can map the evolving and migrating channel feature that persists in this area. Together these data and the emerging results provide valuable new insights into the gas hydrate systems at these two sites.

  11. Imaging cortical absorption, scattering, and hemodynamic response during ischemic stroke using spatially modulated near-infrared illumination

    PubMed Central

    Abookasis, David; Lay, Christopher C.; Mathews, Marlon S.; Linskey, Mark E.; Frostig, Ron D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a technique that uses spatially modulated near-infrared (NIR) illumination to detect and map changes in both optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering parameters) and tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation) during acute ischemic injury in the rat barrel cortex. Cerebral ischemia is induced using an open vascular occlusion technique of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Diffuse reflected NIR light (680 to 980 nm) from the left parietal somatosensory cortex is detected by a CCD camera before and after MCA occlusion. Monte Carlo simulations are used to analyze the spatial frequency dependence of the reflected light to predict spatiotemporal changes in the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering properties in the brain. Experimental results from seven rats show a 17±4.7% increase in tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin and a 45±3.1, 23±5.4, and 21±2.2% decrease in oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation levels, respectively, 45 min following induction of cerebral ischemia. An ischemic index (Iisch=ctHHb/ctO2Hb) reveals an average of more then twofold contrast after MCAo. The wavelength-dependence of the reduced scattering (i.e., scatter power) decreased by 35±10.3% after MCA occlusion. Compared to conventional CCD-based intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI), the use of structured illumination and model-based analysis allows for generation of separate maps of light absorption and scattering properties as well as tissue hemoglobin concentration. This potentially provides a powerful approach for quantitative monitoring and imaging of neurophysiology and metabolism with high spatiotemporal resolution. PMID:19405762

  12. Spatio-seasonal variability of chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption and responses to photobleaching in a large shallow temperate lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Encina Aulló-Maestro, María; Hunter, Peter; Spyrakos, Evangelos; Mercatoris, Pierre; Kovács, Attila; Horváth, Hajnalka; Preston, Tom; Présing, Mátyás; Torres Palenzuela, Jesús; Tyler, Andrew

    2017-03-01

    The development and validation of remote-sensing-based approaches for the retrieval of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) concentrations requires a comprehensive understanding of the sources and magnitude of variability in the optical properties of dissolved material within lakes. In this study, spatial and seasonal variability in concentration and composition of CDOM and the origin of its variation was studied in Lake Balaton (Hungary), a large temperate shallow lake in central Europe. In addition, we investigated the effect of photobleaching on the optical properties of CDOM through in-lake incubation experiments. There was marked variability throughout the year in CDOM absorption in Lake Balaton (aCDOM(440) = 0. 06-9.01 m-1). The highest values were consistently observed at the mouth of the main inflow (Zala River), which drains humic-rich material from the adjoining Kis-Balaton wetland, but CDOM absorption decreased rapidly towards the east where it was consistently lower and less variable than in the westernmost lake basins. The spectral slope parameter for the interval of 350-500 nm (SCDOM(350-500)) was more variable with increasing distance from the inflow (observed range 0.0161-0.0181 nm-1 for the mouth of the main inflow and 0.0158-0.0300 nm-1 for waters closer to the outflow). However, spatial variation in SCDOM was more constant exhibiting a negative correlation with aCDOM(440). Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was strongly positively correlated with aCDOM(440) and followed a similar seasonal trend but it demonstrated more variability than either aCDOM or SCDOM with distance through the system. Photobleaching resulting from a 7-day exposure to natural solar UV radiation resulted in a marked decrease in allochthonous CDOM absorption (7.04 to 3.36 m-1, 42 % decrease). Photodegradation also resulted in an increase in the spectral slope coefficient of dissolved material.

  13. Imaging cortical absorption, scattering, and hemodynamic response during ischemic stroke using spatially modulated near-infrared illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abookasis, David; Lay, Christopher C.; Mathews, Marlon S.; Linskey, Mark E.; Frostig, Ron D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2009-03-01

    We describe a technique that uses spatially modulated near-infrared (NIR) illumination to detect and map changes in both optical properties (absorption and reduced scattering parameters) and tissue composition (oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin, and oxygen saturation) during acute ischemic injury in the rat barrel cortex. Cerebral ischemia is induced using an open vascular occlusion technique of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Diffuse reflected NIR light (680 to 980 nm) from the left parietal somatosensory cortex is detected by a CCD camera before and after MCA occlusion. Monte Carlo simulations are used to analyze the spatial frequency dependence of the reflected light to predict spatiotemporal changes in the distribution of tissue absorption and scattering properties in the brain. Experimental results from seven rats show a 17+/-4.7% increase in tissue concentration of deoxyhemoglobin and a 45+/-3.1, 23+/-5.4, and 21+/-2.2% decrease in oxyhemoglobin, total hemoglobin concentration and cerebral tissue oxygen saturation levels, respectively, 45 min following induction of cerebral ischemia. An ischemic index (Iisch=ctHHb/ctO2Hb) reveals an average of more then twofold contrast after MCAo. The wavelength-dependence of the reduced scattering (i.e., scatter power) decreased by 35+/-10.3% after MCA occlusion. Compared to conventional CCD-based intrinsic signal optical imaging (ISOI), the use of structured illumination and model-based analysis allows for generation of separate maps of light absorption and scattering properties as well as tissue hemoglobin concentration. This potentially provides a powerful approach for quantitative monitoring and imaging of neurophysiology and metabolism with high spatiotemporal resolution.

  14. The spin rates of O stars in WR + O binaries - I. Motivation, methodology, and first results from SALT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shara, Michael M.; Crawford, Steven M.; Vanbeveren, Dany; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Zurek, David; Crause, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The black holes (BH) in merging BH-BH binaries are likely progeny of binary O stars. Their properties, including their spins, will be strongly influenced by the evolution of their progenitor O stars. The remarkable observation that many single O stars spin very rapidly can be explained if they accreted angular momentum from a mass-transferring, O-type or Wolf-Rayet (WR) companion before that star blew up as a supernova. To test this prediction, we have measured the spin rates of eight O stars in WR + O binaries, increasing the total sample size of such O stars' measured spins from 2 to 10. Polarimetric and other determinations of these systems' sin i allow us to determine an average equatorial rotation velocity from He I (He II) lines of ve = 348 (173) km s-1 for these O stars, with individual star's ve from He I (He II) lines ranging from 482 (237) to 290 (91) km s-1. We argue that the ˜100 per cent difference between He I and He II speeds is due to gravity darkening. Supersynchronous spins, now observed in all 10 O stars in WR + O binaries where it has been measured, are strong observational evidence that Roche lobe overflow mass transfer from a WR progenitor companion has played a critical role in the evolution of WR + OB binaries. While theory predicts that this mass transfer rapidly spins up the O-type mass gainer to a nearly breakup rotational velocity of ve ˜ 530 km s-1, the observed average ve of the O-type stars in our sample is 65 per cent of that speed. This demonstrates that, even over the relatively short WR-phase time-scale, tidal and/or other effects causing rotational spin-down must be efficient. A challenge to tidal synchronization theory is that the two longest period binaries in our sample (with periods of 29.7 and 78.5 d) unexpectedly display supersynchronous rotation.

  15. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. I. METHODS AND FIRST RESULTS: 41 NEW WR STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Gerke, Jill; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Villar-Sbaffi, Alfredo; Stanonik, Kathryn; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jgerke@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: alfredovs@hotmail.com E-mail: eartigau@gemini.edu

    2009-08-15

    The discovery of new Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in our Galaxy via large-scale narrowband optical surveys has been severely limited by dust extinction. Recent improvements in infrared technology have made narrowband-broadband imaging surveys viable again. We report a new J, K, and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, spanning 150 degrees in Galactic longitude and reaching 1 degree above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 173 WR star candidates we have discovered 41 new WR stars, 15 of type WN and 26 of type WC. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with K-band spectra, and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. A few of the new WR stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new WR stars is seen to follow that of previously known WR stars along the spiral arms of the Galaxy. Tentative radial velocities were also measured for most of the new WR stars.

  16. Absorbing aerosols over Asia: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2008-11-01

    Forcing by absorbing atmospheric black carbon (BC) tends to heat the atmosphere, cool the surface, and reduce the surface latent and sensible heat fluxes. BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates and the hydrologic cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain concerning the increases in (1) the total amount of all aerosol species and (2) the amount of aerosol absorption that may have occurred over the 1950-1990 period. Focusing on south and east Asia, the sensitivity of a general circulation model's climate response (with prescribed sea surface temperatures and aerosol distributions) to such changes is investigated by considering a range of both aerosol absorption and aerosol extinction optical depth increases. We include direct and semidirect aerosol effects only. Precipitation changes are less sensitive to changes in aerosol absorption optical depth at lower aerosol loadings. At higher-extinction optical depths, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of absorbing aerosols and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation in northwestern India. In contrast, the presence of increases in only scattering aerosols weakens the monsoonal circulation and inhibits precipitation here. Cloud amount changes can enhance or counteract surface solar flux reduction depending on the aerosol loading and absorption, with the changes also influencing the surface temperature and the surface energy balance. The results have implications for aerosol reduction strategies in the future that seek to mitigate air pollution concerns. At higher optical depths, if absorbing aerosol is present, reduction of scattering aerosol alone has a reduced effect on precipitation changes, implying that reductions in BC aerosols should be undertaken at the same time as reductions in sulfate aerosols.

  17. Digestion, absorption and tissue distribution of ovalbumin and palmitoyl-ovalbumin: impact on immune responses triggered by orally administered antigens.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, F M; Dos Santos, E M; Alves, A C; Campana-Pereira, M A; Ramaldes, G A; Cardoso, V N; Ruiz-de-Souza, V; Gontijo, C M

    2007-02-01

    Previous work in this laboratory has demonstrated that ovalbumin coupled to palmitoyl residues (palmitoyl-Ova) does not induce oral tolerance. The present study sought to determine whether this coupling affects digestion, absorption and transfer of antigen. Ova and palmitoyl-Ova were shown to be digested differently in vitro by proteolytic enzymes and presented different tissue distribution kinetics after being labelled with (99m)technetium and orally administered to animals. Palmitoyl-Ova remained longer in the stomach, while native Ova was quickly transferred to the gut and other organs. After 3 h, higher levels of palmitoyl-Ova were found in the blood, Peyer's patches, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver and, especially, the spleen, which appears to be essential for immunization with palmitoyl-Ova. In fact, splenectomized mice treated orally with palmitoyl-Ova became tolerant, while tolerance to Ova was not affected. Thus, palmitoyl coupling was demonstrated to affect antigen digestion, absorption and transport. This is the first time that the spleen has been shown to be required for oral immunization with palmitoyl-Ova.

  18. High Power RF Tests on WR650 Pre-Stressed Planar Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Stirbet, Mircea; Davis, G. Kirk; Elliott, Thomas S.; King, Larry; Powers, Thomas J.; Rimmer, Robert A.; Walker, Richard L.

    2009-11-01

    A new planar, ceramic window intended to be used with WR650 waveguide fundamental power couplers at 1300 MHz or 1500 MHz has been developed. It is based on the pre-stressed planar window concept tested in PEP II and LEDA. A test stand that made use of the 100kW CW 1500 MHz RF system in the JLAB FEL was commissioned and used to apply up to 80 kW traveling wave (TW)to the windows. Two different types of RF windows (brazed and diffusion bonded ceramics) with design specification of 50 kW CW in TW mode were successfully tested both as a gas barrier (intended to operate up to 2 psi) and as a vacuum barrier. The vacuum windows were able to maintain UHV quality vacuum and were successfully operated in the 10{sup -9} mbar range. An overview of the pre-stressed power windows, RF test stand, procedures and RF power testing results will be presented.

  19. Erratum: The 2.27 day period of WR-134 (HD 191765)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccandliss, Stephan R.; Bohannan, Bruce; Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1994-01-01

    The original temporal analysis of a 12 night spectral timeseries of Wolf-Rayet (WR)-134 has been found to be flawed and a re-analysis shows that the line profile variations are indeed periodic. When combined with a 4 night timeseries taken 45 days earlier, a period near 2.27 d is found in periodograms of the He II lambda 5412 line centroid, rms line width, and line skew variations. When the emission line residuals are ordered as a function of phase, a sinuous feature appears to 'snake' about the line center with an amplitude of +/-500 km/s. This is approximately equal to 20 larger than the line centroid amplitude; the calculation of which is heavily weighted by static portions of the line profile. In addition to the 'snake,' emission residuals appear that move away from line center on unbound trajectories and are thought to result from the interaction of a periodic driver with the unstable flow of the radiation driven wind.

  20. Erratum: The 2.27 day period of WR-134 (HD 191765)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, Stephan R.; Bohannan, Bruce; Robert, Carmelle; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    1994-11-01

    The original temporal analysis of a 12 night spectral timeseries of Wolf-Rayet (WR)-134 has been found to be flawed and a re-analysis shows that the line profile variations are indeed periodic. When combined with a 4 night timeseries taken 45 days earlier, a period near 2.27 d is found in periodograms of the He II lambda 5412 line centroid, rms line width, and line skew variations. When the emission line residuals are ordered as a function of phase, a sinuous feature appears to 'snake' about the line center with an amplitude of +/-500 km/s. This is approximately equal to 20 larger than the line centroid amplitude; the calculation of which is heavily weighted by static portions of the line profile. In addition to the 'snake,' emission residuals appear that move away from line center on unbound trajectories and are thought to result from the interaction of a periodic driver with the unstable flow of the radiation driven wind.

  1. Chemical abundances of the WR-ring nebulae NGC 2359 and RCW 78

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, C.; Vilchez, J. M.; Manchado, A.; Edmunds, M. G.

    1989-07-01

    This paper reports on extensive spectroscopic observations of the WR-ring nebulae NGC 2359 and RCW 78, respectively, excited by the WN5 stars HD 56925 and WN8 HD 117688. For the first object, abundances were determined for O/H, Ne/H, N/H, and He/H in many different positions, including the ionized gas in the bubble, inside the optical shell structure, and the outermost zones associated with the S 298 H II region. No significant difference in the N/H and O/H abundances was found over the entire nebula. The O/H and N/H abundances expected are close to those for a normal H II region located at similar distance. In the case of He/H, indication is found of local enhancements which sum to the abundance of metal-rich galactic H II regions like M17. RCW 78 appears to show slight overabundances of He/H and N/H in the two observed positions. The ionizing temperature for the WN central star (HD 56925) of NGC 2359 is determined from the observed H II region spectrum giving a value of 50,000 K, appropriate to its spectral type.

  2. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS REVEAL VERY HIGH X-RAY LUMINOSITY FROM THE CARBON-RICH WOLF-RAYET STAR WR 48a

    SciTech Connect

    Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Gagne, Marc; Skinner, Stephen L. E-mail: mgagne@wcupa.edu

    2011-01-20

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the dusty Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star WR 48a. This is the first detection of this object in X-rays. The XMM-Newton EPIC spectra are heavily absorbed and the presence of numerous strong emission lines indicates a thermal origin of the WR 48a X-ray emission, with dominant temperature components at kT{sub cool} {approx} 1 keV and kT{sub hot} {approx} 3 keV, the hotter component dominating the observed flux. No significant X-ray variability was detected on timescales {<=}1 day. Although the distance to WR 48a is uncertain, if it is physically associated with Open clusters Danks 1 and 2 at d {approx}4 kpc, then the resultant X-ray luminosity L{sub X}{approx} 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1} makes it the most X-ray luminous W-R star in the Galaxy detected so far, after the black hole candidate Cyg X-3. We assume the following scenarios as the most likely explanation for the X-ray properties of WR 48a: (1) colliding stellar winds in a wide WR+O binary system, or in a hierarchical triple system with non-degenerate stellar components and (2) accretion shocks from the WR 48a wind onto a close companion (possibly a neutron star). More specific information about WR 48a and its wind properties will be needed to distinguish between the above possibilities.

  3. Determination of the radioprotective effects of topical applications of MEA, WR-2721, and N-acetylcysteine on murine skin

    SciTech Connect

    Verhey, L.J.; Sedlacek, R.

    1983-01-01

    Topical applications of MEA (beta-mercaptoethylamine or cysteamine), WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)-ethylphosphorothioic acid), and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were tested for their ability to protect the normal skin of the hind legs of mice against acute and late damage from single doses of /sup 137/Cs radiation. No significant protection was observed with either WR-2721 or NAC. MEA was shown to offer significant protection against acute skin damage in both buffered and unbuffered forms, but no significant protection against late contraction. The use of topical MEA on unanesthetized animals breathing carbogen (95% O2, 5% CO2) appears to give an enhanced level of radioprotection over that shown for anesthetized, air-breathing animals.

  4. Beyond the electric-dipole approximation: A formulation and implementation of molecular response theory for the description of absorption of electromagnetic field radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Kauczor, Joanna; Saue, Trond; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Norman, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a formulation of molecular response theory for the description of a quantum mechanical molecular system in the presence of a weak, monochromatic, linearly polarized electromagnetic field without introducing truncated multipolar expansions. The presentation focuses on a description of linear absorption by adopting the energy-loss approach in combination with the complex polarization propagator formulation of response theory. Going beyond the electric-dipole approximation is essential whenever studying electric-dipole-forbidden transitions, and in general, non-dipolar effects become increasingly important when addressing spectroscopies involving higher-energy photons. These two aspects are examined by our study of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of the alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra) as well as the trans-polyenes. In following the series of alkaline earth metals, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed with respect to increasing photon energies and a detailed assessment of results is made in terms of studying the pertinent transition electron densities and in particular their spatial extension in comparison with the photon wavelength. Along the series of trans-polyenes, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed for X-ray spectroscopies on organic molecules with respect to the spatial extension of the chromophore.

  5. Beyond the electric-dipole approximation: A formulation and implementation of molecular response theory for the description of absorption of electromagnetic field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    List, Nanna Holmgaard Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Kauczor, Joanna; Norman, Patrick; Saue, Trond

    2015-06-28

    We present a formulation of molecular response theory for the description of a quantum mechanical molecular system in the presence of a weak, monochromatic, linearly polarized electromagnetic field without introducing truncated multipolar expansions. The presentation focuses on a description of linear absorption by adopting the energy-loss approach in combination with the complex polarization propagator formulation of response theory. Going beyond the electric-dipole approximation is essential whenever studying electric-dipole-forbidden transitions, and in general, non-dipolar effects become increasingly important when addressing spectroscopies involving higher-energy photons. These two aspects are examined by our study of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure of the alkaline earth metals (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, and Ra) as well as the trans-polyenes. In following the series of alkaline earth metals, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed with respect to increasing photon energies and a detailed assessment of results is made in terms of studying the pertinent transition electron densities and in particular their spatial extension in comparison with the photon wavelength. Along the series of trans-polyenes, the sizes of non-dipolar effects are probed for X-ray spectroscopies on organic molecules with respect to the spatial extension of the chromophore.

  6. Proof of principle of a high-spatial-resolution, resonant-response γ-ray detector for Gamma Resonance Absorption in 14N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandis, M.; Goldberg, M. B.; Vartsky, D.; Friedman, E.; Kreslo, I.; Mardor, I.; Dangendorf, V.; Levi, S.; Mor, I.; Bar, D.

    2011-02-01

    The development of a mm-spatial-resolution, resonant-response detector based on a micrometric glass capillary array filled with liquid scintillator is described. This detector was developed for Gamma Resonance Absorption (GRA) in 14N. GRA is an automatic-decision radiographic screening technique that combines high radiation penetration (the probe is a 9.17 MeV γ-ray) with very good sensitivity and specificity to nitrogenous explosives. Detailed simulation of the detector response to electrons and protons generated by the 9.17 MeV γ-rays was followed by a proof-of-principle experiment, using a mixed γ-ray and neutron source. Towards this, a prototype capillary detector was assembled, including the associated filling and readout systems. Simulations and experimental results indeed show that proton tracks are distinguishable from electron tracks at relevant energies, based on a criterion that combines track length and light intensity per unit length.

  7. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR238605 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Rats. Volume 2 of 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-18

    NN Normocytic & Normochromic 15. TG Target Cells 16. LP Large Platelets 17. CP Clumped Platelets 18. RF Rouleaux Formation 19. NRC Normal Red...SUB-GROUP 18. SUBJECT TERMS {Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) WR 238605 Hemolytic Toxicology anemia Antimala rial 9...in mid and high dose animals, but was reversible. Microscopic lesions in the spleen, kidney, and bone marrow were secondary to mild hemolytic anemia

  8. Organ-specific gene expression in maize: The P-wr allele. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, T.A.

    1997-06-01

    The ultimate aim of our work is to understand how a regulatory gene produces a specific pattern of gene expression during plant development. Our model is the P-wr gene of maize, which produces a distinctive pattern of pigmentation of maize floral organs. We are investigating this system using a combination of classical genetic and molecular approaches. Mechanisms of organ-specific gene expression are a subject of intense research interest, as it is the operation of these mechanisms during eukaryotic development which determine the characteristics of each organism Allele-specific expression has been characterized in only a few other plant genes. In maize, organ-specific pigmentation regulated by the R, B, and Pl genes is achieved by differential transcription of functionally conserved protein coding sequences. Our studies point to a strikingly different mechanism of organ-specific gene expression, involving post-transcriptional regulation of the regulatory P gene. The novel pigmentation pattern of the P-wr allele is associated with differences in the encoded protein. Furthermore, the P-wr gene itself is present as a unique tandemly amplified structure, which may affect its transcriptional regulation.

  9. Electronic excited states responsible for dimer formation upon UV absorption directly by thymine strands: joint experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Banyasz, Akos; Douki, Thierry; Improta, Roberto; Gustavsson, Thomas; Onidas, Delphine; Vayá, Ignacio; Perron, Marion; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2012-09-12

    The study addresses interconnected issues related to two major types of cycloadditions between adjacent thymines in DNA leading to cyclobutane dimers (T<>Ts) and (6-4) adducts. Experimental results are obtained for the single strand (dT)(20) by steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy, as well as by HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. Calculations are carried out for the dinucleoside monophosphate in water using the TD-M052X method and including the polarizable continuum model; the reliability of TD-M052X is checked against CASPT2 calculations regarding the behavior of two stacked thymines in the gas phase. It is shown that irradiation at the main absorption band leads to cyclobutane dimers (T<>Ts) and (6-4) adducts via different electronic excited states. T<>Ts are formed via (1)ππ* excitons; [2 + 2] dimerization proceeds along a barrierless path, in line with the constant quantum yield (0.05) with the irradiation wavelength, the contribution of the (3)ππ* state to this reaction being less than 10%. The formation of oxetane, the reaction intermediate leading to (6-4) adducts, occurs via charge transfer excited states involving two stacked thymines, whose fingerprint is detected in the fluorescence spectra; it involves an energy barrier explaining the important decrease in the quantum yield of (6-4) adducts with the irradiation wavelength.

  10. Neutrino jets from high-mass WR gauge bosons in TeV-scale left-right symmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Manimala; Ruiz, Richard; Scott, Darren J.; Spannowsky, Michael

    2016-11-01

    We reexamine the discovery potential at hadron colliders of high-mass right-handed (RH) gauge bosons WR—an inherent ingredient of left-right symmetric models (LRSM). We focus on the regime where the WR is very heavy compared to the heavy Majorana neutrino N , and we investigate an alternative signature for WR→N decays. The produced neutrinos are highly boosted in this mass regime. Subsequently, their decays via off-shell WR bosons to jets, i.e., N →ℓ±jj, are highly collimated, forming a single neutrino jet (jN). The final-state collider signature is then ℓ±jN, instead of the widely studied ℓ±ℓ±j j . Present search strategies are not sensitive to this hierarchical mass regime due to the breakdown of the collider signature definition. We take into account QCD corrections beyond next-to-leading order (NLO) that are important for high-mass Drell-Yan processes at the 13 TeV Large Hadron Collider (LHC). For the first time, we evaluate WR production at NLO with threshold resummation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithm (NNLL) matched to the threshold-improved parton distributions. With these improvements, we find that a WR of mass MWR=3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and mass ratio of (mN/MWR)<0.1 can be discovered with a 5 - 6 σ statistical significance at 13 TeV after 10 (100 )[2000 ] fb-1 of data. Extending the analysis to the hypothetical 100 TeV Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC), 5 σ can be obtained for WR masses up to MW R=15 (30 ) with approximately 100 fb-1 (10 ab-1 ). Conversely, with 0.9 (10 )[150 ] fb-1 of 13 TeV data, MWR<3 (4 )[5 ] TeV and (mN/MWR)<0.1 can be excluded at 95% C.L.; with 100 fb-1 (2.5 ab-1 ) of 100 TeV data, MW R<22 (33 ) TeV can be excluded.

  11. Effects of S-2-(3-Methylaminopropylamino)ethyl Phosphorothioic Acid (WR- 3689), Alone or Combined with Caffeine, on Catecholamine Content of Mouse Hypothalamus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    phosphorothioate. the aminothiol compound re- the combined treatment group were higher than the sembles cysteamine . In fact, it has been proposed that WR...differences can be metabolized to cysteamine by various polvam- were not statistically significant. ine. diamine. or monoamine oxidases (42). Unlike...phosphorothioates, cysteamine has no problem crossing Discussion the BBB (39) and is known to have a number of The results of this study indicate that WR

  12. Rapid response of leaf photosynthesis in two fern species Pteridium aquilinum and Thelypteris dentata to changes in CO2 measured by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Keisuke; Kodama, Naomi; Yonemura, Seiichiro; Hanba, Yuko T

    2015-09-01

    We investigated stomatal conductance (g(s)) and mesophyll conductance (g(m)) in response to atmospheric CO2 concentration [CO2] in two primitive land plants, the fern species Pteridium aquilinum and Thelypteris dentata, using the concurrent measurement of leaf gas exchange and carbon isotope discrimination. [CO2] was initially decreased from 400 to 200 μmol mol(-1), and then increased from 200 to 700 μmol mol(-1), and finally decreased from 700 to 400 μmol mol(-1). Analysis by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) revealed a rapid and continuous response in g m within a few minutes. In most cases, both ferns showed rapid and significant responses of g m to changes in [CO2]. The largest changes (quote % decrease) were obtained when [CO2] was decreased from 400 to 200 μmol mol(-1). This is in contrast to angiosperms where an increase in g(m) is commonly observed at low [CO2]. Similarly, fern species observed little or no response of g(s) to changes in [CO2] whereas, a concomitant decline of g(m) and g(s) with [CO2] is often reported in angiosperms. Together, these results suggest that regulation of g(m) to [CO2] may differ between angiosperms and ferns.

  13. Multiphoton transition moments and absorption cross sections in coupled cluster response theory employing variational transition moment functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hättig, Christof; Christiansen, Ove; Jørgensen, Poul

    1998-05-01

    Based on an analysis of the first residues of coupled cluster response functions we devise variational functionals from which the transition moments for n-photon excitations can be calculated as nth derivatives. Combining these functionals with variational perturbation theory, we obtain a new approach for the derivation of multiphoton transition moments which allows us to utilize the full strengths of variational perturbation theory without the roundabout way via residues of response functions. Coupled cluster multiphoton transition moments derived by this approach are formally equivalent to the one identified from the first residues of the ground state response functions. The introduction of the variational functionals makes the mathematical structure of the transition moments more transparent and provides an interpretation of intermediates in terms of responses of excited state vectors and Lagrangian multipliers. 2n+1 and 2n+2 rules are formulated for the transition moments and build the basis for a straightforward derivation of a computational efficient formulation. The strength of the new approach is demonstrated by the derivation of three- and four-photon transition moments.

  14. A NEAR-INFRARED SURVEY OF THE INNER GALACTIC PLANE FOR WOLF-RAYET STARS. II. GOING FAINTER: 71 MORE NEW W-R STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shara, Michael M.; Faherty, Jacqueline K.; Zurek, David; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Doyon, Rene; Gerke, Jill; Artigau, Etienne; Drissen, Laurent E-mail: jfaherty@amnh.org E-mail: moffat@astro.umontreal.ca E-mail: gerke@astronomy.ohio-state.edu E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.ca

    2012-06-15

    We are continuing a J, K and narrowband imaging survey of 300 deg{sup 2} of the plane of the Galaxy, searching for new Wolf-Rayet (W-R) stars. Our survey spans 150 Degree-Sign in Galactic longitude and reaches 1 Degree-Sign above and below the Galactic plane. The survey has a useful limiting magnitude of K = 15 over most of the observed Galactic plane, and K = 14 (due to severe crowding) within a few degrees of the Galactic center. Thousands of emission-line candidates have been detected. In spectrographic follow-ups of 146 relatively bright W-R star candidates, we have re-examined 11 previously known WC and WN stars and discovered 71 new W-R stars, 17 of type WN and 54 of type WC. Our latest image analysis pipeline now picks out W-R stars with a 57% success rate. Star subtype assignments have been confirmed with the K-band spectra and distances approximated using the method of spectroscopic parallax. Some of the new W-R stars are among the most distant known in our Galaxy. The distribution of these new W-R stars is beginning to trace the locations of massive stars along the distant spiral arms of the Milky Way.

  15. Differences in Copper Absorption and Accumulation between Copper-Exclusion and Copper-Enrichment Plants: A Comparison of Structure and Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Xishi; Li, Shuhuan; Guo, Pan; Shen, Zhenguo; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Yahua

    2015-01-01

    Differences in copper (Cu) absorption and transport, physiological responses and structural characteristics between two types of Cu-resistant plants, Oenothera glazioviana (Cu-exclusion type) and Elsholtzia haichowensis (Cu-enrichment type), were investigated in the present study. The results indicated the following: (1) After 50 μM Cu treatment, the Cu ratio in the xylem vessels of E. haichowensis increased by 60%. A Cu adsorption experiment indicated that O. glazioviana exhibited greater resistance to Cu, and Cu absorption and the shoot/root ratio of Cu were significantly lower in O. glazioviana than in E. haichowensis. (2) An analysis of the endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) variance and exogenous ABA treatment demonstrated that the ABA levels of both plants did not differ; exogenous ABA treatment clearly reduced Cu accumulation in both plants. (3) The leaf stomatal density of O. glazioviana was significantly less than that of E. haichowensis. Guard cells in E. haichowensis plants were covered with a thick cuticle layer, the epidermal hair was more numerous and longer, and the number of xylem conduits in the root was small. (4) The transpiration rate and the stomatal conductance of O. glazioviana were both significantly lower than those of E. haichowensis, regardless of whether the plants were treated with Cu. Taken together, these results indicate that the differences in the structural characteristics between these two plant species, particularly in the characteristics related to plant transpiration, are important factors that govern whether plants acquire or exclude Cu. PMID:26207743

  16. Photothermal response of CVD synthesized carbon (nano)spheres/aqueous nanofluids for potential application in direct solar absorption collectors: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Shah, Monaliben; Laava, Iafeta; Fawcett, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Direct-absorption solar collectors have the potential to offer an unlimited source of renewable energy with minimal environmental impact. Unfortunately, their performance is limited by the absorption efficiency of the working fluid. Nanoparticles of functionalized carbon nanospheres (CNS) have the potential to improve the photothermal properties of the working fluid. CNS are produced by the pyrolysis of acetylene gas in a tube-based electric furnace/chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The reaction takes place at 1000°C in the presence of nitrogen gas without the use of a catalyst. The synthesized CNS were examined and characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and ultraviolet-visible analysis. The CNS powders with a mean particle size of 210 nm were then functionalized using tetraethylammonium hydroxide ([C2H5]4 N[OH]) and used to produce a series of aqueous nanofluids with varying mass content. The photothermal response of both the nanofluids and films composed of CNS were investigated under 1000 W/m(2) solar irradiation.

  17. Photothermal response of CVD synthesized carbon (nano)spheres/aqueous nanofluids for potential application in direct solar absorption collectors: a preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Brundavanam, Sridevi; Shah, Monaliben; Laava, Iafeta; Fawcett, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Direct-absorption solar collectors have the potential to offer an unlimited source of renewable energy with minimal environmental impact. Unfortunately, their performance is limited by the absorption efficiency of the working fluid. Nanoparticles of functionalized carbon nanospheres (CNS) have the potential to improve the photothermal properties of the working fluid. CNS are produced by the pyrolysis of acetylene gas in a tube-based electric furnace/chemical vapor deposition apparatus. The reaction takes place at 1000°C in the presence of nitrogen gas without the use of a catalyst. The synthesized CNS were examined and characterized using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and ultraviolet-visible analysis. The CNS powders with a mean particle size of 210 nm were then functionalized using tetraethylammonium hydroxide ([C2H5]4 N[OH]) and used to produce a series of aqueous nanofluids with varying mass content. The photothermal response of both the nanofluids and films composed of CNS were investigated under 1000 W/m2 solar irradiation. PMID:24198496

  18. Differences in Copper Absorption and Accumulation between Copper-Exclusion and Copper-Enrichment Plants: A Comparison of Structure and Physiological Responses.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lei; Chen, Chen; Wang, Bin; Zhou, Xishi; Li, Shuhuan; Guo, Pan; Shen, Zhenguo; Wang, Guiping; Chen, Yahua

    2015-01-01

    Differences in copper (Cu) absorption and transport, physiological responses and structural characteristics between two types of Cu-resistant plants, Oenothera glazioviana (Cu-exclusion type) and Elsholtzia haichowensis (Cu-enrichment type), were investigated in the present study. The results indicated the following: (1) After 50 μM Cu treatment, the Cu ratio in the xylem vessels of E. haichowensis increased by 60%. A Cu adsorption experiment indicated that O. glazioviana exhibited greater resistance to Cu, and Cu absorption and the shoot/root ratio of Cu were significantly lower in O. glazioviana than in E. haichowensis. (2) An analysis of the endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) variance and exogenous ABA treatment demonstrated that the ABA levels of both plants did not differ; exogenous ABA treatment clearly reduced Cu accumulation in both plants. (3) The leaf stomatal density of O. glazioviana was significantly less than that of E. haichowensis. Guard cells in E. haichowensis plants were covered with a thick cuticle layer, the epidermal hair was more numerous and longer, and the number of xylem conduits in the root was small. (4) The transpiration rate and the stomatal conductance of O. glazioviana were both significantly lower than those of E. haichowensis, regardless of whether the plants were treated with Cu. Taken together, these results indicate that the differences in the structural characteristics between these two plant species, particularly in the characteristics related to plant transpiration, are important factors that govern whether plants acquire or exclude Cu.

  19. Fast time response measurements of gaseous nitrous acid using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer: HONO emission source from vehicle exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongquan Q.; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2008-02-01

    We present the measurement of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer. This method utilizes one strong absorption feature at 1713.511cm-1, which is free of interference and suitable for ambient HONO measurements. The detection limit for a 1-second integration time is determined to be better than 200 pptv. The measurement method has been demonstrated by sampling room air over an 11-day period. HONO mixing ratios ranged from below the detection limit (<=200 pptv) to 4.8 ppbv, with a mean value of 0.73 ppbv. A number of elevated HONO events lasting from several seconds up to hours were observed and have been associated with roadway traffic adjacent to the building where the measurements were performed. The variation in the ratio of HONO/NOx and its anti-correlation with ambient NOx measurements indicate that the source of HONO in this measurement study is mainly from the direct emission of traffic exhausts and local heterogeneous reactions. The demonstrated application of TDLAS fast response measurement technology is capable of providing new information on the sources and sinks of HONO in the environment.

  20. Characterizing the constitutive response and energy absorption of rigid polymeric foams subjected to intermediate-velocity impact

    SciTech Connect

    Koohbor, Behrad; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2016-06-27

    As an optimum energy-absorbing material system, polymeric foams are needed to dissipate the kinetic energy of an impact, while maintaining the impact force transferred to the protected object at a low level. As a result, it is crucial to accurately characterize the load bearing and energy dissipation performance of foams at high strain rate loading conditions. There are certain challenges faced in the accurate measurement of the deformation response of foams due to their low mechanical impedance. In the present work, a non-parametric method is successfully implemented to enable the accurate assessment of the compressive constitutive response of rigid polymeric foams subjected to impact loading conditions. The method is based on stereovision high speed photography in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation, and allows for accurate evaluation of inertia stresses developed within the specimen during deformation time. In conclusion, full-field distributions of stress, strain and strain rate are used to extract the local constitutive response of the material at any given location along the specimen axis. In addition, the effective energy absorbed by the material is calculated. Finally, results obtained from the proposed non-parametric analysis are compared with data obtained from conventional test procedures.

  1. Characterizing the constitutive response and energy absorption of rigid polymeric foams subjected to intermediate-velocity impact

    DOE PAGES

    Koohbor, Behrad; Kidane, Addis; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2016-06-27

    As an optimum energy-absorbing material system, polymeric foams are needed to dissipate the kinetic energy of an impact, while maintaining the impact force transferred to the protected object at a low level. As a result, it is crucial to accurately characterize the load bearing and energy dissipation performance of foams at high strain rate loading conditions. There are certain challenges faced in the accurate measurement of the deformation response of foams due to their low mechanical impedance. In the present work, a non-parametric method is successfully implemented to enable the accurate assessment of the compressive constitutive response of rigid polymericmore » foams subjected to impact loading conditions. The method is based on stereovision high speed photography in conjunction with 3D digital image correlation, and allows for accurate evaluation of inertia stresses developed within the specimen during deformation time. In conclusion, full-field distributions of stress, strain and strain rate are used to extract the local constitutive response of the material at any given location along the specimen axis. In addition, the effective energy absorbed by the material is calculated. Finally, results obtained from the proposed non-parametric analysis are compared with data obtained from conventional test procedures.« less

  2. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  3. Using historical woodland creation to construct a long-term, large-scale natural experiment: the WrEN project.

    PubMed

    Watts, Kevin; Fuentes-Montemayor, Elisa; Macgregor, Nicholas A; Peredo-Alvarez, Victor; Ferryman, Mark; Bellamy, Chloe; Brown, Nigel; Park, Kirsty J

    2016-05-01

    Natural experiments have been proposed as a way of complementing manipulative experiments to improve ecological understanding and guide management. There is a pressing need for evidence from such studies to inform a shift to landscape-scale conservation, including the design of ecological networks. Although this shift has been widely embraced by conservation communities worldwide, the empirical evidence is limited and equivocal, and may be limiting effective conservation. We present principles for well-designed natural experiments to inform landscape-scale conservation and outline how they are being applied in the WrEN project, which is studying the effects of 160 years of woodland creation on biodiversity in UK landscapes. We describe the study areas and outline the systematic process used to select suitable historical woodland creation sites based on key site- and landscape-scale variables - including size, age, and proximity to other woodland. We present the results of an analysis to explore variation in these variables across sites to test their suitability as a basis for a natural experiment. Our results confirm that this landscape satisfies the principles we have identified and provides an ideal study system for a long-term, large-scale natural experiment to explore how woodland biodiversity is affected by different site and landscape attributes. The WrEN sites are now being surveyed for a wide selection of species that are likely to respond differently to site- and landscape-scale attributes and at different spatial and temporal scales. The results from WrEN will help develop detailed recommendations to guide landscape-scale conservation, including the design of ecological networks. We also believe that the approach presented demonstrates the wider utility of well-designed natural experiments to improve our understanding of ecological systems and inform policy and practice.

  4. Fotometría CCD de dos cúmulos abiertos con estrellas WR: NGC 6231 y TR 27

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baume, G.; Vázquez, R. A.; Feinstein, A.

    Se ha realizado fotometría CCD en los filtros UBVI del sistema de Cousins en las zonas de los cúmulos abiertos NGC 6231 y Trumpler 27, llegando hasta aproximadamente magnitud V=19. Ambos objetos presentan estrellas WR en su proximidad. Se ha re-determinado el Eb-v en esas direcciones, asi como la distancia a la que se encontrarían los cúmulos y sus edades por medio de un ajuste de la ZAMS y de un conjunto de isocronas respectivamente.

  5. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  6. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows.

  7. Changes in bile acids, FGF-19 and sterol absorption in response to bile salt hydrolase active L. reuteri NCIMB 30242

    PubMed Central

    Martoni, Christopher J; Labbé, Alain; Ganopolsky, Jorge G; Prakash, Satya; Jones, Mitchell L

    2015-01-01

    The size and composition of the circulating bile acid (BA) pool are important factors in regulating the human gut microbiota. Disrupted regulation of BA metabolism is implicated in several chronic diseases. Bile salt hydrolase (BSH)-active Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 30242, previously shown to decrease LDL-cholesterol and increase circulating BA, was investigated for its dose response effect on BA profile in a pilot clinical study. Ten otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic adults, recruited from a clinical trial site in London, ON, were randomized to consume delayed release or standard release capsules containing L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 in escalating dose over 4 weeks. In another aspect, 4 healthy normocholesterolemic subjects with LDL-C below 3.4 mmol/l received delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 at a constant dose over 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was the change in plasma BA profile over the intervention period. Additional outcomes included circulating fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-19, plant sterols and LDL-cholesterol as well as fecal microbiota and bsh gene presence. After one week of intervention subjects receiving delayed release L. reuteri NCIMB 30242 increased total BA by 1.13 ± 0.67 μmol/l (P = 0.02), conjugated BA by 0.67 ± 0.39 μmol/l (P = 0.02) and unconjugated BA by 0.46 ± 0.43 μmol/l (P = 0.07), which represented a greater than 2-fold change relative to baseline. Increases in BA were largely maintained post-week 1 and were generally correlated with FGF-19 and inversely correlated with plant sterols. This is the first clinical support showing that a BSH-active probiotic can significantly and rapidly influence BA metabolism and may prove useful in chronic diseases beyond hypercholesterolemia. PMID:25612224

  8. Multiple response optimization for Cu, Fe and Pb determination in naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with sample injection as detergent emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, Daniel M.; Lima, Claudio F.; Robaina, Nicolle F.; Fonseca, Teresa Cristina O.; Cassella, Ricardo J.

    2011-05-01

    The present paper reports the optimization for Cu, Fe and Pb determination in naphtha by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) employing a strategy based on the injection of the samples as detergent emulsions. The method was optimized in relation to the experimental conditions for the emulsion formation and taking into account that the three analytes (Cu, Fe and Pb) should be measured in the same emulsion. The optimization was performed in a multivariate way by employing a three-variable Doehlert design and a multiple response strategy. For this purpose, the individual responses of the three analytes were combined, yielding a global response that was employed as a dependent variable. The three factors related to the optimization process were: the concentration of HNO 3, the concentration of the emulsifier agent (Triton X-100 or Triton X-114) in aqueous solution used to emulsify the sample and the volume of solution. At optimum conditions, it was possible to obtain satisfactory results with an emulsion formed by mixing 4 mL of the samples with 1 mL of a 4.7% w/v Triton X-100 solution prepared in 10% v/v HNO 3 medium. The resulting emulsion was stable for 250 min, at least, and provided enough sensitivity to determine the three analytes in the five samples tested. A recovery test was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the optimized procedure and recovery rates, in the range of 88-105%; 94-118% and 95-120%, were verified for Cu, Fe and Pb, respectively.

  9. Four-Component Damped Density Functional Response Theory Study of UV/Vis Absorption Spectra and Phosphorescence Parameters of Group 12 Metal-Substituted Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Saue, Trond; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    The influences of group 12 (Zn, Cd, Hg) metal-substitution on the valence spectra and phosphorescence parameters of porphyrins (P) have been investigated in a relativistic setting. In order to obtain valence spectra, this study reports the first application of the damped linear response function, or complex polarization propagator, in the four-component density functional theory framework [as formulated in Villaume et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2010 , 133 , 064105 ]. It is shown that the steep increase in the density of states as due to the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling yields only minor changes in overall computational costs involved with the solution of the set of linear response equations. Comparing single-frequency to multifrequency spectral calculations, it is noted that the number of iterations in the iterative linear equation solver per frequency grid-point decreases monotonously from 30 to 0.74 as the number of frequency points goes from one to 19. The main heavy-atom effect on the UV/vis-absorption spectra is indirect and attributed to the change of point group symmetry due to metal-substitution, and it is noted that substitutions using heavier atoms yield small red-shifts of the intense Soret-band. Concerning phosphorescence parameters, the adoption of a four-component relativistic setting enables the calculation of such properties at a linear order of response theory, and any higher-order response functions do not need to be considered-a real, conventional, form of linear response theory has been used for the calculation of these parameters. For the substituted porphyrins, electronic coupling between the lowest triplet states is strong and results in theoretical estimates of lifetimes that are sensitive to the wave function and electron density parametrization. With this in mind, we report our best estimates of the phosphorescence lifetimes to be 460, 13.8, 11.2, and 0.00155 s for H2P, ZnP, CdP, and HgP, respectively, with the corresponding transition

  10. MAGIICAT III. Interpreting Self-similarity of the Circumgalactic Medium with Virial Mass Using Mg II Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher W.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Kacprzak, Glenn G.

    2013-12-01

    In Churchill et al., we used halo abundance matching applied to 182 galaxies in the Mg II Absorber-Galaxy Catalog (MAGIICAT) and showed that the mean Mg II λ2796 equivalent width follows a tight inverse-square power law, Wr (2796)vprop(D/R vir)-2, with projected location relative to the galaxy virial radius and that the Mg II absorption covering fraction is effectively invariant with galaxy virial mass, M h, over the range 10.7 <= log M h/M ⊙ <= 13.9. In this work, we explore multivariate relationships between Wr (2796), virial mass, impact parameter, virial radius, and the theoretical cooling radius that further elucidate self-similarity in the cool/warm (T = 104-104.5 K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) with virial mass. We show that virial mass determines the extent and strength of the Mg II absorbing gas such that the mean Wr (2796) increases with virial mass at fixed distance while decreasing with galactocentric distance for fixed virial mass. The majority of the absorbing gas resides within D ~= 0.3 R vir, independent of both virial mass and minimum absorption threshold; inside this region, and perhaps also in the region 0.3 < D/R vir <= 1, the mean Wr (2796) is independent of virial mass. Contrary to absorber-galaxy cross-correlation studies, we show there is no anti-correlation between Wr (2796) and virial mass. We discuss how simulations and theory constrained by observations support self-similarity of the cool/warm CGM via the physics governing star formation, gas-phase metal enrichment, recycling efficiency of galactic scale winds, filament and merger accretion, and overdensity of local environment as a function of virial mass.

  11. Differences in the effects of turns and constrictions on the resistive response in current-biased superconducting wire after single photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotova, A. N.; Y Vodolazov, D.

    2013-07-01

    We study how turns and constrictions affect the resistive response of superconducting wire after instantaneous, localized heating, by modeling the absorption of a single photon by the wire. We find that the presence of constrictions favors the detection of photons with a range of energies whereas the presence of turns increases the ability to detect only relatively ‘low’ energy photons. The main reason is that in the case of a constriction the current density is increased over the whole length and width of the constriction while in the case of a turn the current density is enhanced only near the inner corner of the turn. This results in inhomogeneous Joule heating near the turn and worsens the conditions for the appearance of the normal domain at relatively small currents, where the ‘high’ energy photons could already create a normal domain in the straight part of the wire. We also find that the amplitude of the voltage pulse depends on the location at which the photon is absorbed, being smallest when the photon is absorbed near the turn and largest when the photon is absorbed near the constriction. This effect is due to the difference in the resistance of constrictions and turns in the normal state from the resistance of the rest of the wire.

  12. Narrow absorption lines with two observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Cao, Yue

    2015-07-01

    We assemble 3524 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with repeated observations to search for variations of the narrow C IV λ λ 1548,1551 and Mg II λ λ 2796,2803 absorption doublets in spectral regions shortward of 7000 Å in the observed frame, which corresponds to time-scales of about 150-2643 d in the quasar rest frame. In these quasar spectra, we detect 3580 C IV absorption systems with zabs = 1.5188-3.5212 and 1809 Mg II absorption systems with zabs = 0.3948-1.7167. In term of the absorber velocity (β) distribution in the quasar rest frame, we find a substantial number of C IV absorbers with β < 0.06, which might be connected to absorption of quasar outflows. The outflow absorption peaks at υ ≈ 2000 km s^{-1} and drops rapidly below this peak value. Among 3580 C IV absorption systems, 52 systems (˜1.5 per cent) show obvious variations in equivalent widths in the absorber rest frame (Wr): 16 enhanced, 16 emerged, 12 weakened and 8 disappeared systems, respectively. We find that changes in Wrλ1548 are related neither to the time-scales of the two SDSS observations nor to absorber velocities in the quasar rest frame. Variable absorption in low-ionization species is important to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbing gas. There are two variable Mg II absorption systems measured from SDSS spectra detected by Hacker et al. However, in our Mg II absorption sample, we find that neither shows variable absorption with confident levels of >4σ for λ2796 lines and >3σ for λ2803 lines.

  13. [Protective effects of WR2721 on early bone marrow hematopoietic function in mice exposed to 6.5 Gy of (60)Co γ-rays].

    PubMed

    Deng, Zi-Liang; Zhang, Liu-Zhen; Cong, Yue; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Yu, Zu-Ying; Shan, Ya-Jun; Cui, Yu; Wang, Li-Mei; Xing, Shuang; Cong, Yu-Wen; Luo, Qing-Liang

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of WR2721(amifostine) against bone marrow hematopoietic damage of mice exposed to 6.5 Gy of (60)Co-γ ray. A total of 60 C57/BL6J mice was divided into 3 groups:normal group (mice were injected with physiological salt solution), irradiation group (mice were injected with physiologic salt solution before irradiation) and WR2721 group (mice were injected with WR2721 before irradiation). The WBC, neutrophil (Neut), Plt and RBC levels in peripheral blood of 3 group mice were counted within 60 days after irradiation; the bone marrow nuclear cells (BMNC) were counted at 2 and 24 hours after irradiation; the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (LK/LSK) level and colony formation capability were detected by flow cytometry at 2 and 24 hours after irradiation. The results indicated that the counts of WBC and neut at 4 and 18 days, Plt at 7-18 days and RBC at 10-30 day after irradiation in WR2721 group were higher than those in irradiation group (P < 0.05); the BMNC, LSK and LK levels obviously increased at 24 hours after irradiation (P < 0.05), the CFU-GEMM, CFU-GM, CFU-MK BFU-E and CFU-E all significantly increased at 2 and 24 hours after irradiation (P < 0.01), as compared with irradiation group. It is concluded that WR2721 can effectively alleviate early hematopoietic damage and promote the fast recovery of peripheral blood cells in mice exposed to γ-ray, suggesting that the WR2721 has significant radioprotective effect on hematopoietic system.

  14. Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion of Cranberry (Poly)phenols in Humans: A Dose Response Study and Assessment of Inter-Individual Variability

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P.; Mills, Charlotte E.; Istas, Geoffrey; Heiss, Christian; Rodriguez-Mateos, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial health effects of cranberries have been attributed to their (poly)phenol content. Recent studies have investigated the absorption, metabolism and excretion of cranberry (poly)phenols; however, little is known about whether they follow a dose response in vivo at different levels of intake. An acute double-blind randomized controlled trial in 10 healthy men with cranberry juices containing 409, 787, 1238, 1534 and 1910 mg total (poly)phenols was performed. Blood and urine were analyzed by UPLC-Q-TOF-MS. Sixty metabolites were identified in plasma and urine including cinnamic acids, dihydrocinnamic, flavonols, benzoic acids, phenylacetic acids, benzaldehydes, valerolactones, hippuric acids, catechols, and pyrogallols. Total plasma, but not excreted urinary (poly)phenol metabolites, exhibited a linear dose response (r2 = 0.74, p < 0.05), driven by caffeic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, quercetin-3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, ferulic acid 4-O-ß-d-glucuronide, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid 3-O-ß-d-glucuronide, sinapic acid, ferulic acid 4-O-sulfate, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid-4-O-sulfate, (4R)-5-(3′-hydroxyphenyl)-γ-valerolactone-4′-O-sulfate, 4-methylgallic acid-3-O-sulfate, and isoferulic acid 3-O-sulfate (all r2 ≥ 0.89, p < 0.05). Inter-individual variability of the plasma metabolite concentration was broad and dependent on the metabolite. Herein, we show that specific plasma (poly)phenol metabolites are linearly related to the amount of (poly)phenols consumed in cranberry juice. The large inter-individual variation in metabolite profile may be due to variations in the gut microbiome. PMID:28287476

  15. Transcriptional analysis of porcine intestinal mucosa infected with Salmonella Typhimurium revealed a massive inflammatory response and disruption of bile acid absorption in ileum.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Juber Herrera; Collado-Romero, Melania; Zaldívar-López, Sara; Arce, Cristina; Bautista, Rocío; Carvajal, Ana; Cirera, Susanna; Claros, M Gonzalo; Garrido, Juan J

    2016-01-07

    Infected pork meat is an important source of non-typhoidal human salmonellosis. Understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis is important for the development of therapeutic and preventive strategies. Thus, hereby we study the transcriptional profiles along the porcine intestine during infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as post-transcriptional gene modulation by microRNAs (miRNA). Sixteen piglets were orally challenged with S. Typhimurium. Samples from jejunum, ileum and colon, collected 1, 2 and 6 days post infection (dpi) were hybridized to mRNA and miRNA expression microarrays and analyzed. Jejunum showed a reduced transcriptional response indicating mild inflammation only at 2 dpi. In ileum inflammatory genes were overexpressed (e.g., IL-1B, IL-6, IL-8, IL1RAP, TNFα), indicating a strong immune response at all times of infection. Infection also down-regulated genes of the FXR pathway (e.g., NR1H4, FABP6, APOA1, SLC10A2), indicating disruption of the bile acid absorption in ileum. This result was confirmed by decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in serum of infected pigs. Ileal inflammatory gene expression changes peaked at 2 dpi and tended to resolve at 6 dpi. Furthermore, miRNA analysis of ileum at 2 dpi revealed 62 miRNAs potentially regulating target genes involved in this inflammatory process (e.g., miR-374 and miR-451). In colon, genes involved in epithelial adherence, proliferation and cellular reorganization were down-regulated at 2 and 6 dpi. In summary, here we show the transcriptional changes occurring at the intestine at different time points of the infection, which are mainly related to inflammation and disruption of the bile acid metabolism.

  16. Using the orbiting companion to trace WR wind structures in the 29d WC8d + O8-9IV binary CV Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Uraz, Alexandre; Moffat, Anthony F. J.

    2011-07-01

    We have used continuous, high-precision, broadband visible photometry from the MOST satellite to trace wind structures in the WR component of CV Ser over more than a full orbit. Most of the small-scale light-curve variations are likely due to extinction by clumps along the line of sight to the O companion as it orbits and shines through varying columns of the WR wind. Parallel optical spectroscopy from the Mont Megantic Observatory is used to refine the orbital and wind-collision parameters, as well as to reveal line emission from clumps.

  17. Photobleaching Response of Different Sources of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Exposed to Natural Solar Radiation Using Absorption and Excitation–Emission Matrix Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L.; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN∶TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN∶TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0–9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%–5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  18. THE ISOLATION OF LYSOSOMES FROM EHRLICH ASCITES TUMOR CELLS FOLLOWING PRETREATMENT OF MICE WITH TRITON WR-1339

    PubMed Central

    Horvat, Agnes; Baxandall, Jane; Touster, Oscar

    1969-01-01

    A method is described for obtaining highly purified lysosomes from Ehrlich ascites tumo cells grown in mice injected with Triton WR-1339. The isolated particles show a high specific activity for aryl sulfatase, representing an 80–90-fold purification over the homogenate, and a 15–18% yield of the total enzyme activity. Mitochondrial and microsomal marker enzymes are present in negligible amounts (0.2% of the activity of the homogenate). The biochemical evidence for a rather high degree of homogeneity of the fraction is supported by the electron microscopic examination of the purified lysosomes. The intracellular localizations of N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase, NADH-cytochrome c reductase and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in Ehrlich ascites cells are also reported, the first two being present in highest concentration in the combined mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction and the third in the microsomal fraction. PMID:5792335

  19. The isolation of lysosomes from Ehrlich ascites tumor cells following pretreatment of mice with Triton WR-1339.

    PubMed

    Horvat, A; Baxandall, J; Touster, O

    1969-08-01

    A method is described for obtaining highly purified lysosomes from Ehrlich ascites tumo cells grown in mice injected with Triton WR-1339. The isolated particles show a high specific activity for aryl sulfatase, representing an 80-90-fold purification over the homogenate, and a 15-18% yield of the total enzyme activity. Mitochondrial and microsomal marker enzymes are present in negligible amounts (0.2% of the activity of the homogenate). The biochemical evidence for a rather high degree of homogeneity of the fraction is supported by the electron microscopic examination of the purified lysosomes. The intracellular localizations of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase, NADH-cytochrome c reductase and NADPH-cytochrome c reductase in Ehrlich ascites cells are also reported, the first two being present in highest concentration in the combined mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction and the third in the microsomal fraction.

  20. New type of brightness variations of the colliding wind WO4 + O5((f)) binary WR 30a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paardekooper, S. J.; van der Hucht, K. A.; van Genderen, A. M.; Brogt, E.; Gieles, M.; Meijerink, R.

    2003-06-01

    We present new photometric observations in Johnson V and B of WR 30a, revealing relative dramatic changes in brightness of 0fm 2. These variations occur on a time scale of hours, and are only seen in V. We argue that they are not caused by dust extinction, but either by a dramatic change in the strength of the C IV 5801-12 Å emission line doublet due to a de-excitation process, or by some unknown continuum effect. Tables 2-4 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/404/L29

  1. Induction of an adaptive response in human blood lymphocytes exposed to radiofrequency fields: influence of the universal mobile telecommunication system (UMTS) signal and the specific absorption rate.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Olga; Sannino, Anna; Romeo, Stefania; Massa, Rita; Sarti, Maurizio; Reddy, Abishek B; Prihoda, Thomas J; Vijayalaxmi; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria

    2012-08-30

    The induction of an adaptive response (AR) was examined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields (RF). Cells from nine healthy human volunteers were stimulated for 24h with phytohaemagglutinin and then exposed for 20h to an adaptive dose (AD) of a 1950MHz RF UMTS (universal mobile telecommunication system) signal used for mobile communications, at different specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1.25, 0.6, 0.3, and 0.15W/kg. This was followed by treatment of the cells at 48h with a challenge dose (CD) of 100ng/ml mitomycin C (MMC). Lymphocytes were collected at the end of the 72h total culture period. The cytokinesis-block method was used to record the frequency of micronuclei (MN) as genotoxicity end-point. When lymphocytes from six donors were pre-exposed to RF at 0.3W/kg SAR and then treated with MMC, these cells showed a significant reduction in the frequency of MN, compared with the cells treated with MMC alone; this result is indicative of induction of AR. The results from our earlier study indicated that lymphocytes that were stimulated for 24h, exposed for 20h to a 900MHz RF GSM (global system for mobile communication) signal at 1.25W/kg SAR and then treated with 100ng/ml MMC, also exhibited AR. These overall data suggest that the induction of AR depends on RF frequency, type of the signal and SAR. Further characterization of RF-induced AR is in progress.

  2. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  3. Understanding the Unusual X-Ray Emission Properties of the Massive, Close Binary WR 20a: A High Energy Window into the Stellar Wind Initiation Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  4. Relación física entre el cúmulo abierto Hogg 15 y la estrella Wolf-Rayet WR 47

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatti, A. E.; Bica, E.; Santos, J. F. C., Jr.; Clariá, J. J.

    We revise the fundamental parameters of the faint open cluster Hogg 15, for which two recent colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) studies have obtained significantly different ages (Sagar et al. 2001, MNRAS, 327, 23; Piatti & Clariá 2001, A&A, 370, 931). In the present study, we combine a series of methods trying to constrain age, together with other fundamental parameters. We employ spatial extractions to construct the CMDs, and the cluster integrated spectrum to compare the latter with those of templates of known age. For Hogg 15 we derive an age of (20 ± 10) Myr, a reddening of (1.10 ± 0.05) mag, and a distance of (3.1 ± 0.5) kpc. We conclude that the estimation of an older age in the study of Piatti & Clariá can be accounted for in terms of main sequence/turnoff curvature being blurred in the CMDs, an effect mainly caused by field contamination. To clarify the issue of whether the Wolf-Rayet star HDE 311884 (WR 47), known to be a WN6 + O5V binary system, is associated or not with Hogg 15, we discuss its fundamental parameters, particularly its distance. Based on the WR 47 spectrum and available photometry, we assume that the underestimated distance implied by the Hipparcos parallax (216 pc) is affected by its binary character. By comparing the WR 47 spectrum with those of WR stars of a similar type, we conclude that WR 47 is not affected by a E(B-V) colour excess much higher than that associated with Hogg 15, namely E(B-V) = 1.10. On the basis of the WR 47's resulting distance of (5.2 ± 0.9) kpc, which largely surpasses that of the cluster, we conclude that WR 47 is not related to Hogg 15 from the point of view of origin, since the cluster and the star do not belong to the same formation event.

  5. Inhibition of topoisomerase II activity in repair-proficient CHO K1 cells by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Constantinou, A.; Shigematsu, N.

    1992-09-01

    The aminothiol 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol (WR-1065) is the active thiol of the clinically studied radioprotective agent S-2-(3-aminopropylamino) ethylphosphorothioic acid (WR-2721). WR-1065 is an effective radiation protector under in vitro conditions when it is administered 30 min prior to radiation exposure at a concentration of 4 mM to repair-proficient Chinese hamster ovary Kl cells (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.4). In contrast, the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient Chinese hamster ovary xrs-5 cell line is not protected under these conditions (i.e., a dose modification factor of 1.0). Topoisomerase (topo) I and II activities and protein contents were measured in both Kl and xrs-5 cell lines and were found to be similar in magnitude. Neither exposure to radiation, to WR-1065, or to both affected these variables in xrs-5 cells. WR 1065 was effective, however, in reducing topo 11 activity by a factor of 2 in the repair-proficient Kl cell line. Topo II protein content, however, was not affected by these exposure conditions. One of several mechanisms of radiation protection attributed to aminothiol compounds has been their ability to affect enzymatic reactions involved in DNA synthesis, repair, and cell cycle progression. These results demonstrate a modifying effect by 2-[(aminopropyl)amino]ethanethiol on a specific nuclear enzyme (i.e., type H topoisomerase), which is involved in DNA synthesis. These results also suggest that differences do exist between the topo 11 enzymes isolated from the parent repair-proficient Kl and the DNA double-strand break, repair-deficient xrs-5 mutant cell lines.

  6. Star-formation Activity in the Neighborhood of W-R 1503-160L Star in the Mid-infrared Bubble N46

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Baug, T.; Ojha, D. K.; Janardhan, P.; Ninan, J. P.; Luna, A.; Zinchenko, I.

    2016-07-01

    In order to investigate star-formation (SF) processes in extreme environments, we have carried out a multi-wavelength analysis of the mid-infrared bubble N46, which hosts a WN7 Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star. We have used 13CO line data to trace an expanding shell surrounding the W-R star containing about five condensations within the molecular cloud associated with the bubble. The W-R star is associated with a powerful stellar wind having a mechanical luminosity of ˜4 × 1037 erg s-1. A deviation of the H-band starlight mean polarization angles around the bubble has also been traced, indicating the impact of stellar wind on the surroundings. The Herschel temperature map shows a temperature range of ˜18-24 K toward the five molecular condensations. The photometric analysis reveals that these condensations are associated with the identified clusters of young stellar objects, revealing ongoing SF process. The densest among these five condensations (peak N(H2) ˜9.2 × 1022 cm-2 and A V ˜ 98 mag) is associated with a 6.7 GHz methanol maser, an infrared dark cloud, and the CO outflow, tracing active massive SF within it. At least five compact radio sources (CRSs) are physically linked with the edges of the bubble, and each of them is consistent with the radio spectral class of a B0V-B0.5V-type star. The ages of the individual infrared counterparts of three CRSs (˜1-2 Myr) and a typical age of WN7 W-R star (˜4 Myr) indicate that the SF activities around the bubble are influenced by the feedback of the W-R star.

  7. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  8. Incidence of H I 21-cm absorption in strong Fe II systems at 0.5 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R.; Srianand, R.; Gupta, N.; Joshi, R.; Petitjean, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Ge, J.; Krogager, J.-K.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results from our search for H I 21-cm absorption in a sample of 16 strong Fe II systems [Wr(Mg II λ2796) ≥ 1.0 Å and Wr(Fe II λ2600) or W_{Fe II} ≥ 1 Å] at 0.5 < z < 1.5 using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Green Bank Telescope. We report six new H I 21-cm absorption detections from our sample, which have increased the known number of detections in strong Mg II systems at this redshift range by ∼50 per cent. Combining our measurements with those in the literature, we find that the detection rate of H I 21-cm absorption increases with W_{Fe II}, being four times higher in systems with W_{Fe II} ≥ 1 Å compared to systems with W_{Fe II} < 1 Å. The N(H I) associated with the H I 21-cm absorbers would be ≥2 × 1020 cm-2, assuming a spin temperature of ∼500 K (based on H I 21-cm absorption measurements of damped Lyman α systems at this redshift range) and unit covering factor. We find that H I 21-cm absorption arises on an average in systems with stronger metal absorption. We also find that quasars with H I 21-cm absorption detected towards them have systematically higher E(B - V) values than those which do not. Further, by comparing the velocity widths of H I 21-cm absorption lines detected in absorption- and galaxy-selected samples, we find that they show an increasing trend (significant at 3.8σ) with redshift at z < 3.5, which could imply that the absorption originates from more massive galaxy haloes at high z. Increasing the number of H I 21-cm absorption detections at these redshifts is important to confirm various trends noted here with higher statistical significance.

  9. Observations of Mg II Absorption near z ~ 1 Galaxies Selected from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    We study the frequency of Mg II absorption in the outer halos of galaxies at z = 0.6-1.4 (with median z = 0.87), using new spectra obtained of 10 background quasars with galaxy impact parameters of b < 100 kpc. The quasar sight lines were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 QSO catalog based on proximity to galaxies in the DEEP2 redshift survey. In addition to the 10 small impact systems, we examine 40 additional galaxies at 100 kpc < b < 500 kpc serendipitously located in the same fields. We detect Mg II absorbers with equivalent width Wr = 0.15-1.0 Å, though not all absorbers correlate with DEEP galaxies. We find five unique absorbers within Δv = 500 km s-1 and b < 100 kpc of a DEEP galaxy; this small sample contains both early- and late-type galaxies and has no obvious trends with star formation rate. No Mg II is detected more than 100 kpc from galaxies; inside this radius the covering fraction scales with impact parameter and galaxy luminosity in a very similar fashion to samples studied at lower redshift. In all but one case, when Mg II is detected without a spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, there exists a plausible photometric candidate which was excluded because of slit collision or apparent magnitude. We do not detect any strong absorbers with Wr > 1.0 Å, consistent with other samples of galaxy-selected Mg II systems. We speculate that Mg II systems with 0.3 < Wr < 1.0 trace old relic material from galactic outflows and/or the halo assembly process, and that in contrast, systems with large Wr are more likely to reflect the more recent star-forming history of their associated galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  10. Protection against radiation-induced mutations at the hprt locus by spermine and N,N{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278)

    SciTech Connect

    Grdina, D.J.; Schwartz, J.L. |; Shigematsu, N.

    1993-06-01

    The polyamine spermine and the disulfide NN{double_prime}-(dithiodi-2,1-ethanediyl)bis-1,3-propanediamine (WR-33278) are structurally similar agents capable of binding to DNA. WR-33278 is the disulfide moiety of the clinically studied radioprotective agent (WR-2721). Because of their structural similarities, it was of interest to characterize and compare their radioprotective properties using the endpoints of cell survival and mutation induction at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) locus in Chinese hamster AA8 cells. In order to facilitate both the uptake of VM-33278 into cells and the direct comparison between the protective properties of WR-33278 and spermine, these agents were electroporated into cells. Electroporation alone reduced cell survival to 75% but had no effect on hprt mutation frequency. The electroporation of either spermine or WR-33278 at concentrations greater than 0.01 mM was extremely toxic. The exposure of cells to both electroporation and irradiation gave rise to enhanced cell killing and mutation induction. Cell survival values at a radiation dose of 750 cGy were enhanced by factors of 1.3 and 1.8 following electroporation of 0.01 mM of spermine and WR-33278, respectively, 30 min prior to irradiation. Neither agent was protective at a concentration of 0.001 mM. Protection against radiation-induced hprt mutations was observed for both spermine and WR-33278 under all experimental conditions tested.

  11. Effect of ezetimibe on plasma cholesterol levels, cholesterol absorption, and secretion of biliary cholesterol in laboratory opossums with high and low responses to dietary cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeannie; Kushwaha, Rampratap S; Vandeberg, Jane F; Vandeberg, John L

    2008-12-01

    Partially inbred lines of laboratory opossums differ in plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and cholesterol absorption on a high-cholesterol diet. The aim of the present studies was to determine whether ezetimibe inhibits cholesterol absorption and eliminates the differences in plasma cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol metabolism between high and low responders on a high-cholesterol diet. Initially, we determined that the optimum dose of ezetimibe was 5 mg/(kg d) and treated 6 high- and 6 low-responding opossums with this dose (with equal numbers of controls) for 3 weeks while the opossums consumed a high-cholesterol and low-fat diet. Plasma and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly (P < .05) in treated but not in untreated high-responding opossums. Plasma cholesterol concentrations increased slightly (P < .05) in untreated low responders but not in treated low responders. The percentage of cholesterol absorption was significantly higher in untreated high responders than in other groups. Livers from high responders with or without treatment were significantly (P < .01) heavier than livers from low responders with or without treatment. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P < .05) higher than those in low responders with or without treatment (P < .001). The gall bladder bile cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P < .05) lower than those in other groups. A decrease in biliary cholesterol in low responders treated with ezetimibe was associated with a decrease in hepatic expression of ABCG5 and ABCG8. These studies suggest that ezetimibe decreases plasma cholesterol levels in high responders mainly by decreasing cholesterol absorption and increasing biliary cholesterol concentrations. Because ezetimibe's target is NPC1L1 and NPC1L1 is expressed in the intestine of opossums, its effect on cholesterol absorption may be mediated

  12. THE LARGE-SCALE SEPARATION OF PEROXISOMES, MITOCHONDRIA, AND LYSOSOMES FROM THE LIVERS OF RATS INJECTED WITH TRITON WR-1339

    PubMed Central

    Leighton, Federico; Poole, Brian; Beaufay, Henri; Baudhuin, Pierre; Coffey, John W.; Fowler, Stanley; De Duve, Christian

    1968-01-01

    Improved, largely automated methods are described for the purification and analysis o peroxisomes, lysosomes, and mitochondria from the livers of rats injected with Triton WR-1339. With these new methods, it has become possible to obtain, in less than 6 hr and with reliable reproducibility, mitochondria practically free of contaminants, as well as the rarer cytoplasmic particles in amounts (about 100 mg of protein) and in a state of purity (95%) that make them suitable for detailed biochemical studies. The results obtained so far on these preparations have made more conclusive and precise previous estimates of the biochemical and morphological properties of the three groups of cytoplasmic particles. In addition, peroxisomes were found to contain essentially all the L-α-hydroxy acid oxidase of the liver, as well as a small, but significant fraction of its NADP-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. Another small fraction of the latter enzyme is present in the mitochondria, the remainder being associated with the cell sap. The mitochondrial localization of the metabolically active cytoplasmic DNA could be verified. The relative content of the fractions in mitochondria, whole peroxisomes, peroxisome cores, lysosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum was estimated independently by direct measurements on electron micrographs, and by linear programming (based on the assumption that the particles are biochemically homogeneous) of the results of enzyme assays. The two types of estimates agreed very well, except for one fraction in which low cytochrome oxidase activity was associated with mitochondrial damage. PMID:4297786

  13. Search for Heavy Neutrinos and WR Bosons with Right-Handed Couplings in a Left-Right Symmetric Model in pp Collisions at s=7TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Mohammadi, A.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Anjos, T. S.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Karjalainen, A.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Calpas, B.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.

    2012-12-01

    Results are presented from a search for heavy, right-handed muon neutrinos, Nμ, and right-handed WR bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model. The analysis is based on a 5.0fb-1 sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence is observed for an excess of events over the standard model expectation. For models with exact left-right symmetry, heavy right-handed neutrinos are excluded at 95% confidence level for a range of neutrino masses below the WR mass, dependent on the value of MWR. The excluded region in the two-dimensional (MWR, MNμ) mass plane extends to MWR=2.5TeV.

  14. Multiwavelength observations of NaSt1 (WR 122): equatorial mass loss and X-rays from an interacting Wolf-Rayet binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauerhan, Jon; Smith, Nathan; Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Morzinski, Katie M.; Close, Laird M.; Hinz, Philip M.; Males, Jared R.; Rodigas, Timothy J.

    2015-07-01

    NaSt1 (aka Wolf-Rayet 122) is a peculiar emission-line star embedded in an extended nebula of [N II] emission with a compact dusty core. The object was previously characterized as a Wolf-Rayet (WR) star cloaked in an opaque nebula of CNO-processed material, perhaps analogous to η Car and its Homunculus nebula, albeit with a hotter central source. To discern the morphology of the [N II] nebula we performed narrow-band imaging using the Hubble Space Telescope and Wide-field Camera 3. The images reveal that the nebula has a disc-like geometry tilted ≈12° from edge-on, composed of a bright central ellipsoid surrounded by a larger clumpy ring. Ground-based spectroscopy reveals radial velocity structure (±10 km s-1) near the outer portions of the nebula's major axis, which is likely to be the imprint of outflowing gas. Near-infrared adaptive-optics imaging with Magellan AO has resolved a compact ellipsoid of Ks-band emission aligned with the larger [N II] nebula, which we suspect is the result of scattered He I line emission (λ2.06 μm). Observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have revealed an X-ray point source at the core of the nebula that is heavily absorbed at energies <1 keV and has properties consistent with WR stars and colliding-wind binaries. We suggest that NaSt1 is a WR binary embedded in an equatorial outflow that formed as the result of non-conservative mass transfer. NaSt1 thus appears to be a rare and important example of a stripped-envelope WR forming through binary interaction, caught in the brief Roche lobe overflow phase.

  15. Crystal and Molecular Structure of the Antimalarial Agent 4-(tert-Butyl- 2-(tert-Butylaminomethyl)-6-(4-Chlorophenyl)Phenol Dihydrogen Phosphate (WR 194, 965 Phosphate)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    became defined. The WR 194,%5 molecule fitted more (Fig. 6C. In her review, Oleksyn (13) points out that in the closely to the three-dimensional space...molecule and the possible importance of 11. Oleksyn , B., L. Lebioda, and M. Ciechanowicz-Rutkowska. 1979. hydrogen bonding with a receptor. Although the...closely into the 12. Oleksyn , B., K. M. Stadnicka, and S. A. Hodorowicz. 1978. The ., -’ three-dimensional space defined by a combination of meflo

  16. Factors responsible for the patchy distribution of natural soil water repellency in Mediterranean semiarid forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, E.; Jiménez-Pinilla, P.; Mataix-Solera, J.; González-Pérez, J. A.; García-Orenes, F.; Torres, M. P.; Arcenegui, V.; Mataix-Beneyto, J.

    2012-04-01

    Soil water repellency (WR) is commonly observed in forest areas showing wettable and water repellent patches with high spatial variability. This has important hydrological implications; in semiarid areas where water supply is limited, even slight WR may play an important role in infiltration patterns and distribution of water into the soil (Mataix-Solera et al., 2007). It has been proposed that the origin of WR is the release of organic compounds from different plants species and sources (due to waxes and other organic substances in their tissues; Doerr et al., 1998). However, the relationship between WR and plants may not always be a direct one: a group of fungi (mainly mycorrhizal fungi) and microorganisms could be also responsible for WR. The aim of this research is to study the relationships between WR in soils under different plant cover with selected soil properties and the quantity of fungi and their exudates. The study area is located in Southeast Spain, "Sierra de la Taja" near Pinoso (Alicante)), with a semiarid Mediterranean climate (Pm=260mm). Samples were taken in September 2011, when WR is normally strongest after summer drought. Soil samples were collected from the first 2.5cm of the mineral A horizon at microsites beneath each of the four most representative species (Pinus halepensis, Rosmarinus officinalis, Quercus. rotundifolia and Cistus albidus; n=15 per specie) and 5 samples from bare soil with no influence of any species. Different soil parameters were analyzed; water content, soil organic mater content (SOM), pH, WR, easily extractable glomalin (EEG), total mycelium and extractable lipids. The occurrence of WR was higher under P. halepensis (87% of samples) and Q. rotundifolia (60% of samples). Positive significant correlations were found between WR and SOM content for all species, with the best correlations for Pinus and Quercus (r=0.855**, r= 0.934** respectively). In addition, negative significant correlations were found between WR and p

  17. Frequency of Oxygen VI in Intervening QSO Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burles, Scott; Tytler, David

    1994-12-01

    We have conducted the first survey for QSO with O VI lambda lambda 1032,1038 absorption lines. We obtained medium resolution (R ~ 1300), high signal-to-noise (~ 20) spectra of 11 QSOs (0.53<= zem <=2.08) taken with the Faint Object Spectrograph from the Hubble Space Telescope Archive. The O VI doublet is found exclusively in the Lyman-alpha forest. All previous surveys of metal lines in QSO absorption systems were done redward of Lyalpha emission, avoiding blending due to Lyman-alpha forest clouds. The higher density of lines in the Lyman-alpha forest demands new stringent criteria to ensure the identification of the O VI doublet. We used simulated spectra to determine the statistical significance of lines indentified in the Lyman-alpha forest. We found 12 O VI doublets and 9 are expected to be real. Six constitute a uniform sample with both lines exceeding a rest equivalent width of W_r =0.21 Angstroms. The number of O VI doublets per unit redshift is = 1.0 +/-0.6 at a mean absorption redshift of zave = 0.9. For comparable W_r the density of O VI absorbers is similar to Mg II (Tytler et al 1986; Steidel & Sargent 1992) and C IV absorbers (Sargent et al 1988; Bahcall et al 1993). We searched for other common ions in the O VI absorption systems. Out of 8 O VI absorption systems in which C IV is also found, C IV is stronger in all except zabs=1.0828 towards PG1206+459 which we believe is collisionally ionized. A rough estimate of the cosmological mass density of O VI is carried out. If we assume that O VI lines are linear, we get a lower limit of Omega (OVI) >= 3 times 10(-9) h(-1}_{100) . Since O > O VI, if the mean metal abundance were below 0.002 solar, then the accompanying Hydrogen and Helium would account for all baryons in the universe. We conclude that mean abundances are above 0.002 solar, and much greater if the gas is not highly ionized (O >> O VI).

  18. Triton WR1339, an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, decreases vitamin E concentration in some tissues of rats by inhibiting its transport to liver.

    PubMed

    Abe, Chisato; Ikeda, Saiko; Uchida, Tomono; Yamashita, Kanae; Ichikawa, Tomio

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this experiment was to clarify the contribution of the alpha-tocopherol transfer activity of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) to vitamin E transport to tissues in vivo. We studied the effect of Triton WR1339, which prevents the catabolism of triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins by LPL on vitamin E distribution in rats. Vitamin E-deficient rats fed a vitamin E-free diet for 4 wk were injected with Triton WR1339 and administered by oral gavage an emulsion containing 10 mg of alpha-tocopherol, 10 mg of gamma-tocopherol, or 29.5 mg of a tocotrienol mixture with 200 mg of sodium taurocholate, 200 mg of triolein, and 50 mg of albumin. alpha-Tocopherol was detected in the serum and other tissues of the vitamin E-deficient rats, but gamma-tocopherol, alpha- and gamma-tocotrienol were not detected. Triton WR1339 injection elevated (P<0.05) the serum alpha-tocopherol concentration and inhibited (P<0.05) the elevation of alpha-tocopherol concentration in the liver, adrenal gland, and spleen due to the oral administration of alpha-tocopherol. Neither alpha-tocopherol administration nor Triton WR1339 injection affected (P>or=0.05) the alpha-tocopherol concentration in the perirenal adipose tissue, epididymal fat, and soleus muscle despite a high expression of LPL in the adipose tissue and muscle. These data show that alpha-tocopherol transfer activity of LPL in adipose tissue and muscle is not important for alpha-tocopherol transport to the tissue after alpha-tocopherol intake or that the amount transferred is small relative to the tissue concentration. Furthermore, Triton WR1339 injection tended to elevate the serum gamma-tocopherol (P=0.071) and alpha-tocotrienol (P=0.053) concentrations and lowered them (P<0.05) in the liver and adrenal gland of rats administered gamma-tocopherol or alpha-tocotrienol. These data suggest that lipolysis of triacylglycerol-rich chylomicron by LPL is necessary for postprandial vitamin E transport to the liver and subsequent transport to the

  19. Effects of luminal nutrient absorption, intraluminal physical stimulation, and intravenous parenteral alimentation on the recovery responses of duodenal villus morphology following feed withdrawal in chickens.

    PubMed

    Tarachai, P; Yamauchi, K

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify which of the following three factors induces villus morphological recovery best: enteral nutrient absorption, intraluminal physical stimulation, or intravenous parenteral alimentation. At 142 d, male White Leghorn chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) were divided into eight groups of five birds each as follows: 1) access given ad libitum to a commercial layer mash diet (CP, 17.5%; ME, 2,830 kcal/kg) (control), 2) 5-d feed withdrawal (feed withdrawal), 3) 3-d feed withdrawal (3-FW), followed by refeeding the same diet as the control for 2 d (refeeding), 4) 3-FW followed by force-feeding enteral hyperalimentation (enteral), 5) 3-FW followed by force-feeding an indigestible (nonabsorbable) substance (kaolin), 6) 3-FW followed by force-feeding water for 2 d (force-fed control), 7) 3-FW followed by parenteral hyperalimentation (parenteral), and 8) 3-FW followed by no alimentation (sham control) for 2 d. In the refeeding and enteral groups, BW significantly recovered (P < 0.05), and in the parenteral group, BW tended to increase, suggesting that nutrients were enterally and parenterally absorbed, respectively. The BW in the remaining three groups showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05), indicating that kaolin could not be absorbed enterally. Compared with the feed withdrawal group, villus height, cell mitosis, and villus tip surface morphology of refeeding and enteral groups exhibited rapid villus morphological recovery. Villus morphological recovery of the enteral group appears to have been caused by enteral nutrient absorption. However, villus morphology in the kaolin treatment was not different from that in the feed withdrawal group, which suggests that intraluminal physical stimulation had no effect on villus morphological recovery. On the other hand, the parenteral group showed no effect on villus morphological recovery, which suggests that the parenteral nutrient supplied to the villi via the blood could not induce villus

  20. Effect of diet on triolein absorption in weanling rats

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, C.A.; Brannon, P.M.; Wells, M.A.; Morrill, M.; Koldovsky, O. )

    1990-01-01

    To determine the effect of altered dietary fat intake on the rate of fat absorption in the intact animal, we fed male weanling rats either a high fat-low carbohydrate (HF-LC) (calories: 67% fat, 10% carbohydrate, 20% protein) or low fat-high carbohydrate (LF-HC) (calories: 10% fat, 67% carbohydrate, 20% protein) diet for 8 days. Absorption of ({sup 14}C)triolein was estimated by determining (1) {sup 14}CO{sub 2} expiration in breath, (2) intestinal triglyceride output using Triton WR-1339, an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase, and (3) quantitating the disappearance of labeled triolein from the gastrointestinal tract. Changes in the activity of pancreatic lipase and amylase confirmed the adaptation to altered fat and carbohydrate intake. Animals fed the HF-LC diet exhibited approximately twofold greater triolein disappearance, oxidation, and intestinal triglyceride output compared with animals fed LF-HC. There was also a highly significant linear relationship between {sup 14}CO{sub 2} excretion and intestinal triglyceride output in both diet groups. These data show that high dietary fat content markedly enhances in vivo fat absorption in the weanling rat.

  1. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  2. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  3. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  4. Seismic investigation of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico: 2013 multi-component and high-resolution 2D acquisition at GC955 and WR313

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, Seth S.; Hart, Patrick E.; Shedd, William W.; Frye, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey led a seismic acquisition cruise at Green Canyon 955 (GC955) and Walker Ridge 313 (WR313) in the Gulf of Mexico from April 18 to May 3, 2013, acquiring multicomponent and high-resolution 2D seismic data. GC955 and WR313 are established, world-class study sites where high gas hydrate saturations exist within reservoir-grade sands in this long-established petroleum province. Logging-while-drilling (LWD) data acquired in 2009 by the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrates Joint Industry Project provide detailed characterization at the borehole locations, and industry seismic data provide regional- and local-scale structural and stratigraphic characterization. Significant remaining questions regarding lithology and hydrate saturation between and away from the boreholes spurred new geophysical data acquisition at these sites. The goals of our 2013 surveys were to (1) achieve improved imaging and characterization at these sites and (2) refine geophysical methods for gas hydrate characterization in other locations. In the area of GC955 we deployed 21 ocean-bottom seismometers (OBS) and acquired approximately 400 km of high-resolution 2D streamer seismic data in a grid with line spacing as small as 50 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km and diverse azimuths for the OBS. In the area of WR313 we deployed 25 OBS and acquired approximately 450 km of streamer seismic data in a grid pattern with line spacing as small as 250 m and along radial lines that provide source offsets up to 10 km for the OBS. These new data afford at least five times better resolution of the structural and stratigraphic features of interest at the sites and enable considerably improved characterization of lithology and the gas and gas hydrate systems. Our recent survey represents a unique application of dedicated geophysical data to the characterization of confirmed reservoir-grade gas hydrate accumulations.

  5. TWIST1 associates with NF-κB subunit RELA via carboxyl-terminal WR domain to promote cell autonomous invasion through IL8 production

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Metastasis is the primary cause of death for cancer patients. TWIST1, an evolutionarily conserved basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, is a strong promoter of metastatic spread and its expression is elevated in many advanced human carcinomas. However, the molecular events triggered by TWIST1 to motivate dissemination of cancer cells are largely unknown. Results Here we show that TWIST1 induces the production of interleukin 8 (IL8), which activates matrix metalloproteinases and promotes invasion of breast epithelial and cancer cells. In this novel mechanism, TWIST1-mediated IL8 transcription is induced through the TWIST1 carboxy-terminal WR (Trp-Arg) domain instead of the classic DNA binding bHLH domain. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses revealed that the WR domain mediates the formation of a protein complex comprised of TWIST1 and the nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) subunit RELA (p65/NF-κB3), which synergistically activates the transcriptional activity of NF-κB. This activation leads to increased DNA binding affinity of RELA to the IL8 promoter and thus induces the expression of the cytokine. Blockage of IL8 signaling by IL8 neutralizing antibodies or receptor inhibition reduced the invasiveness of both breast epithelial and cancer cells, indicating that TWIST1 induces autonomous cell invasion by establishing an IL8 antocrine loop. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the TWIST1 WR domain plays a critical role in TWIST1-induced IL8 expression through interactions with and activation of NF-κB. The produced IL8 signals through an autocrine loop and promotes extracellular matrix degradation to enable cell invasion across the basement membrane. PMID:22891766

  6. Tracing WR wind structures by using the orbiting companion in the 29d WC8d + O8-9IV binary CV Ser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David-Uraz, Alexandre; Moffat, Anthony F. J.; Chené, André Nicolas; Lange, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained continuous, high-precision, broadband visible photometry from the MOST satellite of CV Ser over more than a full orbit in order to link the small-scale light-curve variations to extinction due to wind structures in the WR component, thus permitting us to trace these structures. The light-curve presented unexpected characteristics, in particular eclipses with a varying depth. Parallel optical spectroscopy from the Mont Megantic Observatory and Dominion Astrophysical Observatory was obtained to refine the orbital and wind-collision parameters, as well as to reveal line emission from clumps.

  7. P-glycoprotein is responsible for the poor intestinal absorption and low toxicity of oral aconitine: in vitro, in situ, in vivo and in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cuiping; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Zheng; Xu, Liang; Liu, Fei; Ruan, Jinxiu; Liu, Keliang; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2013-12-15

    Aconitine (AC) is a highly toxic alkaloid from bioactive plants of the genus Aconitum, some of which have been widely used as medicinal herbs for thousands of years. In this study, we systematically evaluated the potential role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the mechanisms underlying the low and variable bioavailability of oral AC. First, the bidirectional transport of AC across Caco-2 and MDCKII-MDR1 cells was investigated. The efflux of AC across monolayers of these two cell lines was greater than its influx. Additionally, the P-gp inhibitors, verapamil and cyclosporin A, significantly decreased the efflux of AC. An in situ intestinal perfusion study in rats showed that verapamil co-perfusion caused a significant increase in the intestinal permeability of AC, from 0.22×10(-5) to 2.85×10(-5) cm/s. Then, the pharmacokinetic profile of orally administered AC with or without pre-treatment with verapamil was determined in rats. With pre-treatment of verapamil, the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of AC increased sharply, from 39.43 to 1490.7 ng/ml. Accordingly, a 6.7-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-12h) of AC was observed when co-administered with verapamil. In silico docking analyses suggested that AC and verapamil possess similar P-gp recognition mechanisms. This work demonstrated that P-gp is involved in limiting the intestinal absorption of AC and attenuating its toxicity to humans. Our data indicate that potential P-gp-mediated drug-drug interactions should be considered carefully in the clinical application of aconite and formulations containing AC.

  8. Growth, nutrient absorption, and moisture status of selected woody species in coal-mine spoil in response to an induced infection by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F.; West, D.C.; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1982-09-01

    In this study, nursery grown loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings infected with Pisolithus and control seedlings were outplanted on a coal mine spoil in Tennessee which had been previously hydroseeded. Granular fertilizer was applied by broadcasting to one-half of the seedlings of each ectomycorrhizal treatment at the rate of 112 kg/ha NPK. After 3 years, the survival and growth of loblolly pine infected with Pisolithus were superior to that of the control seedlings, and chemical analyses of foliar samples revealed that the seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae had a higher foliar concentration of NO/sub 3/ and a lower concentration of Zn than the control seedlings. The survival, growth, and nutrient absorption of Virginia pine were not significantly affected by the infection with Pisolithus after 2 years, but both loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae exhibited an enhanced ability to absorb water during periods of high moisture stress, as determined by the pressure chamber technique. Fertilization substantially reduced the survival of the seedlings of both species. Sweet birch and European alder were grown under high, intermediate, and low fertility regimes in sand culture containing a mycelial inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius for 5 months and then transplanted to coal mine spoil containing an identical Pisolithus inoculum. Control seedlings of each species were similarly grown except that no inoculum was incorporated into the potting media. The nutrient treatments initiated in the sand culture were continued throughout the study. Examinations of the roots of the sweet birch seedlings revealed that high fertility significantly reduced the development of Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae, but Pisolithus formed abundant ectomycorrhizae on the roots of sweet birch grown under the intermediate and low fertility regimes and these seedlings were significantly larger than comparable control seedlings.

  9. The putative nebula of the Wolf-Rayet WR 60 star: a case of mistaken identity and reclassification as a new supernova remnant G310.5+0.8

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupar, M.; Parker, Q. A.; Filipović, M. D.

    2011-04-01

    We present narrow band AAO/UKST H α images and medium and low resolution optical spectra of a nebula shell putatively associated with the Wolf-Rayet star WR 60. We also present the first identification of this shell in the radio regime at 843 MHz and at 4850 MHz from the Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS), and from the Parkes-MIT-NRAO (PMN) survey respectively. This radio emission closely follows the optical emission. The optical spectra from the shell exhibits the typical shock excitation signatures sometimes seen in Wolf-Rayet stellar ejecta but also common to supernova remnants. A key finding however, is that the WR 60 star, is not, in fact, anywhere near the geometrical centre of the putative arcuate nebula ejecta as had been previously stated. This was due to an erroneous positional identification for the star in the literature which we now correct. This new identification calls into serious question any association of the nebula with WR 60 as such nebula are usually quite well centred on the WR stars themselves. We now propose that this fact combined with our new optical spectra, deeper H α imaging and newly identified radio structures actually imply that the WR 60 nebula should be reclassified as an unassociated new supernova remnant which we designate G310.5+0.8.

  10. Glycoprotein (90 kDa) isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO lowers plasma lipid level through scavenging of intracellular radicals in Triton WR-1339-induced mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Phil-Sun; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2006-07-01

    The Opuntia ficus-indica var. saboten MAKINO (OFI) has been traditionally used as health food and herbal agent in folk medicine in Korea. In this study, we investigated whether the OFI glycoprotein has antioxidative activity and hypolipidemic effect on Triton WR-1339-induced A/J mice. The OFI glycoprotein inhibits the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by glucose/glucose oxidase (G/GO) in BNL CL.2 cells. With its antioxidative property, the mice were orally administered in the OFI glycoprotein [50 mg/kg body weight (BW)] for two weeks. Our finding resulted in a significant decrease of plasma lipid levels in Triton WR-1339-treated mice such as total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Indeed, mice which induced by Triton WR-1339 were significantly increased the levels of TC, TG and LDL, whereas the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) level obviously decreased. However, the values were reversed at pretreatment with OFI glycoprotein in Triton WR-1339-treated mice. The data also showed that pretreatment with OFI glycoprotein resulted in decrease of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level and in increase of nitric oxide (NO) amount in presence of Triton WR-1339-treated mice, while the activities of antioxidant enzyme [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)] were augmented. Therefore, we speculate that the OFI glycoprotein would be effective in lowering of plasma lipid levels.

  11. Influence of muscle metabolic heterogeneity in determining the V̇o2p kinetic response to ramp-incremental exercise

    PubMed Central

    Keir, Daniel A.; Benson, Alan P.; Love, Lorenzo K.; Robertson, Taylor C.

    2015-01-01

    The pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) response to ramp-incremental (RI) exercise increases linearly with work rate (WR) after an early exponential phase, implying that a single time constant (τ) and gain (G) describe the response. However, variability in τ and G of V̇o2p kinetics to different step increments in WR is documented. We hypothesized that the “linear” V̇o2p-WR relationship during RI exercise results from the conflation between WR-dependent changes in τ and G. Nine men performed three or four repeats of RI exercise (30 W/min) and two step-incremental protocols consisting of four 60-W increments beginning from 20 W or 50 W. During testing, breath-by-breath V̇o2p was measured by mass spectrometry and volume turbine. For each individual, the V̇o2p RI response was characterized with exponential functions containing either constant or variable τ and G values. A relationship between τ and G vs. WR was determined from the step-incremental protocols to derive the variable model parameters. τ and G increased from 21 ± 5 to 98 ± 20 s and from 8.7 ± 0.6 to 12.0 ± 1.9 ml·min−1·W−1 for WRs of 20-230 W, respectively, and were best described by a second-order (τ) and a first-order (G) polynomial function of WR (lowest Akaike information criterion score). The sum of squared residuals was not different (P > 0.05) when the V̇o2p RI response was characterized with either the constant or variable models, indicating that they described the response equally well. Results suggest that τ and G increase progressively with WR during RI exercise. Importantly, these relationships may conflate to produce a linear V̇o2p-WR response, emphasizing the influence of metabolic heterogeneity in determining the apparent V̇o2p-WR relationship during RI exercise. PMID:26679614

  12. Influence of muscle metabolic heterogeneity in determining the V̇o2p kinetic response to ramp-incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Keir, Daniel A; Benson, Alan P; Love, Lorenzo K; Robertson, Taylor C; Rossiter, Harry B; Kowalchuk, John M

    2016-03-01

    The pulmonary O2 uptake (V̇o2p) response to ramp-incremental (RI) exercise increases linearly with work rate (WR) after an early exponential phase, implying that a single time constant (τ) and gain (G) describe the response. However, variability in τ and G of V̇o2p kinetics to different step increments in WR is documented. We hypothesized that the "linear" V̇o2p-WR relationship during RI exercise results from the conflation between WR-dependent changes in τ and G. Nine men performed three or four repeats of RI exercise (30 W/min) and two step-incremental protocols consisting of four 60-W increments beginning from 20 W or 50 W. During testing, breath-by-breath V̇o2p was measured by mass spectrometry and volume turbine. For each individual, the V̇o2p RI response was characterized with exponential functions containing either constant or variable τ and G values. A relationship between τ and G vs. WR was determined from the step-incremental protocols to derive the variable model parameters. τ and G increased from 21 ± 5 to 98 ± 20 s and from 8.7 ± 0.6 to 12.0 ± 1.9 ml·min(-1)·W(-1) for WRs of 20-230 W, respectively, and were best described by a second-order (τ) and a first-order (G) polynomial function of WR (lowest Akaike information criterion score). The sum of squared residuals was not different (P > 0.05) when the V̇o2p RI response was characterized with either the constant or variable models, indicating that they described the response equally well. Results suggest that τ and G increase progressively with WR during RI exercise. Importantly, these relationships may conflate to produce a linear V̇o2p-WR response, emphasizing the influence of metabolic heterogeneity in determining the apparent V̇o2p-WR relationship during RI exercise.

  13. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  14. P-glycoprotein is responsible for the poor intestinal absorption and low toxicity of oral aconitine: In vitro, in situ, in vivo and in silico studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Cuiping Zhang, Tianhong Li, Zheng Xu, Liang Liu, Fei Ruan, Jinxiu Liu, Keliang Zhang, Zhenqing

    2013-12-15

    Aconitine (AC) is a highly toxic alkaloid from bioactive plants of the genus Aconitum, some of which have been widely used as medicinal herbs for thousands of years. In this study, we systematically evaluated the potential role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in the mechanisms underlying the low and variable bioavailability of oral AC. First, the bidirectional transport of AC across Caco-2 and MDCKII-MDR1 cells was investigated. The efflux of AC across monolayers of these two cell lines was greater than its influx. Additionally, the P-gp inhibitors, verapamil and cyclosporin A, significantly decreased the efflux of AC. An in situ intestinal perfusion study in rats showed that verapamil co-perfusion caused a significant increase in the intestinal permeability of AC, from 0.22 × 10{sup −5} to 2.85 × 10{sup −5} cm/s. Then, the pharmacokinetic profile of orally administered AC with or without pre-treatment with verapamil was determined in rats. With pre-treatment of verapamil, the maximum plasma concentration (C{sub max}) of AC increased sharply, from 39.43 to 1490.7 ng/ml. Accordingly, a 6.7-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC{sub 0–12} {sub h}) of AC was observed when co-administered with verapamil. In silico docking analyses suggested that AC and verapamil possess similar P-gp recognition mechanisms. This work demonstrated that P-gp is involved in limiting the intestinal absorption of AC and attenuating its toxicity to humans. Our data indicate that potential P-gp-mediated drug–drug interactions should be considered carefully in the clinical application of aconite and formulations containing AC. - Highlights: • Verapamil and cyclosporin A decreased the efflux of aconitine across Caco-2 cells. • Both inhibitors decreased the efflux of aconitine across MDCKII-MDR1 cells. • Co-perfusion with verapamil increased the intestinal permeability of aconitine. • Co-administration with verapamil sharply increased the C{sub max

  15. Intervening Mg II absorption systems from the SDSS DR12 quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Clowes, Roger G.; Campusano, Luis E.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the catalogue of the Mg II absorption systems detected at a high significance level using an automated search algorithm in the spectra of quasars from the 12th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A total of 266,433 background quasars were searched for the presence of absorption systems in their spectra. The continuum modelling for the quasar spectra was performed using a mean filter. A pseudo-continuum derived using a median filter was used to trace the emission lines. The absorption system catalogue contains 39,694 Mg II systems detected at a 6.0, 3.0σ level respectively for the two lines of the doublet. The catalogue was constrained to an absorption line redshift of 0.35 ≤ z2796 ≤ 2.3. The rest-frame equivalent width of the λ2796 line ranges between 0.2 ≤ Wr ≤ 6.2 Å. Using Gaussian noise-only simulations, we estimate a false positive rate of 7.7 per cent in the catalogue. We measured the number density ∂N2796/∂z of Mg II absorbers and find evidence for steeper evolution of the systems with Wr ≥ 1.2 Å at low redshifts (z2796 ≤ 1.0), consistent with other earlier studies. A suite of null tests over the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z2796 ≤ 1.5 was used to study the presence of systematics and selection effects like the dependence of the number density evolution of the absorption systems on the properties of the background quasar spectra. The null tests do not indicate the presence of any selection effects in the absorption catalogue if the quasars with spectral signal-to-noise level less than 5.0 are removed. The resultant catalogue contains 36,981 absorption systems. The Mg II absorption catalogue is publicly available and can be downloaded from the link http://srini.ph.unimelb.edu.au/mgii.php.

  16. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  17. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  18. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  19. Optical absorption in trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Niu, Qian

    2013-03-01

    We use a low energy effective model to analyze the optical responses of trilayer graphene samples. We first show that optical absorption of the ABA-stacked trilayer has strong dependence on both the Fermi energy and optical frequency, which is in sharp contrast to that of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. Secondly, we are able to determine the possible existence of trigonal warping effects in the bandstructure of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene by a divergence in the absorption spectra at around 10 meV. In addition, we can partially distinguish the vairious broken symmetry states driven by electron-electron interactions in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. In particular, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is sensitive to the polarization of the incident light, giving a way to detect its possible existence.

  20. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  1. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  2. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  3. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  4. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  5. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  6. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  7. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  8. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  9. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  10. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  11. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  12. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems.

  13. Overexpression of transcription factor OsWR2 1 regulates wax/cutin biosynthesis and enhances drought tolerance in rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drought is the major abiotic stress limiting crop production. Plant cuticle represents the outer-most layer of the epidermis and previous studies demonstrate its association with plant response to climatological drought. We report here the functional characterization of the rice ((Oryza sativa L.) W...

  14. Dilution cycle control for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A dilution cycle control system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The control system includes a time delay relay for sensing shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system and for generating a control signal only after expiration of a preselected time period measured from the sensed shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system, during which the absorption refrigeration system is not restarted. A dilution cycle for the absorption refrigeration system is initiated in response to generation of a control signal by the time delay relay. This control system is particularly suitable for use with an absorption refrigeration system which is frequently cycled on and off since the time delay provided by the control system prevents needless dilution of the absorption refrigeration system when the system is turned off for only a short period of time and then is turned back on.

  15. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  16. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  17. Thirteen Week Oral Toxicity Study of WR242511 with a Thirteen Week Recovery Period in Dogs. Volume 1 of 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-07

    8217Includes nucleated RBCs. bMeasured with a Co-oximeter (Instrumentation Laboratory). The assay was performed within one hour of sample collection. The...occurrence of increased levels of haptoglobin, which is synthesized b_y hepatocytes, is^ indicative of an inflammatory response, i.e., an acute phase reaction ...inflammatory event, i.e., an acute phase reaction . These alterations suggest the presence of mild hepatocellular injury in male and female dogs. However

  18. Coherent perfect absorption and reflection in slow-light waveguides.

    PubMed

    Gutman, Nadav; Sukhorukov, Andrey A; Chong, Y D; de Sterke, C Martijn

    2013-12-01

    We identify a family of unusual slow-light modes occurring in lossy multimode grating waveguides, for which either the forward or backward mode components, or both, are degenerate. In the fully degenerate case, the response can be modulated between coherent perfect absorption (zero reflection) and perfect reflection by varying the wave amplitudes in a uniform input waveguide. The perfectly absorbed wave has anomalously short absorption length, scaling as the inverse one-third power of the absorptivity.

  19. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  20. Short communication: Enhancement of topoisomerase I-mediated unwinding of supercoiled DNA by the radioprotector WR-33278

    SciTech Connect

    Holwitt, E.A.; Koda, E.; Swenberg, C.E.

    1990-01-01

    Cellular DNA is one of the critical targets for ionizing radiation. To mitigate the effects of ionizing radiation, the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command has synthesized several radioprotective drugs, primarily aminothiol compounds. Many mechanisms responsible for their radioprotective action have been proposed, including radical scavenging, hydrogen atom donation to DNA carbon center radicals, enhancement of DNA repair process, and reduction in the target volume. All of these processes require that the radioprotector or its metabolite be located within molecular distances, less than 50A, from DNA.

  1. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  2. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-17

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  3. Antihypercholesterolemic and Antioxidative Potential of an Extract of the Plant, Piper betle, and Its Active Constituent, Eugenol, in Triton WR-1339-Induced Hypercholesterolemia in Experimental Rats.

    PubMed

    Venkadeswaran, Karuppasamy; Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Annadurai, Thangaraj; Ruban, Vasanthakumar Vasantha; Sundararajan, Mahalingam; Anandhi, Ramalingam; Thomas, Philip A; Geraldine, Pitchairaj

    2014-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a dominant risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, the putative antihypercholesterolemic and antioxidative properties of an ethanolic extract of Piper betle and of its active constituent, eugenol, were evaluated in experimental hypercholesterolemia induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of Triton WR-1339 (300 mg/kg b.wt) in Wistar rats. Saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats revealed significantly higher mean blood/serum levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, low density and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and of serum hepatic marker enzymes; in addition, significantly lower mean serum levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and significantly lower mean activities of enzymatic antioxidants and nonenzymatic antioxidants were noted in hepatic tissue samples from saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats, compared to controls. However, in hypercholesterolemic rats receiving the Piper betle extract (500 mg/kg b.wt) or eugenol (5 mg/kg b.wt) for seven days orally, all these parameters were significantly better than those in saline-treated hypercholesterolemic rats. The hypercholesterolemia-ameliorating effect was better defined in eugenol-treated than in Piper betle extract-treated rats, being as effective as that of the standard lipid-lowering drug, lovastatin (10 mg/kg b.wt). These results suggest that eugenol, an active constituent of the Piper betle extract, possesses antihypercholesterolemic and other activities in experimental hypercholesterolemic Wistar rats.

  4. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  5. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  6. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  7. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  8. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  9. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  10. Adaptive responses of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in fast-twitch muscle of voluntary running rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henriksen, E. J.; Halseth, A. E.

    1995-01-01

    Glucose transporter (GLUT-4) protein, hexokinase, and citrate synthase (proteins involved in oxidative energy production from blood glucose catabolism) increase in response to chronically elevated neuromuscular activity. It is currently unclear whether these proteins increase in a coordinated manner in response to this stimulus. Therefore, voluntary wheel running (WR) was used to chronically overload the fast-twitch rat plantaris muscle and the myocardium, and the early time courses of adaptative responses of GLUT-4 protein and the activities of hexokinase and citrate synthase were characterized and compared. Plantaris hexokinase activity increased 51% after just 1 wk of WR, whereas GLUT-4 and citrate synthase were increased by 51 and 40%, respectively, only after 2 wk of WR. All three variables remained comparably elevated (+50-64%) through 4 wk of WR. Despite the overload of the myocardium with this protocol, no substantial elevations in these variables were observed. These findings are consistent with a coordinated upregulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase in the fast-twitch plantaris, but not in the myocardium, in response to this increased neuromuscular activity. Regulation of hexokinase in fast-twitch muscle appears to be uncoupled from regulation of GLUT-4 and citrate synthase, as increases in the former are detectable well before increases in the latter.

  11. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  12. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  13. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatial regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.

  14. What Drives the Outflows in Broad Absorption Line QSOs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1997-01-01

    We have made progress in the areas related to the propulsion and confinement of gas responsible for broad absorption troughts in QSOs: Radiative Acceleration in BALQSOs; The "Ghost" of Lyman (alpha); and Magnetic Confinement of Absorbing Gas.

  15. Quantitative imaging of airway liquid absorption in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Harding, Thomas J; Brown, Stefanie L; Nero, Joseph A; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    New measures are needed to rapidly assess emerging treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Using an imaging approach, we evaluated the absorptive clearance of the radiolabeled small molecule probe diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) as an in vivo indicator of changes in airway liquid absorption. DTPA absorption and mucociliary clearance rates were measured in 21 patients with CF (12 adults and nine children) and nine adult controls using nuclear imaging. The effect of hypertonic saline on DTPA absorption was also studied. In addition, in vitro studies were conducted to identify the determinants of transepithelial DTPA absorption. CF patients had significantly increased rates of DTPA absorption compared with control subjects but had similar mucociliary clearance rates. Treatment with hypertonic saline resulted in a decrease in DTPA absorption and an increase in mucociliary clearance in 11 out of 11 adult CF patients compared with treatment with isotonic saline. In vitro studies revealed that ∼ 50% of DTPA absorption can be attributed to transepithelial fluid transport. Apically applied mucus impedes liquid and DTPA absorption. However, mucus effects become negligible in the presence of an osmotic stimulus. Functional imaging of DTPA absorption provides a quantifiable marker of immediate response to treatments that promote airway surface liquid hydration.

  16. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  17. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  18. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  19. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  20. Hypolipidaemic activity of aqueous Ocimum basilicum extract in acute hyperlipidaemia induced by triton WR-1339 in rats and its antioxidant property.

    PubMed

    Amrani, Souliman; Harnafi, Hicham; Bouanani, Nour El Houda; Aziz, Mohammed; Caid, Hana Serghini; Manfredini, Stefano; Besco, Elena; Napolitano, Mariarosaria; Bravo, Elena

    2006-12-01

    Hyperlipidaemia, atherosclerosis and related diseases are becoming a major health problem in developing countries. Ocimum basilicum is one of the medicinal plants widely used in Morocco to reduce plasma cholesterol and to reduce the risk of atherosclerosis-related diseases. However, mechanisms underlying the reported hypolipidaemic effect of this plant have not been investigated. This study evaluates the lipid lowering effect of aqueous Ocimum basilicum extract in Triton WR-1339-induced hyperlipidaemic rats. Hyperlipidaemia was developed in animals by intraperitoneal injection of Triton (200 mg/kg). After injection of Triton the animals were divided into three treatment groups: hyperlipidaemic, hyperlipidaemic plus herb extract and hyperlipidaemic plus fenofibrate treated rats. At 7 h after the Triton injection, levels of plasma cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol in rats treated also with the Ocimum basilicum extract (0.5 g/100 g body weight) were, respectively, 50%, 83% and 79% lower than Triton-treated rats and HDL-cholesterol was 129% higher than in rats given Triton alone. At 24 h following Ocimum basilicum administration, total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL-cholesterol levels decreased by 56%, 63% and 68%, respectively, in comparison with the Triton treated group and HDL-cholesterol was not increased significantly. The hypolipidaemic effect exerted by Ocimum basilicum extract was markedly stronger than the effect induced by fenofibrate treatments. Further it was demonstrated that Ocimum basilicum aqueous extract displayed a very high antioxidant power. These results indicate that Ocimum basilicum extract may contain hypolipidaemic and antioxidant substances and its use as a therapeutic tool in hyperlipidaemic subjects may be of benefit and encourage further investigation in this field.

  1. An extensive spectroscopic time series of three Wolf-Rayet stars - I. The lifetime of large-scale structures in the wind of WR 134

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldoretta, E. J.; St-Louis, N.; Richardson, N. D.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Eversberg, T.; Hill, G. M.; Shenar, T.; Artigau, É.; Gauza, B.; Knapen, J. H.; Kubát, J.; Kubátová, B.; Maltais-Tariant, R.; Muñoz, M.; Pablo, H.; Ramiaramanantsoa, T.; Richard-Laferrière, A.; Sablowski, D. P.; Simón-Díaz, S.; St-Jean, L.; Bolduan, F.; Dias, F. M.; Dubreuil, P.; Fuchs, D.; Garrel, T.; Grutzeck, G.; Hunger, T.; Küsters, D.; Langenbrink, M.; Leadbeater, R.; Li, D.; Lopez, A.; Mauclaire, B.; Moldenhawer, T.; Potter, M.; dos Santos, E. M.; Schanne, L.; Schmidt, J.; Sieske, H.; Strachan, J.; Stinner, E.; Stinner, P.; Stober, B.; Strandbaek, K.; Syder, T.; Verilhac, D.; Waldschläger, U.; Weiss, D.; Wendt, A.

    2016-08-01

    During the summer of 2013, a 4-month spectroscopic campaign took place to observe the variabilities in three Wolf-Rayet stars. The spectroscopic data have been analysed for WR 134 (WN6b), to better understand its behaviour and long-term periodicity, which we interpret as arising from corotating interaction regions (CIRs) in the wind. By analysing the variability of the He II λ5411 emission line, the previously identified period was refined to P = 2.255 ± 0.008 (s.d.) d. The coherency time of the variability, which we associate with the lifetime of the CIRs in the wind, was deduced to be 40 ± 6 d, or ˜18 cycles, by cross-correlating the variability patterns as a function of time. When comparing the phased observational grey-scale difference images with theoretical grey-scales previously calculated from models including CIRs in an optically thin stellar wind, we find that two CIRs were likely present. A separation in longitude of Δφ ≃ 90° was determined between the two CIRs and we suggest that the different maximum velocities that they reach indicate that they emerge from different latitudes. We have also been able to detect observational signatures of the CIRs in other spectral lines (C IV λλ5802,5812 and He I λ5876). Furthermore, a DAC was found to be present simultaneously with the CIR signatures detected in the He I λ5876 emission line which is consistent with the proposed geometry of the large-scale structures in the wind. Small-scale structures also show a presence in the wind, simultaneously with the larger scale structures, showing that they do in fact co-exist.

  2. Haptoglobin is an Early Serum Biomarker of Virus-Induced Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes in BBDR and LEW1.WR1 Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Annie J.; Yang, Chaoxing; Tam, Sun W.; Hinerfeld, Douglas; Evans, James E.; Green, Karin M.; Leszyk, John; Yang, Kejian; Guberski, Dennis L.; Mordes, John P.; Greiner, Dale L.; Rossini, Aldo A.; Bortell, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic profiling of serum is a powerful technique to identify differentially expressed proteins that can serve as biomarkers predictive of disease onset. In this study, we utilized 2D gel analysis followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis to identify putative serum biomarkers for autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) in BioBreeding Diabetes Resistant (BBDR) rats induced to express disease. Treatment with toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) ligand, polyinosinic:polycytidilic acid (pIC), plus infection with Kilham rat virus (KRV), a rat parvovirus, results in nearly 100% of young BBDR rats becoming diabetic within 11–21 days. Sera collected from pre-diabetic rats at early time points following treatment with pIC + KRV were analyzed by 2D gel electrophoresis and compared with sera from control rats treated with PBS, pIC alone, or pIC + H1, a non-diabetogenic parvovirus. None of the latter three control treatments precipitates T1D. 2D gel analysis revealed that haptoglobin, an acute phase and hemoglobin scavenger protein, was differentially expressed in the sera of rats treated with pIC + KRV relative to control groups. These results were confirmed by Western blot and ELISA studies that further validated haptoglobin levels as being differentially increased in the sera of pIC + KRV treated rats relative to controls during the first week following infection. Early elevations in serum haptoglobin were also observed in LEW1.WR1 rats that became diabetic following infection with rat cytomegalovirus (RCMV). The identification and validation of haptoglobin as a putative serum biomarker for autoimmune T1D in rats now affords us the opportunity to test the validity of this protein as a biomarker for human T1D, particularly in those situations where viral infection is believed to precede onset of disease. PMID:20975081

  3. Massive open star clusters using the VVV survey. IV. WR 62-2, a new very massive star in the core of the VVV CL041 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chené, A.-N.; Ramírez Alegría, S.; Borissova, J.; O'Leary, E.; Martins, F.; Hervé, A.; Kuhn, M.; Kurtev, R.; Consuelo Amigo Fuentes, P.; Bonatto, C.; Minniti, D.

    2015-12-01

    Context. The ESO Public Survey VISTA Variables in the Vía Láctea (VVV) provides deep multi-epoch infrared observations for an unprecedented 562 sq. deg of the Galactic bulge and adjacent regions of the disk. Nearly 150 new open clusters and cluster candidates have been discovered in this survey. Aims: We present the fourth article in a series of papers focussed on young and massive clusters discovered in the VVV survey. This article is dedicated to the cluster VVV CL041, which contains a new very massive star candidate, WR 62-2. Methods: Following the methodology presented in the first paper of the series, wide-field, deep JHKs VVV observations, combined with new infrared spectroscopy, are employed to constrain fundamental parameters (distance, reddening, mass, age) of VVV CL041. Results: We confirm that the cluster VVV CL041 is a young (less than 4 Myr) and massive (3 ± 2 × 103 M⊙) cluster, and not a simple asterism. It is located at a distance of 4.2 ± 0.9 kpc, and its reddening is AV = 8.0 ± 0.2 mag, which is slightly lower than the average for the young clusters towards the centre of the Galaxy. Spectral analysis shows that the most luminous star of the cluster, of the WN8h spectral type, is a candidate to have an initial mass larger than 100 M⊙. Based on observations taken within the ESO VISTA Public Survey VVV, Programme ID 179.B-2002, and on observations with VLT/ISAAC at ESO (programme 087.D.0341A) and Flamingos-2 at Gemini (programme GS-2014A-Q-72).The photometric catalogue is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/584/A31

  4. Extraordinary absorption of sound in porous lamella-crystals

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J.; Romero-García, V.; Picó, R.; Cebrecos, A.; de Abajo, F. J. García; Mortensen, N. A.; Willatzen, M.; Sánchez-Morcillo, V. J.

    2014-01-01

    We present the design of a structured material supporting complete absorption of sound with a broadband response and functional for any direction of incident radiation. The structure which is fabricated out of porous lamellas is arranged into a low-density crystal and backed by a reflecting support. Experimental measurements show that strong all-angle sound absorption with almost zero reflectance takes place for a frequency range exceeding two octaves. We demonstrate that lowering the crystal filling fraction increases the wave interaction time and is responsible for the enhancement of intrinsic material dissipation, making the system more absorptive with less material. PMID:24728322

  5. Transfection of Babesia bovis by Double Selection with WR99210 and Blasticidin-S and Its Application for Functional Analysis of Thioredoxin Peroxidase-1

    PubMed Central

    Asada, Masahito; Yahata, Kazuhide; Hakimi, Hassan; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo; Kaneko, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation is an essential technique to analyze gene function; however, limited methods are available for Babesia bovis, a causative pathogen of the globally important cattle disease, bovine babesiosis. To date, two stable transfection systems have been developed for B. bovis, using selectable markers blasticidin-S deaminase (bsd) or human dihydrofolate reductase (hdhfr). In this work, we combine these two selectable markers in a sequential transfection system. Specifically, a parent transgenic B. bovis line which episomally expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) and human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR), was transfected with a plasmid encoding a fusion protein consisting of red fluorescent protein (RFP) and blasticidin-S deaminase (BSD). Selection with WR99210 and blasticidin-S resulted in the emergence of parasites double positive for GFP and RFP. We then applied this method to complement gene function in a parasite line in which thioredoxin peroxidase-1 (Bbtpx-1) gene was knocked out using hDHFR as a selectable marker. A plasmid was constructed harboring both RFP-BSD and Bbtpx-1 expression cassettes, and transfected into a Bbtpx-1 knockout (KO) parasite. Transfectants were independently obtained by two transfection methods, episomal transfection and genome integration. Complementation of Bbtpx-1 resulted in full recovery of resistance to nitrosative stress, via the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside, which was impaired in the Bbtpx-1 KO parasites. In conclusion, we developed a sequential transfection method in B. bovis and subsequently applied this technique in a gene complementation study. This method will enable broader genetic manipulation of Babesia toward enhancing our understanding of the biology of this parasite. PMID:25962142

  6. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; Rostem, K.; U-Yen, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50O and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  7. Impedance Matched Absorptive Thermal Blocking Filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Chuss, D. T.; U-Yen, K.; Rostem, K.

    2014-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated and characterized absorptive thermal blocking filters for cryogenic microwave applications. The transmission line filter's input characteristic impedance is designed to match 50 Omega and its response has been validated from 0-to-50GHz. The observed return loss in the 0-to-20GHz design band is greater than 20 dB and shows graceful degradation with frequency. Design considerations and equations are provided that enable this approach to be scaled and modified for use in other applications.

  8. Absorption spectrum of DNA for wavelengths greater than 300 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, J.C.; Griffin, K.P.

    1981-06-01

    Although DNA absorption at wavelengths greater than 300 nm is much weaker than that at shorter wavelengths, this absorption seems to be responsible for much of the biological damage caused by solar radiation of wavelengths less than 320 nm. Accurate measurement of the absorption spectrum of DNA above 300 nm is complicated by turbidity characteristic of concentrated solutions of DNA. We have measured the absorption spectra of DNA from calf thymus, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, salmon testis, and human placenta using procedures which separate optical density due to true absorption from that due to turbidity. Above 300 nm, the relative absorption of DNA increases as a function of guanine-cytosine content, presumably because the absorption of guanine is much greater than the absorption of adenine at these wavelengths. This result suggests that the photophysical processes which follow absorption of a long-wavelength photon may, on the average, differ from those induced by shorter-wavelength photons. It may also explain the lower quantum yield for the killing of cells by wavelengths above 300 nm compared to that by shorter wavelengths.

  9. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  10. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  11. Two absorption furosemide prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Suescun, L; Pardo, H; Manta, E; Prandi, C

    1999-03-15

    The structures of two absorption furosemide prodrugs, hexanoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoyl-anthranilate (C19H23CIN2O7S), (I), and benzoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilate (C20H17CIN2O7S), (II), are described in this paper and compared with furosemide and four other prodrugs. The molecular conformations of both compounds are similar to those of the other prodrugs; the packing and the crystal system are the primary differences. Compound (I) crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 and compound (II) in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The packing of both structures is stabilized by a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network.

  12. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  13. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  14. Production of silicon modified to have enhanced infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weld, E.; Ayachitula, R.; de La Harpe, K.; Brandt, L.; Chilton, M.; Knize, R. J.; Patterson, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced optical properties of silicon microstructures formed by irradiation of a silicon wafer by a modulated continuous wave (CW) laser beam in the presence of SF6. The microstructures are doped with about 0.6% sulfur, which extends the absorption well below the 1.1um bandgap of crystalline silicon and results in a 60% increase in the absorption of infrared radiation. The microstructured silicon produced using microsecond pulses of CW light demonstrates comparable infrared absorption enhancement to black silicon made using more expensive and complicated laser systems. This enhanced absorption as a result of these microstructures has been studied over the past decade in an effort to create high responsivity detectors and night vision goggles and improve the efficiency of solar cells. We will also discuss additional methods that allow tunability and scalability in the production of silicon modified to demonstrate increased infrared absorption.

  15. Mechanochemical Tuning of Pyrene Absorption Spectrum Using Force Probes.

    PubMed

    Fernández-González, Miguel Ángel; Rivero, Daniel; García-Iriepa, Cristina; Sampedro, Diego; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2017-02-14

    Control of absorption spectra in chromophores is a fundamental aspect of many photochemical and photophysical processes as it constitutes the first step of the global photoinduced process. Here we explore the use of mechanical forces to modulate the light absorption process. Specifically, we develop a computational formalism for determining the type of mechanical forces permitting a global tuning of the absorption spectrum. This control extends to the excitation wavelength, absorption bands overlap, and oscillator strength. The determination of these optimal forces permits us to rationally guide the design of new mechano-responsive chromophores. Pyrene has been chosen as the case study for applying these computational tools because significant absorption spectra information is available for the chromophore as well as for different strained derivatives. Additionally, pyrene presents a large flexibility, which makes it a good system to test the inclusion of force probes as the strategy to exert forces on the system.

  16. Amount of leachant and water absorption levels of wood treated with borates and water repellents.

    PubMed

    Baysal, Ergun; Sonmez, Abdullah; Colak, Mehmet; Toker, Hilmi

    2006-12-01

    Wood protection efficacy of borates against biological agents, flame retardancy, and suitability to the environment is well known. Since borates can be applied to timber as water based solutions, they are preferred economically as well. Even though they are highly mobile in wood, boron compounds are widely used in timber preservation. Borates migrate in liquid and increase the hygroscopicity of wood in damp conditions. This study deals with the physical restriction of water access in wood by impregnating water repellent agents into wood to limit amount of leachant and water absorption levels of wood after boron treatment. Borates were incorporated with polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400) their bulking effect in wood was considered. Results indicated that the amount of leachates from wood treated with borates in PEG-400 was remarkably higher compared to those of wood treated with the aqueous solutions of borates. Water absorption (WA) levels of wood treated with aqueous solutions of borates were higher than those of their treated samples with the solutions in PEG-400. Secondary treatments of wood with the water repellent (WR) chemicals following borate impregnation reduced the leaching of chemicals from wood in water and also WA of the specimens were less than those of the wood treated with only borates from aqueous and PEG solutions. Styrene (St) was the most effective monomer among the other agents used in terms of immobility effect on borates and WA.

  17. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  18. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  19. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  20. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  1. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  2. Iron absorption by small intestine of chickens.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, M P; Martí, M T; Mitjavila, M T; Planas, J

    1993-01-01

    Iron (Fe) absorption by three segments (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum) of the small intestine of chickens was studied by a perfusion technique in vivo in closed circuit using 59Fe Cl3 and was related to the histological characteristics of each segment. The serosal transfers of Fe for the duodenum and jejunum were the same (14%/cm), but significantly different (p < 0.05) from those of the ileum (9%/cm), which may be explained by the morphological and histological properties of the gut of chickens. However, the presence of Fe in blood and in liver was significantly lower after perfusion of the jejunum and ileum than after perfusion of the duodenum. It is concluded that chickens show an early adaptation of small intestine to Fe absorption in response to the considerable loss of Fe suffered during the laying process.

  3. Terahertz absorption of dilute aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Heyden, Matthias; Tobias, Douglas J; Matyushov, Dmitry V

    2012-12-21

    Absorption of terahertz (THz) radiation by aqueous solutions of large solutes reports on the polarization response of their hydration shells. This is because the dipolar relaxation of the solute is dynamically frozen at these frequencies, and most of the solute-induced absorption changes, apart from the expulsion of water, are caused by interfacial water. We propose a model expressing the dipolar response of solutions in terms of a single parameter, the interface dipole moment induced in the interfacial water by electromagnetic radiation. We apply this concept to experimental THz absorption of hydrated sugars, amino acids, and proteins. None of the solutes studied here follow the expectations of dielectric theories, which predict a negative projection of the interface dipole on the external electric field. We find that this prediction is not able to describe the available experimental data, which instead suggests a nearly zero interface dipole for sugars and a more diverse pattern for amino acids. Hydrophobic amino acids, similarly to sugars, give rise to near zero interface dipoles, while strongly hydrophilic ones are best described by a positive projection of the interface dipole on the external field. The sign of the interface dipole is connected to the slope of the absorption coefficient with the solute concentration. A positive slope, implying an increase in the solution polarity relative to water, mirrors results frequently reported for protein solutions. We therefore use molecular dynamics simulations of hydrated glucose and lambda repressor protein to calculate the interface dipole moments of these solutes and the concentration dependence of the THz absorption. The absorption at THz frequencies increases with increasing solute concentration in both cases, implying a higher polarity of the solution compared to bulk water. The structure of the hydration layer, extracted from simulations, is qualitatively similar in both cases, with spatial correlations

  4. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  5. Site-specific drug delivery to the middle-to-lower region of the small intestine reduces food-drug interactions that are responsible for low drug absorption in the fed state.

    PubMed

    Tanno, Fumié K; Sakuma, Shinji; Masaoka, Yoshie; Kataoka, Makoto; Kozaki, Toshio; Kamaguchi, Ryosei; Ikeda, Yutaka; Kokubo, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Shinji

    2008-12-01

    Food-drug interactions may reduce the bioavailability of drugs taken after meals (negative food effects). We designed enteric-coated tablets that start to disintegrate when they reach the middle-to-lower region of the small intestine, and examined whether they could reduce negative food effects in dogs. Tablets containing trientine as a model drug were coated with hypromellose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) with various values of succinoyl group content. The time lag of drug dissolution from these enteric-coated tablets in simulated intestinal fluid of pH 6.8 increased as the succinoyl group content was decreased. The AUC of trientine after oral administration of its aqueous solution to fed dogs was one-eighth of that in fasted dogs. The low drug absorption in fed dogs was improved when trientine was administered as enteric-coated tablets. The average ratio of AUC in the fed state to that in the fasted state increased with decreasing succinoyl group content of HPMCAS. Negative food effects completely disappeared after oral administration of tablets coated with HPMCAS having a succinoyl group content of 6.2% or less, which probably disintegrated in the middle-to-lower small intestine. Our results indicated that food-drug interactions were avoided by separating the main absorption site of drugs from that of food components.

  6. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  7. EVIDENCE FOR PHOTOIONIZATION-DRIVEN BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tinggui; Yang, Chenwei; Wang, Huiyuan; Ferland, Gary

    2015-12-01

    We present a qualitative analysis of the variability of quasar broad absorption lines using the large multi-epoch spectroscopic data set of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We confirm that variations of absorption lines are highly coordinated among different components of the same ion or the same absorption component of different ions for C iv, Si iv, and N v. Furthermore, we show that the equivalent widths (EWs) of the lines decrease or increase statistically when the continuum brightens or dims. This is further supported by the synchronized variations of emission and absorption-line EWs when the well-established intrinsic Baldwin effect for emission lines is taken into account. We find that the emergence of an absorption component is usually accompanied by the dimming of the continuum while the disappearance of an absorption-line component is accompanied by the brightening of the continuum. This suggests that the emergence or disappearance of a C iv absorption component is only the extreme case, when the ionic column density is very sensitive to continuum variations or the continuum variability the amplitude is larger. These results support the idea that absorption-line variability is driven mainly by changes in the gas ionization in response to continuum variations, that the line-absorbing gas is highly ionized, and in some extreme cases, too highly ionized to be detected in UV absorption lines. Due to uncertainties in the spectroscopic flux calibration, we cannot quantify the fraction of quasars with asynchronized continuum and absorption-line variations.

  8. Radioprotection of intestinal stem cells and whole body radiation lethality from photons and neutrons by prostaglandins along or in combination with WR-2721. Technical report 24 Feb 86-30 Sep 89

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, W.R.

    1990-12-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) have been shown to protect the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic cell renewal systems from some degree of radiation damage. The mechanism(s) to account for these observations are unknown. Based on preliminary evidence that PGs varied in the degree to which they afforded protection of intestinal stem cells, we studied protection by several PGs and their analogues. The most protective PGs found to date were 16,16 dm PGE2, misoprostol, a PGE1 analogues, and iloprost, a PGI2 analogue. The relative degrees of protection were 400%, 700% and 800% above control values at a dose of 13.5 137 Cs gamma radiation. These three PGs were used for subsequent studies. Iloprost is a stable PG at room temperature and was found to be protective given orally. In addition to radioprotection of the intestinal stem cells, these Pgs increased the LD50/6, LD50/30 and animal longevity through both the gastrointestinal and hematopoietic syndromes. Misoprostol protected the gut from JANUS neutrons and increased animal longevity following neutron irradiation. Although the mechanism for PG-induced radioprotection is unknown, it appears to be different compared to the widely studied amino thiol, WR-2721. Evidence to support this contention came from data showing that all these analogues were additive to the protective effect of Wr-2721.

  9. Search for heavy neutrinos and W(R) bosons with right-handed couplings in a left-right symmetric model in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=7  TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Aguilo, E; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Reis, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Garcia, G; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; Mccartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Soares Jorge, L; Sznajder, A; Vilela Pereira, A; Anjos, T S; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Karjalainen, A; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Bontenackels, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; 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Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Vodopiyanov, I; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Anghel, I M; Apanasevich, L; Bai, Y; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Lacroix, F; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Duru, F; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Tinti, G; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Krajczar, K; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wenger, E A; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Cooper, S I; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Nash, D; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Boulahouache, C; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Rose, K; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Sengupta, S; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Roh, Y; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Florez, C; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Belknap, D; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Palmonari, F; Pierro, G A; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2012-12-28

    Results are presented from a search for heavy, right-handed muon neutrinos, N(μ), and right-handed W(R) bosons, which arise in the left-right symmetric extensions of the standard model. The analysis is based on a 5.0  fb(-1) sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, collected by the CMS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No evidence is observed for an excess of events over the standard model expectation. For models with exact left-right symmetry, heavy right-handed neutrinos are excluded at 95% confidence level for a range of neutrino masses below the W(R) mass, dependent on the value of M(W(R)). The excluded region in the two-dimensional (M(W(R)), M(N(μ)) mass plane extends to M(W(R))=2.5  TeV.

  10. Nonlinear Terahertz Absorption of Graphene Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Jadidi, Mohammad M; König-Otto, Jacob C; Winnerl, Stephan; Sushkov, Andrei B; Drew, H Dennis; Murphy, Thomas E; Mittendorff, Martin

    2016-04-13

    Subwavelength graphene structures support localized plasmonic resonances in the terahertz and mid-infrared spectral regimes. The strong field confinement at the resonant frequency is predicted to significantly enhance the light-graphene interaction, which could enable nonlinear optics at low intensity in atomically thin, subwavelength devices. To date, the nonlinear response of graphene plasmons and their energy loss dynamics have not been experimentally studied. We measure and theoretically model the terahertz nonlinear response and energy relaxation dynamics of plasmons in graphene nanoribbons. We employ a terahertz pump-terahertz probe technique at the plasmon frequency and observe a strong saturation of plasmon absorption followed by a 10 ps relaxation time. The observed nonlinearity is enhanced by 2 orders of magnitude compared to unpatterned graphene with no plasmon resonance. We further present a thermal model for the nonlinear plasmonic absorption that supports the experimental results. The model shows that the observed strong linearity is caused by an unexpected red shift of plasmon resonance together with a broadening and weakening of the resonance caused by the transient increase in electron temperature. The model further predicts that even greater resonant enhancement of the nonlinear response can be expected in high-mobility graphene, suggesting that nonlinear graphene plasmonic devices could be promising candidates for nonlinear optical processing.

  11. Microwave radiation absorption: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, J A

    1991-07-01

    The literature contains much evidence that absorption of microwave energy will lead to behavioral changes in man and laboratory animals. The changes include simple perturbations or outright stoppage of ongoing behavior. On one extreme, intense microwave absorption can result in seizures followed by death. On the other extreme, man and animals can hear microwave pulses at very low rates of absorption. Under certain conditions of exposure, animals will avoid microwaves, while under other conditions, they will actively work to obtain warmth produced by microwaves. Some research has shown behavioral effects during chronic exposure to low-level microwaves. The specific absorption rates that produce behavioral effects seem to depend on microwave frequency, but controversy exists over thresholds and mechanism of action. In all cases, however, the behavioral disruptions cease when chronic microwave exposure is terminated. Thermal changes in man and animals during microwave exposure appear to account for all reported behavioral effects.

  12. Importance of the green color, absorption gradient, and spectral absorption of chloroplasts for the radiative energy balance of leaves.

    PubMed

    Kume, Atsushi

    2017-03-14

    Terrestrial green plants absorb photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) but do not absorb photons evenly across the PAR waveband. The spectral absorbance of photosystems and chloroplasts is lowest for green light, which occurs within the highest irradiance waveband of direct solar radiation. We demonstrate a close relationship between this phenomenon and the safe and efficient utilization of direct solar radiation in simple biophysiological models. The effects of spectral absorptance on the photon and irradiance absorption processes are evaluated using the spectra of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The radiation absorption of a leaf arises as a consequence of the absorption of chloroplasts. The photon absorption of chloroplasts is strongly dependent on the distribution of pigment concentrations and their absorbance spectra. While chloroplast movements in response to light are important mechanisms controlling PAR absorption, they are not effective for green light because chloroplasts have the lowest spectral absorptance in the waveband. With the development of palisade tissue, the incident photons per total palisade cell surface area and the absorbed photons per chloroplast decrease. The spectral absorbance of carotenoids is effective in eliminating shortwave PAR (<520 nm), which contains much of the surplus energy that is not used for photosynthesis and is dissipated as heat. The PAR absorptance of a whole leaf shows no substantial difference based on the spectra of direct or diffuse solar radiation. However, most of the near infrared radiation is unabsorbed and heat stress is greatly reduced. The incident solar radiation is too strong to be utilized for photosynthesis under the current CO2 concentration in the terrestrial environment. Therefore, the photon absorption of a whole leaf is efficiently regulated by photosynthetic pigments with low spectral absorptance in the highest irradiance waveband and through a combination of pigment density

  13. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed Central

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children. PMID:6476870

  14. Reflective-tube absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Bartz, Robert; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    The design and calibration of a proposed in situ spectral absorption meter is evaluated using a laboratory prototype. The design includes a silver coated (second-surface) glass tube, a tungsten light source (stabilized by means of optical feedback), a monochromator, and a solid state detector. The device measures the absorption coefficient plus a portion of the volume scattering function. Theoretical analyses and laboratory experiments which explore the magnitude and variation of the errors due to scattering and internal reflections are described. Similar analyses are performed on the Cary 1 18 Spectrophotometer to allow cross calibration. Algorithms to yield the abscrption coefficient and the zenith-sun diffuse attenuation coefficient are presented and evaluated. Simultaneous measurement of the beam attenuation or backscattering coefficient allows use of algoriThms with much narrower error bands. The various methods of obtaining absorption and diffuse attenuation values are compared. Procedures for using reverse osmosis filtration to produce a clean water calibration standard are described. An absorption spectrum for pure water is obtained. Development of the absorption meter is proceeding along two lines: 1) a two-wavelength side-by-side LED is being fabricated to allow an in situ chlorophyll a absorption meter to be constructed, and 2) scientific projects using a shipboard or laboratory flow.-through pumping system are being planned.

  15. Reactivation of sub-bandgap absorption in chalcogen-hyperdoped silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Bonna K.; Sher, Meng-Ju; Mazur, Eric; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2011-06-01

    Silicon doped with nonequilibrium concentrations of chalcogens using a femtosecond laser exhibits near-unity absorption of sub-bandgap photons to wavelengths of at least 2500 nm. Previous studies have shown that sub-bandgap absorptance decreases with thermal annealing up to 1175 K and that the absorption deactivation correlates with chalcogen diffusivity. In this work, we show that sub-bandgap absorptance can be reactivated by annealing at temperatures between 1350 and 1550 K followed by fast cooling (>50 K/s). Our results suggest that the defects responsible for sub-bandgap absorptance are in equilibrium at high temperatures in hyperdoped Si:chalcogen systems.

  16. Optimization of absorption placement using geometrical acoustic models and least squares.

    PubMed

    Saksela, Kai; Botts, Jonathan; Savioja, Lauri

    2015-04-01

    Given a geometrical model of a space, the problem of optimally placing absorption in a space to match a desired impulse response is in general nonlinear. This has led some to use costly optimization procedures. This letter reformulates absorption assignment as a constrained linear least-squares problem. Regularized solutions result in direct distribution of absorption in the room and can accommodate multiple frequency bands, multiple sources and receivers, and constraints on geometrical placement of absorption. The method is demonstrated using a beam tracing model, resulting in the optimal absorption placement on the walls and ceiling of a classroom.

  17. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption.

  18. Absorption and Metabolism of Xanthophylls

    PubMed Central

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Nagao, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids, especially xanthophylls, have attracted significant attention because of their characteristic biological activities, including anti-allergic, anti-cancer, and anti-obese actions. Although no less than forty carotenoids are ingested under usual dietary habits, only six carotenoids and their metabolites have been found in human tissues, suggesting selectivity in the intestinal absorption of carotenoids. Recently, facilitated diffusion in addition to simple diffusion has been reported to mediate the intestinal absorption of carotenoids in mammals. The selective absorption of carotenoids may be caused by uptake to the intestinal epithelia by the facilitated diffusion and an unknown excretion to intestinal lumen. It is well known that β-carotene can be metabolized to vitamin A after intestinal absorption of carotenoids, but little is known about the metabolic transformation of non provitamin A xanthophylls. The enzymatic oxidation of the secondary hydroxyl group leading to keto-carotenoids would occur as a common pathway of xanthophyll metabolism in mammals. This paper reviews the absorption and metabolism of xanthophylls by introducing recent advances in this field. PMID:21747746

  19. Transient absorption of vibrationally excited water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, H. J.; Nienhuys, H.-K.; Gallot, G.; Lascoux, N.; Gale, G. M.; Leicknam, J.-C.; Bratos, S.

    2002-02-01

    We study the spectral response of the transition between the first and the second excited state of the O-H stretch vibration of HDO dissolved in liquid D2O with two-color femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy. The spectral response of this transition differs strongly from the fundamental absorption spectrum of the O-H stretch vibration. In addition, excitation of the O-H stretch vibration is observed to lead to a change of the hydrogen-bond dynamics of liquid water. We show that both these observations can be described with a refined quantum-mechanical version of the Lippincott-Schroeder model for hydrogen-bonded OH⋯O systems.

  20. Comparative study of some robust statistical methods: weighted, parametric, and nonparametric linear regression of HPLC convoluted peak responses using internal standard method in drug bioavailability studies.

    PubMed

    Korany, Mohamed A; Maher, Hadir M; Galal, Shereen M; Ragab, Marwa A A

    2013-05-01

    This manuscript discusses the application and the comparison between three statistical regression methods for handling data: parametric, nonparametric, and weighted regression (WR). These data were obtained from different chemometric methods applied to the high-performance liquid chromatography response data using the internal standard method. This was performed on a model drug Acyclovir which was analyzed in human plasma with the use of ganciclovir as internal standard. In vivo study was also performed. Derivative treatment of chromatographic response ratio data was followed by convolution of the resulting derivative curves using 8-points sin x i polynomials (discrete Fourier functions). This work studies and also compares the application of WR method and Theil's method, a nonparametric regression (NPR) method with the least squares parametric regression (LSPR) method, which is considered the de facto standard method used for regression. When the assumption of homoscedasticity is not met for analytical data, a simple and effective way to counteract the great influence of the high concentrations on the fitted regression line is to use WR method. WR was found to be superior to the method of LSPR as the former assumes that the y-direction error in the calibration curve will increase as x increases. Theil's NPR method was also found to be superior to the method of LSPR as the former assumes that errors could occur in both x- and y-directions and that might not be normally distributed. Most of the results showed a significant improvement in the precision and accuracy on applying WR and NPR methods relative to LSPR.

  1. Thomson Thick X-Ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar, PG 0946+301.

    PubMed

    Mathur; Green; Arav; Brotherton; Crenshaw; deKool; Elvis; Goodrich; Hamann; Hines; Kashyap; Korista; Peterson; Shields; Shlosman; van Breugel W; Voit

    2000-04-20

    We present a deep ASCA observation of a broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) PG 0946+301. The source was clearly detected in one of the gas imaging spectrometers, but not in any other detector. If BALQSOs have intrinsic X-ray spectra similar to normal radio-quiet quasars, our observations imply that there is Thomson thick X-ray absorption (NH greater, similar1024 cm-2) toward PG 0946+301. This is the largest column density estimated so far toward a BALQSO. The absorber must be at least partially ionized and may be responsible for attenuation in the optical and UV. If the Thomson optical depth toward BALQSOs is close to 1, as inferred here, then spectroscopy in hard X-rays with large telescopes like XMM would be feasible.

  2. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  3. Three-dimensional cloud effects and enhanced atmospheric absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hirok, William John

    1997-09-01

    Recent global observations suggest that clouds may enhance atmospheric absorption of solar radiation by as much as 15-35 Wm-2 (diurnal average) over theoretical estimates. Considering that doubling of the greenhouse gas, CO2, implies a 4 Wm-2 radiative forcing on the climate system, the large discrepancy between theory and observations is disturbing. In this research, the hypothesis is tested that the plane-parallel assumption employed in climate models provides a partial explanation for discrepancies between theory and observations of atmospheric absorption. To test this hypothesis, a Monte Carlo 3-D radiative transfer model of high spectral and spatial resolution which contains all of the important atmospheric radiative constituents was developed. Computations for a synthetic tropical cloud field, derived from satellite imagery, are performed in 3-D (to represent a realistic cloud) and in two modes which are representative of traditional climate models (plane- parallel and independent pixel). Results show the 3-D cloud effect reduces broadband spatially averaged albedo, increases transmission to the surface, and enhances atmospheric absorption of solar radiation. The enhanced absorption is primarily attributed to greater absorption by water vapor for high overhead sun and increasing absorption by cloud droplets as the sun approaches the horizon. The mechanisms responsible are photon focusing/trapping within the interior of clouds, photon leakage to the lower atmosphere, cloud-side interception of the direct solar beam, cloud interception of reflected photons, and enhanced photon pathlength below layered clouds. From a sensitivity analysis, the most important factor for 3-D enhanced absorption is the vertical structure near the top of the cloud field, followed by the vertical stratification of water vapor. Internal vertical cloud heterogeneity is less important. Spectrally, the 3-D effect reduces absorption in the UV and increases absorption in the gaseous

  4. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  5. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  6. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  7. Vitamin D supplementation increases calcium absorption without a threshold effect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The maximal calcium absorption in response to vitamin D has been proposed as a biomarker for vitamin D sufficiency. Our objective was to determine whether there is a threshold beyond which increasing doses of vitamin D, or concentrations of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], no longer increase cal...

  8. "Absorption": Personality Correlate or Expectancy-Mediated Artifact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council, James R.; Kirsch, Irving

    Scales assessing absorption, or a predisposition to become highly involved in sensory and imaginative experiences in non-hypnotic contexts, have predicted hypnotic responsivity as well. To examine the effects of expectancy on hypnotic responding by measuring expectancies at different points in the hypnotic experience, and to test for possible…

  9. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  10. Separation of distinct photoexcitation species in femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; ...

    2016-02-03

    Femtosecond transient absorption microscopy is a novel chemical imaging capability with simultaneous high spatial and temporal resolution. Although several powerful data analysis approaches have been developed and successfully applied to separate distinct chemical species in such images, the application of such analysis to distinguish different photoexcited species is rare. In this paper, we demonstrate a combined approach based on phasor and linear decomposition analysis on a microscopic level that allows us to separate the contributions of both the excitons and free charge carriers in the observed transient absorption response of a composite organometallic lead halide perovskite film. We found spatialmore » regions where the transient absorption response was predominately a result of excitons and others where it was predominately due to charge carriers, and regions consisting of signals from both contributors. Lastly, quantitative decomposition of the transient absorption response curves further enabled us to reveal the relative contribution of each photoexcitation to the measured response at spatially resolved locations in the film.« less

  11. Metal powder absorptivity: Modeling and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Boley, C. D.; Mitchell, S. C.; Rubenchik, A. M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Here, we present results of numerical modeling and direct calorimetric measurements of the powder absorptivity for a number of metals. The modeling results generally correlate well with experiment. We show that the powder absorptivity is determined, to a great extent, by the absorptivity of a flat surface at normal incidence. Our results allow the prediction of the powder absorptivity from normal flat-surface absorptivity measurements.

  12. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  13. Nonlinear Saturable and Polarization-induced Absorption of Rhenium Disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yudong; Lu, Feifei; Liu, Xueming

    2017-01-01

    Monolayer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), with lamellar structure as that of graphene, has attracted significant attentions in optoelectronics and photonics. Here, we focus on the optical absorption response of a new member TMDs, rhenium disulphide (ReS2) whose monolayer and bulk forms have the nearly identical band structures. The nonlinear saturable and polarization-induced absorption of ReS2 are investigated at near-infrared communication band beyond its bandgap. It is found that the ReS2-covered D-shaped fiber (RDF) displays the remarkable polarization-induced absorption, which indicates the different responses for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations relative to ReS2 plane. Nonlinear saturable absorption of RDF exhibits the similar saturable fluence of several tens of μJ/cm2 and modulation depth of about 1% for ultrafast pulses with two orthogonal polarizations. RDF is utilized as a saturable absorber to achieve self-started mode-locking operation in an Er-doped fiber laser. The results broaden the operation wavelength of ReS2 from visible light to around 1550 nm, and numerous applications may benefit from the anisotropic and nonlinear absorption characteristics of ReS2, such as in-line optical polarizers, high-power pulsed lasers, and optical communication system.

  14. Nonlinear Saturable and Polarization-induced Absorption of Rhenium Disulfide.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yudong; Lu, Feifei; Liu, Xueming

    2017-01-05

    Monolayer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), with lamellar structure as that of graphene, has attracted significant attentions in optoelectronics and photonics. Here, we focus on the optical absorption response of a new member TMDs, rhenium disulphide (ReS2) whose monolayer and bulk forms have the nearly identical band structures. The nonlinear saturable and polarization-induced absorption of ReS2 are investigated at near-infrared communication band beyond its bandgap. It is found that the ReS2-covered D-shaped fiber (RDF) displays the remarkable polarization-induced absorption, which indicates the different responses for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations relative to ReS2 plane. Nonlinear saturable absorption of RDF exhibits the similar saturable fluence of several tens of μJ/cm(2) and modulation depth of about 1% for ultrafast pulses with two orthogonal polarizations. RDF is utilized as a saturable absorber to achieve self-started mode-locking operation in an Er-doped fiber laser. The results broaden the operation wavelength of ReS2 from visible light to around 1550 nm, and numerous applications may benefit from the anisotropic and nonlinear absorption characteristics of ReS2, such as in-line optical polarizers, high-power pulsed lasers, and optical communication system.

  15. Nonlinear Saturable and Polarization-induced Absorption of Rhenium Disulfide

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yudong; Lu, Feifei; Liu, Xueming

    2017-01-01

    Monolayer of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), with lamellar structure as that of graphene, has attracted significant attentions in optoelectronics and photonics. Here, we focus on the optical absorption response of a new member TMDs, rhenium disulphide (ReS2) whose monolayer and bulk forms have the nearly identical band structures. The nonlinear saturable and polarization-induced absorption of ReS2 are investigated at near-infrared communication band beyond its bandgap. It is found that the ReS2-covered D-shaped fiber (RDF) displays the remarkable polarization-induced absorption, which indicates the different responses for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations relative to ReS2 plane. Nonlinear saturable absorption of RDF exhibits the similar saturable fluence of several tens of μJ/cm2 and modulation depth of about 1% for ultrafast pulses with two orthogonal polarizations. RDF is utilized as a saturable absorber to achieve self-started mode-locking operation in an Er-doped fiber laser. The results broaden the operation wavelength of ReS2 from visible light to around 1550 nm, and numerous applications may benefit from the anisotropic and nonlinear absorption characteristics of ReS2, such as in-line optical polarizers, high-power pulsed lasers, and optical communication system. PMID:28053313

  16. Modelling millimetre wave propagation and absorption in a high resolution skin model: the effect of sweat glands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Moros, Eduardo G.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the potential effect of sweat gland ducts (SGD) on specific absorption rate (SAR) and temperature distributions during mm-wave irradiation. High resolution electromagnetic and bio-heat transfer models of human skin with SGD were developed using a commercially available simulation software package (SEMCAD X™). The skin model consisted of a 30 µm stratum corneum, 350 µm epidermis and papillary dermis (EPD) and 1000 µm dermis. Five SGD of 60 µm radius and 300 µm height were embedded linearly with 370 µm separation. A WR-10 waveguide positioned 20 µm from the skin surface and delivering 94 GHz electromagnetic radiation was included in the model. Saline conductivity was assigned inside SGD. SAR and temperatures were computed with and without SGD. Despite their small scale, SAR was significantly higher within SGD than in the EPD without SGD. Without SGD, SAR and temperature maxima were in the dermis near EPD. With SGD, SAR maximum was inside SGD while temperature maximum moved to the EPD/stratum-corneum junction. Since the EPD participates actively in perception, the effect of SGD should be taken into account in nociceptive studies involving mm-waves. This research represents a significant step towards higher spatial resolution numerical modelling of the skin and shows that microstructures can play a significant role in mm-wave absorption and induced temperature distributions.

  17. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A.; Cox, J. D.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    Saturable absorption is a nonperturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a semianalytical nonperturbative single-particle approach, describing electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics nonperturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. We obtain results in qualitative agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations of graphene nanoribbons including electron-electron interactions, finite-size, and higher-band effects. Remarkably, such effects are found to affect mainly the linear absorption, while the predicted saturation intensities are in good quantitative agreement in the limit of extended graphene. Additionally, we find that the modulation depth of saturable absorption in graphene can be electrically manipulated through an externally applied gate voltage. Our results are relevant for the development of graphene-based optoelectronic devices, as well as for applications in mode-locking and random lasers.

  18. Migrant labor absorption in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nayagam, J

    1992-01-01

    The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and absorption of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process."

  19. Quasistellar Objects: Intervening Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, J.; Churchill, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Every parcel of gas along the line of sight to a distant QUASAR will selectively absorb certain wavelengths of continuum light of the quasar due to the presence of the various chemical elements in the gas. Through the analysis of these quasar absorption lines we can study the spatial distributions, motions, chemical enrichment and ionization histories of gaseous structures from REDSHIFT five unti...

  20. Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows.

    PubMed

    Buote

    2000-04-01

    The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC, we have detected strong absorption over energies approximately 0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central approximately 1&arcmin; of the galaxy NGC 1399, the group NGC 5044, and the cluster A1795. These systems have among the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below approximately 0.4 keV, the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=105-106 K in which ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from H i and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass dropout in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra and X-Ray Multimirror Mission.

  1. Neutron Absorption in Geological Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Andersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal neutron absorption cross section of geological samples is determined with the steady state neutron source method. Cross section measurements of North Sea sediments demonstrate that also materials with high contents of clay minerals may be investigated with the steady state method.

  2. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  3. Inhibitor of intramembranous absorption in ovine amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Anderson, Debra F

    2014-02-01

    Intramembranous absorption increases during intra-amniotic infusion of physiological saline solutions. The increase may be due partly to the concomitant elevation in fetal urine production as fetal urine contains a stimulator of intramembranous absorption. In this study, we hypothesized that the increase in intramembranous absorption during intra-amniotic infusion is due, in part, to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is present in amniotic fluid. In late-gestation fetal sheep, amniotic fluid volume and the four primary amniotic inflows and outflows were determined over 2-day intervals under three conditions: 1) control conditions when fetal urine entered the amniotic sac, 2) during intra-amniotic infusion of 2 l/day of lactated Ringer solution when urine entered the amniotic sac, and 3) during the same intra-amniotic infusion when fetal urine was continuously replaced with lactated Ringer solution. Amniotic fluid volume, fetal urine production, swallowed volume, and intramembranous absorption rate increased during the infusions independent of fetal urine entry into the amniotic sac or its replacement. Lung liquid secretion rate was unchanged during infusion. Because fetal membrane stretch has been shown not to be involved and because urine replacement did not alter the response, we conclude that the increase in intramembranous absorption that occurs during intra-amniotic infusions is due primarily to dilution of a nonrenal inhibitor of intramembranous absorption that is normally present in amniotic fluid. This result combined with our previous study suggests that a nonrenal inhibitor(s) together with a renal stimulator(s) interact to regulate intramembranous absorption rate and, hence, amniotic fluid volume.

  4. Light Absorption By Coated Soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the IPCC best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of the uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. With the advent of techniques that can directly measure aerosol light absorption without influences due to collection substrate or light scattering (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (Arnott et al., 2005; Lack et al., 2006) and photothermal interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007)) the potential exists for quantifying this interdependence. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve this objective measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated and denuded conditions were conducted. In this paper, light absorption by dioctyl sebacate (DOS) encapsulated soot and sulfuric acid coated soot using the technique of photothermal interferometry will be presented. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a monotonic increase in light absorption as a function DOS coating thickness to nearly 100% is observed. This observation is consistent with a coating-induced amplification in particle light absorption. (Bond et al. 2006) However

  5. Optical absorptions of polyfluorene transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yvonne Y.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2005-07-01

    Conjugated polymers are a promising class of materials for organic electronics. While the progress in device performance is impressive, the basics of charge transport still pose many open questions. Specifically, conduction at the comparatively rough polymer-polymer interface in an all-polymer field-effect transistor is expected to be different from a sharp interface with an inorganic dielectric, such as silicon dioxide. In this work, charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS) is used to study the optical absorptions in the presence of charges in situ in the transistor structure. This allows direct observation of the charge carriers in the operational device via their spectroscopic signature; the technique is by design very sensitive to the properties of the semiconductor-dielectric interface. The semiconducting copolymer poly( 9,9' -dioctyl-fluorene-co-bithiophene) (F8T2) is incorporated into a top-gate thin-film transistor structure with a polymer dielectric layer deposited by spin coating and inkjet-printed polymer electrodes. A prominent charge-induced absorption at 1.65eV is observed as well as a shoulder at 1.3eV and a tail extending toward the absorption edge. The bias dependence of the CMS signature confirms that intermixing of the polymer layers is minimal, as expected from the excellent transistor characteristics. Polarization-dependent CMS measurements on aligned transistors show that the main feature at 1.65eV is strongly polarized whereas the shoulder is unpolarized. This observation, as well as further experimental evidence, lead to the conclusion that while the main absorption is attributable to the intrinsic, polaronic absorption in F8T2, the shoulder is likely to originate from a defect state.

  6. ac Magnetization transport and power absorption in nonitinerant spin chains.

    PubMed

    Trauzettel, Björn; Simon, Pascal; Loss, Daniel

    2008-07-04

    We investigate the ac transport of magnetization in nonitinerant quantum systems such as spin chains described by the XXZ Hamiltonian. Using linear response theory, we calculate the ac magnetization current and the power absorption of such magnetic systems. Remarkably, the difference in the exchange interaction of the spin chain itself and the bulk magnets (i.e., the magnetization reservoirs), to which the spin chain is coupled, strongly influences the absorbed power of the system. This feature can be used in future spintronic devices to control power dissipation. Our analysis allows us to make quantitative predictions about the power absorption, and we show that magnetic systems are superior to their electronic counterparts.

  7. Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, A. J.; Lui, C. H.; Fang, W.; Nair, N. L.; Herring, P. K.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Kong, J.; Gedik, N.

    2013-03-01

    When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap semiconductor with linear dispersion. By using time domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy in conjunction with optical pump excitation, we observe a reduced absorption of THz radiation in photoexcited graphene. The measured spectral shape of the differential optical conductivity exhibits non-Drude behavior. We discuss several possible mechanisms that contribute to the observed low-frequency non-equilibrium optical response of graphene.

  8. A platform for colorful solar cells with enhanced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhindsa, Navneet; Walia, Jaspreet; Singh Saini, Simarjeet

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate submicron thick platform integrating amorphous silicon nanowires and thin-films achieving vivid colors in transmission and reflection. The platform nearly doubles the absorption efficiency compared to the starting thin-film without much compromising with color diverseness. The structural colors can be changed over a wide range by changing the diameters of the nanowires while still keeping the absorption efficiency higher than starting thin-film. The optical response of the platform is conceptually understood for different diameters combined with different thin-film thicknesses indicating the presence of leaky waveguide modes and coupled cavity modes. Our proposed platform can enable architectural low price colorful solar cells on transparent substrates.

  9. A platform for colorful solar cells with enhanced absorption.

    PubMed

    Dhindsa, Navneet; Walia, Jaspreet; Saini, Simarjeet Singh

    2016-12-09

    We demonstrate submicron thick platform integrating amorphous silicon nanowires and thin-films achieving vivid colors in transmission and reflection. The platform nearly doubles the absorption efficiency compared to the starting thin-film without much compromising with color diverseness. The structural colors can be changed over a wide range by changing the diameters of the nanowires while still keeping the absorption efficiency higher than starting thin-film. The optical response of the platform is conceptually understood for different diameters combined with different thin-film thicknesses indicating the presence of leaky waveguide modes and coupled cavity modes. Our proposed platform can enable architectural low price colorful solar cells on transparent substrates.

  10. Laser absorption and electron propagation in rippled plasma targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Chandrasekhar; Das, Amita; Patel, Kartik

    2016-10-01

    Efficient absorption of laser energy and the collimated propagation of relativistic electron beams (generated by the laser target interaction) in plasma are two issues which are of significant importance for applications such as fast ignition scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It is shown with the help of 2-D Particle- In- Cell simulations that introducing density ripples transverse to the laser propagation direction enhances the efficiency of laser power absorption. Furthermore, the density ripples are also instrumental in suppressing the Weibel instability of the propagating electron beam (which is responsible for the divergence of the beam). A physical understanding of the two effects is also provided.

  11. Microwave absorption by nanoresonator vibrations tuned with surface modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivosudský, Ondrej; Cifra, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Elucidating the physical and chemical parameters that govern viscous damping of nanoresonator vibrations and their coupling to electromagnetic radiation is important for understanding the behavior of matter at the nanoscale. Here we develop an analytical model of microwave absorption of a longitudinally oscillating and electrically polar rod-like nanoresonator embedded in a viscoelastic fluid. We show that the slip length, which can be tuned via surface modifications, controls the quality factor and coupling of nanoresonator vibration modes to microwave radiation. We demonstrate that the larger slip length brings the sharper frequency response of the nanoresonator vibration and electromagnetic absorption. Our findings contribute to design guidelines of fluid embedded nanoresonator devices.

  12. Diel oscillation in the optical activity of carotenoids in the absorption spectrum of Nannochloropsis.

    PubMed

    Possa, Gabriela C; Santana, Hugo; Brasil, Bruno S A F; Roncaratti, Luiz F

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we show that the absorption spectrum of the microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica exhibits changes in response to the modulation of incident light. A model was used to analyze the contribution of different active pigments to the total absorption in the photosynthetically active radiation region and suggested consistent diel oscillations in the optical activity of carotenoids.

  13. Infrasound absorption by atmospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudoin, Michael; Coulouvrat, Francois; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    A model is developed for the absorption of infrasound by atmospheric clouds made of a suspension of liquid water droplets within a gaseous mixture of water vapor and air. The model is based on the work of D.A. Gubaidullin and R.I. Nigmatulin [Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 26, 207-228, 2000], which is applied to atmospheric clouds. Three physical mechanisms are included : unsteady viscous drag associated with momentum transfers due to the translation of water droplets, unsteady thermal transfers between the liquid and gaseous phases, and mass transfers due to the evaporation or condensation of the water phase. For clouds, in the infrasonic frequency range, phase changes are the dominant mechanisms (around 1 Hz), while viscous and heat transfers become significant only around 100 Hz. Mass transfers involve two physical effects : evaporation and condensation of the water phase at the droplet surface, and diffusion of the water vapor within the gaseous phase. The first one is described through the Hertz-Knudsen-Langmuir theory based on kinetic theory. It involves a little known coefficient known as coefficient of accommodation. The second one is the classical Fick diffusion. For clouds, and unless the coefficient of accommodation is very small (far from the generally recommended value is close to one), diffusion is the main limiting effects for mass transfers. In a second stage, the sound and infrasound absorption is evaluated for various typical clouds up to about 4 km altitude. Above this altitude, the ice content of clouds is dominant compared to their water content, and the present model is not applicable. Cloud thickness, water content, and droplets size distribution are shown to be the major factors influencing the infrasound absorption. A variety of clouds have been analyzed. In most cases, it is shown that infrasound absorption within clouds is several orders larger than classical absorption (due to molecular relaxation of nitrogen and oxygen molecules in presence

  14. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-06

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions' spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches).

  15. Landing gear energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Christopher P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A landing pad system is described for absorbing horizontal and vertical impact forces upon engagement with a landing surface where circumferentially arranged landing struts respectively have a clevis which receives a slidable rod member and where the upper portion of a slidable rod member is coupled to the clevis by friction washers which are force fit onto the rod member to provide for controlled constant force energy absorption when the rod member moves relative to the clevis. The lower end of the friction rod is pivotally attached by a ball and socket to a support plate where the support plate is arranged to slide in a transverse direction relative to a housing which contains an energy absorption material for absorbing energy in a transverse direction.

  16. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  17. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  18. Optical Absorption Characteristics of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-11

    properties of the powder as well as the thickness of the layer. For a layer that is thick enough so that no light is transmitted, the Kubelka -- Munk theory...which is a two stream radiative transfer model, relates the reflectance to the ratio of the absorption to the scattering. The Kubelka - Munk theory has...of the aerosol material is known. Under the assumptions of the Kubelka - Munk . theory, the imaginary component of the refractive index is deter- mined

  19. Photodetector with enhanced light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Kane, James

    1985-01-01

    A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the absorption of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.

  20. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  1. Physiology of Intestinal Absorption and Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Kiela, Pawel R.; Ghishan, Fayez K.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all nutrients from the diet are absorbed into blood across the highly polarized epithelial cell layer forming the small and large intestinal mucosa. Anatomical, histological, and functional specializations along the gastrointestinal tract are responsible for the effective and regulated nutrient transport via both passive and active mechanisms. In this chapter, we summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism of intestinal absorption of key nutrients such as sodium, anions (chloride, sulfate, oxalate), carbohydrates, amino acids and peptides, lipids, lipidand water-soluble vitamins, as well as the major minerals and micronutrients. This outline, including the molecular identity, specificity, and coordinated activities of key transport proteins and genes involved, serves as the background for the following chapters focused on the pathophysiology of acquired and congenital intestinal malabsorption, as well as clinical tools to test and treat malabsorptive symptoms. PMID:27086882

  2. High Absorptance Coatings for THz Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    High absorptance materials find application throughout the electromagnetic spectrum as radiation terminations, calibration standards, and glint reduction coatings. Successful use of materials at millimeter through submillimeter wavelengths requires an accurate knowledge and control over their thermal, mechanical, and electromagnetic properties in order to achieve the desired response while minimizing mass and volume. In practice, the achieved blackness is intimately linked to the material properties and geometry. Here, we summarize the characteristics of a variety of tunable artificial dielectric mixtures appropriate for THz applications at room and cryogenic temperatures. Theoretical guidelines for their application will be provided in the context of the effective-medium mean-field-approximation. The performance of these coatings as elements of reflectance standards, radiometric flux calibrators, passive thermal radiators, and stray light suppression baffles for imaging systems will be reviewed.

  3. Total absorption in ultra-thin lossy layer on transparent substrate using dielectric resonance structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, T.; Iizuka, H.

    2017-03-01

    A resonant sub-wavelength structure made of a high-refractive-index dielectric material exhibits a resonator-like response and provides unity reflection. We show that near-unity absorption is obtained by using a sub-wavelength resonant structure, which consists of periodic high-refractive-index nano-blocks, when an ultra-thin absorption layer is attached to a transparent dielectric substrate. The resonant structure does not necessarily touch the absorption layer and, therefore, a coating film can be inserted between the absorption layer and the periodic structure. Our results significantly extend application scenarios of detectors and optoelectronic devices that can be implemented on transparent dielectric substrates.

  4. Effect of nonlinear absorption on electric field applied lead chloride by Z-scan technique

    SciTech Connect

    Rejeena, I.; Lillibai,; Nampoori, V. P. N.; Radhakrishnan, P.; Rahimkutty, M. H.

    2014-10-15

    The preparation, spectral response and optical nonlinearity of gel grown lead chloride single crystals subjected to electric field of 20V using parallel plate arrangements have been investigated. Optical band gap of the samples were determined using linear absorption spectra. Open aperture z-scan was employed for the determination of nonlinear absorption coefficient of PbCl{sub 2} solution. The normalized transmittance curve exhibits a valley shows reverse saturable absorption. The non linear absorption at different input fluences were recorded using a single Gaussian laser beam in tight focus geometry. The RSA nature of the sample makes it suitable for optical limiting applications.

  5. Nonlinear absorption coefficient of pulsed laser deposited MgZnO thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Arpana Dar, Tanveer A.; Solanki, Ravi; Sen, Pratima; Phase, D. M.

    2015-06-24

    We report the imaginary part of 3{sup rd} order nonlinear susceptibility and the nonlinear absorption coefficient of Mg doped ZnO thin film using standard Z-scan technique. The origin of nonlinear absorption is attributed to the two photon absorption followed by the free carrier absorption because of the presence of oxygen vacancy defects. We have also confirmed the experimental results with the theoretical results obtained by considering the steady state response of a two level atom with the monochromatic field models.

  6. Absorption Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of absorption spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on absorption spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)

  7. Solvent effects on two-photon absorption of dialkylamino substituted distyrylbenzene chromophore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ke; Ferrighi, Lara; Frediani, Luca; Wang, Chuan-Kui; Luo, Yi

    2007-05-01

    Solvent effects on the two-photon absorption of a symmetrical diamino substituted distyrylbenzene chromophore have been studied using the density functional response theory in combination with the polarizable continuum model. It is shown that the dielectric medium has a rather small effect both on the bond length alternation and on the one-photon absorption spectrum, but it affects significantly the two-photon absorption cross section. It is found that both one- and two-photon absorptions are extremely sensitive to the planarity of the molecule, and the absorption intensity can be dramatically reduced by the conformation distortion. It has led to the conclusion that the experimentally observed anomalous solvent effect on the two-photon absorption of dialkylamino substituted distyrylbenzene chromophores cannot be attributed to the intrinsic properties of a single molecule and its interaction with solvents.

  8. Economic strategies of plant absorptive roots vary with root diameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, D. L.; Wang, J. J.; Kardol, P.; Wu, H. F.; Zeng, H.; Deng, X. B.; Deng, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Plant roots typically vary along a dominant ecological axis, the root economics spectrum, depicting a tradeoff between resource acquisition and conservation. For absorptive roots, which are mainly responsible for resource acquisition, we hypothesized that root economic strategies differ with increasing root diameter. To test this hypothesis, we used seven plant species (a fern, a conifer, and five angiosperms from south China) for which we separated absorptive roots into two categories: thin roots (thickness of root cortex plus epidermis < 247 µm) and thick roots. For each category, we analyzed a range of root traits related to resource acquisition and conservation, including root tissue density, different carbon (C), and nitrogen (N) fractions (i.e., extractive, acid-soluble, and acid-insoluble fractions) as well as root anatomical traits. The results showed significant relationships among root traits indicating an acquisition-conservation tradeoff for thin absorptive roots while no such trait relationships were found for thick absorptive roots. Similar results were found when reanalyzing data of a previous study including 96 plant species. The contrasting economic strategies between thin and thick absorptive roots, as revealed here, may provide a new perspective on our understanding of the root economics spectrum.

  9. Question of Ages of Cenozoic Volcanic Centers Inferred Beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) from Coincident Aeromagnetic and Radar Ice Sounding Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2007-12-01

    The recently acquired radar ice sounding surveys (Holt, et al., 2006) extending the 1990s Central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey to the Amundsen and Bellingshausen sea coasts allows us to revise a thought experiment reported by Behrendt et al., 1991 from very limited bed elevation data. Were the ice of the WAIS flowing through the WR to be compressed to the density of crustal rock, almost all of the area beneath the WAIS would be at or above sea level, much >1 km elevation. There are only about 10-20% of the very deep areas (such as the Bentley subglacial trench and the Byrd Subglacial Basin) filled with 3-4-km thick ice that would be well below sea level. The age of the 5-7-km high rift shoulder bounding the asymmetric WR from northern Victoria Land through the Horlick Mountains (where it diverges from the Transantarctic Mountains) to the Ellsworth Mountains has been reported as old as Cretaceous. Volcanic exposures associated with the West Antarctic rift system in the present WAIS area extend at least to 34 Ma and the West Antarctic ice sheet has flowed through the rift possibly as far back in time as 25 Ma. Active volcanism has been reported for the WR at only a few widely scattered locations, so speculations about present volcanic activity beneath the WAIS are quite uncertain, and it is probably quite rare. The Central West Antarctic aeromagnetic and radar ice sounding survey carried out in the 1990s revealed about 1000 "volcanic centers" characterized by 100-1000 nT shallow source magnetic anomalies, at least 400 of which have associated bed topography. About 80% of these show relief <200 m and have been interpreted as smoothed off as they were erupted (injected) into the moving WAIS. Several kilometer-thick highly magnetic sources are required to fit these anomalies requiring high remanent magnetizations in the present field direction. We interpreted these sources as subvolcanic intrusions which must be younger than about 100 Ma because the

  10. Non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not interact with heme iron absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Gaitán, Diego; Olivares, Manuel; Lönnerdal, Bo; Brito, Alex; Pizarro, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    The absorption of heme iron has been described as distinctly different from that of non-heme iron. Moreover, whether heme and non-heme iron compete for absorption has not been well established. Our objective was to investigate the potential competition between heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate for absorption, when both iron forms are ingested on an empty stomach. Twenty-six healthy nonpregnant women were selected to participate in two iron absorption studies using iron radioactive tracers. We obtained the dose-response curve for absorption of 0.5, 10, 20, and 50 mg heme iron doses, as concentrated red blood cells. Then, we evaluated the absorption of the same doses, but additionally we added non-heme iron, as ferrous sulfate, at constant heme/non-heme iron molar ratio (1:1). Finally, we compare the two curves by a two-way ANOVA. Iron sources were administered on an empty stomach. One factor analysis showed that heme iron absorption was diminished just by increasing total heme iron (P < 0.0001). The addition of non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate did not have any effect on heme iron absorption (P = NS). We reported evidence that heme and non-heme iron as ferrous sulfate does not compete for absorption. The mechanism behind the absorption of these iron sources is not clear.

  11. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  12. Abnormal relationships between the neural response to high- and low-calorie foods and endogenous acylated ghrelin in women with active and weight-recovered anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Holsen, Laura M.; Lawson, Elizabeth A.; Christensen, Kara; Klibanski, Anne; Goldstein, Jill M.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence contributing to the understanding of neurobiological mechanisms underlying appetite dysregulation in anorexia nervosa draws heavily on separate lines of research into neuroendocrine and neural circuitry functioning. In particular, studies consistently cite elevated ghrelin and abnormal activation patterns in homeostatic (hypothalamus) and hedonic (striatum, amygdala, insula) regions governing appetite. The current preliminary study examined the interaction of these systems, based on research demonstrating associations between circulating ghrelin levels and activity in these regions in healthy individuals. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 13 women with active anorexia nervosa (AN), 9 women weight-recovered from AN (AN-WR), and 12 healthy-weight control women using a food cue functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm, with assessment of fasting levels of acylated ghrelin. Healthy-weight control women exhibited significant positive associations between fasting acylated ghrelin and activity in the right amygdala, hippocampus, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex in response to high-calorie foods, associations which were absent in the AN and AN-WR groups. Women with AN-WR demonstrated a negative relationship between ghrelin and activity in the left hippocampus in response to high-calorie foods, while women with AN showed a positive association between ghrelin and activity in the right orbitofrontal cortex in response to low-calorie foods. Findings suggest a breakdown in the interaction between ghrelin signaling and neural activity in relation to reward responsivity in AN, a phenomenon that may be further characterized using pharmacogenetic studies. PMID:24862390

  13. YAC contigs of the Rab1 and wobbler (wr) spinal muscular atrophy gene region on proximal mouse chromosome 11 and of the homologous region on human chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Wedemeyer, N.; Lengeling, A.; Ronsiek, M.

    1996-03-05

    Despite rapid progress in the physical characterization of murine and human genomes, little molecular information is available on certain regions, e.g., proximal mouse chromosome 11 (Chr 11) and human chromosome 2p (Chr2p). We have localized the wobbler spinal atrophy gene wr to proximal mouse Chr 11, tightly linked to Rab1, a gene coding for a small GTP-binding protein, and Glns-ps1, an intronless pseudogene of the glutamine synthetase gene. We have not used these markers to construct a 1.3-Mb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contig of the Rab1 region on mouse Chr 11. Four YAC clones isolated from two independent YAC libraries were characterized by rare-cutting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and sequence-tagged site (STS) isolation and mapping. Rab1 and Glns-ps1 were found to be only 200 kb apart. A potential CpG island near a methylated NarI site and a trapped exon, ETG1.1, were found over 250 kb from Rab1. Two overlapping YACs were identified that contained a 150-kb region of human Chr 2p, comprising the RAB1 locus, AHY1.1, and the human homologue of ETG1.1, indicating a high degree of conservation of this region in the two species. We mapped AHY1.1 and thus human RAB1 on Chr 2p13.4-p14 using somatic cell hybrids and a radiation hybrid panel, thus extending a known region of conserved synteny between mouse Chr 11 and human Chr 2p. Recently, the gene LMGMD2B for a human recessive neuromuscular disease, limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, has been mapped to 2p13-p16. The conservation between the mouse Rab1 and human RAB1 regions will be helpful in identifying candidate genes for the wobbler spinal muscular atrophy and in clarifying a possible relationship between wr and LMGMD2B. 33 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. The Soil Chemical Response to Decreases in Atmospheric Sulfate deposition Across the Northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHale, M. R.; Siemion, J.; Lawrence, G. B.; Mast, A.

    2012-12-01

    the WR site in northwestern Maine, which had the highest precipitation pH and the lowest stream-water pH, there were no clear changes in soil pH in the A- or B-horizons at either the ridge top or the mid slope sampling locations. Soil chemical analyses indicate that chemistry of the B-horizon had the greatest influence on stream water chemistry. WR A-horizon soils had the highest base saturation of the three sites, but WR B-horizon soils had the lowest base saturation. As a result although WR had the highest precipitation pH during the study period, it also had the lowest stream-water pH. In addition, soil pH did not change during the 10-year period when acid deposition was decreasing. During a 10-year period of decreasing acid deposition B-horizon soil chemistry from the mid and lower slope locations appeared to control the response of soil and water chemistry at all of the study sites.

  15. Glucagon receptor antagonism induces increased cholesterol absorption[S

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiaodong; Lu, Ku; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Castro-Perez, Jose M.; Previs, Stephen; Wright, Michael; Shah, Vinit; Herath, Kithsiri; Xie, Dan; Szeto, Daphne; Forrest, Gail; Xiao, Jing Chen; Palyha, Oksana; Sun, Li-Ping; Andryuk, Paula J.; Engel, Samuel S.; Xiong, Yusheng; Lin, Songnian; Kelley, David E.; Erion, Mark D.; Davis, Harry R.; Wang, Liangsu

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon and insulin have opposing action in governing glucose homeostasis. In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), plasma glucagon is characteristically elevated, contributing to increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Therefore, glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonism has been proposed as a pharmacologic approach to treat T2DM. In support of this concept, a potent small-molecule GCGR antagonist (GRA), MK-0893, demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy to reduce hyperglycemia, with an HbA1c reduction of 1.5% at the 80 mg dose for 12 weeks in T2DM. However, GRA treatment was associated with dose-dependent elevation of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c). The current studies investigated the cause for increased LDL-c. We report findings that link MK-0893 with increased glucagon-like peptide 2 and cholesterol absorption. There was not, however, a GRA-related modulation of cholesterol synthesis. These findings were replicated using structurally diverse GRAs. To examine potential pharmacologic mitigation, coadministration of ezetimibe (a potent inhibitor of cholesterol absorption) in mice abrogated the GRA-associated increase of LDL-c. Although the molecular mechanism is unknown, our results provide a novel finding by which glucagon and, hence, GCGR antagonism govern cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26373568

  16. Transdermal absorption of radioprotectors in the rat using permeation-enhancing vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Lamperti, A.; Ziskin, M.C.; Bergey, E.; Gorlowski, J.; Sodicoff, M. )

    1990-11-01

    Topical radioprotection of rat skin with WR-2721 has not been effective presumably because the drug does not cross the stratum corneum to reach the epidermis and dermis. Earlier, we showed in the mouse that WR-2721 and cysteine dissolved in permeation-enhancing vehicles passed through the skin more readily than when in water. However, the most effective vehicles in the mouse were not necessarily as effective in the rat. Here we report that the most effective transport vehicles in the rat were (1) water with WR-2721, (2) water and dimethylformamide (DMF) with cysteine, and (3) water and DMF with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Pretreatment of the skin with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) further improved the transfer of the radioprotectors across the skin in most cases. After pretreatment with DMSO, the most effective vehicles were (1) water for WR-2721, (2) water and methyl-2-pyrrolidone (M-2-P) for cysteine, and (3) DMF for PGE2.

  17. Physiological Importance and Mechanisms of Protein Hydrolysate Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhanghi, Brian M.; Matthews, James C.

    Understanding opportunities to maximize the efficient digestion and assimilation by production animals of plant- and animal-derived protein products is critical for farmers, nutritionists, and feed manufacturers to sustain and expand the affordable production of high quality animal products for human consumption. The challenge to nutritionists is to match gastrointestinal tract load to existing or ­inducible digestive and absorptive capacities. The challenge to feed manufacturers is to develop products that are efficient substrates for digestion, absorption, and/or both events. Ultimately, the efficient absorption of digesta proteins depends on the mediated passage (transport) of protein hydrosylate products as dipeptides and unbound amino acids across the lumen- and blood-facing membranes of intestinal absorptive cells. Data testing the relative efficiency of supplying protein as hydrolysates or specific dipeptides versus as free amino acids, and the response of animals in several physiological states to feeding of protein hydrolysates, are presented and reviewed in this chapter. Next, data describing the transport mechanisms responsible for absorbing protein hydrolysate digestion products, and the known and putative regulation of these mechanisms by their substrates (small peptides) and hormones are presented and reviewed. Several conclusions are drawn regarding the efficient use of protein hydrolysate-based diets for particular physiological states, the economically-practical application of which likely will depend on technological advances in the manufacture of protein hydrolysate products.

  18. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  19. Energy Absorption of Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    34 tion in a helicopter crash is accomplished Foye , et al. [4 an 5] examlnei th, primarily through three mechanisms; strok- energy absorption chara"tr...irar [3] and Foye , et al. [4]. No significant o. ’, energy release was obse:’viV-cirur, i m: rcg . . the Gr/FE tubes s .. 0T Fu!.A 4r /-e 45rK r5 1...K/E, GI/E, hybrid com- posite tubes and aluminum tubes. The 5. R. L. Foye , and W. T. H,.dg, " r following statements are based on results Results from

  20. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  1. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  2. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility. PMID:27958303

  3. Absorption of CO laser radiation by NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes absorption calculations and measurements at selected infrared CO laser wavelengths which are nearly coincident with absorption lines in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO near 5.3 microns. Initial work was directed towards establishing the optimal CO laser-NO absorption line coincidence for high temperature applications. Measurements of the absorption coefficient at this optimal laser wavelength were carried out, first using a room-temperature absorption cell for high-temperature calculations and then using a shock tube, for the temperature range 630-4000 K, to validate the high temperature calculations.

  4. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  5. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Bast, Radovan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-05-20

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process.

  6. X-RAY ABSORPTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, Assaf; Behar, Ehud E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.il

    2013-09-01

    The soft X-ray photoelectric absorption of high-z quasars has been known for two decades, but has no unambiguous astrophysical context. We construct the largest sample to date of 58 high-redshift quasars (z > 0.45) selected from the XMM-Newton archive based on a high photon count criterion (>1800). We measure the optical depth {tau} at 0.5 keV and find that 43% of the quasars show significant absorption. We aim to find which physical parameters of the quasars, e.g., redshift, radio luminosity, radio loudness, or X-ray luminosity, drive their observed absorption. We compare the absorption behavior with redshift with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We also compare the absorption with a comparison sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows. Although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with diffuse IGM absorption, many intermediate-z (0.45 < z < 2) quasars are not sufficiently absorbed for this scenario, and are appreciably less absorbed than GRBs. Only 10/37 quasars at z < 2 are absorbed, and only 5/30 radio-quiet quasars are absorbed. We find a weak correlation between {tau} and z, and an even weaker correlation between {tau} and radio luminosity. These findings lead to the conclusion that although a diffuse IGM origin for the quasar absorption is unlikely, the optical depth does seem to increase with redshift, roughly as (1 + z){sup 2.2{+-}0.6}, tending to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 at high redshifts, similar to the high-z GRBs. This result can be explained by an ionized and clumpy IGM at z < 2, and a cold, diffuse IGM at higher redshift. If, conversely, the absorption occurs at the quasar, and owing to the steep L{sub x} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 7.1{+-}0.5} correlation in the present sample, the host column density scales as N{sub H}{proportional_to}L{sub x}{sup 0.7{+-}0.1}.

  7. Sulphate absorption across biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2016-01-01

    1. Sulphonation is unusual amongst the common Phase II (condensation; synthetic) reactions experienced by xenobiotics, in that the availability of the conjugating agent, sulphate, may become a rate-limiting factor. This sulphate is derived within the body via the oxygenation of sulphur moieties liberated from numerous ingested compounds including the sulphur-containing amino acids. Preformed inorganic sulphate also makes a considerable contribution to this pool. 2. There has been a divergence of opinion as to whether or not inorganic sulphate may be readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and this controversy still continues in some quarters. Even more so, is the vexing question of potential absorption of inorganic sulphate via the lungs and through the skin. 3. This review examines the relevant diverse literature and concludes that sulphate ions may move across biological membranes by means of specific transporters and, although the gastrointestinal tract is by far the major portal of entry, some absorption across the lungs and the skin may take place under appropriate circumstances.

  8. Formaldehyde Absorption toward W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G.F.; Bennett, C.L.; Petuchowski, S.J.

    1988-04-01

    We have measured formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) absorption toward the HII region complex W51A (G49.5-0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions with angular resolution of approximately 4 inch. The continuum HII region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. We observe no H{sub 2}CO emission in regions of low continuum intensity. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping than previous maps at lower resolution. The good S/N of the maps allows accurate estimation of the complicated line profiles, showing some of the absorbing clouds to be quite patchy. We list the properties of the opacity spectra for a number of positions both in the clumps and in the more diffuse regions of the absorbing clouds, and derive column densities for the 1{sub 11} and 2{sub 12} rotational levels of ortho-formaldehyde.

  9. QED-driven laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Blackburn, T.; Ratan, N.; Sadler, J.; Ridgers, C.; Kasim, M.; Ceurvorst, L.; Holloway, J.; Baring, M.; Bell, A.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.; Tabak, M.; Wilks, S.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Absorption covers the physical processes which convert intense photon flux into energetic particles when a high-power laser (I >1018 W cm-2 where I is intensity at 1 μm wavelength) illuminates optically-thick matter. It underpins important applications of petawatt laser systems today, e.g., in isochoric heating of materials. Next-generation lasers such as ELI are anticipated to produce quantum electrodynamical (QED) bursts of γ-rays and anti-matter via the multiphoton Breit-Wheeler process which could enable scaled laboratory probes, e.g., of black hole winds. Here, applying strong-field QED to advances in plasma kinematic theory, we present a model elucidating absorption limited only by an avalanche of self-created electron-positron pairs at ultra-high-field. The model, confirmed by multidimensional QED-PIC simulations, works over six orders of magnitude in optical intensity and reveals this cascade is initiated at 1.8 x 1025 W cm-2 using a realistic linearly-polarized laser pulse. Here the laser couples its energy into highly-collimated electrons, ions, γ-rays, and positrons at 12%, 6%, 58% and 13% efficiency, respectively. We remark on attributes of the QED plasma state and possible applications.

  10. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions’ spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches). PMID:28067834

  11. Absorption in Extended Inhomogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, P. K.; Krotkov, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The launch of several different sensors, including CloudSat, into the A-train constellation of satellites allows us for the first time to compute absorption that can occur in realistic vertically inhomogeneous clouds including multiple cloud decks. CloudSat data show that these situations are common. Therefore, understanding vertically inhomogeneous clouds is important from both climate and satellite atmospheric composition remote sensing perspectives. Satellite passive sensors that operate from the near IR to the UV often rely on radiative cloud pressures derived from absorption in oxygen bands (A, B, gamma, or O2-O2 bands) or from rotational-Raman scattering in order to retrieve information about atmospheric trace gases. The radiative cloud pressure is distinct from the physical cloud top derived from thermal infrared measurements. Therefore, the combination of information from different passive sensors yields some information about the cloud vertical profile. When either or both the clouds or atmospheric absorbers (trace gases and aerosols) are vertically inhomogeneous, the use of an effective cloud pressure derived from these approaches may lead to errors. Here, we focus on several scenarios (deep convective clouds and distinct two layer clouds) based on realistic cloud optical depth vertical profiles derived from the CloudSatfMODIS combination. We focus on implications for trace-gas column amount retrievals (specifically ozone and NO2) and derived surface UV irradiance from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Atrain Aura platform.

  12. Energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study on the energy absorption characteristics of selected composite material systems are presented and the results compared with aluminum. Composite compression tube specimens were fabricated with both tape and woven fabric prepreg using graphite/epoxy (Gr/E), Kevlar (TM)/epoxy (K/E) and glass/epoxy (Gl/E). Chamfering and notching one end of the composite tube specimen reduced the peak load at initial failure without altering the sustained crushing load, and prevented catastrophic failure. Static compression and vertical impact tests were performed on 128 tubes. The results varied significantly as a function of material type and ply orientation. In general, the Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the Gl/E or K/E tubes for the same ply orientation. The 0/ + or - 15 Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the aluminum tubes. Gr/E and Gl/E tubes failed in a brittle mode and had negligible post crushing integrity, whereas the K/E tubes failed in an accordian buckling mode similar to the aluminum tubes. The energy absorption and post crushing integrity of hybrid composite tubes were not significantly better than that of the single material tubes.

  13. High Resolution Spectra of Low Redshift Damped Lyalpha Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. D.; Beaver, E. A.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.; Smith, H. E.

    1998-05-01

    We have been able to form a fairly complete picture of the galaxy responsible for the z_a=0.395 absorption line system in PKS 1229--021 by combining Keck HIRES and LRIS spectroscopy with observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The image of the absorber is consistent with the inclined disk of a moderately luminous spiral galaxy. We have not been able to detect the continuum from this galaxy spectroscopically, but our LRIS spectra show emission from [O II] lambda3727 which can be interpreted to be indicative of star formation at the rate of a few M_⊙ per year. The HIRES spectra clearly show an ``edge--leading'' absorption profile. Prochaska and Wolfe have predicted that the velocity of the center of mass of the absorbing galaxy should fall near one edge of the absorption profile if the damped Lyalpha systems are due to the rotating disks of spiral galaxies. The [O II] emission velocity is consistent with this, but there is some ambiguity due to the doublet nature of the [O II] emission. Although the absorption lines of the abundant elements are saturated in the components which correspond to the H I absorption, we have been able to measure accurate column densities for Ca II, Ti II, and Mn II for comparison with the H I column density determined from low resolution HST/FOS spectra. The abundances are compatible with approximately 0.1 of solar, with little or no dust, but they are also consistent with lines of sight toward zeta Oph through warm interstellar clouds. HIRES observations of the z_a=0.692 absorption line system in 3CR 286 will also be discussed, after the data are fully analyzed. This work is part of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Guaranteed Time Observations and is supported by NASA grant NAG5--1858 and the NSF.

  14. The molecular basis of ultrasonic absorption by proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    This article reviews significant advances in understanding the basis for the magnitude of ultrasonic absorption in proteins and related biological materials. Carstensen and Schwan's accurate and extensive measurements on blood and hemoglobin solutions provided the initial experimental data; these were augmented by data from measurements on aqueous solutions of gelatin, bovine serum albumin, lysozyme, various polypeptides, and amino acids. The initial frequency range of 1-10 MHz was expanded to 0.035-1000 MHz; temperature and pH dependences of absorption were studied. Theoretical approaches included consideration of the relative motion of blood cells in plasma, perturbation of water structure around macromolecules, solvation of charged entities, proton-transfer reactions, and helix-coil transitions. Proton-transfer reactions between amino and carboxylic groups and water proved to be largely responsible for the observed peaks in pH dependence of absorption coefficient; the peaks occurred in the basic and acidic regions corresponding to the pKs for titration of these groups. Such reactions could not account for the magnitude of absorption at physiological pH because only histidine titrated in this range. Extensive analysis, using relaxation theory, and measurements have shown that the proton transfer reaction between the imidazole group of histidine and hydrogen phosphate ion (in solution) provides sufficient volume change for significant ultrasonic absorption at physiological pH. Excellent agreement between theory and experiment was found with the peptide bacitracin in phosphate buffer solutions. By generalizing these results to the case of a protein, Slutsky wt al estimated maximum values of frequency-dependent absorption coefficients for typical tissue and found them to be correct to order of magnitude.

  15. Assessing the absorption of new pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, I J

    2001-11-01

    The advent of more efficient methods to synthesize and screen new chemical compounds is increasing the number of chemical leads identified in the drug discovery phase. Compounds with good biological activity may fail to become drugs due to insufficient oral absorption. Selection of drug development candidates with adequate absorption characteristics should increase the probability of success in the development phase. To assess the absorption potential of new chemical entities numerous in vitro and in vivo model systems have been used. Many laboratories rely on cell culture models of intestinal permeability such as, Caco-2, HT-29 and MDCK. To attempt to increase the throughput of permeability measurements, several physicochemical methods such as, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) columns and parallel artificial membrane permeation assay (PAMPA) have been used. More recently, much attention has been given to the development of computational methods to predict drug absorption. However, it is clear that no single method will sufficient for studying drug absorption, but most likely a combination of systems will be needed. Higher throughput, less reliable methods could be used to discover 'loser' compounds, whereas lower throughput, more accurate methods could be used to optimize the absorption properties of lead compounds. Finally, accurate methods are needed to understand absorption mechanisms (efflux-limited absorption, carrier-mediated, intestinal metabolism) that may limit intestinal drug absorption. This information could be extremely valuable to medicinal chemists in the selection of favorable chemo-types. This review describes different techniques used for evaluating drug absorption and indicates their advantages and disadvantages.

  16. Computer programs for absorption spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    Jones, R N

    1969-03-01

    Brief descriptions are given of twenty-two modular computer programs for performing the basic numerical computations of absorption spectrophotometry. The programs, written in Fortran IV for card input and output, are available from the National Research Council of Canada. The input and output formats are standardized to permit easy interfacing to yield more complex data processing systems. Though these programs were developed for ir spectrophotometry, they are readily modified for use with digitized visual and uv spectrophotometers. The operations covered include ordinate and abscissal unit and scale interconversions, ordinate addition and subtraction, location of band maxima and minima, smoothing and differentiation, slit function convolution and deconvolution, band profile analysis and asymmetry quantification, Fourier transformation to time correlation curves, multiple overlapping band separation in terms of Cauchy (Lorentz), Gauss, Cauchy-Gauss product, and Cauchy-Gauss sum functions and cell path length determination from fringe spacing analysis.

  17. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  18. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  19. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  20. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N -2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  1. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  2. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators. PMID:24492860

  3. Acoustic Absorption in Porous Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Johnston, James C.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of both the areas of materials science and acoustics is necessary to successfully develop materials for acoustic absorption applications. This paper presents the basic knowledge and approaches for determining the acoustic performance of porous materials in a manner that will help materials researchers new to this area gain the understanding and skills necessary to make meaningful contributions to this field of study. Beginning with the basics and making as few assumptions as possible, this paper reviews relevant topics in the acoustic performance of porous materials, which are often used to make acoustic bulk absorbers, moving from the physics of sound wave interactions with porous materials to measurement techniques for flow resistivity, characteristic impedance, and wavenumber.

  4. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators.

  5. Analysis of frequency dependent pump light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlmuth, Matthias; Pflaum, Christoph

    2011-03-01

    Simulations have to accurately model thermal lensing in order to help improving resonator design of diode pumped solid state lasers. To this end, a precise description of the pump light absorption is an important prerequisite. In this paper, we discuss the frequency dependency of the pump light absorption in the laser crystal and its influence on the simulated laser performance. The results show that the pump light absorption has to include the spectral overlap of the emitting pump source and the absorbing laser material. This information can either be used for a fully frequency dependent absorption model or, at least in the shown examples, to compute an effective value for an exponential Beer-Lambert law of absorption. This is particularly significant at pump wavelengths coinciding with a peak of absorption. Consequences for laser stability and performance are analyzed for different pump wavelengths in a Nd:YAG laser.

  6. Studies of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for weak absorption gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liucheng; Duo, Liping; Gong, Deyu; Ma, Yanhua; Zhang, Zhiguo; Wang, Yuanhu; Zhou, Dongjian; Jin, Yuqi

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the concentrations of trace amount metastable species in chemical lasers, an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for the detection of weak absorption gases has been built with a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.6x10-8 cm-1. The absorption spectrum of trace amount gaseous ammonia and water vapor was obtained with a spectral resolution of about 78 MHz. A multiple-line absorption spectroscopic method to determine the temperature of gaseous ammonia has been developed by use of multiple lines of ammonia molecule absorption spectrum.

  7. Atomic absorption spectroscopy in ion channel screening.

    PubMed

    Stankovich, Larisa; Wicks, David; Despotovski, Sasko; Liang, Dong

    2004-10-01

    This article examines the utility of atomic absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with cold flux assays, to ion channel screening. The multiplicity of ion channels that can be interrogated using cold flux assays and atomic absorption spectroscopy is summarized. The importance of atomic absorption spectroscopy as a screening tool is further elaborated upon by providing examples of the relevance of ion channels to various physiological processes and targeted diseases.

  8. Absorption Coefficient of Alkaline Earth Halides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    levels . As a natural consequence, the magnitude of the absorption coefficient is the key parameter in selecting laser window materials. Over the past...of as can be achieved through improved crystal growing techniques and surface polishing. 2.5. Urbach’s Rule A central question for the development of...high absorption levels , inaccuracies progressively increasing with decreasing absorption level , a natural consequence of decreasing in instrumental

  9. Olestra ingestion and dietary fat absorption in humans.

    PubMed

    Daher, G C; Cooper, D A; Zorich, N L; King, D; Riccardi, K A; Peters, J C

    1997-08-01

    The effect of olestra, a zero-calorie fat replacement, on the absorption of dietary fat was determined with a dual-isotope technique in 67 healthy male subjects. After a 30-d adaptation period in which they consumed potato chips which delivered either 10 g/d olestra or 10 g/d triglyceride under free-living conditions, the subjects were housed in a metabolic ward and given 0, 8, 20 or 32 g olestra in potato chips. The chips were eaten as part of a breakfast containing about 38 g of fat, about 0.16 mg of 14C-triolein, and a nonabsorbable marker, 51CrCl3. Feces were collected for 7 d, and aliquots of the two daily collections containing the highest levels of 51Cr were oxidized. The CO2 was collected, and 14C content was determined by liquid scintillation spectrometry. The fractional absorption of 14C-triolein was calculated from the average ratios of 14C/51Cr dosed and measured in the feces. Olestra had a slight but significant dose-response effect on triglyceride absorption: the highest olestra dose (32 g) reduced absorption by 1.2%. This effect is not nutritionally significant with respect to either availability of essential fatty acids or energy intake.

  10. Giant many-body effects in liquid ammonia absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, we accurately calculate the absorption spectrum of liquid ammonia up to 13 eV using many-body perturbation approach. The electronic bandgap of liquid NH3 is perfectly described as the combination of density functional theory, Coulomb-hole screened exchange, and G0W0 approximation to the electronic self-energy, yielding a direct gap (Γ → Γ) of 7.71 eV, fully consistent with the experimentally measured gap from photo-emission spectroscopy. With respect to the NH3 optical properties, the entire spectrum in particular the low lying first absorption band is extremely affected by electron-hole interactions, leading to a fundamental redistribution of spectral weights of the independent-particle spectrum. Three well separated but broad main peaks are identified at 7.0, 9.8, and 11.8 eV with steadily increasing intensities in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe a giant net blue-shift of the first absorption peak of about 1.4 eV from gaseous to liquid phase as the direct consequence of many-body effects, allowing the associated liquid ammonia absorption band exciton to delocalize and feel more effectively the repulsion effects imposed by the surrounding solvent shells. Further, the spectrum is insensitive to the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions. Concerning electronic response structure of liquid NH3, it is most sensitive to excitations at energies lower than its electronic gap.

  11. In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Jonathan H.; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Bluhm, Hendrik; Coriton, Bruno; Huang, Erxiong; Osborn, David L.

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy for imaging carbonaceous species in hydrocarbon flames is demonstrated using synchrotron radiation. Soft X-rays are absorbed by core level electrons in all carbon atoms regardless of their molecular structure. Core electron spectroscopy affords distinct advantages over valence spectroscopy, which forms the basis of traditional laser diagnostic techniques for combustion. In core level spectroscopy, the transition linewidths are predominantly determined by the instrument response function and the decay time of the core-hole, which is on the order of a femtosecond. As a result, soft X-ray absorption measurements can be performed in flames with negligible Doppler and collisional broadening. Core level spectroscopy has the further advantage of measuring all carbonaceous species regardless of molecular structure in the far-edge region, whereas near-edge features are molecule specific. Interferences from non-carbon flame species are unstructured and can be subtracted. In the present study, absorption measurements in the carbon K-edge region are demonstrated in low-pressure ( P total = 20-30 Torr) methane jet flames. Two-dimensional imaging of the major carbonaceous species, CH4, CO2, and CO, is accomplished by tuning the synchrotron radiation to the respective carbon K-edge, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) transitions and scanning the burner.

  12. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function.

  13. Sulphur trioxide absorption apparatus and process

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, G.M.

    1987-03-31

    This patent describes a contact process for producing a concentrated sulphuric acid from dry sulphur dioxide and oxygen containing mixtures which employs the absorption of sulphur trioxide from a hot, dry gas stream containing sulphur trioxide into at least one sulphuric acid stream. The improvement described here comprises: (a) feeding the gas stream to a lower packed absorption zone contained within an absorption tower; (b) feeding a first sulphuric acid stream to the lower absorption zone to effect absorption of a major portion of the sulphur trioxide from the gas stream into the first sulphuric acid stream to produce a first enriched sulphuric acid stream and a depleted sulphur trioxide gas stream; (c) feeding the depleted sulphur trioxide gas stream to an upper packed absorption zone above the lower absorption zone within the tower; and (d) feeding a second sulphuric acid stream to the upper absorption zone to effect absorption of substantially all of the sulphur trioxide remaining in the depleted sulphur trioxide gas stream to produce a second enriched sulphuric acid stream and a substantially sulphur trioxide-free gas stream.

  14. Study of Evanescence Wave Absorption in Lindane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, A.; Prasetyo, E.; Gitrin, M. P.; Suryanti, V.

    2017-02-01

    Evanescent wave field has been studied for the purpose of tailoring fiber sensor capable of detecting lindane concentration in a solution. The mounted fiber was optically polished such that part of the fiber clad is stripped off. To study the evanescent wave field absorption in lindane solution, the unclad fiber was immersed in the solution. Light coming out of the fiber was studied at different wavelength each for different lindane concentration. It was shown that evanescent wave field absorption is stronger at wavelength corresponding to lindane absorption band as has been shown from absorption studies lindane in UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer.

  15. Terahertz wave absorption via preformed air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ji; Zhang, LiangLiang; Wu, Tong; Zhang, CunLin; Zhao, YueJin

    2016-12-01

    Terahertz wave generation from laser-induced air plasma has continued to be an exciting field of research over the course of the past decade. In this paper, we report on an investigation concerning terahertz wave absorption with preformed plasma created by another laser pulse. We examine terahertz absorption behavior by varying the pump power and then analyze the polarization effect of the preplasma beam on terahertz wave absorption. The results of experiments conducted in which a type-I beta barium borate (BBO) crystal is placed before the preformed air plasma indicate that the fundamental (ω) and second harmonic (2ω) pulses can also influence terahertz absorption.

  16. Sensitive and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser-induced deflection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon

    2012-12-01

    The laser-induced deflection (LID) technique, a photo-thermal deflection setup with transversal pump-probe-beam arrangement, is applied for sensitive and absolute absorption measurements of optical materials and coatings. Different LID concepts for bulk and transparent coating absorption measurements, respectively, are explained, focusing on providing accurate absorption data with only one measurement and one sample. Furthermore, a new sandwich concept is introduced that allows transferring the LID technique to very small sample geometries and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with weak photo-thermal responses. For each of the different concepts, a representative application example is given. Particular emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure for providing absolute absorption data. The validity of an electrical calibration procedure for the LID setup is proven using specially engineered surface absorbing samples. The electrical calibration procedure is then applied to evaluate two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples.

  17. Improved conversion efficiency of GaN-based solar cells with Mn-doped absorption layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Jinn-Kong; Huang, Feng-Wen; Lee, Chia-Hui; Lee, Ming-Lun; Yeh, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Po-Cheng; Lai, Wei-Chih

    2013-08-01

    GaN-based solar cells with Mn-doped absorption layer grown by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy were investigated. The transmittance spectrum and the spectral response showed the presence of an Mn-related band absorption property. Power-dependent, dual-light excitation, and lock-in amplifier techniques were performed to confirm if the two-photon absorption process occurred in the solar cells with Mn-doped GaN absorption layer. Although a slight decrease in an open circuit voltage was observed, a prominent increase in the short circuit current density resulted in a significant enhancement of the overall conversion efficiency. Under one-sun air mass 1.5 G standard testing condition, the conversion efficiency of Mn-doped solar cells can be enhanced by a magnitude of 5 times compared with the cells without Mn-doped absorption layer.

  18. Trait absorption is related to enhanced emotional picture processing and reduced processing of secondary acoustic probes.

    PubMed

    Benning, Stephen D; Rozalski, Vincent; Klingspon, Kara L

    2015-10-01

    Trait absorption reflects a propensity to have one's attention drawn to engaging sensory or imaginal experiences. It is related to self-reported levels of positive and negative emotionality, but little work has examined whether absorption is related to greater levels of basic emotional processing. We used the late positive potential (LPP) to pictures and P3 response to subsequent startle probes during those pictures to examine how absorption was related to initial emotional processing and reactivity to a second stimulus. Across genders, absorption was positively related to LPP amplitude to emotional versus neutral pictures at PZ, and it was negatively related to overall P3 amplitude to startle probes at FZ. Thus, absorption appears to index greater processing of emotional material at the cost of reduced processing of subsequent incoming stimuli.

  19. Excited state two photon absorption of a charge transfer radical dimer in the near infrared.

    PubMed

    Schiccheri, Nicola; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2005-06-02

    Nonlinear transmission measurements of a solution of radical dimers of tetramethyl-tetrathiafulvalene, (TMTTF+)2, recorded with 9 ns laser pulses at 1064 nm are reported and interpreted on the basis of a multiphoton absorption process. One finds that the process can be interpreted with a sequence of three photon absorption, the first being a one photon absorption related to the intermolecular charge transfer process characteristic of the dimers and the second a two photon absorption from the excited state created with the first process. A model calculation allows one to obtain the value of the two photon absorption cross section which is found to be several orders of magnitude larger than those usually found for two photon absorbing systems excited from the ground state. These results show the importance of an excited-state population for obtaining large nonlinear optical responses.

  20. Absorption Characteristics of Vertebrate Non-Visual Opsin, Opn3

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, Tomohiro; Nagata, Takashi; Mason, Benjamin; Koyanagi, Mitsumasa; Terakita, Akihisa

    2016-01-01

    Most animals possess multiple opsins which sense light for visual and non-visual functions. Here, we show spectral characteristics of non-visual opsins, vertebrate Opn3s, which are widely distributed among vertebrates. We successfully expressed zebrafish Opn3 in mammalian cultured cells and measured its absorption spectrum spectroscopically. When incubated with 11-cis retinal, zebrafish Opn3 formed a blue-sensitive photopigment with an absorption maximum around 465 nm. The Opn3 converts to an all-trans retinal-bearing photoproduct with an absorption spectrum similar to the dark state following brief blue-light irradiation. The photoproduct experienced a remarkable blue-shift, with changes in position of the isosbestic point, during further irradiation. We then used a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay to investigate light-dependent cAMP responses in cultured cells expressing zebrafish, pufferfish, anole and chicken Opn3. The wild type opsins did not produce responses, but cells expressing chimera mutants (WT Opn3s in which the third intracellular loops were replaced with the third intracellular loop of a Gs-coupled jellyfish opsin) displayed light-dependent changes in cAMP. The results suggest that Opn3 is capable of activating G protein(s) in a light-dependent manner. Finally, we used this assay to measure the relative wavelength-dependent response of cells expressing Opn3 chimeras to multiple quantally-matched stimuli. The inferred spectral sensitivity curve of zebrafish Opn3 accurately matched the measured absorption spectrum. We were unable to estimate the spectral sensitivity curve of mouse or anole Opn3, but, like zebrafish Opn3, the chicken and pufferfish Opn3-JiL3 chimeras also formed blue-sensitive pigments. These findings suggest that vertebrate Opn3s may form blue-sensitive G protein-coupled pigments. Further, we suggest that the method described here, combining a cAMP-dependent luciferase reporter assay with chimeric opsins possessing the third

  1. Demonstration That Calibration of the Instrument Response to Polarizations Parallel and Perpendicular to the Object Space Projected Slit of an Imaging Spectrometer Enable Measurement of the Atmospheric Absorption Spectrum in Region of the Weak CO2 Band for the Case of Arbitrary Polarization: Implication for the Geocarb Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumer, J. B.; Rairden, R. L.; Polonsky, I. N.; O'Brien, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (TIMS) unit rebuilt to operate in a narrow spectral region, approximately 1603 to 1615 nm, of the weak CO2 band as described by Kumer et al. (2013, Proc. SPIE 8867, doi:10.1117/12.2022668) was used to conduct the demonstration. An integrating sphere (IS), linear polarizers and quarter wave plate were used to confirm that the instrument's spectral response to unpolarized light, to 45° linearly polarized light and to circular polarized light are identical. In all these cases the intensity components Ip = Is where Ip is the component parallel to the object space projected slit and Is is perpendicular to the slit. In the circular polarized case Ip = Is in the time averaged sense. The polarizer and IS were used to characterize the ratio Rθ of the instrument response to linearly polarized light at the angle θ relative to parallel from the slit, for increments of θ from 0 to 90°, to that of the unpolarized case. Spectra of diffusely reflected sunlight passed through the polarizer in increments of θ, and divided by the respective Rθ showed identical results, within the noise limit, for solar spectrum multiplied by the atmospheric transmission and convolved by the Instrument Line Shape (ILS). These measurements demonstrate that unknown polarization in the diffusely reflected sunlight on this small spectral range affect only the slow change across the narrow band in spectral response relative to that of unpolarized light and NOT the finely structured / high contrast spectral structure of the CO2 atmospheric absorption that is used to retrieve the atmospheric content of CO2. The latter is one of the geoCARB mission objectives (Kumer et al, 2013). The situation is similar for the other three narrow geoCARB bands; O2 A band 757.9 to 768.6 nm; strong CO2 band 2045.0 to 2085.0 nm; CH4 and CO region 2300.6 to 2345.6 nm. Polonsky et al have repeated the mission simulation study doi:10.5194/amt-7-959-2014 assuming no use of a geo

  2. Absorption of harmonic light in plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Maria A.; de Ceglia, Domenico; Scalora, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Surface plasmons are known for their ability to provide large field enhancement at the interface between a metal and another medium. They can be observed in a variety of structures ranging from plain metallic films to nanoparticles and gratings. Thanks to their large electric field enhancement, surface plasmons have also been exploited for the enhancement of second and third harmonic generation. In fact, metals possess a relatively high third order susceptibility and, although dipole-allowed quadratic nonlinearities are not present in the bulk, they also display an effective second order response that arises from symmetry breaking at the surface, magnetic dipoles (Lorentz force), inner-core electrons, convective nonlinear sources, and electron gas pressure. While much attention has been devoted to achieve efficient excitation of surface plasmons to improve far-field harmonic generation, little or no attention has been paid to the dissipation of the generated harmonic light. Therefore, we undertake a discussion of both harmonic generation and absorption in simple metallic/dielectric interfaces with or without excitation of surface plasmons. We demonstrate that, despite the best efforts embarked upon to study plasmon excitation, the absorbed harmonic energy can far surpass the energy emitted in the far-field. These findings suggest that quantification of the absorbed harmonic light should be an important parameter in evaluating designs of plasmonic nanostructures for frequency mixing.

  3. Effect of folic acid on zinc absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, L.; Keating, S.; King, J.C.; Stokstad, E.L.R.

    1986-03-05

    The effect of folic acid on zinc uptake was studied in the human and in the rat. The serum zinc response to a 25 mg oral dose or zinc was measured with and without a 10 mg dose of folic acid. Serum zinc levels were measured prior to the oral dose of zinc and at hourly intervals up to 4 hours after the dose. When zinc was given along, the increases in serum zinc from baseline at hours 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 92, 118, 92 and 66 ..mu..g/dl, respectively. When both zinc and folic acid were given, the increases in serum zinc at hours 1, 2, 3 and 4 were 100, 140, 110 and 75 ..mu..g/dl, respectively. When the increases in serum zinc were plotted against time, there was no significant difference between the areas under the two curves. The everted jejunal sac from the rat was used to study the effect of folate on zinc transport using 100 ..mu..M zinc in the mucosal buffer. The addition of folic acid at levels up to 10/sup -3/M had no significant effect on zinc transport to the serosal side solution or on uptake by the intestinal mucosa. This in vivo study with humans and in vitro study with rat intestine does not support a direct adverse effect of folic acid on zinc absorption.

  4. Effect of water absorption on pollen adhesion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haisheng; Lizarraga, Leonardo; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Carson Meredith, J

    2015-03-15

    Pollens possess a thin liquid coating, pollenkitt, which plays a major role in adhesion by forming capillary menisci at interfaces. Unfortunately, the influence of humidity on pollenkitt properties and capillary adhesion is unknown. Because humidity varies widely in the environment, the answers have important implications for better understanding plant reproduction, allergy and asthma, and pollen as atmospheric condensation nuclei. Here, pollenkitt-mediated adhesion of sunflower pollen to hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was measured as a function of humidity. The results quantify for the first time the significant water absorption of pollenkitt and the resulting complex dependence of adhesion on humidity. On hydrophilic Si, adhesion increased with increasing RH for pollens with or without pollenkitt, up to 200nN at 70% RH. In contrast, on hydrophobic PS, adhesion of pollenkitt-free pollen is independent of RH. Surprisingly, when pollenkitt was present adhesion forces on hydrophobic PS first increased with RH up to a maximum value at 35% RH (∼160nN), and then decreased with further increases in RH. Independent measurement of pollenkitt properties is used with models of capillary adhesion to show that humidity-dependent changes in pollenkitt wetting and viscosity are responsible for this complex adhesion behavior.

  5. Fluid absorption solar energy receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bair, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    A conventional solar dynamic system transmits solar energy to the flowing fluid of a thermodynamic cycle through structures which contain the gas and thermal energy storage material. Such a heat transfer mechanism dictates that the structure operate at a higher temperature than the fluid. This investigation reports on a fluid absorption receiver where only a part of the solar energy is transmitted to the structure. The other part is absorbed directly by the fluid. By proportioning these two heat transfer paths the energy to the structure can preheat the fluid, while the energy absorbed directly by the fluid raises the fluid to its final working temperature. The surface temperatures need not exceed the output temperature of the fluid. This makes the output temperature of the gas the maximum temperature in the system. The gas can have local maximum temperatures higher than the output working temperature. However local high temperatures are quickly equilibrated, and since the gas does not emit radiation, local high temperatures do not result in a radiative heat loss. Thermal radiation, thermal conductivity, and heat exchange with the gas all help equilibrate the surface temperature.

  6. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  7. Integrated measurements of 222Rn by absorption in Makrofol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir; Buysse, Jozef; Poffijn, André; Van Deynse, Annick; Meesen, Geert

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a method for long-term 222Rn measurements based on the radon absorption ability and track-etch properties of Makrofol has been proposed. The basic idea is to remove, after exposure, a surface layer, thicker than the range of the α-particles of the 222Rn or 220Rn progenies, and to study the track density of the electrochemically etched tracks at that depth. This paper summarizes the performance of the method under laboratory and field conditions. The effects on the response due to differences in pressure, temperature, humidity, the presence of 220Rn, dust and cigarette smoke in the air have been studied experimentally. The effect of these factors, but the temperature, is either absent, or restricted to about 10% for the very extreme cases. The variation of the response at the studied depth of 83 μm over the temperature interval 15-25°C is ±12% around the 19.5°C value. The field comparison conducted showed an agreement between the method of radon absorption in Makrofol and the conventional diffusion chambers. Therefore, a potential for long-term 222Rn measurements in the human environment by radon absorption in Makrofol or equivalent polycarbonates clearly exists.

  8. Energy absorption capabilities of composite sandwich panels under blast loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar Ray, Tirtha

    As blast threats on military and civilian structures continue to be a significant concern, there remains a need for improved design strategies to increase blast resistance capabilities. The approach to blast resistance proposed here is focused on dissipating the high levels of pressure induced during a blast through maximizing the potential for energy absorption of composite sandwich panels, which are a competitive structural member type due to the inherent energy absorption capabilities of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Furthermore, the middle core in the sandwich panels can be designed as a sacrificial layer allowing for a significant amount of deformation or progressive failure to maximize the potential for energy absorption. The research here is aimed at the optimization of composite sandwich panels for blast mitigation via energy absorption mechanisms. The energy absorption mechanisms considered include absorbed strain energy due to inelastic deformation as well as energy dissipation through progressive failure of the core of the sandwich panels. The methods employed in the research consist of a combination of experimentally-validated finite element analysis (FEA) and the derivation and use of a simplified analytical model. The key components of the scope of work then includes: establishment of quantified energy absorption criteria, validation of the selected FE modeling techniques, development of the simplified analytical model, investigation of influential core architectures and geometric parameters, and investigation of influential material properties. For the parameters that are identified as being most-influential, recommended values for these parameters are suggested in conceptual terms that are conducive to designing composite sandwich panels for various blast threats. Based on reviewing the energy response characteristic of the panel under blast loading, a non-dimensional parameter AET/ ET (absorbed energy, AET, normalized by total energy

  9. Do Atoms Really "Emit" Absorption Lines?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecher, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Presents three absorption line sources that enhance student understanding of the phenomena associated with the interaction of light with matter and help dispel the misconception that atoms "emit" absorption lines. Sources include neodymium, food coloring and other common household liquids, and fluorescent materials. (MDH)

  10. Iron absorption from intrinsically-labeled lentils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low iron (Fe) absorption from important staple foods may contribute to Fe deficiency in developing countries. To date, there are few studies examining the Fe bioavailability of pulse crops as commonly prepared and consumed by humans. The objectives of this study were to characterize the Fe absorpt...

  11. A Low-Cost Quantitative Absorption Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Daniel R.; Todt, Michael A.; Davis, H. Floyd

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to make absorption spectrophotometry available to high school chemistry and physics classes, we have designed an inexpensive visible light absorption spectrophotometer. The spectrophotometer was constructed using LEGO blocks, a light emitting diode, optical elements (including a lens), a slide-mounted diffraction grating, and a…

  12. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  13. Low absorptance porcelain-on-aluminum coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leggett, H.

    1979-01-01

    Porcelain thermal-control coating for aluminum sheet and foil has solar absorptance of 0.22. Specially formulated coating absorptance is highly stable, changing only 0.03 after 1,000 hours of exposure to simulated sunlight and can be applied by standard commercial methods.

  14. Energy Absorption Behaviors of Nanoporous Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    energy absorption isotherms : (a) the first loading-unloading cycle; (b) the second, the third, and the fourth loading-unloading cycles without thermal...change, AV (cm- /g) Fig.7 The energy absorption isotherms under a cyclic loading in a 23. lwt% aqueous solution of NaC1. 80

  15. On the dynamic and static manifestation of molecular absorption in thin films probed by a microcantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Finot, Eric; Fabre, Arnaud; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Mechanical resonators shaped like microcantilevers have been demonstrated as a platform for very sensitive detection of chemical and biological analytes. However, its use as an analytical tool will require fundamental understanding of the molecular absorption-induced effects in the static and dynamic sensor response. The effect of absorption-induced surface stress on the microcantilever response is here investigated using palladium hydride formation. It is shown that the resonance and deformation states of the cantilever monitored simultaneously exhibit excellent correlation with the phase of the hydride formation. However, the associated frequency shifts and quasistatic bending are observed to be independent during solid solution phase. Importantly, absorption-induced changes in the elastic parameters of the palladium film are found to play a dominant role in the static and dynamic response. The presented results help in discerning the parameters that control the cantilever response as well as the relationships between these parameters.

  16. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  17. Coherent perfect absorption induced by the nonlinearity of a Helmholtz resonator.

    PubMed

    Achilleos, V; Richoux, O; Theocharis, G

    2016-07-01

    In this work, coherent perfect absorption of sound waves induced by the nonlinear response of a Helmholtz Resonator side loaded to a waveguide, is reported. It is shown that this two-port system can perfectly absorb two high amplitude symmetric incident waves under a certain condition. For the one-sided incidence configuration, this condition leads to an absorption equal to 0.5. Experiments verify these results and are in agreement with an analytical nonlinear impedance model for the resonator. The nonlinear control of perfect absorption opens new possibilities in the design of high amplitude sound attenuators for aero-engine applications.

  18. Two-photon absorption of [2.2]paracyclophane derivatives in solution: A theoretical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrighi, Lara; Frediani, Luca; Fossgaard, Eirik; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-12-01

    The two-photon absorption of a class of [2.2]paracyclophane derivatives has been studied using quadratic response and density functional theories. For the molecules investigated, several effects influencing the two-photon absorption spectra have been investigated, such as side-chain elongation, hydrogen bonding, the use of ionic species, and solvent effects, the latter described by the polarizable continuum model. The calculations have been carried out using a recent parallel implementation of the polarizable continuum model in the DALTON code. Special attention is given to those aspects that could explain the large solvent effect on the two-photon absorption cross sections observed experimentally for this class of compounds.

  19. Ultraviolet absorption of common spacecraft contaminants. [to control effects of contaminants on optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colony, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    Organic contamination of ultraviolet optical systems is discussed. Degradation of signal by reflection, scattering, interference, and absorption is shown. The first three processes depend on the physical state of the contaminant while absorption depends on its chemical structure. The latter phenomenon is isolated from the others by dissolving contaminants in cyclohexane and determining absorption spectra from 2100A to 3600A. A variety of materials representing the types of contaminants responsible for most spaceflight hardware problems is scanned and the spectra is presented. The effect of thickness is demonstrated for the most common contaminant, di(2 ethyl hexyl)phthalate, by scanning successive dilutions.

  20. Absorption imaging of a single atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streed, Erik W.; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G.; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-01

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  1. Absorption imaging of a single atom.

    PubMed

    Streed, Erik W; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-03

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  2. [Effect of altitude on iron absorption].

    PubMed

    Pizarro, F; Zavaleta, N; Hertrampf, E; Berlanga, R; Camborda, L; Olivares, M

    1998-03-01

    Iron bioavailability was evaluated in people living in high altitudes. Absorption was estimated from a reference dose of ferrous ascorbate and from a standard diet of wheat flour, using extrinsic tag radioisotope technique of 55Fe and 59Fe. Twenty four volunteers, healthy women, with ages ranging from 28 to 45 years, participated. Of those, eleven lived at 3450 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.) in Huancayo city-Peru (study group), and 13 lived in Santiago de Chile at 630 m.a.s.l. (control group). Iron absorption from reference dose of ferrous ascorbate was 32.0% and 31.1% in the study and control groups respectively. The geometric mean of iron absorption from the standard diet, corrected to 40% of absorption of reference dose, was 9.0% and 6.9% in the study and control groups respectively (NS). The results suggest that altitude does not produce a high iron absorption in highlander residents.

  3. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  4. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yongjun

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the μM level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  5. Near-infrared absorptions of monomethylhydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Mark; Kurtz, Joe

    1993-01-01

    The peak absorption coefficients for two near-infrared absorptions of monomethylhydrazine, CH3-N2H3, (MMH) were measured. Absorption bands located at 1.524 micrometers (6560/cm), 1.557 micrometers (6423/cm), and 1.583 micrometers (6316/cm) are assigned to the Delta upsilon = 2 overtones of the infared N-H stretching fundamentals at 3317, 3245 and 3177/cm. An absorption band located at 1.04 micrometers (9620 +/- 100/cm) is assigned to the Delta upsilon = 3 overtone of one of these fundamentals. The peak absorption coefficients (alpha(sub 10)) at 1.524 micrometers (6560 +/- 20/cm) and 1.04 micrometers (9620 +/- 100/cm) are 31 x 10(exp -3) and 0.97 x 10(exp -3)/(cm atm), respectively. Uncertainties in these coefficients were estimated to be less than +/- 20% due primarily to uncertainties in the partial vapor pressure of MMH.

  6. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  7. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  8. Operating data on a novel absorption refrigeration cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, R.J.

    1993-12-23

    This report describes the modifications and repairs made to the 200 ton absorption refrigeration pilot plant since April 1992, when Clarkson University assumed responsibility for it. Current operating problems and the performance of the plant, achieved to date, are detailed. Performance has been limited by small air leaks into the absorption section of the plant and by plugging in a heat exchanger which has limited the flow of purified glycol to the absorber. Nonetheless, the plant has been operated for periods of over eight hours with sustained cooling loads of 40 tons. Chilled water has been produced at a temperature as low as 38 degrees Fahrenheit. The principal leak sources have been pinpointed. Plans are described for achieving plant operation at designed levels.

  9. Effects of alpha- and beta-tigogenin cellobiosides on cholesterol absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Malinow, M.R.; Gardner, J.O.; Nelson, J.T.; McLaughlin, P.; Upson, B.; Aigner-Held, R.

    1986-09-01

    We have synthesized alpha- and beta-anomers of tigogenin cellobioside and have determined their effects on intestinal absorption of (1,2-/sup 3/H)cholesterol in rats. We demonstrated that the loss of tritium label likely to occur in the conversion of cholesterol to coprostanone was minimal. Dose response studies showed that both anomers depressed intestinal absorption of cholesterol but the depression was greater with the beta-anomer.

  10. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  11. Absorption-Line Studies of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael

    We propose to undertake a "reverberation analysis" of the variable absorption lines ill two Seyfert Galaxies (NGC 4051 and Mrk 279) to help understand the origin of intrinsic absorption lines in AGNs. Stich an analysis is a powerful tool for elucidating the radial distribution of absorbing gas in the broad-line region (BLR) and narrow-line region (NLR). Only two Seyferts have previously been studied with this technique: NGC 4151 (Bromage el al. 1985; Clavel et al. 1987) and NGC 3516 (Voit, Shull, and Begelman 1987). The absorption features have been interpreted as an outflow of ionized clouds from the nuclear region or from an accretion disk affected by UV/X-ray heating. Neither the source of the absorbing gas in these Seyferts nor the "gene" which distingishes them from other Seyferts is known. Until the 1984 onset of absorption in Mrk 279, broad self-absorbed. lines had been observed only in Seyferts of low intrinsic luminosity, such as NGC 4051. Mrk 279 is intrinsically much brighter, and therefore more quasar-like, than the other three absorptionline Seyfert I's in the CfA sample. Thus, it may show how the absorption phenomenon changes at higher luminosity and could bridge the gap between the low luminosity absorption-line Seyferts and the well-studied broad absorption-line (BAL) QSO's. In addition, Mrk 279's significant redshift will allow us to study, for the first time, the Ly-alpha line in an absorption-line Seyfert. With 3 US-1 shifts for each of these two underobserved Seyferts, we can double the number of objects in which absorption-line variability has been studied and investigate why the absorption-line strengths correlate or anti-correlate with the UV continuum.

  12. Photon absorption potential coefficient as a tool for materials engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akande, Raphael Oluwole; Oyewande, Emmanuel Oluwole

    2016-09-01

    Different atoms achieve ionizations at different energies. Therefore, atoms are characterized by different responses to photon absorption in this study. That means there exists a coefficient for their potential for photon absorption from a photon source. In this study, we consider the manner in which molecular constituents (atoms) absorb photon from a photon source. We observe that there seems to be a common pattern of variation in the absorption of photon among the electrons in all atoms on the periodic table. We assume that the electrons closest to the nucleus (En) and the electrons closest to the outside of the atom (Eo) do not have as much potential for photon absorption as the electrons at the middle of the atom (Em). The explanation we give to this effect is that the En electrons are embedded within the nuclear influence, and similarly, Eo electrons are embedded within the influence of energies outside the atom that there exists a low potential for photon absorption for them. Unlike En and Eo, Em electrons are conditioned, such that there is a quest for balance between being influenced either by the nuclear force or forces external to the atom. Therefore, there exists a higher potential for photon absorption for Em electrons than for En and Eo electrons. The results of our derivations and analysis always produce a bell-shaped curve, instead of an increasing curve as in the ionization energies, for all elements in the periodic table. We obtained a huge data of PAPC for each of the several materials considered. The point at which two or more PAPC values cross one another is termed to be a region of conflicting order of ionization, where all the atoms absorb equal portion of the photon source at the same time. At this point, a greater fraction of the photon source is pumped into the material which could lead to an explosive response from the material. In fact, an unimaginable and unreported phenomenon (in physics) could occur, when two or more PAPCs cross, and

  13. Mutagencity Testing of WR238605 Succinate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-05-03

    Mitomycin C (MMC), was obtained from the Sigma Chemical Company, and was dissolved and diluted in sterile distilled water to stock concentrations...AMENDMENT: Amend Positive controls to read " Mitomycin C (MMC)" and "Cyclophosphamide (CP)". REASON FOR THE AMENDMENT: The supply of triethylenemelamine...TEM) has run out and is no longer manufactured. LOCATION: Page 4 of 8, § 7.53; Positive Controls AMENDMENT: Amend first sentence to read " Mitomycin

  14. A Classical WR Model with Particle Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazel, A.; Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2015-06-01

    A version of the Widom-Rowlinson model is considered, where particles of types coexist, subject to pairwise hard-core exclusions. For , in the case of large equal fugacities, we give a complete description of the pure phase picture based on the theory of dominant ground states.

  15. Lactose enhances mineral absorption in infancy.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, E E; Fomon, S J

    1983-05-01

    To determine if lactose promotes the intestinal absorption of calcium and other minerals by infants, metabolic balance studies were performed with infants fed two formulas nearly identical in composition except for carbohydrate. One contained only lactose and the other contained sucrose and corn starch hydrolysate. Each of six normal infants had two balance studies performed with each formula in alternating sequence. When lactose was the carbohydrate, net absorption and net retention of calcium were significantly greater than when lactose was not present in the formula. Absorptions of magnesium and manganese were also significantly enhanced by lactose. Absorptions of copper and zinc were somewhat greater (not statistically significant) when lactose was present, whereas absorption of iron was not affected. Absorption of phosphorus was not different, but urinary excretion was less when the lactose containing formula was fed and, hence, net retention of phosphorus was significantly enhanced. These results confirm findings from animal studies and previous human studies and show that, in infants, lactose has a significant and sustained promoting effect on absorption of calcium and other minerals.

  16. The effect of tea on iron absorption.

    PubMed Central

    Disler, P B; Lynch, S R; Charlton, R W; Torrance, J D; Bothwell, T H; Walker, R B; Mayet, F

    1975-01-01

    The effect of tea on iron absorption was studied in human volunteers. Absorption from solutions of FeCl3 and FeSO4, bread, a meal of rice with potato and onion soup, and uncooked haemoglobin was inhibited whether ascorbic acid was present or not. No inhibition was noted if the haemoglobin was cooked. The effect on the absorption of non-haem iron was ascribed to the formation of insoluble iron tannate complexes. Drinking tannin-containing beverages such as tea with meals may contribute to the pathogenesis of iron deficiency if the diet consists largely of vegetable foodstuffs. PMID:1168162

  17. Selective coherent perfect absorption in metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-17

    We show multi-band coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in simple bilayered asymmetrically split ring metamaterials. The selectivity of absorption can be accomplished by separately excited electric and magnetic modes in a standing wave formed by two coherent counterpropagating beams. In particular, each CPA can be completely switched on/off by the phase of a second coherent wave. We propose a practical scheme for realizing multi-band coherent perfect absorption of 100% that is allowed to work from microwave to optical frequency.

  18. Not-so-resonant, resonant absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, F.

    1987-07-01

    When an intense electromagnetic wave is incident obliquely on a sharply bounded overdense plasma, strong energy absorption can be accounted for by the electrons that are dragged into the vacuum and sent back into the plasma with velocities v~=vosc. This mechanism is more efficient than usual resonant absorption for vosc/ω>L, with L being the density gradient length. In the very high-intensity CO2-laser-target interaction, this mechanism may account for most of the energy absorption.

  19. Total absorption by degenerate critical coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, Jessica R. Liu, Victor; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-06-23

    We consider a mirror-symmetric resonator with two ports. We show that, when excited from a single port, complete absorption can be achieved through critical coupling to degenerate resonances with opposite symmetry. Moreover, any time two resonances with opposite symmetry are degenerate in frequency and absorption is always significantly enhanced. In contrast, when two resonances with the same symmetry are nearly degenerate, there is no absorption enhancement. We numerically demonstrate these effects using a graphene monolayer on top of a photonic crystal slab, illuminated from a single side in the near-infrared.

  20. The gastrointestinal absorption of the actinide elements.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J D

    1991-03-01

    The greatest uncertainty in dose estimates for the ingestion of long-lived, alpha-emitting isotopes of the actinide elements is in the values used for their fractional absorption from the gastrointestinal tract (f1 values). Recent years have seen a large increase in the available data on actinide absorption. Human data are reviewed here, together with animal data, to illustrate the effect on absorption of chemical form, incorporation into food materials, fasting and other dietary factors, and age at ingestion. The f1 values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency and by the National Radiological Protection Board are discussed.

  1. Absorption of surface acoustic waves by graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Xu, W.

    2011-06-01

    We present a theoretical study on interactions of electrons in graphene with surface acoustic waves (SAWs). We find that owing to momentum and energy conservation laws, the electronic transition accompanied by the SAW absorption cannot be achieved via inter-band transition channels in graphene. For graphene, strong absorption of SAWs can be observed in a wide frequency range up to terahertz at room temperature. The intensity of SAW absorption by graphene depends strongly on temperature and can be adjusted by changing the carrier density. This study is relevant to the exploration of the acoustic properties of graphene and to the application of graphene as frequency-tunable SAW devices.

  2. Comparison of the effects of maximal dose atorvastatin and rosuvastatin therapy on cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured plasma markers of cholesterol synthesis (lathosterol) and absorption (campesterol, sitosterol, and cholestanol) in order to compare the effects of maximal doses of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin and investigate the basis for the significant individual variation in lipid lowering response...

  3. Broadband enhancement of infrared absorption in microbolometers using Ag nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hyun, Jerome K.; Ahn, Chi Won; Kim, Woo Choong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Hyun, Moon Seop; Kim, Hee Yeoun E-mail: jhpark@nnfc.re.kr; Park, Jae Hong E-mail: jhpark@nnfc.re.kr; Lee, Won-Oh

    2015-12-21

    High performance microbolometers are widely sought for thermal imaging applications. In order to increase the performance limits of microbolometers, the responsivity of the device to broadband infrared (IR) radiation needs to be improved. In this work, we report a simple, quick, and cost-effective approach to modestly enhance the broadband IR response of the device by evaporating Ag nanocrystals onto the light entrance surface of the device. When irradiated with IR light, strong fields are built up within the gaps between adjacent Ag nanocrystals. These fields resistively generate heat in the nanocrystals and underlying substrate, which is transduced into an electrical signal via a resistive sensing element in the device. Through this method, we are able to enhance the IR absorption over a broadband spectrum and improve the responsivity of the device by ∼11%.

  4. Modeled Aeromagnetic Anomalies, Controlled By Radar Ice Sounding, As Evidence for Subglacial Volcanic Activity in the West Antarctic Rift System (WR) Beneath the Area of the Divide of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Thwaites and Pine Island ice shelves, buttressing the WAIS, have passed the turning point as they are eaten away by warmer ocean waters (Joghin et al., 2014; Rignot et al., 2014). There is an increasing evidence (aeromagnetic, radar ice-sounding, high heat flow, subglacial volcanic seismicity, and several exposed and subglacial active volcanoes), for volcanic activity in the WR beneath the WAIS, which flows through it. The 5-km, orthogonally line spaced, central West Antarctica (CWA) aerogeophysical survey defined >400 high amplitude volcanic magnetic anomalies correlated with glacial bed topography. Modeled anomalies defined magnetic properties; interpreted volcanic edifices were mostly removed by the moving ice into which they were erupted. Very high apparent susceptibility contrasts (.001->.3 SI) are typical of measured properties from volcanic exposures in the WAIS area. About 90% of the magnetic sources have normal magnetization in the present field direction. Two explanations as to why the anomalies are not approximately 50% negative: (1) Volcanic activity resulting in these anomalies occurred in a predominantly normal field (unlikely). (2) Sources are a combination of induced and remanent magnetization resulting in anomalies of low amplitude (induced cancels remanent) and are not recognized because they are <100 nT (most probable). About 18 high relief, (~600-2000 m) "volcanic centers" beneath the WAIS surface, probably were erupted subaerially when the WAIS was absent; nine of these are in the general area beneath the divide of the WAIS. A 70-km wide, ring of interpreted subglacial volcanic rocks may define a volcanic caldera underlying thedivide (Behrendt et al., 1998). A 2 km-high subaerially erupted volcano (subglacial Mt Thiel, ~78o30'S, 111oW) ~ 100 km north of the WAISCORE, could be the source an ash layer observed in the core. Models by Tulaczyk and Hossainzadeh (2011) indicate >4mm/yr basal melting beneath the WAIS, supportive of high heat flow

  5. Molar Absorptivity Measurements in Absorbing Solvents: Impact on Solvent Absorptivity Values.

    PubMed

    Bohman, Ariel; Arnold, Mark A

    2016-10-18

    Molar absorptivity is a fundamental molecular property that quantifies absorption strength as a function of wavelength. Absolute measurements of molar absorptivity demand accounting for all mechanisms of light attenuation, including reflective losses at interfaces associated with the sample. Ideally, such measurements are performed in nonabsorbing solvents and reflective losses can be determined in a straightforward manner from Fresnel equations or effectively accounted for by path length difference methods. At near-infrared wavelengths, however, many solvents, including water, are absorbing which complicates the quantification of reflective losses. Here, generalized equations are developed for calculating absolute molar absorptivities of neat liquids wherein the dependency of reflective loss on absorption properties of the liquid are considered explicitly. The resulting equations are used to characterize sensitivity of absolute molar absorptivity measurements for solvents to the absorption strength of the solvent as well as the path length of the measurement. Methods are derived from these equations to properly account for reflective losses in general and the effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated for absolute molar absorptivity measurements for water over the combination region (5000-4000 cm(-1)) of the near-infrared spectrum. Results indicate that ignoring solvent absorption effects can incorporate wide ranging systematic errors depending upon experimental conditions. As an example, systematic errors range from 0 to 10% for common conditions used in the measurement of absolute molar absorptivity of water over the combination region of the near-infrared spectrum.

  6. Two-Photon-Absorption Scheme for Optical Beam Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Farr, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A new optical beam tracking approach for free-space optical communication links using two-photon absorption (TPA) in a high-bandgap detector material was demonstrated. This tracking scheme is part of the canonical architecture described in the preceding article. TPA is used to track a long-wavelength transmit laser while direct absorption on the same sensor simultaneously tracks a shorter-wavelength beacon. The TPA responsivity was measured for silicon using a PIN photodiode at a laser beacon wavelength of 1,550 nm. As expected, the responsivity shows a linear dependence with incident power level. The responsivity slope is 4.5 x 10(exp -7) A/W2. Also, optical beam spots from the 1,550-nm laser beacon were characterized on commercial charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imagers with as little as 13.7 microWatts of optical power (see figure). This new tracker technology offers an innovative solution to reduce system complexity, improve transmit/receive isolation, improve optical efficiency, improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reduce cost for free-space optical communications transceivers.

  7. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  8. Terahertz absorption spectra of highly energetic chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slingerland, E. J.; Vallon, M. K.; Jahngen, E. G. E.; Giles, R. H.; Goyette, T. M.

    2010-04-01

    Research into absorption spectra is useful for detecting chemicals in the field. Each molecule absorbs a set of specific frequencies, which are dependent on the molecule's structure. While theoretical models are available for predicting the absorption frequencies of a particular molecule, experimental measurements are a more reliable method of determining a molecule's actual absorption behavior. The goal of this research is to explore chemical markers (absorption frequencies) that can be used to identify highly energetic molecules of interest to the remote sensing community. Particular attention was paid to the frequency ranges located within the terahertz transmission windows of the atmosphere. In addition, theoretical derivations, with the purpose of calculating the detection limits of such chemicals, will also be presented.

  9. Performance Analysis of Solution Transportation Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Behdad; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Thermally activated advanced absorption cycles are considered promising candidates to replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs for residential and commercial applications. In such absorption systems, it is desirable to utilize the waste heat from industries for heating and cooling applications in commercial and residential sectors. For this purpose, it is necessary to transport energy over some distance because the waste heat source and demand are generally located apart from each other. Transportation of steam, hot water or chilled water requires high construction costs for insulation. There is an efficient method of energy transportation using absorption system called “ Solution Transportation Absorption System (STA)”. The solution is transported at an ambient temperature so that tube-insulations not required. This paper shows the simulation of the abovementioned system and the optimal result, using mathematical optimization. The optimum system with industry‧s waste heat utilization is obtained. At the end, the effect on the pollution emission and energy conservation is obtained.

  10. Absorption chillers: Part of the solution

    SciTech Connect

    Occhionero, A.J. ); Hughes, P.J. ); Reid, E.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Acid rain, ozone depletion, global warming, and implementation economics are considered as they relate to the advisability of expanding the application of absorption chillers. Introductory and background information are provided to put the discussion in the proper context. Then all four issues are discussed separately as they relate to absorption chillers. Acid rain and ozone depletion concerns, and implementation economics, are found to support the expanded use of absorption chillers. The global warming concern is found to be more of a gray area, but the areas of benefit correspond well with the conditions of greatest economic advantage. All things considered, absorption chillers are believed to be part of the environmental and economic solution. It is further believed that integrated resource planning (IRP) processes that consider electric and gas technologies on an equal footing would come to the same conclusion for many regions of the United States. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. The Absorption Spectrum of Sodium Vapor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, R. A.; Gotthard, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    Procedures and discussion of an experiment to be used in an undergraduate course in spectroscopy are presented. The experiment involves the measurement of the absorption spectrum of sodium vapor. (DT)

  12. Optical absorption coefficients of pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zheng; Zhao, Xianzhen; Fry, Edward S.

    2002-10-01

    The integrating cavity absorption meter(ICAM), which is independent of scattering effect, is used to measure the absolute values of small optical absorption coefficients of liquid. A modified ICAM is being used to measure the absorption of water in the wavelength range 300 to 700 nm. The ultrapure water produced by a two-stages water purification system reaches Type I quality. This is equal to or better than ASTM,CAP and NCCLS water quality standards. To avoid the fact that dissolved oxygen absorbs ultraviolet light due to the photochemical effect, the water sample is delivered through a nitrogen sealed system which will prevent the sample from contacting with oxygen. A compassion of our absorption spectrum with other existing data is given.

  13. Theory of absorption-induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigo, Sergio G.; García-Vidal, F. J.; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2013-10-01

    Recent experiments [Hutchison, O’Carroll, Schwartz, Genet, and Ebbesen, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed.1433-785110.1002/anie.201006019 50, 2085 (2011)] have demonstrated that optical transmission through an array of subwavelength holes in a metal film can be enhanced by the intentional presence of dyes in the system. As the transmission maximum occurs spectrally close to the absorption resonances of the dyes, this phenomenon was christened “absorption induced transparency”. Here, a theoretical study on absorption induced transparency is presented. The results show that the appearance of transmission maxima requires that the absorbent fills the holes and that it occurs also for single holes. Furthermore, it is shown that the transmission process is nonresonant, being composed by a sequential passage of the electromagnetic field through the hole. Finally, the physical origin of the phenomenon is demonstrated to be nonplasmonic, which implies that absorption induced transparency should also occur at the infrared or terahertz frequency regimes.

  14. Measurements of scattering and absorption changes in muscle and brain.

    PubMed Central

    Gratton, E; Fantini, S; Franceschini, M A; Gratton, G; Fabiani, M

    1997-01-01

    Non-invasive techniques for the study of human brain function based on changes of the haemoglobin content or on changes of haemoglobin saturation have recently been proposed. Among the new methods, near-infrared transmission measurements may have significant advantages and complement well-established methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. Near-infrared measurements can be very fast, comparable in speed to electrophysiological measurements, bur are better localized. We will present the demonstration of measurements of millisecond signals due to brain activity in humans following stimulation of the visual cortex. However, major unresolved questions remain about the origin of the signals observed. Optical measurements on exposed cortex in animals show that both the absorption and the scattering coefficient are affected by neural activity. Model calculations show that the signals we detected may originate from rapid changes of the scattering coefficient in a region about 1 to 2 cm below the scalp. We discuss our measurement protocol, which is based on a frequency-domain instrument, and the algorithm to separate the absorption from the scattering contribution in the overall response. Our method produces excellent separation between scattering and absorption in relatively homogeneous masses such as large muscles. The extrapolation of our measurement protocol to a complex structure such as the human head is critically evaluated. PMID:9232861

  15. Development of carbohydrate absorption in the fetus and neonate.

    PubMed

    Mobassaleh, M; Montgomery, R K; Biller, J A; Grand, R J

    1985-01-01

    Maturation of mechanisms for carbohydrate absorption occurs in a defined sequence during human fetal development. The intestinal enzymes, lactase, sucrase, maltase, isomaltase, and glucoamylase, are at mature levels in the term fetus. Mature levels of pancreatic amylase activity and glucose transport occur postnatally, and levels are low in both the term and preterm neonate. In the preterm infant, sucrase, maltase, and isomaltase are usually fully active, but lactase activity, which increases markedly from 24 to 40 weeks, may be low depending upon fetal age. Despite these developmental patterns, clinical lactose intolerance is uncommon. Postnatal adaptive responses to ingested carbohydrates lead to competent carbohydrate absorption. Inadequately absorbed carbohydrates are salvaged by colonic flora through fermentation of carbohydrates to hydrogen gas and short-chain fatty acids; the latter are readily absorbed by the colon. In this setting, carbohydrate tends to be absent from the stool. Noninvasive reflection of the status of carbohydrate absorption may be obtained from breath hydrogen testing, a technique of particular value in young infants.

  16. Broadband infrared absorption enhancement by electroless-deposited silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritti, Claudia; Raza, Søren; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Kardynal, Beata; Malureanu, Radu; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2017-01-01

    Decorating semiconductor surfaces with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) is considered a viable solution for enhancing the absorptive properties of photovoltaic and photodetecting devices. We propose to deposit silver NPs on top of a semiconductor wafer by a cheap and fast electroless plating technique. Optical characterization confirms that the random array of electroless-deposited NPs improves absorption by up to 20% in a broadband of near-infrared frequencies from the bandgap edge to 2000 nm. Due to the small filling fraction of particles, the reflection in the visible range is practically unchanged, which points to the possible applications of such deposition method for harvesting photons in nanophotonics and photovoltaics. The broadband absorption is a consequence of the resonant behavior of particles with different shapes and sizes, which strongly localize the incident light at the interface of a high-index semiconductor substrate. Our hypothesis is substantiated by examining the plasmonic response of the electroless-deposited NPs using both electron energy loss spectroscopy and numerical calculations.

  17. Broadband infrared absorption enhancement by electroless-deposited silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritti, Claudia; Raza, Søren; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Kardynal, Beata; Malureanu, Radu; Mortensen, N. Asger; Lavrinenko, Andrei V.

    2016-07-01

    Decorating semiconductor surfaces with plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) is considered a viable solution for enhancing the absorptive properties of photovoltaic and photodetecting devices. We propose to deposit silver NPs on top of a semiconductor wafer by a cheap and fast electroless plating technique. Optical characterization confirms that the random array of electroless-deposited NPs improves absorption by up to 20% in a broadband of near-infrared frequencies from the bandgap edge to 2000 nm. Due to the small filling fraction of particles, the reflection in the visible range is practically unchanged, which points to the possible applications of such deposition method for harvesting photons in nanophotonics and photovoltaics. The broadband absorption is a consequence of the resonant behavior of particles with different shapes and sizes, which strongly localize the incident light at the interface of a high-index semiconductor substrate. Our hypothesis is substantiated by examining the plasmonic response of the electroless-deposited NPs using both electron energy loss spectroscopy and numerical calculations.

  18. Absorption and scattering of light by VO2 nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaojing; Li, Yi; Wang, Haifang; Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yize

    2009-07-01

    Much attention has been paid to the semiconductor-metal phase transition in vanadium dioxide nanomaterials, accompanied with an abrupt change in its resistivity and near-infrared transmission. The phase transition and optical properties of vanadium dioxide nanoparticles were studied by the mathematical model based on the complex refractive changing with the temperature and wavelength. The optical properties of nano-array were investigated by using the discrete dipole approximation and Mie scattering theory, as well as the absorption and scattering properties of small particles. The results show that the main contribution to the optical response with variational wavelength in the infrared is from absorption cross section comparing with the scattering cross section. It is obvious that the absorption peak of metal phase occurs near 980nm. With the change of temperature, the variation of extinction coefficient is larger in the infrared region than in the visible region. The largest change of extinction coefficient occurs in the near-infrared region. The extincition coefficient is very small in the visible region and there is a maximal value in the infrared region in the nano-array.

  19. Intestinal Cgi-58 deficiency reduces postprandial lipid absorption.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping; Guo, Feng; Ma, Yinyan; Zhu, Hongling; Wang, Freddy; Xue, Bingzhong; Shi, Hang; Yang, Jian; Yu, Liqing

    2014-01-01

    Comparative Gene Identification-58 (CGI-58), a lipid droplet (LD)-associated protein, promotes intracellular triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis in vitro. Mutations in human CGI-58 cause TG accumulation in numerous tissues including intestine. Enterocytes are thought not to store TG-rich LDs, but a fatty meal does induce temporary cytosolic accumulation of LDs. Accumulated LDs are eventually cleared out, implying existence of TG hydrolytic machinery in enterocytes. However, identities of proteins responsible for LD-TG hydrolysis remain unknown. Here we report that intestine-specific inactivation of CGI-58 in mice significantly reduces postprandial plasma TG concentrations and intestinal TG hydrolase activity, which is associated with a 4-fold increase in intestinal TG content and large cytosolic LD accumulation in absorptive enterocytes during the fasting state. Intestine-specific CGI-58 knockout mice also display mild yet significant decreases in intestinal fatty acid absorption and oxidation. Surprisingly, inactivation of CGI-58 in intestine significantly raises plasma and intestinal cholesterol, and reduces hepatic cholesterol, without altering intestinal cholesterol absorption and fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, intestinal CGI-58 is required for efficient postprandial lipoprotein-TG secretion and for maintaining hepatic and plasma lipid homeostasis. Our animal model will serve as a valuable tool to further define how intestinal fat metabolism influences the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  20. Atmospheric Absorption Parameters for Laser Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    high-resolution, good photometric accuracy data for numerous bands in the 3-5 Am region, using the facility at Kitt Peak National Solar Observatory. The...L49-L52 (2001). 44. A. Castrillo, G. Gagliardi, G. Casa , and L. Gianfrani, "Combined interferometric and absorption-spectroscopic technique for...from FT visible solar absorption spectra and evaluation of spectroscopic databases," JQRST 82, 133-150 (2003). 53. D. Jacquemart, R.R. Gamache, and L.S

  1. Seasonal Solar Thermal Absorption Energy Storage Development.

    PubMed

    Daguenet-Frick, Xavier; Gantenbein, Paul; Rommel, Mathias; Fumey, Benjamin; Weber, Robert; Gooneseker, Kanishka; Williamson, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a thermochemical seasonal storage with emphasis on the development of a reaction zone for an absorption/desorption unit. The heat and mass exchanges are modelled and the design of a suitable reaction zone is explained. A tube bundle concept is retained for the heat and mass exchangers and the units are manufactured and commissioned. Furthermore, experimental results of both absorption and desorption processes are presented and the exchanged power is compared to the results of the simulations.

  2. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  3. Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Rohatgi, N. K.; Demore, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    Absorption cross-sections of hydrogen peroxide vapor and of neutral aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide were measured in the wavelength range from 195 to 350 nm at 296 K. The spectrophotometric procedure is described, and the reported cross-sections are compared with values obtained by other researchers. Photodissociation coefficients of atmospheric H2O2 were calculated for direct absorption of unscattered solar radiation, and the vertical distributions of these coefficients are shown for various solar zenith angles.

  4. Contrasting effects of the stomach and small intestine of rats on copper absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, M.; Craft, N.; Lewis, C.; Holbrook, J.; Rose, A.; Reiser, S.; Smith, J.C.

    1986-11-01

    Since the severity of copper deficiency has been shown to be enhanced by feeding diets containing fructose but ameliorated by diets containing starch, we decided to investigate the effect of fructose or starch on copper absorption. As copper transport has been reported to occur also from the stomach, it was possible that copper absorption is inhibited by fructose already from that tissue. Under anesthesia, stomachs of 72 rats fed copper-deficient or supplemented diets containing fructose or starch were ligated prior to the oral administration of /sup 64/Cu. Gastric absorption of /sup 64/Cu was studied when the isotope was administered by gastric tube either in diet containing fructose or starch or in water. /sup 64/Cu was not absorbed from the stomach regardless of the type of dietary treatment, copper status or whether the copper was administered either in diet or in water. In addition, the absorption of /sup 64/Cu from a diet containing either fructose or starch or from a saline solution was studied using the isolated ligated duodenal loop. When /sup 64/Cu was administered with dietary fructose /sup 64/Cu retention and absorption were impaired when compared to starch. When /sup 64/Cu was administered in saline solution, differences in retention and absorption between the four dietary groups disappeared. It is suggested that the requirements for copper rather than the decreased absorption of copper are responsible at least in part for the more pronounced severity of copper deficiency in rats fed fructose compared to those fed starch.

  5. Vitamin D and intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Porta, Angela; Mady, Leila J; Seth, Tanya

    2011-12-05

    The principal function of vitamin D in calcium homeostasis is to increase calcium absorption from the intestine. Calcium is absorbed by both an active transcellular pathway, which is energy dependent, and by a passive paracellular pathway through tight junctions. 1,25Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) the hormonally active form of vitamin D, through its genomic actions, is the major stimulator of active intestinal calcium absorption which involves calcium influx, translocation of calcium through the interior of the enterocyte and basolateral extrusion of calcium by the intestinal plasma membrane pump. This article reviews recent studies that have challenged the traditional model of vitamin D mediated transcellular calcium absorption and the crucial role of specific calcium transport proteins in intestinal calcium absorption. There is also increasing evidence that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) can enhance paracellular calcium diffusion. The influence of estrogen, prolactin, glucocorticoids and aging on intestinal calcium absorption and the role of the distal intestine in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption are also discussed.

  6. A search for intervening HI absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Sarah N.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Allison, James R.; Koribalski, Baerbel S.; Curran, Stephen J.

    2013-03-01

    HI absorption-line studies provide a unique probe of the gas distribution and kinematics in galaxies well beyond the local universe (z ≳ 0.3). HI absorption-line surveys with next-generation radio telescopes will provide the first large-scale studies of HI in a redshift regime which is poorly understood. However, we currently lack the understanding to infer galaxy properties from absorption-line observations alone. To address this issue, we are conducting a search for intervening HI absorption in a sample of 20 nearby galaxies. Our aim is to investigate how the detection rate varies with distance from the galaxy. We target sight-lines to bright continuum sources, which intercept known gas-rich galaxies, selected from the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (Koribalski et al. 2004). In our pilot sample, six galaxies with impact parameters < 20 kpc, we do not detect any absorption lines - although all are detected in 21cm emission. This indicates that an absorption non-detection cannot simply be interpreted as an absence of neutral gas - see Fig. 1. Our detection rate is low compared to previous surveys e.g. Gupta et al. (2010). This is, at least partially, due to the high resolution of the observations reducing the flux of the background source, which will also be an issue in future surveys, such as ASKAP-FLASH.

  7. High temperature measurement of water vapor absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefer, Dennis; Lewis, J. W. L.; Eskridge, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to measure the absorption coefficient, at a wavelength of 10.6 microns, for mixtures of water vapor and a diluent gas at high temperature and pressure. The experimental concept was to create the desired conditions of temperature and pressure in a laser absorption wave, similar to that which would be created in a laser propulsion system. A simplified numerical model was developed to predict the characteristics of the absorption wave and to estimate the laser intensity threshold for initiation. A non-intrusive method for temperature measurement utilizing optical laser-beam deflection (OLD) and optical spark breakdown produced by an excimer laser, was thoroughly investigated and found suitable for the non-equilibrium conditions expected in the wave. Experiments were performed to verify the temperature measurement technique, to screen possible materials for surface initiation of the laser absorption wave and to attempt to initiate an absorption wave using the 1.5 kW carbon dioxide laser. The OLD technique was proven for air and for argon, but spark breakdown could not be produced in helium. It was not possible to initiate a laser absorption wave in mixtures of water and helium or water and argon using the 1.5 kW laser, a result which was consistent with the model prediction.

  8. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  9. The Effect of Surface Heterogeneity on Cloud Absorption Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan C.; Marshak, Alexander; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a systematic and quantitative analysis of the effect of inhomogeneous surface albedo on shortwave cloud absorption estimates. We use 3D radiative transfer modeling with gradually complex clouds over a simplified surface to calculate cloud absorption. We find that averaging surface albedo always underestimates cloud absorption, and thus accounting for surface heterogeneity always enhances cloud absorption. However, the impact on cloud absorption estimates is not enough to explain the discrepancy between measured and model calculated shortwave cloud absorptions.

  10. The Absorption Spectrum of PKS 1756+237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, J. M.; Roth, K. C.; Jim, K. T. C.

    1998-05-01

    We are involved in a program to investigate the relationship between damped Lyalpha absorption systems and the interstellar medium of our own galaxy and nearby galaxies. This ultimately requires the proper identification of the systems responsible for the absorption so that a connection may be drawn between the absorption characteristics and the physical characteristics of the absorber, such as galaxy morphology, size, brightness, and separation from the QSO line of sight (see Jim & Roth, Kolhatkar et al., and Roth et al. also presenting here). PKS 1756+237 is a relatively bright QSO (m_V~18.0) with an emission redshift of z=1.721. There are two strong intervening absorption line systems at redshifts of 1.426 and 1.673. Both systems exhibit strong low-ionization lines, and so are believed to originate in the inner regions of galactic systems at some stage of formation. We obtained two hours of high quality HIRES spectra on the Keck 10m telescope for this QSO in May, 1997. The 6.5 km/s (0.09 Angstroms FWHM) resolution of this data is a ten-fold improvement over existing data, providing kinematic information as well as significantly improved column density measurements. Preliminary analysis of the data suggests the existence of significant Ni II abundance at z=1.67, possibly indicating a damped absorber system. The spectra cover the C II and Si II lines, enabling us to search for associated fine-structure excitation. These spectra also cover several additional low and high-ionization species from which we derive abundance and kinematic information. Images of this QSO, acquired at the UH 2.2m telescope using the QUIRC infrared and Tek2048 optical cameras with UH's tip-tilt system, show possible candidates for absorber systems.

  11. Giant many-body effects in liquid ammonia absorption spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ziaei, Vafa; Bredow, Thomas

    2016-11-07

    In the present work, we accurately calculate the absorption spectrum of liquid ammonia up to 13 eV using many-body perturbation approach. The electronic bandgap of liquid NH3 is perfectly described as the combination of density functional theory, Coulomb-hole screened exchange, and G0W0 approximation to the electronic self-energy, yielding a direct gap (Γ → Γ) of 7.71 eV, fully consistent with the experimentally measured gap from photo-emission spectroscopy. With respect to the NH3 optical properties, the entire spectrum in particular the low lying first absorption band is extremely affected by electron-hole interactions, leading to a fundamental redistribution of spectral weights of the independent-particle spectrum. Three well separated but broad main peaks are identified at 7.0, 9.8, and 11.8 eV with steadily increasing intensities in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Furthermore, we observe a giant net blue-shift of the first absorption peak of about 1.4 eV from gaseous to liquid phase as the direct consequence of many-body effects, allowing the associated liquid ammonia absorption band exciton to delocalize and feel more effectively the repulsion effects imposed by the surrounding solvent shells. Further, the spectrum is insensitive to the coupling of resonant and anti-resonant contributions. Concerning electronic response structure of liquid NH3, it is most sensitive to excitations at energies lower than its electronic gap.

  12. Absorption efficiency enhancement in inorganic and organic thin film solar cells via plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Tok, Rüştü Umut; Sendur, Kürşat

    2013-08-15

    We demonstrate theoretically that by embedding plasmonic honeycomb nanoantenna arrays into the active layers of inorganic (c-Si) and organic (P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS) thin film solar cells, absorption efficiency can be improved. To obtain the solar cell absorption spectrum that conforms to the solar radiation, spectral broadening is achieved by breaking the symmetry within the Wigner-Seitz unit cell on a uniform hexagonal grid. For optimized honeycomb designs, absorption efficiency enhancements of 106.2% and 20.8% are achieved for c-Si and P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS thin film solar cells, respectively. We have demonstrated that the transverse modes are responsible for the enhancement in c-Si solar cells, whereas both the longitudinal and transverse modes, albeit weaker, are the main enhancement mechanisms for P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS solar cells. For both inorganic and organic solar cells, the absorption enhancement is independent of polarization.

  13. Photocarrier dynamics in anatase TiO{sub 2} investigated by pump-probe absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuzaki, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Matsui, Y.; Uchida, R.; Yada, H.; Terashige, T.; Li, B.-S.; Sawa, A.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.; Okamoto, H. E-mail: okamotoh@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-02-07

    The dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes in undoped anatase TiO{sub 2} were studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy from the visible to mid-infrared region (0.1–2.0 eV). The transient absorption spectra exhibited clear metallic responses, which were well reproduced by a simple Drude model. No mid-gap absorptions originating from photocarrier localization were observed. The reduced optical mass of the photocarriers obtained from the Drude-model analysis is comparable to theoretically expected one. These results demonstrate that both photogenerated holes and electrons act as mobile carriers in anatase TiO{sub 2}. We also discuss scattering and recombination dynamics of photogenerated electrons and holes on the basis of the time dependence of absorption changes.

  14. In vivo absorption spectra of the two stable states of the Euglena photoreceptor photocycle.

    PubMed

    Barsanti, Laura; Coltelli, Primo; Evangelista, Valtere; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Vesentini, Nicoletta; Santoro, Fabrizio; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Euglena gracilis possesses a simple but sophisticated light detecting system, consisting of an eyespot formed by carotenoids globules and a photoreceptor. The photoreceptor of Euglena is characterized by optical bistability, with two stable states. In order to provide important and discriminating information on the series of structural changes that Euglena photoreceptive protein(s) undergoes inside the photoreceptor in response to light, we measured the in vivo absorption spectra of the two stable states A and B of photoreceptor photocycle. Data were collected using two different devices, i.e. a microspectrophotometer and a digital microscope. Our results show that the photocycle and the absorption spectra of the photoreceptor possess strong spectroscopic similarities with a rhodopsin-like protein. Moreover, the analysis of the absorption spectra of the two stable states of the photoreceptor and the absorption spectrum of the eyespot suggests an intriguing hypothesis for the orientation of microalgae toward light.

  15. Two-photon absorption in oxazole derivatives: An experimental and quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, D. L.; De Boni, L.; Correa, D. S.; Costa, S. C. S.; Hidalgo, A. A.; Zilio, S. C.; Canuto, S.; Mendonca, C. R.

    2012-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the two-photon absorption properties of two oxazole derivatives: 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) are presented. The two-photon absorption cross-section spectra were determined by means of the Z-scan technique, from 460 up to 650 nm, and reached peak values of 84 GM for PBD and 27 GM for PPO. Density Functional Theory and response function formalism are used to determine the molecular structures and the one- and two-photon absorption properties and to assist in the interpretation of the experimental results. The Polarizable Continuum Model in one-photon absorption calculations is used to estimate solvent effects.

  16. Lactose and milk replacer influence on lead absorption and lead toxicity in calves

    SciTech Connect

    Zmudzki, J.; Bratton, G.R.; Womac, C.W.; Rowe, L.D. Jr.; Wagner, B.

    1986-03-01

    The absorption, tissue deposition, retention, and excretion of ingested lead is in large part due to associated dietary factors. Young suckling calves are extremely susceptible to low doses of lead, especially when maintained totally on milk. Unfortunately, the complexity of milk makes it difficult to determine which constituent is actually responsible for increased Pb absorption. Recent studies have shown that lactose, the major carbohydrate of milk, is a dietary factor that increases the absorption of several minerals including Pb in rats. The authors laboratory has recently demonstrated that milk greatly increased the tissue deposition of lead in calves. Lactose, however, has not been considered in the ruminant animal. Moreover, liquid milk seems to increase the absorption of lead more significantly than powdered milk. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of lactose and powdered milk on lead uptake and tissue distribution in calves.

  17. Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

  18. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  19. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Huang, Yunxia; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong

    2015-07-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye.

  20. Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Flynn, Donna M.; Marchand, Roger T.

    2003-05-16

    The data set from ARESE II, sponsored by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, provides a unique opportunity to understand solar absorption in the atmosphere because of the combination of three sets of broadband solar radiometers mounted on the Twin Otter aircraft and the ground based instruments at the ARM Southern Great Plains facility. In this study, we analyze the measurements taken on two clear sky days and three cloudy days and model the solar radiative transfer in each case with two different models. On the two clear days, the calculated and measured column absorptions agree to better than 10 Wm-2, which is about 10% of the total column absorption. Because both the model fluxes and the individual radiometer measurements are accurate to no better than 10 Wm-2, we conclude that the models and measurements are essentially in agreement. For the three cloudy days, the model calculations agree very well with each other and on two of the three days agree with the measurements to 20 Wm-2 or less out of a total column absorption of more than 200 Wm-2, which is again agreement at better than 10%. On the third day, the model and measurements agree to either 8% or 14% depending on which value of surface albedo is used. Differences exceeding 10% represent a significant absorption difference between model and observations. In addition to the uncertainty in absorption due to surface albedo, we show that including aerosol with an optical depth similar to that found on clear days can reduce the difference between model and measurement by 5% or more. Thus, we conclude that the ARESE II results are incompatible with previous studies reporting extreme anomalous absorption and can be modeled with our current understanding of radiative transfer.