Science.gov

Sample records for absorption selection rules

  1. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  2. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  3. (FIELD) SYMMETRIZATION SELECTION RULES

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE

    2000-08-01

    QCD and QED exhibit an infinite set of three-point Green's functions that contain only OZI rule violating contributions, and (for QCD) are subleading in the large N{sub c} expansion. We prove that the QCD amplitude for a neutral hybrid {l_brace}1,3,5. . .{r_brace}{+-} exotic current to create {eta}{pi}{sup 0} only comes from OZI rule violating contributions under certain conditions, and is subleading in N{sub c}.

  4. Simple Derivation of Some Basic Selection Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannigrahi, A. B.; Das, Ranjan

    1980-01-01

    Presents the selection rules for all four quantum numbers of the hydrogen atom and for a linear harmonic oscillator. Suggests that these rules deserve special mention in an elementary course of quantum chemistry. (Author/JN)

  5. Compton Scattering and Photo-absorption Sum Rules on Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshteyn, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2012-03-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new ``constituent quark model'' sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition we extract the J=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high energy proton data we find that the J=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman. We discuss phenomenological implications of this new result.

  6. Compton scattering from nuclei and photo-absorption sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2011-12-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new “constituent quark model” sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition, we extract the α=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high-energy proton data, we find that the α=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman.

  7. Selective coherent perfect absorption in metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-17

    We show multi-band coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in simple bilayered asymmetrically split ring metamaterials. The selectivity of absorption can be accomplished by separately excited electric and magnetic modes in a standing wave formed by two coherent counterpropagating beams. In particular, each CPA can be completely switched on/off by the phase of a second coherent wave. We propose a practical scheme for realizing multi-band coherent perfect absorption of 100% that is allowed to work from microwave to optical frequency.

  8. Teaching the Spin Selection Rule: An Inductive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    In the group exercise described, students are guided through an inductive justification for the spin conservation selection rule ([delta]S = 0). Although the exercise only explicitly involves various states of helium, the conclusion is one of the most widely applicable selection rules for the interaction of light with matter, applying, in various…

  9. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  10. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Bast, Radovan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-05-20

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process.

  11. Does natural selection favour the Rescorla-Wagner rule?

    PubMed

    Trimmer, Pete C; McNamara, John M; Houston, Alasdair I; Marshall, James A R

    2012-06-07

    A fundamental question relating to animal behaviour is how animals learn; in particular, how they come to associate stimuli with rewards. Numerous empirical findings can be explained by assuming that animals use some mechanism similar to the Rescorla-Wagner learning rule, which is a relatively simple and highly general method of updating the associative strength between different stimuli. However, the Rescorla-Wagner rule is often not optimal, which raises the question of why a rule with such properties should have evolved. We consider the evolution of learning rules in a simple environment where there exists an optimal rule of similar complexity to the Rescorla-Wagner rule. We show that because the Rescorla-Wagner rule is less sensitive to changes in its parameters than the optimal rule, there is a wider range of parameter values over which the rule structure is initially viable. Consequently, the Rescorla-Wagner rule can be favoured by natural selection, ahead of other rules which are more accurate.

  12. Topological charge selection rule for phase singularities

    SciTech Connect

    Zacares, M.; Vijande, J.; Ferrando, A.; Merino, E.

    2009-10-15

    We present a study of the dynamics and decay pattern of phase singularities due to the action of a system with a discrete rotational symmetry of finite order. A topological charge conservation rule is identified. The role played by the underlying symmetry is emphasized. An effective model describing the short range dynamics of the vortex clusters has been designed. A method to engineer any desired configuration of clusters of phase singularities is proposed. Its flexibility to create and control clusters of vortices is discussed.

  13. Quark-number selection rule for nonleptonic weak decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ernest; Pakvasa, Sandip; Simmons, Walter A.

    1980-12-01

    Recent experimental observations such as τ( D 0)<τ( D +) were anticipated in a 1972 paper by Hayashi, Nakagawa, Nitto, and Ogawa, in which a quark-number selection rule for nonleptonic weak decays was proposed. We present here a diagrammatic interpretation of this selection rule and discuss several specific predictions and tests involving charmed mesons and baryons as well as b-flavored particles.

  14. Fuzzification of ASAT's rule based aimpoint selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weight, Thomas H.

    1993-06-01

    The aimpoint algorithms being developed at Dr. Weight and Associates are based on the concept of fuzzy logic. This approach does not require a particular type of sensor data or algorithm type, but allows the user to develop a fuzzy logic algorithm based on existing aimpoint algorithms and models. This provides an opportunity for the user to upgrade an existing system design to achieve higher performance at minimal cost. Many projects have aimpoint algorithms which are based on 'crisp' logic rule based algorithms. These algorithms are sensitive to glint, corner reflectors, or intermittent thruster firings, and to uncertainties in the a priori estimates of angle of attack. If these projects are continued through to a demonstration involving a launch to hit a target, it is quite possible that the crisp logic approaches will need to be upgraded to handle these important error sources.

  15. Photo-absorption sum rules σ-1 in different environments (Atoms, nuclei, nucleons)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    Combining the spin-dependent dispersion GDH-sum rule, the isotopic-spin-dependent Cabibbo-Radicati sum rule, and the relativistic dipole-moment-fluctuation (i.e. generalized Gottfried) sum rule with the three valence quark configuration of nucleons taken into account for the composition of the ground and the excited states of the nucleon, the relevant moments of the distribution and correlation functions of the quark electric dipole moment operators in the nucleon ground state are expressed via the experimentally measurable nucleon resonance photo-excitation amplitudes.These functions are of interest for checking detailed quark-configuration structure of the nucleon state vector. Within the non-relativistic approach to photo-absorption sum rules for the 3N-nuclei a new σ-1 sum rule proposed which is based on general charge-symmetry (CS) consequences for the "CS-conjugated" triton and 3He.

  16. New rules for visual selection: Isolating procedural attention.

    PubMed

    Ramamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Blaser, Erik

    2017-02-01

    High performance in well-practiced, everyday tasks-driving, sports, gaming-suggests a kind of procedural attention that can allocate processing resources to behaviorally relevant information in an unsupervised manner. Here we show that training can lead to a new, automatic attentional selection rule that operates in the absence of bottom-up, salience-driven triggers and willful top-down selection. Taking advantage of the fact that attention modulates motion aftereffects, observers were presented with a bivectorial display with overlapping, iso-salient red and green dot fields moving to the right and left, respectively, while distracted by a demanding auditory two-back memory task. Before training, since the motion vectors canceled each other out, no net motion aftereffect (MAE) was found. However, after 3 days (0.5 hr/day) of training, during which observers practiced selectively attending to the red, rightward field, a significant net MAE was observed-even when top-down selection was again distracted. Further experiments showed that these results were not due to perceptual learning, and that the new rule targeted the motion, and not the color of the target dot field, and global, not local, motion signals; thus, the new rule was: "select the rightward field." This study builds on recent work on selection history-driven and reward-driven biases, but uses a novel paradigm where the allocation of visual processing resources are measured passively, offline, and when the observer's ability to execute top-down selection is defeated.

  17. Learning a New Selection Rule in Visual and Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    van der Togt, Chris; Stănişor, Liviu; Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Albantakis, Larissa; Deco, Gustavo; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2016-01-01

    How do you make a decision if you do not know the rules of the game? Models of sensory decision-making suggest that choices are slow if evidence is weak, but they may only apply if the subject knows the task rules. Here, we asked how the learning of a new rule influences neuronal activity in the visual (area V1) and frontal cortex (area FEF) of monkeys. We devised a new icon-selection task. On each day, the monkeys saw 2 new icons (small pictures) and learned which one was relevant. We rewarded eye movements to a saccade target connected to the relevant icon with a curve. Neurons in visual and frontal cortex coded the monkey's choice, because the representation of the selected curve was enhanced. Learning delayed the neuronal selection signals and we uncovered the cause of this delay in V1, where learning to select the relevant icon caused an early suppression of surrounding image elements. These results demonstrate that the learning of a new rule causes a transition from fast and random decisions to a more considerate strategy that takes additional time and they reveal the contribution of visual and frontal cortex to the learning process. PMID:27269960

  18. 17 CFR 243.100 - General rule regarding selective disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General rule regarding selective disclosure. 243.100 Section 243.100 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE... issuer or its securities to any person described in paragraph (b)(1) of this section, the issuer...

  19. Sexual selection explains Rensch's rule of size dimorphism in shorebirds.

    PubMed

    Székely, Tamás; Freckleton, Robert P; Reynolds, John D

    2004-08-17

    Sexual size dimorphism shows a remarkably widespread relationship to body size in the animal kingdom: within lineages, it decreases with size when females are the larger sex, but it increases with size when males are the larger sex. Here we demonstrate that this pattern, termed Rensch's rule, exists in shorebirds and allies (Charadriides), and it is determined by two components of sexual selection: the intensity of sexual selection acting on males and the agility of the males' display. These effects are interactive so that the effect of sexual selection on size dimorphism depends on male agility. As a control, we also examine dimorphism in bill length, which is a functionally selected trait. As such, dimorphism in bill length neither exhibits Rensch's rule nor is associated with sexual selection and display. Our results show that variation among taxa in the direction and magnitude of sexual size dimorphism, as manifested as Rensch's rule, can be explained by the interaction between the form and strength of sexual selection acting on each sex in relation to body size.

  20. Universal rules for visible-light absorption in hybrid perovskite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masato; Fujiseki, Takemasa; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Sugita, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shohei; Tamakoshi, Masato; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    A variety of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (APbX3) consisting of mixed center cations [A = CH3NH3+, HC(NH2)2+, and Cs+] with different PbX3- cages (X = I, Br, and Cl) have been developed to realize high-efficiency solar cells. Nevertheless, clear understanding of the effects of A and X on the optical transition has been lacking. Here, we present universal rules that allow the unified interpretation of the optical absorption in various hybrid perovskites. In particular, we find that the influence of the A-site cation on the light absorption is rather significant and the absorption coefficient (α) reduces to half when CH3NH3+ is replaced with HC(NH2)2+ in the APbI3 system. Our density functional theory calculations reproduce all of the fine absorption features observed in HC(NH2)2PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3, allowing the unique assignment of the interband transitions in the Brillouin zone. In contrast to general understanding that the A-site cation involves weakly in the optical process, our theoretical calculations reveal that the center cation plays a critical role in the interband transition and the absorption strength in the visible region is modified by the strong A-X interaction. Furthermore, our systematic analyses show that the variation of the absorption spectrum with X can be described simply by the well-known sum rule. The universal rules established in this study explain the large reduction of α in HC(NH2)2PbI3 and predict CsPbI3 as the highest α material.

  1. Selective Photothermolysis: Precise Microsurgery by Selective Absorption of Pulsed Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. Rox; Parrish, John A.

    1983-04-01

    Suitably brief pulses of selectively absorbed optical radiation can cause selective damage to pigmented structures, cells, and organelles in vivo. Precise aiming is unnecessary in this unique form of radiation injury because inherent optical and thermal properties provide target selectivity. A simple, predictive model is presented. Selective damage to cutaneous microvessels and to melanosomes within melanocytes is shown after 577-nanometer (3 × 10-7 second) and 351-nanometer (2 × 10-8 second) pulses, respectively. Hemodynamic, histological, and ultrastructural responses are discussed.

  2. Selection rules for the nonlinear interaction of internal gravity waves.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chung-Hsiang; Marcus, Philip S

    2009-03-27

    Two intersecting beams of internal gravity waves will generically create two wave packets by nonlinear interaction. The frequency of one packet will be the sum and that of the other packet will be the difference of the frequencies of the intersecting beams. In principle, each packet should form an "X" pattern, or "St. Andrew's cross" consisting of four beams outgoing from the point of intersection. Here we derive selection rules and show that most of the expected nonlinear beams are forbidden. These rules can also be applied to the reflection of a beam from a boundary.

  3. A Rule-Based Industrial Boiler Selection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. F.; Khalil, S. N.; Karjanto, J.; Tee, B. T.; Wahidin, L. S.; Chen, W.; Rauterberg, G. W. M.; Sivarao, S.; Lim, T. L.

    2015-09-01

    Boiler is a device used for generating the steam for power generation, process use or heating, and hot water for heating purposes. Steam boiler consists of the containing vessel and convection heating surfaces only, whereas a steam generator covers the whole unit, encompassing water wall tubes, super heaters, air heaters and economizers. The selection of the boiler is very important to the industry for conducting the operation system successfully. The selection criteria are based on rule based expert system and multi-criteria weighted average method. The developed system consists of Knowledge Acquisition Module, Boiler Selection Module, User Interface Module and Help Module. The system capable of selecting the suitable boiler based on criteria weighted. The main benefits from using the system is to reduce the complexity in the decision making for selecting the most appropriate boiler to palm oil process plant.

  4. Intraband magneto-optical absorption in InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Orbital Zeeman splitting and the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.-Z.; Galbraith, I.

    2008-05-01

    Using perturbation theory, intraband magneto-optical absorption is calculated for InAs/GaAs truncated pyramidal quantum dots in a magnetic field applied parallel to the growth direction z . The effects of the magnetic field on the electronic states as well as the intraband transitions are systematically studied. Selection rules governing the intraband transitions are discussed based on the symmetry properties of the electronic states. While the broadband z -polarized absorption is almost insensitive to the magnetic field, the orbital Zeeman splitting is the dominant feature in the in-plane polarized spectrum. Strong in-plane polarized magneto-absorption features are located in the far-infrared region, while z -polarized absorption occurs at higher frequencies. This is due to the dot geometry (the base length is much larger than the height) yielding different quantum confinement in the vertical and lateral directions. The Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, including the magnetic field effect, is applied together with the selection rules to the absorption spectra. The orbital Zeeman splitting depends on both the dot size and the confining potential—the splitting decreases as the dot size or the confining potential decreases. Our calculated Zeeman splittings are in agreement with experimental data.

  5. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Díaz, P.; Romero, G.; Harmans, C. J. P. M.; Solano, E.; Mooij, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling strength. We report the spectroscopic observation of a resonant transition that breaks a selection rule in the quantum Rabi model, implemented using an LC resonator and an artificial atom, a superconducting qubit. The eigenstates of the system consist of a superposition of bare qubit-resonator states with a relative sign. When the qubit-resonator coupling strength is negligible compared to their own frequencies, the matrix element between excited eigenstates of different sign is very small in presence of a resonator drive, establishing a sign-preserving selection rule. Here, our qubit-resonator system operates in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the coupling strength is 10% of the resonator frequency, allowing sign-changing transitions to be activated and, therefore, detected. This work shows that sign-changing transitions are an unambiguous, distinctive signature of systems operating in the ultrastrong coupling regime of the quantum Rabi model. These results pave the way to further studies of sign-preserving selection rules in multiqubit and multiphoton models. PMID:27273346

  6. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model.

    PubMed

    Forn-Díaz, P; Romero, G; Harmans, C J P M; Solano, E; Mooij, J E

    2016-06-07

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling strength. We report the spectroscopic observation of a resonant transition that breaks a selection rule in the quantum Rabi model, implemented using an LC resonator and an artificial atom, a superconducting qubit. The eigenstates of the system consist of a superposition of bare qubit-resonator states with a relative sign. When the qubit-resonator coupling strength is negligible compared to their own frequencies, the matrix element between excited eigenstates of different sign is very small in presence of a resonator drive, establishing a sign-preserving selection rule. Here, our qubit-resonator system operates in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the coupling strength is 10% of the resonator frequency, allowing sign-changing transitions to be activated and, therefore, detected. This work shows that sign-changing transitions are an unambiguous, distinctive signature of systems operating in the ultrastrong coupling regime of the quantum Rabi model. These results pave the way to further studies of sign-preserving selection rules in multiqubit and multiphoton models.

  7. Sexual selection, sexual size dimorphism and Rensch's rule in Odonata.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Meneses, M A; Córdoba-Aguilar, A; Azpilicueta-Amorín, M; González-Soriano, E; Székely, T

    2008-09-01

    Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) exhibit a range of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) that includes species with male-biased (males > females) or female-biased SSD (males < females) and species exhibiting nonterritorial or territorial mating strategies. Here, we use phylogenetic comparative analyses to investigate the influence of sexual selection on SSD in both suborders: dragonflies (Anisoptera) and damselflies (Zygoptera). First, we show that damselflies have male-biased SSD, and exhibit an allometric relationship between body size and SSD, that is consistent with Rensch's rule. Second, SSD of dragonflies is not different from unit, and this suborder does not exhibit Rensch's rule. Third, we test the influence of sexual selection on SSD using proxy variables of territorial mating strategy and male agility. Using generalized least squares to account for phylogenetic relationships between species, we show that male-biased SSD increases with territoriality in damselflies, but not in dragonflies. Finally, we show that nonagile territorial odonates exhibit male-biased SSD, whereas male agility is not related to SSD in nonterritorial odonates. These results suggest that sexual selection acting on male sizes influences SSD in Odonata. Taken together, our results, along with avian studies (bustards and shorebirds), suggest that male agility influences SSD, although this influence is modulated by territorial mating strategy and thus the likely advantage of being large. Other evolutionary processes, such as fecundity selection and viability selection, however, need further investigation.

  8. Heuristic Rules Underlying Dragonfly Prey Selection and Interception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huai-Ti; Leonardo, Anthony

    2017-03-28

    Animals use rules to initiate behaviors. Such rules are often described as triggers that determine when behavior begins. However, although less explored, these selection rules are also an opportunity to establish sensorimotor constraints that influence how the behavior ends. These constraints may be particularly significant in influencing success in prey capture. Here we explore this in dragonfly prey interception. We found that in the moments leading up to takeoff, perched dragonflies employ a series of sensorimotor rules that determine the time of takeoff and increase the probability of successful capture. First, the dragonfly makes a head saccade followed by smooth pursuit movements to orient its direction-of-gaze at potential prey. Second, the dragonfly assesses whether the prey's angular size and speed co-vary within a privileged range. Finally, the dragonfly times the moment of its takeoff to a prediction of when the prey will cross the zenith. Each of these processes serves a purpose. The angular size-speed criteria biases interception flights to catchable prey, while the head movements and the predictive takeoff ensure flights begin with the prey visually fixated and directly overhead-the key parameters that underlie interception steering. Prey that do not elicit takeoff generally fail at least one of the criterion, and the loss of prey fixation or overhead positioning during flight is strongly correlated with terminated flights. Thus from an abundance of potential targets, the dragonfly selects a stereotyped set of takeoff conditions based on the prey and body states most likely to end in successful capture.

  9. A prediction rule for selective screening of Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Gotz, H; van Bergen, J E A M; Veldhuijzen, I; Broer, J; Hoebe, C; Richardus, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis infections is aimed at the reduction of these infections and subsequent complications. Selective screening may increase the cost effectiveness of a screening programme. Few population based systematic screening programmes have been carried out and attempts to validate selective screening criteria have shown poor performance. This study describes the development of a prediction rule for estimating the risk of chlamydial infection as a basis for selective screening. Methods: A population based chlamydia screening study was performed in the Netherlands by inviting 21 000 15–29 year old women and men in urban and rural areas for home based urine testing. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for chlamydial infection among 6303 sexually active participants, and the discriminative ability was measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Internal validity was assessed with bootstrap resampling techniques. Results: The prevalence of C trachomatis (CT) infection was 2.6% (95% CI 2.2 to 3.2) in women and 2.0% (95% CI 1.4 to 2.7) in men. Chlamydial infection was associated with high level of urbanisation, young age, Surinam/Antillian ethnicity, low/intermediate education, multiple lifetime partners, a new contact in the previous two months, no condom use at last sexual contact, and complaints of (post)coital bleeding in women and frequent urination in men. A prediction model with these risk factors showed adequate discriminative ability at internal validation (AUC 0.78). Conclusion: The prediction rule has the potential to guide individuals in their choice of participation when offered chlamydia screening and is a promising tool for selective CT screening at population level. PMID:15681717

  10. Selection rules for hadronic transitions of XYZ mesons.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson

    2014-06-06

    Many of the XYZ mesons discovered in the last decade can be identified as bound states of a heavy quark and antiquark in Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potentials defined by the energy of gluon and light-quark fields in the presence of static color sources. The mesons include quarkonium hybrids, which are bound states in excited flavor-singlet BO potentials, and quarkonium tetraquarks, which are bound states in BO potentials with light-quark+antiquark flavor. The deepest hybrid potentials are known from lattice QCD calculations. The deepest tetraquark potentials can be inferred from lattice QCD calculations of static adjoint mesons. Selection rules for hadronic transitions are derived and used to identify XYZ mesons that are candidates for ground-state energy levels in the BO potentials for charmonium hybrids and tetraquarks.

  11. Multiple beats of weakly confined excitons with inverted selection rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Hideki; Ishihara, Hajime

    2009-05-01

    The phenomenon of multiple beats (MBs) arising from nondipole-type excitons weakly confined in a thin film is theoretically elucidated using a nonlocal transient-response theory. Kojima previously demonstrated for a GaAs thin film that the degenerate four-wave mixing signals from the quantized levels of the center-of-mass motion of excitons exhibit complex interference between beats under femtosecond-order pulse incidence [Kojima , J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 77, 044701 (2008)]. This leads to an ultrafast optical response on the order of femtoseconds. This effect occurs in a size region beyond the long-wavelength approximation regime due to the resonant enhancement of the internal field, wherein the usual dipole selection rule is violated. Our analysis of MBs employs a model of the nonlocal multilevel system that considers the spatial interplay between excitonic waves and the radiation field to elucidate the mechanism behind the observed ultrafast response.

  12. Helicity selection rules and noninterference for BSM amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azatov, Aleksandr; Contino, Roberto; Machado, Camila S.; Riva, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    Precision studies of scattering processes at colliders provide powerful indirect constraints on new physics. We study the helicity structure of scattering amplitudes in the standard model (SM) and in the context of an effective Lagrangian description of beyond-the-SM (BSM) dynamics. Our analysis reveals a novel set of helicity selection rules according to which, in the majority of 2 →2 scattering processes at high energy, the SM and the leading BSM effects do not interfere. In such situations, the naive expectation that dimension-6 operators represent the leading BSM contribution is compromised, as corrections from dimension-8 operators can become equally (if not more) important well within the validity of the effective field theory approach.

  13. Universal rules for division plane selection in plants.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    Coordinated cell divisions and cell expansion are the key processes that command growth in all organisms. The orientation of cell divisions and the direction of cell expansion are critical for normal development. Symmetric divisions contribute to proliferation and growth, while asymmetric divisions initiate pattern formation and differentiation. In plants these processes are of particular importance since their cells are encased in cellulosic walls that determine their shape and lock their position within tissues and organs. Several recent studies have analyzed the relationship between cell shape and patterns of symmetric cell division in diverse organisms and employed biophysical and mathematical considerations to develop computer simulations that have allowed accurate prediction of cell division patterns. From these studies, a picture emerges that diverse biological systems follow simple universal rules of geometry to select their division planes and that the microtubule cytoskeleton takes a major part in sensing the geometric information and translates this information into a specific division outcome. In plant cells, the division plane is selected before mitosis, and spatial information of the division plane is preserved throughout division by the presence of reference molecules at a distinct region of the plasma membrane, the cortical division zone. The recruitment of these division zone markers occurs multiple times by several mechanisms, suggesting that the cortical division zone is a highly dynamic region.

  14. The rule of unity for human intestinal absorption 2: application to pharmaceutical drugs that are marketed as salts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Raj B; Admire, Brittany; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of the human intestinal absorption (HIA) of the 59 drugs which are marketed as salts is predicted using the rule of unity. Intrinsic aqueous solubilities and partition coefficients along with the drug dose are used to calculate modified absorption potential (MAP) values. These values are shown to be related to the fraction of the dose that is absorbed upon oral administration in humans (FA). It is shown that the MAP value can distinguish between drugs that are poorly absorbed (FA <0.5) and those that are well absorbed (FA ≥ 0.5). Inspection of the data as well as a receiver operative characteristic (ROC) plot shows that a single critical MAP value can be used for predicting efficient human absorption of drugs. This forms the basis of a simple rule of unity based solely on in vitro data for predicting whether or not a drug will be well absorbed at a given dose.

  15. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  16. Incorporating Employee Heterogeneity into Default Rules for Retirement Plan Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Manchester, Colleen Flaherty

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of incorporating heterogeneity into default rules by examining the choice between retirement plans at a firm that transitioned from a defined benefit (DB) to a defined contribution (DC) plan. The default plan for existing employees varied discontinuously depending on their age. Employing regression discontinuity techniques,…

  17. Comparing the Performance of Five Multidimensional CAT Selection Procedures with Different Stopping Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    Through simulated data, five multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) selection procedures with varying test lengths are examined and compared using different stopping rules. Fixed item exposure rates are used for all the items, and the Priority Index (PI) method is used for the content constraints. Two stopping rules, standard error…

  18. Birefringence-Directed Raman Selection Rules in 2D Black Phosphorus Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    The incident and scattered light engaged in the Raman scattering process of low symmetry crystals always suffer from the birefringence-induced depolarization. Therefore, for anisotropic crystals, the classical Raman selection rules should be corrected by taking the birefringence effect into consideration. The appearance of the 2D anisotropic materials provides an excellent platform to explore the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules, due to its controllable thickness at the nanoscale that greatly simplifies the situation comparing with bulk materials. Herein, a theoretical and experimental investigation on the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules in the anisotropic black phosphorus (BP) crystals is presented. The abnormal angle-dependent polarized Raman scattering of the Ag modes in thin BP crystal, which deviates from the normal Raman selection rules, is successfully interpreted by the theoretical model based on birefringence. It is further confirmed by the examination of different Raman modes using different laser lines and BP samples of different thicknesses.

  19. A collision-selection rule for a particle simulation method suited to vector computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.; Mcdonald, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    A theory is developed for a selection rule governing collisions in a particle simulation of rarefied gas-dynamic flows. The selection rule leads to an algorithmic form highly compatible with fine grain parallel decomposition, allowing for efficient utilization of supercomputers having vector or massively parallel single instruction multiple data architectures. A comparison of shock-wave profiles obtained using both the selection rule and Bird's direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method show excellent agreement. The equation on which the selection rule is based is shown to be directly related to the time-counter procedure in the DSMC method. The results of several example simulations of representative rarefied flows are presented, for which the number of particles used ranged from 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 7th demonstrating the greatly improved computational efficiency of the method.

  20. Bigger Knows Better: Young Children Selectively Learn Rule Games from Adults Rather than from Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Hamann, Katharina; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Preschoolers' selective learning from adult versus peer models was investigated. Extending previous research, children from age 3 were shown to selectively learn simple rule games from adult rather than peer models. Furthermore, this selective learning was not confined to preferentially performing certain acts oneself, but more specifically had a…

  1. Sound absorption of metallic sound absorbers fabricated via the selective laser melting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Li-Wei; Cheng, Chung-Wei; Chung, Kuo-Chun; Kam, Tai-Yan

    2017-01-01

    The sound absorption capability of metallic sound absorbers fabricated using the additive manufacturing (selective laser melting) method is investigated via both the experimental and theoretical approaches. The metallic sound absorption structures composed of periodic cubic cells were made of laser-melted Ti6Al4 V powder. The acoustic impedance equations with different frequency-independent and frequency-dependent end corrections factors are employed to calculate the theoretical sound absorption coefficients of the metallic sound absorption structures. The calculated sound absorption coefficients are in close agreement with the experimental results for the frequencies ranging from 2 to 13 kHz.

  2. Towards a Model Selection Rule for Quantum State Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Travis; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    Quantum tomography on large and/or complex systems will rely heavily on model selection techniques, which permit on-the-fly selection of small efficient statistical models (e.g. small Hilbert spaces) that accurately fit the data. Many model selection tools, such as hypothesis testing or Akaike's AIC, rely implicitly or explicitly on the Wilks Theorem, which predicts the behavior of the loglikelihood ratio statistic (LLRS) used to choose between models. We used Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the LLRS in quantum state tomography, and found that it disagrees dramatically with Wilks' prediction. We propose a simple explanation for this behavior; namely, that boundaries (in state space and between models) play a significant role in determining the distribution of the LLRS. The resulting distribution is very complex, depending strongly both on the true state and the nature of the data. We consider a simplified model that neglects anistropy in the Fisher information, derive an almost analytic prediction for the mean value of the LLRS, and compare it to numerical experiments. While our simplified model outperforms the Wilks Theorem, it still does not predict the LLRS accurately, implying that alternative methods may be necessary for tomographic model selection. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  3. Effects of Practical Constraints on Item Selection Rules at the Early Stages of Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Shu-Ying; Ankenman, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of four item selection rules--(1) Fisher information (F), (2) Fisher information with a posterior distribution (FP), (3) Kullback-Leibler information with a posterior distribution (KP), and (4) completely randomized item selection (RN)--with respect to the precision of trait estimation and the…

  4. X-ray-selected broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, M. J.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M.; Corral, A.; Ebrero, J.; Esquej, P.; Krumpe, M.; Mateos, S.; Rosen, S.; Schwope, A.; Streblyanska, A.; Symeonidis, M.; Tedds, J. A.; Watson, M. G.

    2017-02-01

    We study a sample of six X-ray-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from the XMM-Newton Wide Angle Survey. All six objects are classified as BALQSOs using the classic balnicity index, and together they form the largest sample of X-ray-selected BALQSOs. We find evidence for absorption in the X-ray spectra of all six objects. An ionized absorption model applied to an X-ray spectral shape that would be typical for non-BAL QSOs (a power law with energy index α = 0.98) provides acceptable fits to the X-ray spectra of all six objects. The optical to X-ray spectral indices, αOX, of the X-ray-selected BALQSOs, have a mean value of <αOX> = 1.69 ± 0.05, which is similar to that found for X-ray-selected and optically selected non-BAL QSOs of a similar ultraviolet luminosity. In contrast, optically selected BALQSOs typically have much larger αOX and so are characterized as being X-ray weak. The results imply that X-ray selection yields intrinsically X-ray bright BALQSOs, but their X-ray spectra are absorbed by a similar degree to that seen in optically selected BALQSO samples; X-ray absorption appears to be ubiquitous in BALQSOs, but X-ray weakness is not. We argue that BALQSOs sit at one end of a spectrum of X-ray absorption properties in QSOs related to the degree of ultraviolet absorption in C IV 1550 Å.

  5. Selecting Pesticides and Nonchemical Alternatives: Green Thumbs' Rules of Thumb Decision Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieshop, James I.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 78 (of 320) home gardeners use rules of thumb (heuristics) to choose between chemical pesticides and nonchemical alternatives. Pesticides rank low in 24 choice attributes where alternatives rank high, and vice versa. Gender, age, and years of pesticide use correlate with pesticide selection. (SK)

  6. Learner Control versus Program Control as Adaptive Strategies for Selection of Instructional Support on Math Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Steven M.; Rakow, Ernest A.

    1981-01-01

    Subjects completed a self-paced lesson on math rules in which the number of supporting examples was adapted to pretest scores through program control, selected through learner control, or kept constant (nonadaptive). Program control means were consistently highest while learner control means were lowest. (Author/BW)

  7. A collision-selection rule for a particle simulation method suited to vector computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baganoff, D.; McDonald, J. D.

    1990-07-01

    A theory is developed for a selection rule governing collisions in a particle simulation of rarefied gas-dynamic flows. The selection rule leads to an algorithmic form that is highly compatible with fine grain parallel decomposition, allowing for very efficient utilization of supercomputers having vector or massively parallel single instruction multiple data (SIMD) architectures. A comparison of shock-wave profiles obtained using both the selection rule and Bird's direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method show excellent agreement. This serves to establish the validity of the method, as the DSMC method is known to compare well with experimentally determined shock-wave profiles. In addition, the equation on which the selection rule is based is shown to be directly related to the time-counter procedure in the DSMC method, further establishing their equivalence. The results of several example simulations of representative rarefied flows are presented, for which the number of particles used ranged from 106 to 107, demonstrating the greatly improved computational efficiency of the method.

  8. Bourdieu's Distinction between Rules and Strategies and Secondary Principal Practice: A Review of Selected Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews a selection of literature on secondary principal practice from which to propose an approach for further research. The review demonstrates that applications of Bourdieu's theory of practice have contributed to understandings about secondary principal practice, and that the distinction he made between rules and strategies has the…

  9. Electrically Tunable Absorption Enhancement with Spectral and Polarization Selectivity through Graphene Plasmonic Light Trapping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, anisotropic graphene plasmonic structures are explored for light trapping and absorption enhancement in surrounding media. It is shown that electrically tunable and versatile spectral and polarization selectivity can be realized. Particularly, it is possible to control absorption of the incident light’s polarization component at a specific wavelength by varying the Fermi energy with suitable geometric designs. It may find applications for new types of infrared and THz photodetectors and will promote the research of other novel polarization devices.

  10. An infrared metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption for low observability (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jagyeong; Han, Kiwook; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    Advancement in stealth technology is very crucial for the protection from enemy. Detection of IR electromagnetic wave is performed by detecting the IR radiation from aircraft fuselage or reflected laser by using laser guided missile. In this research, we designed the metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption to minimize observability from these detecting system. The model is designed as T-asymmetric structure for dual-band absorption or emission, and these two parts can be independently tuned. One part is designed as emitter which emit the radiation in the wavelength region where atmospheric absorption is strong. In order to select the target wavelength region, we used the MODTRAN database to calculate the molecular absorption in the atmosphere and strong absorptions occurs at 2μm, 4μm and 5-8μm wavelength regions. The other part is designed as an absorber which absorbs the IR signal from laser guided missile at 1.064μm. Selective emission or absorption at these wavelength region can be achieved by tuning the geometry of the structure. These mechanisms suppose the thermal equilibrium state so that the Kirchhoff law is satisfied. FDTD simulations of the designed structure was conducted to confirm the electromagnetic resonance. Also, we calculated the detected energy from the designed structure and compared with that from conventional aircraft surface. According to the calculation results, the measured signal from the suggested structure decreases to 1/10 of the signal from conventional surface.

  11. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  12. A Flexible Mechanism of Rule Selection Enables Rapid Feature-Based Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Balcarras, Matthew; Womelsdorf, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Learning in a new environment is influenced by prior learning and experience. Correctly applying a rule that maps a context to stimuli, actions, and outcomes enables faster learning and better outcomes compared to relying on strategies for learning that are ignorant of task structure. However, it is often difficult to know when and how to apply learned rules in new contexts. In our study we explored how subjects employ different strategies for learning the relationship between stimulus features and positive outcomes in a probabilistic task context. We test the hypothesis that task naive subjects will show enhanced learning of feature specific reward associations by switching to the use of an abstract rule that associates stimuli by feature type and restricts selections to that dimension. To test this hypothesis we designed a decision making task where subjects receive probabilistic feedback following choices between pairs of stimuli. In the task, trials are grouped in two contexts by blocks, where in one type of block there is no unique relationship between a specific feature dimension (stimulus shape or color) and positive outcomes, and following an un-cued transition, alternating blocks have outcomes that are linked to either stimulus shape or color. Two-thirds of subjects (n = 22/32) exhibited behavior that was best fit by a hierarchical feature-rule model. Supporting the prediction of the model mechanism these subjects showed significantly enhanced performance in feature-reward blocks, and rapidly switched their choice strategy to using abstract feature rules when reward contingencies changed. Choice behavior of other subjects (n = 10/32) was fit by a range of alternative reinforcement learning models representing strategies that do not benefit from applying previously learned rules. In summary, these results show that untrained subjects are capable of flexibly shifting between behavioral rules by leveraging simple model-free reinforcement learning and context

  13. A Flexible Mechanism of Rule Selection Enables Rapid Feature-Based Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Balcarras, Matthew; Womelsdorf, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Learning in a new environment is influenced by prior learning and experience. Correctly applying a rule that maps a context to stimuli, actions, and outcomes enables faster learning and better outcomes compared to relying on strategies for learning that are ignorant of task structure. However, it is often difficult to know when and how to apply learned rules in new contexts. In our study we explored how subjects employ different strategies for learning the relationship between stimulus features and positive outcomes in a probabilistic task context. We test the hypothesis that task naive subjects will show enhanced learning of feature specific reward associations by switching to the use of an abstract rule that associates stimuli by feature type and restricts selections to that dimension. To test this hypothesis we designed a decision making task where subjects receive probabilistic feedback following choices between pairs of stimuli. In the task, trials are grouped in two contexts by blocks, where in one type of block there is no unique relationship between a specific feature dimension (stimulus shape or color) and positive outcomes, and following an un-cued transition, alternating blocks have outcomes that are linked to either stimulus shape or color. Two-thirds of subjects (n = 22/32) exhibited behavior that was best fit by a hierarchical feature-rule model. Supporting the prediction of the model mechanism these subjects showed significantly enhanced performance in feature-reward blocks, and rapidly switched their choice strategy to using abstract feature rules when reward contingencies changed. Choice behavior of other subjects (n = 10/32) was fit by a range of alternative reinforcement learning models representing strategies that do not benefit from applying previously learned rules. In summary, these results show that untrained subjects are capable of flexibly shifting between behavioral rules by leveraging simple model-free reinforcement learning and context

  14. Enhancement mechanism of the additional absorbent on the absorption of the absorbing composite using a type-based mixing rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    A silicone rubber composite filled with carbonyl iron particles and four different carbonous materials (carbon black, graphite, carbon fiber or multi-walled carbon nanotubes) was prepared using a two-roller mixture. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer at the frequency of 2-18 GHz. Then a type-based mixing rule based on the dielectric absorbent and magnetic absorbent was proposed to reveal the enhancing mechanism on the permittivity and permeability. The enforcement effect lies in the decreased percolation threshold and the changing pending parameter as the carbonous materials were added. The reflection loss (RL) result showed the added carbonous materials enhanced the absorption in the lower frequency range, the RL decrement value being about 2 dB at 4-5 GHz with a thickness of 1 mm. All the added carbonous materials reinforced the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composites. The maximum increment value of the SE was about 3.23 dB at 0.5 mm and 4.65 dB at 1 mm, respectively. The added carbonous materials could be effective additives for enforcing the absorption and shielding property of the absorbers.

  15. Bilingualism trains specific brain circuits involved in flexible rule selection and application.

    PubMed

    Stocco, Andrea; Prat, Chantel S

    2014-10-01

    Bilingual individuals have been shown to outperform monolinguals on a variety of tasks that measure non-linguistic executive functioning, suggesting that some facets of the bilingual experience give rise to generalized improvements in cognitive performance. The current study investigated the hypothesis that such advantage in executive functioning arises from the need to flexibly select and apply rules when speaking multiple languages. Such flexible behavior may strengthen the functioning of the fronto-striatal loops that direct signals to the prefrontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we compared behavioral and brain data from proficient bilinguals and monolinguals who performed a Rapid Instructed Task Learning paradigm, which requires behaving according to ever-changing rules. Consistent with our hypothesis, bilinguals were faster than monolinguals when executing novel rules, and this improvement was associated with greater modulation of activity in the basal ganglia. The implications of these findings for language and executive function research are discussed herein.

  16. Sexual selection explains Rensch's rule of allometry for sexual size dimorphism.

    PubMed

    Dale, James; Dunn, Peter O; Figuerola, Jordi; Lislevand, Terje; Székely, Tamás; Whittingham, Linda A

    2007-12-07

    In 1950, Rensch first described that in groups of related species, sexual size dimorphism is more pronounced in larger species. This widespread and fundamental allometric relationship is now commonly referred to as 'Rensch's rule'. However, despite numerous recent studies, we still do not have a general explanation for this allometry. Here we report that patterns of allometry in over 5300 bird species demonstrate that Rensch's rule is driven by a correlated evolutionary change in females to directional sexual selection on males. First, in detailed multivariate analysis, the strength of sexual selection was, by far, the strongest predictor of allometry. This was found to be the case even after controlling for numerous potential confounding factors, such as overall size, degree of ornamentation, phylogenetic history and the range and degree of size dimorphism. Second, in groups where sexual selection is stronger in females, allometry consistently goes in the opposite direction to Rensch's rule. Taken together, these results provide the first clear solution to the long-standing evolutionary problem of allometry for sexual size dimorphism: sexual selection causes size dimorphism to correlate with species size.

  17. Three-dimensional superwetting mesh film based on graphene assembly for liquid transportation and selective absorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; Qin, Xiaojuan; Zhu, Zhaoqi; Liang, Weidong; An, Jin; La, Peiqing; Deng, Weiqiao

    2013-12-01

    Superwetting membranes or porous absorbent materials have recently attracted considerable interest from both commercial and academic communities due to their excellent performance for separation or selective absorption of organic compounds and oils from water, which shows great potential for addressing environmental issues. Herein, the first example of engineering a commercially available stainless-steel grid based on the assembly of graphene for the fabrication of superwetting mesh films (SMFs) is reported. An excellent surface wettability of the SMFs, which exhibit a unique adhesion force to liquids, is observed; this makes it possible to transfer small quantities of liquid samples to perform microsample analysis. A three-dimensional SMF shows unprecedented performance in the separation, transportation, and selective absorption of organic compounds or oils from water. The performance is considerably improved in comparison to traditional separation/absorption technologies and may useful for a wide range of applications such as purification, water treatment, or oil-spill cleanup.

  18. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  19. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sponge for the selective absorption of oil from water.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sung-Jin; Kwon, Tae-Hong; Im, Hwon; Moon, Dong-Il; Baek, David J; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Duarte, Juan P; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2011-12-01

    We present a sugar-templated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sponge for the selective absorption of oil from water. The process for fabricating the PDMS sponge does not require any intricate synthesis processes or equipment and it is not environmentally hazardous, thus promoting potential in environmental applications. The proposed PDMS sponge can be elastically deformed into any shape, and it can be compressed repeatedly in air or liquids without collapsing. Therefore, absorbed oils and organic solvents can be readily removed and reused by simply squeezing the PDMS sponge, enabling excellent recyclability. Furthermore, through appropriately combining various sugar particles, the absorption capacity of the PDMS sponge is favorably optimized.

  20. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  1. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  2. [Rules analysis of acupoint selection on perimenopausal syndrome treated with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmeng; Wang, Jian; Wang, Rui

    2015-04-01

    With the keywords of "acupuncture" "acupuncture and moxibustion" "perimenopausal syndrome" "rules of acupoint selection", the clinical literature in recent 10 years regarding perimenopausal syndrome treated with acupuncture and moxibustion was searched from China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI). One hundred and ninety-seven relevant articles were acquired,and after excluding, total 67 articles were in accord with research criterion. With method of artificial count, acupoints selected in the inclusive articles were counted. Frequencies of main acupoints, matching acupoints,meridial distributions and locations of the acupoints selected were calculated,and then rules on main acupoints, matching acupoints, meridial distributions and acupoints locations were analyzed. The result indicates that the acupoints with higher selection frequency on perimenopausal syndrome treated with acupuncture and moxibustion are Sanyinjiao(SP 6), Baihui(GV 20),Taichong(LR 3) Shenshu(BL 23), Guanyuan(CV 4), Shenmen(HT 7),Taixi(KI 3), Zusanli(ST 36), Pishu(BL 20) and Ganshu(BL 18), and the meridians are mainly concentrated on governor vessel, bladder meridian, kidney meridian,stomach meridian, conception vessel and spleen meridian,and the distribution of acupoints are mostly concentrated on the 4 limbs and the back and waist.

  3. Theoretical calculations on the electron absorption spectra of selected Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Ping

    1993-01-01

    As a theoretical component of the joint effort with the laboratory of Dr. Lou Allamandola to search for potential candidates for interstellar organic carbon compound that are responsible for the visible diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIB's), quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the electron absorption spectra of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives. In the completed project, 15 different species of naphthalene, its hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives, and corresponding cations and anions were studied. Using semiempirical quantum mechanical method INDO/S, the ground electronic state of each species was evaluated with restricted Hartree-Fock scheme and limited configuration interaction. The lowest energy spin state for each species was used for electron absorption calculations. Results indicate that these calculations are accurate enough to reproduce the spectra of naphthalene cation and anion observed in neon matrix. The spectral pattern of the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives predicted based on these results indicate that the electron configuration of the pi orbitals of these species is the dominant determinant. A combined list of 19 absorptions calculated from 4500 A to 10,400 A were compiled and suggested as potential candidates that are relevant for the DIB's absorptions. Continued studies on pyrene and derivatives revealed the ground state symmetries and multiplicities of its neutral, anionic, and cationic species. Spectral calculations show that the cation (B(sub 3g)-2) and the anion (A(sub u)-2) are more likely to have low energy absorptions in the regions between 10 kK and 20 kK, similar to naphthalene. These absorptions, together with those to be determined from the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives of pyrene, can be used to provide additional candidates and suggest experimental work in the search for interstellar compounds that are responsible for DIB's.

  4. ORTHO-PARA SELECTION RULES IN THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY OF INTERSTELLAR AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, A.; Hily-Blant, P.; Le Gal, R.; Rist, C.

    2013-06-10

    The ortho-para chemistry of ammonia in the cold interstellar medium is investigated using a gas-phase chemical network. Branching ratios for the primary reaction chain involved in the formation and destruction of ortho- and para-NH{sub 3} were derived using angular momentum rules based on the conservation of the nuclear spin. We show that the 'anomalous' ortho-to-para ratio of ammonia ({approx}0.7) observed in various interstellar regions is in fact consistent with nuclear spin selection rules in a para-enriched H{sub 2} gas. This ratio is found to be independent of temperature in the range 5-30 K. We also predict an ortho-to-para ratio of {approx}2.3 for NH{sub 2}. We conclude that a low ortho-to-para ratio of H{sub 2} naturally drives the ortho-to-para ratios of nitrogen hydrides below the statistical values.

  5. Explicit category learning in Parkinson's disease: deficits related to impaired rule generation and selection processes.

    PubMed

    Price, Amanda L

    2006-03-01

    The present study examined the source of explicit category learning deficits previously noted in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Task stimuli consisted of 4 binary-valued cues that together determined category assignment, although some cues were more important for the categorization decision. Participants verbalized the hypotheses being tested to provide several measures of the hypothesis testing. Analyses of these verbal protocols indicated that PD patients were impaired on rule generation and selection but not rule shifting. Patients had particular difficulty noting the relative importance of the cues. Specific aspects of performance were differently correlated with neuropsychological measures of working memory and hypothesis testing ability. Together, the results suggest that the cognitive processes required for explicit category learning are mediated by partially distinct neural mechanisms.

  6. Electromagnetic Selection Rules for \\varvec{^{12}}C in a 3 \\varvec{α } Cluster Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, L.; Stellin, G.; Vitturi, A.

    2017-01-01

    The recent successful application of the Algebraic Cluster Model to the energy spectrum of ^{12}C has brought a new impetus on spectroscopy of this and other α -conjugate nuclei. In fact, known spectral properties have been reexamined on the basis of vibrations and rotations of three α particles at the vertexes of an equilateral triangle and new excited states have been measured that fit into this scheme. The analysis of this system entails the application of molecular models for rotational-vibrational spectra to the nuclear context and requires deep knowledge of the underlying group-theoretical properties, based on the D_{3h} symmetry, similarly to what is done in quantum chemistry. We have recently analyzed the symmetries of the model and the quantum numbers in great depth, reproducing the all-important results of Wheeler and we have derived electromagnetic selection rules for the system of three α particles, finding, for instance, that electric dipole E1 and magnetic dipole M1 excitations are excluded from the model. The lowest active modes are therefore E2, E3,\\cdots and M2, M3, \\cdots although there are further restrictions between certain types of bands. The selection rules summarized in the text provide a criterion for assigning of observed lines to the alpha cluster model or not and they might help to further unravel the electromagnetic properties of ^{12}C. With the perspective of new facilities (such as ELI) where photo-excitation and photo-dissociation experiments will play a major role, a complete understanding of e.m. selection rules as a tool to confirm or disprove nuclear structure models, is mandatory.

  7. Comparison of the Electronic Transitions of Unconjugated Thiones and Imines: An Exercise in the Application of Symmetry Selection Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worman, James J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how symmetry selection rules can be used to determine whether certain of the electronic transitions exhibited by the title compounds are allowed or forbidden by symmetry. (Author/CP)

  8. Selection rules for electromagnetic transitions in triaxially deformed odd-A nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Kosai; Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko

    2008-06-15

    The approximate selection rules for the interband and intraband electromagnetic transitions are predicted referring to two quantum numbers, which are derived from an algebraic solution for the particle-rotor model with one high-j nucleon coupled to a triaxially deformed core. It is shown that the inclusion of angular momentum dependence for moments of inertia reproduces the experimental excitation energies relative to a reference quite well both for positive and negative parity TSD bands in {sup 161,163,165,167}Lu.

  9. [Acupoints selection rules analysis of ancient acupuncture for urinary incontinence based on data mining technology].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Zhigao; Cao, Juanshu; Gong, Houwu; Qin, Zuoai; Zhong, Feng; Cao, Yue; Wei, Yanrong

    2015-12-01

    Based on ancient literature of acupuncture in Canon of Chinese Medicine (4th edition), the articles regarding acupuncture for urinary incontinence were retrieved and collected to establish a database. By Weka data mining software, the multi-level association rules analysis method was applied to analyze the acupoints selection characteristics and rules of ancient acupuncture for treatment of urinary incontinence. Totally 356 articles of acupuncture for urinary incontinence were collected, involving 41 acupoints with a total frequency of 364. As a result, (1) the acupoints in the yin-meridian of hand and foot were highly valued, as the frequency of acupoints in yin-meridians was 2.6 times than that in yang-meridians, and the frequency of acupoints selected was the most in the liver meridian of foot-jueyin; (2) the acupoints in bladder meridian of foot-taiyang were also highly valued, and among three yang-meridians of foot, the frequency of acupoints in the bladder meridian of foot-taiyang was 54, accounting for 65.85% (54/82); (3) more acupoints selected were located in the lower limbs and abdomen; (4) specific acupoints in above meridians were mostly selected, presenting 73.2% (30/41) to the ratio of number and 79.4% (289/364) to the frequency, respectively; (5) Zhongji (CV 3), the front-mu point of bladder meridian, was seldom selected in the ancient acupuncture literature, which was different from modern literature reports. The results show that urinary incontinence belongs to external genitalia diseases, which should be treated from yin, indicating more yin-meridians be used and special acupoints be focused on. It is essential to focus inheritance and innovation in TCM clinical treatment, and applying data mining technology to ancient literature of acupuncture could provide classic theory basis for TCM clinical treatment.

  10. Selection of the optimal combination of water vapor absorption lines for detection of temperature in combustion zones of mixing supersonic gas flows by diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironenko, V. R.; Kuritsyn, Yu. A.; Bolshov, M. A.; Liger, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    Determination of a gas medium temperature by diode laser absorption spectrometry (DLAS) is based on the measurement of integral intensities of the absorption lines of a test molecule (generally water vapor molecule). In case of local thermodynamic equilibrium temperature is inferred from the ratio of the integral intensities of two lines with different low energy levels. For the total gas pressure above 1 atm the absorption lines are broadened and one cannot find isolated well resolved water vapor absorption lines within relatively narrow spectral interval of fast diode laser (DL) tuning range (about 3 cm-1). For diagnostics of a gas object in the case of high temperature and pressure DLAS technique can be realized with two diode lasers working in different spectral regions with strong absorption lines. In such situation the criteria of the optimal line selection differs significantly from the case of narrow lines. These criteria are discussed in our work. The software for selection the optimal spectral regions using the HITRAN-2012 and HITEMP data bases is developed. The program selects spectral regions of DL tuning, minimizing the error of temperature determination δT/T, basing on the attainable experimental error of line intensity measurement δS. Two combinations of optimal spectral regions were selected - (1.392 & 1.343 μm) and (1.392 & 1.339 μm). Different algorithms of experimental data processing are discussed.

  11. Intercalation of IR absorber into layered double hydroxides: Preparation, thermal stability and selective IR absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Haifeng; Tang, Pinggui; Feng, Yongjun; Wang, Lijing; Li, Dianqing

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PMIDA anions were intercalated into Mg{sub 2}Al-NO{sub 3} LDH by anion-exchange method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prepared material has highly selective IR absorption property in 9-11 {mu}m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obtained material has practical applications as heat-retaining additive. -- Abstract: N-phosphonomethyl aminodiacetic acid (PMIDA) was intercalated into the interlayer spacing of layered double hydroxides (LDH) by an anion-exchange method. The intercalated LDHs were characterized by various techniques such as powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and simultaneous thermogravimetric and mass spectrometry (TG-MS) in details. The results show the formation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH based on the expansion of d-spacing from 0.89 nm to 1.22 nm and the disappearance of the characteristic IR absorption band at 1384 cm{sup -1} for NO{sub 3}{sup -} anions. The incorporation of Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH into the low density polyethylene (LDPE) as an additive enhances the selectivity of IR absorption in the main wavelength region 9-11 {mu}m for radiant heat loss at night. Mg{sub 2}Al-PMIDA LDH as a heat-retaining additive has practical application in agricultural plastic films.

  12. Bipyridine hydrogel for selective and visible detection and absorption of Cd2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qingqing; Wu, Ziye; Hai, Zijuan; Tao, Changlu; Yuan, Qingpan; Gong, Yadi; Guan, Yafeng; Jiang, Jun; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report for the first time the use of bipyridine-based hydrogel for selective and visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. At low concentrations, hydrogelator 1 was applied for selective detection of Cd2+in vitro and in living cells with high sensitivity. In the absence of metal ions, 1 is nonfluorescent at 470 nm. Upon addition of metal ions, 1 selectively coordinates to Cd2+, causing an 86-fold increase of fluorescence intensity at 470 nm via the chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect, as revealed by first-principles simulations. At 1.5 wt% and pH 5.5, 1 self-assembles into nanofibers to form hydrogel Gel I. Since Cd2+ could actively participate in the hydrogelation and promote the self-assembly, we also successfully applied Gel I for visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. With these excellent properties, Gel I is expected to be explored as one type of versatile biomaterial for not only environmental monitoring but also for pollution treatment in the near future.Herein, we report for the first time the use of bipyridine-based hydrogel for selective and visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. At low concentrations, hydrogelator 1 was applied for selective detection of Cd2+in vitro and in living cells with high sensitivity. In the absence of metal ions, 1 is nonfluorescent at 470 nm. Upon addition of metal ions, 1 selectively coordinates to Cd2+, causing an 86-fold increase of fluorescence intensity at 470 nm via the chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect, as revealed by first-principles simulations. At 1.5 wt% and pH 5.5, 1 self-assembles into nanofibers to form hydrogel Gel I. Since Cd2+ could actively participate in the hydrogelation and promote the self-assembly, we also successfully applied Gel I for visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. With these excellent properties, Gel I is expected to be explored as one type of versatile biomaterial for not only environmental monitoring but also for pollution treatment in the near future

  13. Comparative accuracy of the Albedo, transmission and absorption for selected radiative transfer approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.; HARSHVARDHAN

    1986-01-01

    Illustrations of both the relative and absolute accuracy of eight different radiative transfer approximations as a function of optical thickness, solar zenith angle and single scattering albedo are given. Computational results for the plane albedo, total transmission and fractional absorption were obtained for plane-parallel atmospheres composed of cloud particles. These computations, which were obtained using the doubling method, are compared with comparable results obtained using selected radiative transfer approximations. Comparisons were made between asymptotic theory for thick layers and the following widely used two stream approximations: Coakley-Chylek's models 1 and 2, Meador-Weaver, Eddington, delta-Eddington, PIFM and delta-discrete ordinates.

  14. Permutation symmetry in spinor quantum gases: selection rules, conservation laws, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Yurovsky, Vladimir A

    2014-11-14

    Many-body systems of identical arbitrary-spin particles, with separable spin and spatial degrees of freedom, are considered. Their eigenstates can be classified by Young diagrams, corresponding to nontrivial permutation symmetries (beyond the conventional paradigm of symmetric-antisymmetric states). The present work obtains the following. (a) Selection rules for additional nonseparable (dependent on spins and coordinates) k-body interactions: the Young diagrams, associated with the initial and final states of a transition, can differ by relocation of no more than k boxes between their rows. (b) Correlation rules in which eigenstate-averaged local correlations of k particles vanish if k exceeds the number of columns (for bosons) or rows (for fermions) in the associated Young diagram. It also elucidates the physical meaning of the quantities conserved due to permutation symmetry-in 1929, Dirac identified those with characters of the symmetric group-relating them to experimentally observable correlations of several particles. The results provide a way to control the formation of entangled states belonging to multidimensional non-Abelian representations of the symmetric group. These states can find applications in quantum computation and metrology.

  15. On morphological selection rule of noisy character applied to model (dis)orderly protein formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siódmiak, Jacek; Santamaría-Holek, Ivan; Gadomski, Adam

    2010-05-01

    We propose that the main mechanism controlling the selection rule of model (dis)orderly protein formations, such as non-Kossel crystal growth and aggregation of lysozyme from aqueous solution, is an ion-channeling filter having flicker-noise properties. This filter is originated at the interfaces between growing solidlike object and its external liquid-type phase, and it can be considered as a series of voltage gated ion subchannels. The dynamics of each channel is studied by using both simulation and analytic argumentation lines, and represents a novel thought on how to utilize the presence of constructive-noise sources in protein formation, a field of utmost experimental and technological interest.

  16. Raman selection rule for surface optical phonons in ZnS nanobelts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang; Varadhan, Purushothaman; Wang, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Cheng-Ying; Fang, Xiaosheng; He-Hau, Jr.

    2016-03-01

    We report Raman scattering results for high-quality wurtzite ZnS nanobelts (NBs) grown by chemical vapor deposition. In the Raman spectrum, the ensembles of ZnS NBs exhibit first order phonon modes at 274 cm-1 and 350 cm-1, corresponding to A1/E1 transverse optical and A1/E1 longitudinal optical phonons, in addition to a strong surface optical (SO) phonon mode at 329 cm-1. The existence of the SO band is confirmed by its shift with different surrounding dielectric media. Polarization dependent Raman spectra were recorded on a single ZnS NB and for the first time a SO phonon band has been detected on a single nanobelt. Different selection rules for the SO phonon mode are shown from their corresponding E1/A1 phonon modes, and were attributed to the breaking of anisotropic translational symmetry on the NB surface.

  17. Nuclear spin selection rules for reactive collision systems by the spin-modification probability method.

    PubMed

    Park, Kisam; Light, John C

    2007-12-14

    The spin-modification probability (SMP) method, which provides fundamental and detailed quantitative information on the nuclear spin selection rules, is discussed more systematically and generalized for reactive collision systems involving more than one configuration of reactant and product molecules, explicitly taking account of the conservation of the overall nuclear spin symmetry as well as the conservation of the total nuclear spin angular momentum, under the assumption of no nuclear hyperfine interaction. The values of SMP once calculated can be used for any system of identical nuclei of any spin as long as the system has the corresponding nuclear spin symmetry. The values of SMP calculated for simple systems can also be used for more complex systems containing several kinds of identical nuclei or various isotopomers. The generalized formulation of statistical scattering theory which can easily represent various rearrangement mechanisms is also presented.

  18. Screening method for solvent selection used in tar removal by the absorption process.

    PubMed

    Masurel, Eve; Authier, Olivier; Castel, Christophe; Roizard, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the treatment of flue gas issued from a process of biomass gasification in fluidized bed. The flue gas contains tar which should be selectively removed from the fuel components of interest (e.g. H2, CO and light hydrocarbons) to avoid condensation and deposits in internal combustion engine. The chosen flue gas treatment is the gas-liquid absorption using solvents, which present specific physicochemical properties (e.g. solubility, viscosity, volatility and chemical and thermal stability) in order to optimize the unit on energetic, technico-economic and environmental criteria. The rational choice of the proper solvent is essential for solving the tar issue. The preselection of the solvents is made using a Hansen parameter in order to evaluate the tar solubility and the saturation vapour pressure of the solvent is obtained using Antoine law. Among the nine families of screened solvents (alcohols, amines, ketones, halogenates, ethers, esters, hydrocarbons, sulphured and chlorinates), acids methyl esters arise as solvents of interest. Methyl oleate has then been selected and studied furthermore. Experimental liquid-vapour equilibrium data using bubbling point and absorption cell measurements and theoretical results obtained by the UNIFAC-Dortmund model confirm the high potential of this solvent and the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  19. Selective Inhibition of Absorption and Long Distance Transport in Relation to the Dual Mechanisms of Ion Absorption in Maize Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Luttge, Ulrich; Laties, George G.

    1967-01-01

    The influence of several uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation and inhibitors of terminal electron transport was studied on absorption and long distance transport of both K and C1 at concentrations within each range of the dual isotherm typical of ion uptake by maize roots. At low concentrations in the range of system 1, the system considered to implement ion movement through the plasma membrane, root absorption and long distance transport are equally inhibited by a given inhibitor. In the high range of system 2, the system considered to mediate ion passage through the tonoplast, long distance transport is markedly less sensitive to inhibitors than is absorption. The observations are in accord with the hypothesis that only system 1 is involved in the uptake of ions from the external solution into the symplast, and hence into the xylem. At high concentrations, entrance into the symplasm is deemed to be largely by diffusion and therefore less inhibitor sensitive. With respect to absorption by the roots, the plasma membrane system is more inhibitor sensitive than is the tonoplast system. It is suggested that the difference in sensitivity is real, and not the consequence of an inequality of inhibitor concentration in the vicinity of the plasma membrane and tonoplast respectively. Images PMID:6040889

  20. A new hyperbox selection rule and a pruning strategy for the enhanced fuzzy min-max neural network.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Mohammed Falah; Lim, Chee Peng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we extend our previous work on the Enhanced Fuzzy Min-Max (EFMM) neural network by introducing a new hyperbox selection rule and a pruning strategy to reduce network complexity and improve classification performance. Specifically, a new k-nearest hyperbox expansion rule (for selection of a new winning hyperbox) is first introduced to reduce the network complexity by avoiding the creation of too many small hyperboxes within the vicinity of the winning hyperbox. A pruning strategy is then deployed to further reduce the network complexity in the presence of noisy data. The effectiveness of the proposed network is evaluated using a number of benchmark data sets. The results compare favorably with those from other related models. The findings indicate that the newly introduced hyperbox winner selection rule coupled with the pruning strategy are useful for undertaking pattern classification problems.

  1. Communication: The H{sub 2}@C{sub 60} inelastic neutron scattering selection rule: Expanded and explained

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Bill

    2015-09-14

    Recently [M. Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 064309 (2013)], an unexpected selection rule was discovered for the title system, contradicting the previously held belief that inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is not subject to any selection rules. Moreover, the newly predicted forbidden transitions, which emerge only in the context of coupled H{sub 2} translation-rotation (TR) dynamics, have been confirmed experimentally. However, a simple physical understanding, e.g., based on group theory, has been heretofore lacking. This is provided in the present paper, in which we (1) derive the correct symmetry group for the H{sub 2}@C{sub 60} TR Hamiltonian and eigenstates; (2) complete the INS selection rule, and show that the set of forbidden transitions is actually much larger than previously believed; and (3) evaluate previous theoretical and experimental results, in light of the new findings.

  2. Slowing down fat digestion and absorption by an oxadiazolone inhibitor targeting selectively gastric lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Point, Vanessa; Bénarouche, Anais; Zarrillo, Julie; Guy, Alexandre; Magnez, Romain; Fonseca, Laurence; Raux, Brigitt; Leclaire, Julien; Buono, Gérard; Fotiadu, Frédéric; Durand, Thierry; Carrière, Frédéric; Vaysse, Carole; Couëdelo, Leslie; Cavalier, Jean-François

    2016-11-10

    Based on a previous study and in silico molecular docking experiments, we have designed and synthesized a new series of ten 5-Alkoxy-N-3-(3-PhenoxyPhenyl)-1,3,4-Oxadiazol-2(3H)-one derivatives (RmPPOX). These molecules were further evaluated as selective and potent inhibitors of mammalian digestive lipases: purified dog gastric lipase (DGL) and guinea pig pancreatic lipase related protein 2 (GPLRP2), as well as porcine (PPL) and human (HPL) pancreatic lipases contained in porcine pancreatic extracts (PPE) and human pancreatic juices (HPJ), respectively. These compounds were found to strongly discriminate classical pancreatic lipases (poorly inhibited) from gastric lipase (fully inhibited). Among them, the 5-(2-(Benzyloxy)ethoxy)-3-(3-PhenoxyPhenyl)-1,3,4-Oxadiazol-2(3H)-one (BemPPOX) was identified as the most potent inhibitor of DGL, even more active than the FDA-approved drug Orlistat. BemPPOX and Orlistat were further compared in vitro in the course of test meal digestion, and in vivo with a mesenteric lymph duct cannulated rat model to evaluate their respective impacts on fat absorption. While Orlistat inhibited both gastric and duodenal lipolysis and drastically reduced fat absorption in rats, BemPPOX showed a specific action on gastric lipolysis that slowed down the overall lipolysis process and led to a subsequent reduction of around 55% of the intestinal absorption of fatty acids compared to controls. All these data promote BemPPOX as a potent candidate to efficiently regulate the gastrointestinal lipolysis, and to investigate its link with satiety mechanisms and therefore develop new strategies to "fight against obesity".

  3. Selective absorption and emission on magnetic transitions in low dimensional dielectric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugayev, Roman; Bermel, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state systems have potential advantages as platforms for manipulating spin states in several applications, such as quantum computing. Here, it is most desirable to utilize the zero phonon line (ZPL), since its corresponding states are partially shielded from loss and dephasing, but it often directly overlaps in frequency with broadened phonon sidebands at room temperature. The ZPL in solid-state spin systems, such as xenon vacancy centers in diamond and transition metal ions in crystals, is often magnetic dipole (MD), whereas the broadened phonon sideband is predominantly electric dipole (ED). In this letter, we numerically demonstrate a nanorod system that efficiently suppresses ED absorption, and furthermore allows selective detection of emitted radiation originating from MD transitions. The factor of suppression of electric absorption is 1.3 × 10 4 , while the factor of detected ED emission suppression is 20 in the plane. We also show that a nanoparticle suppresses ED emission by a factor of 12. This approach can allow nanoscale decoupling of ZPL from the phonon sidebands, thus facilitating the use of solid-state material systems with MD ZPL transitions for on-chip quantum applications.

  4. Analytical application of 2f-wavelength modulation for isotope selective diode laser graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wizemann, H D

    2000-01-01

    Experiences in the analytical application of the 2f-wavelength modulation technique for isotope selective atomic absorption spectroscopy in a graphite furnace are reported. Experimental as well as calculated results are presented, mainly for the natural lithium isotopes. Sensitivity, linearity, and (isotope) selectivity are studied by intensity modulation and wavelength modulation. High selectivities can be attained, however, on the cost of detection power. It is shown that the method enables the measurement of lithium isotope ratios larger than 2000 by absorption in a low-pressure graphite tube atomizer.

  5. Analysis Of Spectrally Selective Liquid Absorption Filters For Hybrid Solar Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chendo, M. A. C.; Osborn, D. E.; Swenson, Rick

    1985-12-01

    Various techniques have been proposed to convert solar energy to both electric power and heat in hybrid systems. Many of these approaches are designed to utilize spectral selectivity to improve the overall conversion efficiency. Examples include spectrally selective beamsplitters and arrangements of long-wave or short-wave-pass glass filters that divide the spectrum so that photon energies are roughly matched to the energies corresponding to the solar-cell bandgaps or to efficient photothermal convertors. This paper describes the analysis of liquid optical filters that have high transmittance in the visible spectrum and high absorptance in the infrared. These qualities make it possible to capture that portion of the spectrum useful to a quantum convertor, such as a photovoltaic cell, while channeling the "excess heat" of the photons with energies below the bandgap to a thermal convertor, thereby enhancing the overall conversion efficiency of the system. The preliminary studies show that spectral responses of the tested solutions (salts in water) are primarily influenced by the cation component of the salt solution. By changing the solutions and concentrations, a variety of spectrally selective filters can be tailored to match system requirements.

  6. The mass-metallicity relation of absorption selected high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lise; Møller, P.; Rhodin, Henrik; Krogager, Jens-Kristian; Fynbo, Johan P. U.

    2017-03-01

    Strong absorption lines in quasar spectra primarily probe low-mass galaxies and detecting these in emission has previously been difficult. Dedicated surveys for the host galaxies of damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems have often resulted in non-detections and upper limits. Targeting the most metal-rich absorbers has proven to be a viable method, because these galaxies are brighter. By combining DLA metallicities and deriving host galaxy stellar masses, we find that metal-rich DLAs (with >10% solar metallicity) and their host galaxies follow the same redshift-dependent scaling relation between stellar mass and metallicity as luminosity-selected galaxies. We derive a prediction for an absorber galaxy mass that depends on the DLA metallicity.

  7. Absorption Coefficient of Alkaline Earth Halides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    levels . As a natural consequence, the magnitude of the absorption coefficient is the key parameter in selecting laser window materials. Over the past...of as can be achieved through improved crystal growing techniques and surface polishing. 2.5. Urbach’s Rule A central question for the development of...high absorption levels , inaccuracies progressively increasing with decreasing absorption level , a natural consequence of decreasing in instrumental

  8. Confirming a Predicted Selection Rule in Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy: The Quantum Translator-Rotator H2 Entrapped Inside C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Minzhong; Jiménez-Ruiz, Mónica; Johnson, Mark R.; Rols, Stéphane; Ye, Shufeng; Carravetta, Marina; Denning, Mark S.; Lei, Xuegong; Bačić, Zlatko; Horsewill, Anthony J.

    2014-09-01

    We report an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of a H2 molecule encapsulated inside the fullerene C60 which confirms the recently predicted selection rule, the first to be established for the INS spectroscopy of aperiodic, discrete molecular compounds. Several transitions from the ground state of para-H2 to certain excited translation-rotation states, forbidden according to the selection rule, are systematically absent from the INS spectra, thus validating the selection rule with a high degree of confidence. Its confirmation sets a precedent, as it runs counter to the widely held view that the INS spectroscopy of molecular compounds is not subject to any selection rules.

  9. Optical selection rules for excitonic Rydberg series in the massive Dirac cones of hexagonal two-dimensional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Pu; Yu, Hongyi; Wang, Yong; Yao, Wang

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the optical transition selection rules for excitonic Rydberg series formed in massive Dirac cones. The entanglement of the exciton envelop function with the pseudospin texture leads to anomalous selection rules for one-photon generation of excitons, where d orbitals can be excited with the opposite helicity selection rule from the s orbitals in a given valley. The trigonal warping effects in realistic hexagonal lattices further renders more excited states bright, where p orbitals can also be accessed by one-photon excitation with the opposite valley selection rules to the s orbitals. The one-photon generation of exciton in the various states and the intraexcitonic transition between these states are both dictated by the discrete in-plane rotational symmetry of the lattices, and our results show that in hexagonal 2D materials the symmetry allowed transitions are enabled when trigonal warping effects are included in the massive Dirac fermion model. In monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides where excitons can be generated by visible light and intraexcitonic transitions can be induced by infrared light, we give the strength of these optical transitions, estimated using modified hydrogenlike envelope functions combined with the optical transition matrix elements between the Bloch states calculated at various k points.

  10. Selected Laws, Rules and State-Level Activities in Wisconsin Related to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Information Memorandum 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard

    This information memorandum describes the selected laws, rules, and state-level activities in Wisconsin related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tests for antibodies to the virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. A section on current state laws on AIDS and HIV antibody testing describes laws related to informed consent for testing,…

  11. Selection and identity rules for subductions of type A quantum Iwahori-Hecke algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Chilla, Vincenzo

    2007-11-15

    This paper is concerned with the subduction problem of type A quantum Iwahori-Hecke algebras CH(S{sub f},q{sup 2}) with a real deformation parameter q, i.e., the problem of decomposing irreducible representations of such algebras as direct sum of irreducible representations of the subalgebras CH(S{sub f{sub 1}},q{sup 2})xCH(S{sub f{sub 2}},q{sup 2}), with f{sub 1}+f{sub 2}=f. After giving a suitable combinatorial description for the subduction issue, we provide a selection rule, based on the Richardson-Littlewood criterion, which allows to determine the vanishing coupling coefficients between standard basis vectors for such representations, and we also present an equivariance condition for the subduction coefficients. Such results extend those ones corresponding to the subduction problem in symmetric group algebras CS{sub f}{down_arrow}CS{sub f{sub 1}}xCS{sub f{sub 2}} which are obtained by q approaching the value of 1.

  12. Towards photodetection with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity: graphene plasmonics for light trapping and absorption engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges.Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Spectral tuning of absorption by changing the diameter of graphene nanodisks. Perfect light absorption in the whole structure and further enhancement of absorption in the underlying absorptive layer with a back mirror. Light trapping and enhancement of

  13. Mechanical- and oil-durable superhydrophobic polyester materials for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Zhang, Junping; Li, Bucheng; Wang, Aiqin

    2014-01-01

    The low stability and complicated fabrication procedures seriously hindered practical applications of superhydrophobic materials. Here we present a facile approach for preparing durable superhydrophobic polyester materials by dip-coating in a nanocomposite solution of polymerized tetraethoxysilane and n-hexadecyltriethoxysilane. The coated samples exhibit excellent superhydrophobicity, superoleophilicity, mechanical and chemical stabilities. This is attributed to the tight binding of the nanocomposite on the polyester fibers and the inherent stability of silicone. The coated samples can quickly absorb petrol, diesel and crude oil, and show very high selectivity in oil/water separation. In addition, the coated samples could maintain their superhydrophobicity, oil absorption capacity and oil/water selectivity after harsh mechanical damage, 90 days of immersion in oils and ten cycles of absorption-desorption. Moreover, this approach is simple and can be easily scaled up for producing samples on a large size, which makes it very promising for practical oil absorption.

  14. Observations of Mg II Absorption near z ~ 1 Galaxies Selected from the DEEP2 Redshift Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Elizabeth; Simcoe, Robert A.

    2011-10-01

    We study the frequency of Mg II absorption in the outer halos of galaxies at z = 0.6-1.4 (with median z = 0.87), using new spectra obtained of 10 background quasars with galaxy impact parameters of b < 100 kpc. The quasar sight lines were selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR6 QSO catalog based on proximity to galaxies in the DEEP2 redshift survey. In addition to the 10 small impact systems, we examine 40 additional galaxies at 100 kpc < b < 500 kpc serendipitously located in the same fields. We detect Mg II absorbers with equivalent width Wr = 0.15-1.0 Å, though not all absorbers correlate with DEEP galaxies. We find five unique absorbers within Δv = 500 km s-1 and b < 100 kpc of a DEEP galaxy; this small sample contains both early- and late-type galaxies and has no obvious trends with star formation rate. No Mg II is detected more than 100 kpc from galaxies; inside this radius the covering fraction scales with impact parameter and galaxy luminosity in a very similar fashion to samples studied at lower redshift. In all but one case, when Mg II is detected without a spectroscopically confirmed galaxy, there exists a plausible photometric candidate which was excluded because of slit collision or apparent magnitude. We do not detect any strong absorbers with Wr > 1.0 Å, consistent with other samples of galaxy-selected Mg II systems. We speculate that Mg II systems with 0.3 < Wr < 1.0 trace old relic material from galactic outflows and/or the halo assembly process, and that in contrast, systems with large Wr are more likely to reflect the more recent star-forming history of their associated galaxies. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  15. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Wei, Su-Huai; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-10-05

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  16. Exact symmetries of electron states and optical selection rules in wurtzite-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaev, Yu. E.; Tronc, P.

    2001-11-01

    The crystal structure of wurtzite-based (hexagonal) quantum wells (QW's), such as (GaN)m/AlN ones for example, is found to be described by the layer group P3m1 (DG69) and does not depend on the number of atomic monolayers constituting the QW whereas the symmetry of wurtzite-based superlattices (SL's), such as (GaN)m(AlN)n ones for example, has been previously shown to be described by the space groups C13v or C46v depending on m+n is even or odd. The P3m1 (DG69) group is a factor group of the C13v group, the latter being the product of the P3m1 group and the subgroup containing the translations along the z axis. Basing on these symmetries, we have determined the exact symmetries of Bloch states at the Γ and other symmetry points of the Brillouin zones of QW's and SL's and derived optical selection rules for carriers and excitons. The latters present large Rydberg values. We have shown that the built-in electric field, directed along the z axis due to the symmetry, breaks the translational invariance of the SL's along this direction reducing their symmetry to that of a single QW. We have established that when one (several) phonon(s) is (are) involved in a radiative process, it is always possible to connect any initial state to any final one. The energy of the emitted photon depends on the nature of the phonon(s) if several channels are allowed for the transition. The symmetry of electron states in very thin QW's and short-period SL's is shown to be determined by their exact symmetry rather than that implied in envelope function approximation (EFA). Within the domain of validity of the EFA, i.e., for not too thin layers, a detailed analysis of the Bloch-state symmetry is performed on imposing the invariance of the structure under the change of z to -z (the σz symmetry operation). The correspondence is established between the symmetry of a Bloch state and the parity with respect to σz of its associated envelope function. It is shown that EFA artificially induces a

  17. Ca II AND Na I QUASAR ABSORPTION-LINE SYSTEMS IN AN EMISSION-SELECTED SAMPLE OF SDSS DR7 GALAXY/QUASAR PROJECTIONS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this project is to identify low-redshift host galaxies of quasar absorption-line systems by selecting galaxies that are seen in projection onto quasar sightlines. To this end, we use the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct a parent sample of 97,489 galaxy/quasar projections at impact parameters of up to 100 kpc to the foreground galaxy. We then search the quasar spectra for absorption-line systems of Ca II and Na I within {+-}500 km s{sup -1} of the galaxy's velocity. This yields 92 Ca II and 16 Na I absorption systems. We find that most of the Ca II and Na I systems are sightlines through the Galactic disk, through high-velocity cloud complexes in our halo, or Virgo Cluster sightlines. Placing constraints on the absorption line rest equivalent width significance ({>=}3.0{sigma}), the local standard of rest velocity along the sightline ({>=}345 km s{sup -1}), and the ratio of the impact parameter to the galaxy optical radius ({<=}5.0), we identify four absorption-line systems that are associated with low-redshift galaxies at high confidence, consisting of two Ca II systems (one of which also shows Na I) and two Na I systems. These four systems arise in blue, {approx}L*{sub r} galaxies. Tables of the 108 absorption systems are provided to facilitate future follow-up.

  18. Studies of selected transuranium and lanthanide triiodides under pressure using absorption spectrophotometry

    SciTech Connect

    Haire, R.G.; Young, J.P.; Peterson, J.R.; Benedict, U.

    1986-01-01

    The anhydrous triiodides of plutonium, americium, and curium under pressure have been investigated using absorption spectrophotometry. These initial studies on plutonium and curium triiodides together with the published data for americium triiodide show that the rhombohedral (BiI/sub 3/-type structure) form of these compounds can be converted to the same orthorhombic (PuBr/sub 3/-type structure) form by applying pressure at room temperature. Absorption spectrophotometry can often differentiate between two crystallographic forms of materials and has been used in the present high pressure studies to monitor the effects of pressure on the triiodides. A complication in these studies of the triiodides is a significant shift of their absorption edges from the near uv to the visible spectral region with pressure. With curium triiodide this shift causes interference with the major f-f absorption peaks and precludes identification by absorption spectrophotometry of the high pressure phase of CmI/sub 3/. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  20. HALO GAS CROSS SECTIONS AND COVERING FRACTIONS OF Mg II ABSORPTION SELECTED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Steidel, Charles C.; Murphy, Michael T. E-mail: cwc@nmsu.edu E-mail: mmurphy@astro.swin.edu.au

    2008-03-15

    We examine halo gas cross sections and covering fractions, f{sub c} , of intermediate-redshift Mg II absorption selected galaxies. We computed statistical absorber halo radii, R{sub x}, using current values of dN/dz and Schechter luminosity function parameters, and have compared these values to the distribution of impact parameters and luminosities from a sample of 37 galaxies. For equivalent widths W{sub r}(2796) {>=} 0.3 A, we find 43 {<=} R{sub x} {<=} 88 kpc, depending on the lower luminosity cutoff and the slope, {beta}, of the Holmberg-like luminosity scaling, R {proportional_to} L{sup {beta}}. The observed distribution of impact parameters, D, are such that several absorbing galaxies lie at D>R{sub x} and several non-absorbing galaxies lie at D < R{sub x}. We deduced that f{sub c} must be less than unity and obtain a mean of {approx} 0.5 for our sample. Moreover, the data suggest that halo radii of Mg II absorbing galaxies do not follow a luminosity scaling with {beta} in the range of 0.2-0.28, if f{sub c} = 1 as previously reported. However, provided f{sub c} {approx} 0.5, we find that halo radii can remain consistent with a Holmberg-like luminosity relation with {beta} {approx_equal} 0.2 and R{sub *}= R{sub x}/{radical}(f{sub c}){approx}110 kpc. No luminosity scaling ({beta} = 0) is also consistent with the observed distribution of impact parameters if f{sub c} {<=} 0.37. The data support a scenario in which gaseous halos are patchy and likely have non-symmetric geometric distributions about the galaxies. We suggest that halo gas distributions may not be governed primarily by galaxy mass/luminosity but also by stochastic processes local to the galaxy.

  1. Rule-based approach to operating system selection: RMS vs. UNIX

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.S.; Sadlowe, A.R.; Emrich, M.L.; Gadagkar, H.P.

    1988-10-01

    A rule-based system is under development for choosing computer operating systems. Following a brief historical account, this paper compares and contrasts the essential features of two operating systems highlighting particular applications. ATandT's UNIX System and Datapoint Corporations's Resource Management System (RMS) are used as illustrative examples. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  2. A novel control system for automatically locking a diode laser frequency to a selected gas absorption line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lei; Yin, Wangbao; Ma, Weiguang; Jia, Suotang

    2007-05-01

    A novel control system has been developed for avoiding manual operation during traditional frequency locking. The control system uses a computer with a commercial data acquisition card. This accomplishes the whole operation of frequency locking, including generating ramp, searching locking point, engaging a proportional-integral-differential (PID) regulator at the proper time and outputting PID compensation signal. Moreover, a new method has also been employed to make the novel control system accurately identify the locking points of all absorption lines within the scanning range, so that the laser frequency can be automatically firmly brought onto any selected absorption line centre without any adjusting time. The operation of the system, the ability to identify absorption lines and the performance of the frequency locking were discussed in detail. Successful tests were made with two different lasers: external cavity diode lasers and distributed feedback diode lasers.

  3. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  4. Computerized nodule detection in thin-slice CT using selective enhancement filter and automated rule-based classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiang; Li, Feng; Doi, Kunio

    2005-04-01

    We have been developing computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) scheme to assist radiologists detect lung nodules in thoracic CT images. In order to improve the sensitivity for nodule detection, we developed a selective nodule enhancement filter for nodule which can simultaneously enhance nodules and suppress other normal anatomic structures such as blood vessels and airway walls. Therefore, as preprocessing steps, this filter is useful for improving the sensitivity of nodule detection and for reducing the number of false positives. Another new technique we employed in this study is an automated rule-based classifier. It can significantly reduce the extent of the disadvantages of existing rule-based classifiers, including manual design, poor reproducibility, poor evaluation methods such as re-substitution, and a large overtraining effect. Experimental results performed with Monte Carlo simulation and a real lung nodule CT dataset demonstrated that the automated method can completely eliminate overtraining effect in the procedure of cutoff threshold selection, and thus can minimize overall overtraining effect in the rule-based classifier.

  5. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    PubMed

    Mann, Richard P; Perna, Andrea; Strömbom, Daniel; Garnett, Roman; Herbert-Read, James E; Sumpter, David J T; Ward, Ashley J W

    2012-01-01

    Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis). We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture fine scale rules of interaction, which are primarily mediated by physical contact. Conversely, the Markovian self-propelled particle model captures the fine scale rules of interaction but fails to reproduce global dynamics. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  6. A Common Selection Rule for Organic Reactions in Terms of Signs of Direct and Indirect Interorbital Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gineityte, Viktorija

    2009-02-01

    The semilocalized approach to chemical reactivity suggested recently is overviewed with respect to both theory and applications. The principal attention is paid to formulation of a common selection rule for organic reactions and to demonstration of its validity to various heterolytic (i. e. nucleophilic and electrophilic) and pericyclic processes. The total energy of the whole reacting system (E) is represented in this approach in the form of power series with respect to all interfragmental interactions (fragments coincide with individual chemical bonds, phenyl rings, etc.). For any reaction, a certain decisive k-th-order energy correction E(k) may be revealed, the sign of which depends on the actual way of the process. The allowed and forbidden reactions are then defined as those described by negative (stabilizing) and positive (destabilizing) corrections E(k), respectively. The condition which ensures the negative sign of E(k) resolves itself into a universal requirement of coinciding signs of the principal direct and indirect interactions of basis orbitals localized on separate fragments (e. g. bond orbitals). This result forms the basis for the above-mentioned selection rule. Allowed (forbidden) ways of heterolytic reactions are exemplified by the back (frontal) attack of a nucleophile upon a substituted alkane in the SN2 process, the meta (ortho, para) attacks of electrophile upon the pyridine molecule, the addition of electrophile to the Cβ (Cα ) atom of a donor-containing derivative of ethene (D-CαH=Cβ H2), the trans (cis)-β -elimination processes of substituted alkanes, etc. Application of the same rule to pericyclic reactions is demonstrated to yield predictions coinciding with those of other approaches including the famous Woodward-Hoffmann rule.

  7. Separation and preconcentration of chromium species by selective absorption on Lemna minor and determination by slurry atomisation electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, G; Li, S

    2001-08-01

    A novel method for the separation and preconcentration of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) with Lemna minor and determination by slurry atomization electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. A sample solution was added to a polyethylene beaker containing 10 mg of 160 mesh pre-treated Lemna minor, adjusted to pH 1.0, stirred for 8 min for selective absorption of Cr(III) and then centrifuged. The upper layer of solution was transferred into another polyethylene beaker containing 10 mg of 160 mesh pre-treated Lemna minor, adjusted to pH 5.0, stirred for 12 min for adsorption of the residual Cr(VI) and centrifuged. The two residues in two centrifuge tubes were washed twice with water, 2 ml of agar solution added, stirred for 2 min, then two slurries were prepared and used for the determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) by ETAAS. Detection limits (3sigma) of 0.01 microg L(-1) for Cr(III) and 0.03 microg L(-1) for Cr(VI) were obtained. The relative standard deviation was 2.8% for Cr(III) and 3.3% for Cr(VI) at the 1 microg L(-1) level. The method was applied to the determination of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) in water samples. The analytical recoveries of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) added to samples were 97-102 and 96-103%, respectively.

  8. 76 FR 78215 - Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins; Biennial Review; Proposed Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 73 RIN 0920-AA34 Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins...) requesting public comment on the appropriateness of the current HHS and Overlap list of select agents and... appropriateness of the proposed tiering of the select agents and toxins list; whether minimum standards...

  9. Young Children's Selective Learning of Rule Games from Reliable and Unreliable Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We investigated preschoolers' selective learning from models that had previously appeared to be reliable or unreliable. Replicating previous research, children from 4 years selectively learned novel words from reliable over unreliable speakers. Extending previous research, children also selectively learned other kinds of acts--novel games--from…

  10. Electrostatic potential within the free volume space of imidazole-based solvents: insights into gas absorption selectivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haining; Zhang, Zhongtao; Bara, Jason E; Turner, C Heath

    2014-01-09

    In this work, a variety of molecular simulation tools are used to help characterize the selective absorption of CO2 and CH4 in imidazole-based solvents. We focus our efforts on a series of 1-n-alkyl-2-methyl-imidazoles and ether-functionalized imidazoles, over a temperature range from 293 to 353 K, and we perform detailed analysis of the free volume. We find that the electrostatic potential within the solvent free volume cavities provides a useful indication of the selective absorption of CO2 and CH4. The electrostatic potential calculation is significantly faster than the direct calculation of the chemical potential, and tests with the 1-n-alkyl-2-methyl-imidazoles and the ether-functionalized imidazoles indicate that this may be a useful screening tool for other solvents.

  11. Polarization-selective three-photon absorption and subsequent photoluminescence in CsPbBr3 single crystal at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. J.; Stoumpos, C. C.; Saouma, F. O.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Jang, J. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on highly polarization-selective three-photon absorption (3PA) in a Bridgman-grown single crystal of CsPbBr3 oriented along the (112) direction, which is an inorganic counterpart to emerging organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites for solar-cell and optoelectronic applications. The crystal exhibits strong photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature as a direct consequence of 3PA of fundamental radiation. Interestingly, 3PA disappears when the input polarization is parallel to the (-110 ) direction. This 3PA effect is strongest when orthogonal to (-110 ) and the corresponding 3PA coefficient was measured to be γ =0.14 ±0.03 cm3/GW2 under picosecond-pulse excitation at the fundamental wavelength of λ =1200 nm. The laser-induced damage threshold was also determined to be about 20 GW/cm2 at the same wavelength. Based on relative PL intensities upon λ tuning over the entire 3PA range (1100 -1700 nm), we determined the nonlinear optical dispersion of the 3PA coefficient for CsPbBr3, which is consistent with a theoretical prediction. Experimentally observed significant polarization dependence of γ was explained by relevant selection rules. The perovskite is potentially important for nonlinear optical applications owing to its highly efficient 3PA-induced PL response with a sharp on/off ratio by active polarization control.

  12. Methods for analysis of selected metals in water by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Downs, Sanford C.

    1966-01-01

    This manual describes atomic-absorption-spectroscopy methods for determining calcium, copper, lithium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, strontium and zinc in atmospheric precipitation, fresh waters, and brines. The procedures are intended to be used by water quality laboratories of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Detailed procedures, calculations, and methods for the preparation of reagents are given for each element along with data on accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. Other topics discussed briefly are the principle of atomic absorption, instrumentation used, and special analytical techniques.

  13. Application of a rule-based knowledge system using CLIPS for the taxonomy of selected Opuntia species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymans, Bart C.; Onema, Joel P.; Kuti, Joseph O.

    1991-01-01

    A rule based knowledge system was developed in CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) for identifying Opuntia species in the family Cactaceae, which contains approx. 1500 different species. This botanist expert tool system is capable of identifying selected Opuntia plants from the family level down to the species level when given some basic characteristics of the plants. Many plants are becoming of increasing importance because of their nutrition and human health potential, especially in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The expert tool system described can be extremely useful in an unequivocal identification of many useful Opuntia species.

  14. [Acupoints selecting and medication rules analysis based on data mining technique for bronchial asthma treated with acupoint application].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohui; Han, Dongyue; Qie, Lili; Liu, Chang; Wang, Fuchun

    2015-06-01

    Clinical literature of bronchial asthma treated with acupoints application from January 2000 to March 2014 in modern periodicals databases was retrieved through computer. With cluster analysis and frequency analysis methods of data mining, acupoints selecting and medication rules of bronchial asthma treated with acupoints application were analyzed. Total 38 articles were included eventually, including 25 acupoints and 42 medicines. The results indicate that on acupoints selecting, Feishu (BL 13) is used as the main acupoint and 3 groups of bladder meridian and conception vessel acupoints are applied alternately and on medicines, Baijiezi (Brassica alba Boiss), Xixin (Radix et Rhizoma Asari), Gansui (Radix Kansui), Yanhusuo (Corydalis) and Mahuang (Radix et Rhizonma Ephedrae) are primarily adopted, epispastic medicines being the main medicines; medicines mostly belong to lung meridian, main medicines being unchanged mostly with Shengjiang as guiding drug.

  15. Multi-scale inference of interaction rules in animal groups using Bayesian model selection.

    PubMed

    Mann, Richard P; Perna, Andrea; Strömbom, Daniel; Garnett, Roman; Herbert-Read, James E; Sumpter, David J T; Ward, Ashley J W

    2013-01-01

    Inference of interaction rules of animals moving in groups usually relies on an analysis of large scale system behaviour. Models are tuned through repeated simulation until they match the observed behaviour. More recent work has used the fine scale motions of animals to validate and fit the rules of interaction of animals in groups. Here, we use a Bayesian methodology to compare a variety of models to the collective motion of glass prawns (Paratya australiensis). We show that these exhibit a stereotypical 'phase transition', whereby an increase in density leads to the onset of collective motion in one direction. We fit models to this data, which range from: a mean-field model where all prawns interact globally; to a spatial Markovian model where prawns are self-propelled particles influenced only by the current positions and directions of their neighbours; up to non-Markovian models where prawns have 'memory' of previous interactions, integrating their experiences over time when deciding to change behaviour. We show that the mean-field model fits the large scale behaviour of the system, but does not capture the observed locality of interactions. Traditional self-propelled particle models fail to capture the fine scale dynamics of the system. The most sophisticated model, the non-Markovian model, provides a good match to the data at both the fine scale and in terms of reproducing global dynamics, while maintaining a biologically plausible perceptual range. We conclude that prawns' movements are influenced by not just the current direction of nearby conspecifics, but also those encountered in the recent past. Given the simplicity of prawns as a study system our research suggests that self-propelled particle models of collective motion should, if they are to be realistic at multiple biological scales, include memory of previous interactions and other non-Markovian effects.

  16. The use of selected neutron absorption resonance filters to suppress spurious events on hot neutron spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lançon, D.; Ewings, R. A.; Stewart, J. R.; Jiménez-Ruiz, M.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2015-04-01

    Resonant absorption can be used as a filter for high energy neutron spectroscopy. Here we report the transmission of eight thin foil filters: erbium, indium, iridium, dysprosium, hafnium, gadolinium, cadmium and samarium, measured using neutron time-of-flight techniques over a range of energies (1 meV to 10 eV). Measured transmission is converted into energy-dependent absorption cross-section which compares closely to tabulated values. Each resonance is characterized from 91 meV (samarium) to 2815 meV (gadolinium) by Lorentzian fits. Possibilities for the use of neutron filters depending on the type of spurious background are discussed and the performance is simulated for a specific example of a hot neutron triple axis spectrometer experiment.

  17. Towards photodetection with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity: graphene plasmonics for light trapping and absorption engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2015-08-28

    Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges.

  18. Selective photobleaching of radiation-induced absorption in a-SiO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajime, Mori; Yoshiro, Suzuki; Masamitsu, Hirai

    1994-06-01

    Photobleaching effects on radiation-induced absorption in silica glass have been studied in a spectral range from 1.5 to 6.5 eV. The broad absorption induced by γ-ray exposure on chlorine-containing silica glass was fractionally decomposed with light illumination by successive change of photon energies from 1.6 to 5.0 eV. The decomposed spectra show that the γ-ray induced absorption consists of nine Gaussian component bands with the peak energy of 2.2, 2.6, 3.1, 4.0, 5.0, 5.1, 5.5, 5.8, and 6.2 eV. Photobleaching effects observed in the ESR spectra suggest that the 2.6 or 3.1 eV band originates from chlorine atoms generated by γ-ray exposure on the glass. From the correlative bleaching behaviors of the respective bands, the possible origins and their formation mechanism are discussed.

  19. Chemical effect on the K shell absorption parameters of some selected cerium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, F.; Kaçal, M. R.; Durak, R.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the photoelectric cross section values of Ce, CeCl3.7H2O, Ce2(SO4)3, Ce(OH)4 and Ce2O3 samples were measured in the energy range from 31.82 keV up to 51.70 keV by adopting in narrow beam geometry. Using these photoelectric cross sections, the K shell photoelectric cross sections at the K-edge, the K shell absorption jump ratios and jump factors, the Davisson-Kirchner ratios and K shell oscillator strength values were estimated experimentally. The measured parameters were compared with the theoretical calculated values. It is observed that the K shell photoelectric cross section at the K-edge and K shell oscillator strength values of an element are affected by the chemical environment of material while the K shell absorption jump ratio, K shell absorption jump factor and Davisson-Kirchner ratio are not affected by the chemical environment of material for the present samples. To the best of our knowledge, the chemical effects on the Davisson-Kirchner ratio and K shell oscillator strength have not been discussed for any element by now.

  20. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  1. In vitro modeling of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor's absorption with chromatographic retention data and selected molecular descriptors.

    PubMed

    Odović, Jadranka; Marković, Bojan; Vladimirov, Sote; Karljiković-Rajić, Katarina

    2014-03-15

    Set of nine angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril, ramipril, benazepril, perindopril and moexipril) were studied to evaluate the correlation between their intestinal absorption and salting-out thin-layer chromatography hydrophobicity parameters (RM(0) or C0) obtained by ascending technique applying four different salts, (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NH4Cl and NaCl as mobile phases. The best correlations between KOWWIN logP and both hydrophobicity parameters, RM(0) and C0, (R(2)>0.850) were observed for NaCl (1.0-3.0M) while the lowest R(2) was obtained for (NH4)2SO4 (0.649 and 0.427, respectively) due to highest salting-out effect of (NH4)2SO4. The effect of selected inorganic salts in the salting-out mobile phases, on the solutes solubility and retention was evaluated. The topological polar surface area should be selected as independent variable (only this molecular descriptor showed low correlation with chromatographic hydrophobicity parameters) for multiple linear regression analysis, to obtain reliable correlation between angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor's intestinal absorption data and salting-out thin-layer chromatograpic hydrophobicity parameters. These correlations provide R(2)=0.823 for RM(0) or R(2)=0.799 for C0 indicating good relationship between predicted and literature available intestinal absorption (ranged from 22% to 70%) of investigated angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The proposed in vitro model was checked with three in addition experimentally analyzed drugs, zofenopril, trandolapril and captoril. The satisfactory absorption prediction was obtained for zofenopril and trandolapril, while divergence established for captopril resulted from considerably different structure.

  2. Supreme Court Rulings on Abortion: Roe v. Wade and Selected Progeny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uerling, Donald F.

    2006-01-01

    Abortion is one of the most controversial and contentious issues of our time. Few topics generate as much public debate or leave as little room for political compromise. This article presents a discussion of selected United States Supreme Court decisions on abortion and the legal reasoning supporting those decisions. It should be noted initially…

  3. The Danger of Selectively Changing the Rules in Youth Sport: The Case of the Strike Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cesar R.

    2010-01-01

    Albeit well-intentioned, the practice of selectively changing the strike zone to promote young players' welfare is critically flawed. After discussing the central purpose of competitive sport, the duty of officials, and the significance of impartiality in officiating, this article demonstrates that this practice presents numerous practical…

  4. Nucleon and heavy-ion total and absorption cross section for selected nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Costner, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the coupled-channel equations for high-energy composite particle scattering are obtained and are applied to the nuclear scattering problem. Relationships between several approximation procedures are established and discussed. The eikonal formalism is used with a small-angle approximation to calculate the coherent elastic scattered amplitude from which total and absorption cross sections are derived. Detailed comparisons with nucleon-nucleus experiments show agreement within 5 percent except at lower energies where the eikonal approximation is of questionable accuracy. Even at these lower energies, agreement is within 15 percent. Tables of cross sections required for cosmic heavy-ion transport and shielding studies are presented.

  5. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A concept-driven interactive pathway on the selective absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a 'concept-driven interactive pathway'. It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light by a medium as a selective multiplication (i.e. one depending on the wavelength) of the intensity by a factor smaller than one. Six teaching interviews conducted with fourth-year university students were recorded, transcribed and coded. Their analysis led us to evaluate the importance of the main obstacle expected, that is, of restricting the interpretation of absorption/transmission phenomena to the idea of 'less light', or, equivalently, of seeing a multiplication by a factor smaller than one as just a subtraction. The students' comments at the end of the interview introduce a discussion about the links between their intellectual satisfaction, critical attitude and comprehension of the topic.

  6. a New Framework for Geospatial Site Selection Using Artificial Neural Networks as Decision Rules: a Case Study on Landfill Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abujayyab, S. K. M.; Ahamad, M. A. S.; Yahya, A. S.; Saad, A.-M. H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    This paper briefly introduced the theory and framework of geospatial site selection (GSS) and discussed the application and framework of artificial neural networks (ANNs). The related literature on the use of ANNs as decision rules in GSS is scarce from 2000 till 2015. As this study found, ANNs are not only adaptable to dynamic changes but also capable of improving the objectivity of acquisition in GSS, reducing time consumption, and providing high validation. ANNs make for a powerful tool for solving geospatial decision-making problems by enabling geospatial decision makers to implement their constraints and imprecise concepts. This tool offers a way to represent and handle uncertainty. Specifically, ANNs are decision rules implemented to enhance conventional GSS frameworks. The main assumption in implementing ANNs in GSS is that the current characteristics of existing sites are indicative of the degree of suitability of new locations with similar characteristics. GSS requires several input criteria that embody specific requirements and the desired site characteristics, which could contribute to geospatial sites. In this study, the proposed framework consists of four stages for implementing ANNs in GSS. A multilayer feed-forward network with a backpropagation algorithm was used to train the networks from prior sites to assess, generalize, and evaluate the outputs on the basis of the inputs for the new sites. Two metrics, namely, confusion matrix and receiver operating characteristic tests, were utilized to achieve high accuracy and validation. Results proved that ANNs provide reasonable and efficient results as an accurate and inexpensive quantitative technique for GSS.

  7. The Host Nature and Environment of SDSS selected Mg II absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caler, M.; Sheth, R.; Jain, B.

    2005-12-01

    We present preliminary results of an investigation into the nature and environment of Mg II absorption systems as seen in the spectra of background QSOs. Our sample is the Mg II absorbing system catalog of Prochter, Prochaska, and Burles 2004; we divide this sample by redshift and equivalent width to probe differences between populations. We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4) to find galaxies projected near the absorbing systems to within 3 arcmin. From this data we compute the galaxy-absorber angular correlation function as well as the luminosity function and colour distribution of neighbouring galaxies. Characterisitcs of candidate host systems are also considered. We discuss the interpretation of these results in terms of the halo structure of absorbing systems.

  8. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  9. Site- and phase-selective x-ray absorption spectroscopy based on phase-retrieval calculation.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Fukuda, Katsutoshi; Matsubara, Eiichiro

    2017-03-22

    Understanding the chemical state of a particular element with multiple crystallographic sites and/or phases is essential to unlocking the origin of material properties. To this end, resonant x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (RXDS) achieved through a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques can allow for the measurement of diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS). This is expected to provide a peerless tool for electronic/local structural analyses of materials with complicated structures thanks to its capability to extract spectroscopic information about a given element at each crystallographic site and/or phase. At present, one of the major challenges for the practical application of RXDS is the rigorous determination of resonant terms from observed DAFS, as this requires somehow determining the phase change in the elastic scattering around the absorption edge from the scattering intensity. This is widely known in the field of XRD as the phase problem. The present review describes the basics of this problem, including the relevant background and theory for DAFS and a guide to a newly-developed phase-retrieval method based on the logarithmic dispersion relation that makes it possible to analyze DAFS without suffering from the intrinsic ambiguities of conventional iterative-fitting. Several matters relating to data collection and correction of RXDS are also covered, with a final emphasis on the great potential of powder-sample-based RXDS (P-RXDS) to be used in various applications relevant to practical materials, including antisite-defect-type electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  10. Enhancing and broadening absorption properties of frequency selective surfaces absorbers using FeCoB-based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenyi; Nie, Yan; Xiong, Xuan; Zhang, Cui; Zhou, Yan; Gong, Rongzhou

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the influence of FeCoB-based magnetic film on the absorption properties of traditional frequency selective surface (FSS) was investigated experimentally. A single-layer Minkowski fractal planar frequency selective surface was chosen, and the laser etching technique was proposed to fabricate aluminum-based FSS (AFSS) samples. Magnetic films were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, with the targets of Fe40Co40B20 and SiO2. It is found that after the magnetic film is incorporated, the bandwidth under -10 dB increases by 33.3% from 5.08 to 6.78 GHz and the peak value of reflectivity decreases from -12.46 to -38.41 dB. The 3.1-mm-thick radar absorber is relatively light and could obtain the reflectivity of -38.41 with -20 dB bandwidth of 1.85 GHz. As a consequence, under the circumstance that the total thickness of the sample maintains relatively constant, the magnetic thin film can effectively improve the absorption properties of the sample.

  11. Method for making an aluminum or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A panel is described for selectively absorbing solar energy comprising an aluminum substrate. A zinc layer was covered by a layer of nickel and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a nickel layer. A layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate was included. A method for making these panels is disclosed.

  12. [Acupoint selection and medication rules analysis for allergic rhinitis treated with acupoint application-based on data mining technology].

    PubMed

    Han, Dongyue; Liu, Chang; Qie, Lili; Wang, Fuchun; Wang Zhaohui

    2015-11-01

    To make a systematic study on acupoints selection and medication rules for allergic rhinitis treated with acupoint application, literature regarding clinical researches on acupoint application for allergic rhinitis since 2000 has been retrieved; medication and acupoints involved were preprocessed and cluster analysis technique was applied to classify the data. As a result, a total of 37 pieces of literature were included, involving 27 types of herbs and 33 acupoints. The results showed Baijiezi (Brassica alba Boiss), Xixin (Radix et Rhizoma Asari), Gansui (Radix Kansui), Yanhusuo (Corydalis), Jiangzhi (Ginger juice) and Baizhi (Radix angelicae) constituted the main herb prescription, and the layer was increased along with frequency of use. Feishu (BL 13), Dazhui (GV 14), Shenshu (BL 23), Pishu (BL 20), Gaohuang (BL 43), Fengmen (BL 12) constituted the main acupoint prescription, which were clustered into 4 classes; Feishu (BL 13) and Dazhui (GV 14) constituted the first class; Pishu (BL 20) and Shenshu (BL 23) constituted the second class; the first and second class merged into the third class, Including Feishu (BL 13), Dazhui (GV 14), Shenshu (BL 23) and Pishu (BL 20); Gaohuang (BL 43) and Fengmen (BL 12) constituted the fourth class; the fourth class and the third class constituted the whole acupoint prescription. It was showed that for the allergic rhinitis treated with acupoint application, the medication was mainly epispastic herbs with pungent nature that belonged to the lung, spleen and kidney meridian, which presented the principle of simultaneous treatment of principal and subordinate symptoms; also the medication can be selected from core layer to supporting layer based on clinical needs; for the selection of acupoints, acupoints in lung and bladder meridian were mainly selected to assist exterior and resist the pathogenic qi, which could treat allergic rhinitis fundamentally by joint use with acupoints in soleen and kidney meridian.

  13. Hamilton's rule.

    PubMed

    van Veelen, Matthijs; Allen, Benjamin; Hoffman, Moshe; Simon, Burton; Veller, Carl

    2017-02-07

    This paper reviews and addresses a variety of issues relating to inclusive fitness. The main question is: are there limits to the generality of inclusive fitness, and if so, what are the perimeters of the domain within which inclusive fitness works? This question is addressed using two well-known tools from evolutionary theory: the replicator dynamics, and adaptive dynamics. Both are combined with population structure. How generally Hamilton's rule applies depends on how costs and benefits are defined. We therefore consider costs and benefits following from Karlin and Matessi's (1983) "counterfactual method", and costs and benefits as defined by the "regression method" (Gardner et al., 2011). With the latter definition of costs and benefits, Hamilton's rule always indicates the direction of selection correctly, and with the former it does not. How these two definitions can meaningfully be interpreted is also discussed. We also consider cases where the qualitative claim that relatedness fosters cooperation holds, even if Hamilton's rule as a quantitative prediction does not. We furthermore find out what the relation is between Hamilton's rule and Fisher's Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection. We also consider cancellation effects - which is the most important deepening of our understanding of when altruism is selected for. Finally we also explore the remarkable (im)possibilities for empirical testing with either definition of costs and benefits in Hamilton's rule.

  14. Reversible Assembly of Graphitic Carbon Nitride 3D Network for Highly Selective Dyes Absorption and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuye; Zhou, Zhixin; Shen, Yanfei; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Jianhai; Liu, Anran; Liu, Songqin; Zhang, Yuanjian

    2016-09-27

    Responsive assembly of 2D materials is of great interest for a range of applications. In this work, interfacial functionalized carbon nitride (CN) nanofibers were synthesized by hydrolyzing bulk CN in sodium hydroxide solution. The reversible assemble and disassemble behavior of the as-prepared CN nanofibers was investigated by using CO2 as a trigger to form a hydrogel network at first. Compared to the most widespread absorbent materials such as active carbon, graphene and previously reported supramolecular gel, the proposed CN hydrogel not only exhibited a competitive absorbing capacity (maximum absorbing capacity of methylene blue up to 402 mg/g) but also overcame the typical deficiencies such as poor selectivity and high energy-consuming regeneration. This work would provide a strategy to construct a 3D CN network and open an avenue for developing smart assembly for potential applications ranging from environment to selective extraction.

  15. Aluminium or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method for making panels which selectively absorb solar energy is disclosed. The panels are comprised of an aluminum substrate, a layer of zinc thereon, a layer of nickel over the zinc layer and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a layer of nickel thereon and a layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate.

  16. Specific absorption of human serum albumin, immunoglobulin A, and immunoglobulin G with selected strains of group A and G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, G; Simmons, A; Myhre, E B; Jonsson, S

    1979-01-01

    Five gram-positive bacterial strains were selected for absorption studies of human serum samples. Strain AR1 (group A, M-type 1) and G148 (group G), with strong immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding capacities, and strain AW43 (group A, M-type 60), binding both IgA1 and IgA2, were compared with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I and with Staphylococcus epidermidis L603. Both AR1 and G148 were capable of completely absorbing out serum IgG. In contrast, S. aureus Cowan I left a fraction unabsorbed, as expected from its known lack of IgG3 binding. Strain AW43 absorbed out all serum IgA, using a 10-microliter bacterial pellet for 20 microliter of serum. Serum IgM levels were slightly reduced by S. aureus Cowan I absorption. On the basis of the experiments, a bacterial mixture was designed consisting of S. aureus Cowan I and group A streptococcus strains AR1 and AW43, with absorption characteristics suitable for use in discriminating between early IgM and late IgG and IgA immune responses in routine serological work. A new type of bacteria-mammalian protein binding was discovered. Human serum albumin was completely absorbed out by strain G148 and to a lesser extent by strain AR1 and AW43. S. aureus Cowan I and S. epidermidis were negative. The binding capacity of G148 for albumin equalled that of Cowan I for IgG. The binding pattern of albumin to the strains was different from those of IgG, IgA, IgM, fibrinogen, haptoglobin, or aggregated beta 2-microglobulin and therefore seems to represent another type of bacterial-mammalian interaction with a specific albumin receptor on the surface of streptococci. Images PMID:383609

  17. Properties of solid dispersions of selected magnesium salts and the absorption process of Mg2+ ions in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcoin, Waclawa; Duda, Henryk; Chrobak, Dariusz

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an application of phosphatidylcholine 45% (PC 45) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in formulations of magnesium salts such as Mg(VitB6) and Mg(VitB6Arg) prepared by solid dispersion (SD) techniques. The evaluation of influence of the selected carriers on some physicochemical properties of solid dispersions and on the absorption process of Mg +2 ions in vitro were made. An infrared (IR) spectra study suggested creation of a hydrogen bond between the carriers and the examined magnesium salts. The results of the following thermal analysis: differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermogravimetry (TG), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that application of PVP into SD lower the temperature of the decomposition process. However, in the case of PC 45 into SD the characteristic thermal effects of higher temperatures were observed. Moreover, values of the enthalpy SD of decomposition process were decreased. The results of these studies on absorption process of Mg2+ ions in vitro showed the positive influence of the applied carriers on the partition coefficient values (log P) in the examined formulation.

  18. On the selection of damped Lyman α systems using Mg II absorption at 2 < zabs < 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, T. A. M.; Ellison, S. L.; Prochaska, J. X.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Lopez, S.; D'Odorico, V.; Becker, G.; Christensen, L.; Cupani, G.; Denney, K.; Worseck, G.

    2017-01-01

    The XQ-100 survey provides optical and near-infrared coverage of 36 blindly selected, intervening damped Lyman α systems (DLAs) at 2 < zabs < 4, simultaneously covering the Mg II doublet at λλ2796, 2803Å, and the Ly α transition. Using the XQ-100 DLA sample, we investigate the completeness of selecting DLA absorbers based on their Mg II rest-frame equivalent width (W0^{2796}) at these redshifts. Of the 29 DLAs with clean Mg II profiles, we find that six (20 per cent of DLAs) have W0^{2796} < 0.6 Å. The DLA incidence rate of W0^{2796} < 0.6 Å absorbers is a factor of ˜5 higher than what is seen in z ˜ 1 samples, indicating a potential evolution in the Mg II properties of DLAs with redshift. All of the W0^{2796} < 0.6 Å DLAs have low metallicities (-2.5 < [M/H] < -1.7), small velocity widths (v90 < 50 km s-1), and tend to have relatively low N(H I). We demonstrate that the exclusion of these low W0^{2796} DLAs results in a higher mean N(H I) which in turn leads to an ˜7 per cent increase in the cosmological gas density of H I of DLAs at 2 < zabs < 4; and that this exclusion has a minimal effect on the H I-weighted mean metallicity.

  19. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  20. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  1. Uv/vis Absorption Experiments on Mass Selected Cations by Counter-Ion Introduction Into AN Inert Neon Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehr, N. P.; Szczepanski, J.; Polfer, N. C.

    2012-06-01

    Obtaining UV/Vis absorption spectra of cations is a challenging endeavor due to the low densities that can be achieved in the gas phase. In matrix isolation, ions of interest are accumulated in a cold inert matrix of a rare gas (e.g. Argon, Neon) until sufficient concentrations are attained for direct spectroscopic characterization. Nonetheless, in order to ensure neutralization of the matrix, experimentalists often rely on non-ideal, energetic processes, such as electron emission from metal surfaces upon cation bombardment. A better method for matrix neutralization would involve co-depositing a molecular counter-ion. In this talk, a two-ion source instrument is presented, where cations and anions are deposited into a cold inert matrix. Mass-selected cation beams are generated in an electron ionization source and filtered in a quadrupole mass filter (5-10 nA mass-selected naphthalene radical cations recorded). Anion beams are generated in a chemical ionization source (20 nA SF6- recorded). Both ion beams are introduced into an octopole ion guide via a quadrupole deflector. Cations and anions can be deposited simultaneously or separately; in the latter case, alternating layers of each species can be formed. Target cations of interest include open-shell naphthalene and tetracene, for which UV/Vis absorption spectra are recorded after deposition. The counter-ion of choice is SF6-, due to the high electronegativity of SF6. J. P. Maier, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 90, 600(1989). Godbout, et al., J. Phys. Chem. 100 2892-2899(1996). P. Brechignac, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22 7337-7347(1999). M. Vala, et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 245 539-548(1995).

  2. A theory for bioinorganic chemical reactivity of oxometal complexes and analogous oxidants: the exchange and orbital-selection rules.

    PubMed

    Usharani, Dandamudi; Janardanan, Deepa; Li, Chunsen; Shaik, Sason

    2013-02-19

    unpaired electrons on the metal center. Thus, we introduce the exchange-enhanced reactivity (EER) principle, which predicts the preferred spin state during oxidation reactions, the dependence of the barrier on the number of unpaired electrons in the TS, and the dependence of the deformation energy of the reactants on the spin state. We complement EER with orbital-selection rules, which predict the structure of the preferred TS and provide a handy theory of bioinorganic oxidative reactions. These rules show how EER provides a Hund's Rule for chemical reactivity: EER controls the reactivity landscape for a great variety of transition-metal complexes and substrates. Among many reactivity patterns explained, EER rationalizes the abundance of high-spin oxoiron(IV) complexes in enzymes that carry out bond activation of the strongest bonds. The concepts used in this Account might also be applicable in other areas such as in f-block chemistry and excited-state reactivity of 4d and 5d OMCs.

  3. Evolution of sexual dimorphism and Rensch’s rule in the beetle genus Limnebius (Hydraenidae): is sexual selection opportunistic?

    PubMed Central

    Rudoy, Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Sexual size dimorphism (SSD) is widespread among animals, with larger females usually attributed to an optimization of resources in reproduction and larger males to sexual selection. A general pattern in the evolution of SSD is Rensch’s rule, which states that SSD increases with body size in species with larger males but decreases when females are larger. We studied the evolution of SSD in the genus Limnebius (Coleoptera, Hydraenidae), measuring SSD and male genital size and complexity of ca. 80% of its 150 species and reconstructing its evolution in a molecular phylogeny with 71 species. We found strong support for a higher evolutionary lability of male body size, which had an overall positive allometry with respect to females and higher evolutionary rates measured over the individual branches of the phylogeny. Increases in SSD were associated to increases in body size, but there were some exceptions with an increase associated to changes in only one sex. Secondary sexual characters (SSC) in the external morphology of males appeared several times independently, generally on species that had already increased their size. There was an overall significant correlation between SSD, male body size and male genital size and complexity, although some lineages with complex genitalia had low SSD, and some small species with complex genitalia had no SSD. Our results suggest that the origin of the higher evolutionary variance of male body size may be due to lack of constraints rather than to sexual selection, that may start to act in species with already larger males due to random variation. PMID:28286715

  4. The effect of selective solvent absorption on coal conversion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    Using a pair of different recycle oils from Wilsonville and {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation (GPC) chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and elemental analysis, no significant differences were observed between the composition of the recycle oil and that portion of the oil not absorbed by the coal. For these complex mixtures, coals are not selective absorbants. Since most of the heteroatoms responsible for most of the specific interactions have been removed by hydrogenolyses, this is perhaps not surprising. To address the issue of the role of hydrogen bond donors in the reused as hydrogen donor coal, tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin were used as hydrogen donor solvents. This work is reported in detail in Section 2. The basic idea is that the presence of the t-butyl group on the aromatic ring will hinder or block diffusion of the hydrogen donor into the coal resulting in lower conversions and less hydrogen transferred with 2-t-butyltetralin than with tetralin. Observed was identical amounts of hydrogen transfer and nearly identical conversions to pyridine solubles for both hydrogen donors. Diffusion of hydrogen donors into the coal does not seem to play a significant role in coal conversion. Finally, in Section 3 is discussed the unfavorable impact on conversion of the structural rearrangements which occur when Illinois No. 6 coal is swollen with a solvent. We believe this rearrangement results in a more strongly associated solid leading to the diminution of coal reactions. Hydrogen donor diffusion does not seem to be a major factor in coal conversion while the structural rearrangement does. Both areas warrant further exploration.

  5. The application of rules in morphology, syntax and number processing: a case of selective deficit of procedural or executive mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Macoir, Joël; Fossard, Marion; Nespoulous, Jean-Luc; Demonet, Jean-François; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2010-08-01

    Declarative memory is a long-term store for facts, concepts and words. Procedural memory subserves the learning and control of sensorimotor and cognitive skills, including the mental grammar. In this study, we report a single-case study of a mild aphasic patient who showed procedural deficits in the presence of preserved declarative memory abilities. We administered several experiments to explore rule application in morphology, syntax and number processing. Results partly support the differentiation between declarative and procedural memory. Moreover, the patient's performance varied according to the domain in which rules were to be applied, which underlines the need for more fine-grained distinctions in cognition between procedural rules.

  6. An evaluation of atomic and molecular mixture rules and group additivity concepts for the estimation of radiation absorption by long-chained, saturated hydrocarbons at vacuum UV and soft X-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Au, Jennifer W.; Cooper, Glyn; Burton, Gordon R.; Brion, C. E.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of using atomic and molecular mixture rules as well as group additivity concepts for predicting valence shell photoabsorption oscillator strengths (cross sections) for long-chained alkane molecules has been investigated over a wide energy range from 18 to 220 eV. The predictions are discussed with reference to recently reported experimental measurements (Chem. Phys. 173 (1993) 209) for normal alkanes, C nH 2 n+2 ( n=1-8). Atomic mixture rules based on either theoretical or experimental atomic oscillator strength sums are found to be unsatisfactory, giving very large errors at most photon energies. A wide range of molecular mixture rules based on linear combinations of measured oscillator strength values for small 'component' alkane molecules and molecular hydrogen have also been evaluated. Although good agreement with experiment is obtained with some linear combinations, many others result in substantial errors. Molecular mixture rules constructed using oscillator strength for larger component alkanes generally give better estimates of the experimentally measured data; however, since no other a priori physical or chemical reasons can be advanced for any particular choice of molecular mixture rule, this procedure is unsatisfactory for general application. In contrast, a group additivity procedure based on oscillator strength estimates for the methylene (CH 2) and methyl (CH 3) alkane group fragments, derived entirely from the photoabsorption measurements for lower alkanes, provides excellent agreement with the measured oscillator strengths for C 8H 18 over the entire energy range studied (18-220 eV). The absolute photoabsorption group oscillator strengths derived for the CH 2 and CH 3 fragments should be applicable to assessing the contributions from saturated hydrocarbon groupings to vacuum UV and soft X-ray absorption in larger chemical and biochemical systems.

  7. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded.

    PubMed

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-15

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  8. UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy: Lambert-Beer reloaded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäntele, Werner; Deniz, Erhan

    2017-02-01

    UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy is used in almost every spectroscopy laboratory for routine analysis or research. All spectroscopists rely on the Lambert-Beer Law but many of them are less aware of its limitations. This tutorial discusses typical problems in routine spectroscopy that come along with technical limitations or careless selection of experimental parameters. Simple rules are provided to avoid these problems.

  9. Selection of the distributional rule as an alternative tool to foster cooperation in a Public Good Game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colasante, Annarita

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an investigation about cooperation in a Public Good Game using an Agent Based Model calibrated on experimental data. Starting from the experiment proposed in Colasante and Russo (2016), we analyze the dynamic of cooperation in a Public Good Game where agents receive an heterogeneous income and choose both the level of contribution and the distribution rule. The starting point is the calibration and the output validation of the model using the experimental results. Once tested the goodness of fit of the Agent Based Model, we run some policy experiment in order to verify how each distribution rule, i.e. equidistribution, proportional to contribution and progressive, affects the level of contribution in the simulated model. We find out that the share of cooperators decreases over time if we exogenously set the equidistribution rule. On the contrary, the share of cooperators converges to 100 % if we impose the progressive rule. Finally, the most interesting result refers to the effect of the progressive rule. We observe that, in the case of high inequality, this rule is not able to reduce the heterogeneity of income.

  10. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A Concept-Driven Interactive Pathway on the Selective Absorption of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a "concept-driven interactive pathway". It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light…

  11. Point-group selection rules for ΔS=2 multiplicity change: Application to catalysis and organo-transition metal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Ying-Nan; Chow Chiu, Lue-Yung

    1983-02-01

    Electron spin-spin and second-order spin-orbit interaction operators are expanded as products of irreducible representations of symmetry point groups (Oh, Td, D5d, D6d, and C4v). From the transformation of the separated orbit and of the spin part, the selection rules for off-diagonal matrix elements may be deduced by taking direct products of the ``initial'' and ``final'' states. The special ΔMl selection rule for the orbital part of spin-spin interaction after expansion is also discussed. Emphasis is given to the ΔS=2 change connected by these operators. Possible examples of ΔS=2 change in d4, d5, and d6 configurations under the above mentioned point groups are given. As illustrations of the selection rules, the matrix elements for ΔS=2 and ΔMs=2 for these configurations are evaluated in the decoupled representation and given in terms of common parameters. The relevance of these multiplicity change to catalysis and reaction of organo-transition metal complexes is briefly alluded to.

  12. Multiplexed selective detection and identification of TCE and xylene in water by on-chip absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a device which can do multiplexed detection of two different chemicals on one chip by using infrared absorption spectroscopy. The signature of Trichloroethylene(TCE) and xylene in water enable multiplexed detection on one chip. We use the slow light effect in the photonic crystal design which enhances the absorption of the analytes by a factor of 30 as demonstrated by our previous works. In order to match the absorption peaks of these two analytes, photonic crystal slow light regions are designed at 1644nm and 1674nm with a SU8 cladding on top. Multiplexed detection is enabled by using a multimode interference (MMI) optical power splitter at the input, which divides optical power into two arms, and Y combiner at the output. Consequently, the absorption of these two chemicals can be enhanced by the slow light effect. The MMI structure and Y combiner also enable the multiplexed detection of two analytes on one chip.

  13. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Reserve Select; TRICARE Dental Program; Early Eligibility for TRICARE for Certain Reserve Component Members. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-15

    TRICARE Reserve Select (TRS) is a premium-based TRICARE health plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified members of the Ready Reserve and by qualified survivors of TRS members. TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) is a premium-based TRICARE dental plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified Service members. This final rule revises requirements and procedures for the TRS program to specify the appropriate actuarial basis for calculating premiums in addition to making other minor clarifying administrative changes. For a member who is involuntarily separated from the Selected Reserve under other than adverse conditions this final rule provides a time-limited exception that allows TRS coverage in effect to continue for up to 180 days after the date on which the member is separated from the Selected Reserve and TDP coverage in effect to continue for no less than 180 days after the separation date. It also expands early TRICARE eligibility for certain Reserve Component members from a maximum of 90 days to a maximum of 180 days prior to activation in support of a contingency operation for more than 30 days.

  14. Exact symmetries of electron Bloch states and optical selection rules in [001] GaAs/AlAs quantum wells and superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronc, P.; Kitaev, Yu. E.

    2001-05-01

    We determined the exact symmetries of conduction and valence Bloch states in type-I and type-II [001] (GaAs)m(AlAs)n superlattices at the Γ point and at some other symmetry points of the Brillouin zone of the superlattices and derived optical selection rules. Contrary to a result widely accepted in the envelope-function approximation (EFA), pz atomic orbitals cannot mix with px and py orbitals to build Bloch states. The phonon-assisted transitions involving the Γ point as an initial or final state are allowed both without and with taking into account the spin-orbit interaction whatever are the symmetries of the initial and final states. The electron band structure of the superlattices is discussed. Within the domain of validity of EFA (i.e., for not too small values of m and n), a detailed analysis of the Bloch-state symmetry and selection rules is provided on imposing invariance of the superlattice structure under the change of z to -z (the σz symmetry operation). It is shown that optical transitions between the conduction states arising from the Γ states of GaAs on one hand and the conduction states arising from the X states of AlAs on the other hand can be allowed from spin-orbit coupling only. The correspondence is provided between the symmetry of a Bloch state and the parity with respect to σz of its associated envelope function. The effect of an electric field parallel to the growth axis is discussed. Quantum wells do not differ from superlattices with regard to Bloch-state and envelope-function symmetries or optical selection rules. All the above results are still valid for any pseudomorphic superlattice or quantum well made of two binary compounds with zinc-blend structure and identical cations or anions, such as, for example, in the GaN/AlN system.

  15. Ruling Out Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Papaparaskevas, Joseph; Houhoula, Dimitra P.; Papadimitriou, Maria; Saroglou, Georgios; Legakis, Nicholas J.

    2004-01-01

    Optimization of methods for ruling out Bacillus anthracis leads to increased yields, faster turnaround times, and a lighter workload. We used 72 environmental non–B. anthracis bacilli to validate methods for ruling out B. anthracis. Most effective were horse blood agar, motility testing after a 2-h incubation in trypticase soy broth, and screening with a B. anthracis–selective agar. PMID:15200872

  16. A nanoporous 3D zinc(II) metal–organic framework for selective absorption of benzaldehyde and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Moradpour, Tahereh; Abbasi, Alireza; Van Hecke, Kristof

    2015-08-15

    A new 3D nanoporous metal–organic framework (MOF), [[Zn{sub 4}O(C{sub 24}H{sub 15}N{sub 6}O{sub 6}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O·DMF]{sub n} (1) based on 4,4′,4″-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate (TATAB) ligand was solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single–crystal X-ray diffraction, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses. X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis reveals that 1 exhibits a 3D network with new kvh1 topology. Semi-empirical (AM1) calculations were carried out to obtain stable conformers for TATAB ligand. In addition, the absorption of two typical aldehydes (benzaldehyde and formaldehyde) in the presence of 1 was investigated and the effect of the aldehyde concentration, exposure time and temperature was studied. It was found that compound 1 has a potential for the absorption of aldehydes under mild conditions. - Graphical abstract: Absorption of two typical aldehydes (formaldehyde and benzaldehyde) by solvothermally synthesized of a 3D nano-porous MOF based on TATAB tricarboxylate ligand and Zn (NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • We present a 3D Zn(II)-MOF with TATAB linker by solvothermal method. • The framework possesses a new kvh1 topology. • The framework displays formaldehyde and benzaldehyde absorption property. • Conformational analysis was performed to determine the stable linker geometry.

  17. Raman and absorption spectrophotometric studies of selected lanthanide, californium-doped lanthanide, and actinide trihalides in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1988-03-01

    The solid-state absorption spectra of Cf(III) ions as a dopant in lanthanide trihalide hosts (LnCl/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, and Y; LnBr/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, Tb, and Y; LnI/sub 3/: Ln = Ce and Y) have been recorded. The spectra of Cf(III) have been correlated with the various crystal structures. The phonon Raman spectra and solid-state absorption spectra of PmF/sub 3/, PmCl/sub 3/, PmBr/sub 3/, and two crystal modifications of PmI/sub 3/ have been recorded. Symmetry assignments have been made for the Raman-active bands for these trihalides and also the sesquioxide. The room-temperature absorption spectra have been correlated to crystal field effects. The symmetry assignments of the Raman-active phonon modes have been made based on polarized Raman spectra from single crystals of YF/sub 3/-type orthorhombic TbF/sub 3/ and PuBr/sub 3/-type orthorhombic NdBr/sub 3/. Raman spectra of other isostructural lanthanide compounds have been recorded and compared. Symmetry assignments for these compounds have been made by analogy to the single-crystal assignments. Raman spectra have been obtained and catalogued for a number of actinide compounds. Symmetry assignments have been made for the observed Raman-active phonon bands in this work based on the assignments made for isostructural lanthanide compounds. 29 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Site selection for managed aquifer recharge using fuzzy rules: integrating geographical information system (GIS) tools and multi-criteria decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekmohammadi, Bahram; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Jafari, Hamid Reza

    2012-11-01

    One of the most important water-resources management strategies for arid lands is managed aquifer recharge (MAR). In establishing a MAR scheme, site selection is the prime prerequisite that can be assisted by geographic information system (GIS) tools. One of the most important uncertainties in the site-selection process using GIS is finite ranges or intervals resulting from data classification. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a novel method has been developed involving the integration of multi-criteria decision making (MCDM), GIS, and a fuzzy inference system (FIS). The Shemil-Ashkara plain in the Hormozgan Province of Iran was selected as the case study; slope, geology, groundwater depth, potential for runoff, land use, and groundwater electrical conductivity have been considered as site-selection factors. By defining fuzzy membership functions for the input layers and the output layer, and by constructing fuzzy rules, a FIS has been developed. Comparison of the results produced by the proposed method and the traditional simple additive weighted (SAW) method shows that the proposed method yields more precise results. In conclusion, fuzzy-set theory can be an effective method to overcome associated uncertainties in classification of geographic information data.

  19. Selective Two-Photon-Absorption-Induced Reactions of Anthracene-2-Carboxylic Acid on Tunable Plasmonic Substrate with Incoherent Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pincella, Francesca; Isozaki, Katsuhiro; Taguchi, Tomoya; Song, Yeji; Miki, Kazushi

    2015-02-01

    In this research, we report the development, characterization and application of various plasmonic substrates (with localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength tunable by gold nanoparticle size) for two-photon absorption (TPA)-induced photodimerization of an anthracene derivative, anthracene carboxylic acid, in both surface and solution phase under incoherent visible light irradiation. Despite the efficient photoreaction property of anthracene derivatives and the huge number of publications about them, there has never been a report of a multiphoton photoreaction involving an anthracene derivative with the exception of a reverse photoconversion of anthracene photodimer to monomer with three-photon absorption. We examined the progress of the TPA-induced photoreaction by means of surface-enhanced Raman scattering, taking advantage of the ability of our plasmonic substrate to enhance and localize both incident light for photoreaction and Raman scattering signal for analysis of photoreaction products. The TPA-induced photoreaction in the case of anthracene carboxylic acid coated 2D array of gold nanoparticles gave different results according to the properties of the plasmonic substrate, such as the size of the gold nanoparticle and also its resultant optical properties. In particular, a stringent requirement to achieve TPA-induced photodimerization was found to be the matching between irradiation wavelength, localized surface plasmon resonance of the 2D array, and twice the wavelength of the molecular excitation of the target material (in this case, anthracene carboxylic acid). These results will be useful for the future development of efficient plasmonic substrates for TPA-induced photoreactions with various materials.

  20. Rules to fly by: pigeons navigating horizontal obstacles limit steering by selecting gaps most aligned to their flight direction.

    PubMed

    Ros, Ivo G; Bhagavatula, Partha S; Lin, Huai-Ti; Biewener, Andrew A

    2017-02-06

    Flying animals must successfully contend with obstacles in their natural environments. Inspired by the robust manoeuvring abilities of flying animals, unmanned aerial systems are being developed and tested to improve flight control through cluttered environments. We previously examined steering strategies that pigeons adopt to fly through an array of vertical obstacles (VOs). Modelling VO flight guidance revealed that pigeons steer towards larger visual gaps when making fast steering decisions. In the present experiments, we recorded three-dimensional flight kinematics of pigeons as they flew through randomized arrays of horizontal obstacles (HOs). We found that pigeons still decelerated upon approach but flew faster through a denser array of HOs compared with the VO array previously tested. Pigeons exhibited limited steering and chose gaps between obstacles most aligned to their immediate flight direction, in contrast to VO navigation that favoured widest gap steering. In addition, pigeons navigated past the HOs with more variable and decreased wing stroke span and adjusted their wing stroke plane to reduce contact with the obstacles. Variability in wing extension, stroke plane and wing stroke path was greater during HO flight. Pigeons also exhibited pronounced head movements when negotiating HOs, which potentially serve a visual function. These head-bobbing-like movements were most pronounced in the horizontal (flight direction) and vertical directions, consistent with engaging motion vision mechanisms for obstacle detection. These results show that pigeons exhibit a keen kinesthetic sense of their body and wings in relation to obstacles. Together with aerodynamic flapping flight mechanics that favours vertical manoeuvring, pigeons are able to navigate HOs using simple rules, with remarkable success.

  1. Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins; Biennial Review of the List of Select Agents and Toxins and Enhanced Biosafety Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-19

    In accordance with the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (the Bioterrorism Response Act), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has reviewed the list of biological agents and toxins that have the potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. Following the review, HHS has decided: Not to finalize the proposed changes to the list of select agents and toxins at this time; to finalize provisions to address toxin permissible limits and the inactivation of select agents; to finalize specific provisions to the section of the regulations addressing biosafety; and to clarify regulatory language concerning security, training, incident response, and records. In a companion document published in this issue of the Federal Register, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has made parallel regulatory changes.

  2. Self-accommodation of B19' martensite in Ti-Ni shape memory alloys - Part I. Morphological and crystallographic studies of the variant selection rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, M.; Nishiura, T.; Kawano, H.; Inamura, T.

    2012-06-01

    The self-accommodation morphologies of B19‧ martensite in Ti-Ni alloys have been investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Twelve pairs of minimum units consisting of two habit plane variants (HPVs) with V-shaped morphology connected to a ? B19‧ type I variant accommodation twin were observed. Three types of self-accommodation morphologies, based on the V-shaped minimum unit, developed around one of the {111}B2 traces, which were triangular, rhombic and hexangular and consisted of three, four and six HPVs, respectively. In addition, the variant selection rule and the number of possible HPV combinations in each of these self-accommodation morphologies are discussed.

  3. Direct estimates of natural selection in Iberia indicate calcium absorption was not the only driver of lactase persistence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Sverrisdóttir, Oddny Ósk; Timpson, Adrian; Toombs, Jamie; Lecoeur, Cecile; Froguel, Philippe; Carretero, Jose Miguel; Arsuaga Ferreras, Juan Luis; Götherström, Anders; Thomas, Mark G

    2014-04-01

    Lactase persistence (LP) is a genetically determined trait whereby the enzyme lactase is expressed throughout adult life. Lactase is necessary for the digestion of lactose--the main carbohydrate in milk--and its production is downregulated after the weaning period in most humans and all other mammals studied. Several sources of evidence indicate that LP has evolved independently, in different parts of the world over the last 10,000 years, and has been subject to strong natural selection in dairying populations. In Europeans, LP is strongly associated with, and probably caused by, a single C to T mutation 13,910 bp upstream of the lactase (LCT) gene (-13,910*T). Despite a considerable body of research, the reasons why LP should provide such a strong selective advantage remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine one of the most widely cited hypotheses for selection on LP--that fresh milk consumption supplemented the poor vitamin D and calcium status of northern Europe's early farmers (the calcium assimilation hypothesis). We do this by testing for natural selection on -13,910*T using ancient DNA data from the skeletal remains of eight late Neolithic Iberian individuals, whom we would not expect to have poor vitamin D and calcium status because of relatively high incident UVB light levels. None of the eight samples successfully typed in the study had the derived T-allele. In addition, we reanalyze published data from French Neolithic remains to both test for population continuity and further examine the evolution of LP in the region. Using simulations that accommodate genetic drift, natural selection, uncertainty in calibrated radiocarbon dates, and sampling error, we find that natural selection is still required to explain the observed increase in allele frequency. We conclude that the calcium assimilation hypothesis is insufficient to explain the spread of LP in Europe.

  4. An Examination of Biomedical Intellectual Reputation in Relationship to Graduates' Productivity, Regional Innovation and Absorptive Capacity at Selected Universities Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Gesulla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to determine factors associated with intellectual reputation, specifically among selected biomedical departments worldwide within the university setting. Second, the study aimed to examine intellectual reputation in relationship to doctoral graduates' productivity in the biomedical sciences and in relationship…

  5. In situ infrared reflection and transmission absorption spectroscopy study of surface reactions in selective chemical-vapor deposition of tungsten using WF6 and SiH4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Nobuyoshi; Nakamura, Yoshitaka; Goto, Hidekazu; Homma, Yoshio

    1993-05-01

    The adsorption of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) and monosilane (SiH4) in selective chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten (W) is investigated in situ using Fourier-transform infrared reflection and transmission absorption spectroscopy (FTIR RAS and TMS). The selectivity for W growth is found to originate from the dissociation of SiH4 on a W surface. That is, SiH4 dissociates on a W surface to form Si-containing adsorbed species when the W surface is exposed to SiH4 at temperatures higher than 110 °C, whereas SiH4 does not dissociate on a SiO2 surface. On the other hand, when W and SiO2 surfaces are exposed to WF6 at temperatures from 20 to 300 °C, no adsorbed species are observed by FTIR RAS. However, WF6 can easily react with the Si-containing adsorbed species on a W surface to form W and byproduct gases of SiHF3 and SiF4. The main surface reaction of selective W CVD can be expressed as WF6+2SiH4=W+2SiHF3+3H2. These experimental results support the selective W-CVD mechanism previously proposed, which shows that dissociation of SiH4 and not the dissociation of WF6 has a central role in this process.

  6. Selective speciation of inorganic antimony on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel column and its determination by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mendil, Durali; Bardak, Hilmi; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2013-03-30

    A speciation system for antimony (III) and antimony (V) ions that based on solid phase extraction on tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel has been established. Antimony was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Analytical conditions including pH, sample volume, etc., were studied for the quantitative recoveries of Sb (III) and Sb (V). Matrix effects on the recovery were also investigated. The recovery values and detection limit for antimony (III) at optimal conditions were found as >95% and 0.020 μg L(-1), respectively. Preconcentration factor was calculated as 50. The capacity of adsorption for the tetraethylenepentamine bonded silica gel was 7.9 mg g(-1). The validation was checked by analysis of NIST SRM 1573a Tomato laves and GBW 07605 Tea certified reference materials. The procedure was successfully applied to speciation of antimony in tap water, mineral water and spring water samples. Total antimony was determined in refined salt, unrefined salt, black tea, rice, tuna fish and soil samples after microwave digestion and presented enrichment method combination.

  7. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  8. Selective cloud point extraction and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of molybdenum (VI) ion in seawater samples.

    PubMed

    Filik, Hayati; Cengel, Tayfun; Apak, Reşat

    2009-09-30

    A cloud point extraction process using the nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 to extract molybdenum from aqueous solutions was investigated. The method is based on the complexation reaction of Mo(VI) with 1,2,5,8-tetrahydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione (quinalizarine: QA) and micelle-mediated extraction of the complex. The enriched analyte in the surfactant-rich phase was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The optimal extraction and reaction conditions (e.g. pH, reagent and surfactant concentrations, temperature, incubation and centrifugation times) were evaluated and optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for Mo(VI) was 7.0 ng L(-1) with an preconcentration factor of approximately 25 when 10 mL of sample solution was preconcentrated to 0.4 mL. The proposed method (with extraction) showed linear calibration within the range 0.03-0.6 microg L(-1). The relative standard deviation (RSD) was found to be 3.7% (C(Mo(VI))=0.05 microg L(-1), n=5) for pure standard solutions, whereas RSD for the recoveries from real samples ranged between 2 and 8% (mean RSD=3.9%). The method was applied to the determination of Mo(VI) in seawater and tap water samples with a recovery for the spiked samples in the range of 98-103%. The interference effect of some cations and anions was also studied. In the presence of foreign ions, no significant interference was observed. In order to verify the accuracy of the method, a certified reference water sample was analysed and the results obtained were in good agreement with the certified values.

  9. Crystal and molecular structures of selected organic and organometallic compounds and an algorithm for empirical absorption correction

    SciTech Connect

    Karcher, B.

    1981-10-01

    Cr(CO)/sub 5/(SCMe/sub 2/) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/sub 1//a with a = 10.468(8), b = 11.879(5), c = 9.575(6) A, and ..beta.. = 108.14(9)/sup 0/, with an octahedral coordination around the chromium atom. PSN/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 12/ crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/sub 1//n with a = 10.896(1), b = 11.443(1), c = 7.288(1) A, and ..beta.. = 104.45(1)/sup 0/. Each of the five-membered rings in this structure contains a carbon atom which is puckered toward the sulfur and out of the nearly planar arrays of the remaining ring atoms. (RhO/sub 4/N/sub 4/C/sub 48/H/sub 56/)/sup +/(BC/sub 24/H/sub 20/)/sup -/.1.5NC/sub 2/H/sub 3/ crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1 with a = 17.355(8), b = 21.135(10), c = 10.757(5) A, ..cap alpha.. = 101.29(5), ..beta.. = 98.36(5), and ..gamma.. = 113.92(4)/sup 0/. Each Rh cation complex is a monomer. MoP/sub 2/O/sub 10/C/sub 16/H/sub 22/ crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/sub 1//c with a = 12.220(3), b = 9.963(2), c = 20.150(6) A, and ..beta.. = 103.01(3)/sup 0/. The molybdenum atom occupies the axial position of the six-membered ring of each of the two phosphorinane ligands. An empirical absorption correction program was written.

  10. Relationship between element-selective electronic states and hydrogen absorption properties of Pd-M (M =Ru ,Rh,Ag, and Au) alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Kanako; Ishimatsu, Naoki; Maruyama, Hiroshi; Shishidou, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Shinjiro; Kawamura, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    To understand how the constituent atoms participate in the hydrogenation of Pd-based alloys at ˜0.1 MPa of hydrogen pressure (PH2),we investigated the electronic states in Pd-M (M =Ru,Rh,Ag, and Au) alloys and their hydrides element-selectively by using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the L2 ,3 edges. Spectral changes near the absorption edge demonstrate that both Pd and M atoms form bonds with H atoms in the Pd-M (M =Ru and Rh) alloys even at PH 2˜0.1 MPa. This is a striking result because high pressures of more than 1 GPa are required for the hydrogenation of Rh and Ru pure metals. In contrast, only Pd atoms bond with H atoms and the M -H bond is absent in the case of Pd-M (M =Ag and Au) alloys. Therefore, the hydrogen-induced changes in the electronic states differ between M s with fully occupied d shells and M s with partially occupied d shells. This study reveals that the thermodynamic hydrogenation properties of Pd-M alloys can be determined by a combination of the formation of the M -H bond and lattice expansion or compression by alloying Pd metal with M .

  11. Low-dimensional systems investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy: a selection of 2D, 1D and 0D cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mino, Lorenzo; Agostini, Giovanni; Borfecchia, Elisa; Gianolio, Diego; Piovano, Andrea; Gallo, Erik; Lamberti, Carlo

    2013-10-01

    Over the last three decades low-dimensional systems have attracted increasing interest both from the fundamental and technological points of view due to their unique physical and chemical properties. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a powerful tool for the characterization of such kinds of systems, owing to its chemical selectivity and high sensitivity in interatomic distance determination. Moreover, XAS does not require long-range ordering, that is usually absent in low-dimensional systems. Finally, this technique can simultaneously provide information on electronic and local structural properties of the nanomaterials, significantly contributing to clarify the relation between their atomic structure and their peculiar physical properties. This review provides a general introduction to XAS, discussing the basic theory of the technique, the most used detection modes, the related experimental setups and some complementary relevant characterization techniques (diffraction anomalous fine structure, extended energy-loss fine structure, pair distribution function, x-ray emission spectroscopy, high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS and x-ray Raman scattering). Subsequently, a selection of significant applications of XAS to two-, one- and zero-dimensional systems will be presented. The selected low-dimensional systems include IV and III-V semiconductor films, quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots; carbon-based nanomaterials (epitaxial graphene and carbon nanotubes); metal oxide films, nanowires, nanorods and nanocrystals; metal nanoparticles. Finally, the future perspectives for the application of XAS to nanostructures are discussed.

  12. Association Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höppner, Frank

    Association rules are rules of the kind "70% of the customers who buy vine and cheese also buy grapes". While the traditional field of application is market basket analysis, association rule mining has been applied to various fields since then, which has led to a number of important modifications and extensions. We discuss the most frequently applied approach that is central to many extensions, the Apriori algorithm, and briefly review some applications to other data types, well-known problems of rule evaluation via support and confidence, and extensions of or alternatives to the standard framework.

  13. Integrating user centered design, universal design and goal, operation, method and selection rules to improve the usability of DAISY player for persons with visual impairments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Ming-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The Digital Accessible Information SYstem (DAISY) player is an assistive reading tool developed for use by persons with visual impairments. Certain problems have persisted in the operating procedure and interface of DAISY players, especially for their Chinese users. Therefore, the aim of this study was to redesign the DAISY player with increased usability features for use by native Chinese speakers. First, a User Centered Design (UCD) process was employed to analyze the development of the prototype. Next, operation procedures were reorganized according to GOMS (Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection rules) methodology. Then the user interface was redesigned according to specific Universal Design (UD) principles. Following these revisions, an experiment involving four scenarios was conducted to compare the new prototype to other players, and it was tested by twelve visually impaired participants. Results indicate the prototype had the quickest operating times, the fewest number of operating errors, and the lowest mental workloads of all the compared players, significantly enhancing the prototype's usability. These findings have allowed us to generate suggestions for developing the next generation of DAISY players for people, especially for Chinese audience.

  14. Optimization of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction for the selective determination of trace amounts of palladium by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kokya, Taher Ahmadzadeh; Farhadi, Khalil

    2009-09-30

    A new simple and reliable method for rapid and selective extraction and determination of the trace levels of Pd(2+) ion was developed by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction preconcentration and flame atomic absorption spectrometry detection. In the proposed approach, thioridazine HCl (TRH) was used as a Pd(2+) ion selective complexing agent. The effective parameters on the extraction recovery were studied and optimized utilizing two decent optimization methods; factorial design and central composite design (CCD). Through factorial design the best efficiency of extraction acquired using ethanol and chloroform as dispersive and extraction solvents respectively. CCD optimization resulted in 1.50 mL of dispersive solvent; 0.15 mL of extraction solvent; 0.45 mg of TRH and 250 mg of potassium chloride salt per 5 mL of sample solution. Under the optimum conditions the calibration graph was linear over the range 100-2000 microgL(-1). The average relative standard deviation was 0.7% for five repeated determinations. The limit of detection was 90 microg L(-1). The average enrichment factor and recovery reached 45.7% and 74.2% respectively. The method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amounts of palladium in the real water samples.

  15. Novel ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica for selective magnetic solid phase extraction of trace Cd followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingshan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Determination of trace Cd in environmental, biological and food samples is of great significance to toxicological research and environmental pollution monitoring. While the direct determination of Cd in real-world samples is difficult due to its low concentration and the complex matrix. Herein, a novel Cd(II)-ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica (Cd(II)-II-MMS) was prepared and was employed as a selective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) material for extraction of trace Cd in real-world samples followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the proposed method was 6.1 ng L- 1 for Cd with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.0% (c = 50 ng L- 1, n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 50-fold. To validate the proposed method, Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ 50009-88 environmental water, ZK018-1 lyophilized human urine and NIES10-b rice flour were analyzed and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method exhibited a robust anti-interference ability due to the good selectivity of Cd(II)-II-MMS toward Cd(II). It was successfully employed for the determination of trace Cd(II) in environmental water, human urine and rice samples with recoveries of 89.3-116%, demonstrating that the proposed method has good application potential in real world samples with complex matrix.

  16. Preparation and evaluation of an oral delivery system for time-dependent colon release of insulin and selected protease inhibitor and absorption enhancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Del Curto, Maria Dorly; Maroni, Alessandra; Foppoli, Anastasia; Zema, Lucia; Gazzaniga, Andrea; Sangalli, Maria Edvige

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare and evaluate an oral dosage form intended for time-dependent colon delivery of insulin along with a selected protease inhibitor (camostat mesilate) and absorption enhancer (sodium glycocholate). A previously described release platform, which had proven potentially suitable for the protein delivery, was exploited. Insulin compatibility with the above-mentioned adjuvants was preliminarily evaluated. For this purpose, the drug and its main degradation products were assayed by HPLC in insulin powder mixtures with camostat mesilate and/or sodium glycocholate stored 12 months at 4 degrees C. No significant decrease in protein content or increase in degradation product percentages beyond Eur. Ph. 6th Ed. limits was highlighted. Moreover, calorimetric studies performed on physical and compacted binary insulin mixtures with camostat mesilate and sodium glycocholate showed that the thermal behavior of both adjuvants was unchanged. Subsequently, tablet cores with differing compositions were prepared and spray-coated with an aqueous HPMC solution in order to obtain pulsatile delivery systems. The coated units were demonstrated to concurrently release the drug and the adjuvants in a prompt and quantitative mode after consistent lag times. Based on these results, the device was proven a potential candidate for colon delivery of insulin and the selected adjuvants.

  17. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  18. Absorption of light by colloidal semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokutnyi, Sergey I.; Ovchinnikov, Oleg V.; Kondratenko, Tamara S.

    2016-07-01

    UV-Vis absorption of colloidal cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by an aqueous synthesis in a gelatin matrix was investigated. Using the dipole approximation, taking into account the Coulomb interaction between the electron and hole in a QD and the polarization effects on the spherical boundary of QD and matrix, it was found the change of selection rules for optical transitions. It is shown that the optical absorption edge of QDs is formed by two optical transitions of electron between low-excited levels of size quantization of heavy hole (1S and 2S), located in QDs valence band and fundamental size-quantized states 1Se of conduction band. These transitions are identical in intensity. Estimations of average values of CdS QDs radius were realized using the developed formalism for UV-Vis absorption spectra. These data were compared with experimental values of this parameter, obtained using transmission electron microscope.

  19. One-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the selective determination of methylmercury in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Mo, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for the selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg) was developed by one-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (D-DLLME) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In the proposed method, Cu(II) reacted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to form Cu-DDTC complex, which was used as the chelating agent instead of DDTC for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of MeHg. Because the stability of MeHg-DDTC is higher than that of Cu-DDTC, MeHg can displace Cu from the Cu-DDTC complex and be preconcentrated in a single DLLME procedure. MeHg could be extracted into the extraction solvent phase at pH 6 while Hg(II) remained in the sample solution. Potential interference from co-existing metal ions with lower DDTC complex stability was largely eliminated without the need of any masking reagent. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of this method was 13.6ngL(-1) (as Hg), and an enhancement factor of 81 was achieved with a sample volume of 5.0mL. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace MeHg in some environmental samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane@Fe3O4@SiO2@fluoropolymer sponges for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Li, Bucheng; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-03-04

    Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponges were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) to bind the Fe3O4 nanoparticles tightly on the sponge and then dip-coating in a fluoropolymer (FP) aqueous solution. The sponges were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. The effects of CVD time of TEOS and FP concentration on wettability, mechanical properties, oil absorbency, and oil/water selectivity of the sponges were also investigated. The sponges exhibit fast magnetic responsivity and excellent superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity (CAwater = 157° and CAoil ≈ 0°). The sponges also show very high efficiency in oil/water separation and could, driven by a magnet, quickly absorb floating oils on the water surface and heavy oils under water. Moreover, the PU@Fe3O4@SiO2@FP sponges could be used as membranes for oil/water separation and for continuous separation of large amounts of oil pollutants from the water surface with the help of a pump. The in turn binding of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, SiO2, and FP can also improve mechanical properties of the PU sponge. The sponges maintain the superhydrophobicity even when they are stretched with 200% strain or compressed with 50% strain. The sponges also show excellent mechanical stability, oil stability, and reusability in terms of superhydrophobicity and oil absorbency. The magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic PU sponges are very promising materials for practical oil absorption and oil/water separation.

  1. Two novel POM-based inorganic-organic hybrid compounds: synthesis, structures, magnetic properties, photodegradation and selective absorption of organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Dui, Xue-Jing; Yang, Wen-Bin; Wu, Xiao-Yuan; Kuang, Xiaofei; Liao, Jian-Zhen; Yu, Rongmin; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2015-05-28

    The hydrothermal reactions of a mixture of (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O, Cu(Ac)2·H2O and 3-bpo ligands at different temperatures result in the isolation of two novel inorganic-organic hybrid materials containing different but related isopolymolybdate units, [Cu(3-bpo)(H2O)(Mo4O13)]·3H2O () and [Cu2(3-bpo)2(Mo6O20)] (). The {Mo4O13}n chains in and unprecedented [Mo6O20](4-) isopolyhexamolybdate anions in are linked by octahedral Cu(2+) ions into two-dimensional hybrid layers. Interestingly, 3-bpo ligands in both and are located on either side of these hybrid layers and serve as arched footbridges to link Cu(ii) ions in the layer via pyridyl N-donors, and at the same time connect these hybrid layers into 3D supramolecular frameworks via weak MoNoxadiazole bonds. Another important point for is that water clusters are filled in the 1D channels surrounded by isopolytetramolybdate units. In addition, dye adsorption and photocatalytic properties of and magnetic properties of have been investigated. The results indicated that complex is not only a good heterogeneous photocatalyst in the degradation of methyl orange (MO) and methylene blue (MB), but also has high absorption capacity of MB at room temperature and can selectively capture MB molecules from binary mixtures of MB/MO or MB/RhB. All MB molecules absorbed on can be completely released and photodegraded in the presence of adequate peroxide. The temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility revealed that complex exhibits antiferromagnetic ordering at about 5 K, and a spin-flop transition was observed at about 5.8 T at 2 K, indicating metamagnetic-like behaviour from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic phases.

  2. High-energy resolution X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy reveals insight into unique selectivity of La-based nanoparticles for CO2

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Ofer; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Luo, Li; Süess, Martin J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Koziej, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The lanthanum-based materials, due to their layered structure and f-electron configuration, are relevant for electrochemical application. Particularly, La2O2CO3 shows a prominent chemoresistive response to CO2. However, surprisingly less is known about its atomic and electronic structure and electrochemically significant sites and therefore, its structure–functions relationships have yet to be established. Here we determine the position of the different constituents within the unit cell of monoclinic La2O2CO3 and use this information to interpret in situ high-energy resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (vtc XES). Compared with La(OH)3 or previously known hexagonal La2O2CO3 structures, La in the monoclinic unit cell has a much lower number of neighboring oxygen atoms, which is manifested in the whiteline broadening in XANES spectra. Such a superior sensitivity to subtle changes is given by HERFD method, which is essential for in situ studying of the interaction with CO2. Here, we study La2O2CO3-based sensors in real operando conditions at 250 °C in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. We identify that the distribution of unoccupied La d-states and occupied O p- and La d-states changes during CO2 chemoresistive sensing of La2O2CO3. The correlation between these spectroscopic findings with electrical resistance measurements leads to a more comprehensive understanding of the selective adsorption at La site and may enable the design of new materials for CO2 electrochemical applications. PMID:26668362

  3. Modeling and Cognitive Behavior: The Effects of Modeling, Modes of Modeling and Selected Model Attributes on Rule-Governed Language Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieshop, James Ivo

    The effect of modeling on the performance of rule-governed language behaviors of 208 male and female, Anglo and Chicano, sixth grade students in Albuquerque, N.M. was experimentally investigated. Eight boys and 8 girls (4 each Chicano and Anglo) were randomly assigned to each of the 12 experimental conditions and to the control group. Three modes…

  4. Effect of pyridine on infrared absorption spectra of copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sukhwinder; Tripathi, S K; Saini, G S S

    2008-02-01

    Infrared absorption spectra of copper phthalocyanine in KBr pellet and pyridine solution in 400-1625 and 2900-3200 cm(-1)regions are reported. In the IR spectra of solid sample, presence of weak bands, which are forbidden according to the selection rules of D4h point group, is explained on the basis of distortion in the copper phthalocyanine molecule caused by the crystal packing effects. Observation of a new band at 1511 cm(-1) and change in intensity of some other bands in pyridine are interpreted on the basis of coordination of the solvent molecule with the central copper ion.

  5. Intersubband infrared absorption in Ge(x)Si(1-x)/Si superlattice by photocurrent measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Park, J. S.; Wang, K. L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1990-01-01

    The intersubband IR absorption of holes in a Ge(x)Si(1-x)/Si superlattice is observed for the first time. In the experiment, the photocurrent is measured as a function of applied bias which is used to inject holes to the minibands of the superlattice. Two peaks in the photocurrent as a function of bias across the device are observed due to intersubband absorption between the ground to the first and the first of the second light hole minibands. The polarization dependence measurement is used to study the nature of the transitions and is in good agreement with the selection rules.

  6. Low absorption vitreous carbon reactors for operando XAS: a case study on Cu/Zeolites for selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) by NH3.

    PubMed

    Kispersky, Vincent F; Kropf, A Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H; Miller, Jeffrey T

    2012-02-21

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) by NH(3) on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH(3), 5% O(2), 5% H(2)O, 5% CO(2) and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situ SCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO(2) catalyst, reduced in H(2) at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO(2) catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal-Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance.

  7. Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEMS WITH W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A FOR A RADIO SELECTED SAMPLE OF 77 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MAGNETIC FIELDS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J. E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.c

    2010-03-01

    We present a catalog of Mg II absorption systems obtained from high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/VLT data of 77 quasi-stellar objects in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0, and down to an equivalent width W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A. The statistical properties of our sample are found to be in agreement with those from the previous work in the literature. However, we point out that the previously observed increase with redshift of partial derivN/partial derivz for weak absorbers pertains exclusively to very weak absorbers with W{sub 0} < 0.1 A. Instead, partial derivN/partial derivz for absorbers with W{sub 0} in the range 0.1-0.3 A actually decreases with redshift, similar to the case of strong absorbers. We then use this catalog to extend our earlier analysis of the links between the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the quasars and the presence of intervening Mg II absorbing systems in their spectra. In contrast to the case with strong Mg II absorption systems (W{sub 0} > 0.3 A), the weaker systems do not contribute significantly to the observed RM of the background quasars. This is possibly due to the higher impact parameters of the weak systems compared to strong ones, suggesting that the high column density magnetized material that is responsible for the Faraday rotation is located within about 50 kpc of the galaxies. Finally, we show that this result also rules out the possibility that some unexpected secondary correlation between the quasar redshift and its intrinsic RM is responsible for the association of high RM and strong intervening Mg II absorption that we have presented elsewhere, since this would have produced an equal effect for the weak absorption line systems, which exhibit a very similar distribution of quasar redshifts.

  8. Collaboration rules.

    PubMed

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  9. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  10. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  11. Allocating application to group of consecutive processors in fault-tolerant deadlock-free routing path defined by routers obeying same rules for path selection

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Vitus J.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Bender, Michael A.; Bunde, David P.

    2009-07-21

    In a multiple processor computing apparatus, directional routing restrictions and a logical channel construct permit fault tolerant, deadlock-free routing. Processor allocation can be performed by creating a linear ordering of the processors based on routing rules used for routing communications between the processors. The linear ordering can assume a loop configuration, and bin-packing is applied to this loop configuration. The interconnection of the processors can be conceptualized as a generally rectangular 3-dimensional grid, and the MC allocation algorithm is applied with respect to the 3-dimensional grid.

  12. Single-Sex Schools, Student Achievement, and Course Selection: Evidence from Rule-Based Student Assignments in Trinidad and Tobago. NBER Working Paper No. 16817

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, C. Kirabo

    2011-01-01

    Existing studies on single-sex schooling suffer from biases due to student selection to schools and single-sex schools being better in unmeasured ways. In Trinidad and Tobago students are assigned to secondary schools based on an algorithm allowing one to address self-selection bias and cleanly estimate an upper-bound single-sex school effect. The…

  13. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  14. Carbohydrate-based switch-on molecular sensor for Cu(II) in buffer: absorption and fluorescence study of the selective recognition of Cu(II) ions by galactosyl derivatives in HEPES buffer.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Nitin Kumar; Ramanujam, Balaji; Mariappanadar, Vairamani; Rao, Chebrolu Pulla

    2006-08-03

    [graph: see text] 1-(Beta-D-galactopyranosyl-1'-deoxy-1'-iminomethyl)-2-hydroxynaphthalene (L1), possessing an ONO binding core, was found to be selective for Cu2+ ions in N-[2-hydroxyethyl]piperazine-N'-[2-ethanesulfonic acid] buffer, at concentrations < or = 580 ppb, at physiological pH by eliciting switch-on behavior, whereas the other ions, viz., Mg2+, Ca2+, Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+, caused no significant change in the fluorescence. Whereas the binding characteristics were ascertained by absorption spectroscopy, the species formed were shown by Q-TOF ES MS.

  15. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ombaba, Jackson M.

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The device exhibits a stable signal because the plasma is self-seeding and reignites itself every half cycle. A tesla coil is not required to commence generation of the plasma if the ac voltage applied is greater than the breakdown voltage of the plasma-supporting gas. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (Mvutilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienyl manganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer (common room humidifier) was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were also considered. Figures of merits of selected elements both in absorption and emission modes are reported. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using

  16. Magneto-absorption in conical quantum dot ensemble: Possible applications for QD LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetyan, D. B.; Kazaryan, E. M.; Sarkisyan, H. A.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the adiabatic approximation, the energy states of electron, as well as the direct light absorption are investigated in conical quantum dot under the external magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the particle wave function and energy spectrum are obtained. The dependence of the absorption edge on the geometrical parameters of conical quantum dot is obtained. Selection rules are revealed for transitions between levels with different quantum numbers. Absorption coefficient dependence on the frequency of the incident light is revealed taking into account dispersion of conical quantum dot's base radius for both cases of symmetric and asymmetric distribution functions. Such structures are very promising and can be used for the element base quantum dots LEDs.

  17. The selectivity of Vibrio cholerae H-NOX for gaseous ligands follows the "sliding scale rule" hypothesis. Ligand interactions with both ferrous and ferric Vc H-NOX.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Liu, Wen; Berka, Vladimir; Tsai, Ah-lim

    2013-12-31

    Vc H-NOX (or VCA0720) is an H-NOX (heme-nitric oxide and oxygen binding) protein from facultative aerobic bacterium Vibrio cholerae. It shares significant sequence homology with soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a NO sensor protein commonly found in animals. Similar to sGC, Vc H-NOX binds strongly to NO and CO with affinities of 0.27 nM and 0.77 μM, respectively, but weakly to O2. When positioned on a "sliding scale" plot [Tsai, A.-l., et al. (2012) Biochemistry 51, 172-186], the line connecting log K(D)(NO) and log K(D)(CO) of Vc H-NOX can almost be superimposed with that of Ns H-NOX. Therefore, the measured affinities and kinetic parameters of gaseous ligands to Vc H-NOX provide more evidence to validate the "sliding scale rule" hypothesis. Like sGC, Vc H-NOX binds NO in multiple steps, forming first a six-coordinate heme-NO complex at a rate of 1.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), and then converts to a five-coordinate heme-NO complex at a rate that is also dependent on NO concentration. Although the formation of oxyferrous Vc H-NOX cannot be detected at a normal atmospheric oxygen level, ferrous Vc H-NOX is oxidized to the ferric form at a rate of 0.06 s(-1) when mixed with O2. Ferric Vc H-NOX exists as a mixture of high- and low-spin states and is influenced by binding to different ligands. Characterization of both ferric and ferrous Vc H-NOX and their complexes with various ligands lays the foundation for understanding the possible dual roles in gas and redox sensing of Vc H-NOX.

  18. 77 FR 55888 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change Amending...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h) To Add a PL Select Order September 5, 2012. I. Introduction On May 22...-4 thereunder,\\2\\ a proposed rule change to amend NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h) to add a PL Select... Proposed Rule Change Amending NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h) To Add a PL Select Order Type)....

  19. Probing the many energy-transfer processes in the photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II at 77 K using energy-selective sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, H. M.; Kleima, F. J.; van Stokkum, I. H. M.; van Grondelle, R.; van Amerongen, H.

    1996-10-01

    The dynamics of energy equilibration in the main plant light-harvesting complex, LHCII, at a temperature of 77 K was probed using sub-picosecond excitation pulses at 649, 661, 672 and 682 nm and detection of the resulting difference absorption spectra from 630 to 700 nm. We find three distinct chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a (Chl a) transfer times, of < 0.3, 0.6 and 4-9 ps, respectively. From a comparison of the amplitudes of the bleaching signal, a plausible scheme for the Chl b to Chl a transfer in the LHCII complex is proposed. Two Chl b molecules transfer energy to Chl a in less than 0.3 ps, two Chl b molecules transfer with 0.6 ps and one Chl b has a transfer time of 4-9 ps. In the Chl a absorption region, a 2.4 ps energy-transfer process from a pigment absorbing around 661 nm, and a 0.4 ps process from a pigment absorbing around 672 nm is found. Furthermore, evidence is found for slow, 10-20 ps energy-transfer processes between some of the Chl a molecules. The data are compared to model calculations using the 3.4 Å LHCII monomer structure (containing 5 Chl b and 7 Chl a molecules) and Förster energy transfer. We conclude that the observed energy-transfer rates are consistent with both the preliminary assignment of the Chl identities ( a or b) of Kühlbrandt et al. and a recent proposal for the arrangement of some of the transition dipole moments (Gülen et al.). Singlet-singlet and singlet-triplet annihilation processes are observed in two different experiments, and both these processes occur with time constants of 2-3 and 12-20 ps, suggesting that both annihilation pathways are at least partly limited by slow energy transfer. The wide range of observed time constants in the equilibration, from < 0.3 to ˜ 20 ps, most likely reflects the irregular arrangement of the pigments in the complex, which shows much less symmetry than the recently obtained structure of the peripheral antenna complex of purple bacteria, LH-II (McDermott et al.).

  20. The Author Replies: Regarding Campbell's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Norman C.

    2004-01-01

    A reply in relation to Campbell's rule is presented where the issues of discrepancies in the average value between the two values is discussed and the graphical analysis which had uncovered an aspect of selecting a numerical value for Campbell's rule that was earlier overlooked is appreciated. The cause of the discrepancies in the average value…

  1. The 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? The 5-Second Rule KidsHealth > For Kids > The 5-Second Rule Print A A A en español La ... it, he or she might have yelled, "5-second rule!" This so-called rule says food is ...

  2. In absence of local adaptation, plasticity and spatially varying selection rule: a view from genomic reaction norms in a panmictic species (Anguilla rostrata)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background American eel (Anguilla rostrata) is one of the few species for which panmixia has been demonstrated at the scale of the entire species. As such, the development of long term local adaptation is impossible. However, both plasticity and spatially varying selection have been invoked in explaining how American eel may cope with an unusual broad scope of environmental conditions. Here, we address this question through transcriptomic analyses and genomic reaction norms of eels from two geographic origins reared in controlled environments. Results The null hypothesis of no difference in gene expression between eels from the two origins was rejected. Many unique transcripts and two out of seven gene clusters showed significant difference in expression, both at time of capture and after three months of common rearing. Differences in expression were observed at numerous genes representing many functional groups when comparing eels from a same origin reared under different salinity conditions. Plastic response to different rearing conditions varied among gene clusters with three clusters showing significant origin-environment interactions translating into differential genomic norms of reaction. Most genes and functional categories showing differences between origins were previously shown to be differentially expressed in a study comparing transcription profiles between adult European eels acclimated to different salinities. Conclusions These results emphasize that while plasticity in expression may be important, there is also a role for local genetic (and/or epigenetic) differences in explaining differences in gene expression between eels from different geographic origins. Such differences match those reported in genetically distinct populations in other fishes, both in terms of the proportion of genes that are differentially expressed and the diversity of biological functions involved. We thus propose that genetic differences between glass eels of different

  3. A simple and selective approach for determination of trace Hg(II) using electromembrane extraction followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamyabi, Mohammad Ali; Aghaei, Ali

    2017-02-01

    The present study proposes the determination of trace Hg(II) using electromembrane extraction followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). Hg(II) migrated from 5 mL of an aqueous donor phase across a thin layer of supported liquid membrane, immobilized inside pores of a hollow fiber, into 10 μL of an acidic acceptor phase present inside the lumen of the fiber. The final analysis of the extracted Hg(II) performed using GFAAS (350 °C and 1400 °C for the ashing and atomization temperatures, respectively). Under optimal conditions, Hg(II) was effectively extracted with recoveries in the range of 41-43%, which corresponded to enrichment factors in the range of 102-108. The calibration curve was investigated in the range of 0.5-10 μg/L and a good linearity was achieved with a coefficient factor of 0.998. Detection limit (3σ) was found to be 0.5 μg/L and repeatability for 5 replicate determinations of three different concentration level of Hg(II) were found to be within the range of 6.2-7.1%. The reliability of the proposed method was examined by analyzing different real waters samples.

  4. Inhibition of water absorption and selective damage to human colonic mucosa induced by Shiga toxin-2 are enhanced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Adriana; Gerhardt, Elizabeth; García, Hugo; Amigo, Natalia; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes including bloody and non-bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although multiple serotypes of STEC have been isolated from hemorrhagic colitis cases, E. coli O157:H7 is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with HUS. Shiga toxin is the major virulence factor of E. coli O157:H7 and is responsible for the more severe symptoms of the infection. However, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea mediated by Stx2 are not well known. In this study, we have determined the effects of E. coli O157:H7 strain 125/99 wild type (wt) on the human colonic mucosa mounted in an Ussing chamber. In response to 125/99wt, an inhibition of water absorption across human colonic mucosa was observed. Histological sections showed severe necrosis with detachment of the surface epithelium, mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and loss of goblet cells after 1h of incubation with 125/99wt. These alterations were not observed with the isogenic mutant strain lacking stx2 or with the filter-sterilized culture supernatant from the 125/99wt strain. These results indicate that the cell damages in human colon are induced by Stx2, and that Stx2 production is increased by the interaction with bacterial cells. Identification of host cell-derived factors responsible for increasing Stx2 can lead to new strategies for modulating STEC infections.

  5. Optimization of high-resolution continuum source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for direct analysis of selected trace elements in whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Szwerc, Wojciech; Strzemski, Maciej; Wichłacz, Zoltan; Sawicki, Jan; Kocjan, Ryszard; Latalski, Michał; Sowa, Ireneusz

    2017-04-01

    Trace analysis plays an important role in medicine for diagnosis of various disorders; however, the appropriate sample preparation is required mostly including mineralization. Although graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF AAS) allows the investigation of biological samples such as blood, serum, and plasma without this step, it is rarely used for direct analysis because the residues of the rich organic matrix inside the furnace are difficult to remove and this may cause spectral/matrix interferences and decrease the lifetime of the graphite tube. In our work, the procedure for determination of Se, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cd and Pb with the use of the high resolution continuum source GF-AAS technique in whole blood samples with minimum sample pre-treatment was elaborated. The pyrolysis and atomization temperature as well as the time of signal integration were optimized to obtain the highest intensity and repeatability of the analytical signal. Moreover, due to the apparatus modification, an additional step was added in the for graphite furnace temperature program with minimal argon flow and maximal flow of air during pyrolysis stage to increase the oxidative condition for better matrix removal. The accuracy and precision of the optimized method was verified using certified reference material (CRM) Seronorm Trace Elements Whole Blood L-1 and the developed method was applied for trace analysis of blood samples from volunteer patients of the Orthopedics Department.

  6. A new highly selective, ratiometric and colorimetric fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) with a remarkable red shift in absorption and emission spectra based on internal charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Sen, Debabrata; Das, Nirmal Kumar

    2010-02-19

    A new 1,8-diaminonaphthalene based ratiometric and highly selective colorimetric "off-on" type of fluorescent probe, receptor 2 has been designed and synthesized that senses only Cu(2+) among the other heavy and transition metal ions examined on the basis of internal charge transfer (ICT). The visual sensitivity of the receptor 2 is remarkable, showing dual color changes from colorless (receptor) to purple followed by blue and a large red shift in emission upon Cu(2+) complexation.

  7. Growth, nutrient absorption, and moisture status of selected woody species in coal-mine spoil in response to an induced infection by the ectomycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinctorius

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.F.; West, D.C.; McLaughlin, S.B.

    1982-09-01

    In this study, nursery grown loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings infected with Pisolithus and control seedlings were outplanted on a coal mine spoil in Tennessee which had been previously hydroseeded. Granular fertilizer was applied by broadcasting to one-half of the seedlings of each ectomycorrhizal treatment at the rate of 112 kg/ha NPK. After 3 years, the survival and growth of loblolly pine infected with Pisolithus were superior to that of the control seedlings, and chemical analyses of foliar samples revealed that the seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae had a higher foliar concentration of NO/sub 3/ and a lower concentration of Zn than the control seedlings. The survival, growth, and nutrient absorption of Virginia pine were not significantly affected by the infection with Pisolithus after 2 years, but both loblolly and Virginia pine seedlings with Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae exhibited an enhanced ability to absorb water during periods of high moisture stress, as determined by the pressure chamber technique. Fertilization substantially reduced the survival of the seedlings of both species. Sweet birch and European alder were grown under high, intermediate, and low fertility regimes in sand culture containing a mycelial inoculum of Pisolithus tinctorius for 5 months and then transplanted to coal mine spoil containing an identical Pisolithus inoculum. Control seedlings of each species were similarly grown except that no inoculum was incorporated into the potting media. The nutrient treatments initiated in the sand culture were continued throughout the study. Examinations of the roots of the sweet birch seedlings revealed that high fertility significantly reduced the development of Pisolithus ectomycorrhizae, but Pisolithus formed abundant ectomycorrhizae on the roots of sweet birch grown under the intermediate and low fertility regimes and these seedlings were significantly larger than comparable control seedlings.

  8. Absorption of CO laser radiation by NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes absorption calculations and measurements at selected infrared CO laser wavelengths which are nearly coincident with absorption lines in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO near 5.3 microns. Initial work was directed towards establishing the optimal CO laser-NO absorption line coincidence for high temperature applications. Measurements of the absorption coefficient at this optimal laser wavelength were carried out, first using a room-temperature absorption cell for high-temperature calculations and then using a shock tube, for the temperature range 630-4000 K, to validate the high temperature calculations.

  9. Learning rules and persistence of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Haruo; Hayama, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Motoko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yagishita, Sho; Noguchi, Jun

    2010-07-01

    Structural plasticity of dendritic spines underlies learning, memory and cognition in the cerebral cortex. We here summarize fifteen rules of spine structural plasticity, or 'spine learning rules.' Together, they suggest how the spontaneous generation, selection and strengthening (SGSS) of spines represents the physical basis for learning and memory. This SGSS mechanism is consistent with Hebb's learning rule but suggests new relations between synaptic plasticity and memory. We describe the cellular and molecular bases of the spine learning rules, such as the persistence of spine structures and the fundamental role of actin, which polymerizes to form a 'memory gel' required for the selection and strengthening of spine synapses. We also discuss the possible link between transcriptional and translational regulation of structural plasticity. The SGSS mechanism and spine learning rules elucidate the integral nature of synaptic plasticity in neuronal network operations within the actual brain tissue.

  10. Investigation of chemical effect on the absorption parameters for some selected indium complex at 59.54 keV photon energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, F.; Akman, F.; Kaçal, M. R.; Turhan, M. F.; Akdemir, F.; Araz, A.; Durak, R.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, the mass attenuation coefficients, molecular, atomic and electronic cross sections, effective atomic numbers and electron densities of some selected indium complexes such as C5H10InNO9, C3H6InNO9 and C9H10InNO9, were determined with experimentally and theoretically using transmission geometry at 59.54 keV photon energy which emitted from 241Am annular source. The results were compared with the theoretical calculations which obtained from the WinXCOM program. Also, the results were interpreted based on some chemical parameters such as energy gap, ionization energy, electron affinity, hardness, chemical potential, electronegativity and global electrophilicity values of malonate, 2, 2 dimethylmalonate and phenylmalonate which were calculated using the density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP).

  11. The group selection controversy.

    PubMed

    Leigh, E G

    2010-01-01

    Many thought Darwinian natural selection could not explain altruism. This error led Wynne-Edwards to explain sustainable exploitation in animals by selection against overexploiting groups. Williams riposted that selection among groups rarely overrides within-group selection. Hamilton showed that altruism can evolve through kin selection. How strongly does group selection influence evolution? Following Price, Hamilton showed how levels of selection interact: group selection prevails if Hamilton's rule applies. Several showed that group selection drove some major evolutionary transitions. Following Hamilton's lead, Queller extended Hamilton's rule, replacing genealogical relatedness by the regression on an actor's genotypic altruism of interacting neighbours' phenotypic altruism. Price's theorem shows the generality of Hamilton's rule. All instances of group selection can be viewed as increasing inclusive fitness of autosomal genomes. Nonetheless, to grasp fully how cooperation and altruism evolve, most biologists need more concrete concepts like kin selection, group selection and selection among individuals for their common good.

  12. Quasistellar Objects: Intervening Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, J.; Churchill, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Every parcel of gas along the line of sight to a distant QUASAR will selectively absorb certain wavelengths of continuum light of the quasar due to the presence of the various chemical elements in the gas. Through the analysis of these quasar absorption lines we can study the spatial distributions, motions, chemical enrichment and ionization histories of gaseous structures from REDSHIFT five unti...

  13. Water absorption lines, 931-961 nm - Selected intensities, N2-collision-broadening coefficients, self-broadening coefficients, and pressure shifts in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Gentry, B.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Intensities were measured for 97 lines of H2O vapor between 932 and 961 nm. The lines were selected for their potential usefulness for remote laser measurements of H2O vapor in the earth's atmosphere. The spectra were obtained with several different H2O vapor abundances and N2 broadening gas pressures; the spectral resolution was 0.046/cm FWHM. Measured H2O line intensities range from 7 x 10 to the -25th to 7 x 10 to the -22nd/cm per (molecules/sq cm). H2O self-broadening coefficients were measured for 13 of these strongest lines; the mean value was 0.5/cm per atm. N2-collision-broadening coefficients were measured for 73 lines, and the average was 0.11 cm per atm HWHM. Pressure shifts in air were determined for a sample of six lines between 948 and 950 nm; these lines shift to lower frequency by an amount comparable to 0.1 of the collision-broadened widths measured in air or N2. The measured intensities of many lines of 300-000 band are much larger than expected from prior computations, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. Coriolis interactions with the stronger 201-000 band appear to be the primary cause of the enhancement of these line intensities.

  14. Phonological reduplication in sign language: Rules rule.

    PubMed

    Berent, Iris; Dupuis, Amanda; Brentari, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Productivity-the hallmark of linguistic competence-is typically attributed to algebraic rules that support broad generalizations. Past research on spoken language has documented such generalizations in both adults and infants. But whether algebraic rules form part of the linguistic competence of signers remains unknown. To address this question, here we gauge the generalization afforded by American Sign Language (ASL). As a case study, we examine reduplication (X→XX)-a rule that, inter alia, generates ASL nouns from verbs. If signers encode this rule, then they should freely extend it to novel syllables, including ones with features that are unattested in ASL. And since reduplicated disyllables are preferred in ASL, such a rule should favor novel reduplicated signs. Novel reduplicated signs should thus be preferred to nonreduplicative controls (in rating), and consequently, such stimuli should also be harder to classify as nonsigns (in the lexical decision task). The results of four experiments support this prediction. These findings suggest that the phonological knowledge of signers includes powerful algebraic rules. The convergence between these conclusions and previous evidence for phonological rules in spoken language suggests that the architecture of the phonological mind is partly amodal.

  15. 2-Nitroso-1-naphthol as a selective reagent for preconcentration of cobalt by vortex assisted combined with solidification of organic droplet and its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chamsaz, Mahmoud; Eftekhari, Mohammad; Eftekhari, Ali; Yekkebashi, Ali

    2013-11-01

    Highly rapid and selective vortex-assisted liquid-liquid microextraction based on solidification of organic drop has been used for determination of cobalt ion. 2-Nitroso-1-naphthol (2N1N) was used as a selective complexing agent to form stable cobalt-2N1N complex which can be extracted with 1-undecanol at a short time by the assistance of vortex agitator system followed by its determination using flame atomic absorption spectrometry. In vortex assisted, vigorous vortex stream as well as the vibrant effect of vortex system cause very fine droplets of extraction solvent to be produced and extraction occurred at a short time. Some parameters influencing the extraction process such as pH of samples, concentration of 2-nitroso-1-naphthol, extraction solvent volume, extraction time, ionic strength and surfactant addition, as well as interferences were evaluated in detail and optimum conditions were selected. At the optimum conditions, the calibration curve was linear in the range of 15 to 400 μg L(-1) of cobalt ions. The relative standard deviation based on ten replicate analysis of sample solution containing 50 μg L(-1) of cobalt was 3.4%. The detection limit (calculated as the concentration equivalent to three times of the standard deviation of the blank divided by the slope of the calibration curve after preconcentration) was 5.4 μg L(-1). The accuracy of the proposed method was successfully evaluated by the analysis of certified reference materials. This selective and highly rapid method was used for determination of cobalt ions in different water samples.

  16. Giant Two-photon Absorption in Circular Graphene Quantum Dots in Infrared Region

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaobo; Li, Zhisong; Li, Xin; Liu, Yingkai

    2016-01-01

    We investigate theoretically the two-photon absorption (TPA) for circular graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with the edge of armchair and zigzag on the basis of electronic energy states obtained by solving the Dirac-Weyl equation numerically under finite difference method. The expressions for TPA cross section are derived and the transition selection rules are obtained. Results reveal that the TPA is significantly greater in GQDs than conventional semiconductor QDs in infrared spectrum (2–6 um) with a resonant TPA cross section of up to 1011 GM. The TPA peaks are tuned by the GQDs’ size, edge and electron relaxation rate. PMID:27629800

  17. Study of band inversion in the PbxSn1-xTe class of topological crystalline insulators using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, K. V.; Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Krbal, M.; Tominaga, J.; Uruga, T.

    2014-11-01

    PbxSn1-xTe and PbxSn1-xSe crystals belong to the class of topological crystalline insulators where topological protection is achieved due to crystal symmetry rather than time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we make use of selection rules in the x-ray absorption process to experimentally detect band inversion along the PbTe(Se)-SnTe(Se) tie-lines. The observed significant change in the ratio of intensities of L1 and L3 transitions along the tie-line demonstrates that x-ray absorption can be a useful tool to study band inversion in topological insulators.

  18. 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness The 5-Second Rule KidsHealth > For Teens > The 5-Second Rule Print A A A Almost everyone has ... to eat it. Some people apply the "5-second rule" — that random saying about how food won' ...

  19. A Better Budget Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dothan, Michael; Thompson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Debt limits, interest coverage ratios, one-off balanced budget requirements, pay-as-you-go rules, and tax and expenditure limits are among the most important fiscal rules for constraining intertemporal transfers. There is considerable evidence that the least costly and most effective of such rules are those that focus directly on the rate of…

  20. Two Rules for Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important and most difficult skills of academic leadership is communication. In this column, the author defines what he considers to be the two most important rules for communication. The first rule, which he terms the "Great American Rule," involves trusting that the person on the other end of the line or the fax or the e-mail is…

  1. Electron States and light absorption in strongly oblate and strongly prolate ellipsoidal quantum dots in presence of electrical and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Dvoyan, Karen G; Hayrapetyan, David B; Kazaryan, Eduard M; Tshantshapanyan, Ani A

    2007-11-13

    In framework of the adiabatic approximation the energy states of electron as well as direct light absorption are investigated in strongly oblate and strongly prolate ellipsoidal quantum dots (QDs) at presence of electric and magnetic fields. Analytical expressions for particle energy spectrum are obtained. The dependence of energy levels' configuration on QD geometrical parameters and field intensities is analytically obtained. The energy levels of electrons are shown to be equidistant both for strongly oblate and prolate QDs. The effect of the external fields on direct light absorption of a QD was investigated. The dependence of the absorption edge on geometrical parameters of QDs and intensities of the electric and magnetic fields is obtained. Selection rules are obtained at presence as well as absence of external electric and magnetic fields. In particular, it is shown that the presence of the electric field cancels the quantum numbers selection rules at the field direction, whereas in radial direction the selection rules are preserved. Perspectives of practical applications for device manufacturing based on ellipsoidal quantum dots are outlined.

  2. Absorption and Metabolism of Xanthophylls

    PubMed Central

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Nagao, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids, especially xanthophylls, have attracted significant attention because of their characteristic biological activities, including anti-allergic, anti-cancer, and anti-obese actions. Although no less than forty carotenoids are ingested under usual dietary habits, only six carotenoids and their metabolites have been found in human tissues, suggesting selectivity in the intestinal absorption of carotenoids. Recently, facilitated diffusion in addition to simple diffusion has been reported to mediate the intestinal absorption of carotenoids in mammals. The selective absorption of carotenoids may be caused by uptake to the intestinal epithelia by the facilitated diffusion and an unknown excretion to intestinal lumen. It is well known that β-carotene can be metabolized to vitamin A after intestinal absorption of carotenoids, but little is known about the metabolic transformation of non provitamin A xanthophylls. The enzymatic oxidation of the secondary hydroxyl group leading to keto-carotenoids would occur as a common pathway of xanthophyll metabolism in mammals. This paper reviews the absorption and metabolism of xanthophylls by introducing recent advances in this field. PMID:21747746

  3. Assessing the absorption of new pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, I J

    2001-11-01

    The advent of more efficient methods to synthesize and screen new chemical compounds is increasing the number of chemical leads identified in the drug discovery phase. Compounds with good biological activity may fail to become drugs due to insufficient oral absorption. Selection of drug development candidates with adequate absorption characteristics should increase the probability of success in the development phase. To assess the absorption potential of new chemical entities numerous in vitro and in vivo model systems have been used. Many laboratories rely on cell culture models of intestinal permeability such as, Caco-2, HT-29 and MDCK. To attempt to increase the throughput of permeability measurements, several physicochemical methods such as, immobilized artificial membrane (IAM) columns and parallel artificial membrane permeation assay (PAMPA) have been used. More recently, much attention has been given to the development of computational methods to predict drug absorption. However, it is clear that no single method will sufficient for studying drug absorption, but most likely a combination of systems will be needed. Higher throughput, less reliable methods could be used to discover 'loser' compounds, whereas lower throughput, more accurate methods could be used to optimize the absorption properties of lead compounds. Finally, accurate methods are needed to understand absorption mechanisms (efflux-limited absorption, carrier-mediated, intestinal metabolism) that may limit intestinal drug absorption. This information could be extremely valuable to medicinal chemists in the selection of favorable chemo-types. This review describes different techniques used for evaluating drug absorption and indicates their advantages and disadvantages.

  4. Rules on determining hearing appearances. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-05-21

    This final rule is another step in our continual efforts to handle workloads more effectively and efficiently. We are publishing final rules for portions of the rules we proposed in October 2007 that relate to persons, other than the claimant or any other party to the hearing, appearing by telephone. We are also clarifying that the administrative law judge (ALJ) will allow the claimant or any other party to a hearing to appear by telephone under certain circumstances when the claimant or other party requests to make his or her appearance in that manner. We expect that these final rules will make the hearings process more efficient and help us continue to reduce the hearings backlog. In addition, we made some minor editorial changes to our regulations that do not have any effect on the rights of claimants or any other parties.

  5. Evidence of multicenter structure of cerium ions in gadolinium gallium garnet crystals studied by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przybylińska, H.; Ma, Chong-Geng; Brik, M. G.; Kamińska, A.; Szczepkowski, J.; Sybilski, P.; Wittlin, A.; Berkowski, M.; Jastrzębski, W.; Suchocki, A.

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature, infrared absorption spectra of gadolinium gallium garnet crystals doped with Ce are presented. In the region of intraconfigurational 4f-4f transitions the spectra exhibit existence of at least two different, major Ce3+ related centers in the GGG crystals and also some other centers at lower concentration. The spectrum of 4f-4f intrashell transitions of Ce3+ ions extends up to about 3700 cm-1 due to the large splitting of the 2F7/2 excited state. In the visible region the absorption spectrum shows influence of symmetry-related selection rules. The absorption coefficient changes in the region of 4f1-5d1 transitions due to thermal population of the second level, belonging to the 2F5/2 ground state. This suggests that the symmetry of the site occupied by Ce3+ ions, which substitute Gd3+, is higher than D2 expected for garnet hosts.

  6. Interplay between the spin-selection rule and frontier orbital theory in O2 activation and CO oxidation by single-atom-sized catalysts on TiO2(110).

    PubMed

    Li, Shunfang; Zhao, Xingju; Shi, Jinlei; Jia, Yu; Guo, Zhengxiao; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Gao, Yanfei; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-09-28

    Exploration of the catalytic activity of low-dimensional transition metal (TM) or noble metal catalysts is a vital subject of modern materials science because of their instrumental role in numerous industrial applications. Recent experimental advances have demonstrated the utilization of single atoms on different substrates as effective catalysts, which exhibit amazing catalytic properties such as more efficient catalytic performance and higher selectivity in chemical reactions as compared to their nanostructured counterparts; however, the underlying microscopic mechanisms operative in these single atom catalysts still remain elusive. Based on first-principles calculations, herein, we present a comparative study of the key kinetic rate processes involved in CO oxidation using a monomer or dimer of two representative TMs (Pd and Ni) on defective TiO2(110) substrates (TMn@TiO2(110), n = 1, 2) to elucidate the underlying mechanism of single-atom catalysis. We reveal that the O2 activation rates of the single atom TM catalysts deposited on TiO2(110) are governed cooperatively by the classic spin-selection rule and the well-known frontier orbital theory (or generalized d-band picture) that emphasizes the energy gap between the frontier orbitals of the TM catalysts and O2 molecule. We further illuminate that the subsequent CO oxidation reactions proceed via the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with contrasting reaction barriers for the Pd monomer and dimer catalysts. These findings not only provide an explanation for existing observations of distinctly different catalytic activities of Pd@TiO2(110) and Pd2@TiO2(110) [Kaden et al., Science, 2009, 326, 826-829] but also shed new insights into future utilization and optimization of single-atom catalysis.

  7. a Heterosynaptic Learning Rule for Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank

    In this article we introduce a novel stochastic Hebb-like learning rule for neural networks that is neurobiologically motivated. This learning rule combines features of unsupervised (Hebbian) and supervised (reinforcement) learning and is stochastic with respect to the selection of the time points when a synapse is modified. Moreover, the learning rule does not only affect the synapse between pre- and postsynaptic neuron, which is called homosynaptic plasticity, but effects also further remote synapses of the pre- and postsynaptic neuron. This more complex form of synaptic plasticity has recently come under investigations in neurobiology and is called heterosynaptic plasticity. We demonstrate that this learning rule is useful in training neural networks by learning parity functions including the exclusive-or (XOR) mapping in a multilayer feed-forward network. We find, that our stochastic learning rule works well, even in the presence of noise. Importantly, the mean learning time increases with the number of patterns to be learned polynomially, indicating efficient learning.

  8. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  9. Possible impact of the atmospheric water vapor absorption on the total ozone amount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makogon, Mikail M.; Nesmelova, Ljudmila I.; Rodimova, Olga B.

    2004-02-01

    The total ozone amount (TOA) is determined as a rule by classic spectrophotometric method: TOA is found from a measured difference of the atmospheric optical thicknesses at two specially selected wavelengths in the region 305-340 nm. In this region the aerosol and molecular scattering takes place and it is traditionally believed, that the molecular absorption in this spectral region is conditioned only by ozone. Researches performed in the Institute of Atmospheric Optics SB RAS at the end of 1980s have shown, that there is also gentle absorption of a water vapor in this region, which can make a contribution to the measured difference of atmospheric optical thicknesses and can result in some methodical error. Thus, the TOA value which is determined without considering the water vapor, may be overstated.

  10. Rule groupings in expert systems using nearest neighbour decision rules, and convex hulls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasiadis, Stergios

    1991-01-01

    Expert System shells are lacking in many areas of software engineering. Large rule based systems are not semantically comprehensible, difficult to debug, and impossible to modify or validate. Partitioning a set of rules found in CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) into groups of rules which reflect the underlying semantic subdomains of the problem, will address adequately the concerns stated above. Techniques are introduced to structure a CLIPS rule base into groups of rules that inherently have common semantic information. The concepts involved are imported from the field of A.I., Pattern Recognition, and Statistical Inference. Techniques focus on the areas of feature selection, classification, and a criteria of how 'good' the classification technique is, based on Bayesian Decision Theory. A variety of distance metrics are discussed for measuring the 'closeness' of CLIPS rules and various Nearest Neighbor classification algorithms are described based on the above metric.

  11. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Lapucha, A.; Lazarov, L.; Amui, J.

    1992-04-01

    The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stage of direct coal liquefaction.

  12. Strategy as simple rules.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Sull, D N

    2001-01-01

    The success of Yahoo!, eBay, Enron, and other companies that have become adept at morphing to meet the demands of changing markets can't be explained using traditional thinking about competitive strategy. These companies have succeeded by pursuing constantly evolving strategies in market spaces that were considered unattractive according to traditional measures. In this article--the third in an HBR series by Kathleen Eisenhardt and Donald Sull on strategy in the new economy--the authors ask, what are the sources of competitive advantage in high-velocity markets? The secret, they say, is strategy as simple rules. The companies know that the greatest opportunities for competitive advantage lie in market confusion, but they recognize the need for a few crucial strategic processes and a few simple rules. In traditional strategy, advantage comes from exploiting resources or stable market positions. In strategy as simple rules, advantage comes from successfully seizing fleeting opportunities. Key strategic processes, such as product innovation, partnering, or spinout creation, place the company where the flow of opportunities is greatest. Simple rules then provide the guidelines within which managers can pursue such opportunities. Simple rules, which grow out of experience, fall into five broad categories: how- to rules, boundary conditions, priority rules, timing rules, and exit rules. Companies with simple-rules strategies must follow the rules religiously and avoid the temptation to change them too frequently. A consistent strategy helps managers sort through opportunities and gain short-term advantage by exploiting the attractive ones. In stable markets, managers rely on complicated strategies built on detailed predictions of the future. But when business is complicated, strategy should be simple.

  13. Bootstrap classification and point-based feature selection from age-staged mouse cerebellum tissues of matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectra using a fuzzy rule-building expert system.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Peter B; Laurent, Claudine; Levinson, Douglas F; Levitt, Pat; Markey, Sanford P

    2007-09-19

    A bootstrap method for point-based detection of candidate biomarker peaks has been developed from pattern classifiers. Point-based detection methods are advantageous in comparison to peak-based methods. Peak determination and selection are problematic when spectral peaks are not baseline resolved or on a varying baseline. The benefit of point-based detection is that peaks can be globally determined from the characteristic features of the entire data set (i.e., subsets of candidate points) as opposed to the traditional method of selecting peaks from individual spectra and then combining the peak list into a data set. The point-based method is demonstrated to be more effective and efficient using a synthetic data set when compared to using Mahalanobis distance for feature selection. In addition, probabilities that characterize the uniqueness of the peaks are determined. This method was applied for detecting peaks that characterize age-specific patterns of protein expression of developing and adult mouse cerebella from matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) data. The mice comprised three age groups: 42 adults, 19 14-day-old pups, and 16 7-day-old pups. Three sequential spectra were obtained from each tissue section to yield 126, 57 and 48 spectra for adult, 14-day-old pup, and 7-day-old pup spectra, respectively. Each spectrum comprised 71,879 mass measurements in a range of 3.5-50 kDa. A previous study revealed that 846 unique peaks were detected that were consistent for 50% of the mice in each age group (C. Laurent, D.F. Levinson, S.A. Schwartz, P.B. Harrington, S.P. Markey, R.M. Caprioli, P. Levitt, Direct profiling of the cerebellum by MALDI MS: a methodological study in postnatal and adult mouse, J. Neurosci. Res. 81 (2005) 613-621.). A fuzzy rule-building expert system (FuRES) was applied to investigate the correlation of age with features in the MS data. FuRES detected two outlier pup-14 spectra. Prediction was evaluated

  14. How Rules Shape Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emo, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Rules guide and constrain participants' actions as they participate in any educational activity. This ethnographically driven case study examines how organizational rules--the implicit and explicit regulations that constrain actions and interactions--influence children to use science in the experiential educational activity of raising 4-H market…

  15. "Chaos Rules" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    About 20 years ago, while lost in the midst of his PhD research, the author mused over proposed titles for his thesis. He was pretty pleased with himself when he came up with "Chaos Rules" (the implied double meaning was deliberate), or more completely, "Chaos Rules: An Exploration of the Work of Instructional Designers in Distance Education." He…

  16. Rules for Thesaurus Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Educational Research and Development (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC. Panel on Educational Terminology.

    This is a revision of the "Rules for Thesaurus Preparation," published in October 1966. These rules are designed to help the Central ERIC staff and the staffs of the ERIC Clearinghouses make similar decisions related to the addition and modification of terms in the "Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors," Second Edition. In addition to…

  17. A Reconceptualization of Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Malcolm

    Recently, communications scholars and theorists have begun formulating rules to describe the workings of language in various situations of everyday use. Theoretically, current rules approaches are in violation of the basic philosophy underlying communication theory--Whitehead's notion of process. The inconsistency is a function of the degree of…

  18. Are Intuitive Rules Universal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavy, Ruth; Babai, Reuven; Tsamir, Pessia; Tirosh, Dina; Lin, Fou-Lai; McRobbie, Campbell

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on the intuitive rules theory. The study was conducted in Australia (with aboriginal children) in Taiwan and in Israel. Our findings indicate that Taiwanese and Australian Aboriginal students, much like Israeli ones, provided incorrect responses, most of which were in line with the intuitive rules. Also,…

  19. Beyond Rules to Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartrell, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Rules are not helpful in the adult-child community. They are usually stated in the negative: "No," "Don't," etc. The way they are worded, adults seem to expect children to break them. Even when they are not totally negative, like "Be nice to your friends," rules have an "or else" moral implication that adults carry around in their heads. When…

  20. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  1. 14 CFR 23.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shock absorption tests. 23.723 Section 23... Landing Gear § 23.723 Shock absorption tests. (a) It must be shown that the limit load factors selected... exceeded. This must be shown by energy absorption tests except that analysis based on tests conducted on...

  2. 14 CFR 23.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shock absorption tests. 23.723 Section 23... Landing Gear § 23.723 Shock absorption tests. (a) It must be shown that the limit load factors selected... exceeded. This must be shown by energy absorption tests except that analysis based on tests conducted on...

  3. 14 CFR 23.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shock absorption tests. 23.723 Section 23... Landing Gear § 23.723 Shock absorption tests. (a) It must be shown that the limit load factors selected... exceeded. This must be shown by energy absorption tests except that analysis based on tests conducted on...

  4. 14 CFR 23.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shock absorption tests. 23.723 Section 23... Landing Gear § 23.723 Shock absorption tests. (a) It must be shown that the limit load factors selected... exceeded. This must be shown by energy absorption tests except that analysis based on tests conducted on...

  5. 14 CFR 23.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shock absorption tests. 23.723 Section 23... Landing Gear § 23.723 Shock absorption tests. (a) It must be shown that the limit load factors selected... exceeded. This must be shown by energy absorption tests except that analysis based on tests conducted on...

  6. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  7. Effects of Dynamically Weighting Autonomous Rules in an Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Flocking Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-18

    inner strength and peace of mind to tackle this last stretch—thank you. To the people who have gone before me: Craig Reynolds, Benaiah Lozano, Gabe...34 Rule 12— Wander ...o Hypothesis 2: For the selected mission, optimizing and enabling Rule 7 (Stay Within Boundary), Rule 11 (Divergence) and Rule 12 ( Wander ) parameters

  8. Bending Rules in Graphene Kirigami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, Bastien F.; Mele, E. J.

    2015-11-01

    The three-dimensional shapes of graphene sheets produced by nanoscale cut-and-join kirigami are studied by combining large-scale atomistic simulations with continuum elastic modeling. Lattice segments are selectively removed from a graphene sheet, and the structure is allowed to close by relaxing in the third dimension. The surface relaxation is limited by a nonzero bending modulus which produces a smoothly modulated landscape instead of the ridge-and-plateau motif found in macroscopic lattice kirigami. The resulting surface shapes and their interactions are well described by a new set of microscopic kirigami rules that resolve the competition between bending and stretching energies.

  9. Bending Rules in Graphene Kirigami.

    PubMed

    Grosso, Bastien F; Mele, E J

    2015-11-06

    The three-dimensional shapes of graphene sheets produced by nanoscale cut-and-join kirigami are studied by combining large-scale atomistic simulations with continuum elastic modeling. Lattice segments are selectively removed from a graphene sheet, and the structure is allowed to close by relaxing in the third dimension. The surface relaxation is limited by a nonzero bending modulus which produces a smoothly modulated landscape instead of the ridge-and-plateau motif found in macroscopic lattice kirigami. The resulting surface shapes and their interactions are well described by a new set of microscopic kirigami rules that resolve the competition between bending and stretching energies.

  10. Following the Rules.

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2016-05-01

    I am getting better at following the rules as I grow older, although I still bristle at many of them. I was a typical rebellious teenager; no one understood me, David Bowie was my idol, and, one day, my generation was going to change the world. Now I really want people to understand me: David Bowie remains one of my favorite singers and, yes, my generation has changed the world, and not necessarily for the better. Growing up means that you have to make the rules, not just follow those set by others, and, at times, having rules makes a lot of sense.
.

  11. Flow injection solid phase extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of Cr(VI) by selective separation and preconcentration on a lab-made hybrid mesoporous solid microcolumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Manuela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2009-06-01

    A lab-made hybrid mesoporous solid was employed in a flow injection solid phase extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-SPE-ETAAS) system for the selective retention of Cr(VI). The solid was prepared by co-condensation of sodium tetraethylortosilicate and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane by sol-gel methodology and one-pot synthesis and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction spectroscopy, and scanning electronic microscopy. Adsorption capacities at different pH values of both, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), were also measured in order to obtain the optimum retention for Cr(VI) with no interference of Cr(III). The maximum capacity of adsorption (4.35 mmol g - 1) was observed for pH values between 2-3, whilst Cr(III) was found to remain in solution (adsorption capacity = 0.007 mmol g - 1). Then, a microcolumn (bed volume: 7.9 µL) was filled with the solid and inserted in the FI-ETAAS system for analytical purposes. Since the analyte was strongly retained by the filling in the anionic form, 0.1 mol L - 1 hydroxylammonium chloride in 1 mol L - 1 hydrochloric acid was selected as eluent due to its redox characteristics. In this way, the sorbed Cr(VI) was easily released in the cationic form. The enrichment factor (EF) was found as a compromise between sensitivity and sample throughput and a value of 27 was obtained under optimized conditions: pH 2, sample loading 2 mL min - 1 (60 s), elution flow rate 0.5 ml min - 1 (eluent volume: 75 μL). Under optimized conditions the limit of detection for Cr(VI) was 1.2 ng L - 1, the precision, expressed as RSD was 2.5%, the sample throughput 21/h, and the microcolumn lifetime was over 300 adsorption/desorption cycles. Cr(III) determination was also performed by simply measuring its concentration at the end of the column and after Cr(VI) retention by the mesoporous solid. Applications of the methodology to the determination of Cr(VI) in deionized, osmosis, mineral, effluent and river

  12. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medication Therapy Management programs Drug plan coverage rules , current page Using your drug plan for the first time Filling a prescription without your new plan card Costs for Medicare drug coverage Joining a health or ...

  13. 6 new buying rules.

    PubMed

    Pasternack, A

    1998-02-20

    Times change--and so does software purchasing. Buying in bulk, paying top dollar for what a system does, trusting a vendor to watch out for you--that's old input. Here are six fresh rules for the buying game.

  14. The 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about the 5-second rule: A clean-looking floor isn't necessarily clean. A floor that looks dirty is usually worse, but even dry floors that look clean can contain bacteria. Why? Some germs can survive ...

  15. Revised Total Coliform Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Revised Total Coliform Rule (RTCR) aims to increase public health protection through the reduction of potential pathways for fecal contamination in the distribution system of a public water system (PWS).

  16. Data breaches. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-04-11

    This document adopts, without change, the interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2007, addressing data breaches of sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This final rule implements certain provisions of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006. The regulations prescribe the mechanisms for taking action in response to a data breach of sensitive personal information.

  17. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  18. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  19. Mechanisms of rule acquisition and rule following in inductive reasoning.

    PubMed

    Crescentini, Cristiano; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; De Pisapia, Nicola; Jovicich, Jorge; Amati, Daniele; Shallice, Tim

    2011-05-25

    Despite the recent interest in the neuroanatomy of inductive reasoning processes, the regional specificity within prefrontal cortex (PFC) for the different mechanisms involved in induction tasks remains to be determined. In this study, we used fMRI to investigate the contribution of PFC regions to rule acquisition (rule search and rule discovery) and rule following. Twenty-six healthy young adult participants were presented with a series of images of cards, each consisting of a set of circles numbered in sequence with one colored blue. Participants had to predict the position of the blue circle on the next card. The rules that had to be acquired pertained to the relationship among succeeding stimuli. Responses given by subjects were categorized in a series of phases either tapping rule acquisition (responses given up to and including rule discovery) or rule following (correct responses after rule acquisition). Mid-dorsolateral PFC (mid-DLPFC) was active during rule search and remained active until successful rule acquisition. By contrast, rule following was associated with activation in temporal, motor, and medial/anterior prefrontal cortex. Moreover, frontopolar cortex (FPC) was active throughout the rule acquisition and rule following phases before a rule became familiar. We attributed activation in mid-DLPFC to hypothesis generation and in FPC to integration of multiple separate inferences. The present study provides evidence that brain activation during inductive reasoning involves a complex network of frontal processes and that different subregions respond during rule acquisition and rule following phases.

  20. The Golden Rule Agreement is Psychometrically Defensible.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Tamayo, Eulogio

    The agreement between the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the Golden Rule Insurance Company of Illinois is interpreted as setting the general principles on which items must be selected to be included in a licensure test. These principles put a limit to the difficulty level of any item, and they also limit the size of the difference in…

  1. Five rules for the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Martin A

    2006-12-08

    Cooperation is needed for evolution to construct new levels of organization. Genomes, cells, multicellular organisms, social insects, and human society are all based on cooperation. Cooperation means that selfish replicators forgo some of their reproductive potential to help one another. But natural selection implies competition and therefore opposes cooperation unless a specific mechanism is at work. Here I discuss five mechanisms for the evolution of cooperation: kin selection, direct reciprocity, indirect reciprocity, network reciprocity, and group selection. For each mechanism, a simple rule is derived that specifies whether natural selection can lead to cooperation.

  2. Five Rules for the Evolution of Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Martin A.

    2006-12-01

    Cooperation is needed for evolution to construct new levels of organization. Genomes, cells, multicellular organisms, social insects, and human society are all based on cooperation. Cooperation means that selfish replicators forgo some of their reproductive potential to help one another. But natural selection implies competition and therefore opposes cooperation unless a specific mechanism is at work. Here I discuss five mechanisms for the evolution of cooperation: kin selection, direct reciprocity, indirect reciprocity, network reciprocity, and group selection. For each mechanism, a simple rule is derived that specifies whether natural selection can lead to cooperation.

  3. Sticky Rules: Integration Between Abstract Rules and Specific Actions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayr, Ulrich; Bryck, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    The authors manipulated repetitions and/or changes of abstract response rules and the specific stimulus- response (S-R) associations used under these rules. Experiments 1 and 2, assessing trial-to-trial priming effects, showed that repetition of complete S-R couplings produced only benefits when the rule also repeated (i.e., rule-S-R conjunctions)…

  4. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  5. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  6. 78 FR 6385 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Order Approving a Proposed Rule Change Amending...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h)(7) To Permit PL Select Orders To Interact With Incoming Orders Larger Than the Size of the PL Select Order January 24, 2013. I. Introduction On November 27, 2012, NYSE Arca...,\\2\\ a proposed rule change to amend NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h)(7) to permit PL Select Orders...

  7. 42 CFR 422.320 - Special rules for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules for hospice care. 422.320 Section 422....320 Special rules for hospice care. (a) Information. An MA organization that has a contract under subpart K of this part must inform each Medicare enrollee eligible to select hospice care under §...

  8. 42 CFR 422.320 - Special rules for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special rules for hospice care. 422.320 Section 422... Organizations § 422.320 Special rules for hospice care. (a) Information. An MA organization that has a contract under subpart K of this part must inform each Medicare enrollee eligible to select hospice care...

  9. 42 CFR 422.320 - Special rules for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Special rules for hospice care. 422.320 Section 422... Organizations § 422.320 Special rules for hospice care. (a) Information. An MA organization that has a contract under subpart K of this part must inform each Medicare enrollee eligible to select hospice care...

  10. 42 CFR 422.320 - Special rules for hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special rules for hospice care. 422.320 Section 422... Organizations § 422.320 Special rules for hospice care. (a) Information. An MA organization that has a contract under subpart K of this part must inform each Medicare enrollee eligible to select hospice care...

  11. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  12. Novice Rules for Projectile Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, David P.

    1988-01-01

    Investigates several aspects of undergraduate students' rules for projectile motion including general patterns; rules for questions about time, distance, solids and liquids; and changes in rules when asked to ignore air resistance. Reports approach differences by sex and high school physics experience, and that novice rules are situation…

  13. Nature and Function of Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Barry A.

    1997-01-01

    Surveyed Year 1 and 2 teachers in Australia about their classroom rules. Found that teachers have about six rules for their classes relating to pupil-pupil relations, completing academic tasks, movement around the classroom, property, safety, and other. Most rules concerned pupil-pupil interactions, and all rules can be seen as a way of…

  14. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

    1987-04-07

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

  15. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  16. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  17. Generalized Deterministic Traffic Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Henryk; Boccara, Nino

    We study a family of deterministic models for highway traffic flow which generalize cellular automaton rule 184. This family is parameterized by the speed limit m and another parameter k that represents a "degree of aggressiveness" in driving, strictly related to the distance between two consecutive cars. We compare two driving strategies with identical maximum throughput: "conservative" driving with high speed limit and "aggressive" driving with low speed limit. Those two strategies are evaluated in terms of accident probability. We also discuss fundamental diagrams of generalized traffic rules and examine limitations of maximum achievable throughput. Possible modifications of the model are considered.

  18. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  19. Sum rules for leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide class of models which give a dynamical description of the origin of flavor in terms of spontaneous symmetry breaking of an underlying symmetry. Many of these models exhibit sum rules which relate on the one hand mixing angles and the Dirac CP phase with each other and/or on the other hand neutrino masses and Majorana phases with each other. We will briefly sketch how this happens and discuss briefly the impact of renormalization group corrections to the mass sum rules.

  20. Sum Rules for Leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    There is a wide class of models which give a dynamical description of the origin of avor in terms of spontaneous symmetry breaking of an underlying symmetry. Many of these models exhibit sum rules which relate on the one hand mixing angles and the Dirac CP phase with each other and/or on the other hand neutrino masses and Majorana phases with each other. We will briey sketch how this happens and discuss briey the impact of renormalization group corrections to the mass sum rules.

  1. Sum Rules, Classical and Quantum - A Pedagogical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstens, William; Smith, David Y.

    2014-03-01

    Sum rules in the form of integrals over the response of a system to an external probe provide general analytical tools for both experiment and theory. For example, the celebrated f-sum rule gives a system's plasma frequency as an integral over the optical-dipole absorption spectrum regardless of the specific spectral distribution. Moreover, this rule underlies Smakula's equation for the number density of absorbers in a sample in terms of the area under their absorption bands. Commonly such rules are derived from quantum-mechanical commutation relations, but many are fundamentally classical (independent of ℏ) and so can be derived from more transparent mechanical models. We have exploited this to illustrate the fundamental role of inertia in the case of optical sum rules. Similar considerations apply to sum rules in many other branches of physics. Thus, the ``attenuation integral theorems'' of ac circuit theory reflect the ``inertial'' effect of Lenz's Law in inductors or the potential energy ``storage'' in capacitors. These considerations are closely related to the fact that the real and imaginary parts of a response function cannot be specified independently, a result that is encapsulated in the Kramers-Kronig relations. Supported in part by the US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  2. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  3. Enigmatic photon absorption in plasmas near solar interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    Large systematic discrepancies between theoretical and experimental photon absorption of Fe plasmas applicable to the solar interior were reported [Bailey et al., Nature 517, 56 (2015)]. The disagreement is examined in the context of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn f-sum rule. The analysis identifies several anomalies in the experimental results.

  4. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  5. Crispen's Five Antivirus Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispen, Patrick Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Provides rules for protecting computers from viruses, Trojan horses, or worms. Topics include purchasing commercial antivirus programs and keeping them updated; updating virus definitions weekly; precautions before opening attached files; macro virus protection in Microsoft Word; and precautions with executable files. (LRW)

  6. Crispen's Five Antivirus Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispen, Patrick Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Explains five rules to protect computers from viruses. Highlights include commercial antivirus software programs and the need to upgrade them periodically (every year to 18 months); updating virus definitions at least weekly; scanning attached files from email with antivirus software before opening them; Microsoft Word macro protection; and the…

  7. Willpower and Personal Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benabou, Roland; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    We develop a theory of internal commitments or "personal rules" based on self-reputation over one's willpower, which transforms lapses into precedents that undermine future self-restraint. The foundation for this mechanism is the imperfect recall of past motives and feelings, leading people to draw inferences from their past actions. The degree of…

  8. Cramer's Rule Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2005-01-01

    In 1750, the Swiss mathematician Gabriel Cramer published a well-written algebra book entitled "Introduction a l'Analyse des Lignes Courbes Algebriques." In the appendix to this book, Cramer gave, without proof, the rule named after him for solving a linear system of equations using determinants (Kosinki, 2001). Since then several derivations of…

  9. 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel tempted by the 5-second rule: A clean-looking floor isn't necessarily clean. A shiny linoleum floor ... cleaner than a 1970s-era carpet. But even clean, dry floors can harbor bacteria. Newly washed floors are only ...

  10. An Airship Slide Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Pickering, S F

    1924-01-01

    This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.

  11. Representation of abstract quantitative rules applied to spatial and numerical magnitudes in primate prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Eiselt, Anne-Kathrin; Nieder, Andreas

    2013-04-24

    Processing quantity information based on abstract principles is central to intelligent behavior. Neural correlates of quantitative rule selectivity have been identified previously in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). However, whether individual neurons represent rules applied to multiple magnitude types is unknown. We recorded from PFC neurons while monkeys switched between "greater than/less than" rules applied to spatial and numerical magnitudes. A majority of rule-selective neurons responded only to the quantitative rules applied to one specific magnitude type. However, another population of neurons generalized the magnitude principle and represented the quantitative rules related to both magnitudes. This indicates that the primate brain uses rule-selective neurons specialized in guiding decisions related to a specific magnitude type only, as well as generalizing neurons that respond abstractly to the overarching concept "magnitude rules."

  12. Szego-Lobatto quadrature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagels, Carl; Reichel, Lothar

    2007-03-01

    Gauss-type quadrature rules with one or two prescribed nodes are well known and are commonly referred to as Gauss-Radau and Gauss-Lobatto quadrature rules, respectively. Efficient algorithms are available for their computation. Szego quadrature rules are analogs of Gauss quadrature rules for the integration of periodic functions; they integrate exactly trigonometric polynomials of as high degree as possible. Szego quadrature rules have a free parameter, which can be used to prescribe one node. This paper discusses an analog of Gauss-Lobatto rules, i.e., Szego quadrature rules with two prescribed nodes. We refer to these rules as Szego-Lobatto rules. Their properties as well as numerical methods for their computation are discussed.

  13. Rule activity related to spatial and numerical magnitudes: comparison of prefrontal, premotor, and cingulate motor cortices.

    PubMed

    Eiselt, Anne-Kathrin; Nieder, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In everyday situations, quantitative rules, such as "greater than/less than," need to be applied to a multitude of magnitude comparisons, be they sensory, spatial, temporal, or numerical. We have previously shown that rules applied to different magnitudes are encoded in the lateral PFC. To investigate if and how other frontal lobe areas also contribute to the encoding of quantitative rules applied to multiple magnitudes, we trained monkeys to switch between "greater than/less than" rules applied to either line lengths (spatial magnitudes) or dot numerosities (discrete numerical magnitudes). We recorded single-cell activity from the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC) and cingulate motor cortex (CMA) and compared it with PFC activity. We found the largest proportion of quantitative rule-selective cells in PFC (24% of randomly selected cells), whereas neurons in dPMC and CMA rarely encoded the rule (6% of the cells). In addition, rule selectivity of individual cells was highest in PFC neurons compared with dPMC and CMA neurons. Rule-selective neurons that simultaneously represented the "greater than/less than" rules applied to line lengths and numerosities ("rule generalists") were exclusively present in PFC. In dPMC and CMA, however, neurons primarily encoded rules applied to only one of the two magnitude types ("rule specialists"). Our data suggest a special involvement of PFC in representing quantitative rules at an abstract level, both in terms of the proportion of neurons engaged and the coding capacities.

  14. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  15. Learning categories via rules and similarity: comparing adults and children.

    PubMed

    Rabi, Rahel; Miles, Sarah J; Minda, John Paul

    2015-03-01

    Two experiments explored the different strategies used by children and adults when learning new perceptual categories. Participants were asked to learn a set of categories for which both a single-feature rule and overall similarity would allow for perfect performance. Other rules allowed for suboptimal performance. Transfer stimuli (Experiments 1 and 2) and single features (Experiment 2) were presented after training to help determine how the categories were learned. In both experiments, we found that adults made significantly more optimal rule-based responses to the test stimuli than children. Children showed a variety of categorization styles, with a few relying on the optimal rules, many relying on suboptimal single-feature rules, and only a few relying on overall family resemblance. We interpret these results within a multiple systems framework, and we argue that children show the pattern they do because they lack the necessary cognitive resources to fully engage in hypothesis testing, rule selection, and verbally mediated category learning.

  16. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  17. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  18. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  20. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  1. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  2. Cubature rules of prescribed merit

    SciTech Connect

    Lyness, J.N.; Sloan, I.H.

    1996-03-01

    We introduce a criterion for the evaluation of multidimensional quadrature, or cubature, rules for the hypercube: this is the merit of a rule, which is closely related to its trigonometric degree, and which reduces to the Zaremba figure of merit in the case of a lattice rule. We derive a family of rules Q{sub k}{sup a} having dimension s and merit 2{sup k}. These rules seem to be competitive with lattice rules with respect to the merit that can be achieved with a given number of abscissas.

  3. 77 FR 34115 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; NYSE Arca, Inc.; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule Change Amending...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h) To Add a PL Select Order Type June 4, 2012. Pursuant to Section 19(b)(1... Proposed Rule Change The Exchange proposes to amend NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h) to add a PL Select... add a PL Select Order type. Pursuant to NYSE Arca Equities Rule 7.31(h)(4), a Passive Liquidity...

  4. 75 FR 76065 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Change by NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc. Relating to Rebates and Fees for Adding and Removing Liquidity in Select... Removing Liquidity in Select Symbols in Section I of the Fee Schedule. The text of the proposed rule change.... Purpose The purpose of the proposed rule change is to amend the list of Select Symbols in the...

  5. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  6. Liquid for absorption of solar heat

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Kadotani, K.; Marui, T.

    1984-11-13

    A liquid for the absorption of solar heat, useful as an heat-absorbing medium in water heaters and heat collectors comprises: a dispersing medium selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol, mixture of propylene glycol with water, mixture of propylene glycol with water and glycerin, and mixture of glycerin with water, a dispersant selected from the group consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone, caramel, and mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone with caramel, and a powdered activated carbon as a black coloring material.

  7. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  8. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  9. 4 CFR 22.1 - Applicability of Rules [Rule 1].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... any contract entered into by a legislative branch agency. These rules shall apply to all appeals filed... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD § 22.1 Applicability of Rules . The Government Accountability...

  10. 4 CFR 22.1 - Applicability of Rules [Rule 1].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... any contract entered into by a legislative branch agency. These rules shall apply to all appeals filed... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD § 22.1 Applicability of Rules . The Government Accountability...

  11. 4 CFR 22.1 - Applicability of Rules [Rule 1].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... any contract entered into by a legislative branch agency. These rules shall apply to all appeals filed... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD § 22.1 Applicability of Rules . The Government Accountability...

  12. 4 CFR 22.1 - Applicability of Rules [Rule 1].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... any contract entered into by a legislative branch agency. These rules shall apply to all appeals filed... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD § 22.1 Applicability of Rules . The Government Accountability...

  13. 4 CFR 22.1 - Applicability of Rules [Rule 1].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... any contract entered into by a legislative branch agency. These rules shall apply to all appeals filed... GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE GENERAL PROCEDURES RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD § 22.1 Applicability of Rules . The Government Accountability...

  14. ``Robinson's sum rule'' revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, Yuri F.

    2010-02-01

    This discussion revisits two articles on synchrotron radiation damping published in 1958, one by this author and Evgeny K. Tarasov [Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 34, 651 (1958)ZETFA70044-4510; Sov. Phys. JETP 34, 449 (1958)SPHJAR0038-5646], and one by Kenneth W. Robinson [Phys. Rev. 111, 373 (1958)PHRVAO0031-899X10.1103/PhysRev.111.373]. The latter is the source of what is known as “Robinson’s sum rule.” Both present the familiar rule, but with very different proofs and calculations of concrete damping decrements. Comparative analysis of these differences reveals serious flaws in Robinson’s proof and calculations.

  15. Studies on the complexation of neodymium(III) ion with 1,2,4-1H-triazole and 1,2,3-benzotriazole in absence and presence of calcium(II) ion in aqueous and some selected different aquated organic solvents by an absorption spectroscopy involving 4f-4f transitions.

    PubMed

    Huidrom, Bimola; Ranjana Devi, N; Singh, Th David; Singh, N Rajmuhon

    2012-01-01

    The absorption spectra of trivalent neodymium ion with 1,2,4-1H-triazole and 1,2,3-benzotriazole in absence and presence of calcium(II) ion in aqueous and some selected different aquated organic solvents have been recorded in the visible and near infrared regions. From the data available in the absorption spectra, various spectroscopic parameters such as Slator-Condon (F(k)), Lande spin-orbit coupling constant (ξ(4f)), nephelauxetic ratio (β), bonding parameter (b(1/2)), percent covalency (δ), oscillator strength (P) and Judd-Ofelt intensity (T(λ)) parameters have been evaluated. The Judd-Ofelt intensity, T(λ) (λ=2, 4, 6) parameters are utilized in evaluating the P(cal) from various excited states of trivalent neodymium ions and ratifying as an inner sphere complexations.

  16. Sexual dichromatism in wing pigmentation of New World dragonflies follows Rensch's rule.

    PubMed

    Santos, E S A; Machado, G

    2016-07-01

    Many animal taxa that display sexual size dimorphism (SSD) exhibit a positive allometric relationship in which the degree of dimorphism increases with body size. This macroevolutionary pattern is known as Rensch's rule. Although sexual selection is hypothesized to be the main mechanism causing this pattern, body size is influenced by several selective forces, including natural and sexual selection. Therefore, by focusing exclusively on SSD one cannot ascertain which of these selective forces drives Rensch's rule. If sexual selection is indeed the main mechanism underlying Rensch's rule, we predict that other sexually selected traits, including coloration-based ornaments, will also exhibit interspecific allometric scaling consistent with Rensch's rule. We tested this prediction using wing pigmentation of 89 species of dragonflies. Studies show that male wing pigmentation is generally under strong intra- and intersexual selection, so that sexual dichromatism in this trait should follow Rensch's rule. Conversely, the available evidence suggests that male body size is usually not sexually selected in dragonflies, so we do not expect SSD to follow Rensch's rule. First, we found that sexual dichromatism in wing pigmentation was consistent with Rensch's rule. The phylogenetic major axis regression slope was significantly greater than one. We also showed that the allometric slope for SSD was not different from unity, providing no support for Rensch's rule. Our results provide the first evidence that a trait which appears to be under strong sexual selection exhibits a pattern consistent with Rensch's rule.

  17. Impact of soil properties on selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Kocarek, Martin; Klement, Ales; Fer, Miroslav; Golovko, Oksana; Grabic, Roman; Jaksik, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment has been recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals may contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Study was therefore focused on the evaluation of selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils, as one of the parameters, which are necessary to know when assessing contaminant transport in soils. The goals of this study were: (1) to select representative soils of the Czech Republic and to measure soil physical and chemical properties; (2) to measure adsorption isotherms of selected pharmaceuticals; (3) to evaluate impact of soil properties on pharmaceutical adsorptions and to propose pedotransfer rules for estimating adsorption coefficients from the measured soil properties. Batch sorption tests were performed for 6 selected pharmaceuticals (beta blockers Atenolol and Metoprolol, anticonvulsant Carbamazepin, and antibiotics Clarithromycin, Trimetoprim and Sulfamethoxazol) and 13 representative soils (soil samples from surface horizons of 11 different soil types and 2 substrates). The Freundlich equations were used to describe adsorption isotherms. The simple correlations between measured physical and chemical soil properties (soil particle density, soil texture, oxidable organic carbon content, CaCO3 content, pH_H2O, pH_KCl, exchangeable acidity, cation exchange capacity, hydrolytic acidity, basic cation saturation, sorption complex saturation, salinity), and the Freundlich adsorption coefficients were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Then multiple-linear regressions were applied to predict the Freundlich adsorption coefficients from measured soil properties. The largest adsorption was measured for Clarithromycin (average value of 227.1) and decreased as follows: Trimetoprim (22.5), Metoprolol (9.0), Atenolol (6.6), Carbamazepin (2.7), Sulfamethoxazol (1.9). Absorption coefficients for Atenolol and Metoprolol closely correlated (R=0.85), and both were also

  18. A search for intervening HI absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Sarah N.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Allison, James R.; Koribalski, Baerbel S.; Curran, Stephen J.

    2013-03-01

    HI absorption-line studies provide a unique probe of the gas distribution and kinematics in galaxies well beyond the local universe (z ≳ 0.3). HI absorption-line surveys with next-generation radio telescopes will provide the first large-scale studies of HI in a redshift regime which is poorly understood. However, we currently lack the understanding to infer galaxy properties from absorption-line observations alone. To address this issue, we are conducting a search for intervening HI absorption in a sample of 20 nearby galaxies. Our aim is to investigate how the detection rate varies with distance from the galaxy. We target sight-lines to bright continuum sources, which intercept known gas-rich galaxies, selected from the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (Koribalski et al. 2004). In our pilot sample, six galaxies with impact parameters < 20 kpc, we do not detect any absorption lines - although all are detected in 21cm emission. This indicates that an absorption non-detection cannot simply be interpreted as an absence of neutral gas - see Fig. 1. Our detection rate is low compared to previous surveys e.g. Gupta et al. (2010). This is, at least partially, due to the high resolution of the observations reducing the flux of the background source, which will also be an issue in future surveys, such as ASKAP-FLASH.

  19. 76 FR 46867 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Options Clearing Corporation; Notice of Filing of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-03

    ... this language is broad enough to authorize a private auction, i.e., an auction limited to selected... the Commissions Internet comment form ( http://www.sec.gov/rules/sro.shtml ) or Send an e-mail to rule... on the Commission's Internet Web site ( http://www.sec.gov/rules/sro.shtml ). Copies of...

  20. Modifications of Team Sports Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    In general, there are two reasons for modifying the rules in sport activities: (1) to meet a specific objective or (2) to solve a perceived problem. The sense of the original game is usually not altered significantly because the number of rule changes is kept to a minimum. Changes in rules may be made for administrative or financial reasons, or to…

  1. A Natural Selection Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashiro, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    Provides rules for a game which simulates selection pressures on a hominid group. Objectives include an appreciation of how selectivity works, an understanding of how abiotic factors are able to influence a population, and how interactions within the population can influence the group. (JM)

  2. Advances in QCD sum-rule calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Melikhov, Dmitri

    2016-01-22

    We review the recent progress in the applications of QCD sum rules to hadron properties with the emphasis on the following selected problems: (i) development of new algorithms for the extraction of ground-state parameters from two-point correlators; (ii) form factors at large momentum transfers from three-point vacuum correlation functions: (iii) properties of exotic tetraquark hadrons from correlation functions of four-quark currents.

  3. Equipment Readiness Code Rule System (ERCRULES)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    Teknowledge by the US Army. It is used as the instructional vehicle for training in expert systems by the Army Artificial Intelligence Training Cell ( AITC ...Fort Gordon, GA. As part of the rule development process (see Chapter 4), it was determined that the AITC would provide training to CAA and TRADOC...a base of technical support at the AITC for the operation of the system into the future. 3-4. DESCRIPTION OF SELECTED TOOL. The expert system tool

  4. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  5. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  6. Equations for Scoring Rules When Data Are Missing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A document presents equations for scoring rules in a diagnostic and/or prognostic artificial-intelligence software system of the rule-based inference-engine type. The equations define a set of metrics that characterize the evaluation of a rule when data required for the antecedence clause(s) of the rule are missing. The metrics include a primary measure denoted the rule completeness metric (RCM) plus a number of subsidiary measures that contribute to the RCM. The RCM is derived from an analysis of a rule with respect to its truth and a measure of the completeness of its input data. The derivation is such that the truth value of an antecedent is independent of the measure of its completeness. The RCM can be used to compare the degree of completeness of two or more rules with respect to a given set of data. Hence, the RCM can be used as a guide to choosing among rules during the rule-selection phase of operation of the artificial-intelligence system..

  7. Tuning sum rules with window functions for optical constant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis V.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.

    2016-07-01

    Sum rules are a useful tool to evaluate the global consistency of a set of optical constants. We present a procedure to spectrally tune sum rules to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants. It enables enhancing the weight of a desired spectral range within the sum-rule integral. The procedure consists in multiplying the complex refractive index with an adapted function, which is named window function. Window functions are constructed through integration of Lorentz oscillators. The asymptotic decay of these window functions enables the derivation of a multiplicity of sum rules akin to the inertial sum rule, along with one modified version of f-sum rule. This multiplicity of sum rules combined with the free selection of the photon energy range provides a double way to tune the spectral contribution within the sum rule. Window functions were applied to reported data of SrF2 and of Al films in order to check data consistency over the spectrum. The use of window functions shows that the optical constants of SrF2 are consistent in a broad spectrum. Regarding Al, some spectral ranges are seen to present a lower consistency, even though the standard sum rules with no window function did not detect inconsistencies. Hence window functions are expected to be a helpful tool to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants.

  8. Motor Demands Constrain Cognitive Rule Structures

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Anne Gabrielle Eva; Frank, Michael Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Study of human executive function focuses on our ability to represent cognitive rules independently of stimulus or response modality. However, recent findings suggest that executive functions cannot be modularized separately from perceptual and motor systems, and that they instead scaffold on top of motor action selection. Here we investigate whether patterns of motor demands influence how participants choose to implement abstract rule structures. In a learning task that requires integrating two stimulus dimensions for determining appropriate responses, subjects typically structure the problem hierarchically, using one dimension to cue the task-set and the other to cue the response given the task-set. However, the choice of which dimension to use at each level can be arbitrary. We hypothesized that the specific structure subjects adopt would be constrained by the motor patterns afforded within each rule. Across four independent data-sets, we show that subjects create rule structures that afford motor clustering, preferring structures in which adjacent motor actions are valid within each task-set. In a fifth data-set using instructed rules, this bias was strong enough to counteract the well-known task switch-cost when instructions were incongruent with motor clustering. Computational simulations confirm that observed biases can be explained by leveraging overlap in cortical motor representations to improve outcome prediction and hence infer the structure to be learned. These results highlight the importance of sensorimotor constraints in abstract rule formation and shed light on why humans have strong biases to invent structure even when it does not exist. PMID:26966909

  9. Service dogs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans.

  10. Rules for Optical Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Based on 30 years of optical testing experience, a lot of mistakes, a lot of learning and a lot of experience, I have defined seven guiding principles for optical testing - regardless of how small or how large the optical testing or metrology task: Fully Understand the Task, Develop an Error Budget, Continuous Metrology Coverage, Know where you are, Test like you fly, Independent Cross-Checks, Understand All Anomalies. These rules have been applied with great success to the inprocess optical testing and final specification compliance testing of the JWST mirrors.

  11. Energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study on the energy absorption characteristics of selected composite material systems are presented and the results compared with aluminum. Composite compression tube specimens were fabricated with both tape and woven fabric prepreg using graphite/epoxy (Gr/E), Kevlar (TM)/epoxy (K/E) and glass/epoxy (Gl/E). Chamfering and notching one end of the composite tube specimen reduced the peak load at initial failure without altering the sustained crushing load, and prevented catastrophic failure. Static compression and vertical impact tests were performed on 128 tubes. The results varied significantly as a function of material type and ply orientation. In general, the Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the Gl/E or K/E tubes for the same ply orientation. The 0/ + or - 15 Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the aluminum tubes. Gr/E and Gl/E tubes failed in a brittle mode and had negligible post crushing integrity, whereas the K/E tubes failed in an accordian buckling mode similar to the aluminum tubes. The energy absorption and post crushing integrity of hybrid composite tubes were not significantly better than that of the single material tubes.

  12. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  13. Mathematical model of zinc absorption: effects of dietary calcium, protein and iron on zinc absorption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Leland V; Krebs, Nancy F; Hambidge, K Michael

    2013-02-28

    A previously described mathematical model of Zn absorption as a function of total daily dietary Zn and phytate was fitted to data from studies in which dietary Ca, Fe and protein were also measured. An analysis of regression residuals indicated statistically significant positive relationships between the residuals and Ca, Fe and protein, suggesting that the presence of any of these dietary components enhances Zn absorption. Based on the hypotheses that (1) Ca and Fe both promote Zn absorption by binding with phytate and thereby making it unavailable for binding Zn and (2) protein enhances the availability of Zn for transporter binding, the model was modified to incorporate these effects. The new model of Zn absorption as a function of dietary Zn, phytate, Ca, Fe and protein was then fitted to the data. The proportion of variation in absorbed Zn explained by the new model was 0·88, an increase from 0·82 with the original model. A reduced version of the model without Fe produced an equally good fit to the data and an improved value for the model selection criterion, demonstrating that when dietary Ca and protein are controlled for, there is no evidence that dietary Fe influences Zn absorption. Regression residuals and testing with additional data supported the validity of the new model. It was concluded that dietary Ca and protein modestly enhanced Zn absorption and Fe had no statistically discernable effect. Furthermore, the model provides a meaningful foundation for efforts to model nutrient interactions in mineral absorption.

  14. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  15. Subwavelength single layer absorption resonance antireflection coatings.

    PubMed

    Huber, S P; van de Kruijs, R W E; Yakshin, A E; Zoethout, E; Boller, K-J; Bijkerk, F

    2014-01-13

    We present theoretically derived design rules for an absorbing resonance antireflection coating for the spectral range of 100 - 400 nm, applied here on top of a molybdenum-silicon multilayer mirror (Mo/Si MLM) as commonly used in extreme ultraviolet lithography. The design rules for optimal suppression are found to be strongly dependent on the thickness and optical constants of the coating. For wavelengths below λ ∼ 230 nm, absorbing thin films can be used to generate an additional phase shift and complement the propagational phase shift, enabling full suppression already with film thicknesses far below the quarter-wave limit. Above λ ∼ 230 nm, minimal absorption (k < 0.2) is necessary for low reflectance and the minimum required layer thickness increases with increasing wavelength slowly converging towards the quarter-wave limit.As a proof of principle, SixCyNz thin films were deposited that exhibit optical constants close to the design rules for suppression around 285 nm. The thin films were deposited by electron beam co-deposition of silicon and carbon, with N+ ion implantation during growth and analyzed with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterize the optical constants. We report a reduction of reflectance at λ = 285 nm, from 58% to 0.3% for a Mo/Si MLM coated with a 20 nm thin film of Si0.52C0.16N0.29.

  16. The Product and Quotient Rules Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleton, Roger; Kustov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical elegance is illustrated by strikingly parallel versions of the product and quotient rules of basic calculus, with some applications. Corresponding rules for second derivatives are given: the product rule is familiar, but the quotient rule is less so.

  17. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  18. A clinical case-based hypothesis: secretory IgA operates as an electronic transistor controlling the selection or rejection of molecules in the absorption process in the lumen of gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Zamm, Alfred V

    2013-01-01

    There is a clinical correlation between (1) an allergic patient’s ability to resist the development of symptoms that would have resulted from an allergenic challenge, (2) the magnitude of geomagnetism at a geographic site, and (3) the amount of solar energy falling on that site. It is suggested that the digestive membrane has an electronic gatekeeper that “decides” electronically which molecules to allow or not allow to pass on to the absorptive surface. The unique bipolar structure of secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), having a central secretory piece and the resultant unique electronic function of this polarized molecule, allows it to function as an electronic transistor, producing an electronic gatekeeper in the form of an electronic sieve. PMID:24068871

  19. A clinical case-based hypothesis: secretory IgA operates as an electronic transistor controlling the selection or rejection of molecules in the absorption process in the lumen of gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Alfred V

    2013-01-01

    There is a clinical correlation between (1) an allergic patient's ability to resist the development of symptoms that would have resulted from an allergenic challenge, (2) the magnitude of geomagnetism at a geographic site, and (3) the amount of solar energy falling on that site. It is suggested that the digestive membrane has an electronic gatekeeper that "decides" electronically which molecules to allow or not allow to pass on to the absorptive surface. The unique bipolar structure of secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), having a central secretory piece and the resultant unique electronic function of this polarized molecule, allows it to function as an electronic transistor, producing an electronic gatekeeper in the form of an electronic sieve.

  20. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis.

  1. Use of radiation sources with mercury isotopes for real-time highly sensitive and selective benzene determination in air and natural gas by differential absorption spectrometry with the direct Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Gita; Sholupov, Sergey; Ganeev, Alexander; Pogarev, Sergey; Ryzhov, Vladimir; Skudra, Atis

    2015-08-05

    A new analytical portable system is proposed for the direct determination of benzene vapor in the ambient air and natural gas, using differential absorption spectrometry with the direct Zeeman effect and innovative radiation sources: capillary mercury lamps with different isotopic compositions ((196)Hg, (198)Hg, (202)Hg, (204)Hg, and natural isotopic mixture). Resonance emission of mercury at a wavelength of 254 nm is used as probing radiation. The differential cross section of benzene absorption in dependence on wavelength is determined by scanning of magnetic field. It is found that the sensitivity of benzene detection is enhanced three times using lamp with the mercury isotope (204)Hg in comparison with lamp, filled with the natural isotopic mixture. It is experimentally demonstrated that, when benzene content is measured at the Occupational Exposure Limit (3.2 mg/m(3) for benzene) level, the interference from SO2, NO2, O3, H2S and toluene can be neglected if concentration of these gases does not exceed corresponding Occupational Exposure Limits. To exclude the mercury effect, filters that absorb mercury and let benzene pass in the gas duct are proposed. Basing on the results of our study, a portable spectrometer is designed with a multipath cell of 960 cm total path length and detection limit 0.5 mg/m(3) at 1 s averaging and 0.1 mg/m(3) at 30 s averaging. The applications of the designed spectrometer to measuring the benzene concentration in the atmospheric air from a moving vehicle and in natural gas are exemplified.

  2. Improved 20- to 32-GHz atmospheric absorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Pol, Sandra L.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Keihm, Stephen J.

    1998-09-01

    An improved model for the absorption of the atmosphere near the 22-GHz water vapor line is presented. The Van Vleck-Weisskopf line shape is used with a simple parameterized version of the model from Liebe et al. [1993] for the water vapor absorption spectra and a scaling of the model from Rosenkranz [1993] for the 20- to 32-GHz oxygen absorption. Radiometric brightness temperature measurements from two sites of contrasting climatological properties, San Diego, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, were used as ground truth for comparison with in situ radiosonde-derived brightness temperatures under clear-sky conditions. Estimation of the new model's four parameters, related to water vapor line strength, line width and continuum absorption, and far-wing oxygen absorption, was performed using the Newton-Raphson inversion method. Improvements to the water vapor line strength and line width parameters are found to be statistically significant. The accuracy of the new absorption model is estimated to be 3% between 20 and 24 GHz, degrading to 8% near 32 GHz. In addition, the Hill line shape asymmetry ratio was evaluated in several currently used models to show the agreement of the data with Van Vleck-Weisskopf based models and to rule out water vapor absorption models near 22 GHz given by Waters [1976] and Ulaby et al. [1981], which are based on the Gross line shape.

  3. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  4. Unanimity rule on networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambiotte, Renaud; Thurner, Stefan; Hanel, Rudolf

    2007-10-01

    We present a model for innovation, evolution, and opinion dynamics whose spreading is dictated by a unanimity rule. The underlying structure is a directed network, the state of a node is either activated or inactivated. An inactivated node will change only if all of its incoming links come from nodes that are activated, while an activated node will remain activated forever. It is shown that a transition takes place depending on the initial condition of the problem. In particular, a critical number of initially activated nodes is necessary for the whole system to get activated in the long-time limit. The influence of the degree distribution of the nodes is naturally taken into account. For simple network topologies we solve the model analytically; the cases of random and small world are studied in detail. Applications for food-chain dynamics and viral marketing are discussed.

  5. Experimental determination of terahertz atmospheric absorption parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.; Nixon, William E.

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum since many molecules exhibit a dense selection of rotational and vibrational transitions. Water is a major component of the atmosphere and since it has a large dipole moment the propagation of terahertz radiation will be dominated by atmospheric effects. This study will present the results of high-­-resolution broadband measurements of the terahertz atmospheric absorption and detail the technique for directly measuring the pressure broadening coefficients, absolute absorption coefficients, line positions, and continuum effects. Differences between these measured parameters and those tabulated in HITRAN will be discussed. Once the water vapor absorption was characterized, the same technique was used to measure the line parameters for methanol, a trace gas of interest within Earth's atmosphere. Methanol has a dense absorption spectrum in the terahertz frequency region and is an important molecule in fields such as environmental monitoring, security, and astrophysics. The data obtained in the present study will be of immediate use for the remote sensing community, as it is uncommon to measure this many independent parameters as well as to measure the absolute absorption of the transitions. Current models rely on tabulated databases of calculated values for the line parameters measured in this study. Differences between the measured data and those in the databases will be highlighted and discussed.

  6. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  7. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  8. a Research on Spatial Topological Association Rules Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Liu, S.; Zhang, P.; Sha, Z.

    2012-07-01

    Spatial association rules mining is a process of acquiring information and knowledge from large databases. Due to the nature of geographic space and the complexity of spatial objects and relations, the classical association rule mining methods are not suitable for the spatial association rule mining. Classical association rule mining treats all input data as independent, while spatial association rules often show high autocorrelation among nearby objects. The contiguous, adjacent and neighboring relations between spatial objects are important topological relations. In this paper a new approach based on topological predictions to discover spatial association rules is presented. First, we develop a fast method to get the topological relationship of spatial data with its algebraic structure. Then the interested spatial objects are selected. To find the interested spatial objects, topological relations combining with distance were used. In this step, the frequent topological predications are gained. Next, the attribute datasets of the selected interested spatial objects are mined with Apriori algorithm. Last, get the spatial topological association rules. The presented approach has been implemented and tested by the data of GDP per capita, railroads and roads in China in the year of 2005 at county level. The results of the experiments show that the approach is effective and valid.

  9. The biosphere rules.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Gregory C

    2008-02-01

    Sustainability, defined by natural scientists as the capacity of healthy ecosystems to function indefinitely, has become a clarion call for business. Leading companies have taken high-profile steps toward achieving it: Wal-Mart, for example, with its efforts to reduce packaging waste, and Nike, which has removed toxic chemicals from its shoes. But, says Unruh, the director of Thunderbird's Lincoln Center for Ethics in Global Management, sustainability is more than an endless journey of incremental steps. It is a destination, for which the biosphere of planet Earth--refined through billions of years of trial and error--is a perfect model. Unruh distills some lessons from the biosphere into three rules: Use a parsimonious palette. Managers can rethink their sourcing strategies and dramatically simplify the number and types of materials their companies use in production, making recycling cost-effective. After the furniture manufacturer Herman Miller discovered that its leading desk chair had 200 components made from more than 800 chemical compounds, it designed an award-winning successor whose far more limited materials palette is 96% recyclable. Cycle up, virtuously. Manufacturers should design recovery value into their products at the outset. Shaw Industries, for example, recycles the nylon fiber from its worn-out carpet into brand-new carpet tile. Exploit the power of platforms. Platform design in industry tends to occur at the component level--but the materials in those components constitute a more fundamental platform. Patagonia, by recycling Capilene brand performance underwear, has achieved energy costs 76% below those for virgin sourcing. Biosphere rules can teach companies how to build ecologically friendly products that both reduce manufacturing costs and prove highly attractive to consumers. And managers need not wait for a green technological revolution to implement them.

  10. The Aries Project for Rule-Based-Design Knowledge Acquisition,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-06-01

    because of the project’s association with the RAMS. The ram is the symbol of the astrological sign of Aries. 1-2 Design rules—those that every...knowledge acquisition technique for future rule capture projects for other design areas; and devise training material . The Participating Companies...in the process. It was determined that design rules would be categorized by Material , Analog, Digital, Global, and Part Selection, while design

  11. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  12. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  13. The Clean Air Interstate Rule

    SciTech Connect

    Debra Jezouit; Frank Rambo

    2005-07-01

    On May 12, 2005, EPA promulgated the Clean Air Interstate Rule, which overhauls and expands the scope of air emissions trading programs in the eastern United States. The rule imposes statewide caps on emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide to be introduced in two phases, beginning in 2009. This article briefly explains the background leading up to the rule and summarizes its key findings and requirements. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  15. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  16. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  17. A New Approach for Resolving Conflicts in Actionable Behavioral Rules

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Zeng, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is considered actionable if users can take direct actions based on such knowledge to their advantage. Among the most important and distinctive actionable knowledge are actionable behavioral rules that can directly and explicitly suggest specific actions to take to influence (restrain or encourage) the behavior in the users' best interest. However, in mining such rules, it often occurs that different rules may suggest the same actions with different expected utilities, which we call conflicting rules. To resolve the conflicts, a previous valid method was proposed. However, inconsistency of the measure for rule evaluating may hinder its performance. To overcome this problem, we develop a new method that utilizes rule ranking procedure as the basis for selecting the rule with the highest utility prediction accuracy. More specifically, we propose an integrative measure, which combines the measures of the support and antecedent length, to evaluate the utility prediction accuracies of conflicting rules. We also introduce a tunable weight parameter to allow the flexibility of integration. We conduct several experiments to test our proposed approach and evaluate the sensitivity of the weight parameter. Empirical results indicate that our approach outperforms those from previous research. PMID:25162054

  18. Simple learning rules to cope with changing environments.

    PubMed

    Gross, Roderich; Houston, Alasdair I; Collins, Edmund J; McNamara, John M; Dechaume-Moncharmont, François-Xavier; Franks, Nigel R

    2008-10-06

    We consider an agent that must choose repeatedly among several actions. Each action has a certain probability of giving the agent an energy reward, and costs may be associated with switching between actions. The agent does not know which action has the highest reward probability, and the probabilities change randomly over time. We study two learning rules that have been widely used to model decision-making processes in animals-one deterministic and the other stochastic. In particular, we examine the influence of the rules' 'learning rate' on the agent's energy gain. We compare the performance of each rule with the best performance attainable when the agent has either full knowledge or no knowledge of the environment. Over relatively short periods of time, both rules are successful in enabling agents to exploit their environment. Moreover, under a range of effective learning rates, both rules are equivalent, and can be expressed by a third rule that requires the agent to select the action for which the current run of unsuccessful trials is shortest. However, the performance of both rules is relatively poor over longer periods of time, and under most circumstances no better than the performance an agent could achieve without knowledge of the environment. We propose a simple extension to the original rules that enables agents to learn about and effectively exploit a changing environment for an unlimited period of time.

  19. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  20. Empirically derived injury prevention rules.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L; Schick, B

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a set of empirically derived safety rules that if followed, would have prevented the occurrence of minor injuries. Epidemiologists have criticized behavioral interventions as increasing "safe" behavior but failing to demonstrate a decrease in injury. The present study documents retrospectively the link between safe behavior and injury. It demonstrates that these empirically derived rules are very similar to rules for the prevention of serious injury. The study also shows that these rules are not widely accepted and implemented by parents. Suggestions for future research in this area are advanced. PMID:8307829

  1. Anticircumvention rules: threat to science.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, P

    2001-09-14

    Scientists who study encryption or computer security or otherwise reverse engineer technical measures, who make tools enabling them to do this work, and who report the results of their research face new risks of legal liability because of recently adopted rules prohibiting the circumvention of technical measures and manufacture or distribution of circumvention tools. Because all data in digital form can be technically protected, the impact of these rules goes far beyond encryption and computer security research. The scientific community must recognize the harms these rules pose and provide guidance about how to improve the anticircumvention rules.

  2. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-15

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  3. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  4. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  5. Challenges for Rule Systems on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuh-Jong; Yeh, Ching-Long; Laun, Wolfgang

    The RuleML Challenge started in 2007 with the objective of inspiring the issues of implementation for management, integration, interoperation and interchange of rules in an open distributed environment, such as the Web. Rules are usually classified as three types: deductive rules, normative rules, and reactive rules. The reactive rules are further classified as ECA rules and production rules. The study of combination rule and ontology is traced back to an earlier active rule system for relational and object-oriented (OO) databases. Recently, this issue has become one of the most important research problems in the Semantic Web. Once we consider a computer executable policy as a declarative set of rules and ontologies that guides the behavior of entities within a system, we have a flexible way to implement real world policies without rewriting the computer code, as we did before. Fortunately, we have de facto rule markup languages, such as RuleML or RIF to achieve the portability and interchange of rules for different rule systems. Otherwise, executing real-life rule-based applications on the Web is almost impossible. Several commercial or open source rule engines are available for the rule-based applications. However, we still need a standard rule language and benchmark for not only to compare the rule systems but also to measure the progress in the field. Finally, a number of real-life rule-based use cases will be investigated to demonstrate the applicability of current rule systems on the Web.

  6. [Contributions of the Council of Europe's Blood Transfusion Steering Committee to the determination of rules for the selection of donors of blood and blood components and the study of sexual behaviors having an impact on blood safety].

    PubMed

    Behr-Gross, M-E; Heiden, M; Norda, R

    2013-05-01

    In November 2009, the Council of Europe's Blood Transfusion Steering Committee created a group of experts to explore the problem of behaviors having an impact on the management of donors of blood and blood components and on blood transfusion safety in Europe. This ad hoc group sought a harmonised interpretation of temporary exclusion (or temporary deferral), as opposed to permanent exclusion (or permanent deferral), in the context of the selection of donors of blood and blood components. It was also given the mandate to assess, on the basis of available data, the possibility of differentiating "at risk" behaviours from behaviours "at high risk" of contamination by serious infectious diseases transmitted by blood, blood components or derived therapeutic products. The primary objective of this work was to ensure the safety of blood, blood components and derived therapeutic products for future recipients by promoting a risk analysis-based approach, given that some countries envisaged amending their provisions for donor selection. However, a risk analysis can only be performed on groups, not individuals, which may give the impression of a discriminatory approach, so it needed to be justified in the context of transfusion safety. A collaborative project, which included an investigation phase, led to the drafting of a technical memorandum that summarised the data collected in ten Council of Europe member states on the selection criteria for blood donors and the epidemiology of infectious diseases (with a focus on human immunodeficiency virus) in the general population and among blood donors. The technical memorandum was published in 2011 on the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and Healthcare website dedicated to this project. A draft resolution of the Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe was then developed by the Council of Europe's Blood Transfusion Steering Committee. This text was circulated among member and observer states of the Council

  7. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  8. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  9. The Clean Air Mercury Rule

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Rossler

    2005-07-01

    Coming into force on July 15, 2005, the US Clean Air Mercury Rule will use a market-based cap-and-trade approach under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act to reduce mercury emissions from the electric power sector. This article provides a comprehensive summary of the new rule. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  10. Drinking Water Arsenic Rule History

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA published the final arsenic rule on January 22, 2001. In response to the national debate surrounding the arsenic rule related to science and costs, the EPA announced on March 20, 2001 that the agency would reassess the science and cost issues.

  11. Art as a Singular Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avital, Doron

    2007-01-01

    This paper will examine an unresolved tension inherent in the question of art and argue for the idea of a singular rule as a natural resolution. In so doing, the structure of a singular rule will be fully outlined and its paradoxical constitution will be resolved. The tension I mention above unfolds both as a matter of history and as a product of…

  12. Key Principles of Superfund Remedy Selection

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance on the primary considerations of remedy selection which are universally applicable at Superfund sites. Key guidance here include: Rules of Thumb for Superfund Remedy Selection and Role of the Baseline Risk Assessment.

  13. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  14. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  15. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  16. Process stability assessed by selecting Shewhart's psi statistical analysis technique of the influence of matrix modifier and furnace program in the optimization and precision of zinc determinations by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Al-Tufail, M; Akram, M; Haq, A

    1999-03-01

    The method previously used in the Toxicology Laboratories of King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center for determining the zinc concentration in serum by Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer was improved by modifying the matrix modifier and by changing the heated graphite furnace atomization (HGA) program. After trying several methods we failed to achieve the required precision and the accuracy of methods for serum zinc determination. We changed the matrix modifier to a fifty percent mixture (v/v) of 3.90 grams per liter of ammonium phosphate in Type 1 water with 0.2% nitric acid and 1.0 gram per liter of magnesium nitrate in acidic water (0.2% HNO3) with 0.1% triton X-100 was used as matrix modifier. A twenty-five fold dilution of the sample in matrix modifier was injected on the L'vov's platform of the furnace. In order to reduce the high sensitivity of Zn the furnace program was modified. The method is found very robust. The average reproducibility between inter-runs and intra-run is less than 1.59% with a high degree of accuracy. We used two levels of controls i.e. normal or low level and abnormal or high level. The linearity and the detection limit of the assay were 0.9992 and 0.010 micromol/L respectively. Average recovery of the analyte was 98.65%. The X-Bar and R charts were constructed by using Shewhart's statistical analysis technique to assess the test methodology. It was found that the assay is capable and stable for routine clinical and research analysis. The capability index (C(P)) of the assay, an indicator of the precision, was calculated.

  17. Efficient Pruning of Class Association Rules Using Statistics and Genetic Relation Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Eloy; Mabu, Shingo; Taboada, Karla; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    Association rule mining is one of the most exploited areas in data mining, which includes applications from business to data classification and summarization. Thus, several association rule-based classification methods have been proposed. Most of them often produce too many rules for humans to read over, that is, the generated rules are usually complex and hardly understandable for the users. Only some of the rules extracted are of real interest. Most of the rules are either redundant, irrelevant, or obvious. In this paper, a new post-processing method for pruning class association rules is proposed by a combination of statistics and an evolutionary method named Genetic Relation Algorithm (GRA). The algorithm is carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the rules are pruned depending on their matching degree with data, and in the second phase, GRA selects the most interesting rules using the distance between them. The two-phase method has the following properties: 1) efficient since it reduces dramatically the pruning processing time. 2) reliable because a small rule set is produced which is accurate (it keeps at least the same prediction accuracy as the original large rule set), comprehensible (it is more understandable for the users since the number of attributes involved in the rule is also small) and interesting because of the diversity of rules. The advantages of the proposed method is demonstrated using several real datasets and it is compared with other conventional methods including GNP-based mining in terms of prediction accuracy and time consumption.

  18. Energy absorption of refractory absorber with periodic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yuchen; Yang, Shuhan; Wang, Yanhong; Wu, Jingzhi

    2016-10-01

    Refractory material with surface plasmonic structures have the function of spectrum selective absorption and radiation spectrum regulation. In this paper, we design an absorber with periodic cylindrical nanostructures and a dielectric layer of Al2O3 based on the substrate of metal Tantalum (Ta). The energy absorption characteristics of the absorber have been simulated and analyzed by changing various constructional parameters. The simulation results indicate that structural parameters have great influence on the spectrum absorption in the range of wavelength 400-4000nm. The period and radius of nanostructure have a important effect on the absorption peaks in the infrared region. Infrared absorption peak can reach more than 99% and produce a red shift due to parameters changing. At the whole visible field, the absorption enhancement effect is significant. The refractive index and thickness of dielectric layer also have an obviously effect on the absorption spectrum. Furthermore, it is also obviously that thickness of dielectric layer has enhancement effect on absorption of infrared spectrum. The research found that the absorption and radiation spectrum of surface plasmonic materials can be effectively controlled by combining the high temperature radiation characteristics of high temperature metal. Thermophotovoltaic system can provide a kind of new methods and ideas for improving conversion efficiency, energy saving and consumption reducing.

  19. Tunable absorption in heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metallic film and Fibonacci fractal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Jie; Du, Gui-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the anomalous optical properties of heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metal film and a truncated Fibonacci fractal photonic crystal. It is found that one or multiple highly reflected peaks, even enhanced transmission narrowband, can be realized in the near-complete absorption broadband, where the photonic crystals are selected with various Fibonacci sequences or a given sequence as the basic unit. These properties are significant to design important reflection or transmission optical devices in the visible and near-infrared ranges.

  20. Highly Sensitive and Selective Uranium Detection in Natural Water Systems Using a Luminescent Mesoporous Metal-Organic Framework Equipped with Abundant Lewis Basic Sites: A Combined Batch, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and First Principles Simulation Investigation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Dai, Xing; Bai, Zhuanling; Wang, Yanlong; Yang, Zaixing; Zhang, Linjuan; Xu, Lin; Chen, Lanhua; Li, Yuxiang; Gui, Daxiang; Diwu, Juan; Wang, Jianqiang; Zhou, Ruhong; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2017-04-04

    Uranium is not only a strategic resource for the nuclear industry but also a global contaminant with high toxicity. Although several strategies have been established for detecting uranyl ions in water, searching for new uranium sensor material with great sensitivity, selectivity, and stability remains a challenge. We introduce here a hydrolytically stable mesoporous terbium(III)-based MOF material compound 1, whose channels are as large as 27 Å × 23 Å and are equipped with abundant exposed Lewis basic sites, the luminescence intensity of which can be efficiently and selectively quenched by uranyl ions. The detection limit in deionized water reaches 0.9 μg/L, far below the maximum contamination standard of 30 μg/L in drinking water defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, making compound 1 currently the only MOF material that can achieve this goal. More importantly, this material exhibits great capability in detecting uranyl ions in natural water systems such as lake water and seawater with pH being adjusted to 4, where huge excesses of competing ions are present. The uranyl detection limits in Dushu Lake water and in seawater were calculated to be 14.0 and 3.5 μg/L, respectively. This great detection capability originates from the selective binding of uranyl ions onto the Lewis basic sites of the MOF material, as demonstrated by synchrotron radiation extended X-ray adsorption fine structure, X-ray adsorption near edge structure, and first principles calculations, further leading to an effective energy transfer between the uranyl ions and the MOF skeleton.

  1. Unifying iteration rule for fractal objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittel, A.; Parisi, J.; Peinke, J.; Baier, G.; Klein, M.; Rössler, O. E.

    1997-03-01

    We introduce an iteration rule for real numbers capable to generate attractors with dragon-, snowflake-, sponge-, or Swiss-flag-like cross sections. The idea behind it is the mapping of a torus into two (or more) shrunken and twisted tori located inside the previous one. Three distinct parameters define the symmetry, the dimension, and the connectedness or disconnectedness of the fractal object. For some selected triples of parameter values, a couple of well known fractal geometries (e.g. the Cantor set, the Sierpinski gasket, or the Swiss flag) can be gained as special cases.

  2. PG 1411 + 442 - The nearest broad absorption line quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malkan, Matthew A.; Green, Richard F.; Hutchings, John B.

    1987-01-01

    IUE observations reveal strong, moderately broad absorption troughs in the blue wings of the C IV and N V emission lines of the quasar PG 1411 + 442. No absorption from weakly ionized gas is detected. The emission-line strengths and overall shape of the ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared/far-infrared continuum of the new broad absorption line quasar are within the range normally measured in quasars. Its redshift is low enough to allow the morphology of the host galaxy to be studied in deep broad-band and intermediate-band CCD images. The galaxy appears to be a large spiral with a very long arm or tail. The inclination angle is 57 deg, which rules out the possibility that the line of sight to the nucleus intersects a large path length in a galactic disk.

  3. English Stress Rules and Native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptista, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study that compares Chomsky and Halle's main stress rule with Guierre's stress rules to discover which rules lead to the same word stress replacement that native speakers would give to totally unfamiliar words. Only five of Chomsky and Halle's rules were as consistently followed as Guierre's suffix rules. (SED)which+that

  4. 77 FR 22200 - Rescission of Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ...-Advertising (``MAP-Ad'') Rule and the Mortgage Assistance Relief Services (``MARS'') Rule. \\20\\ Omnibus... Commission is rescinding its MAP-Ad and MARS rules. The CFPB republished these rules on an interim final... The MARS Rule addresses the practices of entities (other than mortgage servicers) who offer...

  5. The N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tasaki, Takafumi; Sriram, Shashikanth M.; Park, Kyong Soo; Kwon, Yong Tae

    2013-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a proteolytic system in which N-terminal residues of short-lived proteins are recognized by recognition components (N-recognins) as essential components of degrons, called N-degrons. Known N-recognins in eukaryotes mediate protein ubiquitylation and selective proteolysis by the 26S proteasome. Substrates of N-recognins can be generated when normally embedded destabilizing residues are exposed at the N terminus by proteolytic cleavage. N-degrons can also be generated through modifications of posttranslationally exposed pro-N-degrons of otherwise stable proteins; such modifications include oxidation, arginylation, leucylation, phenylalanylation, and acetylation. Although there are variations in components, degrons, and hierarchical structures, the proteolytic systems based on generation and recognition of N-degrons have been observed in all eukaryotes and prokaryotes examined thus far. The N-end rule pathway regulates homeostasis of various physiological processes, in part, through interaction with small molecules. Here, we review the biochemical mechanisms, structures, physiological functions, and small-molecule-mediated regulation of the N-end rule pathway. PMID:22524314

  6. Revisions to direct fee payment rules. Final rules.

    PubMed

    2015-01-06

    We are adopting, with two revisions, our interim final rules that implemented amendments to the Social Security Act (Act) made by the Social Security Disability Applicants' Access to Professional Representation Act of 2010 (PRA). The interim final rules made permanent the direct fee payment rules for eligible non-attorney representatives under titles II and XVI of the Act and for attorney representatives under title XVI of the Act. They also revised some of our eligibility policies for non-attorney representatives under titles II and XVI of the Act. Based on public comment and subsequent inquiries, we are revising our rules to clarify that an eligible non-attorney representative's liability insurance policy must include malpractice coverage. We are also reaffirming that a business entity legally permitted to provide the required insurance in the States in which the non-attorney representative conducts business must underwrite the policies.

  7. Universal waste rule: Final rule issued. Environmental Guidance Regulatory Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-14

    On February 11, 1993, EPA proposed to streamline the management requirements for certain hazardous wastes that were generated in large quantities by a variety of generators (i.e., residential, small businesses, industries, etc.). EPA`s intention was to facilitate the environmentally sound collection and disposal of these types of wastes. In this proposed rule, EPA termed these types of hazardous wastes ``universal wastes`` and developed a management system which was less stringent than the existing Subtitle C regulations. EPA proposed that the following three types of hazardous wastes be managed as universal wastes: batteries, certain pesticides, and thermostats. Because EPA believed that the authority to propose the promulgation of the universal waste rule was not significantly linked to HSWA provisions, the Agency proposed the promulgation of the universal waste rule under pre-HSWA authority. On May 11, 1995, at FR 25492, EPA promulgated a pre-HSWA rule that streamlined hazardous waste management regulations for universal wastes.

  8. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  9. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  10. Rules of Emissivity Sample Choice in Multi-wavelength Pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, M.; Sun, B.; Sun, X.; Xie, J.; Yu, C.

    2017-03-01

    Since the theory for emissivity sample (example) is not clear, there exists unavoidable blindness in the sample choice for the true temperature determination (create emissivity samples using an assumption to calculate the true temperature according to brightness temperature and wavelength) in multi-wavelength pyrometry, resulting in considerable computational complexity and slow computing speed. In this article, the rules of the emissivity sample were first discovered through the theoretical analysis of the relationship between brightness temperature and emissivity, which provide a theoretical basis for the emissivity sample choice. Furthermore, the rules can reduce the sample size (amount) and improve the calculation speed. The effectiveness of the proposed rules was verified by measuring the true temperature of a solid rocket engine plume, in which the rules were applied to effectively select emissivity samples. The experimental results demonstrate that the computing speed of the true temperature determination can be improved by 5.73% to 48.64%.

  11. Viscosity mixing rules for binary systems containing one ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammed; Altamash, Tausif; Salavera, Daniel; Coronas, Alberto; Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, Jose N

    2013-06-24

    In this work the applicability of four of the most commonly used viscosity mixing rules to [ionic liquid (IL)+molecular solvent (MS)] systems is assessed. More than one hundred (IL+MS) binary mixtures were selected from the literature to test the viscosity mixing rules proposed by 1) Hind (Hi), 2) Grunberg and Nissan (G-N), 3) Herric (He) and 4) Katti and Chaudhri (K-C). The analyses were performed by estimating the average (absolute or relative) deviations, AADs and ARDs, between the available experimental data and the predicted ideal mixture viscosity values obtained by means of each rule. The interaction terms corresponding to the adjustable parameters inherent to each rule were also calculated and their trends discussed.

  12. Emerging rules for inducing organ regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yannas, Ioannis V

    2013-01-01

    We review the available evidence for regeneration of adult organs of very diverse nature and examine the applicability of simple rules that can be used to summarize these treatments. In the field of regenerative medicine no widely accepted paradigm is currently available that can guide formulation of new theories on the mechanism of regeneration in adults and open new directions for improved regeneration outcomes. The four rules have emerged from multiyear quantitative studies with skin and peripheral nerve regeneration using scaffold libraries based on a simple, well-defined collagen scaffold. These largely quantitative rules distinguish sharply between spontaneously regenerative and nonregenerative tissues, select the two reactants that are required for regeneration, recognize the essential modification of the wound healing process that must be realized prior to regeneration, and identify three structural features of scaffolds that are required for regenerative activity. The combined evidence points at certain requirements for the structure of a collagen scaffold with regenerative activity. An active scaffold emerges as a temporarily insoluble collagen surface, equipped with sufficient ligands for integrins of contractile cells, that inhibits wound contraction while also serving as a topographic template for new stroma synthesis. The four rules, based on studies with just two organs (skin and peripheral nerves), are now viewed in the context of ongoing studies using scaffolds based on decellularized matrices, which are mostly based on collagen. Decellularized matrices have been used during the past few years to regenerate, in whole or in part, the urethra, the abdominal wall, the Achilles tendon, the bladder, the trachea and other organs in several animal models and occasionally in humans. Although these acellular matrices are distinctly different from simple collagen scaffolds, and the methods used by the investigators are still evolving, the results obtained

  13. Carbon dioxide adsorption on a ZnO(101[combining macron]0) substrate studied by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, Maria; Weidler, Peter G; Bebensee, Fabian; Nefedov, Alexei; Wöll, Christof

    2014-01-28

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide on the mixed-terminated ZnO(101[combining macron]0) surface of a bulk single crystal was studied by UHV Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS). In contrast to metals, the classic surface selection rule for IRRAS does not apply to bulk oxide crystals, and hence vibrational bands can also be observed for s-polarized light. Although this fact substantially complicates data interpretation, a careful analysis allows for a direct determination of the adsorbate geometry. Here, we demonstrate the huge potential of IR-spectroscopy for investigations on oxide single crystal surfaces by considering all three components of the incident polarized light separately. We find that the tridentate (surface) carbonate is aligned along the [0001] direction. A comparison to data reported previously for CO2 adsorbed on the surfaces of ZnO nanoparticles provides important insight into the role of defects in the surface chemistry of powder particles.

  14. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  15. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  16. Two absorption furosemide prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Suescun, L; Pardo, H; Manta, E; Prandi, C

    1999-03-15

    The structures of two absorption furosemide prodrugs, hexanoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoyl-anthranilate (C19H23CIN2O7S), (I), and benzoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilate (C20H17CIN2O7S), (II), are described in this paper and compared with furosemide and four other prodrugs. The molecular conformations of both compounds are similar to those of the other prodrugs; the packing and the crystal system are the primary differences. Compound (I) crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 and compound (II) in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The packing of both structures is stabilized by a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network.

  17. 2-Ethylhexanol; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), requiring manufacturers and processors of 2-ethylhexanol (EH: CAS No. 104-76-7) to conduct a 2-year oncogenicity bioassay.

  18. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requiring manufacturers and processors of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT, CAS No. 149—30-4) to perform testing.

  19. Toxic Substances; Biphenyl; Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This rule promulgates EPA’s decision to require manufacturers and processors to test biphenyl (CAS No: 92—52—4) for environmental effects and chemical fate under section 4(a) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  20. Proposed Rule (April 18, 2016)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Proposed Rule - Protection of Stratospheric Ozone: New Listings of Substitutes; Changes of Listing Status; Reinterpretation of Unacceptability for Closed Cell Foam Products under the Significant New Alternatives Policy Program; and Revision of Clean Air Ac

  1. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  2. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  3. Simulation of large-scale rule-based models

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek, William S; Monnie, Michael I; Colvin, Joshua; Faseder, James

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of molecules, such as signaling proteins, with multiple binding sites and/or multiple sites of post-translational covalent modification can be modeled using reaction rules. Rules comprehensively, but implicitly, define the individual chemical species and reactions that molecular interactions can potentially generate. Although rules can be automatically processed to define a biochemical reaction network, the network implied by a set of rules is often too large to generate completely or to simulate using conventional procedures. To address this problem, we present DYNSTOC, a general-purpose tool for simulating rule-based models. DYNSTOC implements a null-event algorithm for simulating chemical reactions in a homogenous reaction compartment. The simulation method does not require that a reaction network be specified explicitly in advance, but rather takes advantage of the availability of the reaction rules in a rule-based specification of a network to determine if a randomly selected set of molecular components participates in a reaction during a time step. DYNSTOC reads reaction rules written in the BioNetGen language which is useful for modeling protein-protein interactions involved in signal transduction. The method of DYNSTOC is closely related to that of STOCHSIM. DYNSTOC differs from STOCHSIM by allowing for model specification in terms of BNGL, which extends the range of protein complexes that can be considered in a model. DYNSTOC enables the simulation of rule-based models that cannot be simulated by conventional methods. We demonstrate the ability of DYNSTOC to simulate models accounting for multisite phosphorylation and multivalent binding processes that are characterized by large numbers of reactions. DYNSTOC is free for non-commercial use. The C source code, supporting documentation and example input files are available at .

  4. The N-end rule pathway and regulation by proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Varshavsky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the regulation of the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. Degradation signals (degrons) that are targeted by the N-end rule pathway include a set called N-degrons. The main determinant of an N-degron is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein. In eukaryotes, the N-end rule pathway is a part of the ubiquitin system and consists of two branches, the Ac/N-end rule and the Arg/N-end rule pathways. The Ac/N-end rule pathway targets proteins containing Nα-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) residues. The Arg/N-end rule pathway recognizes unacetylated N-terminal residues and involves N-terminal arginylation. Together, these branches target for degradation a majority of cellular proteins. For example, more than 80% of human proteins are cotranslationally Nt-acetylated. Thus, most proteins harbor a specific degradation signal, termed AcN-degron, from the moment of their birth. Specific N-end rule pathways are also present in prokaryotes and in mitochondria. Enzymes that produce N-degrons include methionine-aminopeptidases, caspases, calpains, Nt-acetylases, Nt-amidases, arginyl-transferases, and leucyl-transferases. Regulated degradation of specific proteins by the N-end rule pathway mediates a legion of physiological functions, including the sensing of heme, oxygen, and nitric oxide; selective elimination of misfolded proteins; the regulation of DNA repair, segregation, and condensation; the signaling by G proteins; the regulation of peptide import, fat metabolism, viral and bacterial infections, apoptosis, meiosis, spermatogenesis, neurogenesis, and cardiovascular development; and the functioning of adult organs, including the pancreas and the brain. Discovered 25 years ago, this pathway continues to be a fount of biological insights. PMID:21633985

  5. Rule-Based Runtime Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2003-01-01

    We present a rule-based framework for defining and implementing finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time logics, interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. Our logic, EAGLE, is implemented as a Java library and involves novel techniques for rule definition, manipulation and execution. Monitoring is done on a state-by-state basis, without storing the execution trace.

  6. 76 FR 30551 - Commission's Ex Parte Rules and Other Procedural Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 1 Commission's Ex Parte Rules and Other Procedural Rules AGENCY: Federal... Order, Amendment of the Commission's Ex Parte Rules and Other Procedural Rules. DATES: The amendments to... rules and other procedural rules contained in information collection OMB Control No: 3060-0430,...

  7. 47 CFR 95.402 - (CB Rule 2) How do I use these rules?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 2) How do I use these rules? 95.402... SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Citizens Band (CB) Radio Service General Provisions § 95.402 (CB Rule 2) How do I use these rules? (a) You must comply with these rules (See CB Rule 21 § 95.421, for...

  8. Efficient Sub-Bandgap Light Absorption and Signal Amplification in Silicon Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Hsin

    This thesis focuses on two areas in silicon photodetectors, the first being enhancing the sub-bandgap light absorption of IR wavelenghts in silicon, and the second being intrinsic signal amplification in silicon photodetectors. Both of these are achieved using heavily doped p-n junction devices which create localized states that relax the k-selection rule of indirect bandgap material. The probability of transitions between impurity band and the conduction/valence band would be much more efficient than the one between band-to-band transition. The waveguide-coupled epitaxial p-n photodetector was demonstrated for 1310 nm wavelength detection. Incorporated with the Franz-Keldysh effect and the quasi-confined epitaxial layer design, an absorption coefficient around 10 cm-1 has been measured and internal quantum efficiency nearly 100% at -2.5V. The absorption coefficient is calculated from the wave function of the electron and hole in p-n diode. The heavily doped impurity wave function can be formulated as a delta function, and the quasi-confined conduction band energy states, and the wave function on each level can be obtained from the Silvaco software. The calculated theoretical absorption coefficient increases with the increasing applied bias and the doping concentration, which matches the experimental results. To solve the issues of large excess noise and high operation bias for avalanche photodiodes based on impact ionization, I presented a detector using the Cycling Excitation Process (CEP) for signal amplification. This can be realized in a heavily doped and highly compensated Si p-n junction, showing ultra high gain about 3000 at very low bias (<4 V), and possessing an intrinsic, phonon-mediated regulation process to keep the device stable without any quenching device required in today's Geiger-mode avalanche detectors. The CEP can be formulated with the rate equations in conduction bands and impurity states. The gain expression, which is a function of the

  9. Rules of Attraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image composite shows two of the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's magnets, the 'capture' magnet (upper portion of left panel) and the 'filter' magnet (lower portion of left panel). Scientists use these tools to study the origins of martian dust in the atmosphere. The left panel was taken by the rover's panoramic camera. The four panels to the right, taken by the microscopic imager, show close-up views of the two magnets. The bull's-eye appearance of the capture magnet is a result of alternating magnetic fields, which are used to increase overall magnetic force. The filter magnet lacks these alternating fields and consequently produces a weaker magnetic force. This weaker force selectively attracts only strong magnetic particles.

    Scientists were surprised by the large dark particles on the magnets because airborne particles are smaller in size. They theorize that these spots might be aggregates of small particles that clump together in a magnetic field.

  10. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  11. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  12. Vitamin A a absorption - nutritional aspects.

    PubMed

    Berger, S

    1975-01-01

    A brief review of the present knowledge of vitamin A (both performed and precursor forms) absorption is outlined with special emphasis on the dietary factors involved in this process. Some details are discussed related to the techniques used for measurement of vitamin A absorption from different sources and under different experimental conditions. Suggestions are also made to standardize appropriate procedure in this respect; this might enable comparisons and wide use of respective results obtained in various laboratories. Nutritional significance, including advantages or disadvantages of the liver test in these studies, is specifically highlighted with special reference to the determination of vitamin A bio-potency in various products. Some selected results and experience in this field are briefly presented.

  13. An Optimal Class Association Rule Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean Claude, Turiho; Sheng, Yang; Chuang, Li; Kaia, Xie

    Classification and association rule mining algorithms are two important aspects of data mining. Class association rule mining algorithm is a promising approach for it involves the use of association rule mining algorithm to discover classification rules. This paper introduces an optimal class association rule mining algorithm known as OCARA. It uses optimal association rule mining algorithm and the rule set is sorted by priority of rules resulting into a more accurate classifier. It outperforms the C4.5, CBA, RMR on UCI eight data sets, which is proved by experimental results.

  14. Occupied and unoccupied orbitals of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} probed with C 1s emission and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the orbital structure of the fullerenes, and to pursue its evolution from a cluster to the infinite solid. For obtaining a complete picture of the electronic structure the authors compare a variety of experimental techniques, i.e. photoemission and core level emission for occupied orbitals and inverse photoemission and core level absorption for unoccupied orbitals. Their experimental results focus on optical probes involving the C 1s core level, i.e. absorption via transitions from the C 1s level into unoccupied {pi}* and {sigma}* orbitals and emission involving transitions from occupied orbitals into a C 1s hole. Due to the simplicity of the C 1s level there exist clear selection rules. For example, only transitions to and from orbitals with p-character are dipole-allowed. These results on the p-projected density of states are compared with inverse photoemission and photoemission results, where the selection rules are less definitive. In addition, a first-principles quasiparticle calculation of the density of states is used to assign the orbital features. The spectra from C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} are still far from their infinite analog, i.e., graphite, which is also measured with the same techniques. In order to determine the effect of electron transfer onto C{sub 60}, as in superconducting alkali fullerides, the authors are studying resonant emission of C{sub 60}. An electron is placed in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) by optical absorption from the C 1s level and the C 1s emission detected in the presence of this spectator electron.

  15. Academic Debate Paradigms: An Examination from a Rules Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Kenneth G.

    Debate paradigms, which at one time established standards to help judges evaluate arguments and rules to guide debaters' argument choice and strategy selection, no longer offer consistent guidance for either judges or debaters. An increased emphasis on creativity and flexibility has led to a general unwillingness to use a rigid debate format. The…

  16. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  17. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  18. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  19. Gloger's rule in plants: The species and ecosystem levels

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Gloger's rule posits that darker birds are found more often in humid environments than in arid ones, especially in the tropics. Accordingly, desert-inhabiting animals tend to be light-colored. This rule is also true for certain mammalian groups, including humans. Gloger's rule is manifested at 2 levels: (1) at the species level (different populations of the same species have different pigmentation at different latitudes), and (2) at the species assembly level (different taxa at a certain geography have different pigmentation than other taxa found at different habitats or latitudes). Concerning plants, Gloger's rule was first proposed to operate in many plant species growing in sand dunes, sandy shores and in deserts, because of being white, whitish, or silver colored, based on white trichomes, because of sand grains and clay particles glued to sticky glandular trichomes, or because of light-colored waxes. Recently, Gloger's rule was shown to also be true at the intraspecific level in relation to protection of anthers from UV irradiation. While Gloger's rule is true in certain plant taxa and ecologies, there are others where “anti-Gloger” coloration patterns exist. In some of these the selective agents are known and in others they are not. I present both Gloger and “anti-Gloger” cases and argue that this largely neglected aspect of plant biology deserves much more research attention. PMID:26786012

  20. Gloger's rule in plants: The species and ecosystem levels.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Gloger's rule posits that darker birds are found more often in humid environments than in arid ones, especially in the tropics. Accordingly, desert-inhabiting animals tend to be light-colored. This rule is also true for certain mammalian groups, including humans. Gloger's rule is manifested at 2 levels: (1) at the species level (different populations of the same species have different pigmentation at different latitudes), and (2) at the species assembly level (different taxa at a certain geography have different pigmentation than other taxa found at different habitats or latitudes). Concerning plants, Gloger's rule was first proposed to operate in many plant species growing in sand dunes, sandy shores and in deserts, because of being white, whitish, or silver colored, based on white trichomes, because of sand grains and clay particles glued to sticky glandular trichomes, or because of light-colored waxes. Recently, Gloger's rule was shown to also be true at the intraspecific level in relation to protection of anthers from UV irradiation. While Gloger's rule is true in certain plant taxa and ecologies, there are others where "anti-Gloger" coloration patterns exist. In some of these the selective agents are known and in others they are not. I present both Gloger and "anti-Gloger" cases and argue that this largely neglected aspect of plant biology deserves much more research attention.

  1. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  2. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  3. Hamilton's rule and the causes of social evolution.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Andrew F G

    2014-05-19

    Hamilton's rule is a central theorem of inclusive fitness (kin selection) theory and predicts that social behaviour evolves under specific combinations of relatedness, benefit and cost. This review provides evidence for Hamilton's rule by presenting novel syntheses of results from two kinds of study in diverse taxa, including cooperatively breeding birds and mammals and eusocial insects. These are, first, studies that empirically parametrize Hamilton's rule in natural populations and, second, comparative phylogenetic analyses of the genetic, life-history and ecological correlates of sociality. Studies parametrizing Hamilton's rule are not rare and demonstrate quantitatively that (i) altruism (net loss of direct fitness) occurs even when sociality is facultative, (ii) in most cases, altruism is under positive selection via indirect fitness benefits that exceed direct fitness costs and (iii) social behaviour commonly generates indirect benefits by enhancing the productivity or survivorship of kin. Comparative phylogenetic analyses show that cooperative breeding and eusociality are promoted by (i) high relatedness and monogamy and, potentially, by (ii) life-history factors facilitating family structure and high benefits of helping and (iii) ecological factors generating low costs of social behaviour. Overall, the focal studies strongly confirm the predictions of Hamilton's rule regarding conditions for social evolution and their causes.

  4. Rule-based simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieten, Joseph L.; Seraphine, Kathleen M.

    1991-01-01

    Procedural modeling systems, rule based modeling systems, and a method for converting a procedural model to a rule based model are described. Simulation models are used to represent real time engineering systems. A real time system can be represented by a set of equations or functions connected so that they perform in the same manner as the actual system. Most modeling system languages are based on FORTRAN or some other procedural language. Therefore, they must be enhanced with a reaction capability. Rule based systems are reactive by definition. Once the engineering system has been decomposed into a set of calculations using only basic algebraic unary operations, a knowledge network of calculations and functions can be constructed. The knowledge network required by a rule based system can be generated by a knowledge acquisition tool or a source level compiler. The compiler would take an existing model source file, a syntax template, and a symbol table and generate the knowledge network. Thus, existing procedural models can be translated and executed by a rule based system. Neural models can be provide the high capacity data manipulation required by the most complex real time models.

  5. Electronic selection rules controlling dislocation glide in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Jones, Travis E; Eberhart, Mark E; Clougherty, Dennis P; Woodward, Chris

    2008-08-22

    The validity of the structure-property relationships governing the low-temperature deformation behavior of many bcc metals was brought into question with recent ab initio density functional studies of isolated screw dislocations in Mo and Ta. These relationships were semiclassical in nature, having grown from atomistic investigations of the deformation properties of the group V and VI transition metals. We find that the correct form for these structure-property relationships is fully quantum mechanical, involving the coupling of electronic states with the strain field at the core of long a/<2111> screw dislocations.

  6. Edge-dependent selection rules in magic triangular graphene flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akola, J.; Heiskanen, H. P.; Manninen, M.

    2008-05-01

    The electronic shell and supershell structure of triangular graphene quantum dots has been studied using density functional and tight-binding methods. The density functional calculations demonstrate that the electronic structure close to the Fermi energy is correctly described with a simple tight-binding model, where only the pz orbitals perpendicular to the graphene layer are included. The results show that (i) both at the bottom and at the top of the pz band, a supershell structure similar to that of free electrons confined in a triangular cavity is seen, (ii) close to the Fermi level, the shell structure is that of free massless particles, (iii) triangles with armchair edges show an additional sequence of levels (“ghost states”) absent for triangles with zigzag edges while the latter exhibit edge states, and (iv) the observed shell structure is rather insensitive to the edge roughness.

  7. Higher Order Rule Characterization of Heuristics for Compass and Straight Edge Constructions in Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scandura, Joseph M.; And Others

    The research reported in this paper was designed to analyze the incidence of use of higher-order rules by students solving geometric construction problems. A carefully selected set of construction problems was subjected to rigorous a priori analysis by mathematics educators to determine what basic and second-order rules might be used by able high…

  8. Risk management. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Interim rule adopted as final with changes.

    PubMed

    2000-11-22

    This is a final rule amending the NASA FAR Supplement (NFS) to emphasize considerations of risk management, including safety, security (including information technology security), health, export control, and damage to the environment, within the acquisition process. This final rule addresses risk management within the context of acquisition planning, selecting sources, choosing contract type, structuring award fee incentives, administering contracts, and conducting contractor surveillance.

  9. The six golden rules to improve compliance in hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Kampf, G

    2004-04-01

    Improvement of compliance in hand hygiene is probably the most effective step in reducing the incidence of nosocomial infections (NI). But improvement of compliance is known to be complex. Six possibilities for improving compliance are available although some of them may be difficult to carry out. Rule 1: Select an alcohol-based hand rub which has a good skin tolerance and is acceptable to health care workers to use. This has been shown to improve compliance. Rule 2: The hand rub shall be easily available. Wall dispensers near the patient and pocket bottles may well help. Other possibilities should be assessed locally. Rule 3: Implement teaching and promotion of hand hygiene, which has been shown to be very effective. This is may be the most effective tool but will cost time and money. If money is a problem, rule 4 may be the solution. Rule 4: Create a hospital budget which covers all costs involved with preventable nosocomial infection. Combine it with the budget for hand hygiene products. Even a small number of prevented NI largely outweighs the cost of effective hand hygiene products. Rule 5: Get senior staff to set a good example in order to motivate junior staff, because negligence in hand hygiene appears to correlate with the number of professional years. Rule 6: Have the patient-staff ratio well balanced. It has been shown that staff shortage decreases hand hygiene compliance. Other factors may be important as well, but implementation of these 6 golden rules could be an effective step into the right direction.

  10. 75 FR 3886 - Amateur Service Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 97 Amateur Service Rules AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This document proposes to amend the amateur radio service rules to clarify certain rules and codify existing procedures governing the amateur service vanity call sign system, and to...

  11. Faculty Union Contracts: The New Organizational Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Harold I., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    The recent expansion of collective bargaining among faculty unions has led to the establishment of new organizational rules. These new rules eliminate discretion, but unlike traditional rules imposed by superiors to control subordinates, collective bargaining initiates a different format for rule-making--formal joint determination. Collective…

  12. Extending the CLAST sequential rule to one-way ANOVA under group sampling.

    PubMed

    Ximénez, Carmen; Revuelta, Javier

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the fixed-sample stopping rule (FSR), in which the sample size is determined in advance, is less practical and efficient than are sequential-stopping rules. The composite limited adaptive sequential test (CLAST) is one such sequential-stopping rule. Previous research has shown that CLAST is more efficient in terms of sample size and power than are the FSR and other sequential rules and that it reflects more realistically the practice of experimental psychology researchers. The CLAST rule has been applied only to the t test of mean differences with two matched samples and to the chi-square independence test for twofold contingency tables. The present work extends previous research on the efficiency of CLAST to multiple group statistical tests. Simulation studies were conducted to test the efficiency of the CLAST rule for the one-way ANOVA for fixed effects models. The ANOVA general test and two linear contrasts of multiple comparisons among treatment means are considered. The article also introduces four rules for allocating N observations to J groups under the general null hypothesis and three allocation rules for the linear contrasts. Results show that the CLAST rule is generally more efficient than the FSR in terms of sample size and power for one-way ANOVA tests. However, the allocation rules vary in their optimality and have a differential impact on sample size and power. Thus, selecting an allocation rule depends on the cost of sampling and the intended precision.

  13. A mechanism for decision rule discrimination by supplementary eye field neurons.

    PubMed

    Ray, Supriya; Heinen, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    A decision to select an action from alternatives is often guided by rules that flexibly map sensory inputs to motor outputs when certain conditions are satisfied. However, the neural mechanisms underlying rule-based decision making remain poorly understood. Two complementary types of neurons in the supplementary eye field (SEF) of macaques have been identified that modulate activity differentially to interpret rules in an ocular go-nogo task, which stipulates that the animal either visually pursue a moving object if it intersects a visible zone ('go'), or maintain fixation if it does not ('nogo'). These neurons discriminate between go and nogo rule-states by increasing activity to signal their preferred (agonist) rule-state and decreasing activity to signal their non-preferred (antagonist) rule-state. In the current study, we found that SEF neurons decrease activity in anticipation of the antagonist rule-state, and do so more rapidly when the rule-state is easier to predict. This rapid decrease in activity could underlie a process of elimination in which trajectories that do not invoke the preferred rule-state receive no further computational resources. Furthermore, discrimination between difficult and easy trials in the antagonist rule-state occurs prior to when discrimination within the agonist rule-state occurs. A winner-take-all like model that incorporates a pair of mutually inhibited integrators to accumulate evidence in favor of either the decision to pursue or the decision to continue fixation accounts for the observed neural phenomena.

  14. Integration rules for scattering equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baadsgaard, Christian; Bjerrum-Bohr, N. E. J.; Bourjaily, Jacob L.; Damgaard, Poul H.

    2015-09-01

    As described by Cachazo, He and Yuan, scattering amplitudes in many quantum field theories can be represented as integrals that are fully localized on solutions to the so-called scattering equations. Because the number of solutions to the scattering equations grows quite rapidly, the contour of integration involves contributions from many isolated components. In this paper, we provide a simple, combinatorial rule that immediately provides the result of integration against the scattering equation constraints fo any Möbius-invariant integrand involving only simple poles. These rules have a simple diagrammatic interpretation that makes the evaluation of any such integrand immediate. Finally, we explain how these rules are related to the computation of amplitudes in the field theory limit of string theory.

  15. Reevaluating the dead donor rule.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mike

    2010-04-01

    The dead donor rule justifies current practice in organ procurement for transplantation and states that organ donors must be dead prior to donation. The majority of organ donors are diagnosed as having suffered brain death and hence are declared dead by neurological criteria. However, a significant amount of unrest in both the philosophical and the medical literature has surfaced since this practice began forty years ago. I argue that, first, declaring death by neurological criteria is both unreliable and unjustified but further, the ethical principles which themselves justify the dead donor rule are better served by abandoning that rule and instead allowing individuals who have suffered severe and irreversible brain damage to become organ donors, even though they are not yet dead and even though the removal of their organs would be the proximal cause of death.

  16. CHaracteristics of Two-Stage Absorption Heat Pump Cycler Driven by Waste Heat From Gas Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroshi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Recently the energy conservation is expected from the global environment protection view point. In this study, a new concept of a compound gas cooling system using treated sewage water combining a gas engine heat pump and an absorption heat pump is proposed. In this system, the absorption heat pump is driven by the waste heat from the gas engine. In this paper, first, the best absorption cycle for this absorption heat pump is selected for the cooling and heating mode. And finally the simulation model of the two-stage absorption heat pumps for heating mode is demonstrated and the static characteristics are clarified.

  17. Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-02

    This final rule replaces the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule with the Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule. The rule also makes conforming amendments in rules in related requirements. This rule will assist title IV-E agencies in developing information management systems that leverage new innovations and technology in order to better serve children and families. More specifically, this final rule supports the use of cost-effective, innovative technologies to automate the collection of high-quality case management data and to promote its analysis, distribution, and use by workers, supervisors, administrators, researchers, and policy makers.

  18. Conformance Testing: Measurement Decision Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of a Quality Management System (QMS) as specified in ISO 9001 and AS9100 is to provide assurance to the customer that end products meet specifications. Measuring devices, often called measuring and test equipment (MTE), are used to provide the evidence of product conformity to specified requirements. Unfortunately, processes that employ MTE can become a weak link to the overall QMS if proper attention is not given to the measurement process design, capability, and implementation. Documented "decision rules" establish the requirements to ensure measurement processes provide the measurement data that supports the needs of the QMS. Measurement data are used to make the decisions that impact all areas of technology. Whether measurements support research, design, production, or maintenance, ensuring the data supports the decision is crucial. Measurement data quality can be critical to the resulting consequences of measurement-based decisions. Historically, most industries required simplistic, one-size-fits-all decision rules for measurements. One-size-fits-all rules in some cases are not rigorous enough to provide adequate measurement results, while in other cases are overly conservative and too costly to implement. Ideally, decision rules should be rigorous enough to match the criticality of the parameter being measured, while being flexible enough to be cost effective. The goal of a decision rule is to ensure that measurement processes provide data with a sufficient level of quality to support the decisions being made - no more, no less. This paper discusses the basic concepts of providing measurement-based evidence that end products meet specifications. Although relevant to all measurement-based conformance tests, the target audience is the MTE end-user, which is anyone using MTE other than calibration service providers. Topics include measurement fundamentals, the associated decision risks, verifying conformance to specifications, and basic measurement

  19. Parallel machine architecture for production rule systems

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Jr., John D.; Butler, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    A parallel processing system for production rule programs utilizes a host processor for storing production rule right hand sides (RHS) and a plurality of rule processors for storing left hand sides (LHS). The rule processors operate in parallel in the recognize phase of the system recognize -Act Cycle to match their respective LHS's against a stored list of working memory elements (WME) in order to find a self consistent set of WME's. The list of WME is dynamically varied during the Act phase of the system in which the host executes or fires rule RHS's for those rules for which a self-consistent set has been found by the rule processors. The host transmits instructions for creating or deleting working memory elements as dictated by the rule firings until the rule processors are unable to find any further self-consistent working memory element sets at which time the production rule system is halted.

  20. A Short Note on Rules and Higher Order Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scandura, Joseph M.

    This brief paper argues that structural analysis--an extended form of cognitive task analysis--demonstrates that both domain dependent and domain independent knowledge can be derived from specific content domains. It is noted that the major difference between the two is that lower order rules (specific knowledge) are derived directly from specific…

  1. Division rules for polygonal cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, R; Morris, V B

    1988-03-07

    A number of fascinating mathematical problems concerning the division of two-dimensional space are formulated from questions about the planes of cell division in embryonic epithelia. Their solution aids in the quantitative description of cellular arrangement in epithelia. Cells, considered as polygons, site their division line according to stochastic rules, eventually forming a tessellation of the plane. The equilibrium distributions for the resulting mix of polygonal types are explored for a range of stochastic rules. We find surprising links with some classical distributions from the theory of probability.

  2. Flight Rules Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, E.; Knudsen, F.; Rice, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increment 23/24 Critical Readiness Review (CRR) flight rules are presented. The topics include: 1) B13-152 Acoustic Constraints; 2) B13-113 IFM/Corrective Action Prioritization Due to Loss of Exercise Capability; 3) B13-116 Constraints on Treadmill VIS Failure; 4) B13-201 Medical Management of ISS Fire/Smoke Response; 5) ARED and T2 Exercise constraints Flight rules (flight and stage specific); 6) FYI: B14 FR to be updated with requirement to sample crew sleep locations prior to receiving a "recommendation" from SRAG on where to sleep.

  3. Rule generation from neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, L.

    1994-08-01

    The neural network approach has proven useful for the development of artificial intelligence systems. However, a disadvantage with this approach is that the knowledge embedded in the neural network is opaque. In this paper, we show how to interpret neural network knowledge in symbolic form. We lay down required definitions for this treatment, formulate the interpretation algorithm, and formally verify its soundness. The main result is a formalized relationship between a neural network and a rule-based system. In addition, it has been demonstrated that the neural network generates rules of better performance than the decision tree approach in noisy conditions. 7 refs.

  4. Bilinearity, Rules, and Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Dayan, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Humans can be instructed verbally to perform computationally complex cognitive tasks; their performance then improves relatively slowly over the course of practice. Many skills underlie these abilities; in this paper, we focus on the particular question of a uniform architecture for the instantiation of habitual performance and the storage, recall, and execution of simple rules. Our account builds on models of gated working memory, and involves a bilinear architecture for representing conditional input-output maps and for matching rules to the state of the input and working memory. We demonstrate the performance of our model on two paradigmatic tasks used to investigate prefrontal and basal ganglia function. PMID:18946523

  5. Medical Qualification Determinations. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-18

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing a final rule to revise its regulations for medical qualification determinations. The revised regulations update references and language; add and modify definitions; clarify coverage and applicability; address the need for medical documentation and medical examination and/or testing for an applicant or employee whose position may or may not have medical standards and/or physical requirements; and recommend the establishment of agency medical review boards. The final rule provides agencies guidance regarding medical evaluation procedures.

  6. Electronic absorptions of the benzylium cation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Chalyavi, Nahid; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2012-11-01

    The electronic transitions of the benzylium cation (Bz+) are investigated over the 250-550 nm range by monitoring the photodissociation of mass-selected C7H7+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The Bz+-Ar spectrum displays two distinct band systems, the S1←S0 band system extending from 370 to 530 nm with an origin at 19 067 ± 15 cm-1, and a much stronger S3←S0 band system extending from 270 to 320 nm with an origin at 32 035 ± 15 cm-1. Whereas the S1←S0 absorption exhibits well resolved vibrational progressions, the S3←S0 absorption is broad and relatively structureless. Vibronic structure of the S1←S0 system, which is interpreted with the aid of time-dependent density functional theory and Franck-Condon simulations, reflects the activity of four totally symmetric ring deformation modes (ν5, ν6, ν9, ν13). We find no evidence for the ultraviolet absorption of the tropylium cation, which according to the neon matrix spectrum should occur over the 260 - 275 nm range [A. Nagy, J. Fulara, I. Garkusha, and J. Maier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 3022 (2011)], 10.1002/anie.201008036.

  7. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  8. In situ Gas Temperature Measurements by UV-Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateev, A.; Clausen, S.

    2009-02-01

    The absorption spectrum of the NO A2Σ+ ← X2Πγ-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the range from 23 °C to 1,500 °C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution γ-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO γ-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 °C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m.

  9. Infrared Laser Therapy using IR absorption of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, K.; Ishii, K.; Hazama, H.

    2011-02-01

    Since numerous characteristic absorption lines caused by molecular vibration exist in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength region, selective excitation or selective dissociation of molecules is possible by tuning the laser wavelength to the characteristic absorption lines of target molecules. By applying this feature to the medical fields, less-invasive treatment and non-destructive diagnosis with absorption spectroscopy are possible using tunable MIR lasers. A high-energy nanosecond pulsed MIR tunable laser was obtained with difference-frequency generation (DFG) between a Nd:YAG and a tunable Cr:forsterite lasers. The MIR-DFG laser was tunable in a wavelength range of 5.5-10 μm and generated a laser pulses with an energy of up to 1.4 mJ, a pulse width of 5 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. Selective removal of atherosclerotic lesion was successfully demonstrated with the MIR-DFG laser tuned at a wavelength of 5.75 μm, which corresponds to the characteristic absorption of the ester bond in cholesterol esters in the atherosclerotic lesions. We have developed a non-destructive diagnostic probe with an attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism and two hollow optical fibres. An absorption spectrum of cholesterol was measured with the ATR probe by scanning the wavelength of the MIR-DFG laser, and the spectrum was in good agreement with that measured with a commercial Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  10. Bisphenol A; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requiring manufacturers and processors of bisphenol A, hereinafter BPA, (4.4’-isopropylidenediphenol, CAS No. 80-05—7) to conduct a 90-day inhalation study.

  11. Data breaches. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-22

    This document establishes regulations to address data breaches regarding sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The regulations implement certain provisions of Title IX of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006, which require promulgation of these regulations as an interim final rule.

  12. Tetrabromobisphenol A; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), requiring manufacturers and processors of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA. CAS No. 79—94—7) to perform testing for chemical fate and environmental effects.

  13. TRICARE reimbursement revisions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-06-27

    This final rule provides several necessary revisions to the regulation in order for TRICARE to be consistent with Medicare. These revisions affect: Hospice periods of care; reimbursement of physician assistants and assistant-at-surgery claims; and diagnosis-related group values, removing references to specific numeric diagnosis-related group values and replacing them with their narrative description.

  14. Close Call: Breaking the Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Contrary to a rule to never teach students to lead climb, an instructor taught several youth to lead climb at a parent's request. These students planned to pursue rock climbing on their own after they left school, and preparing them was deemed a safety precaution. Analysis of this "close call" offers guidelines for introducing students…

  15. Navigation Rules, International-Inland

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    of the United Nations ’ Inter-Governmental Maritime Consultative Organization (IMCO) in 1972. The 72 COLREGS enter into force at 12 noon, local zone...OF BARGES ----------------------------- 161 XV REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES------------------ 163 XVI APPENDIX...they appear in the inter- national convention. COLUMN II A cross-reference index to the 1960 International Rules appears in the second column from the

  16. All Things Out of Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Nuala

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together and compares my own artistic practice of drawing/painting and the eighteenth-century novel "Tristram Shandy." In both cases, there is a free play of lines, textual or graphic, which sets "all things out of rule". A whole typology of lines is woven throughout Sterne's text and reappears,…

  17. The Eighteen-Electron Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, P. R.; Parish, R. V.

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the stability of the structures of transition metal complexes (primarily carbonyls and organometallic compounds) having 18 electrons or less in their valence shell. Presents molecular orbital diagrams for various structures involving alpha and pi bonding and describes the conditions under which the 18 electron rule applies. (RR)

  18. Rules of Procedure for Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

    Among the functions of the Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities of the NEA is the investigation of cases of alleged unethical conduct by members of the teaching profession. The rules of procedure for investigations presented in this document are intended to assure all parties in a conflict of their individual rights of procedural…

  19. Intonation Rules in ELT Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauldwell, Richard; Hewings, Martin

    1996-01-01

    Examines the two rules of intonation most commonly found in English language teaching textbooks: those concerning intonation in lists and intonation in questions. The article suggests that teachers and materials writers must provide learners with descriptions of intonation allowing them to understand the communicative significance of intonation…

  20. Rule Induction with Extension Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xindong

    1998-01-01

    Presents a heuristic, attribute-based, noise-tolerant data mining program, HCV (Version 2.0) based on the newly-developed extension matrix approach. Outlines some techniques implemented in the HCV program for noise handling and discretization of continuous domains; an empirical comparison shows that rules generated by HCV are more compact than the…

  1. 77 FR 71714 - Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ...) requires agencies to prepare a written assessment of the costs, benefits, and other effects of proposed or... regulations shall be written to minimize litigation; and (3) The agency's proposed legislation and regulations... (adjusted for inflation with the base year of 1995). Before promulgating a rule for which a...

  2. Hidden Rules of the Superintendency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caloss, Ronald

    1999-01-01

    Effective superintendents recognize three key management precepts and their hidden rules. Administrators should avoid mixing emotion and logic, attending to detractors' emotional needs before presenting a differing viewpoint. They should be graceful under pressure, expect the unexpected, and build coalitions gradually, mindful of all community…

  3. The privacy rule that's not.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Richard

    2007-01-01

    HIPAA is often described as a privacy rule. It is not. In fact, HIPAA is a disclosure regulation, and it has effectively dismantled the longstanding moral and legal tradition of patient confidentiality. By permitting broad and easy dissemination of patients' medical information, with no audit trails for most disclosures, it has undermined both medical ethics and the effectiveness of medical care.

  4. 76 FR 4144 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Change by NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC Relating to Rebates and Fees for Adding and Removing Liquidity in Select... the Select Symbols in Section I of the Exchange's Fee Schedule titled Rebates and Fees for Adding and Removing Liquidity in Select Symbols. The text of the proposed rule change is available on the...

  5. Microwave radiation absorption: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, J A

    1991-07-01

    The literature contains much evidence that absorption of microwave energy will lead to behavioral changes in man and laboratory animals. The changes include simple perturbations or outright stoppage of ongoing behavior. On one extreme, intense microwave absorption can result in seizures followed by death. On the other extreme, man and animals can hear microwave pulses at very low rates of absorption. Under certain conditions of exposure, animals will avoid microwaves, while under other conditions, they will actively work to obtain warmth produced by microwaves. Some research has shown behavioral effects during chronic exposure to low-level microwaves. The specific absorption rates that produce behavioral effects seem to depend on microwave frequency, but controversy exists over thresholds and mechanism of action. In all cases, however, the behavioral disruptions cease when chronic microwave exposure is terminated. Thermal changes in man and animals during microwave exposure appear to account for all reported behavioral effects.

  6. Symbol manipulation and rule learning in spiking neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Chrisantha

    2011-04-21

    It has been claimed that the productivity, systematicity and compositionality of human language and thought necessitate the existence of a physical symbol system (PSS) in the brain. Recent discoveries about temporal coding suggest a novel type of neuronal implementation of a physical symbol system. Furthermore, learning classifier systems provide a plausible algorithmic basis by which symbol re-write rules could be trained to undertake behaviors exhibiting systematicity and compositionality, using a kind of natural selection of re-write rules in the brain, We show how the core operation of a learning classifier system, namely, the replication with variation of symbol re-write rules, can be implemented using spike-time dependent plasticity based supervised learning. As a whole, the aim of this paper is to integrate an algorithmic and an implementation level description of a neuronal symbol system capable of sustaining systematic and compositional behaviors. Previously proposed neuronal implementations of symbolic representations are compared with this new proposal.

  7. The electrophysiological signature of deliberate rule violations.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Roland; Wirth, Robert; Schwarz, Katharina A; Foerster, Anna; Steinhauser, Marco; Kunde, Wilfried

    2016-12-01

    Humans follow rules by default, and violating even simple rules induces cognitive conflict for the rule breaker. Previous studies revealed this conflict in various behavioral measures, including response times and movement trajectories. Based on these experiments, we investigated the electrophysiological signature of deliberately violating a simple stimulus-response mapping rule. Such rule violations were characterized by a delayed and attenuated P300 component when evaluating a rule-relevant stimulus, most likely reflecting increased response complexity. This parietal attenuation was followed by a frontal positivity for rule violations relative to correct response trials. Together, these results reinforce previous findings on the need to inhibit automatic S-R translation when committing a rule violation, and they point toward additional factors involved in rule violation. Candidate processes such as negative emotional responses and increased monitoring should be targeted by future investigations.

  8. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed Central

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children. PMID:6476870

  9. Reflective-tube absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Bartz, Robert; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    The design and calibration of a proposed in situ spectral absorption meter is evaluated using a laboratory prototype. The design includes a silver coated (second-surface) glass tube, a tungsten light source (stabilized by means of optical feedback), a monochromator, and a solid state detector. The device measures the absorption coefficient plus a portion of the volume scattering function. Theoretical analyses and laboratory experiments which explore the magnitude and variation of the errors due to scattering and internal reflections are described. Similar analyses are performed on the Cary 1 18 Spectrophotometer to allow cross calibration. Algorithms to yield the abscrption coefficient and the zenith-sun diffuse attenuation coefficient are presented and evaluated. Simultaneous measurement of the beam attenuation or backscattering coefficient allows use of algoriThms with much narrower error bands. The various methods of obtaining absorption and diffuse attenuation values are compared. Procedures for using reverse osmosis filtration to produce a clean water calibration standard are described. An absorption spectrum for pure water is obtained. Development of the absorption meter is proceeding along two lines: 1) a two-wavelength side-by-side LED is being fabricated to allow an in situ chlorophyll a absorption meter to be constructed, and 2) scientific projects using a shipboard or laboratory flow.-through pumping system are being planned.

  10. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption.

  11. Evaluation of a rule base for decision making in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Essex, B; Healy, M

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Decision making in general practice relies heavily on judgmental expertise. It should be possible to codify this expertise into rules and principles. AIM. A study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness, of rules from a rule base designed to improve students' and trainees' management decisions relating to patients seen in general practice. METHOD. The rule base was developed after studying decisions about and management of thousands of patients seen in one general practice over an eight year period. Vignettes were presented to 93 fourth year medical students and 179 general practitioner trainees. They recorded their perception and management of each case before and after being presented with a selection of relevant rules. Participants also commented on their level of agreement with each of the rules provided with the vignettes. A panel of five independent assessors then rated as good, acceptable or poor, the participants' perception and management of each case before and after seeing the rules. RESULTS. Exposure to a few selected rules of thumb improved the problem perception and management decisions of both undergraduates and trainees. The degree of improvement was not related to previous experience or to the stated level of agreement with the proposed rules. The assessors identified difficulties students and trainees experienced in changing their perceptions and management decisions when the rules suggested options they had not considered. CONCLUSION. The rules developed to improve decision making skills in general practice are effective when used with vignettes. The next phase is to transform the rule base into an expert system to train students and doctors to acquire decision making skills. It could also be used to provide decision support when confronted with difficult management decisions in general practice. PMID:8204334

  12. Evaluating Terminologies to Enable Imaging-Related Decision Rule Sharing

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zihao; Lacson, Ronilda; Ip, Ivan; Valtchinov, Vladimir; Raja, Ali; Osterbur, David; Khorasani, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clinical decision support tools provide recommendations based on decision rules. A fundamental challenge regarding decision rule-sharing involves inadequate expression using standard terminology. We aimed to evaluate the coverage of three standard terminologies for mapping imaging-related decision rules. Methods: 50 decision rules, randomly selected from an existing library, were mapped to Systemized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED CT), Radiology Lexicon (RadLex) and International Classification of Disease (ICD-10-CM). Decision rule attributes and values were mapped to unique concepts, obtaining the best possible coverage with the fewest concepts. Manual and automated mapping using Clinical Text Analysis and Knowledge Extraction System (cTAKES) were performed. Results: Using manual mapping, SNOMED CT provided the greatest concept coverage (83%), compared to RadLex (36%) and ICD-10-CM (8%) (p<0.0001). Combined mapping had 86% concept coverage. Automated mapping achieved 85% mapping coverage vs. 94% with manual mapping (p<0.001). Conclusion: Although some gaps remain, standard terminologies provide ample coverage for mapping imaging- related evidence. PMID:28269968

  13. Site-dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure has been developed which can be used to determine the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling systems. This procedure has been used in a study to investigate the influence of the site-dependent parameters on the economic feasibility of solar absorption cooling. The purpose of this study was to make preliminary site selections for solar powered absorption cooling systems. This paper summarizes the results of that study.

  14. Measurement of the absorption properties of acoustic materials used in the fabrication of cowlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corlay, B.; Delalot, G.

    1981-07-01

    A wide selection of sound absorbing materials was tested, using the stationary wave tube method, and absorption factors were determined. Results are used to compile a catalog of industrial acoustically absorbant materials which can be employed as interior linings on cowlings for mobile or fixed noisy equipment. Theory that explains the absorptivity of these materials when used alone or in combinations is also presented. Results for low and middle frequency absorption are stressed.

  15. Kin selection under blending inheritance.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Andy

    2011-09-07

    Why did Darwin fail to develop his insights on kin selection into a proper theory of social adaptation? One suggestion has been that his inadequate understanding of heredity kept the problem out of focus. Here, I determine whether it is possible to develop a quantitative theory of kin selection upon the assumption of blending inheritance. I find that, whilst Hamilton's rule of kin selection can be readily derived under the assumption of blending inheritance, this mechanism complicates the computation of relatedness coefficients, and can even cause them to fluctuate over generations. Nevertheless, I show that the ultimate criterion for selection to favour any social trait - i.e. a time-average of Hamilton's rule - remains the same as under particulate inheritance. By eliminating the gene from the theory of kin selection, I clarify the role that it plays in the theory of social adaptation.

  16. Passive acquisition of CLIPS rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovarik, Vincent J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The automated acquisition of knowledge by machine has not lived up to expectations, and knowledge engineering remains a human intensive task. Part of the reason for the lack of success is the difference in the cognitive focus of the expert. The expert must shift his or her focus from the subject domain to that of the representation environment. In doing so this cognitive shift introduces opportunity for errors and omissions. Presented here is work that observes the expert interact with a simulation of the domain. The system logs changes in the simulation objects and the expert's actions in response to those changes. This is followed by the application of inductive reasoning to move the domain specific rules observed to general domain rules.

  17. Ariel Database Rule System Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-14

    NOTES EL CT a Distribution unlimited UL 13. ABSTRACT (Mmmuum 200 we~ The Ariel project has culminated in several advancements in active database...4] Moez Chaabouni. A top-level discrimination network for database rule systems. Master’s thesis, Dept. of Computer Science and Eng., Wright State... Moez Chaabouni. The IBS-tree: A data structure for finding all intervals that overlap a point. Technical Report WSU-CS-90-11, Dept. of Computer

  18. Lead and Copper Rule Revisions White Paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) Revisions White Paper provides examples of regulatory options to improve the existing rule. The paper highlights key challenges, opportunities, and analytical issues presented by these options.

  19. 7 CFR 29.6104 - Rule 18.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.6104 Rule 18. Burn shall be determined as the average burning time of leaves... candle, alcohol lamp, or electrical-lighting device. Good burn shall average 6 seconds or longer;...

  20. 7 CFR 29.6104 - Rule 18.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.6104 Rule 18. Burn shall be determined as the average burning time of leaves... candle, alcohol lamp, or electrical-lighting device. Good burn shall average 6 seconds or longer;...

  1. 7 CFR 29.1132 - Rule 26.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1132 Rule 26. Tobacco that contains a moderate amount of dirt or sand, but... from the Primings group, shall be designated by placing the special factor, “dirt” or “sand” after...

  2. Grammar: Rules and Reasons Working Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that from a pedagogical perspective, there is a cost to associating grammar with rules. Discusses reasons for underlying rules and gives implications for a reason-based approach to teaching grammar. (Author/VWL)

  3. Statistical inference of static analysis rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engler, Dawson Richards (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Various apparatus and methods are disclosed for identifying errors in program code. Respective numbers of observances of at least one correctness rule by different code instances that relate to the at least one correctness rule are counted in the program code. Each code instance has an associated counted number of observances of the correctness rule by the code instance. Also counted are respective numbers of violations of the correctness rule by different code instances that relate to the correctness rule. Each code instance has an associated counted number of violations of the correctness rule by the code instance. A respective likelihood of the validity is determined for each code instance as a function of the counted number of observances and counted number of violations. The likelihood of validity indicates a relative likelihood that a related code instance is required to observe the correctness rule. The violations may be output in order of the likelihood of validity of a violated correctness rule.

  4. Autonomous Rule Creation for Intrusion Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Jim Alves-Foss; Milos Manic

    2011-04-01

    Many computational intelligence techniques for anomaly based network intrusion detection can be found in literature. Translating a newly discovered intrusion recognition criteria into a distributable rule can be a human intensive effort. This paper explores a multi-modal genetic algorithm solution for autonomous rule creation. This algorithm focuses on the process of creating rules once an intrusion has been identified, rather than the evolution of rules to provide a solution for intrusion detection. The algorithm was demonstrated on anomalous ICMP network packets (input) and Snort rules (output of the algorithm). Output rules were sorted according to a fitness value and any duplicates were removed. The experimental results on ten test cases demonstrated a 100 percent rule alert rate. Out of 33,804 test packets 3 produced false positives. Each test case produced a minimum of three rule variations that could be used as candidates for a production system.

  5. Abegg, Lewis, Langmuir, and the Octet Rule.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, William B.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses major events leading to the development of the octet rule. Three conclusions based on the work of Mendeleev, Abegg, Thompson, Kossel, Lewis, and Langmuir are considered as is the debate over the rule's validity. (JN)

  6. Models to predict intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Filipa; Andrade, Fernanda; Ferreira, Domingos; Nielsen, Hanne Morck; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of human intestinal absorption is a major goal in the design, optimization, and selection of drugs intended for oral delivery, in particular proteins, which possess intrinsic poor transport across intestinal epithelium. There are various techniques currently employed to evaluate the extension of protein absorption in the different phases of drug discovery and development. Screening protocols to evaluate protein absorption include a range of preclinical methodologies like in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo. It is the careful and critical use of these techniques that can help to identify drug candidates, which most probably will be well absorbed from the human intestinal tract. It is well recognized that the human intestinal permeability cannot be accurately predicted based on a single preclinical method. However, the present social and scientific concerns about the animal well care as well as the pharmaceutical industries need for rapid, cheap and reliable models predicting bioavailability give reasons for using methods providing an appropriate correlation between results of in vivo and in vitro drug absorption. The aim of this review is to describe and compare in silico, in vitro, in situ, ex vivo and in vivo methods used to predict human intestinal absorption, giving a special attention to the intestinal absorption of therapeutic peptides and proteins.

  7. Refinements of some new efficient quadrature rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qayyum, A.; Shoaib, M.; Faye, I.; Kashif, A. R.

    2016-11-01

    In the field of Engineering and Applied Mathematical Sciences, minimizing approximation error is very important task and therefore quadrature rules are investigated regularly. In this paper, using some standard results of theoretical inequalities, e.g. Ostrowski type inequality, some new efficient quadrature rules are introduced for n-times differentiable mappings. These quadrature rules are expected to give better results comparing to the conventional quadrature rules.

  8. Deriving Optimal Operational Rules for Mitigating Inter-area Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Chen, Yousu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Fuller, Jason C.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Dagle, Jeffery E.

    2011-05-23

    This paper introduces a new method to mitigate inter-area oscillations of a large scale interconnected power system by means of generation re-dispatch. The optimal operational control procedures are derived as the shortest distance from the current operating condition to a desired damping ratio of the oscillation mode by adjusting generator outputs. A sensitivity based method is used to select the most effective generators for generation re-dispatch and decision tree is trained to approximate the security boundary in a space characterized by the selected generators. The optimal operational rules can be found by solving an optimization problem where the boundary constraints are provided by the decision tree rules. This method is tested on a Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) 179-bus simplified network model and simulation results have demonstrated the proof of concept and shown promising application in real time operation.

  9. Survey for z>3 damped Ly alpha absorption systems: the evolution of neutral gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    We have completed spectroscopic observations using LRIS on the Keck 1 telescope of 30 very high redshift quasars, 11 selected for the presence of damped Ly alpha absorption systems and 19 with redshifts z>3.5 not previously surveyed for absorption systems.

  10. Understanding Commenter Influence during Agency Rule Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naughton, Keith; Schmid, Celeste; Yackee, Susan Webb; Zhan, Xueyong

    2009-01-01

    We provide the first empirical assessment of commenter influence during the rule development stage of administrative rulemaking. We argue that public commenters play a critical agenda-setting role during rule development. To test this proposition, we analyze data from 36 Department of Transportation rules and almost 500 comments. Each of these…

  11. 78 FR 54566 - Energy Labeling Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 305 RIN 3084-AB03 Energy Labeling Rule AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY: The Federal Trade Commission published a final rule on July 23, 2013 revising its...

  12. 12 CFR 226.31 - General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General rules. 226.31 Section 226.31 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM TRUTH IN LENDING (REGULATION Z) Special Rules for Certain Home Mortgage Transactions § 226.31 General rules....

  13. NCAA Rule 48: Origins and Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieder, Alan

    1986-01-01

    National Collegiate Athletic Association Rule 48 sets academic standards for high school which incoming freshmen must have met in order to receive a grant-in-aid and play intercollegiate athletics. The author discusses why tougher standards are needed, how Rule 48 operates, what problems are, and why there is opposition to the rule. (MT)

  14. 29 CFR 18.501 - General rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... common law as they may be interpreted by the courts of the United States in the light of reason and experience. However with respect to an element of a claim or defense as to which State law supplies the rule... ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Privileges § 18.501 General rule. Except as otherwise required by...

  15. 12 CFR 23.12 - Transition rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transition rule. 23.12 Section 23.12 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEASING CEBA Leases § 23.12 Transition rule. (a) General rule. A CEBA Lease entered into prior to July 22, 1991, may continue to...

  16. 12 CFR 23.12 - Transition rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transition rule. 23.12 Section 23.12 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LEASING CEBA Leases § 23.12 Transition rule. (a) General rule. A CEBA Lease entered into prior to July 22, 1991, may continue to...

  17. Error Analysis of Quadrature Rules. Classroom Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaister, P.

    2004-01-01

    Approaches to the determination of the error in numerical quadrature rules are discussed and compared. This article considers the problem of the determination of errors in numerical quadrature rules, taking Simpson's rule as the principal example. It suggests an approach based on truncation error analysis of numerical schemes for differential…

  18. 42 CFR 411.106 - Aggregation rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aggregation rules. 411.106 Section 411.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.106 Aggregation rules. The following rules apply...

  19. 42 CFR 411.106 - Aggregation rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aggregation rules. 411.106 Section 411.106 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM... Under Group Health Plans: General Provisions § 411.106 Aggregation rules. The following rules apply...

  20. 7 CFR 29.3618 - Rule 17.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rule 17. 29.3618 Section 29.3618 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.3618 Rule 17. Any lot of tobacco which is not green but contains over...