Science.gov

Sample records for absorption selection rules

  1. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  2. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  3. (FIELD) SYMMETRIZATION SELECTION RULES

    SciTech Connect

    P. PAGE

    2000-08-01

    QCD and QED exhibit an infinite set of three-point Green's functions that contain only OZI rule violating contributions, and (for QCD) are subleading in the large N{sub c} expansion. We prove that the QCD amplitude for a neutral hybrid {l_brace}1,3,5. . .{r_brace}{+-} exotic current to create {eta}{pi}{sup 0} only comes from OZI rule violating contributions under certain conditions, and is subleading in N{sub c}.

  4. Simple Derivation of Some Basic Selection Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sannigrahi, A. B.; Das, Ranjan

    1980-01-01

    Presents the selection rules for all four quantum numbers of the hydrogen atom and for a linear harmonic oscillator. Suggests that these rules deserve special mention in an elementary course of quantum chemistry. (Author/JN)

  5. Compton scattering from nuclei and photo-absorption sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Hobbs, Timothy; Londergan, J. Timothy; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2011-12-01

    We revisit the photo-absorption sum rule for real Compton scattering from the proton and from nuclear targets. In analogy with the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule appropriate at low energies, we propose a new “constituent quark model” sum rule that relates the integrated strength of hadronic resonances to the scattering amplitude on constituent quarks. We study the constituent quark model sum rule for several nuclear targets. In addition, we extract the α=0 pole contribution for both proton and nuclei. Using the modern high-energy proton data, we find that the α=0 pole contribution differs significantly from the Thomson term, in contrast with the original findings by Damashek and Gilman.

  6. a Selection Rule for Multiquark Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.

    By assuming SU(6)CS symmetry for pentaquark decays one finds a selection rule, which strongly reduces the number of states able to decay into a baryon and a meson final state and allows an intriguing identification for the Θ+ particle recently discovered with the prediction of a narrow width.

  7. Selective coherent perfect absorption in metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Guangyu; Shi, Quanchao; Zhu, Zheng; Shi, Jinhui

    2014-11-17

    We show multi-band coherent perfect absorption (CPA) in simple bilayered asymmetrically split ring metamaterials. The selectivity of absorption can be accomplished by separately excited electric and magnetic modes in a standing wave formed by two coherent counterpropagating beams. In particular, each CPA can be completely switched on/off by the phase of a second coherent wave. We propose a practical scheme for realizing multi-band coherent perfect absorption of 100% that is allowed to work from microwave to optical frequency.

  8. Selection rules for harmonic generation in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2015-05-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a bulk crystal was first observed in 2011 [S. Ghimire, A. D. DiChiara, E. Sistrunk, P. Agostini, L. F. DiMauro, and D. A. Reis, Nat. Phys. 7, 138 (2011), 10.1038/nphys1847]. Only odd-order harmonics were observed as expected on the basis of the selection rules in solids, which were derived when only the interband currents were taken into consideration. Here we study HHG in solids when the intraband currents are taken into consideration as well. We show that the dynamical selection rules are broken in solids and the possibility of generation of even-order harmonics cannot be excluded on the basis of the dynamical symmetry analysis. However, a simple analysis of the expression we obtained for the amplitude of the emitted high-order harmonics shows, without the need to carry out numerical calculations, that the even-order harmonics are suppressed due to the localization of the field-free one-electron density probability on the atoms in the solids.

  9. A Generalized Selection Rule for Pericyclic Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    He, Fu-Cheng; Pfeiffer, Gary V.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a convenient procedure, the Odd-Even Rule, for predicting the allowedness of forbiddenness of ground-state, pericyclic reactions. The rule is applied to a number of specific reactions. In contrast to the Woodward-Hoffman approach, the application to each reaction is always the same. (JN)

  10. Teaching the Spin Selection Rule: An Inductive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halstead, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    In the group exercise described, students are guided through an inductive justification for the spin conservation selection rule ([delta]S = 0). Although the exercise only explicitly involves various states of helium, the conclusion is one of the most widely applicable selection rules for the interaction of light with matter, applying, in various…

  11. Selection of Instructional Materials. A Model Policy and Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Larry D.; And Others

    This model prepared by the State of Iowa Department of Public Instruction is intended to provide assistance to schools in developing their own policy and procedures for the selection of library media and text materials. A brief model statement of policy is followed by a model statement of rules which includes (1) responsibility for selection of…

  12. Worldsheet instantons and coupling selection rules in heterotic orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswaran, Susha L.; Zavala, Ivonne

    2014-12-01

    We review recent results [1-3] on string coupling selection rules for heterotic orbifolds, derived using conformal field theory. Such rules are the first step towards understanding the viability of the recently obtained compactifications with potentially realistic particle spectra. They arise from the properties of the worldsheet instantons that mediate the couplings, and include stringy effects that would seem "miraculous" to an effective field theory observer.

  13. Permutation-symmetry related selection rules in spinor quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir

    2014-05-01

    Selection rules constraining possible transitions between states of quantum systems can be derived from the system symmetry. Invariance over permutations of indistinguishable particles, contained in each physical system, is one of the basic symmetries. Consider a many-body system with separable spin and spatial degrees of freedom of particles with arbitrary spins s. Eigenfunctions of such systems can be expressed as a sum of products of spin and spatial functions, which form irreducible representations (irreps) of the symmetric group. The quantum numbers are the Young diagrams λ = [λ1 , ... ,λ2 s + 1 ] . The selection rules for a general k-body interactions allow transitions between the states λ and λ' only if ∑m=12s+1 |λm -λm'| <= 2 k . For s = 1 / 2 , the Young diagrams are unambiguously related to the total spin, and if k = 1 , we get the conventional selection rule for dipole transitions. However, if s > 1 / 2 , the rules cannot be expressed in terms of spins. The selection rules provide a way of control over the formation of many-body entangled states, belonging to multidimensional, non-Abelian irreps of the symmetric group. The effects can be observed with spinor atoms in an optical lattice in the Mott-insulator regime.

  14. Superwetting nanowire membranes for selective absorption.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jikang; Liu, Xiaogang; Akbulut, Ozge; Hu, Junqing; Suib, Steven L; Kong, Jing; Stellacci, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    The construction of nanoporous membranes is of great technological importance for various applications, including catalyst supports, filters for biomolecule purification, environmental remediation and seawater desalination. A major challenge is the scalable fabrication of membranes with the desirable combination of good thermal stability, high selectivity and excellent recyclability. Here we present a self-assembly method for constructing thermally stable, free-standing nanowire membranes that exhibit controlled wetting behaviour ranging from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic. These membranes can selectively absorb oils up to 20 times the material's weight in preference to water, through a combination of superhydrophobicity and capillary action. Moreover, the nanowires that form the membrane structure can be re-suspended in solutions and subsequently re-form the original paper-like morphology over many cycles. Our results suggest an innovative material that should find practical applications in the removal of organics, particularly in the field of oil spill cleanup. PMID:18654542

  15. Selective microwave absorption of iron-rich carbon nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Gui, Xuchun; Wang, Kunlin; Cao, Anyuan; Wei, Jinquan; Lv, Ruitao; Kang, Feiyu; Shu, Qinke; Jia, Yi; Wu, Dehai

    2010-03-01

    We report on high selectivity of microwave absorption by controlling the concentration of carbon nanotubes in polymer composites and matching the dielectric loss and magnetic loss through encapsulation of crystalline Fe nanorods inside nanotubes. The reflection loss reached more than 10 dB (> 90% absorption) by loading nanotubes at concentrations of 1 wt% to 10 wt% into the composites, and the frequencies corresponding to the maximum loss can be tailored throughout the range of 2 to 18 GHz by changing the concentration. A maximum absorption capability (75 dB x GHz) was observed at a CNT loading of about 4.5 wt%. The crystalline structure of encapsulated Fe nanorods can be modified to enhance the reflection loss. Control of absorption selectivity by modifying the structure and concentration of nanoscale fillers could facilitate potential higher-frequency applications (e.g., radar absorbing) of nanocomposites. PMID:20355578

  16. Learning a New Selection Rule in Visual and Frontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    van der Togt, Chris; Stănişor, Liviu; Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Albantakis, Larissa; Deco, Gustavo; Roelfsema, Pieter R

    2016-08-01

    How do you make a decision if you do not know the rules of the game? Models of sensory decision-making suggest that choices are slow if evidence is weak, but they may only apply if the subject knows the task rules. Here, we asked how the learning of a new rule influences neuronal activity in the visual (area V1) and frontal cortex (area FEF) of monkeys. We devised a new icon-selection task. On each day, the monkeys saw 2 new icons (small pictures) and learned which one was relevant. We rewarded eye movements to a saccade target connected to the relevant icon with a curve. Neurons in visual and frontal cortex coded the monkey's choice, because the representation of the selected curve was enhanced. Learning delayed the neuronal selection signals and we uncovered the cause of this delay in V1, where learning to select the relevant icon caused an early suppression of surrounding image elements. These results demonstrate that the learning of a new rule causes a transition from fast and random decisions to a more considerate strategy that takes additional time and they reveal the contribution of visual and frontal cortex to the learning process. PMID:27269960

  17. Pollution Police: How to Determine Spectroscopic Selection Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selco, Jodye I.; Beery, Janet

    2004-01-01

    Students employ mathematics and physical chemistry in a project called Pollution Police to establish spectroscopic selection rules, and apply them to detect environmental contaminants from infrared spectra. This interdisciplinary project enables students to gain multiple information on molecular symmetry, and its role in the development of…

  18. Learning a New Selection Rule in Visual and Frontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    van der Togt, Chris; Stănişor, Liviu; Pooresmaeili, Arezoo; Albantakis, Larissa; Deco, Gustavo; Roelfsema, Pieter R.

    2016-01-01

    How do you make a decision if you do not know the rules of the game? Models of sensory decision-making suggest that choices are slow if evidence is weak, but they may only apply if the subject knows the task rules. Here, we asked how the learning of a new rule influences neuronal activity in the visual (area V1) and frontal cortex (area FEF) of monkeys. We devised a new icon-selection task. On each day, the monkeys saw 2 new icons (small pictures) and learned which one was relevant. We rewarded eye movements to a saccade target connected to the relevant icon with a curve. Neurons in visual and frontal cortex coded the monkey's choice, because the representation of the selected curve was enhanced. Learning delayed the neuronal selection signals and we uncovered the cause of this delay in V1, where learning to select the relevant icon caused an early suppression of surrounding image elements. These results demonstrate that the learning of a new rule causes a transition from fast and random decisions to a more considerate strategy that takes additional time and they reveal the contribution of visual and frontal cortex to the learning process. PMID:27269960

  19. Optimistic Selection Rule Better Than Majority Voting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Takuya; Obata, Takuya; Hoki, Kunihito; Ito, Takeshi

    A recently proposed ensemble approach to game-tree search has attracted a great deal of attention. The ensemble system consists of M computer players, where each player uses a different series of pseudo-random numbers. A combination of multiple players under the majority voting system would improve the performance of a Shogi-playing computer. We present a new strategy of move selection based on the search values of a number of players. The move decision is made by selecting one player from all M players. Each move is selected by referring to the evaluation value of the tree search of each player. The performance and mechanism of the strategy are examined. We show that the optimistic selection rule, which selects the player that yields the highest evaluation value, outperforms the majority voting system. By grouping 16 or more computer players straightforwardly, the winning rates of the strongest Shogi programs increase from 50 to 60% or even higher.

  20. A Rule-Based Industrial Boiler Selection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. F.; Khalil, S. N.; Karjanto, J.; Tee, B. T.; Wahidin, L. S.; Chen, W.; Rauterberg, G. W. M.; Sivarao, S.; Lim, T. L.

    2015-09-01

    Boiler is a device used for generating the steam for power generation, process use or heating, and hot water for heating purposes. Steam boiler consists of the containing vessel and convection heating surfaces only, whereas a steam generator covers the whole unit, encompassing water wall tubes, super heaters, air heaters and economizers. The selection of the boiler is very important to the industry for conducting the operation system successfully. The selection criteria are based on rule based expert system and multi-criteria weighted average method. The developed system consists of Knowledge Acquisition Module, Boiler Selection Module, User Interface Module and Help Module. The system capable of selecting the suitable boiler based on criteria weighted. The main benefits from using the system is to reduce the complexity in the decision making for selecting the most appropriate boiler to palm oil process plant.

  1. Spectrum of the pentaquarks and selection rules for their decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.

    2006-11-01

    By assuming that the chromo-magnetic interaction plays the main role for the mass splittings of the positive and negative parity pentaquarks, we predict the mass difference between the lowest Y = 2, I = 0 and I = 1 states in good agreement with the present experimental evidence. The SU(6)CS transformation properties of these states imply approximate selection rules for the decay of these particles.

  2. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model

    PubMed Central

    Forn-Díaz, P.; Romero, G.; Harmans, C. J. P. M.; Solano, E.; Mooij, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling strength. We report the spectroscopic observation of a resonant transition that breaks a selection rule in the quantum Rabi model, implemented using an LC resonator and an artificial atom, a superconducting qubit. The eigenstates of the system consist of a superposition of bare qubit-resonator states with a relative sign. When the qubit-resonator coupling strength is negligible compared to their own frequencies, the matrix element between excited eigenstates of different sign is very small in presence of a resonator drive, establishing a sign-preserving selection rule. Here, our qubit-resonator system operates in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the coupling strength is 10% of the resonator frequency, allowing sign-changing transitions to be activated and, therefore, detected. This work shows that sign-changing transitions are an unambiguous, distinctive signature of systems operating in the ultrastrong coupling regime of the quantum Rabi model. These results pave the way to further studies of sign-preserving selection rules in multiqubit and multiphoton models. PMID:27273346

  3. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forn-Díaz, P.; Romero, G.; Harmans, C. J. P. M.; Solano, E.; Mooij, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling strength. We report the spectroscopic observation of a resonant transition that breaks a selection rule in the quantum Rabi model, implemented using an LC resonator and an artificial atom, a superconducting qubit. The eigenstates of the system consist of a superposition of bare qubit-resonator states with a relative sign. When the qubit-resonator coupling strength is negligible compared to their own frequencies, the matrix element between excited eigenstates of different sign is very small in presence of a resonator drive, establishing a sign-preserving selection rule. Here, our qubit-resonator system operates in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the coupling strength is 10% of the resonator frequency, allowing sign-changing transitions to be activated and, therefore, detected. This work shows that sign-changing transitions are an unambiguous, distinctive signature of systems operating in the ultrastrong coupling regime of the quantum Rabi model. These results pave the way to further studies of sign-preserving selection rules in multiqubit and multiphoton models.

  4. Broken selection rule in the quantum Rabi model.

    PubMed

    Forn-Díaz, P; Romero, G; Harmans, C J P M; Solano, E; Mooij, J E

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the interaction between light and matter is very relevant for fundamental studies of quantum electrodynamics and for the development of quantum technologies. The quantum Rabi model captures the physics of a single atom interacting with a single photon at all regimes of coupling strength. We report the spectroscopic observation of a resonant transition that breaks a selection rule in the quantum Rabi model, implemented using an LC resonator and an artificial atom, a superconducting qubit. The eigenstates of the system consist of a superposition of bare qubit-resonator states with a relative sign. When the qubit-resonator coupling strength is negligible compared to their own frequencies, the matrix element between excited eigenstates of different sign is very small in presence of a resonator drive, establishing a sign-preserving selection rule. Here, our qubit-resonator system operates in the ultrastrong coupling regime, where the coupling strength is 10% of the resonator frequency, allowing sign-changing transitions to be activated and, therefore, detected. This work shows that sign-changing transitions are an unambiguous, distinctive signature of systems operating in the ultrastrong coupling regime of the quantum Rabi model. These results pave the way to further studies of sign-preserving selection rules in multiqubit and multiphoton models. PMID:27273346

  5. [Anaysis on acupoint selection rule of acupuncture for trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Tao, Shengyu; Xu, Wen; Gao, Zhao; Dong, Qin

    2016-02-01

    The characteristics and rules of acupoint selection of acupuncture for trigeminal neuralgia were analyzed. By searching CNKI, VIP, WF, literature regarding acupuncture for trigeminal neuralgia from 1980 to 2013 was collected to establish an acupuncture prescription database. The data mining technology was applied to analyze the characteristics and rules of the acupoint selection. As a result, a total of 180 papers were included, involving 148 acupoints. It was found that the acupoints that had high frequency of selection included Hegu (LI 4), Xiaguan (ST 7), Fengchi (GB 20) and trigger points. The acupoints selected were distributed in 14 meridians, in which yangming meridian of hand-foot had a frequency of 41. 58%. The special acupoints including crossing points, yuan-primary points and five-shu points were widely used, accounting for 65. 9%. As for the branch of trigeminal nerve, the top-3 selected acupoints were Yangbai (GB 14), Yuyao (EX-HN 4), Cuanzhu (BL 2) in the first branch, Sibai (ST 2), Quanlian (SI 18), Yingxiang (LI 20) in the second branch, Jiache (ST 6), Xiaguan (ST 7), Dicang (ST 4) in the third branch. In conclusion, it is believed that the clinical treatment of trigeminal neural gia focuses on local acupoints in combination with nerve distribution-based acupoints and distal acupoints, also the special acupoints are emphasized. PMID:27348932

  6. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF RADIO-SELECTED BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; Becker, R. H.; Gregg, M. D.; Tran, H. D.; White, R. L.; Laurent-Muehleisen, S. A.

    2010-07-15

    We report spectropolarimetry of 30 radio-selected broad absorption line (BAL) quasars with the Keck Observatory, 25 from the sample of Becker et al. Both high- and low-ionization BAL quasars are represented, with redshifts ranging from 0.5 to 2.5. The spectropolarimetric properties of radio-selected BAL quasars are very similar to those of radio-quiet BAL quasars: a sizeable fraction (20%) shows large continuum polarization (2%-10%) usually rising toward short wavelengths; emission lines are typically less polarized than the continuum; and absorption line troughs often show large polarization jumps. There are no significant correlations between polarization properties and radio properties, including those indicative of system orientation, suggesting that BAL quasars are not simply normal quasars seen from an edge-on perspective.

  7. A prediction rule for selective screening of Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Gotz, H; van Bergen, J E A M; Veldhuijzen, I; Broer, J; Hoebe, C; Richardus, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Screening for Chlamydia trachomatis infections is aimed at the reduction of these infections and subsequent complications. Selective screening may increase the cost effectiveness of a screening programme. Few population based systematic screening programmes have been carried out and attempts to validate selective screening criteria have shown poor performance. This study describes the development of a prediction rule for estimating the risk of chlamydial infection as a basis for selective screening. Methods: A population based chlamydia screening study was performed in the Netherlands by inviting 21 000 15–29 year old women and men in urban and rural areas for home based urine testing. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for chlamydial infection among 6303 sexually active participants, and the discriminative ability was measured by the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Internal validity was assessed with bootstrap resampling techniques. Results: The prevalence of C trachomatis (CT) infection was 2.6% (95% CI 2.2 to 3.2) in women and 2.0% (95% CI 1.4 to 2.7) in men. Chlamydial infection was associated with high level of urbanisation, young age, Surinam/Antillian ethnicity, low/intermediate education, multiple lifetime partners, a new contact in the previous two months, no condom use at last sexual contact, and complaints of (post)coital bleeding in women and frequent urination in men. A prediction model with these risk factors showed adequate discriminative ability at internal validation (AUC 0.78). Conclusion: The prediction rule has the potential to guide individuals in their choice of participation when offered chlamydia screening and is a promising tool for selective CT screening at population level. PMID:15681717

  8. Selection rules for hadronic transitions of XYZ mesons.

    PubMed

    Braaten, Eric; Langmack, Christian; Smith, D Hudson

    2014-06-01

    Many of the XYZ mesons discovered in the last decade can be identified as bound states of a heavy quark and antiquark in Born-Oppenheimer (BO) potentials defined by the energy of gluon and light-quark fields in the presence of static color sources. The mesons include quarkonium hybrids, which are bound states in excited flavor-singlet BO potentials, and quarkonium tetraquarks, which are bound states in BO potentials with light-quark+antiquark flavor. The deepest hybrid potentials are known from lattice QCD calculations. The deepest tetraquark potentials can be inferred from lattice QCD calculations of static adjoint mesons. Selection rules for hadronic transitions are derived and used to identify XYZ mesons that are candidates for ground-state energy levels in the BO potentials for charmonium hybrids and tetraquarks. PMID:24949759

  9. Selective Absorption Mechanism for the Maintenance of Blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Akira; Itoh, Hisanori

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric blocking is one of the most influential phenomena in global atmospheric environments. The understanding of its dynamical processes is important to clarify weather extremes and the stratosphere-troposphere coupling and to extend forecast periods. In the dynamics of blocking, especially, its maintenance mechanism has been a stimulating topic for many meteorologists. About the maintenance mechanism of blocking, Shutts (1983) evaluated the effect of synoptic eddies in his numerical model and proposed the Eddy Straining Mechanism (hereafter, referred to as ESM). Using simple numerical models, he demonstrated that synoptic eddies strained in the north-south direction by blocking provide negative/positive vorticity to a blocking high/low and this vorticity forcing, i.e., the second-order flow maintains the blocking dipole structure against dissipation. Some pieces of evidence, however have shown that the ESM does not work well in several real cases of the block maintenance. For example, Arai and Mukougawa (2002) performed a similar experiment to Shutts (1983) and indicated the strong sensitivity of the ESM against a small meridional shift of the stormtrack (strictly speaking, wavemaker), or a small change of the size of high-frequency eddies. This is a very adverse constraint in the real atmosphere because the relative positions of blocking to the stormtrack tend to fluctuate from case to case so that they do not necessarily exist in the same latitude band. Thus, we propose a more realistic mechanism of the block maintenance named as the Selective Absorption Mechanism (hereafter referred to as SAM), in which a blocking anticyclone selectively and exclusively absorbs synoptic anticyclones. This mechanism is essentially the same mechanism as the Fujiwhara effect, which qualitatively explains that binary eddies with the same polarity merge and eddies with the opposite polarity separate. In this study, we verify the effectiveness of the SAM by observational

  10. Broadband Reflectionless Metasheets: Frequency-Selective Transmission and Perfect Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadchy, V. S.; Faniayeu, I. A.; Ra'di, Y.; Khakhomov, S. A.; Semchenko, I. V.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2015-07-01

    Energy of propagating electromagnetic waves can be fully absorbed in a thin lossy layer, but only in a narrow frequency band, as follows from the causality principle. On the other hand, it appears that there are no fundamental limitations on broadband matching of thin resonant absorbing layers. However, known thin absorbers produce significant reflections outside of the resonant absorption band. In this paper, we explore possibilities to realize a thin absorbing layer that produces no reflected waves in a very wide frequency range, while the transmission coefficient has a narrow peak of full absorption. Here we show, both theoretically and experimentally, that a thin resonant absorber, invisible in reflection in a very wide frequency range, can be realized if one and the same resonant mode of the absorbing array unit cells is utilized to create both electric and magnetic responses. We test this concept using chiral particles in each unit cell, arranged in a periodic planar racemic array, utilizing chirality coupling in each unit cell but compensating the field coupling at the macroscopic level. We prove that the concept and the proposed realization approach also can be used to create nonreflecting layers for full control of transmitted fields. Our results can have a broad range of potential applications over the entire electromagnetic spectrum including, for example, perfect ultracompact wave filters and selective multifrequency sensors.

  11. Selection of dynamical rules in spatial Prisoner's Dilemma games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, G.; Szolnoki, A.; Vukov, J.

    2009-07-01

    We study co-evolutionary Prisoner's Dilemma games where each player can imitate both the strategy and imitation rule from a randomly chosen neighbor with a probability dependent on the payoff difference when the player's income is collected from games with the neighbors. The players, located on the sites of a two-dimensional lattice, follow unconditional cooperation or defection and use individual strategy adoption rule described by a parameter. If the system is started from a random initial state then the present co-evolutionary rule drives the system towards a state where only one evolutionary rule remains alive even in the coexistence of cooperative and defective behaviors. The final rule is related to the optimum providing the highest level of cooperation and affected by the topology of the connectivity structure.

  12. Guided-wave approaches to spectrally selective energy absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of experiments designed to demonstrate spectrally selective absorption in dielectric waveguides on semiconductor substrates are reported. These experiments were conducted with three waveguides formed by sputtering films of PSK2 glass onto silicon-oxide layers grown on silicon substrates. The three waveguide samples were studied at 633 and 532 nm. The samples differed only in the thickness of the silicon-oxide layer, specifically 256 nm, 506 nm, and 740 nm. Agreement between theoretical predictions and measurements of propagation constants (mode angles) of the six or seven modes supported by these samples was excellent. However, the loss measurements were inconclusive because of high scattering losses in the structures fabricated (in excess of 10 dB/cm). Theoretical calculations indicated that the power distribution among all the modes supported by these structures will reach its steady state value after a propagation length of only 1 mm. Accordingly, the measured loss rates were found to be almost independent of which mode was initially excited. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment leads to the conclusion that low loss waveguides confirm the predicted loss rates.

  13. Incorporating Employee Heterogeneity into Default Rules for Retirement Plan Selection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goda, Gopi Shah; Manchester, Colleen Flaherty

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of incorporating heterogeneity into default rules by examining the choice between retirement plans at a firm that transitioned from a defined benefit (DB) to a defined contribution (DC) plan. The default plan for existing employees varied discontinuously depending on their age. Employing regression discontinuity techniques,…

  14. Comparing the Performance of Five Multidimensional CAT Selection Procedures with Different Stopping Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yao, Lihua

    2013-01-01

    Through simulated data, five multidimensional computerized adaptive testing (MCAT) selection procedures with varying test lengths are examined and compared using different stopping rules. Fixed item exposure rates are used for all the items, and the Priority Index (PI) method is used for the content constraints. Two stopping rules, standard error…

  15. A Method for the Comparison of Item Selection Rules in Computerized Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrada, Juan Ramon; Olea, Julio; Ponsoda, Vicente; Abad, Francisco Jose

    2010-01-01

    In a typical study comparing the relative efficiency of two item selection rules in computerized adaptive testing, the common result is that they simultaneously differ in accuracy and security, making it difficult to reach a conclusion on which is the more appropriate rule. This study proposes a strategy to conduct a global comparison of two or…

  16. Birefringence-Directed Raman Selection Rules in 2D Black Phosphorus Crystals.

    PubMed

    Mao, Nannan; Wu, Juanxia; Han, Bowen; Lin, Jingjing; Tong, Lianming; Zhang, Jin

    2016-05-01

    The incident and scattered light engaged in the Raman scattering process of low symmetry crystals always suffer from the birefringence-induced depolarization. Therefore, for anisotropic crystals, the classical Raman selection rules should be corrected by taking the birefringence effect into consideration. The appearance of the 2D anisotropic materials provides an excellent platform to explore the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules, due to its controllable thickness at the nanoscale that greatly simplifies the situation comparing with bulk materials. Herein, a theoretical and experimental investigation on the birefringence-directed Raman selection rules in the anisotropic black phosphorus (BP) crystals is presented. The abnormal angle-dependent polarized Raman scattering of the Ag modes in thin BP crystal, which deviates from the normal Raman selection rules, is successfully interpreted by the theoretical model based on birefringence. It is further confirmed by the examination of different Raman modes using different laser lines and BP samples of different thicknesses. PMID:27030911

  17. A collision-selection rule for a particle simulation method suited to vector computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baganoff, D.; Mcdonald, J. D.

    1990-01-01

    A theory is developed for a selection rule governing collisions in a particle simulation of rarefied gas-dynamic flows. The selection rule leads to an algorithmic form highly compatible with fine grain parallel decomposition, allowing for efficient utilization of supercomputers having vector or massively parallel single instruction multiple data architectures. A comparison of shock-wave profiles obtained using both the selection rule and Bird's direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method show excellent agreement. The equation on which the selection rule is based is shown to be directly related to the time-counter procedure in the DSMC method. The results of several example simulations of representative rarefied flows are presented, for which the number of particles used ranged from 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 7th demonstrating the greatly improved computational efficiency of the method.

  18. AdS perturbations, isometries, selection rules and the Higgs oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evnin, Oleg; Nivesvivat, Rongvoram

    2016-01-01

    Dynamics of small-amplitude perturbations in the global anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime is restricted by selection rules that forbid effective energy transfer between certain sets of normal modes. The selection rules arise algebraically because some integrals of products of AdS mode functions vanish. Here, we reveal the relation of these selection rules to AdS isometries. The formulation we discover through this systematic approach is both simpler and stronger than what has been reported previously. In addition to the selection rule considerations, we develop a number of useful representations for the global AdS mode functions, with connections to algebraic structures of the Higgs oscillator, a superintegrable system describing a particle on a sphere in an inverse cosine-squared potential, where the AdS isometries play the role of a spectrum-generating algebra.

  19. Bigger Knows Better: Young Children Selectively Learn Rule Games from Adults Rather than from Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Hamann, Katharina; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Preschoolers' selective learning from adult versus peer models was investigated. Extending previous research, children from age 3 were shown to selectively learn simple rule games from adult rather than peer models. Furthermore, this selective learning was not confined to preferentially performing certain acts oneself, but more specifically had a…

  20. Towards a Model Selection Rule for Quantum State Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholten, Travis; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    Quantum tomography on large and/or complex systems will rely heavily on model selection techniques, which permit on-the-fly selection of small efficient statistical models (e.g. small Hilbert spaces) that accurately fit the data. Many model selection tools, such as hypothesis testing or Akaike's AIC, rely implicitly or explicitly on the Wilks Theorem, which predicts the behavior of the loglikelihood ratio statistic (LLRS) used to choose between models. We used Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the LLRS in quantum state tomography, and found that it disagrees dramatically with Wilks' prediction. We propose a simple explanation for this behavior; namely, that boundaries (in state space and between models) play a significant role in determining the distribution of the LLRS. The resulting distribution is very complex, depending strongly both on the true state and the nature of the data. We consider a simplified model that neglects anistropy in the Fisher information, derive an almost analytic prediction for the mean value of the LLRS, and compare it to numerical experiments. While our simplified model outperforms the Wilks Theorem, it still does not predict the LLRS accurately, implying that alternative methods may be necessary for tomographic model selection. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE.

  1. Simple rules help select best hydrocarbon distillation scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchezllanes, M.T.; Perez, A.L.; Martinez, M.P.; Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Rosal, R. del )

    1993-12-06

    Separation economics depend mainly on investment for major equipment and energy consumption. This relationship, together with the fact that, in most cases, many alternative schemes will be proposed, make it essential to find an optimum scheme that minimizes overall costs. Practical solutions are found by applying heuristics -- exploratory problem-solving techniques that eliminate alternatives without applying rigorous mathematical procedures. These techniques have been applied to a case study. In the case study, a hydrocarbon mixture will be transported through a pipeline to a fractionation plant, where it will be separated into commercial products for distribution. The fractionation will consist of a simple train of distillation columns, the sequence of which will be defined by applying heuristic rules and determining the required thermal duties for each column. The facility must separate ethane, propane and mixed butanes, natural gasoline (light straight-run, or LSR, gasoline), and condensate (heavy naphtha). The ethane will be delivered to an ethylene plant as a gaseous stream, the propane and butanes will be stored in cryogenic tanks, and the gasoline and heavy naphtha also will be stored.

  2. Selectivity of the optical-absorption method based on an instrumental pick out of Fourier components in the absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarevsky, Yu. V.; Kolesnikov, S. A.; Kolesnikova, E. S.; Turutin, Yu. A.; Konopelko, L. A.; Shor, N. B.

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of interference-polarization filters (IPFs) in the structure of an optical-absorption analyzer makes it possible to pick out a harmonic (a Fourier component of the absorption spectrum) providing measurement with the highest sensitivity. The selectivity of such a method of analysis is determined by overlapping the oscillations of the measured and interfering components. By the example of measurement in benzene in the presence of an interfering component (toluene), the possibility is considered for the optimization of selectivity due to the variation of the path-difference dispersion for ordinary and extraordinary interfering rays. The metrological characteristics of the interference-polarization analyzer of C6H6 confirming the results of calculations are given.

  3. Selection of logical patterns for constructing a decision rule of recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antamoshkin, A. N.; Masich, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate an aspect of the construction of logical recognition algorithms - selection of patterns in the set of found patterns in the data. We consider the recognition problem for objects described by binary attributes and divided into two classes. A result of performance the procedure of searching patterns on the training set (a set of input data) is a number of patterns found. The question is to select some patterns from their total number to form a decision rule. That can not only reduce size of the decision rule, but also to improve recognition. One way to make a selection of patterns is select a subset of patterns that are needed to cover all objects of the training sample. This problem is formulated as an optimization problem. The resulting optimization model represents a problem of conditional pseudo-Boolean optimization, in which the objective function and the constraints functions are unimodal monotone pseudo-Boolean functions. Another way is to make the selection of such patterns, which when used together will increase separating capacity of the decision rule. As a criterion for the formation of the decision rule is considered the width of the separation margin. One more way is the selection supporting objects, rules are formed on the basis of which. Selection of logical patterns, which is made in accordance with the proposed approach, can significantly reduce the number of patterns and simplify the decision rule, almost without compromising the accuracy of recognition. This makes the decision rule clearer, and the results more interpretable. It is necessary to support decision making for recognition.

  4. Cost of cooperation rules selection for cheats in bacterial metapopulations.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Z; Kümmerli, R

    2012-03-01

    Bacteria secrete a large variety of beneficial metabolites into the environment, which can be shared as public goods among producing bacteria, but also be exploited by nonproducing cheats. Here, we focus on cooperative production of iron-chelating molecules (siderophores) in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa to study how relevant ecological factors influence selection for cheating. We designed patch-structured metapopulations that allowed us introducing among-patch ecological variation. We found that cheating readily evolved in uniform iron-limited environments. This finding is explained by severe iron limitation demanding high siderophore-production efforts, which results in high metabolic costs accruing to cooperators, and thereby facilitates the spread of cheats. In contrast, we observed a significant reduction or even negation of selection for cheating in metapopulations where we introduced patches with increased iron availability and/or opportunities to recycle siderophores. These findings are compatible with the view that cheats are less likely to invade in environments that allow bacteria to reduce siderophore-production efforts, as this lowers the overall metabolic costs accruing to cooperators. Because we increased iron availability and siderophore recycling opportunities moderately, and only in some patches, our findings demonstrate that already-small local variations in ecological conditions as occurring in nature can significantly affect selection for public-goods secretion in microbes. In addition, we found that most (84.6%) of the evolved cheats were partially deficient for siderophore production and not loss-of-function mutants. Genetic considerations indicate that mutations leading to partial deficiency occur more frequent than mutations leading to loss of function, but also suggest that partially deficient mutants might often be the more competitive cheats. PMID:22168669

  5. Highly hydrophobic and oleophilic foam for selective absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Changhong

    2009-12-01

    In this article, both highly hydrophobic and oleophilic foam were fabricated by coating inner surface of polyurethane (PU) foam with a super-hydrophobic film. The contact angle of the foam is large as 152.2° for water, and 0° for kerosene. The foam can absorb kerosene selectively from kerosene-water mixture and be regenerated easily. The foam may be used to reclaim oil from polluted natural water area resulted from shipwreck or leakage.

  6. Suppressed Conductance From Spin Selection Rules in F-CNT-F Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Nikolaus; Morgan-Wall, Tyler; Markovic, Nina

    Conductance through a quantum dot can be suppressed due to spin selection rules governing the hoping of an additional electron onto an already-occupied quantum dot. Measurements of this effect in a carbon nanotube quantum dot with ferromagnetic contacts will be presented. Suppressed conductance peaks are observed in the Coulomb diamond plots at zero field and explained using spin selection rules. The pattern of suppressed peaks is observed to change with applied magnetic field as the spin ground state of the occupied quantum dot changes. This work was supported by NSF DMR-1106167.

  7. Formal selection rules for Brillouin scattering in integrated waveguides and structured fibers.

    PubMed

    Wolff, C; Steel, M J; Poulton, C G

    2014-12-29

    We derive formal selection rules for Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) in structured waveguides. Using a group-theoretical approach, we show how the waveguide symmetry determines which optical and acoustic modes interact for both forward and backward SBS. We present a general framework for determining this interaction and give important examples for SBS in waveguides with rectangular, triangular and hexagonal symmetry. The important role played by degeneracy of the optical modes is illustrated. These selection rules are important for SBS-based device design and for a full understanding the physics of SBS in structured waveguides. PMID:25607211

  8. Modafinil Effects on Middle-Frequency Oscillatory Power During Rule Selection in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Minzenberg, Michael J; Yoon, Jong H; Cheng, Yaoan; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-01-01

    Control-related cognitive processes such as rule selection are associated with cortical oscillations in the theta, alpha and, beta ranges, and modulated by catecholamine neurotransmission. Thus, a potential strategy for improving cognitive control deficits in schizophrenia would be to use pro-catecholamine pharmacological agents to augment these control-related oscillations. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled (within-subjects) study, we tested the effects of adjunctive single-dose modafinil 200 mg on rule-related 4–30 Hz oscillations in 23 stable schizophrenia patients, using EEG during cognitive control task performance. EEG data underwent time-frequency decomposition with Morlet wavelets to determine the power of 4–30 Hz oscillations. Modafinil (relative to placebo) enhanced oscillatory power associated with high-control rule selection in theta, alpha, and beta ranges, with modest effects during rule maintenance. Modafinil treatment in schizophrenia augments middle-frequency cortical oscillatory power associated with rule selection, and may subserve diverse subcomponent processes in proactive cognitive control. PMID:24964814

  9. Modafinil effects on middle-frequency oscillatory power during rule selection in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Minzenberg, Michael J; Yoon, Jong H; Cheng, Yaoan; Carter, Cameron S

    2014-12-01

    Control-related cognitive processes such as rule selection are associated with cortical oscillations in the theta, alpha and, beta ranges, and modulated by catecholamine neurotransmission. Thus, a potential strategy for improving cognitive control deficits in schizophrenia would be to use pro-catecholamine pharmacological agents to augment these control-related oscillations. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled (within-subjects) study, we tested the effects of adjunctive single-dose modafinil 200 mg on rule-related 4-30 Hz oscillations in 23 stable schizophrenia patients, using EEG during cognitive control task performance. EEG data underwent time-frequency decomposition with Morlet wavelets to determine the power of 4-30 Hz oscillations. Modafinil (relative to placebo) enhanced oscillatory power associated with high-control rule selection in theta, alpha, and beta ranges, with modest effects during rule maintenance. Modafinil treatment in schizophrenia augments middle-frequency cortical oscillatory power associated with rule selection, and may subserve diverse subcomponent processes in proactive cognitive control. PMID:24964814

  10. Highly selective population of two excited states in nonresonant two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Shi-An; Sun, Zhen-Rong

    2011-08-01

    A nonresonant two-photon absorption process can be manipulated by tailoring the ultra-short laser pulse. In this paper, we theoretically demonstrate a highly selective population of two excited states in the nonresonant two-photon absorption process by rationally designing a spectral phase distribution. Our results show that one excited state is maximally populated while the other state population is widely tunable from zero to the maximum value. We believe that the theoretical results may play an important role in the selective population of a more complex nonlinear process comprising nonresonant two-photon absorption, such as resonance-mediated (2+1)-three-photon absorption and (2+1)-resonant multiphoton ionization.

  11. Strong absorption and selective emission from engineered metals with dielectric coatings.

    PubMed

    Streyer, W; Law, S; Rooney, G; Jacobs, T; Wasserman, D

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate strong-to-perfect absorption across a wide range of mid-infrared wavelengths (5-12µm) using a two-layer system consisting of heavily-doped silicon and a thin high-index germanium dielectric layer. We demonstrate spectral control of the absorption resonance by varying the thickness of the dielectric layer. The absorption resonance is shown to be largely polarization-independent and angle-invariant. Upon heating, we observe selective thermal emission from our materials. Experimental data is compared to an analytical model of our structures with strong agreement. PMID:23572000

  12. Selecting Pesticides and Nonchemical Alternatives: Green Thumbs' Rules of Thumb Decision Tools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grieshop, James I.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A sample of 78 (of 320) home gardeners use rules of thumb (heuristics) to choose between chemical pesticides and nonchemical alternatives. Pesticides rank low in 24 choice attributes where alternatives rank high, and vice versa. Gender, age, and years of pesticide use correlate with pesticide selection. (SK)

  13. Atomic partial charges in condensed phase from an exact sum rule for infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2014-05-01

    A general sum rule for infrared intensities provides a definition of effective partial charges which can be experimentally obtained using isotopic substitutions and is valid in both gas and condensed phases. Of particular interest is the case of molecular liquids. We have, therefore, determined the hydrogen partial charges in liquid methanol and liquid water from the available literature. The resulting charges are 0.63 e and 0.14 e for hydrogen atoms bounded to the methanol oxygen and carbon atoms, respectively, and 0.55 e for hydrogen atoms in liquid water. The effective partial charges in liquid water were also computed from density functional based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and found in good agreement with experiment.

  14. A Flexible Mechanism of Rule Selection Enables Rapid Feature-Based Reinforcement Learning

    PubMed Central

    Balcarras, Matthew; Womelsdorf, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Learning in a new environment is influenced by prior learning and experience. Correctly applying a rule that maps a context to stimuli, actions, and outcomes enables faster learning and better outcomes compared to relying on strategies for learning that are ignorant of task structure. However, it is often difficult to know when and how to apply learned rules in new contexts. In our study we explored how subjects employ different strategies for learning the relationship between stimulus features and positive outcomes in a probabilistic task context. We test the hypothesis that task naive subjects will show enhanced learning of feature specific reward associations by switching to the use of an abstract rule that associates stimuli by feature type and restricts selections to that dimension. To test this hypothesis we designed a decision making task where subjects receive probabilistic feedback following choices between pairs of stimuli. In the task, trials are grouped in two contexts by blocks, where in one type of block there is no unique relationship between a specific feature dimension (stimulus shape or color) and positive outcomes, and following an un-cued transition, alternating blocks have outcomes that are linked to either stimulus shape or color. Two-thirds of subjects (n = 22/32) exhibited behavior that was best fit by a hierarchical feature-rule model. Supporting the prediction of the model mechanism these subjects showed significantly enhanced performance in feature-reward blocks, and rapidly switched their choice strategy to using abstract feature rules when reward contingencies changed. Choice behavior of other subjects (n = 10/32) was fit by a range of alternative reinforcement learning models representing strategies that do not benefit from applying previously learned rules. In summary, these results show that untrained subjects are capable of flexibly shifting between behavioral rules by leveraging simple model-free reinforcement learning and context

  15. A Flexible Mechanism of Rule Selection Enables Rapid Feature-Based Reinforcement Learning.

    PubMed

    Balcarras, Matthew; Womelsdorf, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    Learning in a new environment is influenced by prior learning and experience. Correctly applying a rule that maps a context to stimuli, actions, and outcomes enables faster learning and better outcomes compared to relying on strategies for learning that are ignorant of task structure. However, it is often difficult to know when and how to apply learned rules in new contexts. In our study we explored how subjects employ different strategies for learning the relationship between stimulus features and positive outcomes in a probabilistic task context. We test the hypothesis that task naive subjects will show enhanced learning of feature specific reward associations by switching to the use of an abstract rule that associates stimuli by feature type and restricts selections to that dimension. To test this hypothesis we designed a decision making task where subjects receive probabilistic feedback following choices between pairs of stimuli. In the task, trials are grouped in two contexts by blocks, where in one type of block there is no unique relationship between a specific feature dimension (stimulus shape or color) and positive outcomes, and following an un-cued transition, alternating blocks have outcomes that are linked to either stimulus shape or color. Two-thirds of subjects (n = 22/32) exhibited behavior that was best fit by a hierarchical feature-rule model. Supporting the prediction of the model mechanism these subjects showed significantly enhanced performance in feature-reward blocks, and rapidly switched their choice strategy to using abstract feature rules when reward contingencies changed. Choice behavior of other subjects (n = 10/32) was fit by a range of alternative reinforcement learning models representing strategies that do not benefit from applying previously learned rules. In summary, these results show that untrained subjects are capable of flexibly shifting between behavioral rules by leveraging simple model-free reinforcement learning and context

  16. Enhancement mechanism of the additional absorbent on the absorption of the absorbing composite using a type-based mixing rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yonggang; Yuan, Liming; Zhang, Deyuan

    2016-04-01

    A silicone rubber composite filled with carbonyl iron particles and four different carbonous materials (carbon black, graphite, carbon fiber or multi-walled carbon nanotubes) was prepared using a two-roller mixture. The complex permittivity and permeability were measured using a vector network analyzer at the frequency of 2-18 GHz. Then a type-based mixing rule based on the dielectric absorbent and magnetic absorbent was proposed to reveal the enhancing mechanism on the permittivity and permeability. The enforcement effect lies in the decreased percolation threshold and the changing pending parameter as the carbonous materials were added. The reflection loss (RL) result showed the added carbonous materials enhanced the absorption in the lower frequency range, the RL decrement value being about 2 dB at 4-5 GHz with a thickness of 1 mm. All the added carbonous materials reinforced the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composites. The maximum increment value of the SE was about 3.23 dB at 0.5 mm and 4.65 dB at 1 mm, respectively. The added carbonous materials could be effective additives for enforcing the absorption and shielding property of the absorbers.

  17. [Study on rules of acupoints selection for vertigo in ancient acupuncture].

    PubMed

    Zhan, Qiana; Chen, Hua-De

    2014-04-01

    The characteristics of selection and matching acupoint and application rules of meridians in ancient acupuncture literature for vertigo were explored. The data were collected from literature regarding acupuncture for vertigo from the pre-Qin period to Qing dynasty and then database was established. Frequency statistics method and comparison of support degree were applied to analyze and explore application rules of acupoints and meridians, while association rules in data mining was used to extract combinations of acupoints. As a result, for treatment of vertigo, according to frequency of use and support degree, generally the most selected acupoints, in turn, were Fengchi (GB 20), Shangxing (GV 23), Yanggu (SI 5), Jiexi (ST 41), Zulinqi (GB 41) and Shenting (GV 24), etc.; the most methods for matching acupoint were combination of adjacent acupoints, combination of same-meridian acupoints, combination of the superior-inferior acupoints, combination of yang-meridian and yang-meridian acupoints and combination of child-mother meridians acupoints; the most selected meridians were bladder meridian of foot-taiyang, gallbladder meridian of foot-shaoyang and governor vessel. Compared between the ancient and modern literature, it was found out that the ancient and modern clinic has same points in selection of acupoint-meridian and matching acupoints methods. However, the use of Yanggu (SI 5), Jiexi (ST 41) and Feiyang (BL 58) as well as combination of child-mother meridians acupoints were less seen in modern clinic, which could provide new reference. PMID:24946637

  18. COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF BIOLOGICALLY RELEVANT ARSENICALS BY PH-SELECTIVE HYDRIDE GENERATION-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory


    A method based on pH-selective generation and separation of arsines is commonly used for analysis of inorganic, methylated, and dimethylated trivalent and pentavalent arsenicals by hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS). We have optimized this method to pe...

  19. Code-specific learning rules improve action selection by populations of spiking neurons.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Johannes; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2014-08-01

    Population coding is widely regarded as a key mechanism for achieving reliable behavioral decisions. We previously introduced reinforcement learning for population-based decision making by spiking neurons. Here we generalize population reinforcement learning to spike-based plasticity rules that take account of the postsynaptic neural code. We consider spike/no-spike, spike count and spike latency codes. The multi-valued and continuous-valued features in the postsynaptic code allow for a generalization of binary decision making to multi-valued decision making and continuous-valued action selection. We show that code-specific learning rules speed up learning both for the discrete classification and the continuous regression tasks. The suggested learning rules also speed up with increasing population size as opposed to standard reinforcement learning rules. Continuous action selection is further shown to explain realistic learning speeds in the Morris water maze. Finally, we introduce the concept of action perturbation as opposed to the classical weight- or node-perturbation as an exploration mechanism underlying reinforcement learning. Exploration in the action space greatly increases the speed of learning as compared to exploration in the neuron or weight space. PMID:24875790

  20. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties of Carbon Black/Silicone Rubber Coating by Frequency-Selective Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaoning; Luo, Fa; Gao, Lu; Qing, Yuchang; Zhou, Wancheng; Zhu, Dongmei

    2016-06-01

    A square frequency-selective surface (FSS) design has been employed to improve the microwave absorption properties of carbon black/silicone rubber (CBSR) composite coating. The FSS is placed on the surface of the CBSR coating. The effects of FSS design parameters on the microwave absorption properties of the CBSR coating have been investigated, including the size and period of the FSS design, and the thickness and permittivity of the coating. Simulation results indicate that the absorption peak for the CBSR coating alone is related to its thickness and electromagnetic parameters, while the combination of the CBSR coating with a FSS can exhibit a new absorption peak in the reflection curve; the frequency of the new absorption peak is determined by the resonance of the square FSS design and tightly depends on the size of the squares, with larger squares in the FSS design leading to a lower frequency of the new absorption peak. The enhancement of the absorption performance depends on achievement of a new absorption peak using a suitable␣size and period of the FSS design. In addition, the FSS design has a stable␣frequency response for both transverse electromagnetic (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations as the incident angle varies from 0° to 40°. The optimized results indicate that the bandwidth with reflection loss below -5 dB can encompass the whole frequency range from 8 GHz to 18 GHz for thickness of the CBSR coating of only 1.8 mm. The simulation results are confirmed by experiments.

  1. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  2. Theoretical calculations on the electron absorption spectra of selected Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Du, Ping

    1993-01-01

    As a theoretical component of the joint effort with the laboratory of Dr. Lou Allamandola to search for potential candidates for interstellar organic carbon compound that are responsible for the visible diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIB's), quantum mechanical calculations were performed on the electron absorption spectra of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and derivatives. In the completed project, 15 different species of naphthalene, its hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives, and corresponding cations and anions were studied. Using semiempirical quantum mechanical method INDO/S, the ground electronic state of each species was evaluated with restricted Hartree-Fock scheme and limited configuration interaction. The lowest energy spin state for each species was used for electron absorption calculations. Results indicate that these calculations are accurate enough to reproduce the spectra of naphthalene cation and anion observed in neon matrix. The spectral pattern of the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives predicted based on these results indicate that the electron configuration of the pi orbitals of these species is the dominant determinant. A combined list of 19 absorptions calculated from 4500 A to 10,400 A were compiled and suggested as potential candidates that are relevant for the DIB's absorptions. Continued studies on pyrene and derivatives revealed the ground state symmetries and multiplicities of its neutral, anionic, and cationic species. Spectral calculations show that the cation (B(sub 3g)-2) and the anion (A(sub u)-2) are more likely to have low energy absorptions in the regions between 10 kK and 20 kK, similar to naphthalene. These absorptions, together with those to be determined from the hydrogen abstraction and addition derivatives of pyrene, can be used to provide additional candidates and suggest experimental work in the search for interstellar compounds that are responsible for DIB's.

  3. [Rules analysis of acupoint selection on perimenopausal syndrome treated with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Ma, Mengmeng; Wang, Jian; Wang, Rui

    2015-04-01

    With the keywords of "acupuncture" "acupuncture and moxibustion" "perimenopausal syndrome" "rules of acupoint selection", the clinical literature in recent 10 years regarding perimenopausal syndrome treated with acupuncture and moxibustion was searched from China National Knowledge Infrastructure(CNKI). One hundred and ninety-seven relevant articles were acquired,and after excluding, total 67 articles were in accord with research criterion. With method of artificial count, acupoints selected in the inclusive articles were counted. Frequencies of main acupoints, matching acupoints,meridial distributions and locations of the acupoints selected were calculated,and then rules on main acupoints, matching acupoints, meridial distributions and acupoints locations were analyzed. The result indicates that the acupoints with higher selection frequency on perimenopausal syndrome treated with acupuncture and moxibustion are Sanyinjiao(SP 6), Baihui(GV 20),Taichong(LR 3) Shenshu(BL 23), Guanyuan(CV 4), Shenmen(HT 7),Taixi(KI 3), Zusanli(ST 36), Pishu(BL 20) and Ganshu(BL 18), and the meridians are mainly concentrated on governor vessel, bladder meridian, kidney meridian,stomach meridian, conception vessel and spleen meridian,and the distribution of acupoints are mostly concentrated on the 4 limbs and the back and waist. PMID:26054143

  4. A novel artificial immune clonal selection classification and rule mining with swarm learning model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sheshtawi, Khaled A.; Abdul-Kader, Hatem M.; Elsisi, Ashraf B.

    2013-06-01

    Metaheuristic optimisation algorithms have become popular choice for solving complex problems. By integrating Artificial Immune clonal selection algorithm (CSA) and particle swarm optimisation (PSO) algorithm, a novel hybrid Clonal Selection Classification and Rule Mining with Swarm Learning Algorithm (CS2) is proposed. The main goal of the approach is to exploit and explore the parallel computation merit of Clonal Selection and the speed and self-organisation merits of Particle Swarm by sharing information between clonal selection population and particle swarm. Hence, we employed the advantages of PSO to improve the mutation mechanism of the artificial immune CSA and to mine classification rules within datasets. Consequently, our proposed algorithm required less training time and memory cells in comparison to other AIS algorithms. In this paper, classification rule mining has been modelled as a miltiobjective optimisation problem with predictive accuracy. The multiobjective approach is intended to allow the PSO algorithm to return an approximation to the accuracy and comprehensibility border, containing solutions that are spread across the border. We compared our proposed algorithm classification accuracy CS2 with five commonly used CSAs, namely: AIRS1, AIRS2, AIRS-Parallel, CLONALG, and CSCA using eight benchmark datasets. We also compared our proposed algorithm classification accuracy CS2 with other five methods, namely: Naïve Bayes, SVM, MLP, CART, and RFB. The results show that the proposed algorithm is comparable to the 10 studied algorithms. As a result, the hybridisation, built of CSA and PSO, can develop respective merit, compensate opponent defect, and make search-optimal effect and speed better.

  5. Organic-inorganic hybrid gels for the selective absorption of oils from water.

    PubMed

    Ozan Aydin, Gulsah; Bulbul Sonmez, Hayal

    2016-06-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid gels were synthesized by the condensation of a linear aliphatic diol (1,8-octanediol) and altering the chain length of the alkyltriethoxysilanes (from ethyltriethoxysilane to hexadecyltrimethoxysilane) through a bulk polymerization process without using any initiator, activator, catalyst, or solvent for the selective removal of oils from water. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and solid-state (13)C and (29)Si cross-polarization magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (CPMAS NMR) were used for the structural analysis of hybrid gels. Thermal properties of the hybrid gels were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Oil absorbency of organic-inorganic hybrid gels was determined by oil absorption tests. The results showed that hybrid gels have high and fast absorption capacities and excellent reusability. Good selectivity, high thermal stability, low density, and excellent recyclability for the oil removal give the material potential applications. PMID:26939691

  6. ORTHO-PARA SELECTION RULES IN THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY OF INTERSTELLAR AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, A.; Hily-Blant, P.; Le Gal, R.; Rist, C.

    2013-06-10

    The ortho-para chemistry of ammonia in the cold interstellar medium is investigated using a gas-phase chemical network. Branching ratios for the primary reaction chain involved in the formation and destruction of ortho- and para-NH{sub 3} were derived using angular momentum rules based on the conservation of the nuclear spin. We show that the 'anomalous' ortho-to-para ratio of ammonia ({approx}0.7) observed in various interstellar regions is in fact consistent with nuclear spin selection rules in a para-enriched H{sub 2} gas. This ratio is found to be independent of temperature in the range 5-30 K. We also predict an ortho-to-para ratio of {approx}2.3 for NH{sub 2}. We conclude that a low ortho-to-para ratio of H{sub 2} naturally drives the ortho-to-para ratios of nitrogen hydrides below the statistical values.

  7. How absorption selected galaxies trace the general high-redshift galaxy population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Lise

    2015-08-01

    Strong absorption lines seen in quasar spectra arise when the lines of sight to the quasars intersect intervening galaxies. The associated metal absorption lines from the strongest absorption lines, the damped Lyman alpha absorbers (DLAs), allow us to trace the metallicity of galaxies back to redshifts z>5. Typical metallicities range from 0.1-100% solar metallicities with a huge scatter at any given redshift. Understanding the nature of galaxies that host DLAs is one strategy to probe the early phase and origin of stars in the outskirts of present-day galaxy disks.The search for emission from the elusive high-redshift DLA galaxies has reached a mature state now that we have determined how to best identify the absorbing galaxies. From a growing number of emission-line detections from DLA galaxies at redshifts ranging between 0.1 and 3, we can analyse galaxies in both absorption and emission, and probe the gas-phase metallicities in the outskirts and halos of the galaxies.By combining information for galaxies seen in emission and absorption, I will show that there is a relation between DLA metallicities and the host galaxy luminosities similar to the well-known the mass-metallicity relation for luminosity selected galaxies. This implies that DLA galaxies are drawn from the general population of low- to intermediate mass galaxies. We can determine a metallicity gradient in the extended halo of the galaxies out to ~40 kpc, and this allows us to reproduce observed galaxy correlation functions derived from conventional samples of luminosity selected galaxies.

  8. Selection rules for electromagnetic transitions in triaxially deformed odd-A nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Kosai; Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko

    2008-06-15

    The approximate selection rules for the interband and intraband electromagnetic transitions are predicted referring to two quantum numbers, which are derived from an algebraic solution for the particle-rotor model with one high-j nucleon coupled to a triaxially deformed core. It is shown that the inclusion of angular momentum dependence for moments of inertia reproduces the experimental excitation energies relative to a reference quite well both for positive and negative parity TSD bands in {sup 161,163,165,167}Lu.

  9. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. II - Data calibration and absorption-line selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Saxe, David H.; Weymann, Ray J.; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    We present the observational and data processing aspects of the Hubble Space Telescope Quasar Absorption Line Key Project. Topics discussed include the observational technique, calibration of the data, software that simulates the data, the automated procedure used to identify and characterize the absorption features, and the determination of the sensitivity limits of the survey.

  10. Comparison of the Electronic Transitions of Unconjugated Thiones and Imines: An Exercise in the Application of Symmetry Selection Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worman, James J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show how symmetry selection rules can be used to determine whether certain of the electronic transitions exhibited by the title compounds are allowed or forbidden by symmetry. (Author/CP)

  11. [Acupoints selection rules analysis of ancient acupuncture for urinary incontinence based on data mining technology].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tan, Zhigao; Cao, Juanshu; Gong, Houwu; Qin, Zuoai; Zhong, Feng; Cao, Yue; Wei, Yanrong

    2015-12-01

    Based on ancient literature of acupuncture in Canon of Chinese Medicine (4th edition), the articles regarding acupuncture for urinary incontinence were retrieved and collected to establish a database. By Weka data mining software, the multi-level association rules analysis method was applied to analyze the acupoints selection characteristics and rules of ancient acupuncture for treatment of urinary incontinence. Totally 356 articles of acupuncture for urinary incontinence were collected, involving 41 acupoints with a total frequency of 364. As a result, (1) the acupoints in the yin-meridian of hand and foot were highly valued, as the frequency of acupoints in yin-meridians was 2.6 times than that in yang-meridians, and the frequency of acupoints selected was the most in the liver meridian of foot-jueyin; (2) the acupoints in bladder meridian of foot-taiyang were also highly valued, and among three yang-meridians of foot, the frequency of acupoints in the bladder meridian of foot-taiyang was 54, accounting for 65.85% (54/82); (3) more acupoints selected were located in the lower limbs and abdomen; (4) specific acupoints in above meridians were mostly selected, presenting 73.2% (30/41) to the ratio of number and 79.4% (289/364) to the frequency, respectively; (5) Zhongji (CV 3), the front-mu point of bladder meridian, was seldom selected in the ancient acupuncture literature, which was different from modern literature reports. The results show that urinary incontinence belongs to external genitalia diseases, which should be treated from yin, indicating more yin-meridians be used and special acupoints be focused on. It is essential to focus inheritance and innovation in TCM clinical treatment, and applying data mining technology to ancient literature of acupuncture could provide classic theory basis for TCM clinical treatment. PMID:26964186

  12. Hidden selection rules, M5-instantons and fluxes in F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Luca; Weigand, Timo

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a new approach to investigate the selection rules governing the contributions of fluxed M5-instantons to the F-theory four-dimensional effective action, with emphasis on the generation of charged matter F-terms. The structure of such couplings is unraveled by exploiting the perturbative and non-perturbative homological relations, introduced in our companion paper [1], which encode the interplay between the self-dual 3-form flux on the M5-brane, the background 4-form flux and certain fibral curves. The latter are wrapped by time-like M2-branes representing matter insertions in the instanton path integral. In particular, we clarify how fluxed M5-instantons detect the presence of geometrically massive U(1)s which are responsible for `hidden' selection rules. We discuss how for non-generic embeddings the M5-instanton can probe `locally massless' U(1) symmetries if the rank of its Mordell-Weil group is enhanced compared to that of the bulk. As a phenomenological off-spring we propose a new type of non-perturbative corrections to Yukawa couplings which may change the rank of the Yukawa matrix. Along the way, we also gain new insights into the structure of massive U(1) gauge fluxes in the stable degeneration limit.

  13. Selective spatial damping of propagating kink waves due to resonant absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terradas, J.; Goossens, M.; Verth, G.

    2010-12-01

    Context. There is observational evidence of propagating kink waves driven by photospheric motions. These disturbances, interpreted as kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves are attenuated as they propagate upwards in the solar corona. Aims: We show that resonant absorption provides a simple explanation to the spatial damping of these waves. Methods: Kink MHD waves are studied using a cylindrical model of solar magnetic flux tubes, which includes a non-uniform layer at the tube boundary. Assuming that the frequency is real and the longitudinal wavenumber complex, the damping length and damping per wavelength produced by resonant absorption are analytically calculated in the thin tube (TT) approximation, valid for coronal waves. This assumption is relaxed in the case of chromospheric tube waves and filament thread waves. Results: The damping length of propagating kink waves due to resonant absorption is a monotonically decreasing function of frequency. For kink waves with low frequencies, the damping length is exactly inversely proportional to frequency, and we denote this as the TGV relation. When moving to high frequencies, the TGV relation continues to be an exceptionally good approximation of the actual dependency of the damping length on frequency. This dependency means that resonant absorption is selective as it favours low-frequency waves and can efficiently remove high-frequency waves from a broad band spectrum of kink waves. The efficiency of the damping due to resonant absorption depends on the properties of the equilibrium model, in particular on the width of the non-uniform layer and the steepness of the variation in the local Alfvén speed. Conclusions: Resonant absorption is an effective mechanism for the spatial damping of propagating kink waves. It is selective because the damping length is inversely proportional to frequency so that the damping becomes more severe with increasing frequency. This means that radial inhomogeneity can cause solar

  14. Comparative accuracy of the Albedo, transmission and absorption for selected radiative transfer approximations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.; HARSHVARDHAN

    1986-01-01

    Illustrations of both the relative and absolute accuracy of eight different radiative transfer approximations as a function of optical thickness, solar zenith angle and single scattering albedo are given. Computational results for the plane albedo, total transmission and fractional absorption were obtained for plane-parallel atmospheres composed of cloud particles. These computations, which were obtained using the doubling method, are compared with comparable results obtained using selected radiative transfer approximations. Comparisons were made between asymptotic theory for thick layers and the following widely used two stream approximations: Coakley-Chylek's models 1 and 2, Meador-Weaver, Eddington, delta-Eddington, PIFM and delta-discrete ordinates.

  15. Is selective absorption of ultrasoft x-rays biologically important in mammalian cells?

    PubMed

    Goodhead, D T; Thacker, J; Cox, R

    1981-11-01

    This paper tests whether photon absorption processes in particular atomic element(s) may be responsible for the observed high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ultrasoft X-rays. The effectiveness of titanium K characteristic X-rays (4.55 keV) is compared with previous observations for aluminium (1.5 keV) and carbon (0.28 keV) K ultrasoft X-rays. For a given absorbed dose, five times more Ti K than Al K photons are absorbed in phosphorus; since Al K X-rays are observed to be more effective in killing human and hamster cells it is concluded that absorption in phosphorus does not play a dominant lethal role. This is supported by the observation that the absolute number of Al K photons absorbed in phosphorus of DNA of human fibroblasts is less than 1 per lethal event. For no element is the relative number of absorbed photons of the three X-ray energies even approximately proportional to their observed RBEs. The effectiveness of ultrasoft X-rays is apparently not due to selective absorption but rather to the secondary electrons; consequently the mechanism of action should be common to the large numbers of low energy secondary electrons produced by most other ionising radiations, including gamma-rays. PMID:7323149

  16. Permutation Symmetry in Spinor Quantum Gases: Selection Rules, Conservation Laws, and Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Vladimir A.

    2014-11-01

    Many-body systems of identical arbitrary-spin particles, with separable spin and spatial degrees of freedom, are considered. Their eigenstates can be classified by Young diagrams, corresponding to nontrivial permutation symmetries (beyond the conventional paradigm of symmetric-antisymmetric states). The present work obtains the following. (a) Selection rules for additional nonseparable (dependent on spins and coordinates) k -body interactions: the Young diagrams, associated with the initial and final states of a transition, can differ by relocation of no more than k boxes between their rows. (b) Correlation rules in which eigenstate-averaged local correlations of k particles vanish if k exceeds the number of columns (for bosons) or rows (for fermions) in the associated Young diagram. It also elucidates the physical meaning of the quantities conserved due to permutation symmetry—in 1929, Dirac identified those with characters of the symmetric group—relating them to experimentally observable correlations of several particles. The results provide a way to control the formation of entangled states belonging to multidimensional non-Abelian representations of the symmetric group. These states can find applications in quantum computation and metrology.

  17. H I-SELECTED GALAXIES AS A PROBE OF QUASAR ABSORPTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Okoshi, Katsuya; Nagashima, Masahiro; Gouda, Naoteru; Minowa, Yousuke

    2010-02-20

    We investigate the properties of H I-rich galaxies detected in blind radio surveys within the hierarchical structure formation scenario using a semianalytic model of galaxy formation. By drawing a detailed comparison between the properties of H I-selected galaxies and H I absorption systems, we argue a link between the local galaxy population and quasar absorption systems, particularly for damped Lyalpha absorption (DLA) systems and sub-DLA systems. First, we evaluate how many H I-selected galaxies exhibit H I column densities as high as those of DLA systems. We find that H I-selected galaxies with H I masses M{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} have gaseous disks that produce H I column densities comparable to those of DLA systems. We conclude that DLA galaxies where the H I column densities are as high as those of DLA systems, contribute significantly to the population of H I-selected galaxies at M{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}. Second, we find that star formation rates (SFRs) correlate tightly with H I masses (M{sub H{sub I}}) rather than B- (and J-) band luminosities: SFR {proportional_to} M {sup alpha}{sub H{sub I}}, alpha = 1.25-1.40 for 10{sup 6} <= M{sub H{sub I}}/M{sub sun} <= 10{sup 11}. In the low-mass range M{sub H{sub I}} {approx}< 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}, sub-DLA galaxies replace DLA galaxies as the dominant population. The number fraction of sub-DLA galaxies relative to galaxies reaches 40%-60% for M{sub H{sub I}} {approx} 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} and 30%-80% for M{sub H{sub I}} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub sun}. The H I-selected galaxies at M{sub H{sub I}} {approx} 10{sup 7} M{sub sun} are a strong probe of sub-DLA systems that place stringent constraints on galaxy formation and evolution.

  18. Raman selection rule for surface optical phonons in ZnS nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang; Varadhan, Purushothaman; Wang, Hsin-Hua; Chen, Cheng-Ying; Fang, Xiaosheng; He, Jr-Hau

    2016-03-21

    We report Raman scattering results for high-quality wurtzite ZnS nanobelts (NBs) grown by chemical vapor deposition. In the Raman spectrum, the ensembles of ZnS NBs exhibit first order phonon modes at 274 cm(-1) and 350 cm(-1), corresponding to A1/E1 transverse optical and A1/E1 longitudinal optical phonons, in addition to a strong surface optical (SO) phonon mode at 329 cm(-1). The existence of the SO band is confirmed by its shift with different surrounding dielectric media. Polarization dependent Raman spectra were recorded on a single ZnS NB and for the first time a SO phonon band has been detected on a single nanobelt. Different selection rules for the SO phonon mode are shown from their corresponding E1/A1 phonon modes, and were attributed to the breaking of anisotropic translational symmetry on the NB surface. PMID:26924069

  19. Nuclear spin selection rules for reactive collision systems by the spin-modification probability method.

    PubMed

    Park, Kisam; Light, John C

    2007-12-14

    The spin-modification probability (SMP) method, which provides fundamental and detailed quantitative information on the nuclear spin selection rules, is discussed more systematically and generalized for reactive collision systems involving more than one configuration of reactant and product molecules, explicitly taking account of the conservation of the overall nuclear spin symmetry as well as the conservation of the total nuclear spin angular momentum, under the assumption of no nuclear hyperfine interaction. The values of SMP once calculated can be used for any system of identical nuclei of any spin as long as the system has the corresponding nuclear spin symmetry. The values of SMP calculated for simple systems can also be used for more complex systems containing several kinds of identical nuclei or various isotopomers. The generalized formulation of statistical scattering theory which can easily represent various rearrangement mechanisms is also presented. PMID:18081384

  20. Electromagnetic selection rules in the triangular α-cluster model of 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellin, G.; Fortunato, L.; Vitturi, A.

    2016-08-01

    After recapitulating the procedure to find the bands and the states occurring in the {{ D }}3h alpha-cluster model of 12C in which the clusters are placed at the vertexes of an equilateral triangle, we obtain the selection rules for electromagnetic transitions. While the alpha-cluster structure leads to the cancellation of E1 transitions, the approximations carried out in deriving the rotational-vibrational Hamiltonian lead to the disappearance of M1 transitions. Furthermore, although in general the lowest active modes are E2, E3, ... and M2, M3, ..., the cancellation of M2, M3 and M5 transitions between certain bands also occur as a result of the application of group theoretical techniques drawn from molecular physics. These implications can be very relevant for the spectroscopic analysis of γ-ray spectra of 12C.

  1. Abnormal selection rules of interface modes in ultrathin GaAs/AlAs superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. L.; Zhang, J.; Yang, C. L.; Li, L. Y.; Zhang, L.; Planel, R.

    2000-12-01

    We observed a violation of the normal Raman selection rule in the resonant Raman spectra of interface (IF) phonon modes of the ultrathin (GaAs)4/(AlAs)2 superlattice. Contrary to the prediction of conventional theories, all four IF modes were observed in both (XX) and (XY) geometries. The result can be interpreted as a consequence of the deep penetration of the electron wave function in the GaAs wells into the AlAs barriers and a lack of definite parity of the electron wave function. Furthermore, our result indicates that conventional theory for bulk (thicker) systems may need to be modified and further developed to be applicable to ultrathin systems.

  2. Screening method for solvent selection used in tar removal by the absorption process.

    PubMed

    Masurel, Eve; Authier, Olivier; Castel, Christophe; Roizard, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the study of the treatment of flue gas issued from a process of biomass gasification in fluidized bed. The flue gas contains tar which should be selectively removed from the fuel components of interest (e.g. H2, CO and light hydrocarbons) to avoid condensation and deposits in internal combustion engine. The chosen flue gas treatment is the gas-liquid absorption using solvents, which present specific physicochemical properties (e.g. solubility, viscosity, volatility and chemical and thermal stability) in order to optimize the unit on energetic, technico-economic and environmental criteria. The rational choice of the proper solvent is essential for solving the tar issue. The preselection of the solvents is made using a Hansen parameter in order to evaluate the tar solubility and the saturation vapour pressure of the solvent is obtained using Antoine law. Among the nine families of screened solvents (alcohols, amines, ketones, halogenates, ethers, esters, hydrocarbons, sulphured and chlorinates), acids methyl esters arise as solvents of interest. Methyl oleate has then been selected and studied furthermore. Experimental liquid-vapour equilibrium data using bubbling point and absorption cell measurements and theoretical results obtained by the UNIFAC-Dortmund model confirm the high potential of this solvent and the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results. PMID:25867082

  3. Representation of Functional Category in the Monkey Prefrontal Cortex and Its Rule-Dependent Use for Behavioral Selection.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Hosokawa, Takayuki; Yamada, Munekazu; Iijima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    Humans, monkeys, and other animals are considered to have the cognitive ability to use functional categories--that is, stimulus groups based on functional equivalence independent of physical properties. To investigate the underlying neural mechanisms of the use of functional categories, we recorded single-unit activity in the prefrontal cortex of monkeys performing a behavioral task in which the rule-dependent usage of functional category was needed to select an appropriate response. We found a neural correlate of functional categories on the single-neuron level and found that category information is coded independently of other task-relevant information such as rule and contingency information. Analysis of the time course of the information activation suggested that contingency information used for action selection is derived by integrating incoming category information with rule information maintained throughout a session. Such neural computation can be considered as the neural background of flexible behavioral control based on category and rule. PMID:26961957

  4. Communication: The H{sub 2}@C{sub 60} inelastic neutron scattering selection rule: Expanded and explained

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Bill

    2015-09-14

    Recently [M. Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 064309 (2013)], an unexpected selection rule was discovered for the title system, contradicting the previously held belief that inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is not subject to any selection rules. Moreover, the newly predicted forbidden transitions, which emerge only in the context of coupled H{sub 2} translation-rotation (TR) dynamics, have been confirmed experimentally. However, a simple physical understanding, e.g., based on group theory, has been heretofore lacking. This is provided in the present paper, in which we (1) derive the correct symmetry group for the H{sub 2}@C{sub 60} TR Hamiltonian and eigenstates; (2) complete the INS selection rule, and show that the set of forbidden transitions is actually much larger than previously believed; and (3) evaluate previous theoretical and experimental results, in light of the new findings.

  5. Mid-IR near-perfect absorption with a SiC photonic crystal with angle-controlled polarization selectivity.

    PubMed

    Devarapu, G C R; Foteinopoulou, S

    2012-06-01

    We theoretically investigate mid-IR absorption enhancement with a SiC one-dimensional photonic crystal (PC) microstructure at the frequency regime of the phonon-polariton band gap, where efficient absorption is unattainable in the bulk material. Our study reveals an intricate relationship between absorption efficiency and the energy velocity of light propagation, that is far more complex than hitherto believed. In particular, our findings suggest that absorption peaks away from the photonic-crystal band edge where energy velocity is minimum. While efficient absorption is still associated with a slow-light mode, the latter is faster by at least an order of magnitude in comparison to the bulk material. Moreover, our calculations suggest that absorption becomes optimal when light gradually slow downs as it enters the PC. Relying on this insight, we achieved near-perfect absorption around the phonon-polariton mid-gap frequency with a PC with a suitably terminated end face. We further demonstrate that the near-perfect absorptive property can be tuned with the incident light angle, to be polarization insensitive or polarization selective. We believe our proposed non-metallic paradigm opens up a new route for harnessing infrared absorption with semiconductor and ionic-crystal materials. PMID:22714331

  6. A selection rule for the directions of electronic fluxes during unimolecular pericyclic reactions in the electronic ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manz, Jörn; Yamamoto, Kentaro

    2012-05-01

    Unimolecular pericyclic reactions in a non-degenerate electronic ground state proceed under the constraint of zero electronic angular momentum. This restriction engenders a selection rule on the directions of electronic fluxes. Accordingly, clockwise or counter-clockwise fluxes are 'forbidden', whereas pincer-like fluxes (which consist of concerted clockwise and counter-clockwise fluxes) are 'allowed'. The selection rule is illustrated for three reactions: the degenerate Cope rearrangement of hexadiene, hydrogen transfer in malonaldehyde, and double proton transfer in the formic acid dimer.

  7. Depth-selective X-ray absorption spectroscopy by detection of energy-loss Auger electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Noritake; Soejima, Narumasa; Iwasaki, Shiro; Nomoto, Toyokazu; Murai, Takaaki; Kimoto, Yasuji

    2015-11-01

    A unique X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) method is proposed for depth profiling of chemical states in material surfaces. Partial electron yield mode detecting energy-loss Auger electrons, called the inelastic electron yield (IEY) mode, enables a variation in the probe depth. As an example, Si K-edge XAS spectra for a well-defined multilayer sample (Si3N4/SiO2/Si) have been investigated using this method at various kinetic energies. We found that the peaks assigned to the layers from the top layer to the substrate appeared in the spectra in the order of increasing energy loss relative to the Auger electrons. Thus, the probe depth can be changed by the selection of the kinetic energy of the energy loss electrons in IEY-XAS.

  8. Selective two-photon absorptive resonance femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R; Stauffer, Hans U; Danehy, Paul M; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2016-05-15

    Selective two-photon absorptive resonance femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging (STARFLEET), a nonseeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and nonreactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25 nm 100 fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 μJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and nonreactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities, and further demonstrate the significantly less intrusive nature of STARFLEET. PMID:27176968

  9. Selection and identity rules for subductions of type A quantum Iwahori-Hecke algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Chilla, Vincenzo

    2007-11-15

    This paper is concerned with the subduction problem of type A quantum Iwahori-Hecke algebras CH(S{sub f},q{sup 2}) with a real deformation parameter q, i.e., the problem of decomposing irreducible representations of such algebras as direct sum of irreducible representations of the subalgebras CH(S{sub f{sub 1}},q{sup 2})xCH(S{sub f{sub 2}},q{sup 2}), with f{sub 1}+f{sub 2}=f. After giving a suitable combinatorial description for the subduction issue, we provide a selection rule, based on the Richardson-Littlewood criterion, which allows to determine the vanishing coupling coefficients between standard basis vectors for such representations, and we also present an equivariance condition for the subduction coefficients. Such results extend those ones corresponding to the subduction problem in symmetric group algebras CS{sub f}{down_arrow}CS{sub f{sub 1}}xCS{sub f{sub 2}} which are obtained by q approaching the value of 1.

  10. 15 CFR 801.10 - Rules and regulations for the BE-120, Benchmark Survey of Transactions in Selected Services and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rules and regulations for the BE-120, Benchmark Survey of Transactions in Selected Services and Intangible Assets with Foreign Persons. 801.10 Section 801.10 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS,...

  11. Selected Laws, Rules and State-Level Activities in Wisconsin Related to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Information Memorandum 87-4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard

    This information memorandum describes the selected laws, rules, and state-level activities in Wisconsin related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and tests for antibodies to the virus (HIV) that causes AIDS. A section on current state laws on AIDS and HIV antibody testing describes laws related to informed consent for testing,…

  12. 10 CFR 2.311 - Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of hearing procedures, and requests by potential parties for access to sensitive unclassified non-safeguards information and safeguards information. 2.311 Section 2.311...

  13. 10 CFR 2.311 - Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of hearing procedures, and requests by potential parties for access to sensitive unclassified non-safeguards information and safeguards information. 2.311 Section 2.311...

  14. 10 CFR 2.311 - Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of hearing procedures, and requests by potential parties for access to sensitive unclassified non-safeguards information and safeguards information. 2.311 Section 2.311...

  15. 10 CFR 2.311 - Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of hearing procedures, and requests by potential parties for access to sensitive unclassified non-safeguards information and safeguards information. 2.311 Section 2.311...

  16. 10 CFR 2.311 - Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Interlocutory review of rulings on requests for hearings/petitions to intervene, selection of hearing procedures, and requests by potential parties for access to sensitive unclassified non-safeguards information and safeguards information. 2.311 Section 2.311 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION...

  17. Comprehension and Use of Social Rules in Pronoun Selection by Hungarian Children. Working Papers in Sociolinguistics, No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollos, Marida

    This paper explores the differences between the understanding or knowledge of certain social rules, and their use, as seen in pronoun selection, by children in two different social settings within the same culture area. Different philosophies concerning the interdependence of social, cognitive, and linguistic development are reviewed. The specific…

  18. Towards photodetection with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity: graphene plasmonics for light trapping and absorption engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianfa; Zhu, Zhihong; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Xiaodong; Qin, Shiqiao

    2015-08-01

    Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges.Plasmonics can be used to improve absorption in optoelectronic devices and has been intensively studied for solar cells and photodetectors. Graphene has recently emerged as a powerful plasmonic material. It shows significantly less loss compared to traditional plasmonic materials such as gold and silver and its plasmons can be tuned by changing the Fermi energy with chemical or electrical doping. Here we propose the use of graphene plasmonics for light trapping in optoelectronic devices and show that the excitation of localized plasmons in doped, nanostructured graphene can enhance optical absorption in its surrounding medium including both bulky and two-dimensional materials by tens of times, which may lead to a new generation of photodetectors with high efficiency and tunable spectral selectivity in the mid-infrared and THz ranges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Spectral tuning of absorption by changing the diameter of graphene nanodisks. Perfect light absorption in the whole structure and further enhancement of absorption in the underlying absorptive layer with a back mirror. Light trapping and enhancement of

  19. Rest-frame optical properties of luminous, radio-selected broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.; Ganguly, R.; Brotherton, M. S.; DiPompeo, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    We have obtained Infrared Telescope Facility/SpeX spectra of eight moderate-redshift (z = 0.7-2.4), radio-selected (log R* ≈ 0.4-1.9) broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. The spectra cover the rest-frame optical band. We compare the optical properties of these quasars to those of canonically radio-quiet (log R* ≲ 1) BAL quasars at similar redshifts and to low-redshift quasars from the Palomar-Green catalogue. As with previous studies of BAL quasars, we find that [O III] λ5007 is weak, and optical Fe II emission is strong, a rare combination in canonically radio-loud (log R* ≳ 1) quasars. With our measurements of the optical properties, particularly the Balmer emission-line widths and the continuum luminosity, we have used empirical scaling relations to estimate black hole masses and Eddington ratios. These lie in the range (0.4-2.6) × 109 M⊙ and 0.1-0.9, respectively. Despite their comparatively extreme radio properties relative to most BAL quasars, their optical properties are quite consistent with those of radio-quiet BAL quasars and dissimilar to those of radio-loud non-BAL quasars. While BAL quasars generally appear to have low values of [O III] λ5007/Fe II an extreme of `Eigenvector 1', the Balmer line widths and Eddington ratios do not appear to significantly differ from those of unabsorbed quasars at similar redshifts and luminosities.

  20. An investigative look: selective cholesterol absorption inhibitors--embarking on a new standard of care.

    PubMed

    Stein, Evan A

    2002-02-01

    Phase 2 and 3 clinical trials evaluating the selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor ezetimibe have demonstrated that the drug is safe and effective, both as monotherapy and in combination with several statins. Placebo-controlled phase 2 studies of 8 and 12 weeks' duration established that ezetimibe monotherapy achieved maximum cholesterol lowering at doses between 10 and 20 mg daily. Additional dose-scheduling studies demonstrated that evening dosing was only slightly more effective than morning dosing, and that the drug could be taken with or without food without any impairment in efficacy. These studies also showed that ezetimibe was well tolerated, with side effects no different from those seen with placebo. Short-term, early phase 2 studies evaluating the coadministration of ezetimibe and a number of different statins found that coadministration was safe, that ezetimibe did not alter the pharmacokinetics of the statins or vice versa, and that the reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were complementary, with the degree of cholesterol lowering seen with ezetimibe monotherapy maintained when it was given in combination with a statin. These studies indicate that combination therapy with ezetimibe and a starting dose of a statin produces a reduction in cholesterol levels equivalent to that seen with an 8-fold higher statin dose. Larger, long-term phase 3 trials confirmed the efficacy and safety of the 10-mg dose and also demonstrated that ezetimibe monotherapy is an excellent alternative for patients who cannot tolerate statins. PMID:11855701

  1. Ca II AND Na I QUASAR ABSORPTION-LINE SYSTEMS IN AN EMISSION-SELECTED SAMPLE OF SDSS DR7 GALAXY/QUASAR PROJECTIONS. I. SAMPLE SELECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Cherinka, B.; Schulte-Ladbeck, R. E.

    2011-10-15

    The aim of this project is to identify low-redshift host galaxies of quasar absorption-line systems by selecting galaxies that are seen in projection onto quasar sightlines. To this end, we use the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to construct a parent sample of 97,489 galaxy/quasar projections at impact parameters of up to 100 kpc to the foreground galaxy. We then search the quasar spectra for absorption-line systems of Ca II and Na I within {+-}500 km s{sup -1} of the galaxy's velocity. This yields 92 Ca II and 16 Na I absorption systems. We find that most of the Ca II and Na I systems are sightlines through the Galactic disk, through high-velocity cloud complexes in our halo, or Virgo Cluster sightlines. Placing constraints on the absorption line rest equivalent width significance ({>=}3.0{sigma}), the local standard of rest velocity along the sightline ({>=}345 km s{sup -1}), and the ratio of the impact parameter to the galaxy optical radius ({<=}5.0), we identify four absorption-line systems that are associated with low-redshift galaxies at high confidence, consisting of two Ca II systems (one of which also shows Na I) and two Na I systems. These four systems arise in blue, {approx}L*{sub r} galaxies. Tables of the 108 absorption systems are provided to facilitate future follow-up.

  2. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Wei, Su-Huai; Yan, Yanfa

    2015-10-05

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  3. Surface stability and the selection rules of substrate orientation for optimal growth of epitaxial II-VI semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wan-Jian; Yang, Ji-Hui; Zaunbrecher, Katherine; Gessert, Tim; Barnes, Teresa; Yan, Yanfa; Wei, Su-Huai

    2015-10-01

    The surface structures of ionic zinc-blende CdTe (001), (110), (111), and (211) surfaces are systematically studied by first-principles density functional calculations. Based on the surface structures and surface energies, we identify the detrimental twinning appearing in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of II-VI compounds as the (111) lamellar twin boundaries. To avoid the appearance of twinning in MBE growth, we propose the following selection rules for choosing optimal substrate orientations: (1) the surface should be nonpolar so that there is no large surface reconstructions that could act as a nucleation center and promote the formation of twins; (2) the surface structure should have low symmetry so that there are no multiple equivalent directions for growth. These straightforward rules, in consistent with experimental observations, provide guidelines for selecting proper substrates for high-quality MBE growth of II-VI compounds.

  4. highly selective amino acid salt solutions as absorption liquid for CO(2) capture in gas-liquid membrane contactors.

    PubMed

    Simons, Katja; Nijmeijer, Kitty; Mengers, Harro; Brilman, Wim; Wessling, Matthias

    2010-08-23

    The strong anthropogenic increase in the emission of CO(2) and the related environmental impact force the developments towards sustainability and carbon capture and storage (CCS). In the present work, we combine the high product yields and selectivities of CO(2) absorption processes with the advantages of membrane technology in a membrane contactor for the separation of CO(2) from CH(4) using amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquid to alkanol amine solutions. Amino acids, such as sarcosine, have the same functionality as alkanol amines (e.g., monoethanolamine=MEA), but in contrast, they exhibit a better oxidative stability and resistance to degradation. In addition, they can be made nonvolatile by adding a salt functionality, which significantly reduces the liquid loss due to evaporation at elevated temperatures in the desorber. Membrane contactor experiments using CO(2)/CH(4) feed mixtures to evaluate the overall process performance, including a full absorption/desorption cycle show that even without a temperature difference between absorber and desorber, a CO(2)/CH(4) selectivity of over 70 can be easily achieved with the sarcosine salt solution as absorption liquid. This selectivity reaches values of 120 at a temperature difference between absorber and desorber of 35 degrees C, compared to a value of only 60 for MEA under the same conditions. Although CO(2) permeance values are somewhat lower than the values obtained for MEA, the results clearly show the potential of amino acid salt solutions as competitive absorption liquids for the energy efficient removal of CO(2). In addition, due to the low absorption of CH(4) in sarcosine compared to MEA, the loss of CH(4) is reduced and significantly higher CH(4) product yields can be obtained. PMID:20623726

  5. Molecular basis of substrate selection by the N-end rule adaptor protein ClpS

    SciTech Connect

    Román-Hernández, Giselle; Grant, Robert A.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2009-06-19

    The N-end rule is a conserved degradation pathway that relates the stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid. Here, we present crystal structures of ClpS, the bacterial N-end rule adaptor, alone and engaged with peptides containing N-terminal phenylalanine, leucine, and tryptophan. These structures, together with a previous structure of ClpS bound to an N-terminal tyrosine, illustrate the molecular basis of recognition of the complete set of primary N-end rule amino acids. In each case, the alpha-amino group and side chain of the N-terminal residue are the major determinants of recognition. The binding pocket for the N-end residue is preformed in the free adaptor, and only small adjustments are needed to accommodate N-end rule residues having substantially different sizes and shapes. M53A ClpS is known to mediate degradation of an expanded repertoire of substrates, including those with N-terminal valine or isoleucine. A structure of Met53A ClpS engaged with an N-end rule tryptophan reveals an essentially wild-type mechanism of recognition, indicating that the Met(53) side chain directly enforces specificity by clashing with and excluding beta-branched side chains. Finally, experimental and structural data suggest mechanisms that make proteins with N-terminal methionine bind very poorly to ClpS, explaining why these high-abundance proteins are not degraded via the N-end rule pathway in the cell.

  6. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  7. Tunable ultranarrow spectrum selective absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun

    2016-06-01

    Complete absorption in a graphene monolayer at terahertz frequency through the critical coupling effect is investigated. It is achieved by sandwiching the graphene monolayer between a dielectric grating and a Bragg grating. The designed graphene absorber exhibits near-unity absorption at resonance but with an ultranarrow spectrum and antenna-like response, which is attributed to the combined effects of guided mode resonance with dielectric grating and the photonic band gap with Bragg grating. In addition to numerical simulation, the electric field distributions are also illustrated to provide a physical understanding of the perfect absorption effect. Furthermore, the absorption performance can be tuned by only changing the Fermi level of graphene, which is beneficial for real application. It is believed that this study may be useful for designing next-generation graphene-based optoelectronic devices.

  8. Rule-based approach to operating system selection: RMS vs. UNIX

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.S.; Sadlowe, A.R.; Emrich, M.L.; Gadagkar, H.P.

    1988-10-01

    A rule-based system is under development for choosing computer operating systems. Following a brief historical account, this paper compares and contrasts the essential features of two operating systems highlighting particular applications. ATandT's UNIX System and Datapoint Corporations's Resource Management System (RMS) are used as illustrative examples. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Young Children's Selective Learning of Rule Games from Reliable and Unreliable Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakoczy, Hannes; Warneken, Felix; Tomasello, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We investigated preschoolers' selective learning from models that had previously appeared to be reliable or unreliable. Replicating previous research, children from 4 years selectively learned novel words from reliable over unreliable speakers. Extending previous research, children also selectively learned other kinds of acts--novel games--from…

  10. A Statistical Study of Mg II Absorption Selected Galaxies in the SDSS at 0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Brittney; Lundgren, B.

    2014-01-01

    The spectra of distant quasars frequently exhibit absorption features from singly-ionized magnesium (Mg II), which are understood to trace gas outflow and accretion processes in foreground galaxies. Host galaxies of the Mg II absorbing gas are difficult to detect because they are often faint and have small angular separation from the bright background quasar. We have undertaken a statistical study of low redshift ( 0.4) galaxies identified as potential Mg II absorption hosts which are visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using data from the SDSS DR7, we compiled a census of ~3200 photometrically-identified galaxies within a projected 150 kpc of an Mg II absorbing system. These potential Mg II absorption hosts were then compared to a control sample of galaxies in the foreground of quasars without absorption systems in the same redshift range. We report a positive detection of excess galaxies around the lines of sight to quasars with Mg II absorption systems, extending to ~90 kpc. We present the luminosity distribution of these excess galaxies and compare to previous, smaller studies from the literature. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881 to the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

  11. Unbiased estimation in seamless phase II/III trials with unequal treatment effect variances and hypothesis-driven selection rules.

    PubMed

    Robertson, David S; Prevost, A Toby; Bowden, Jack

    2016-09-30

    Seamless phase II/III clinical trials offer an efficient way to select an experimental treatment and perform confirmatory analysis within a single trial. However, combining the data from both stages in the final analysis can induce bias into the estimates of treatment effects. Methods for bias adjustment developed thus far have made restrictive assumptions about the design and selection rules followed. In order to address these shortcomings, we apply recent methodological advances to derive the uniformly minimum variance conditionally unbiased estimator for two-stage seamless phase II/III trials. Our framework allows for the precision of the treatment arm estimates to take arbitrary values, can be utilised for all treatments that are taken forward to phase III and is applicable when the decision to select or drop treatment arms is driven by a multiplicity-adjusted hypothesis testing procedure. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27103068

  12. Polarization-selective three-photon absorption and subsequent photoluminescence in CsPbBr3 single crystal at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. J.; Stoumpos, C. C.; Saouma, F. O.; Kanatzidis, M. G.; Jang, J. I.

    2016-05-01

    We report on highly polarization-selective three-photon absorption (3PA) in a Bridgman-grown single crystal of CsPbBr3 oriented along the (112) direction, which is an inorganic counterpart to emerging organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites for solar-cell and optoelectronic applications. The crystal exhibits strong photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature as a direct consequence of 3PA of fundamental radiation. Interestingly, 3PA disappears when the input polarization is parallel to the (-110 ) direction. This 3PA effect is strongest when orthogonal to (-110 ) and the corresponding 3PA coefficient was measured to be γ =0.14 ±0.03 cm3/GW2 under picosecond-pulse excitation at the fundamental wavelength of λ =1200 nm. The laser-induced damage threshold was also determined to be about 20 GW/cm2 at the same wavelength. Based on relative PL intensities upon λ tuning over the entire 3PA range (1100 -1700 nm), we determined the nonlinear optical dispersion of the 3PA coefficient for CsPbBr3, which is consistent with a theoretical prediction. Experimentally observed significant polarization dependence of γ was explained by relevant selection rules. The perovskite is potentially important for nonlinear optical applications owing to its highly efficient 3PA-induced PL response with a sharp on/off ratio by active polarization control.

  13. Methods for analysis of selected metals in water by atomic absorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fishman, Marvin J.; Downs, Sanford C.

    1966-01-01

    This manual describes atomic-absorption-spectroscopy methods for determining calcium, copper, lithium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, sodium, strontium and zinc in atmospheric precipitation, fresh waters, and brines. The procedures are intended to be used by water quality laboratories of the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey. Detailed procedures, calculations, and methods for the preparation of reagents are given for each element along with data on accuracy, precision, and sensitivity. Other topics discussed briefly are the principle of atomic absorption, instrumentation used, and special analytical techniques.

  14. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  15. Application of a rule-based knowledge system using CLIPS for the taxonomy of selected Opuntia species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymans, Bart C.; Onema, Joel P.; Kuti, Joseph O.

    1991-01-01

    A rule based knowledge system was developed in CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) for identifying Opuntia species in the family Cactaceae, which contains approx. 1500 different species. This botanist expert tool system is capable of identifying selected Opuntia plants from the family level down to the species level when given some basic characteristics of the plants. Many plants are becoming of increasing importance because of their nutrition and human health potential, especially in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. The expert tool system described can be extremely useful in an unequivocal identification of many useful Opuntia species.

  16. Measurement of mass attenuation coefficients in some Cr, Co and Fe compounds around the absorption edge and the validity of the mixture rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgut, U.; Simsek, O.; Büyükkasap, E.

    2007-08-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients for elements Cr, Co and Fe and compounds CrCl_{2}, CrCl_{3}, Cr_{2}(SO_{4})_{3}K_{2}SO_{4}\\cdot24H_{2}O, CoO, CoCl_{2}, Co(CH_{3}COO)_{2}, FePO_{4}, FeCl_{3}\\cdot6H_{2}O, Fe(SO_{4})_{2}NH_{4}\\cdot12H_{2}O were measured at different energies between 4.508 and 14.142 keV using secondary excitation method. Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, Sr were chosen as secondary exciters. 59.5 keV γ-rays emitted from a ^{241}Am annular source were used to excite a secondary exciter and K_{α}(K-L_{3}, L_{2}) lines emitted by the secondary exciter were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. It was observed that mixture rule method is not a suitable method for determination of the mass attenuation coefficients of compounds, especially at an energy that is near the absorption edge. The obtained values were compared with theoretical values.

  17. Chemical effect on the K shell absorption parameters of some selected cerium compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akman, F.; Kaçal, M. R.; Durak, R.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the photoelectric cross section values of Ce, CeCl3.7H2O, Ce2(SO4)3, Ce(OH)4 and Ce2O3 samples were measured in the energy range from 31.82 keV up to 51.70 keV by adopting in narrow beam geometry. Using these photoelectric cross sections, the K shell photoelectric cross sections at the K-edge, the K shell absorption jump ratios and jump factors, the Davisson-Kirchner ratios and K shell oscillator strength values were estimated experimentally. The measured parameters were compared with the theoretical calculated values. It is observed that the K shell photoelectric cross section at the K-edge and K shell oscillator strength values of an element are affected by the chemical environment of material while the K shell absorption jump ratio, K shell absorption jump factor and Davisson-Kirchner ratio are not affected by the chemical environment of material for the present samples. To the best of our knowledge, the chemical effects on the Davisson-Kirchner ratio and K shell oscillator strength have not been discussed for any element by now.

  18. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  19. Nucleon and heavy-ion total and absorption cross section for selected nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Costner, C. M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximate solutions of the coupled-channel equations for high-energy composite particle scattering are obtained and are applied to the nuclear scattering problem. Relationships between several approximation procedures are established and discussed. The eikonal formalism is used with a small-angle approximation to calculate the coherent elastic scattered amplitude from which total and absorption cross sections are derived. Detailed comparisons with nucleon-nucleus experiments show agreement within 5 percent except at lower energies where the eikonal approximation is of questionable accuracy. Even at these lower energies, agreement is within 15 percent. Tables of cross sections required for cosmic heavy-ion transport and shielding studies are presented.

  20. Filter-free image sensor pixels comprising silicon nanowires with selective color absorption.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyunsung; Dan, Yaping; Seo, Kwanyong; Yu, Young J; Duane, Peter K; Wober, Munib; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2014-01-01

    The organic dye filters of conventional color image sensors achieve the red/green/blue response needed for color imaging, but have disadvantages related to durability, low absorption coefficient, and fabrication complexity. Here, we report a new paradigm for color imaging based on all-silicon nanowire devices and no filters. We fabricate pixels consisting of vertical silicon nanowires with integrated photodetectors, demonstrate that their spectral sensitivities are governed by nanowire radius, and perform color imaging. Our approach is conceptually different from filter-based methods, as absorbed light is converted to photocurrent, ultimately presenting the opportunity for very high photon efficiency. PMID:24588103

  1. The Danger of Selectively Changing the Rules in Youth Sport: The Case of the Strike Zone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Cesar R.

    2010-01-01

    Albeit well-intentioned, the practice of selectively changing the strike zone to promote young players' welfare is critically flawed. After discussing the central purpose of competitive sport, the duty of officials, and the significance of impartiality in officiating, this article demonstrates that this practice presents numerous practical…

  2. Supreme Court Rulings on Abortion: Roe v. Wade and Selected Progeny

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uerling, Donald F.

    2006-01-01

    Abortion is one of the most controversial and contentious issues of our time. Few topics generate as much public debate or leave as little room for political compromise. This article presents a discussion of selected United States Supreme Court decisions on abortion and the legal reasoning supporting those decisions. It should be noted initially…

  3. 76 FR 78215 - Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins; Biennial Review; Proposed Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Services (HHS) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (76 FR 61206... of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (76 FR 61206) requesting public comment on (1... HUMAN SERVICES 42 CFR Part 73 RIN 0920-AA34 Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and...

  4. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A concept-driven interactive pathway on the selective absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a 'concept-driven interactive pathway'. It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light by a medium as a selective multiplication (i.e. one depending on the wavelength) of the intensity by a factor smaller than one. Six teaching interviews conducted with fourth-year university students were recorded, transcribed and coded. Their analysis led us to evaluate the importance of the main obstacle expected, that is, of restricting the interpretation of absorption/transmission phenomena to the idea of 'less light', or, equivalently, of seeing a multiplication by a factor smaller than one as just a subtraction. The students' comments at the end of the interview introduce a discussion about the links between their intellectual satisfaction, critical attitude and comprehension of the topic.

  5. Descending control of neural bias and selectivity in a spatial attention network: rules and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mysore, Shreesh P.; Knudsen, Eric I.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The brain integrates stimulus-driven (exogenous) activity with internally generated (endogenous) activity to compute the highest priority stimulus for gaze and attention. Little is known about how this computation is accomplished neurally. We explored the underlying functional logic in a critical component of the spatial attention network, the optic tectum (OT, superior colliculus in mammals), in awake barn owls. We found that space-specific endogenous influences, evoked by activating descending forebrain pathways, bias competition among exogenous influences, and substantially enhance the quality of the categorical neural pointer to the highest priority stimulus. These endogenous influences operate across sensory modalities. Biologically grounded modeling revealed that the observed effects on network bias and selectivity require a simple circuit mechanism: endogenously driven gain modulation of feedback inhibition among competing channels. Our findings reveal fundamental principles by which internal and external information combine to guide selection of the next target for gaze and attention. PMID:25220813

  6. a New Framework for Geospatial Site Selection Using Artificial Neural Networks as Decision Rules: a Case Study on Landfill Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abujayyab, S. K. M.; Ahamad, M. A. S.; Yahya, A. S.; Saad, A.-M. H. Y.

    2015-10-01

    This paper briefly introduced the theory and framework of geospatial site selection (GSS) and discussed the application and framework of artificial neural networks (ANNs). The related literature on the use of ANNs as decision rules in GSS is scarce from 2000 till 2015. As this study found, ANNs are not only adaptable to dynamic changes but also capable of improving the objectivity of acquisition in GSS, reducing time consumption, and providing high validation. ANNs make for a powerful tool for solving geospatial decision-making problems by enabling geospatial decision makers to implement their constraints and imprecise concepts. This tool offers a way to represent and handle uncertainty. Specifically, ANNs are decision rules implemented to enhance conventional GSS frameworks. The main assumption in implementing ANNs in GSS is that the current characteristics of existing sites are indicative of the degree of suitability of new locations with similar characteristics. GSS requires several input criteria that embody specific requirements and the desired site characteristics, which could contribute to geospatial sites. In this study, the proposed framework consists of four stages for implementing ANNs in GSS. A multilayer feed-forward network with a backpropagation algorithm was used to train the networks from prior sites to assess, generalize, and evaluate the outputs on the basis of the inputs for the new sites. Two metrics, namely, confusion matrix and receiver operating characteristic tests, were utilized to achieve high accuracy and validation. Results proved that ANNs provide reasonable and efficient results as an accurate and inexpensive quantitative technique for GSS.

  7. Enhancing and broadening absorption properties of frequency selective surfaces absorbers using FeCoB-based thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Wenyi; Nie, Yan; Xiong, Xuan; Zhang, Cui; Zhou, Yan; Gong, Rongzhou

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, the influence of FeCoB-based magnetic film on the absorption properties of traditional frequency selective surface (FSS) was investigated experimentally. A single-layer Minkowski fractal planar frequency selective surface was chosen, and the laser etching technique was proposed to fabricate aluminum-based FSS (AFSS) samples. Magnetic films were prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering, with the targets of Fe40Co40B20 and SiO2. It is found that after the magnetic film is incorporated, the bandwidth under -10 dB increases by 33.3% from 5.08 to 6.78 GHz and the peak value of reflectivity decreases from -12.46 to -38.41 dB. The 3.1-mm-thick radar absorber is relatively light and could obtain the reflectivity of -38.41 with -20 dB bandwidth of 1.85 GHz. As a consequence, under the circumstance that the total thickness of the sample maintains relatively constant, the magnetic thin film can effectively improve the absorption properties of the sample.

  8. Selection rule and efficiency for autoionization of diazabicyclooctane as studied by two-color double-resonance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, M.; Sato, K.; Kimura, K.

    1987-12-17

    Photoelectron spectra due to autoionization for two series of high Rydberg states have been observed for diazabicyclooctane (DABCO) in a supersonic jet. The selection rule of the autoionization has been found to be ..delta..v = -1 for each vibrational mode involved in the Rydberg states, consistent with Berry's theory available for the vibrational autoionization of a polyatomic molecule. The relative autoionization efficiencies Phi/sub a/ for the high Rydberg series have also been determined from two-color MPI and fluorescence dip spectra. The irregular variation of Phi/sub a/ with the principal quantum number n has been found for the two Rydberg series, suggesting the irregular variation in their nonradiative rates

  9. Method for making an aluminum or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A panel is described for selectively absorbing solar energy comprising an aluminum substrate. A zinc layer was covered by a layer of nickel and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a nickel layer. A layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate was included. A method for making these panels is disclosed.

  10. Aluminium or copper substrate panel for selective absorption of solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, M. L.; Sharpe, M. H.; Krupnick, A. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method for making panels which selectively absorb solar energy is disclosed. The panels are comprised of an aluminum substrate, a layer of zinc thereon, a layer of nickel over the zinc layer and an outer layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide or a copper substrate with a layer of nickel thereon and a layer of solar energy absorbing nickel oxide distal from the copper substrate.

  11. Simulation of gas absorption with chemical reaction: The selective removal of hydrogen sulfide by aqueous methyldiethanolamine in packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The design of separation devices, particularly for solvent-based selective removal of H{sub 2}S from CO{sub 2}, requires an accurate mathematical model. Unfortunately, this requirement for high accuracy is often in conflict with the need for efficient computation. The addition of more and more complicated analyses, such as a move from Henry's law to a method incorporating gas and liquid activities for computing vapor liquid equilibria, may give a more accurate solution, but only at the cost of decreased computational efficiency. The efforts in this work have been directed toward two goals. The first was to develop an accurate mathematical model for the aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) system. The steady-state packed column model developed in this work has been tested with data from Schubert (1988) to verify its accuracy. The second goal was to modify the model to improve its computational efficiency. Areas such as vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations, flow hydrodynamics, and thermal effects were examined to determine what simplifications could be made, and how these simplifications affected both the accuracy and the efficiency of the model. The result of this effort is a mathematical model for multicomponent chemical absorption in a continuous contactor that balances computation efficiency with rigorous physical and chemical treatment. This model is useful not only for the analysis of the MDEA-H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2} system, but the same framework also could be applied to other chemical absorption systems.

  12. Convection induced by selective absorption of radiation: A laboratory model of conditional instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurti, Ruby

    1998-01-01

    When there is internal heating in a fluid layer, convection can occur even if the static state is one of stable stratification. We have been investigating through laboratory experiments such a stably stratified layer of water which is heated above and cooled below. The water contains in dilute solution thymol blue (a pH indicator), which normally colors the water orange. It turns yellow if the pH is low, blue if the pH is high. A small DC voltage is applied across the layer, by using the bottom boundary as the positive electrode, the top boundary as the negative electrode. The hydroxyl ions formed near the bottom boundary cause the orange fluid to turn blue. The fluid layer is uniformly and steadily illuminated from above with light from a sodium vapor lamp. This radiation travels with negligible absorption through the orange fluid but is strongly absorbed by the blue fluid. The resultant warming of the blue fluid can lead to convective instability, with the blue fluid rising into warm upper layers, which it would continue to penetrate as long as it remains blue and as long as the radiative heating is sufficient to exceed the higher ambient temperatures above. This radiative heating occurs only in the blue rising flow; the sinking fluid is orange and is not heated. We have found that with a strongly stably stratified layer, convective plumes are unable to penetrate far and they remain shallow. However, for a weakly stratified layer, plumes grow tall and furthermore collect into a large convective cluster which persists as a steady coherent structure. The present paper deals also with the formulation of the governing equations to include the fluid-state-dependent heat source. A linear stability analysis shows that the critical Rayleigh number for onset of motion is drastically reduced. Furthermore, the cell size at onset is larger by a factor of √ 3/2 than in the classical Rayleigh-Benard convection problem. However, the laboratory fluid cells were much further

  13. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  14. High levels of absorption in orientation-unbiased, radio-selected 3CR Active Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Haas, Martin; Barthel, Peter; Leipski, Christian; Kuraszkiewicz, Joanna; Worrall, Diana; Birkinshaw, Mark; Willner, Steven P.

    2014-08-01

    A critical problem in understanding active galaxies (AGN) is the separation of intrinsic physical differences from observed differences that are due to orientation. Obscuration of the active nucleus is anisotropic and strongly frequency dependent leading to complex selection effects for observations in most wavebands. These can only be quantified using a sample that is sufficiently unbiased to test orientation effects. Low-frequency radio emission is one way to select a close-to orientation-unbiased sample, albeit limited to the minority of AGN with strong radio emission.Recent Chandra, Spitzer and Herschel observations combined with multi-wavelength data for a complete sample of high-redshift (1 24.2) = 2.5:1.4:1 in these high-luminosity (log L(0.3-8keV) ~ 44-46) sources. These ratios are consistent with current expectations based on modelingthe Cosmic X-ray Background. A strong correlation with radio orientation constrains the geometry of the obscuring disk/torus to have a ~60 degree opening angle and ~12 degree Compton-thick cross-section. The deduced ~50% obscured fraction of the population contrasts with typical estimates of ~20% obscured in optically- and X-ray-selected high-luminosity samples. Once the primary nuclear emission is obscured, AGN X-ray spectra are frequently dominated by unobscured non-nuclear or scattered nuclear emission which cannot be distinguished from direct nuclear emission with a lower obscuration level unless high quality data is available. As a result, both the level of obscuration and the estimated instrinsic luminosities of highly-obscured AGN are likely to be significantly (*10-1000) underestimated for 25-50% of the population. This may explain the lower obscured fractions reported for optical and X-ray samples which have no independent measure of the AGN

  15. Uv/vis Absorption Experiments on Mass Selected Cations by Counter-Ion Introduction Into AN Inert Neon Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehr, N. P.; Szczepanski, J.; Polfer, N. C.

    2012-06-01

    Obtaining UV/Vis absorption spectra of cations is a challenging endeavor due to the low densities that can be achieved in the gas phase. In matrix isolation, ions of interest are accumulated in a cold inert matrix of a rare gas (e.g. Argon, Neon) until sufficient concentrations are attained for direct spectroscopic characterization. Nonetheless, in order to ensure neutralization of the matrix, experimentalists often rely on non-ideal, energetic processes, such as electron emission from metal surfaces upon cation bombardment. A better method for matrix neutralization would involve co-depositing a molecular counter-ion. In this talk, a two-ion source instrument is presented, where cations and anions are deposited into a cold inert matrix. Mass-selected cation beams are generated in an electron ionization source and filtered in a quadrupole mass filter (5-10 nA mass-selected naphthalene radical cations recorded). Anion beams are generated in a chemical ionization source (20 nA SF6- recorded). Both ion beams are introduced into an octopole ion guide via a quadrupole deflector. Cations and anions can be deposited simultaneously or separately; in the latter case, alternating layers of each species can be formed. Target cations of interest include open-shell naphthalene and tetracene, for which UV/Vis absorption spectra are recorded after deposition. The counter-ion of choice is SF6-, due to the high electronegativity of SF6. J. P. Maier, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 90, 600(1989). Godbout, et al., J. Phys. Chem. 100 2892-2899(1996). P. Brechignac, et al., J. Chem. Phys. 22 7337-7347(1999). M. Vala, et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 245 539-548(1995).

  16. The effect of selective solvent absorption on coal conversion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.

    1993-11-01

    Using a pair of different recycle oils from Wilsonville and {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, gel permeation (GPC) chromatography, high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and elemental analysis, no significant differences were observed between the composition of the recycle oil and that portion of the oil not absorbed by the coal. For these complex mixtures, coals are not selective absorbants. Since most of the heteroatoms responsible for most of the specific interactions have been removed by hydrogenolyses, this is perhaps not surprising. To address the issue of the role of hydrogen bond donors in the reused as hydrogen donor coal, tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin were used as hydrogen donor solvents. This work is reported in detail in Section 2. The basic idea is that the presence of the t-butyl group on the aromatic ring will hinder or block diffusion of the hydrogen donor into the coal resulting in lower conversions and less hydrogen transferred with 2-t-butyltetralin than with tetralin. Observed was identical amounts of hydrogen transfer and nearly identical conversions to pyridine solubles for both hydrogen donors. Diffusion of hydrogen donors into the coal does not seem to play a significant role in coal conversion. Finally, in Section 3 is discussed the unfavorable impact on conversion of the structural rearrangements which occur when Illinois No. 6 coal is swollen with a solvent. We believe this rearrangement results in a more strongly associated solid leading to the diminution of coal reactions. Hydrogen donor diffusion does not seem to be a major factor in coal conversion while the structural rearrangement does. Both areas warrant further exploration.

  17. In situ Studies of Soft- and Reactive Landing of Mass-Selected Ions Using Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qichi; Wang, Peng; Gassman, Paul L.; Laskin, Julia

    2009-09-01

    Grazing incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) for in situ and in real time characterization of substrates modified by soft- and reactive landing (SL and RL) of complex ions was implemented on a mass-selected ion deposition instrument. Ions produced by electrospray ionization were mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and deposited onto inert and reactive self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Surface composition during and after ion deposition was monitored using IRRAS. Physisorption of a cyclic peptide, Garmicidin S (GS), was studied for 8 hrs during deposition and additional 12 hrs after the end of deposition. The integrated signal of the characteristic amide bands followed a linear increase during the deposition and stayed unchanged after the deposition was finished. Similar linear increase in IRRAS signal was obtained following reactive deposition of the protonated dodecanediamine onto SAMs of dithiobis (succinimidyl undecanoate) (NHS-SAM) and 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid fluoride (COF-SAM) on gold. IRRAS allowed us to monitor for the first time the formation of the amide bond between reactive SAM surfaces and the projectile molecule.

  18. Increased Potassium Absorption Confers Resistance to Group IA Cations in Rubidium-Selected Suspension Cells of Brassica napus1

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Daniel D.

    1989-01-01

    Cell lines of suspension cultures of Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf were identified for their ability to tolerate 100 millimolar Rb+, a level which was double the normally lethal concentration. Ten spontaneous isolates were obtained from approximately 5 × 107 cells, one of which was reestablished as a cell suspension. This cell line, JL5, was also resistant to the other group IA cations— Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+—and this trait was stable for at least 30 cell generations in the absence of Rb+ selection pressure. The growth characteristics were similar to those of sensitive cells under nonselective conditions. The selected JL5 cells were shown by analysis to have effected more net accumulation of K+ and Rb+ and less of Na+ than did the unselected cells. JL5 and unselected cells after 14 days of culture in basal medium contained 597.2 and 258.2 micromoles of K per gram dry weight, respectively. Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis of K+ influx showed that JL5 possessed an elevated phase 1 Vmax, but there was no alteration in its Km. This is the first time that a plant mutation has been shown to have both increased influx and net absorption of a major essential cation. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667201

  19. ERIC Processing Manual. Rules and Guidelines for the Acquisition, Selection, and Technical Processing of Documents and Journal Articles by the Various Components of the ERIC Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Processing and Reference Facility, Bethesda, MD.

    This loose-leaf manual provides the detailed rules, guidelines, and examples to be used by the components of the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) network in acquiring and selecting documents and in processing them (i.e. cataloging, indexing, abstracting) for input to the ERIC computer system and subsequent announcement in "Research…

  20. Mode Selection Rules for Two-Delay Systems: Dynamical Explanation for the Function of the Register Hole on the Clarinet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kin'ya; Goya, Kana; Goya, Saya

    2014-12-01

    Generally, time-delay systems are regarded as multi-attractor systems. We investigate mode selection rules for two-delay systems considering which oscillation mode is first excited by the Hopf bifurcation with increasing a bifurcation parameter. In particular, we focus on the case that the strength of the short time delay α1 is lower than that of the long time delay α2. In a certain range of α1/α2 in which it is sufficiently small but still not negligible, the third-harmonic mode occupies a particular range of the ratio of the two delay times such that 2 < tR2/tR1 < 4, where tR1 and tR2 denote the short and long delay times, respectively. This is the key for understanding the function of the register hole on the clarinet, which is smaller in radius than the other tone holes, but works well to raise the pitch of first register notes in a wide range more than an octave by a twelfth (19 semitones), i.e., generating third harmonics, when opened. This is confirmed using a simple model of the clarinet with two delays: short and long time delays are regarded as delayed reflections caused by the register hole and the open end of the pipe, respectively. The working range of the register hole roughly corresponds to the particular range of the third-harmonic mode for two-delay systems (2 < tR2/tR1 < 4).

  1. Cosmic Metallicity from ZnII-Selected QSO Absorption Line Systems Near Redshift z=1.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, Eric

    2010-09-01

    We have searched nearly 15,000 strong intervening MgII systems in SDSS quasar spectra to measure spectral regions where weak, unsaturated metal lines are predicted to exist, with the aim of finding a representative sample of the strongest metal-line column density systems in the universe. These systems are clearly damped Lyman-alpha {DLA} systems, which track cosmologically intervening neutral gas regions that fall along the sightlines to background quasars. We propose STIS G230L spectroscopy of seven strong-ZnII-selected systems from this sample in order to measure their Lyman-alpha absorption profiles and derive their HI column densities. Since Zn is not depleted onto grains, measurement of N{HI} allows a direct measurement of the metal abundance in such systems. We expect the results to be representative of the upper envelope of the distribution of neutral-gas-phase metallicities near redshift z=1.2. If these systems are high-N{HI} DLAs {e.g., 6E21 atoms/cm^2} they will have metallicities typical of those normally found in DLAs {e.g., one-tenth solar}. However, if they are low-N{HI} DLAs {e.g., 2E20 atoms/cm(2) }, they will have supersolar metallicities. Since these DLAs are selected on the basis of their extreme metal-line properties, analysis of their metallicities and dust-to-gas ratios will lead to strong constraints on the range of properties exhibited by DLA systems.

  2. Species selective preconcentration and quantification of gold nanoparticles using cloud point extraction and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Georg; Schuster, Michael

    2013-01-25

    The determination of metallic nanoparticles in environmental samples requires sample pretreatment that ideally combines pre-concentration and species selectivity. With cloud point extraction (CPE) using the surfactant Triton X-114 we present a simple and cost effective separation technique that meets both criteria. Effective separation of ionic gold species and Au nanoparticles (Au-NPs) is achieved by using sodium thiosulphate as a complexing agent. The extraction efficiency for Au-NP ranged from 1.01 ± 0.06 (particle size 2 nm) to 0.52 ± 0.16 (particle size 150 nm). An enrichment factor of 80 and a low limit of detection of 5 ng L(-1) is achieved using electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS) for quantification. TEM measurements showed that the particle size is not affected by the CPE process. Natural organic matter (NOM) is tolerated up to a concentration of 10 mg L(-1). The precision of the method expressed as the standard deviation of 12 replicates at an Au-NP concentration of 100 ng L(-1) is 9.5%. A relation between particle concentration and the extraction efficiency was not observed. Spiking experiments showed a recovery higher than 91% for environmental water samples. PMID:23312311

  3. Speciation of inorganic lead and trialkyllead compounds by flame atomic absorption spectrometry following continuous selective preconcentration from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baena, Josefa R.; Gallego, Mercedes; Valcárcel, Miguel

    1999-12-01

    A new method for the speciation of inorganic lead and trialkyllead compounds involving the selective separation of the analytes in a continuous system and their subsequent introduction into a flame atomic absorption spectrometer was developed. The proposed flow system consists of two units. In the first unit, total inorganic lead at concentrations from 8 to 200 ng ml -1 is continuously precipitated as lead chromate and the filtrate, containing trialkyllead cations, is collected in a vessel, the precipitate then being dissolved in diluted acid and driven to the instrument. In the second unit, trimethyllead (TML +) and triethyllead (TEL +) cations at ng ml -1 levels are complexed with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and retained on a C 60 pre-conditioned fullerene column; the mixture of both species was resolved by conditioning the sorbent column with n-hexane or isobutyl methyl ketone solvents. Detection limits of 1-2 ng ml -1 can be achieved by using a sample volume of 50 ml. Special attention was given to the reliability and robustness of the global flow injection method in assessing its applicability to both types of organolead compounds and inorganic lead present in different proportions. Trimethyllead provides the poorest results as consequence of its low adsorption constant on C 60; however, the three different types of species (Pb 2+/TML +/TEL +) can be effectively determined in proportions from 1:1:1 to 30:12:1 with relative errors less than 10%.

  4. Absorption coefficients of selected explosives and related compounds in the range of 0.1-2.8 THz.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Yunqing; Zhao, Hongwei; Bastiaans, Glenn J; Zhang, X-C

    2007-09-17

    We have investigated the absorption spectra of seventeen explosives and related compounds (ERCs) by using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy in the 0.1-2.8 THz region. Most of these substances show characteristic absorption features in this frequency range. The measured absorption coefficients of these ERCs form a database, which is of great importance for biochemical, defense and security related applications. PMID:19547570

  5. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A Concept-Driven Interactive Pathway on the Selective Absorption of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a "concept-driven interactive pathway". It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light…

  6. Differential laser absorption spectrometry for global profiling of tropospheric carbon dioxide: selection of optimum sounding frequencies for high-precision measurements.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Robert T; Tratt, David M

    2003-11-20

    We discuss the spectroscopic requirements for a laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach to high-precision carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements in the troposphere. Global-scale, high-precision CO2 measurements are highly desirable in an effort to improve understanding and quantification of the CO2 sources and sinks and their impact on global climate. We present differential absorption sounding characteristics for selected LAS transmitter laser wavelengths, emphasizing the effects of atmospheric temperature profile uncertainties. Candidate wavelengths for lower-troposphere measurements are identified in the CO2 bands centered near 1.57, 1.60, and 2.06 microm. PMID:14658457

  7. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Odelle; Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.

    2008-04-14

    Black carbon (BC), a main component of combustion-generated soot, is a strong absorber of sunlight and contributes to climate change. Measurement methods for BC are uncertain, however. This study presents a method for analyzing the BC mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength as the sample is heated. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration based on derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAE) of BC and char. The fraction of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO{sub 2}) at temperatures higher than 480 C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected from coastal and mountain sites in Northern California. The uncertainty in measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12 to 100 percent, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 {micro}g BC and uncertainty approached 20 percent for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 {micro}g BC.

  8. Modified thermal-optical analysis using spectral absorption selectivity to distinguish black carbon from pyrolized organic carbon.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Odelle L; Corrigan, Craig E; Kirchstetter, Thomas W

    2008-11-15

    This study presents a method for analyzing the black carbon (BC) mass loading on a quartz fiber filter using a modified thermal-optical analysis method, wherein light transmitted through the sample is measured over a spectral region instead of at a single wavelength. Evolution of the spectral light transmission signal depends on the relative amounts of light-absorbing BC and char, the latter of which forms when organic carbon in the sample pyrolyzes during heating. Absorption selectivities of BC and char are found to be distinct and are used to apportion the amount of light attenuated by each component in the sample. Light attenuation is converted to mass concentration on the basis of derived mass attenuation efficiencies (MAEs) of BC and char. The fractions of attenuation due to each component are scaled by their individual MAE values and added together as the total mass of light absorbing carbon (LAC). An iterative algorithm is used to find the MAE values for both BC and char that provide the best fit to the carbon mass remaining on the filter (derived from direct measurements of thermally evolved CO2) at temperatures higher than 480 degrees C. This method was applied to measure the BC concentration in precipitation samples collected in northern California. The uncertainty in the measured BC concentration of samples that contained a high concentration of organics susceptible to char ranged from 12% to 100%, depending on the mass loading of BC on the filter. The lower detection limit for this method was approximately 0.35 microg of BC, and the uncertainty approached 20% for BC mass loading greater than 1.0 microg of BC. PMID:19068832

  9. Experimental studies of selective acid gas removal: Absorption of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide into aqueous methyldiethanolamine using packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The use of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) for selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from acid gas streams has been studied in a 2 inch column packed with 1/4 inch ceramic Intalox saddles. The column was operated in a counter-current, steady state fashion. The feed gas composition varied between 1 and 5 mole % hydrogen sulfide and between 0 and 50 mole % carbon dioxide. In order to assist the development of packed column absorption models, the rate at which pure carbon dioxide absorbs into 2 M MDEA was measured as a function of pressure, liquid flow rate and packed bed length. The importance of end effects was carefully evaluated. In addition, draining and tracer methods were used to estimate the amount of static holdup present in the column. Using classical draining methods, as much as 50 % of the total holdup was found to be static. However, according to the step decrease in tracer method, less than 5 % of the total holdup was static. Since the step decrease in tracer method measures the amount of static holdup present in the bed under irrigated conditions, it seems likely that the draining method provides an unrealistic estimate of static holdup. Thus, although the notion of static holdup may be useful as a means of correlating mass transfer coefficients, the data indicate that very little static holdup exists in the column under irrigated conditions. Hence, in the absence of a mechanistically sound model, the choice of whether to use static holdup or dispersion as a means of accounting for deviations from plug flow in the liquid phase should be made on the basis of computational convenience.

  10. The application of rules in morphology, syntax and number processing: a case of selective deficit of procedural or executive mechanisms?

    PubMed Central

    Macoir, Joël; Fossard, Marion; Nespoulous, Jean-Luc; Demonet, Jean-François; Bachoud-Lévi, Anne-Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Declarative memory is a long-term store for facts, concepts and words. Procedural memory subserves the learning and control of sensorimotor and cognitive skills, including the mental grammar. In this study, we report a single-case study of a mild aphasic patient who showed procedural deficits in the presence of preserved declarative memory abilities. We administered several experiments to explore rule application in morphology, syntax and number processing. Results partly support the differentiation between declarative and procedural memory. Moreover, the patient’s performance varied according to the domain in which rules were to be applied, which underlines the need for more fine-grained distinctions in cognition between procedural rules. PMID:20446168

  11. Element-selective trace detection of toxic species in environmental samples using chromatographic techniques and derivative diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Zybin, A.; Niemax, K.

    1998-10-01

    Very sensitive laser absorption techniques based on a double-beam scheme with logarithmic processing of the detector signals and wavelength modulation of laser diodes are presented. Detection limits equivalent to 10-7 absorption per square root of detection bandwidth are obtained if sufficient laser power is available and if the absorption is also subject to additional modulation. The analytical versatility of these techniques is demonstrated by quantitative analysis of very low concentrations of (i) Cr(VI) species in tap water and (ii) chlorinated poly-aromatics (chlorophenols) in plant extracts, both after chromatographic separation. The atomic absorption measurements were performed in an air-acetylene flame (Cr) and in a low-pressure microwave-induced plasma (chlorophenols).

  12. Site-selective excitation and polarized absorption and emission spectra of trivalent thulium and erbium in strontium fluorapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, J.B.; Wright, A.O.; Seltzer, M.D.; Zandi, B.; Merkle, L.D.; Hutchinson, J.A.; Morrison, C.A.; Allik, T.H.; Chai, B.H.

    1997-05-01

    Polarized fluorescence spectra produced by site-selective excitation and conventional polarized absorption spectra were obtained for Tm{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+} ions individually incorporated into single crystals of strontium fluorapatite, Sr{sub 5}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}F. Substitution of the trivalent rare earth ion for divalent strontium was achieved by passive charge compensation during Czochralski growth of the fluorapatite crystals. Spectra were obtained between 1780 and 345 nm at temperatures from 4 K to room temperature on crystals having the hexagonal structure [P6{sub 3}/m(C{sub 6h}{sup 2})]. The polarized fluorescence spectra due to transitions from multiplet manifolds of Tm{sup 3+}(4f{sup 12}), including {sup 1}D{sub 2}, {sup 1}G{sub 4}, and {sup 3}H{sub 4} to manifolds {sup 3}H{sub 6} (the ground-state manifold), {sup 3}F{sub 4}, {sup 3}H{sub 5}, {sup 3}H{sub 4}, and {sup 3}F{sub 3} were analyzed for the details of the crystal-field splitting of the manifolds. Fluorescence lifetimes were measured for Tm{sup 3+} transitions from {sup 1}D{sub 2}, {sup 1}G{sub 4}, and {sup 3}H{sub 4} at room temperature and from {sup 1}G{sub 4} at 16 K. Results of the analysis indicate that the majority of Tm{sup 3+} ions occupy sites having C{sub s} symmetry. A point-charge lattice-sum calculation was made in which the crystal-field components, A{sub nm}, were determined assuming that trivalent thulium replaces divalent strontium in the metal site having C{sub s} symmetry. Results support the conclusion that the nearest-neighbor fluoride (F{sup {minus}}) is replaced by divalent oxygen (O{sup 2{minus}}), thus preserving overall charge neutrality and local symmetry. Crystal-field splitting calculations predict energy levels in agreement with experimental data. By varying the crystal-field parameters, B{sub nm}, we obtained a rms difference of 7cm{sup {minus}1} between 43 calculated and experimental Stark levels for Tm{sup 3+}(4f{sup 12}) in Tm:SFAP. (Abstract Truncated)

  13. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Reserve Select; TRICARE Dental Program; Early Eligibility for TRICARE for Certain Reserve Component Members. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-15

    TRICARE Reserve Select (TRS) is a premium-based TRICARE health plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified members of the Ready Reserve and by qualified survivors of TRS members. TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) is a premium-based TRICARE dental plan available for purchase worldwide by qualified Service members. This final rule revises requirements and procedures for the TRS program to specify the appropriate actuarial basis for calculating premiums in addition to making other minor clarifying administrative changes. For a member who is involuntarily separated from the Selected Reserve under other than adverse conditions this final rule provides a time-limited exception that allows TRS coverage in effect to continue for up to 180 days after the date on which the member is separated from the Selected Reserve and TDP coverage in effect to continue for no less than 180 days after the separation date. It also expands early TRICARE eligibility for certain Reserve Component members from a maximum of 90 days to a maximum of 180 days prior to activation in support of a contingency operation for more than 30 days. PMID:26387151

  14. Uncovering the mechanism for selective control of the visible and near-IR absorption bands in bacteriochlorophylls a, b and g

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Nagata, Morio

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) play an important role as light harvesters in photosynthetic bacteria. Interestingly, bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) a, b, and g selectively tune their visible (Qx) and near IR (Qy) absorption bands by the substituent changes. In this paper, we theoretically study the mechanism for the selective control of the absorption bands. Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) and four-orbital model analyses reveal that the selective red-shift of the Qy band with the substituent change from BChl a to b occurs with the lower-energy shift of the (HOMO, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes. In contrast, the Qx band hardly shifts by the cancellation between the higher- and lower-energy shifts of the (HOMO-1, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes and configuration interaction, respectively. On the other hand, with the substituent changes from BChl a to g, the Qx band selectively blue-shifts by the larger higher-energy shift of the (HOMO-1, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy shifts than the lower-energy shift due to the configuration interaction. In contrast, the Qy band hardly shifts by the cancellation between the higher- and lower-energy shifts of the (HOMO, LUMO) excited state directly induced by the molecular-orbital energy changes and configuration interaction, respectively. Our work provides the important knowledge for understanding how nature controls the light-absorption properties of the BChl dyes, which might be also useful for design of porphyrinoid chromophores. PMID:27493495

  15. Selective determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone by atomic-absorption spectrometry with a carbon-tube atomizer.

    PubMed

    Kamada, T; Yamamoto, Y

    1977-05-01

    The extraction behaviour of antimony(III) and antimony(V) with ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate and dithizone in organic solvents has been investigated by means of frameless atomic-absorption spectrophotometry with a carbon-tube atomizer. The selective extraction of antimony(III) and differential determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) have been developed. With ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate and methyl isobutyl ketone, when the aqueous phase/solvent volume ratio is 50 ml/10 ml and the injection volume in the carbon tube is 20 mul, the sensitivity for antimony is 0.2 ng/ml for 1% absorption. The relative standard deviations are ca. 2%. Interferences by many metal ions can be prevented by masking with EDTA. The proposed methods have been applied satisfactorily to determination of antimony(III) and antimony(V) in various types of water. PMID:18962096

  16. A nanoporous 3D zinc(II) metal–organic framework for selective absorption of benzaldehyde and formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Moradpour, Tahereh; Abbasi, Alireza; Van Hecke, Kristof

    2015-08-15

    A new 3D nanoporous metal–organic framework (MOF), [[Zn{sub 4}O(C{sub 24}H{sub 15}N{sub 6}O{sub 6}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O·DMF]{sub n} (1) based on 4,4′,4″-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate (TATAB) ligand was solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single–crystal X-ray diffraction, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analyses. X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis reveals that 1 exhibits a 3D network with new kvh1 topology. Semi-empirical (AM1) calculations were carried out to obtain stable conformers for TATAB ligand. In addition, the absorption of two typical aldehydes (benzaldehyde and formaldehyde) in the presence of 1 was investigated and the effect of the aldehyde concentration, exposure time and temperature was studied. It was found that compound 1 has a potential for the absorption of aldehydes under mild conditions. - Graphical abstract: Absorption of two typical aldehydes (formaldehyde and benzaldehyde) by solvothermally synthesized of a 3D nano-porous MOF based on TATAB tricarboxylate ligand and Zn (NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • We present a 3D Zn(II)-MOF with TATAB linker by solvothermal method. • The framework possesses a new kvh1 topology. • The framework displays formaldehyde and benzaldehyde absorption property. • Conformational analysis was performed to determine the stable linker geometry.

  17. Raman and absorption spectrophotometric studies of selected lanthanide, californium-doped lanthanide, and actinide trihalides in the solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Wilmarth, W.R.

    1988-03-01

    The solid-state absorption spectra of Cf(III) ions as a dopant in lanthanide trihalide hosts (LnCl/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, and Y; LnBr/sub 3/: Ln = Ce, Sm, Tb, and Y; LnI/sub 3/: Ln = Ce and Y) have been recorded. The spectra of Cf(III) have been correlated with the various crystal structures. The phonon Raman spectra and solid-state absorption spectra of PmF/sub 3/, PmCl/sub 3/, PmBr/sub 3/, and two crystal modifications of PmI/sub 3/ have been recorded. Symmetry assignments have been made for the Raman-active bands for these trihalides and also the sesquioxide. The room-temperature absorption spectra have been correlated to crystal field effects. The symmetry assignments of the Raman-active phonon modes have been made based on polarized Raman spectra from single crystals of YF/sub 3/-type orthorhombic TbF/sub 3/ and PuBr/sub 3/-type orthorhombic NdBr/sub 3/. Raman spectra of other isostructural lanthanide compounds have been recorded and compared. Symmetry assignments for these compounds have been made by analogy to the single-crystal assignments. Raman spectra have been obtained and catalogued for a number of actinide compounds. Symmetry assignments have been made for the observed Raman-active phonon bands in this work based on the assignments made for isostructural lanthanide compounds. 29 figs., 22 tabs.

  18. Born Rule(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Urbasi

    2011-09-01

    This paper is based on work published in [1]. It describes a triple slit experiment using single photons that has been used to provide a bound on one of the most fundamental axioms of quantum mechanics i.e. Born's rule for probabilities [2]. In spite of being one of the most successful theories which describes various natural phenomena, quantum mechanics has enough intricacies and "weirdness" associated with it which makes many physicists believe that it may not be the final theory and hints towards the possibility of more generalized versions. Quantum interference as shown by a double slit diffraction experiment only occurs from pairs of paths. Even in multi-slit versions, interference can only occur between pairs of possibilities and increasing the number of slits does not increase the complexity of the theory that still remains second-order. However, more generalized versions of quantum mechanics may allow for multi-path i.e. higher than second order interference. This experiment also provides a bound on the magnitude of such higher order interference. We have been able to bound the magnitude of three-path interference to less than 10-2 of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third and higher order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule.

  19. Band-Selective Measurements of Electron Dynamics in VO2 UsingFemtosecond Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalleri, A.; Rini, M.; Chong, H.H.W.; Fourmaux, S.; Glover,T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Kieffer, J.C.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2005-07-20

    We report on the first demonstration of femtosecond x-rayabsorption spectroscopy, made uniquely possible by the use of broadlytunable bending-magnet radiation from "laser-sliced" electron buncheswithin a synchrotron storage ri ng. We measure the femtosecond electronicrearrangements that occur during the photoinduced insulator-metal phasetransition in VO2. Symmetry- and element-specific x-ray absorption fromV2p and O1s core levels (near 500 eV) separately measures the fillingdynamics of differently hybridized V3d-O2p electronic bands near theFermi level.

  20. Cleavage of highly structured viral RNA molecules by combinatorial libraries of hairpin ribozymes. The most effective ribozymes are not predicted by substrate selection rules.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q; Pecchia, D B; Kingsley, S L; Heckman, J E; Burke, J M

    1998-09-01

    Combinatorial libraries of hairpin ribozymes representing all possible cleavage specificities (>10(5)) were used to evaluate all ribozyme cleavage sites within a large (4.2-kilobase) and highly structured viral mRNA, the 26 S subgenomic RNA of Sindbis virus. The combinatorial approach simultaneously accounts for target site structure and dynamics, together with ribozyme folding, and the sequences that result in a ribozyme-substrate complex with maximal activity. Primer extension was used to map and rank the relative activities of the ribozyme pool against individual sites and revealed two striking findings. First, only a small fraction of potential recognition sites are effectively cleaved (activity-selected sites). Second, nearly all of the most effectively cleaved sites deviated substantially from the established consensus selection rules for the hairpin ribozyme and were not predicted by examining the sequence, or through the use of computer-assisted predictions of RNA secondary structure. In vitro selection methods were used to isolate ribozymes with increased activity against substrates that deviate from the GUC consensus sequence. trans-Acting ribozymes targeting nine of the activity-selected sites were synthesized, together with ribozymes targeting four sites with a perfect match to the cleavage site consensus (sequence-selected sites). Activity-selected ribozymes have much higher cleavage activity against the long, structured RNA molecules than do sequence-selected ribozymes, although the latter are effective in cleaving oligoribonucleotides, as predicted. These results imply that, for Sindbis virus 26 S RNA, designing ribozymes based on matches to the consensus sequence may be an ineffective strategy. PMID:9722591

  1. A nanoporous 3D zinc(II) metal-organic framework for selective absorption of benzaldehyde and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpour, Tahereh; Abbasi, Alireza; Van Hecke, Kristof

    2015-08-01

    A new 3D nanoporous metal-organic framework (MOF), [[Zn4O(C24H15N6O6)2(H2O)2]·6H2O·DMF]n (1) based on 4,4‧,4″-s-triazine-1,3,5-triyltri-p-aminobenzoate (TATAB) ligand was solvothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analyses. X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis reveals that 1 exhibits a 3D network with new kvh1 topology. Semi-empirical (AM1) calculations were carried out to obtain stable conformers for TATAB ligand. In addition, the absorption of two typical aldehydes (benzaldehyde and formaldehyde) in the presence of 1 was investigated and the effect of the aldehyde concentration, exposure time and temperature was studied. It was found that compound 1 has a potential for the absorption of aldehydes under mild conditions.

  2. Site selection for managed aquifer recharge using fuzzy rules: integrating geographical information system (GIS) tools and multi-criteria decision making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekmohammadi, Bahram; Ramezani Mehrian, Majid; Jafari, Hamid Reza

    2012-11-01

    One of the most important water-resources management strategies for arid lands is managed aquifer recharge (MAR). In establishing a MAR scheme, site selection is the prime prerequisite that can be assisted by geographic information system (GIS) tools. One of the most important uncertainties in the site-selection process using GIS is finite ranges or intervals resulting from data classification. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a novel method has been developed involving the integration of multi-criteria decision making (MCDM), GIS, and a fuzzy inference system (FIS). The Shemil-Ashkara plain in the Hormozgan Province of Iran was selected as the case study; slope, geology, groundwater depth, potential for runoff, land use, and groundwater electrical conductivity have been considered as site-selection factors. By defining fuzzy membership functions for the input layers and the output layer, and by constructing fuzzy rules, a FIS has been developed. Comparison of the results produced by the proposed method and the traditional simple additive weighted (SAW) method shows that the proposed method yields more precise results. In conclusion, fuzzy-set theory can be an effective method to overcome associated uncertainties in classification of geographic information data.

  3. FTIR spectrometer with 30 m optical cell and its applications to the sensitive measurements of selective and nonselective absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, Yu. N.; Solodov, A. A.; Solodov, A. M.; Petrova, T. M.; Naumenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    A description of the spectroscopic complex at V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, SB RAS, operating in a wide spectral range with high threshold sensitivity to the absorption coefficient is presented. Measurements of weak lines and nonselective spectra of CO2 and H2O were performed based on the built setup. As new application of this setup, positions and intensities of 152 weak lines of H2O were measured between 2400 and 2560 cm-1 with threshold sensitivity of 8.6×10-10 cm-1, and compared with available calculated and experimental data. Essential deviations between the new intensity measurements and calculated data accepted in HITRAN 2012 and GEISA 2015 forthcoming release are found.

  4. Direct estimates of natural selection in Iberia indicate calcium absorption was not the only driver of lactase persistence in Europe.

    PubMed

    Sverrisdóttir, Oddny Ósk; Timpson, Adrian; Toombs, Jamie; Lecoeur, Cecile; Froguel, Philippe; Carretero, Jose Miguel; Arsuaga Ferreras, Juan Luis; Götherström, Anders; Thomas, Mark G

    2014-04-01

    Lactase persistence (LP) is a genetically determined trait whereby the enzyme lactase is expressed throughout adult life. Lactase is necessary for the digestion of lactose--the main carbohydrate in milk--and its production is downregulated after the weaning period in most humans and all other mammals studied. Several sources of evidence indicate that LP has evolved independently, in different parts of the world over the last 10,000 years, and has been subject to strong natural selection in dairying populations. In Europeans, LP is strongly associated with, and probably caused by, a single C to T mutation 13,910 bp upstream of the lactase (LCT) gene (-13,910*T). Despite a considerable body of research, the reasons why LP should provide such a strong selective advantage remain poorly understood. In this study, we examine one of the most widely cited hypotheses for selection on LP--that fresh milk consumption supplemented the poor vitamin D and calcium status of northern Europe's early farmers (the calcium assimilation hypothesis). We do this by testing for natural selection on -13,910*T using ancient DNA data from the skeletal remains of eight late Neolithic Iberian individuals, whom we would not expect to have poor vitamin D and calcium status because of relatively high incident UVB light levels. None of the eight samples successfully typed in the study had the derived T-allele. In addition, we reanalyze published data from French Neolithic remains to both test for population continuity and further examine the evolution of LP in the region. Using simulations that accommodate genetic drift, natural selection, uncertainty in calibrated radiocarbon dates, and sampling error, we find that natural selection is still required to explain the observed increase in allele frequency. We conclude that the calcium assimilation hypothesis is insufficient to explain the spread of LP in Europe. PMID:24448642

  5. Polarization selection rules and optical transitions in terbium activated yttrium tantalate phosphor under x-ray, vacuum-ultraviolet, and ultraviolet excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, Mihail; Tsukerblat, Boris; Byeon, Clare Chisu; Arellano, Ivan; Popovici, Elisabeth-Jeanne; Noh, Do Young

    2009-01-01

    The terbium-activated yttrium tantalite (YTaO4:Tb{sup 3{sup +}}) phosphor is of great interest due to the interesting spectroscopic properties of rare earth ions in crystals and also practical use in x-ray imaging. Using the group-theoretical approach, we analyze the selection rules for the transition between Stark components of Tb{sup 3{sup +}} in symmetry of the actual crystal field and the polarization for the allowed transitions. The luminescence upon UV, vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV), and x-ray excitation is presented and discussed. The YTaO4:Tb{sup 3{sup +}} phosphors are found to be efficient VUV-excited luminescent materials that could be used not only in x-ray intensifying screens, but also in mercury-free fluorescent lamps or plasma display panels.

  6. Self-accommodation of B19' martensite in Ti-Ni shape memory alloys - Part I. Morphological and crystallographic studies of the variant selection rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, M.; Nishiura, T.; Kawano, H.; Inamura, T.

    2012-06-01

    The self-accommodation morphologies of B19‧ martensite in Ti-Ni alloys have been investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Twelve pairs of minimum units consisting of two habit plane variants (HPVs) with V-shaped morphology connected to a ? B19‧ type I variant accommodation twin were observed. Three types of self-accommodation morphologies, based on the V-shaped minimum unit, developed around one of the {111}B2 traces, which were triangular, rhombic and hexangular and consisted of three, four and six HPVs, respectively. In addition, the variant selection rule and the number of possible HPV combinations in each of these self-accommodation morphologies are discussed.

  7. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of the immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2004-05-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the Immunomagnetic Circulating Cancer Cell Selection and Enumeration System device into class II (special controls). The special control that will apply to the device is the guidance document entitled "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Immunomagnetic Circulating Cancer Cell Selection and Enumeration System." The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (the SMDA), the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA), and the Medical Device User Fee and Modernization Act of 2002 (MDUFMA). The agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice of availability of a guidance document that is the special control for this device. PMID:15137395

  8. An Examination of Biomedical Intellectual Reputation in Relationship to Graduates' Productivity, Regional Innovation and Absorptive Capacity at Selected Universities Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Gesulla

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to determine factors associated with intellectual reputation, specifically among selected biomedical departments worldwide within the university setting. Second, the study aimed to examine intellectual reputation in relationship to doctoral graduates' productivity in the biomedical sciences and in relationship…

  9. Synthesis and selective IR absorption properties of iminodiacetic-acid intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijing; Xu, Xiangyu; Evans, David G.; Duan, Xue; Li, Dianqing

    2010-05-01

    An MgAl-NO 3-layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor has been prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Reaction with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) under weakly acidic conditions led to the replacement of the interlayer nitrate anions by iminodiacetic acid anions. The product was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, TG-DTA, ICP, elemental analysis and SEM. The results show that the original interlayer nitrate anions of LDHs precursor were replaced by iminodiacetic acid anions and that the resulting intercalation product MgAl-IDA-LDH has an ordered crystalline structure. MgAl-IDA-LDH was mixed with low density polyethylene (LDPE) using a masterbatch method. LDPE films filled with MgAl-IDA-LDH showed a higher mid to far infrared absorption than films filled with MgAl-CO 3-LDH in the 7-25 μm range, particularly in the key 9-11 μm range required for application in agricultural plastic films.

  10. Synthesis and selective IR absorption properties of iminodiacetic-acid intercalated MgAl-layered double hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Lijing; Xu Xiangyu; Evans, David G.; Duan Xue; Li Dianqing

    2010-05-15

    An MgAl-NO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursor has been prepared by a method involving separate nucleation and aging steps (SNAS). Reaction with iminodiacetic acid (IDA) under weakly acidic conditions led to the replacement of the interlayer nitrate anions by iminodiacetic acid anions. The product was characterized by XRD, FT-IR, TG-DTA, ICP, elemental analysis and SEM. The results show that the original interlayer nitrate anions of LDHs precursor were replaced by iminodiacetic acid anions and that the resulting intercalation product MgAl-IDA-LDH has an ordered crystalline structure. MgAl-IDA-LDH was mixed with low density polyethylene (LDPE) using a masterbatch method. LDPE films filled with MgAl-IDA-LDH showed a higher mid to far infrared absorption than films filled with MgAl-CO{sub 3}-LDH in the 7-25 {mu}m range, particularly in the key 9-11 {mu}m range required for application in agricultural plastic films. - Graphical abstract: Intercalation of iminodiacetic acid (IDA) anions in a MgAl-NO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide host leads to an enhancement of its infrared absorbing ability for application in agricultural plastic films.

  11. Determination of selected elements in whole coal and in coal ash from the eight argonne premium coal samples by atomic absorption spectrometry, atomic emission spectrometry, and ion-selective electrode

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doughten, M.W.; Gillison, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Methods for the determination of 24 elements in whole coal and coal ash by inductively coupled argon plasma-atomic emission spectrometry, flame, graphite furnace, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry, and by ion-selective electrode are described. Coal ashes were analyzed in triplicate to determine the precision of the methods. Results of the analyses of NBS Standard Reference Materials 1633, 1633a, 1632a, and 1635 are reported. Accuracy of the methods is determined by comparison of the analysis of standard reference materials to their certified values as well as other values in the literature.

  12. Absorption spectra of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. S.; Wu, M. F.; Hsieh, C. T.

    2015-10-01

    The low-frequency optical absorption properties of graphene nanoribbons in a composite magnetic field are investigated by using the gradient approximation. The spectral function exhibits symmetric delta-function like prominent peaks structure in a uniform magnetic field, and changes to asymmetric square-root divergent peaks structure when subjecting to a composite field. These asymmetric divergent peaks can be further classified into principal and secondary peaks. The spectral intensity and frequency of the absorption peaks depend sensitively on the strength and modulation period of the composite field. The transition channels of the absorption peaks are also analyzed. There exists an optical selection rule which is caused by the orthogonal properties of the sublattice wave functions. The evolution of the spectral frequency of the absorption peaks with the field strength is explored.

  13. Crystal and molecular structures of selected organic and organometallic compounds and an algorithm for empirical absorption correction

    SciTech Connect

    Karcher, B.

    1981-10-01

    Cr(CO)/sub 5/(SCMe/sub 2/) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/sub 1//a with a = 10.468(8), b = 11.879(5), c = 9.575(6) A, and ..beta.. = 108.14(9)/sup 0/, with an octahedral coordination around the chromium atom. PSN/sub 3/C/sub 6/H/sub 12/ crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/sub 1//n with a = 10.896(1), b = 11.443(1), c = 7.288(1) A, and ..beta.. = 104.45(1)/sup 0/. Each of the five-membered rings in this structure contains a carbon atom which is puckered toward the sulfur and out of the nearly planar arrays of the remaining ring atoms. (RhO/sub 4/N/sub 4/C/sub 48/H/sub 56/)/sup +/(BC/sub 24/H/sub 20/)/sup -/.1.5NC/sub 2/H/sub 3/ crystallizes in the triclinic space group P1 with a = 17.355(8), b = 21.135(10), c = 10.757(5) A, ..cap alpha.. = 101.29(5), ..beta.. = 98.36(5), and ..gamma.. = 113.92(4)/sup 0/. Each Rh cation complex is a monomer. MoP/sub 2/O/sub 10/C/sub 16/H/sub 22/ crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/sub 1//c with a = 12.220(3), b = 9.963(2), c = 20.150(6) A, and ..beta.. = 103.01(3)/sup 0/. The molybdenum atom occupies the axial position of the six-membered ring of each of the two phosphorinane ligands. An empirical absorption correction program was written.

  14. Site-selective high-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy and high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Timna-Josua; Hormes, Josef; Matoussevitch, Nina; Bönnemann, Helmut; Glatzel, Pieter

    2014-08-18

    The special (macroscopic) properties of nanoparticles are mainly due to their large surface-to-volume ratio. Thus, the separate characterization of geometric and electronic properties of surface and bulk would be favorable for a better understanding of the properties of nanoparticles. Because of the chemical sensitivity of X-ray fluorescence lines, in particular those involving higher lying electronic states, high-resolution fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectra (HRFD-XAS) offer these opportunities. In this study, three types of wet-chemically synthesized Co nanoparticles, ∼6 nm in diameter with varying thicknesses of a protective shell, were investigated at the ID26 beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. HRFD-XAS spectra at the Co K-edge, that is, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (HRFD-XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (HRFD-EXAFS) spectra, were recorded via detection of the Kβ1,3 fluorescence at specific energies. As these spectra are only partly site-selective due to a strong overlap of the emission lines, a numerical procedure was applied based on a least-squares fitting procedure, realized by singular value decomposition. The detailed analysis of the obtained site-selective spectra, regarding chemical composition and crystallographic phase, using measured and simulated FEFF9-based reference spectra, showed that the metallic core had mainly hexagonal close-packed structure with lattice constants matching bulk Co; the spectra for the shell could be satisfactorily fitted by a mixture of CoO and CoCO3; however, with an obvious need for at least a third compound. To obtain additional information about ligands attached to Co, valence-to-core X-ray emission spectra (VTC-XES) using the Kβ2,5 and the satellite structure Kβ″ and VTC-XANES spectra thereof were also recorded, by which the former results are confirmed. Further on, FEFF simulations indicate that a Co-N compound is a very likely candidate for the third

  15. Laser-driven hard-x-ray generation based on ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of Ni compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Shan Fang; Carter, Josh D.; Ng, Vicky; Guo Ting

    2005-02-01

    Three Ni compounds were studied by ultrafast selected energy x-ray absorption spectroscopy using a laser-driven electron x-ray source with a tungsten target. The measured K edges of these Ni compounds using this self-referencing method were made identical to those measured with synchrotron x-ray sources. This enabled us to determine the absolute peak positions of tungsten L{alpha}{sub 1} and L{alpha}{sub 2} emitted from this source to be within 1 eV of those from the neutral tungsten atoms, which strongly suggested that the x rays were emitted from high energy electrons interacting with tungsten atoms in the solid target. This is the best evidence to date that directly supports the cold atom x-ray generation theory.

  16. Coumarin-based fluorescence hybrid silica material used for selective detection and absorption of Hg2+ in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingtao; Jia, Hongmin; Wang, Cuiping; Zhao, Hongbin; Lu, Gonghao; Hu, Zhizhi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Duan, Chunying

    2014-11-01

    An inorganic-organic hybrid fluorescence material (C-SBA-15) was prepared by covalent immobilization of a coumarin derivative within the channels of SBA-15. The characterization results of XRD, TEM micrographs, FT-IR and UV-vis demonstrate that coumarin is successfully grafted onto the inner surface of SBA-15 and its organized structure is preserved. C-SBA-15 can detect Hg2+ with high selectivity to Pb2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Cd2+, Co2+, Ag+, Fe3+, Ni2+, K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and Li+ in water. Furthermore, the fluorogenical response is reversible by treating with EDTA and do not vary over a broad pH range (5.0-10.5). C-SBA-15 features more outstanding absorbing capacity for Hg2+ among other HTM ions in water.

  17. Association Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höppner, Frank

    Association rules are rules of the kind "70% of the customers who buy vine and cheese also buy grapes". While the traditional field of application is market basket analysis, association rule mining has been applied to various fields since then, which has led to a number of important modifications and extensions. We discuss the most frequently applied approach that is central to many extensions, the Apriori algorithm, and briefly review some applications to other data types, well-known problems of rule evaluation via support and confidence, and extensions of or alternatives to the standard framework.

  18. Novel ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica for selective magnetic solid phase extraction of trace Cd followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Bingshan; He, Man; Chen, Beibei; Hu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Determination of trace Cd in environmental, biological and food samples is of great significance to toxicological research and environmental pollution monitoring. While the direct determination of Cd in real-world samples is difficult due to its low concentration and the complex matrix. Herein, a novel Cd(II)-ion imprinted magnetic mesoporous silica (Cd(II)-II-MMS) was prepared and was employed as a selective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) material for extraction of trace Cd in real-world samples followed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) detection. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit of the proposed method was 6.1 ng L- 1 for Cd with the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 4.0% (c = 50 ng L- 1, n = 7), and the enrichment factor was 50-fold. To validate the proposed method, Certified Reference Materials of GSBZ 50009-88 environmental water, ZK018-1 lyophilized human urine and NIES10-b rice flour were analyzed and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method exhibited a robust anti-interference ability due to the good selectivity of Cd(II)-II-MMS toward Cd(II). It was successfully employed for the determination of trace Cd(II) in environmental water, human urine and rice samples with recoveries of 89.3-116%, demonstrating that the proposed method has good application potential in real world samples with complex matrix.

  19. Integrating user centered design, universal design and goal, operation, method and selection rules to improve the usability of DAISY player for persons with visual impairments.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Hsin; Chiu, Ming-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The Digital Accessible Information SYstem (DAISY) player is an assistive reading tool developed for use by persons with visual impairments. Certain problems have persisted in the operating procedure and interface of DAISY players, especially for their Chinese users. Therefore, the aim of this study was to redesign the DAISY player with increased usability features for use by native Chinese speakers. First, a User Centered Design (UCD) process was employed to analyze the development of the prototype. Next, operation procedures were reorganized according to GOMS (Goals, Operators, Methods, and Selection rules) methodology. Then the user interface was redesigned according to specific Universal Design (UD) principles. Following these revisions, an experiment involving four scenarios was conducted to compare the new prototype to other players, and it was tested by twelve visually impaired participants. Results indicate the prototype had the quickest operating times, the fewest number of operating errors, and the lowest mental workloads of all the compared players, significantly enhancing the prototype's usability. These findings have allowed us to generate suggestions for developing the next generation of DAISY players for people, especially for Chinese audience. PMID:26360192

  20. Morphological and genetic analyses reveal a cryptic species complex in the echinoid Echinocardium cordatum and rule out a stabilizing selection explanation.

    PubMed

    Egea, E; David, B; Choné, T; Laurin, B; Féral, J P; Chenuil, A

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary analyses revealed the presence of at least five mitochondrial clades within the widespread sea urchin Echinocardium cordatum (Spatangoida). In this study, we analyzed the genetic (two mitochondrial and two nuclear sequence loci) and morphological characteristics (20 indices) from worldwide samples of this taxon to establish the species limits, morphological diversity and differentiation. Co-occurring spatangoid species were also analyzed with mitochondrial DNA. The nuclear sequences confirm that mitochondrial lineages correspond to true genetic entities and reveal that two clades (named A and B1) hybridize in their sympatry area, although a more closely related pair of clades (B1 and B2), whose distributions widely overlap, does not display hybridization. The morphology of all E. cordatum clade pairs was significantly differentiated, but no morphological diagnostic character was evidenced. By contrast, other spatangoid species pairs that diverged more recently than the E. cordatum clades display clear diagnostic characters. Morphological diversity thus appears responsible for the absence of diagnostic characters, ruling out stabilizing selection, a classical explanation for cryptic species. Alternative classical explanations are (i) environmental plasticity or (ii) a high diversity of genes determining morphology, maintained by varying environmental conditions. We suggest a new hypothesis that the observed morphological diversity is selectively neutral and reflects high effective population sizes in the E. cordatum complex. It is supported by the higher abundance of this taxon compared with other taxa, a trend for the genetic and morphological diversity to be correlated in Europe, and the higher genetic and morphological diversities found in clades of E cordatum (except B1) than in other spatangoid samples in Europe. However, the Pacific clades do not confirm these trends. PMID:26265259

  1. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  2. Selective quantification of trace palladium in road dusts and roadside soils by displacement solid-phase extraction online coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Jiang, Yan; Yan, Xiu-Ping; Ni, Zhe-Ming

    2005-01-01

    There is a growing concern about the effect of palladium on human health because of the toxicity and increasing occurrence of palladium as a result of its extensive use in automotive catalytic converters. Development of reliable analytical methodologies for the determination of palladium in environmental materials is of great importance for critical evaluation of the possible risks for human health. In this work, a displacement solid-phase extraction technique was developed and online coupled to electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) for selective and sensitive determination of trace palladium in environmental samples without need of any special selective complexing agents, selective sorbents, and masking agents. The developed methodology involved the online formation of copper pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (Cu-PDC), and the resultant Cu-PDC was extracted onto a microcolumn packed with the sorbent from a cigarette filter. Trace Pd(II) was selectively preconcentrated through loading the sample solution onto the microcolumn by online displacement reaction between Pd(II) and the extracted Cu-PDC on the microcolumn. The retained analyte was subsequently eluted with 40 microL of ethanol for online ETAAS determination. Interferences from coexisting heavy metal ions with lower stability of their PDC complexes relative to Cu-PDC were minimized. The tolerable concentrations of Cd-(II), Fe(III), Co(II), Mn(II), Cr(III), and Zn(II) were up to 2, 6, 40, 2, 1.5, and at least 100 mg L(-1), respectively. Compared with conventional solid-phase extraction methodology, the developed displacement solid-phase extraction protocol gave 2-4 orders of magnitude improvement in the maximum tolerable concentrations of coexisting heavy metal ions. With the consumption of only 2.8 mL of sample solution, an enhancement factor of 52 and a detection limit (3sigma) of 18 ng L(-1) were achieved at a sample throughput of 30 samples h(-1). The precision (RSD, n = 13) was 2.5% at the 1

  3. Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane@Fe3O4@SiO2@fluoropolymer sponges for selective oil absorption and oil/water separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Li, Lingxiao; Li, Bucheng; Zhang, Junping; Wang, Aiqin

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic polyurethane (PU) sponges were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) to bind the Fe3O4 nanoparticles tightly on the sponge and then dip-coating in a fluoropolymer (FP) aqueous solution. The sponges were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and other analytical techniques. The effects of CVD time of TEOS and FP concentration on wettability, mechanical properties, oil absorbency, and oil/water selectivity of the sponges were also investigated. The sponges exhibit fast magnetic responsivity and excellent superhydrophobicity/superoleophilicity (CAwater = 157° and CAoil ≈ 0°). The sponges also show very high efficiency in oil/water separation and could, driven by a magnet, quickly absorb floating oils on the water surface and heavy oils under water. Moreover, the PU@Fe3O4@SiO2@FP sponges could be used as membranes for oil/water separation and for continuous separation of large amounts of oil pollutants from the water surface with the help of a pump. The in turn binding of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, SiO2, and FP can also improve mechanical properties of the PU sponge. The sponges maintain the superhydrophobicity even when they are stretched with 200% strain or compressed with 50% strain. The sponges also show excellent mechanical stability, oil stability, and reusability in terms of superhydrophobicity and oil absorbency. The magnetic, durable, and superhydrophobic PU sponges are very promising materials for practical oil absorption and oil/water separation. PMID:25671386

  4. On-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals by thioglycolic acid for speciation analysis by selective hydride generation cryotrapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2008-06-01

    An improvement of current method of selective hydride generation based on pre-reduction for differentiation of tri- and pentavalent arsenicals is described, applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic, mono-, di- and trimethylated arsenicals with minimum sample pretreatment using atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The preconcentration and separation of arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine are then carried out by means of cryotrapping. The presented study shows that 2% (m/v) L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate ( L-cys) currently used for off-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals can be substituted with 1% (m/v) thioglycolic acid (TGA). Much faster pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals at 25 °C with equal sensitivities as in the case of L-cys has been achieved with TGA. A setup for on-line pre-reduction by TGA has been optimized, with the application of segmented flow analysis for suppression of axial dispersion in the pre-reduction coil. Standard calibrations measured with or without on-line pre-reduction indicate uniform and equal sensitivities for all As forms. The possibility of standardization by water standards of single species (e.g. iAs(III)) for quantification of all other As forms in urine is demonstrated in the recovery study. Limits of detection were 100 ng l - 1 for iAs(III), 135 ng l - 1 for iAs(V) and 30 to 50 ng l - 1 for methylated arsenicals.

  5. One-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for the selective determination of methylmercury in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Liang, Pei; Kang, Caiyan; Mo, Yajun

    2016-03-01

    A novel method for the selective determination of methylmercury (MeHg) was developed by one-step displacement dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (D-DLLME) coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. In the proposed method, Cu(II) reacted with diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) to form Cu-DDTC complex, which was used as the chelating agent instead of DDTC for the dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) of MeHg. Because the stability of MeHg-DDTC is higher than that of Cu-DDTC, MeHg can displace Cu from the Cu-DDTC complex and be preconcentrated in a single DLLME procedure. MeHg could be extracted into the extraction solvent phase at pH 6 while Hg(II) remained in the sample solution. Potential interference from co-existing metal ions with lower DDTC complex stability was largely eliminated without the need of any masking reagent. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection of this method was 13.6ngL(-1) (as Hg), and an enhancement factor of 81 was achieved with a sample volume of 5.0mL. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of trace MeHg in some environmental samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26717807

  6. Diode laser absorption sensors for combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Zhou

    Combustion is the most widely used energy conversion technique in the world. Diode-laser absorption sensors offer significant opportunities and advantages for in situ measurements of multiple combustion parameters such as temperature and species concentration due to their high sensitivity, high spectral resolution, fast time response, robustness and non-intrusive character. The overall objective of this thesis is to design and develop time-resolved and real-time tunable diode laser sensors with the potential for combustion control. A crucial element in the design of a tunable-diode-laser optical-absorption-based sensor is the selection of optimum transitions. The strategy and spectroscopic criteria for selecting optimum wavelength regions and absorption line combinations are developed. The development of this design-rule approach establishes a new paradigm to optimize tunable diode laser sensors for target applications. The water vapor spectrum in the 1-2 mum near-infrared region is systematically analyzed to find the best absorption transition pairs for sensitive measurement of temperature in the target combustion environment using a single tunable diode laser. Two sensors are developed in this work. The first sensor is a 1.8 mum, single-laser temperature sensor based on direct absorption scans. Successful time-resolved measurements in a variety of laboratory and practical devices are presented and used to identify potential improvements, and design rules for a second-generation sensor are developed based on the lessons learned. The second generation sensor is a 1.4 mum, single-laser temperature sensor using water vapor absorption detected by wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS), which facilitates rapid data analysis and a 2 kHz real-time data rate in the combustion experiments reported here. Demonstration experiments in a heated cell and a forced Hencken burner confirm the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensors. The first application of TDL thermometry to a

  7. Generating Rules and Examples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabinger, R. Scott; Jonassen, David H.

    1989-01-01

    This seventh in a series of articles discussing expert system construction focuses on two ways to create a structure that determines a decision: (1) rule-based, or deductive, implementation; and (2) example-based, or inductive, implementation. Probability factors and confidence levels are discussed, and an example is given for selecting an…

  8. Simultaneous Two-Photon Absorption to Gerade Excited Singlet States of Diphenylacetylene and Diphenylbutadiyne Using Optical-Probing Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Tasuku; Oba, Hikari; Ikoma, Tadaaki; Suzuki, Tadashi

    2016-08-11

    Simultaneous two-photon absorption to one-photon forbidden electronically excited states of diphenylacetylene (DPA) and diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) was investigated by means of highly sensitive optical-probing photoacoustic spectroscopy. The incident laser power dependencies on photoacoustic signal intensity indicate that the signals are dominated by the two-photon absorption regime. Two-photon absorption is responsible for transitions to gerade excited states based on the selection rule. The two-photon absorption bands observed in the heat action spectra were assigned with the aid of quantum chemical calculations. The relative magnitude of the two-photon absorption cross sections of DPA and DPB was estimated, and the larger two-photon absorption cross section of DPB was related to the resonance effect with the red-shifted one-photon allowed 1(1)B1u ← 1(1)Ag transition of DPB. PMID:27410388

  9. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  10. High-energy resolution X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy reveals insight into unique selectivity of La-based nanoparticles for CO2

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Ofer; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Luo, Li; Süess, Martin J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Koziej, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The lanthanum-based materials, due to their layered structure and f-electron configuration, are relevant for electrochemical application. Particularly, La2O2CO3 shows a prominent chemoresistive response to CO2. However, surprisingly less is known about its atomic and electronic structure and electrochemically significant sites and therefore, its structure–functions relationships have yet to be established. Here we determine the position of the different constituents within the unit cell of monoclinic La2O2CO3 and use this information to interpret in situ high-energy resolution fluorescence-detected (HERFD) X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy (vtc XES). Compared with La(OH)3 or previously known hexagonal La2O2CO3 structures, La in the monoclinic unit cell has a much lower number of neighboring oxygen atoms, which is manifested in the whiteline broadening in XANES spectra. Such a superior sensitivity to subtle changes is given by HERFD method, which is essential for in situ studying of the interaction with CO2. Here, we study La2O2CO3-based sensors in real operando conditions at 250 °C in the presence of oxygen and water vapors. We identify that the distribution of unoccupied La d-states and occupied O p- and La d-states changes during CO2 chemoresistive sensing of La2O2CO3. The correlation between these spectroscopic findings with electrical resistance measurements leads to a more comprehensive understanding of the selective adsorption at La site and may enable the design of new materials for CO2 electrochemical applications. PMID:26668362

  11. Age Discrimination and the FAA Age 60 Rule. Hearing before the Select Committee on Aging. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Aging.

    This document presents witness testimonies and related materials from a Congressional hearing called to examine the mandatory retirement age of 60 for airline pilots. In opening remarks, Congressmen Roybal and Pepper question this ruling, citing productivity of older workers and the lack of data to support any specific age for mandatory…

  12. Low Absorption Vitreous Carbon Reactors for Operando XAS: A Case Study on Cu/Zeolites for Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx by NH3

    SciTech Connect

    Kispersky, Vincent F.; Kropf, A. Jeremy; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Miller, Jeffrey T.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the use of vitreous carbon as an improved reactor material for an operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) plug-flow reactor. These tubes significantly broaden the operating range for operando experiments. Using selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH₃ on Cu/Zeolites (SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5) as an example reaction, we illustrate the high-quality XAS data achievable with these reactors. The operando experiments showed that in Standard SCR conditions of 300 ppm NO, 300 ppm NH₃, 5% O₂, 5% H₂O, 5% CO₂ and balance He at 200 °C, the Cu was a mixture of Cu(I) and Cu(II) oxidation states. XANES and EXAFS fitting found the percent of Cu(I) to be 15%, 45% and 65% for SSZ-13, SAPO-34 and ZSM-5, respectively. For Standard SCR, the catalytic rates per mole of Cu for Cu/SSZ-13 and Cu/SAPO-34 were about one third of the rate per mole of Cu on Cu/ZSM-5. Based on the apparent lack of correlation of rate with the presence of Cu(I), we propose that the reaction occurs via a redox cycle of Cu(I) and Cu(II). Cu(I) was not found in in situSCR experiments on Cu/Zeolites under the same conditions, demonstrating a possible pitfall of in situ measurements. A Cu/SiO₂ catalyst, reduced in H₂ at 300 °C, was also used to demonstrate the reactor's operando capabilities using a bending magnet beamline. Analysis of the EXAFS data showed the Cu/SiO₂ catalyst to be in a partially reduced Cu metal–Cu(I) state. In addition to improvements in data quality, the reactors are superior in temperature, stability, strength and ease of use compared to previously proposed borosilicate glass, polyimide tubing, beryllium and capillary reactors. The solid carbon tubes are non-porous, machinable, can be operated at high pressure (tested at 25 bar), are inert, have high material purity and high X-ray transmittance.

  13. Effect of interdiffusion on nonlinear intraband light absorption in Gaussian-shaped double quantum rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz-Aghchegala, V. L.; Mughnetsyan, V. N.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    The effect of interdiffusion on electronic states and nonlinear light absorption in Gaussian-shaped double quantum rings is studied. The confining potential, electron energy spectrum, wave functions and absorption coefficient are obtained for different values of diffusion parameter. The effect of the variation of Gaussian parameters is considered as well. The selection rules for the intraband transitions in the cases of the light polarization parallel and perpendicular to the quantum rings' axis are obtained. It is shown that the interdiffusion can be used as an effective tool for the purposeful manipulation of the electric and optical properties of the considered structure.

  14. Mg II ABSORPTION SYSTEMS WITH W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A FOR A RADIO SELECTED SAMPLE OF 77 QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS AND THEIR ASSOCIATED MAGNETIC FIELDS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J. E-mail: fm@phys.ethz.c

    2010-03-01

    We present a catalog of Mg II absorption systems obtained from high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/VLT data of 77 quasi-stellar objects in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0, and down to an equivalent width W{sub 0} >= 0.1 A. The statistical properties of our sample are found to be in agreement with those from the previous work in the literature. However, we point out that the previously observed increase with redshift of partial derivN/partial derivz for weak absorbers pertains exclusively to very weak absorbers with W{sub 0} < 0.1 A. Instead, partial derivN/partial derivz for absorbers with W{sub 0} in the range 0.1-0.3 A actually decreases with redshift, similar to the case of strong absorbers. We then use this catalog to extend our earlier analysis of the links between the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the quasars and the presence of intervening Mg II absorbing systems in their spectra. In contrast to the case with strong Mg II absorption systems (W{sub 0} > 0.3 A), the weaker systems do not contribute significantly to the observed RM of the background quasars. This is possibly due to the higher impact parameters of the weak systems compared to strong ones, suggesting that the high column density magnetized material that is responsible for the Faraday rotation is located within about 50 kpc of the galaxies. Finally, we show that this result also rules out the possibility that some unexpected secondary correlation between the quasar redshift and its intrinsic RM is responsible for the association of high RM and strong intervening Mg II absorption that we have presented elsewhere, since this would have produced an equal effect for the weak absorption line systems, which exhibit a very similar distribution of quasar redshifts.

  15. Mg II Absorption Systems with W 0 >= 0.1 Å for a Radio Selected Sample of 77 Quasi-Stellar Objects and their Associated Magnetic Fields at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernet, M. L.; Miniati, F.; Lilly, S. J.

    2010-03-01

    We present a catalog of Mg II absorption systems obtained from high-resolution Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph/VLT data of 77 quasi-stellar objects in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.0, and down to an equivalent width W 0 >= 0.1 Å. The statistical properties of our sample are found to be in agreement with those from the previous work in the literature. However, we point out that the previously observed increase with redshift of ∂N/∂z for weak absorbers pertains exclusively to very weak absorbers with W 0 < 0.1 Å. Instead, ∂N/∂z for absorbers with W 0 in the range 0.1-0.3 Å actually decreases with redshift, similar to the case of strong absorbers. We then use this catalog to extend our earlier analysis of the links between the Faraday rotation measure (RM) of the quasars and the presence of intervening Mg II absorbing systems in their spectra. In contrast to the case with strong Mg II absorption systems (W 0 > 0.3 Å), the weaker systems do not contribute significantly to the observed RM of the background quasars. This is possibly due to the higher impact parameters of the weak systems compared to strong ones, suggesting that the high column density magnetized material that is responsible for the Faraday rotation is located within about 50 kpc of the galaxies. Finally, we show that this result also rules out the possibility that some unexpected secondary correlation between the quasar redshift and its intrinsic RM is responsible for the association of high RM and strong intervening Mg II absorption that we have presented elsewhere, since this would have produced an equal effect for the weak absorption line systems, which exhibit a very similar distribution of quasar redshifts. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under Programme IDs 075.A-0841 and 076.A-0860.

  16. Intensities and N2 collision-broadening coefficients measured for selected H2O absorption lines between 715 and 732 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Schwemmer, G.; Gentry, B.; Giver, L. P.

    1979-01-01

    Intensities and N2 collision-broadening coefficients are measured for 62 water vapor absorption lines between 715 and 732 nm potentially applicable to laser remote sensing of atmospheric water vapor. Absolute line strengths and widths were determined from spectra corrected for instrument resolution, air-path absorption and Lorentz and Doppler broadening for pure water vapor and water vapor-nitrogen mixtures in a multipass absorption cell with a base path length of 25 m (White cell). Line strengths are observed to range from 4 x 10 to the -25th to 4 x 10 to the -23rd kayser/molecule per sq cm, and collision broadening coefficients are found to be approximately equal to 0.1 kayser/atm.

  17. HALO GAS AND GALAXY DISK KINEMATICS OF A VOLUME-LIMITED SAMPLE OF Mg II ABSORPTION-SELECTED GALAXIES AT z {approx} 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Cooke, Jeff; Churchill, Christopher W.; Barton, Elizabeth J. E-mail: jcooke@astro.swin.edu.au E-mail: ebarton@uci.edu

    2011-06-01

    We have directly compared Mg II halo gas kinematics to the rotation velocities derived from emission/absorption lines of the associated host galaxies. Our 0.096 {<=} z {<=} 0.148 volume-limited sample comprises 13 {approx}L{sub *} galaxies, with impact parameters of 12-90 kpc from background quasar sight lines, associated with 11 Mg II absorption systems with Mg II equivalent widths 0.3 A {<=} W{sub r} (2796) {<=} 2.3 A. For only 5/13 galaxies, the absorption resides to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity and trends to align with one side of the galaxy rotation curve. The remainder have absorption that spans both sides of the galaxy systemic velocity. These results differ from those at z {approx} 0.5, where 74% of the galaxies have absorption residing to one side of the galaxy systemic velocity. For all the z {approx} 0.1 systems, simple extended disk-like rotation models fail to reproduce the full Mg II velocity spread, implying that other dynamical processes contribute to the Mg II kinematics. In fact 55% of the galaxies are 'counter-rotating' with respect to the bulk of the Mg II absorption. These Mg II host galaxies are isolated, have low star formation rates (SFRs) in their central regions ({approx}< 1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), and SFRs per unit area well below those measured for galaxies with strong winds. The galaxy Na ID (stellar+ISM) and Mg Ib (stellar) absorption line ratios are consistent with a predominately stellar origin, implying kinematically quiescent interstellar media. These facts suggest that the kinematics of the Mg II absorption halos for our sample of galaxies are not influenced by galaxy-galaxy environmental effects, nor by winds intrinsic to the host galaxies. For these low-redshift galaxies, we favor a scenario in which infalling gas accretion provides a gas reservoir for low-to-moderate SFRs and disk/halo processes.

  18. Collaboration rules.

    PubMed

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies. PMID

  19. Allocating application to group of consecutive processors in fault-tolerant deadlock-free routing path defined by routers obeying same rules for path selection

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Vitus J.; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Bender, Michael A.; Bunde, David P.

    2009-07-21

    In a multiple processor computing apparatus, directional routing restrictions and a logical channel construct permit fault tolerant, deadlock-free routing. Processor allocation can be performed by creating a linear ordering of the processors based on routing rules used for routing communications between the processors. The linear ordering can assume a loop configuration, and bin-packing is applied to this loop configuration. The interconnection of the processors can be conceptualized as a generally rectangular 3-dimensional grid, and the MC allocation algorithm is applied with respect to the 3-dimensional grid.

  20. Single-Sex Schools, Student Achievement, and Course Selection: Evidence from Rule-Based Student Assignments in Trinidad and Tobago. NBER Working Paper No. 16817

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, C. Kirabo

    2011-01-01

    Existing studies on single-sex schooling suffer from biases due to student selection to schools and single-sex schools being better in unmeasured ways. In Trinidad and Tobago students are assigned to secondary schools based on an algorithm allowing one to address self-selection bias and cleanly estimate an upper-bound single-sex school effect. The…

  1. Evaluation of intensity and energy interaction parameters for the complexation of Pr(III) with selected nucleoside and nucleotide through absorption spectral studies.

    PubMed

    Bendangsenla, N; Moaienla, T; David Singh, Th; Sumitra, Ch; Rajmuhon Singh, N; Indira Devi, M

    2013-02-15

    The interactions of Pr(III) with nucleosides and nucleotides have been studied in different organic solvents employing absorption difference and comparative absorption spectrophotometry. The magnitudes of the variations in both energy and intensity interaction parameters were used to explore the degree of outer and inner sphere co-ordination, incidence of covalency and the extent of metal 4f-orbital involvement in chemical bonding. Various electronic spectral parameters like Slater-Condon (F(k)), Racah (E(k)), Lande parameter (ξ(4f)), Nephelauxatic ratio (β), bonding (b(1/2)), percentage covalency (δ) and intensity parameters like oscillator strength (P) and Judd Ofelt electronic dipole intensity parameter (T(λ), λ=2,4,6) have been evaluated. The variation of these evaluated parameters were employed to interpret the nature of binding of Pr(III) with different ligands i.e. Adenosine/ATP in presence and absence of Ca(2+). PMID:23257345

  2. Ornament Complexity Is Correlated with Sexual Selection: (A Comment on Raia et al., "Cope's Rule and the Universal Scaling Law of Ornament Complexity").

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Bro-Jørgensen, Jakob

    2016-08-01

    Raia et al. propose that the evolution of the shape and complexity of animal ornaments (e.g., deer antlers) can be explained by interspecific variation in body size and is not influenced by sexual selection. They claim to show that ornament complexity is related to body size by an 0.25-power law and argue that this finding precludes a role for sexual selection in the evolution of ornament complexity. However, their study does not test alternative hypotheses and mismeasures antler shape allometry by omitting much of the published data. We show that an index of sexual selection (sexual size dimorphism) is positively correlated with size-corrected antler complexity and that the allometric slope of complexity is substantially greater than 0.25, contra Raia et al. We conclude that sexual selection and physical constraints both affect the evolution of antler shape. PMID:27420791

  3. An absorption-selected survey of neutral gas in the Milky Way halo. New results based on a large sample of Ca ii, Na i, and H i spectra towards QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Bekhti, N.; Winkel, B.; Richter, P.; Kerp, J.; Klein, U.; Murphy, M. T.

    2012-06-01

    Aims: We aim at analysing systematically the distribution and physical properties of neutral and mildly ionised gas in the Milky Way halo, based on a large absorption-selected data set. Methods: Multi-wavelength studies were performed combining optical absorption line data of Ca ii and Na i with follow-up H i 21-cm emission line observations along 408 sight lines towards low- and high-redshift QSOs. We made use of archival optical spectra obtained with UVES/VLT. H i data were extracted from the Effelsberg-Bonn H i survey and the Galactic All-Sky survey. For selected sight lines we obtained deeper follow-up observations using the Effelsberg 100-m telescope. Results: Ca ii (Na i) halo absorbers at intermediate and high radial velocities are present in 40-55% (20-35%) of the sightlines, depending on the column density threshold chosen. Many halo absorbers show multi-component absorption lines, indicating the presence of sub-structure. In 65% of the cases, absorption is associated with H i 21-cm emission. The Ca ii (Na i) column density distribution function follows a power-law with a slope of β ≈ -2.2 (-1.4). Conclusions: Our absorption-selected survey confirms our previous results that the Milky Way halo is filled with a large number of neutral gas structures whose high column density tail represents the population of common H i high- and intermediate-velocity clouds seen in 21-cm observations. We find that Na i/Ca ii column density ratios in the halo absorbers are typically smaller than those in the Milky Way disc, in the gas in the Magellanic Clouds, and in damped Lyman α systems. The small ratios (prominent in particular in high-velocity components) indicate a lower level of Ca depletion onto dust grains in Milky Way halo absorbers compared to gas in discs and inner regions of galaxies. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/542/A110

  4. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  5. Max-out-in pivot rule with Dantzig's safeguarding rule for the simplex method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipawanna, Monsicha; Sinapiromsaran, Krung

    2014-03-01

    The simplex method is used to solve linear programming problem by improving the current basic feasible solution. It uses a pivot rule to guide the search in the feasible region. The pivot rule is used to select an entering index in simplex method. Nowadays, many pivot rule have been presented, but no pivot rule shows superior performance than other. Therefore, this is still an active research in linear programming. In this research, we present the max-out-in pivot rule with Dantzig's safeguarding for simplex method. This rule is based on maximum improvement of objective value of the current basic feasible point similar to the Dantzig's rule. We can illustrate by Klee and Minty problems that our rule outperforms that of Dantzig's rule by the number of iterations for solving linear programming problems.

  6. Magneto-absorption in conical quantum dot ensemble: Possible applications for QD LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayrapetyan, D. B.; Kazaryan, E. M.; Sarkisyan, H. A.

    2016-07-01

    In the framework of the adiabatic approximation, the energy states of electron, as well as the direct light absorption are investigated in conical quantum dot under the external magnetic field. Analytical expressions for the particle wave function and energy spectrum are obtained. The dependence of the absorption edge on the geometrical parameters of conical quantum dot is obtained. Selection rules are revealed for transitions between levels with different quantum numbers. Absorption coefficient dependence on the frequency of the incident light is revealed taking into account dispersion of conical quantum dot's base radius for both cases of symmetric and asymmetric distribution functions. Such structures are very promising and can be used for the element base quantum dots LEDs.

  7. Two-photon absorption in the relativistic four-component Hartree-Fock approximation.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Johan; Norman, Patrick; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa

    2005-03-15

    A first implementation of the single residue of the quadratic response function in the four-component Hartree-Fock approximation is presented. The implementation is based on a Kramers paired molecular orbital basis and takes full advantage of time and spatial symmetry reductions in a quaternion formulation-in analogy with the previous work on the quadratic response function [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6145 (2004)]. Sample calculations are given in terms of the monochromatic and coherent two-photon absorption cross sections in the noble gases. The relativistic two-photon selection rule DeltaJ = {0,+/-2} allows for nonrelativistically spin-forbidden transitions, and, even in neon, strong two-photon absorption is shown to occur for the X (1)S(0)-->2 (3)P(2) transition. It is argued that relevant comparisons between nonrelativistic and relativistic calculations must be performed at the level of integrated absorption cross sections. PMID:15836200

  8. Probing the many energy-transfer processes in the photosynthetic light-harvesting complex II at 77 K using energy-selective sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, H. M.; Kleima, F. J.; van Stokkum, I. H. M.; van Grondelle, R.; van Amerongen, H.

    1996-10-01

    The dynamics of energy equilibration in the main plant light-harvesting complex, LHCII, at a temperature of 77 K was probed using sub-picosecond excitation pulses at 649, 661, 672 and 682 nm and detection of the resulting difference absorption spectra from 630 to 700 nm. We find three distinct chlorophyll b to chlorophyll a (Chl a) transfer times, of < 0.3, 0.6 and 4-9 ps, respectively. From a comparison of the amplitudes of the bleaching signal, a plausible scheme for the Chl b to Chl a transfer in the LHCII complex is proposed. Two Chl b molecules transfer energy to Chl a in less than 0.3 ps, two Chl b molecules transfer with 0.6 ps and one Chl b has a transfer time of 4-9 ps. In the Chl a absorption region, a 2.4 ps energy-transfer process from a pigment absorbing around 661 nm, and a 0.4 ps process from a pigment absorbing around 672 nm is found. Furthermore, evidence is found for slow, 10-20 ps energy-transfer processes between some of the Chl a molecules. The data are compared to model calculations using the 3.4 Å LHCII monomer structure (containing 5 Chl b and 7 Chl a molecules) and Förster energy transfer. We conclude that the observed energy-transfer rates are consistent with both the preliminary assignment of the Chl identities ( a or b) of Kühlbrandt et al. and a recent proposal for the arrangement of some of the transition dipole moments (Gülen et al.). Singlet-singlet and singlet-triplet annihilation processes are observed in two different experiments, and both these processes occur with time constants of 2-3 and 12-20 ps, suggesting that both annihilation pathways are at least partly limited by slow energy transfer. The wide range of observed time constants in the equilibration, from < 0.3 to ˜ 20 ps, most likely reflects the irregular arrangement of the pigments in the complex, which shows much less symmetry than the recently obtained structure of the peripheral antenna complex of purple bacteria, LH-II (McDermott et al.).

  9. A new highly selective, ratiometric and colorimetric fluorescence sensor for Cu(2+) with a remarkable red shift in absorption and emission spectra based on internal charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Sen, Debabrata; Das, Nirmal Kumar

    2010-02-19

    A new 1,8-diaminonaphthalene based ratiometric and highly selective colorimetric "off-on" type of fluorescent probe, receptor 2 has been designed and synthesized that senses only Cu(2+) among the other heavy and transition metal ions examined on the basis of internal charge transfer (ICT). The visual sensitivity of the receptor 2 is remarkable, showing dual color changes from colorless (receptor) to purple followed by blue and a large red shift in emission upon Cu(2+) complexation. PMID:20104900

  10. A Vacuum Ultraviolet Absorption Array Spectrometer as a Selective Detector for Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography: Concept and First Results.

    PubMed

    Gröger, Thomas; Gruber, Beate; Harrison, Dale; Saraji-Bozorgzad, Mohammad; Mthembu, Makhosazana; Sutherland, Aimée; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2016-03-15

    Fast and selective detectors are very interesting for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC). This is particularly true if the detector system can provide additional spectroscopic information on the compound structure and/or functionality. Other than mass spectrometry (MS), only optical spectroscopic detectors are able to provide selective spectral information. However, until present the application of optical spectroscopy technologies as universal detectors for GC × GC has been restricted mainly due to physical limitations such as insufficient acquisition speed or high detection limits. A recently developed simultaneous-detection spectrometer working in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region of 125-240 nm overcomes these limitations and meets all the criteria of a universal detector for GC × GC. Peak shape and chromatographic resolution is preserved and unique spectral information, complementary to mass spectrometry data, is gained. The power of this detector is quickly recognized as it has the ability to discriminate between isomeric compounds or difficult to separate structurally related isobaric species; thus, it provides additional selectivity. A further promising feature of this detector is the data analysis concept of spectral filtering, which is accomplished by targeting special electronic transitions that allows for a fast screening of GC × GC chromatograms for designated compound classes. PMID:26810390

  11. Inhibition of water absorption and selective damage to human colonic mucosa induced by Shiga toxin-2 are enhanced by Escherichia coli O157:H7 infection.

    PubMed

    Albanese, Adriana; Gerhardt, Elizabeth; García, Hugo; Amigo, Natalia; Cataldi, Angel; Zotta, Elsa; Ibarra, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains are responsible for a variety of clinical syndromes including bloody and non-bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Although multiple serotypes of STEC have been isolated from hemorrhagic colitis cases, E. coli O157:H7 is by far the most prevalent serotype associated with HUS. Shiga toxin is the major virulence factor of E. coli O157:H7 and is responsible for the more severe symptoms of the infection. However, the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of diarrhea mediated by Stx2 are not well known. In this study, we have determined the effects of E. coli O157:H7 strain 125/99 wild type (wt) on the human colonic mucosa mounted in an Ussing chamber. In response to 125/99wt, an inhibition of water absorption across human colonic mucosa was observed. Histological sections showed severe necrosis with detachment of the surface epithelium, mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate and loss of goblet cells after 1h of incubation with 125/99wt. These alterations were not observed with the isogenic mutant strain lacking stx2 or with the filter-sterilized culture supernatant from the 125/99wt strain. These results indicate that the cell damages in human colon are induced by Stx2, and that Stx2 production is increased by the interaction with bacterial cells. Identification of host cell-derived factors responsible for increasing Stx2 can lead to new strategies for modulating STEC infections. PMID:25794836

  12. Prodrugs of the selective antiherpesvirus agent 9-[4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)but-1-yl]guanine (BRL 39123) with improved gastrointestinal absorption properties.

    PubMed

    Harnden, M R; Jarvest, R L; Boyd, M R; Sutton, D; Vere Hodge, R A

    1989-08-01

    Potential oral prodrugs of the antiherpesvirus acyclonucleoside 9-[4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)but-1-yl]guanine (1, BRL 39123) have been synthesized and evaluated for bioavailability of 1 in the blood of mice. Reduction of 9-[4-acetoxy-3-(acetoxymethyl)but-1-yl]-2-amino-6-chloropurine (13) using ammonium formate and 10% palladium on carbon afforded the 2-aminopurine 14, which was hydrolyzed to the monoacetate 15 and to 2-amino-9-[4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)but-1-yl]purine (5). The 2-aminopurine 5 was subsequently converted to additional monoester (17, 21-23) and diester (16, 24) derivatives and to its di-O-isopropylidene derivative 18. Both 5 and its esters (14-17, 21, 22) and also 18 were well absorbed after oral administration and converted efficiently to 1, the diacetyl (14) and dipropionyl (16) esters providing concentrations of 1 in the blood that were more than 15-fold higher than those observed after dosing either 1 or its esters (25-27). Some 6-alkoxy-9-[4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethyl)but-1-yl]purines (8-10), the preparation of which has been reported previously, also showed improved absorption properties, but their conversion to 1 was less efficient than for the 2-aminopurine derivatives. On the basis of these results and subsequent experiments involving determinations of rates of conversion to 1 in the presence of rat and human tissue preparations, 9-[4-acetoxy-3-(acetoxymethyl)but-1-yl]-2-aminopurine (14, BRL 42810) was identified as the preferred prodrug of 1. Oral bioavailability studies in healthy human subjects confirmed 14 as an effective prodrug, and this compound is now being evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:2754699

  13. Automated keys to soil orders based on rule engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lin; Lu, Guonian; Li, Anbo; Sun, Yiqing

    2009-10-01

    Rule engine technique which is firstly used in business realm because of the quickly changing business environment can be a good solution to the management of geographic knowledge. The objective of this paper is to research how to organize geographic knowledge and reason with rule engine. The rules of Keys to Chinese Soil Taxonomy (3rd edition) are taken as an example of geographic knowledge. The researching results are as follows: (1) Through the review of literature and web resources, we know the advancement of rule engine technique, and finally select NxBRE as the rule engine we use; (2) The rules of keys to Soil Orders are analyzed, and represented in the form of RuleML; (3) Rule customization module and RuleML parsing module are developed; (4) Knowledge base which consists of RuleML files is created with rule customization module, and we finally achieve the goal of automated keys to Soil Orders with NxBRE.

  14. Brainstorming, Brainstorming Rules and Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, Vicky L.; Paulus, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of brainstorming experience on the ability of groups to subsequently select the best ideas for implementation. Participants generated ideas either alone or in interactive groups and with either the regular brainstorming rules or with additional rules designed to further increase the number of ideas generated. All…

  15. FeynRules - Feynman rules made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Neil D.; Duhr, Claude

    2009-09-01

    In this paper we present FeynRules, a new Mathematica package that facilitates the implementation of new particle physics models. After the user implements the basic model information ( e.g., particle content, parameters and Lagrangian), FeynRules derives the Feynman rules and stores them in a generic form suitable for translation to any Feynman diagram calculation program. The model can then be translated to the format specific to a particular Feynman diagram calculator via FeynRules translation interfaces. Such interfaces have been written for CalcHEP/CompHEP, FeynArts/FormCalc, MadGraph/MadEvent and Sherpa, making it possible to write a new model once and have it work in all of these programs. In this paper, we describe how to implement a new model, generate the Feynman rules, use a generic translation interface, and write a new translation interface. We also discuss the details of the FeynRules code.

  16. Selenium speciation using capillary electrophoresis coupled with modified electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after selective extraction with 5-sulfosalicylic acid functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lizhen; Deng, Biyang; Shen, Caiying; Long, Chanjuan; Deng, Qiufen; Tao, Chunyao

    2015-05-22

    A new method for selenium speciation in fermented bean curd wastewater and juice was described. This method involved sample extraction with 5-sulfosalicylic acid (SSA)-functionalized silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SMNPs), capillary electrophoresis (CE) separation, and online detection with a modified electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) system. The modified interface for ETAAS allowed for the introduction of CE effluent directly through the end of the graphite tube. Elimination of the upper injection hole of the graphite tube reduced the loss of the anlayte and enhanced the detection sensitivity. The SSA-SMNPs were synthesized and used to extract trace amounts of selenite [Se(IV)], selenite [Se(VI)], selenomethionine (SeMet), and selenocystine (SeCys2) from dilute samples. The concentration enrichment factors for Se(VI), Se(IV), SeMet, and SeCys2 were 21, 29, 18, and 12, respectively, using the SSA-SMNPs extraction. The limits of detection for Se(VI), Se(IV), SeMet, and SeCys2 were 0.18, 0.17, 0.54, 0.49ngmL(-1), respectively. The RSD values (n=6) of method for intraday were observed between 0.7% and 2.9%. The RSD values of method for interday were less than 3.5%. The linear range of Se(VI) and Se(IV) were in the range of 0.5-200ngmL(-1), and the linear ranges of SeMet and SeCys2 were 2-500 and 2-1000ngmL(-1), respectively. The detection limits of this method were improved by 10 times due to the enrichment by the SSA-SMNP extraction. The contents of Se(VI) and Se(IV) in fermented bean curd wastewater were measured as 3.83 and 2.62ngmL(-1), respectively. The contents of Se(VI), Se(IV), SeMet, and SeCys2 in fermented bean curd juice were determined as 6.39, 4.08, 2.77, and 4.00ngmL(-1), respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 99.14-104.5% and the RSDs (n=6) of recoveries between 0.82% and 3.5%. PMID:25865795

  17. Water absorption lines, 931-961 nm - Selected intensities, N2-collision-broadening coefficients, self-broadening coefficients, and pressure shifts in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, L. P.; Gentry, B.; Schwemmer, G.; Wilkerson, T. D.

    1982-01-01

    Intensities were measured for 97 lines of H2O vapor between 932 and 961 nm. The lines were selected for their potential usefulness for remote laser measurements of H2O vapor in the earth's atmosphere. The spectra were obtained with several different H2O vapor abundances and N2 broadening gas pressures; the spectral resolution was 0.046/cm FWHM. Measured H2O line intensities range from 7 x 10 to the -25th to 7 x 10 to the -22nd/cm per (molecules/sq cm). H2O self-broadening coefficients were measured for 13 of these strongest lines; the mean value was 0.5/cm per atm. N2-collision-broadening coefficients were measured for 73 lines, and the average was 0.11 cm per atm HWHM. Pressure shifts in air were determined for a sample of six lines between 948 and 950 nm; these lines shift to lower frequency by an amount comparable to 0.1 of the collision-broadened widths measured in air or N2. The measured intensities of many lines of 300-000 band are much larger than expected from prior computations, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. Coriolis interactions with the stronger 201-000 band appear to be the primary cause of the enhancement of these line intensities.

  18. Phonological reduplication in sign language: Rules rule

    PubMed Central

    Berent, Iris; Dupuis, Amanda; Brentari, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Productivity—the hallmark of linguistic competence—is typically attributed to algebraic rules that support broad generalizations. Past research on spoken language has documented such generalizations in both adults and infants. But whether algebraic rules form part of the linguistic competence of signers remains unknown. To address this question, here we gauge the generalization afforded by American Sign Language (ASL). As a case study, we examine reduplication (X→XX)—a rule that, inter alia, generates ASL nouns from verbs. If signers encode this rule, then they should freely extend it to novel syllables, including ones with features that are unattested in ASL. And since reduplicated disyllables are preferred in ASL, such a rule should favor novel reduplicated signs. Novel reduplicated signs should thus be preferred to nonreduplicative controls (in rating), and consequently, such stimuli should also be harder to classify as nonsigns (in the lexical decision task). The results of four experiments support this prediction. These findings suggest that the phonological knowledge of signers includes powerful algebraic rules. The convergence between these conclusions and previous evidence for phonological rules in spoken language suggests that the architecture of the phonological mind is partly amodal. PMID:24959158

  19. Evaluating Decision Rules for Dryland Crop Selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No-till dryland cropping systems in the central Great Plains have more water available for crop production than the traditional conventionally tilled winter wheat (Triticum aestium L.)-fallow systems because of greater precipitation storage efficiency. That water is used most efficiently when a crop...

  20. Selection rules and dispersion of GaAs/AlAs multiple-quantum-well optical phonons studied by Raman scattering in right-angle, forward, and backscattering in-plane geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fainstein, A.; Etchegoin, P.; Chamberlain, M. P.; Cardona, M.; Tötemeyer, K.; Eberl, K.

    1995-05-01

    We present a detailed experimental study of optical phonon Raman scattering in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells for several in-plane geometries. By exploiting a waveguided structure, we performed 90°, forward, and backscattering experiments with dispersed light propagating along the layers. Using these geometries, phonons with various propagation directions and polarized both parallel and perpendicular to the growth axis can be probed. The 90° data complete and correct earlier results obtained for the same geometry by Zucker et al., bringing them into accord with later experimental and theoretical work. Moreover, in-plane forward scattering data are reportd as a complementary check to these experiments. We discuss selection rules and scattering mechanisms, and compare the results with phonon energies calculated within a continuum model based on linear combinations of LO, TO, and interface modes. We find a very good agreement between the experiment and the predictions of the established theory of phonon modes and Raman scattering in semiconductor heterostructures.

  1. Raman and Infrared Absorption Study of Indigoid-based Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manciu, Felicia; Durrer, William; Reza, Layra; Ramirez, Alejandra; Chianelli, Russell

    2009-04-01

    A fascinating aspect of Maya pigments is that despite the environmentally harsh humidity and high temperatures they resist fading and they have unprecedented stability. In this investigation, we address the question of how organic dye binds to inorganic palygorskite to form pigments. Our analysis by Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopies proves that different processes are taking place for the indigo-palygorskite system as compared with the thioindigo-palygorskite complex. While partial elimination of the selection rules for the centrosymmetric indigo and disappearance of the indigo N-H bonding, with conversion to dehydroindigo, is observed for the first compound, the latter shows no evident structure modification. The interaction between indigo and palygorskite is likely through oxygen and nitrogen. Only oxygen plays this role for the thioindigo-palygorskite complex.

  2. Modifying Intramural Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    1981-01-01

    Standard sports rules can be altered to improve the game for intramural participants. These changes may improve players' attitudes, simplify rules for officials, and add safety features to a game. Specific rule modifications are given for volleyball, football, softball, floor hockey, basketball, and soccer. (JN)

  3. Two Rules for Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Mark R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the most important and most difficult skills of academic leadership is communication. In this column, the author defines what he considers to be the two most important rules for communication. The first rule, which he terms the "Great American Rule," involves trusting that the person on the other end of the line or the fax or the e-mail is…

  4. A Better Budget Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dothan, Michael; Thompson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Debt limits, interest coverage ratios, one-off balanced budget requirements, pay-as-you-go rules, and tax and expenditure limits are among the most important fiscal rules for constraining intertemporal transfers. There is considerable evidence that the least costly and most effective of such rules are those that focus directly on the rate of…

  5. Early object rule acquisition.

    PubMed

    Pierce, D E

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to generate a grounded theory of early object rule acquisition. The grounded theory approach and computer coding were used to analyze videotaped samples of an infant's and a toddler's independent object play, which produced the categories descriptive of three primary types of object rules; rules of object properties, rules of object action, and rules of object affect. This occupational science theory offers potential for understanding the role of objects in human occupations, for development of instruments, and for applications in occupational therapy early intervention. PMID:2048625

  6. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  7. Selective solvent absorption in coal conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.W.; Amui, J.

    1992-06-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to determine the importance of the presence of added hydrogen donor compounds within the coal in the first stage of direct liquefaction processes; and (2) to determine the composition of the solvent absorbed by and present within the coal in the first stages of direct coal liquefaction. Scope of work study the conversion of Argonne Premium coals in tetralin and 2-t-butyltetralin and compare the following: conversion to soluble products and product composition. Hydrogen donated by both solvents will be measured by gas chromatography and the same technique will be used to establish the amount of dealkylation of 2-t-butyltetralin. Reactions will be performed at several different temperatures for varying amounts of time.

  8. a Heterosynaptic Learning Rule for Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert-Streib, Frank

    In this article we introduce a novel stochastic Hebb-like learning rule for neural networks that is neurobiologically motivated. This learning rule combines features of unsupervised (Hebbian) and supervised (reinforcement) learning and is stochastic with respect to the selection of the time points when a synapse is modified. Moreover, the learning rule does not only affect the synapse between pre- and postsynaptic neuron, which is called homosynaptic plasticity, but effects also further remote synapses of the pre- and postsynaptic neuron. This more complex form of synaptic plasticity has recently come under investigations in neurobiology and is called heterosynaptic plasticity. We demonstrate that this learning rule is useful in training neural networks by learning parity functions including the exclusive-or (XOR) mapping in a multilayer feed-forward network. We find, that our stochastic learning rule works well, even in the presence of noise. Importantly, the mean learning time increases with the number of patterns to be learned polynomially, indicating efficient learning.

  9. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  10. Rule groupings in expert systems using nearest neighbour decision rules, and convex hulls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anastasiadis, Stergios

    1991-01-01

    Expert System shells are lacking in many areas of software engineering. Large rule based systems are not semantically comprehensible, difficult to debug, and impossible to modify or validate. Partitioning a set of rules found in CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System) into groups of rules which reflect the underlying semantic subdomains of the problem, will address adequately the concerns stated above. Techniques are introduced to structure a CLIPS rule base into groups of rules that inherently have common semantic information. The concepts involved are imported from the field of A.I., Pattern Recognition, and Statistical Inference. Techniques focus on the areas of feature selection, classification, and a criteria of how 'good' the classification technique is, based on Bayesian Decision Theory. A variety of distance metrics are discussed for measuring the 'closeness' of CLIPS rules and various Nearest Neighbor classification algorithms are described based on the above metric.

  11. D-xylose absorption

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose absorption To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose absorption is a laboratory test to determine ...

  12. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  13. Rules, culture, and fitness.

    PubMed

    Baum, W M

    1995-01-01

    Behavior analysis risks intellectual isolation unless it integrates its explanations with evolutionary theory. Rule-governed behavior is an example of a topic that requires an evolutionary perspective for a full understanding. A rule may be defined as a verbal discriminative stimulus produced by the behavior of a speaker under the stimulus control of a long-term contingency between the behavior and fitness. As a discriminative stimulus, the rule strengthens listener behavior that is reinforced in the short run by socially mediated contingencies, but which also enters into the long-term contingency that enhances the listener's fitness. The long-term contingency constitutes the global context for the speaker's giving the rule. When a rule is said to be "internalized," the listener's behavior has switched from short- to long-term control. The fitness-enhancing consequences of long-term contingencies are health, resources, relationships, or reproduction. This view ties rules both to evolutionary theory and to culture. Stating a rule is a cultural practice. The practice strengthens, with short-term reinforcement, behavior that usually enhances fitness in the long run. The practice evolves because of its effect on fitness. The standard definition of a rule as a verbal statement that points to a contingency fails to distinguish between a rule and a bargain ("If you'll do X, then I'll do Y"), which signifies only a single short-term contingency that provides mutual reinforcement for speaker and listener. In contrast, the giving and following of a rule ("Dress warmly; it's cold outside") can be understood only by reference also to a contingency providing long-term enhancement of the listener's fitness or the fitness of the listener's genes. Such a perspective may change the way both behavior analysts and evolutionary biologists think about rule-governed behavior. PMID:22478201

  14. Strategy as simple rules.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Sull, D N

    2001-01-01

    The success of Yahoo!, eBay, Enron, and other companies that have become adept at morphing to meet the demands of changing markets can't be explained using traditional thinking about competitive strategy. These companies have succeeded by pursuing constantly evolving strategies in market spaces that were considered unattractive according to traditional measures. In this article--the third in an HBR series by Kathleen Eisenhardt and Donald Sull on strategy in the new economy--the authors ask, what are the sources of competitive advantage in high-velocity markets? The secret, they say, is strategy as simple rules. The companies know that the greatest opportunities for competitive advantage lie in market confusion, but they recognize the need for a few crucial strategic processes and a few simple rules. In traditional strategy, advantage comes from exploiting resources or stable market positions. In strategy as simple rules, advantage comes from successfully seizing fleeting opportunities. Key strategic processes, such as product innovation, partnering, or spinout creation, place the company where the flow of opportunities is greatest. Simple rules then provide the guidelines within which managers can pursue such opportunities. Simple rules, which grow out of experience, fall into five broad categories: how- to rules, boundary conditions, priority rules, timing rules, and exit rules. Companies with simple-rules strategies must follow the rules religiously and avoid the temptation to change them too frequently. A consistent strategy helps managers sort through opportunities and gain short-term advantage by exploiting the attractive ones. In stable markets, managers rely on complicated strategies built on detailed predictions of the future. But when business is complicated, strategy should be simple. PMID:11189455

  15. The 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes The 5-Second Rule KidsHealth > For Kids > The 5-Second Rule Print A A A Text Size en español La regla de los 5 segundos Almost everyone has dropped some food on ...

  16. Are Intuitive Rules Universal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavy, Ruth; Babai, Reuven; Tsamir, Pessia; Tirosh, Dina; Lin, Fou-Lai; McRobbie, Campbell

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a cross-cultural study on the intuitive rules theory. The study was conducted in Australia (with aboriginal children) in Taiwan and in Israel. Our findings indicate that Taiwanese and Australian Aboriginal students, much like Israeli ones, provided incorrect responses, most of which were in line with the intuitive rules. Also,…

  17. Beyond Rules to Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartrell, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Rules are not helpful in the adult-child community. They are usually stated in the negative: "No," "Don't," etc. The way they are worded, adults seem to expect children to break them. Even when they are not totally negative, like "Be nice to your friends," rules have an "or else" moral implication that adults carry around in their heads. When…

  18. UNDERSTANDING THE SLIDE RULE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, RONALD E.; AND OTHERS

    A BOOKLET DESIGNED FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS TO BE USED INDEPENDENTLY FROM AND IN ADDITION TO THE REGULAR CLASSROOM CURRICULUM IN MATHEMATICS IS GIVEN. THE FIFTH- OR SIXTH-GRADE STUDENT IS PRESENTED WITH A DISCUSSION OF THE APPLICATIONS OF THE SLIDE RULE AND WITH A BACKGROUND REVIEW OF NECESSARY CONCEPTS. THE CONCEPTS OF THE SLIDE RULE ARE…

  19. Understanding of Jeans Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, C. Y.

    2002-11-01

    Jeans empirical rule has always been used in planetary physics. From the static equation of atmosphere, the equation of state for ideal gases, the law of gravitation and the law of Maxwell distribution, Jeans empirical rule can be derived. Therefore, it seems that Jeans empirical rule should be called Jeans rule. It can be formulated in three forms: in terms of velocity, height, or energy. These three formulations are completely equivalent. According to concrete situation, any one of these forms can be taken freely and used as a criterion, which define whether the atmospheric composition of a given species of particles at the planet surface will exist "forever" or not. The factor in the energy formulation will be neither too large nor too small. According to statistical theory, taking the viewpoint of energy, Jeans rule can be explained more easily. The condition satisfying Jeans rule is only the necessary condition for a given species of partials to be major atmospheric composition of the planets which have dense atmosphere. Jeans rule is not only applicable for the planets and satellites in the solar system, but also suitable for the asteroids, meteoroids and outer solar system objects, such as Centaurs and Kuiper belt objects. The application scope of Jeans rule can be expressed with nomogram as well as defined by equation or by figures. Having been widely used for a long time, it still has a general practical significance in detecting age of planets in the solar system nowadays, especially for the research of outer solar system objects.

  20. Delayed rule following

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Although the elements of a fully stated rule (discriminative stimulus [SD], some behavior, and a consequence) can occur nearly contemporaneously with the statement of the rule, there is often a delay between the rule statement and the SD. The effects of this delay on rule following have not been studied in behavior analysis, but they have been investigated in rule-like settings in the areas of prospective memory (remembering to do something in the future) and goal pursuit. Discriminative events for some behavior can be event based (a specific setting stimulus) or time based. The latter are more demanding with respect to intention following and show age-related deficits. Studies suggest that the specificity with which the components of a rule (termed intention) are stated has a substantial effect on intention following, with more detailed specifications increasing following. Reminders of an intention, too, are most effective when they refer specifically to both the behavior and its occasion. Covert review and written notes are two effective strategies for remembering everyday intentions, but people who use notes appear not to be able to switch quickly to covert review. By focusing on aspects of the setting and rule structure, research on prospective memory and goal pursuit expands the agenda for a more complete explanation of rule effects. PMID:22478363

  1. Core Rules of Netiquette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Virginia

    1994-01-01

    Discusses rules of etiquette for communicating via computer networks, including conversing as politely as you would face-to-face; ethical behavior; becoming familiar with the domain that you are in; rules for discussion groups; quality of writing; sharing appropriate knowledge; and respecting individuals' privacy. (LRW)

  2. 5-Second Rule

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5-second rule" — that random saying about how food won't become contaminated with bacteria if you pick it up off the floor in 5 seconds or less. The 5-second rule has become such a part of our culture that scientists actually tested it. As you can ...

  3. "Chaos Rules" Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    About 20 years ago, while lost in the midst of his PhD research, the author mused over proposed titles for his thesis. He was pretty pleased with himself when he came up with "Chaos Rules" (the implied double meaning was deliberate), or more completely, "Chaos Rules: An Exploration of the Work of Instructional Designers in Distance Education." He…

  4. Flow injection solid phase extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry for the determination of Cr(VI) by selective separation and preconcentration on a lab-made hybrid mesoporous solid microcolumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Manuela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2009-06-01

    A lab-made hybrid mesoporous solid was employed in a flow injection solid phase extraction electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (FI-SPE-ETAAS) system for the selective retention of Cr(VI). The solid was prepared by co-condensation of sodium tetraethylortosilicate and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane by sol-gel methodology and one-pot synthesis and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X ray diffraction spectroscopy, and scanning electronic microscopy. Adsorption capacities at different pH values of both, Cr(VI) and Cr(III), were also measured in order to obtain the optimum retention for Cr(VI) with no interference of Cr(III). The maximum capacity of adsorption (4.35 mmol g - 1) was observed for pH values between 2-3, whilst Cr(III) was found to remain in solution (adsorption capacity = 0.007 mmol g - 1). Then, a microcolumn (bed volume: 7.9 µL) was filled with the solid and inserted in the FI-ETAAS system for analytical purposes. Since the analyte was strongly retained by the filling in the anionic form, 0.1 mol L - 1 hydroxylammonium chloride in 1 mol L - 1 hydrochloric acid was selected as eluent due to its redox characteristics. In this way, the sorbed Cr(VI) was easily released in the cationic form. The enrichment factor (EF) was found as a compromise between sensitivity and sample throughput and a value of 27 was obtained under optimized conditions: pH 2, sample loading 2 mL min - 1 (60 s), elution flow rate 0.5 ml min - 1 (eluent volume: 75 μL). Under optimized conditions the limit of detection for Cr(VI) was 1.2 ng L - 1, the precision, expressed as RSD was 2.5%, the sample throughput 21/h, and the microcolumn lifetime was over 300 adsorption/desorption cycles. Cr(III) determination was also performed by simply measuring its concentration at the end of the column and after Cr(VI) retention by the mesoporous solid. Applications of the methodology to the determination of Cr(VI) in deionized, osmosis, mineral, effluent and river

  5. Absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghawas, H.A.; Ruiz-Ibanez, G.; Sandall, O.C. )

    1988-01-01

    The absorption of carbonyl sulfide in aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) was studied over a range of temperatures and MDEA concentrations. MDEA is commonly used for selective absorption of hydrogen sulfide in the presence of carbon dioxide. However, sulfur in the form of COS may also be present and it is necessary that estimates of absorption rates of this compound be made. The objective of this study is to determine the physiochemical properties needed to predict COS absorption rates in aqueous MDEA. Free gas solubility and the diffusivity of COS in MDEA solutions were measured over the temperature range 15 to 40{sup 0}C for MDEA concentrations up to 30 weight per cent using the nitrous oxide analogy method. Solubilities were measured volumetrically in an equilibrium cell and diffusivities were measured using a laminar liquid jet absorber. The kinetics of the reaction between COS and MDEA were studied by measuring absorption rates in a single wetted-sphere absorber.

  6. Following the Rules.

    PubMed

    Katz, Anne

    2016-05-01

    I am getting better at following the rules as I grow older, although I still bristle at many of them. I was a typical rebellious teenager; no one understood me, David Bowie was my idol, and, one day, my generation was going to change the world. Now I really want people to understand me: David Bowie remains one of my favorite singers and, yes, my generation has changed the world, and not necessarily for the better. Growing up means that you have to make the rules, not just follow those set by others, and, at times, having rules makes a lot of sense.
. PMID:27105186

  7. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  8. Coherent Absorption of N00N States.

    PubMed

    Roger, Thomas; Restuccia, Sara; Lyons, Ashley; Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Jeffers, John; Padgett, Miles; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Recent results in deeply subwavelength thickness films demonstrate coherent control and logical gate operations with both classical and single-photon light sources. However, quantum processing and devices typically involve more than one photon and nontrivial input quantum states. Here we experimentally investigate two-photon N00N state coherent absorption in a multilayer graphene film. Depending on the N00N state input phase, it is possible to selectively choose between single- or two-photon absorption of the input state in the graphene film. These results demonstrate that coherent absorption in the quantum regime exhibits unique features, opening up applications in multiphoton spectroscopy and imaging. PMID:27447505

  9. Coherent Absorption of N00N States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Thomas; Restuccia, Sara; Lyons, Ashley; Giovannini, Daniel; Romero, Jacquiline; Jeffers, John; Padgett, Miles; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Recent results in deeply subwavelength thickness films demonstrate coherent control and logical gate operations with both classical and single-photon light sources. However, quantum processing and devices typically involve more than one photon and nontrivial input quantum states. Here we experimentally investigate two-photon N00N state coherent absorption in a multilayer graphene film. Depending on the N00N state input phase, it is possible to selectively choose between single- or two-photon absorption of the input state in the graphene film. These results demonstrate that coherent absorption in the quantum regime exhibits unique features, opening up applications in multiphoton spectroscopy and imaging.

  10. Drug Plan Coverage Rules

    MedlinePlus

    ... works with other insurance Find health & drug plans Drug plan coverage rules Note Call your Medicare drug ... shingles vaccine) when medically necessary to prevent illness. Drugs you get in hospital outpatient settings In most ...

  11. The vector ruling protractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1924-01-01

    The theory, structure and working of a vector slide rule is presented in this report. This instrument is used for determining a vector in magnitude and position when given its components and its moment about a point in their plane.

  12. Slide rule for gamma-ray flaw detection

    SciTech Connect

    Borovin, I.V.

    1984-03-01

    This article describes a slide rule which makes it possible to determine the exposure time quickly and with sufficient accuracy when inspecting steel parts using Cs-137 and Ir-192 as radioactive sources and x-ray films of types RT-1, RM-1, RT-5, etc. The slide rule scales were designed on the basis of experimental data regarding absorption of gamma rays in steel. The slide rule is similar in construction to a normal doublesided slide rule with one slide and a cursor. Gamma-ray flow detection is one of the most common methods of identifying defects using radiation. The films of different components shot by different operators using the slide rule for determining exposure time can be simultaneously developed without visually controlling the photographic density.

  13. Pushing the rules: effects and aftereffects of deliberate rule violations.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Robert; Pfister, Roland; Foerster, Anna; Huestegge, Lynn; Kunde, Wilfried

    2016-09-01

    Most of our daily life is organized around rules and social norms. But what makes rules so special? And what if one were to break a rule intentionally? Can we simply free us from the present set of rules or do we automatically adhere to them? How do rule violations influence subsequent behavior? To investigate the effects and aftereffects of violating simple S-R rule, we conducted three experiments that investigated continuous finger-tracking responses on an iPad. Our experiments show that rule violations are distinct from rule-based actions in both response times and movement trajectories, they take longer to initiate and execute, and their movement trajectory is heavily contorted. Data not only show differences between the two types of response (rule-based vs. violation), but also yielded a characteristic pattern of aftereffects in case of rule violations: rule violations do not trigger adaptation effects that render further rule violations less difficult, but every rule violation poses repeated effort on the agent. The study represents a first step towards understanding the signature and underlying mechanisms of deliberate rule violations, they cannot be acted out by themselves, but require the activation of the original rule first. Consequently, they are best understood as reformulations of existing rules that are not accessible on their own, but need to be constantly derived from the original rule, with an add-on that might entail an active tendency to steer away from mental representations that reflect (socially) unwanted behavior. PMID:26245822

  14. Transistor h parameter conversion slide rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantner, R. E.

    1967-01-01

    Slide rule enables the ready conversion of transistor h parameters from one form to another and reduces calculation time by a factor of 5 to 10. The scales are selected to cover all ranges of each parameter that will normally exist for any transistor, and answers are given in the correct order of magnitude, making powers-of-ten calculations unnecessary.

  15. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  16. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  17. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  18. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  19. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  20. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

    1987-04-07

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

  1. 33 CFR 403.2 - Scope of rules. [Rule 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Scope of rules. 403.2 Section 403.2 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE JOINT TOLLS REVIEW BOARD § 403.2 Scope of rules. These rules...

  2. 33 CFR 403.2 - Scope of rules. [Rule 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of rules. 403.2 Section 403.2 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE JOINT TOLLS REVIEW BOARD § 403.2 Scope of rules. These rules...

  3. 33 CFR 403.2 - Scope of rules. [Rule 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Scope of rules. 403.2 Section 403.2 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE JOINT TOLLS REVIEW BOARD § 403.2 Scope of rules. These rules...

  4. 33 CFR 403.2 - Scope of rules. [Rule 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Scope of rules. 403.2 Section 403.2 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE JOINT TOLLS REVIEW BOARD § 403.2 Scope of rules. These rules...

  5. 33 CFR 403.2 - Scope of rules. [Rule 2

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Scope of rules. 403.2 Section 403.2 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PROCEDURE OF THE JOINT TOLLS REVIEW BOARD § 403.2 Scope of rules. These rules...

  6. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  7. Purge needs in absorption chillers

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.G. )

    1993-10-01

    Absorption chillers are regaining a significant share of large tonnage chiller sales, such as they had 20 years ago. Gas-fired chillers are now available that have a base energy (ultimate fuel usage) consumption rate per ton comparable to that in electric units. Effective purging in an absorption chiller is an absolute necessity to achieve the low chilled water temperature needed for dehumidification and to fully benefit from the energy savings offered by double-effect cycles. Although the purge system is usually not shown on the typical cycle schematic, its proper functioning is a key requirement for satisfactory machine operation. This article discusses the effect of noncondensible (N/C) gases on the absorption cooling process and the basics of purge systems. In addition, the article discusses the rationale for the important design step of selecting the location of the N/C probe, and discusses purge systems applicable to the direct-fired, double-effect machines now entering the marketplace.

  8. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  9. Absorption chillers: Technology for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, P.W.; Garland, R.W.

    1997-12-31

    In an era of heightened awareness of energy efficiency and the associated environmental impacts, many industries worldwide are exploring ``environmentally friendly`` technologies that provide equivalent or improved performance while reducing or eliminating harmful side-effects. The refrigeration and air-conditioning industry, due to its reliance on CFCs and HCFCs, has invested in research in alternatives to the industry standard vapor compression machines. One alternative technology with great promise is chemical absorption. Absorption chillers offer comparable refrigeration output with reduced SO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} emissions. Absorption chillers do not use CFCs or HCFCs, refrigerants that contribute to ozone depletion and global warming. Additionally, gas-fired absorption chillers can save significant amounts in energy costs when used in combination with a vapor compression chiller in a hybrid system. The hybrid system can take advantage of the comparatively low price of natural gas (per unit ton) and rely on the high performance of vapor compression when electricity prices are lower. The purpose of this article is to provide an introduction for those new to absorption technology as well as a discussion of selected high efficiency cycles, a discussion on the technology of coupling absorption with vapor compression systems to form a hybrid system, and the environmental impacts of absorption.

  10. Sum rules for leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinrath, Martin

    2016-06-01

    There is a wide class of models which give a dynamical description of the origin of flavor in terms of spontaneous symmetry breaking of an underlying symmetry. Many of these models exhibit sum rules which relate on the one hand mixing angles and the Dirac CP phase with each other and/or on the other hand neutrino masses and Majorana phases with each other. We will briefly sketch how this happens and discuss briefly the impact of renormalization group corrections to the mass sum rules.

  11. Alternate Rules of Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtright, Thomas L.; Fairlie, David B.; Zachos, Cosmas K.

    2014-11-01

    The Weyl correspondence rule (107) is not unique: there are a host of alternate equivalent association rules which specify corresponding representations. All these representations with equivalent formalisms are typified by characteristic quasi-distribution functions and ⋆-products, all systematically inter-convertible among themselves. They have been surveyed comparatively and organized in [Lee95, BJ84], on the basis of seminal classification work by Cohen [Coh66, Coh76]. Like different coordinate transformations, they may be favored by virtue of their different characteristic properties in varying applications...

  12. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions. PMID:26934755

  13. Absorption refrigeration machine driven by solar heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keizer, C.; Liem, S. H.

    1980-04-01

    A mathematical model of a single and a two stage solar absorption refrigeration system is developed in which data of collectors and weather data can be implicated. The influence of the generator, the absorber efficiencies, and the cooling temperature on the coefficient of performance (COP) of a single and two stage absorption refrigeration process are investigated. For low generator temperatures the absorber efficiency has more influence on COP than the generator efficiency. Only spectral selective double window and high performance collectors can be used for air cooled solar absorption refrigeration systems at an evaporator temperature of -5 C. It is concluded that a water cooled solar absorption refrigeration system in combination with a solar tapwater installation for household use can be achieved with 6 to 8 square meters high performance collector area.

  14. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  15. Enigmatic photon absorption in plasmas near solar interior conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Carlos A.

    2015-06-01

    Large systematic discrepancies between theoretical and experimental photon absorption of Fe plasmas applicable to the solar interior were reported [Bailey et al., Nature 517, 56 (2015)]. The disagreement is examined in the context of the Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn f-sum rule. The analysis identifies several anomalies in the experimental results.

  16. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  17. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  18. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  19. Dipeptide absorption in man

    PubMed Central

    Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal absorption of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During absorption constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after absorption as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during absorption of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039

  20. An Airship Slide Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, E R; Pickering, S F

    1924-01-01

    This report prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, describes an airship slide rule developed by the Gas-Chemistry Section of the Bureau of Standards, at the request of the Bureau of Engineering of the Navy Department. It is intended primarily to give rapid solutions of a few problems of frequent occurrence in airship navigation, but it can be used to advantage in solving a great variety of problems, involving volumes, lifting powers, temperatures, pressures, altitudes and the purity of the balloon gas. The rule is graduated to read directly in the units actually used in making observations, constants and conversion factors being taken care of by the length and location of the scales. It is thought that with this rule practically any problem likely to arise in this class of work can be readily solved after the user has become familiar with the operation of the rule; and that the solution will, in most cases, be as accurate as the data warrant.

  1. Elimination of Social Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Toole, Teddy

    The thesis of this document is that arbitrary social rules must be eliminated. Chapters cover: (1) what it is like to be a student whose personal activities are controlled; (2) the necessity of environmental freedom as a prerequisite to successful educational reform; (3) the question of environmental control; (4) the legal history of environmental…

  2. Cramer's Rule Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayoub, Ayoub B.

    2005-01-01

    In 1750, the Swiss mathematician Gabriel Cramer published a well-written algebra book entitled "Introduction a l'Analyse des Lignes Courbes Algebriques." In the appendix to this book, Cramer gave, without proof, the rule named after him for solving a linear system of equations using determinants (Kosinki, 2001). Since then several derivations of…

  3. Crispen's Five Antivirus Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispen, Patrick Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Explains five rules to protect computers from viruses. Highlights include commercial antivirus software programs and the need to upgrade them periodically (every year to 18 months); updating virus definitions at least weekly; scanning attached files from email with antivirus software before opening them; Microsoft Word macro protection; and the…

  4. Crispen's Five Antivirus Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crispen, Patrick Douglas

    2000-01-01

    Provides rules for protecting computers from viruses, Trojan horses, or worms. Topics include purchasing commercial antivirus programs and keeping them updated; updating virus definitions weekly; precautions before opening attached files; macro virus protection in Microsoft Word; and precautions with executable files. (LRW)

  5. Willpower and Personal Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benabou, Roland; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    We develop a theory of internal commitments or "personal rules" based on self-reputation over one's willpower, which transforms lapses into precedents that undermine future self-restraint. The foundation for this mechanism is the imperfect recall of past motives and feelings, leading people to draw inferences from their past actions. The degree of…

  6. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  7. Liquid for absorption of solar heat

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, T.; Iwamoto, Y.; Kadotani, K.; Marui, T.

    1984-11-13

    A liquid for the absorption of solar heat, useful as an heat-absorbing medium in water heaters and heat collectors comprises: a dispersing medium selected from the group consisting of propylene glycol, mixture of propylene glycol with water, mixture of propylene glycol with water and glycerin, and mixture of glycerin with water, a dispersant selected from the group consisting of polyvinylpyrrolidone, caramel, and mixture of polyvinylpyrrolidone with caramel, and a powdered activated carbon as a black coloring material.

  8. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  9. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  10. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  11. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-12-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  12. SIRE: A Simple Interactive Rule Editor for NICBES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bykat, Alex

    1988-01-01

    To support evolution of domain expertise, and its representation in an expert system knowledge base, a user-friendly rule base editor is mandatory. The Nickel Cadmium Battery Expert System (NICBES), a prototype of an expert system for the Hubble Space Telescope power storage management system, does not provide such an editor. In the following, a description of a Simple Interactive Rule Base Editor (SIRE) for NICBES is described. The SIRE provides a consistent internal representation of the NICBES knowledge base. It supports knowledge presentation and provides a user-friendly and code language independent medium for rule addition and modification. The SIRE is integrated with NICBES via an interface module. This module provides translation of the internal representation to Prolog-type rules (Horn clauses), latter rule assertion, and a simple mechanism for rule selection for its Prolog inference engine.

  13. Iron, lead, and cobalt absorption: similarities and dissimilarities

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.C.; Conrad, M.E.; Holland, R.

    1981-01-01

    Using isolated intestinal segments in rats, the absorption of iron, lead, and cobalt was increased in iron deficiency and decreased in iron loading. Similarly, the absorption of these metals was decreased in transfusional erythocytosis, after intravenous iron injection and after parenteral endotoxin injection. Acute bleeding or abbreviated intervals of dietary iron deprivation resulted in increased iron absorption from isolated intestinal segments and in intact animals, while the absorption of lead and cobalt was unaffected. These results suggest that the specificity of the mucosal metal absorptive mechanism is either selectively enhanced for iron absorption by phlebotomy or brief periods of dietary iron deprivation, or that two or more mucosal pathways for iron absorption may exist.

  14. 75 FR 76065 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... Change by NASDAQ OMX PHLX, Inc. Relating to Rebates and Fees for Adding and Removing Liquidity in Select... Removing Liquidity in Select Symbols in Section I of the Fee Schedule. The text of the proposed rule change.... Purpose The purpose of the proposed rule change is to amend the list of Select Symbols in the...

  15. Impact of soil properties on selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodesova, Radka; Kocarek, Martin; Klement, Ales; Fer, Miroslav; Golovko, Oksana; Grabic, Roman; Jaksik, Ondrej

    2014-05-01

    The presence of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals in the environment has been recognized as a potential threat. Pharmaceuticals may contaminate soils and consequently surface and groundwater. Study was therefore focused on the evaluation of selected pharmaceuticals adsorption in soils, as one of the parameters, which are necessary to know when assessing contaminant transport in soils. The goals of this study were: (1) to select representative soils of the Czech Republic and to measure soil physical and chemical properties; (2) to measure adsorption isotherms of selected pharmaceuticals; (3) to evaluate impact of soil properties on pharmaceutical adsorptions and to propose pedotransfer rules for estimating adsorption coefficients from the measured soil properties. Batch sorption tests were performed for 6 selected pharmaceuticals (beta blockers Atenolol and Metoprolol, anticonvulsant Carbamazepin, and antibiotics Clarithromycin, Trimetoprim and Sulfamethoxazol) and 13 representative soils (soil samples from surface horizons of 11 different soil types and 2 substrates). The Freundlich equations were used to describe adsorption isotherms. The simple correlations between measured physical and chemical soil properties (soil particle density, soil texture, oxidable organic carbon content, CaCO3 content, pH_H2O, pH_KCl, exchangeable acidity, cation exchange capacity, hydrolytic acidity, basic cation saturation, sorption complex saturation, salinity), and the Freundlich adsorption coefficients were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Then multiple-linear regressions were applied to predict the Freundlich adsorption coefficients from measured soil properties. The largest adsorption was measured for Clarithromycin (average value of 227.1) and decreased as follows: Trimetoprim (22.5), Metoprolol (9.0), Atenolol (6.6), Carbamazepin (2.7), Sulfamethoxazol (1.9). Absorption coefficients for Atenolol and Metoprolol closely correlated (R=0.85), and both were also

  16. Caregivers program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts, with changes, the interim final rule concerning VA's Program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers. VA administers this program to provide certain medical, travel, training, and financial benefits to caregivers of certain veterans and servicemembers who were seriously injured during service on or after September 11, 2001. Also addressed in this rulemaking is the Program of General Caregiver Support Services that provides support services to caregivers of veterans from all eras who are enrolled in the VA health care system. Specifically, changes in this final rule include a requirement that Veterans be notified in writing should a Family Caregiver request revocation (to no longer be a Family Caregiver), an extension of the application timeframe from 30 days to 45 days for a Family Caregiver, and a change in the stipend calculation to ensure that Primary Family Caregivers do not experience unexpected decreases in stipend amounts from year to year. PMID:25581943

  17. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  18. Postmarket surveillance. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2002-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is implementing the postmarket surveillance (PS) provisions of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The purpose of this rule is to provide for the collection of useful data about devices that can reveal unforeseen adverse events or other information necessary to protect the public health. PMID:12053947

  19. A Natural Selection Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashiro, Mark E.

    1984-01-01

    Provides rules for a game which simulates selection pressures on a hominid group. Objectives include an appreciation of how selectivity works, an understanding of how abiotic factors are able to influence a population, and how interactions within the population can influence the group. (JM)

  20. Parental Rule Socialization for Preventive Health and Adolescent Rule Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bylund, Carma L.; Baxter, Leslie A.; Imes, Rebecca S.; Wolf, Bianca

    2010-01-01

    This study examined family rules about nutrition, exercise, and sun protection in 164 parent-young adult children dyads. Both parents and their young adult children independently reported on health rules that they perceived throughout their child's adolescent years and the extent to which the rules were articulated, violations sanctioned, and…

  1. 14 CFR 23.723 - Shock absorption tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.723 Shock absorption tests. (a) It must be shown that the limit load factors selected... landing gear system with identical energy absorption characteristics may be used for increases in previously approved takeoff and landing weights. (b) The landing gear may not fail, but may yield, in a...

  2. Sexual dichromatism in wing pigmentation of New World dragonflies follows Rensch's rule.

    PubMed

    Santos, E S A; Machado, G

    2016-07-01

    Many animal taxa that display sexual size dimorphism (SSD) exhibit a positive allometric relationship in which the degree of dimorphism increases with body size. This macroevolutionary pattern is known as Rensch's rule. Although sexual selection is hypothesized to be the main mechanism causing this pattern, body size is influenced by several selective forces, including natural and sexual selection. Therefore, by focusing exclusively on SSD one cannot ascertain which of these selective forces drives Rensch's rule. If sexual selection is indeed the main mechanism underlying Rensch's rule, we predict that other sexually selected traits, including coloration-based ornaments, will also exhibit interspecific allometric scaling consistent with Rensch's rule. We tested this prediction using wing pigmentation of 89 species of dragonflies. Studies show that male wing pigmentation is generally under strong intra- and intersexual selection, so that sexual dichromatism in this trait should follow Rensch's rule. Conversely, the available evidence suggests that male body size is usually not sexually selected in dragonflies, so we do not expect SSD to follow Rensch's rule. First, we found that sexual dichromatism in wing pigmentation was consistent with Rensch's rule. The phylogenetic major axis regression slope was significantly greater than one. We also showed that the allometric slope for SSD was not different from unity, providing no support for Rensch's rule. Our results provide the first evidence that a trait which appears to be under strong sexual selection exhibits a pattern consistent with Rensch's rule. PMID:27169873

  3. Percutaneous absorption from soil.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous absorption from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin absorption from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the absorption of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703

  4. Multiplasmon Absorption in Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablan, Marinko; Chang, Darrick E.

    2015-06-01

    We show that graphene possesses a strong nonlinear optical response in the form of multiplasmon absorption, with exciting implications in classical and quantum nonlinear optics. Specifically, we predict that graphene nanoribbons can be used as saturable absorbers with low saturation intensity in the far-infrared and terahertz spectrum. Moreover, we predict that two-plasmon absorption and extreme localization of plasmon fields in graphene nanodisks can lead to a plasmon blockade effect, in which a single quantized plasmon strongly suppresses the possibility of exciting a second plasmon.

  5. Chaotic Systems with Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions Dq obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D1 in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results.

  6. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  7. A Categorisation of School Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate and describe the content in school rules by developing a category system of school rules, and thus making the logic behind different types of rules in school explicit. Data were derived from an ethnographic study conducted in two primary schools in Sweden. In order to analyse the data, grounded theory…

  8. Morphological Rules in Russian Conjugation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Linda Kopp

    Recent analyses of Russian (Halle 1963, Lightner 1972) have been forced by the criteria of rule "naturalness" and rule "generality" to posit highly abstract underlying forms. These underlying forms and rules are claimed to represent the speaker's competence. Such analyses are now being criticized (Derwing 1973, Hooper 1974) on the following…

  9. Modifications of Team Sports Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rokosz, Francis M.

    In general, there are two reasons for modifying the rules in sport activities: (1) to meet a specific objective or (2) to solve a perceived problem. The sense of the original game is usually not altered significantly because the number of rule changes is kept to a minimum. Changes in rules may be made for administrative or financial reasons, or to…

  10. Epidermal melanin absorption in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norvang Nilsen, Lill T.; Fiskerstrand, Elisanne J.; Nelson, J. Stuart; Berns, Michael W.; Svaasand, Lars O.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of laser induced selective photothermolysis is to induced thermal damage to specific targets in such a manner that the temperature of the surrounding tissue is maintained below the threshold for thermal damage. The selectivity is obtained by selection of a proper wavelength and pulse duration. The technique is presently being used in the clinic for removal of port-wine stains. The presence of melanin in the epidermal layer can represent a limitation to the selectivity. Melanin absorption drops off significantly with increasing wavelength, but is significant in the entire wavelength region where the blood absorption is high. Treatment of port-wine stain in patients with high skin pigmentation may therefore give overheating of the epidermis, resulting in epidermal necrosis. Melanosomal heating is dependent on the energy and duration of the laser pulse. The heating mechanism for time scales less than typically 1 microsecond(s) corresponds to a transient local heating of the individual melanosomes. For larger time scales, heat diffusion out of the melanosomes become of increased importance, and the temperature distribution will reach a local steady state condition after typically 10 microsecond(s) . For even longer pulse duration, heat diffusing from neighboring melanosomes becomes important, and the temperature rise in a time scale from 100 - 500 microsecond(s) is dominated by this mechanism. The epidermal heating during the typical 450 microsecond(s) pulse used for therapy is thus dependent on the average epidermal melanin content rather than on the absorption coefficient of the individual melanosomes. This study will present in vivo measurements of the epidermal melanin absorption of human skin when exposed to short laser pulses (< 0.1 microsecond(s) ) from a Q-switched ruby laser and with long laser pulses (approximately 500 microsecond(s) ) from a free-running ruby laser or a long pulse length flashlamp pumped dye laser. The epidermal melanin

  11. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  12. Total absorption Cherenkov spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinovski, E. I.

    2015-05-01

    A short review of 50 years of work done with Cherenkov detectors in laboratories at the Lebedev Physical Institute is presented. The report considers some issues concerning the use of Cherenkov total absorption counters based on lead glass and heavy crystals in accelerator experiments.

  13. Cholesterol Absorption and Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Howles, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of cholesterol absorption have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol absorption and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol absorption research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol absorption is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091

  14. Lipids: Absorption and transport

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and absorption. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...

  15. ZINC ABSORPTION BY INFANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc absorption, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...

  16. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  17. The calculation of ionospheric absorption with modern computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotto, Carlo; Settimi, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    New outcomes are proposed for ionospheric absorption starting from the Appleton-Hartree formula, in its complete form. The range of applicability is discussed for the approximate formulae, which are usually employed in the calculation of non-deviative absorption coefficient. These results were achieved by performing a more refined approximation that is valid under quasi-longitudinal (QL) propagation conditions. The more refined QL approximation and the usually employed non-deviative absorption are compared with that derived from a complete formulation. Their expressions, nothing complicated, can usefully be implemented in a software program running on modern computers. Moreover, the importance of considering Booker’s rule is highlighted. A radio link of ground range D = 1000 km was also simulated using ray tracing for a sample daytime ionosphere. Finally, some estimations of the integrated absorption for the radio link considered are provided for different frequencies.

  18. HI Absorption in Merger Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veileux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) pass through a luminous starburst phase, followed by a dust-enshrouded AGN phase, and finally evolve into optically bright "naked" quasars once they shed their gas/dust reservoirs through powerful wind events. We present the results of our recent 21- cm HI survey of 21 merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope. These remnants were selected from the QUEST (Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study) sample of ULIRGs and PG quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by AGN and sample all phases of the proposed ULIRG -> IR-excess quasar -> optical quasar sequence. We explore whether there is an evolutionary connection between ULIRGs and quasars by looking for the occurrence of HI absorption tracing neutral gas outflows; our results will allow us to identify where along the sequence the majority of a merger's gas reservoir is expelled.

  19. Rules for Optical Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Based on 30 years of optical testing experience, a lot of mistakes, a lot of learning and a lot of experience, I have defined seven guiding principles for optical testing - regardless of how small or how large the optical testing or metrology task. GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1. Fully Understand the Task 2. Develop an Error Budget 3. Continuous Metrology Coverage 4. Know where you are 5. 'Test like you fly' 6. Independent Cross-Checks 7. Understand All Anomalies. These rules have been applied with great success to the in-process optical testing and final specification compliance testing of the JWST mirrors.

  20. Rules for Optical Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Based on 30 years of optical testing experience, a lot of mistakes, a lot of learning and a lot of experience, I have defined seven guiding principles for optical testing - regardless of how small or how large the optical testing or metrology task: Fully Understand the Task, Develop an Error Budget, Continuous Metrology Coverage, Know where you are, Test like you fly, Independent Cross-Checks, Understand All Anomalies. These rules have been applied with great success to the inprocess optical testing and final specification compliance testing of the JWST mirrors.

  1. Rules for Optical Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2014-01-01

    Based on 30 years of optical testing experience, a lot of mistakes, a lot of learning and a lot of experience, I have defined seven guiding principles for optical testing - regardless of how small or how large the optical testing or metrology task. GUIDING PRINCIPLES 1.Fully Understand the Task 2.Develop an Error Budget 3.Continuous Metrology Coverage 4.Know where you are 5. 'Test like you fly' 6.Independent Cross-Checks 7.Understand All Anomalies. These rules have been applied with great success to the in-process optical testing and final specification compliance testing of the JWST mirrors.

  2. Service dogs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans. PMID:22950145

  3. Motor Demands Constrain Cognitive Rule Structures.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anne Gabrielle Eva; Frank, Michael Joshua

    2016-03-01

    Study of human executive function focuses on our ability to represent cognitive rules independently of stimulus or response modality. However, recent findings suggest that executive functions cannot be modularized separately from perceptual and motor systems, and that they instead scaffold on top of motor action selection. Here we investigate whether patterns of motor demands influence how participants choose to implement abstract rule structures. In a learning task that requires integrating two stimulus dimensions for determining appropriate responses, subjects typically structure the problem hierarchically, using one dimension to cue the task-set and the other to cue the response given the task-set. However, the choice of which dimension to use at each level can be arbitrary. We hypothesized that the specific structure subjects adopt would be constrained by the motor patterns afforded within each rule. Across four independent data-sets, we show that subjects create rule structures that afford motor clustering, preferring structures in which adjacent motor actions are valid within each task-set. In a fifth data-set using instructed rules, this bias was strong enough to counteract the well-known task switch-cost when instructions were incongruent with motor clustering. Computational simulations confirm that observed biases can be explained by leveraging overlap in cortical motor representations to improve outcome prediction and hence infer the structure to be learned. These results highlight the importance of sensorimotor constraints in abstract rule formation and shed light on why humans have strong biases to invent structure even when it does not exist. PMID:26966909

  4. Motor Demands Constrain Cognitive Rule Structures

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Anne Gabrielle Eva; Frank, Michael Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Study of human executive function focuses on our ability to represent cognitive rules independently of stimulus or response modality. However, recent findings suggest that executive functions cannot be modularized separately from perceptual and motor systems, and that they instead scaffold on top of motor action selection. Here we investigate whether patterns of motor demands influence how participants choose to implement abstract rule structures. In a learning task that requires integrating two stimulus dimensions for determining appropriate responses, subjects typically structure the problem hierarchically, using one dimension to cue the task-set and the other to cue the response given the task-set. However, the choice of which dimension to use at each level can be arbitrary. We hypothesized that the specific structure subjects adopt would be constrained by the motor patterns afforded within each rule. Across four independent data-sets, we show that subjects create rule structures that afford motor clustering, preferring structures in which adjacent motor actions are valid within each task-set. In a fifth data-set using instructed rules, this bias was strong enough to counteract the well-known task switch-cost when instructions were incongruent with motor clustering. Computational simulations confirm that observed biases can be explained by leveraging overlap in cortical motor representations to improve outcome prediction and hence infer the structure to be learned. These results highlight the importance of sensorimotor constraints in abstract rule formation and shed light on why humans have strong biases to invent structure even when it does not exist. PMID:26966909

  5. Tuning sum rules with window functions for optical constant evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-de Marcos, Luis V.; Méndez, José A.; Larruquert, Juan I.

    2016-07-01

    Sum rules are a useful tool to evaluate the global consistency of a set of optical constants. We present a procedure to spectrally tune sum rules to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants. It enables enhancing the weight of a desired spectral range within the sum-rule integral. The procedure consists in multiplying the complex refractive index with an adapted function, which is named window function. Window functions are constructed through integration of Lorentz oscillators. The asymptotic decay of these window functions enables the derivation of a multiplicity of sum rules akin to the inertial sum rule, along with one modified version of f-sum rule. This multiplicity of sum rules combined with the free selection of the photon energy range provides a double way to tune the spectral contribution within the sum rule. Window functions were applied to reported data of SrF2 and of Al films in order to check data consistency over the spectrum. The use of window functions shows that the optical constants of SrF2 are consistent in a broad spectrum. Regarding Al, some spectral ranges are seen to present a lower consistency, even though the standard sum rules with no window function did not detect inconsistencies. Hence window functions are expected to be a helpful tool to evaluate the local consistency of optical constants.

  6. A clinical case-based hypothesis: secretory IgA operates as an electronic transistor controlling the selection or rejection of molecules in the absorption process in the lumen of gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Zamm, Alfred V

    2013-01-01

    There is a clinical correlation between (1) an allergic patient’s ability to resist the development of symptoms that would have resulted from an allergenic challenge, (2) the magnitude of geomagnetism at a geographic site, and (3) the amount of solar energy falling on that site. It is suggested that the digestive membrane has an electronic gatekeeper that “decides” electronically which molecules to allow or not allow to pass on to the absorptive surface. The unique bipolar structure of secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), having a central secretory piece and the resultant unique electronic function of this polarized molecule, allows it to function as an electronic transistor, producing an electronic gatekeeper in the form of an electronic sieve. PMID:24068871

  7. A clinical case-based hypothesis: secretory IgA operates as an electronic transistor controlling the selection or rejection of molecules in the absorption process in the lumen of gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Alfred V

    2013-01-01

    There is a clinical correlation between (1) an allergic patient's ability to resist the development of symptoms that would have resulted from an allergenic challenge, (2) the magnitude of geomagnetism at a geographic site, and (3) the amount of solar energy falling on that site. It is suggested that the digestive membrane has an electronic gatekeeper that "decides" electronically which molecules to allow or not allow to pass on to the absorptive surface. The unique bipolar structure of secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA), having a central secretory piece and the resultant unique electronic function of this polarized molecule, allows it to function as an electronic transistor, producing an electronic gatekeeper in the form of an electronic sieve. PMID:24068871

  8. Rules to acquire by.

    PubMed

    Nolop, Bruce

    2007-09-01

    When Bruce Nolop was an investment banker, he saw only the glamorous side of acquisitions. Since becoming executive vice president and chief financial officer of Pitney Bowes, however, he's learned how hard it is to pull them off. In this article, he shares the lessons his organization has learned throughout its successful six-year acquisition campaign, which comprised more than 70 deals: Stick to adjacent spaces, take a portfolio approach, have a business sponsor, know how to judge an acquisition, and don't shop when you're hungry. Pitney Bowes's management and board of directors now use these five basic rules to chart the company's growth course. For example, when evaluating a potential acquisition, Pitney Bowes distinguishes between "platform" and "bolt-on" acquisitions to set expectations and guide integration efforts; the company applies different criteria, depending on the type. According to Nolop, any company can improve its acquisition track record if it is able to learn from experience, and he suspects that Pitney Bowes's rules apply just as well to other organizations. Buying a company should be treated like any other business process, he maintains. It should be approached deliberately and reviewed and improved constantly. That means mapping a complex chain of actions; paying attention to what can go right or wrong at different stages; and using standard, constantly honed, approaches and tools. PMID:17886488

  9. Use of radiation sources with mercury isotopes for real-time highly sensitive and selective benzene determination in air and natural gas by differential absorption spectrometry with the direct Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Revalde, Gita; Sholupov, Sergey; Ganeev, Alexander; Pogarev, Sergey; Ryzhov, Vladimir; Skudra, Atis

    2015-08-01

    A new analytical portable system is proposed for the direct determination of benzene vapor in the ambient air and natural gas, using differential absorption spectrometry with the direct Zeeman effect and innovative radiation sources: capillary mercury lamps with different isotopic compositions ((196)Hg, (198)Hg, (202)Hg, (204)Hg, and natural isotopic mixture). Resonance emission of mercury at a wavelength of 254 nm is used as probing radiation. The differential cross section of benzene absorption in dependence on wavelength is determined by scanning of magnetic field. It is found that the sensitivity of benzene detection is enhanced three times using lamp with the mercury isotope (204)Hg in comparison with lamp, filled with the natural isotopic mixture. It is experimentally demonstrated that, when benzene content is measured at the Occupational Exposure Limit (3.2 mg/m(3) for benzene) level, the interference from SO2, NO2, O3, H2S and toluene can be neglected if concentration of these gases does not exceed corresponding Occupational Exposure Limits. To exclude the mercury effect, filters that absorb mercury and let benzene pass in the gas duct are proposed. Basing on the results of our study, a portable spectrometer is designed with a multipath cell of 960 cm total path length and detection limit 0.5 mg/m(3) at 1 s averaging and 0.1 mg/m(3) at 30 s averaging. The applications of the designed spectrometer to measuring the benzene concentration in the atmospheric air from a moving vehicle and in natural gas are exemplified. PMID:26320799

  10. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  11. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  12. Experimental determination of terahertz atmospheric absorption parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocum, David M.; Goyette, Thomas M.; Giles, Robert H.; Nixon, William E.

    2015-05-01

    The terahertz frequency regime is often used as the `chemical fingerprint' region of the electromagnetic spectrum since many molecules exhibit a dense selection of rotational and vibrational transitions. Water is a major component of the atmosphere and since it has a large dipole moment the propagation of terahertz radiation will be dominated by atmospheric effects. This study will present the results of high-­-resolution broadband measurements of the terahertz atmospheric absorption and detail the technique for directly measuring the pressure broadening coefficients, absolute absorption coefficients, line positions, and continuum effects. Differences between these measured parameters and those tabulated in HITRAN will be discussed. Once the water vapor absorption was characterized, the same technique was used to measure the line parameters for methanol, a trace gas of interest within Earth's atmosphere. Methanol has a dense absorption spectrum in the terahertz frequency region and is an important molecule in fields such as environmental monitoring, security, and astrophysics. The data obtained in the present study will be of immediate use for the remote sensing community, as it is uncommon to measure this many independent parameters as well as to measure the absolute absorption of the transitions. Current models rely on tabulated databases of calculated values for the line parameters measured in this study. Differences between the measured data and those in the databases will be highlighted and discussed.

  13. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  14. Chaotic systems with absorption.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Eduardo G; Portela, Jefferson S E; Tél, Tamás

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe absorption in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions D(q) obtained without taking absorption and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D(1) in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results. PMID:24138240

  15. The Product and Quotient Rules Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleton, Roger; Kustov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Mathematical elegance is illustrated by strikingly parallel versions of the product and quotient rules of basic calculus, with some applications. Corresponding rules for second derivatives are given: the product rule is familiar, but the quotient rule is less so.

  16. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  17. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  18. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  19. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  20. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule...

  1. Pathways of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N

    2002-01-01

    Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron absorption is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between absorption and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal absorptive cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of absorptive cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224

  2. Rapid Levothyroxine Absorption Testing: A Case Series of Nonadherent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Mamtha; Jhingan, Ram M.; Rubin, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nonadherence to levothyroxine therapy is one cause of persistent hypothyroidism. To distinguish nonadherence from malabsorption, a levothyroxine absorption test is required. Typically, this test measures the serum free thyroxine (FT4) response to 1000 mcg of oral levothyroxine over 4 to 24 hours. Published data indicate that serum levels of FT4 are at or near their peak 2 hours after levothyroxine ingestion. Objectives: We present the successful completion of 2-hour levothyroxine absorption testing in 3 patients as a retrospective case series. Patients and Methods: Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), FT4, and free triiodothyronine (FT3) were drawn at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after 1000 mcg of oral levothyroxine. Results: In all 3 cases, baseline thyroid function indicated the patients had taken their prescribed doses of levothyroxine prior to the absorption test. Despite high baseline levels both FT3 and FT4 increased during each absorption test, providing more evidence of adequate levothyroxine absorption. Subsequently, patients achieved normal TSH levels on lower doses of levothyroxine. Conclusions: Levothyroxine absorption testing over 2 hours may offer a more rapid alternative to the commonly used longer protocols to rule out malabsorption. Scheduling a levothyroxine absorption test may induce some patients to start adhering to levothyroxine therapy. PMID:26633982

  3. Improved 20- to 32-GHz atmospheric absorption model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz Pol, Sandra L.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Keihm, Stephen J.

    1998-09-01

    An improved model for the absorption of the atmosphere near the 22-GHz water vapor line is presented. The Van Vleck-Weisskopf line shape is used with a simple parameterized version of the model from Liebe et al. [1993] for the water vapor absorption spectra and a scaling of the model from Rosenkranz [1993] for the 20- to 32-GHz oxygen absorption. Radiometric brightness temperature measurements from two sites of contrasting climatological properties, San Diego, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, were used as ground truth for comparison with in situ radiosonde-derived brightness temperatures under clear-sky conditions. Estimation of the new model's four parameters, related to water vapor line strength, line width and continuum absorption, and far-wing oxygen absorption, was performed using the Newton-Raphson inversion method. Improvements to the water vapor line strength and line width parameters are found to be statistically significant. The accuracy of the new absorption model is estimated to be 3% between 20 and 24 GHz, degrading to 8% near 32 GHz. In addition, the Hill line shape asymmetry ratio was evaluated in several currently used models to show the agreement of the data with Van Vleck-Weisskopf based models and to rule out water vapor absorption models near 22 GHz given by Waters [1976] and Ulaby et al. [1981], which are based on the Gross line shape.

  4. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  5. Abortion ruling in Quebec.

    PubMed

    Brahams, D

    1989-08-01

    Brahams summarizes a 1989 Quebec Court of Appeal decision in an abortion case and places the ruling in the context of worldwide trends in abortion regulation. In Tremblay v. Daigle (1989 Jul 26), the Quebec court upheld a lower court injunction banning a woman from having an abortion. The injunction had been obtained by the woman's former boyfriend, the putative father. Brahams discusses the current legal status of abortion in Canada, the Daigle court's reasoning, and how the British approach to the legal status of fathers and fetuses in abortion disputes differs from the Canadian. She also briefly summarizes recent abortion-related judicial and regulatory developments in the United States, Ireland, and France. PMID:2569146

  6. The biosphere rules.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Gregory C

    2008-02-01

    Sustainability, defined by natural scientists as the capacity of healthy ecosystems to function indefinitely, has become a clarion call for business. Leading companies have taken high-profile steps toward achieving it: Wal-Mart, for example, with its efforts to reduce packaging waste, and Nike, which has removed toxic chemicals from its shoes. But, says Unruh, the director of Thunderbird's Lincoln Center for Ethics in Global Management, sustainability is more than an endless journey of incremental steps. It is a destination, for which the biosphere of planet Earth--refined through billions of years of trial and error--is a perfect model. Unruh distills some lessons from the biosphere into three rules: Use a parsimonious palette. Managers can rethink their sourcing strategies and dramatically simplify the number and types of materials their companies use in production, making recycling cost-effective. After the furniture manufacturer Herman Miller discovered that its leading desk chair had 200 components made from more than 800 chemical compounds, it designed an award-winning successor whose far more limited materials palette is 96% recyclable. Cycle up, virtuously. Manufacturers should design recovery value into their products at the outset. Shaw Industries, for example, recycles the nylon fiber from its worn-out carpet into brand-new carpet tile. Exploit the power of platforms. Platform design in industry tends to occur at the component level--but the materials in those components constitute a more fundamental platform. Patagonia, by recycling Capilene brand performance underwear, has achieved energy costs 76% below those for virgin sourcing. Biosphere rules can teach companies how to build ecologically friendly products that both reduce manufacturing costs and prove highly attractive to consumers. And managers need not wait for a green technological revolution to implement them. PMID:18314639

  7. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-15

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  8. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes.

    PubMed

    Wiesinger, R; Schade, U; Kleber, Ch; Schreiner, M

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations. PMID:24985826

  9. An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesinger, R.; Schade, U.; Kleber, Ch.; Schreiner, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

  10. Quantum collapse rules from the maximum relative entropy principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Frank; Kamiński, Wojciech; Paweł Kostecki, Ryszard

    2016-01-01

    We show that the von Neumann-Lüders collapse rules in quantum mechanics always select the unique state that maximises the quantum relative entropy with respect to the premeasurement state, subject to the constraint that the postmeasurement state has to be compatible with the knowledge gained in the measurement. This way we provide an information theoretic characterisation of quantum collapse rules by means of the maximum relative entropy principle.

  11. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  12. 19 CFR 102.11 - General rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General rules. 102.11 Section 102.11 Customs... RULES OF ORIGIN Rules of Origin § 102.11 General rules. The following rules shall apply for purposes of... rules are satisfied. (b) Except for a good that is specifically described in the Harmonized System as...

  13. Absorption spectroscopy with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers operating near lambda=8 micrometers were used for detection and quantification of trace gases in ambient air by means of sensitive absorption spectroscopy. N2O, 12CH4, 13CH4, and different isotopic species of H2O were detected. Also, a highly selective detection of ethanol vapor in air with a sensitivity of 125 parts per billion by volume (ppb) was demonstrated.

  14. Scanning imaging absorption spectrometer for atmospheric chartography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burrows, John P.; Chance, Kelly V.

    1991-01-01

    The SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY is an instrument which measures backscattered, reflected, and transmitted light from the earth's atmosphere and surface. SCIAMACHY has eight spectral channels which observe simultaneously the spectral region between 240 and 1700 nm and selected windows between 1940 and 2400 nm. Each spectral channel contains a grating and linear diode array detector. SCIAMACHY observes the atmosphere in nadir, limb, and solar and lunar occultation viewing geometries.

  15. The Clean Air Interstate Rule

    SciTech Connect

    Debra Jezouit; Frank Rambo

    2005-07-01

    On May 12, 2005, EPA promulgated the Clean Air Interstate Rule, which overhauls and expands the scope of air emissions trading programs in the eastern United States. The rule imposes statewide caps on emissions of nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide to be introduced in two phases, beginning in 2009. This article briefly explains the background leading up to the rule and summarizes its key findings and requirements. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Wave Function of the Dirac Equation for an Electron in the Field of a Nucleus Expressed in Terms of an Eigenfunction of the Spin Projection Operator and a Wave Function of the Schrödinger Equation. Radiative Processes of a Hydrogen-Like Atom and Selection Rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-05-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus (Ze), expressed in terms of an eigenfunction of the operator of the spin projection onto the third axis and the corresponding solution of the Schrödinger equation is derived. This solution is suitable for practical calculations. On the basis of this solution, using ordinary methods of QED and field theory, general principles for the emission of photons, axions, and neutrinos {(Ze)}^{*}to (Ze)+γ, a, voverline{v} by a hydrogen-like atom are formulated which take into account the spin state of the electron and, in the case of photons, their polarization. This range of questions pertaining to a comparative characteristic of processes of emission of massless or almost massless particles has, to this day, not been discussed from this point of view in the literature. Selection rules for γ, a,voverline{v} emission processes are also obtained, where for axions and neutrinos they coincide with the existing selection rules in the literature ∆m = 0,±1; with ∆l = ±1 pertaining to photons, but for photon emission a few of them do in fact differ from them with the hypothesis of odd values of ∆l, not established by us and additional to the usual values ∆l = ±1 of variation of the azimuthal quantum number l due to the appearance of "new" integrals over the spherical angle θ for ∆m = ±1, where for ∆m = 0, as before, ∆l = ±1. Moreover, the dependence of the amplitude of the photon emission process on the quantum numbers is in principle different than in the previously adopted approach to the problem although the lifetime in the excited state for small values of the quantum numbers coincides in order of magnitude with the accepted value 10-9 s.

  17. Empirically derived injury prevention rules.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, L; Schick, B

    1993-01-01

    This study describes a set of empirically derived safety rules that if followed, would have prevented the occurrence of minor injuries. Epidemiologists have criticized behavioral interventions as increasing "safe" behavior but failing to demonstrate a decrease in injury. The present study documents retrospectively the link between safe behavior and injury. It demonstrates that these empirically derived rules are very similar to rules for the prevention of serious injury. The study also shows that these rules are not widely accepted and implemented by parents. Suggestions for future research in this area are advanced. PMID:8307829

  18. A new approach for resolving conflicts in actionable behavioral rules.

    PubMed

    Su, Peng; Zhu, Dan; Zeng, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is considered actionable if users can take direct actions based on such knowledge to their advantage. Among the most important and distinctive actionable knowledge are actionable behavioral rules that can directly and explicitly suggest specific actions to take to influence (restrain or encourage) the behavior in the users' best interest. However, in mining such rules, it often occurs that different rules may suggest the same actions with different expected utilities, which we call conflicting rules. To resolve the conflicts, a previous valid method was proposed. However, inconsistency of the measure for rule evaluating may hinder its performance. To overcome this problem, we develop a new method that utilizes rule ranking procedure as the basis for selecting the rule with the highest utility prediction accuracy. More specifically, we propose an integrative measure, which combines the measures of the support and antecedent length, to evaluate the utility prediction accuracies of conflicting rules. We also introduce a tunable weight parameter to allow the flexibility of integration. We conduct several experiments to test our proposed approach and evaluate the sensitivity of the weight parameter. Empirical results indicate that our approach outperforms those from previous research. PMID:25162054

  19. A New Approach for Resolving Conflicts in Actionable Behavioral Rules

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Zeng, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge is considered actionable if users can take direct actions based on such knowledge to their advantage. Among the most important and distinctive actionable knowledge are actionable behavioral rules that can directly and explicitly suggest specific actions to take to influence (restrain or encourage) the behavior in the users' best interest. However, in mining such rules, it often occurs that different rules may suggest the same actions with different expected utilities, which we call conflicting rules. To resolve the conflicts, a previous valid method was proposed. However, inconsistency of the measure for rule evaluating may hinder its performance. To overcome this problem, we develop a new method that utilizes rule ranking procedure as the basis for selecting the rule with the highest utility prediction accuracy. More specifically, we propose an integrative measure, which combines the measures of the support and antecedent length, to evaluate the utility prediction accuracies of conflicting rules. We also introduce a tunable weight parameter to allow the flexibility of integration. We conduct several experiments to test our proposed approach and evaluate the sensitivity of the weight parameter. Empirical results indicate that our approach outperforms those from previous research. PMID:25162054

  20. Dopaminergic Genetic Polymorphisms Predict Rule-based Category Learning.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Kaileigh A; Davis, Tyler; Worthy, Darrell A

    2016-07-01

    Dopaminergic genes play an important role in cognitive function. DRD2 and DARPP-32 dopamine receptor gene polymorphisms affect striatal dopamine binding potential, and the Val158Met single-nucleotide polymorphism of the COMT gene moderates dopamine availability in the pFC. Our study assesses the role of these gene polymorphisms on performance in two rule-based category learning tasks. Participants completed unidimensional and conjunctive rule-based tasks. In the unidimensional task, a rule along a single stimulus dimension can be used to distinguish category members. In contrast, a conjunctive rule utilizes a combination of two dimensions to distinguish category members. DRD2 C957T TT homozygotes outperformed C allele carriers on both tasks, and DARPP-32 AA homozygotes outperformed G allele carriers on both tasks. However, we found an interaction between COMT and task type where Met allele carriers outperformed Val homozygotes in the conjunctive rule task, but both groups performed equally well in the unidimensional task. Thus, striatal dopamine binding may play a critical role in both types of rule-based tasks, whereas prefrontal dopamine binding is important for learning more complex conjunctive rule tasks. Modeling results suggest that striatal dopaminergic genes influence selective attention processes whereas cortical genes mediate the ability to update complex rule representations. PMID:26918585

  1. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  2. 4 CFR 22.1 - Applicability of Rules [Rule 1].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applicability of Rules . 22.1 Section 22.1 Accounts... OFFICE CONTRACT APPEALS BOARD § 22.1 Applicability of Rules . The Government Accountability Office... with the Board on or after October 1, 2007....

  3. Challenges for Rule Systems on the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuh-Jong; Yeh, Ching-Long; Laun, Wolfgang

    The RuleML Challenge started in 2007 with the objective of inspiring the issues of implementation for management, integration, interoperation and interchange of rules in an open distributed environment, such as the Web. Rules are usually classified as three types: deductive rules, normative rules, and reactive rules. The reactive rules are further classified as ECA rules and production rules. The study of combination rule and ontology is traced back to an earlier active rule system for relational and object-oriented (OO) databases. Recently, this issue has become one of the most important research problems in the Semantic Web. Once we consider a computer executable policy as a declarative set of rules and ontologies that guides the behavior of entities within a system, we have a flexible way to implement real world policies without rewriting the computer code, as we did before. Fortunately, we have de facto rule markup languages, such as RuleML or RIF to achieve the portability and interchange of rules for different rule systems. Otherwise, executing real-life rule-based applications on the Web is almost impossible. Several commercial or open source rule engines are available for the rule-based applications. However, we still need a standard rule language and benchmark for not only to compare the rule systems but also to measure the progress in the field. Finally, a number of real-life rule-based use cases will be investigated to demonstrate the applicability of current rule systems on the Web.

  4. Absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of absorption heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the absorption heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of absorption heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.

  5. Scattering with absorptive interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.

    1982-07-01

    The S matrix for a wide class of complex and nonlocal potentials is studied, with special attention given to the motion of singularities in the complex k plane as a function of the imaginary coupling strength. Modifications of Levinson's theorem are obtained and discussed. Analytic approximations to the S matrix in the vicinity of narrow resonances are exhibited and compared to numerical results of resonating-group calculations. The problem of defining resonances in the case of complex interactions is discussed, making contact with the usual analysis of scattering in terms of Argand diagrams. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for absorptive potentials.

  6. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  7. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  8. Inversion of absorption anisotropy and bowing of crystal field splitting in wurtzite MgZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, M. D.; Esser, N.; Chauveau, J.-M.; Goldhahn, R.; Feneberg, M.

    2016-05-01

    The anisotropic optical properties of wurtzite MgxZn1-xO thin films (0 ≤x ≤0.45 ) grown on m-plane ZnO substrates by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy are studied using spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. The data analysis provides the dielectric functions for electric field polarizations perpendicular and parallel to the optical axis. The splitting between the absorption edges of the two polarization directions decreases between x = 0 and x = 0.24, while an inverted absorption anisotropy is found at higher Mg content, indicating a sign change of the crystal field splitting Δcr as for the spin orbit parameter. The characteristic energies such as exciton binding energies and band gaps are determined from the analysis of the imaginary parts of the dielectric functions. In particular, these data reveal a bowing parameter of b =-283 meV for describing the compositional dependence of the crystal field splitting and indicate Δcr=-327 meV for wurtzite MgO. The inverted valence band ordering of ZnO ( Γ7-Γ9-Γ7 ) is found to be preserved with increasing Mg content, while the optical selection rules interchange.

  9. Tunable absorption in heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metallic film and Fibonacci fractal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Wei; Sun, Jie; Du, Gui-Qiang

    2016-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the anomalous optical properties of heterostructures composed of a highly absorptive metal film and a truncated Fibonacci fractal photonic crystal. It is found that one or multiple highly reflected peaks, even enhanced transmission narrowband, can be realized in the near-complete absorption broadband, where the photonic crystals are selected with various Fibonacci sequences or a given sequence as the basic unit. These properties are significant to design important reflection or transmission optical devices in the visible and near-infrared ranges.

  10. Cell permeability beyond the rule of 5.

    PubMed

    Matsson, Pär; Doak, Bradley C; Over, Björn; Kihlberg, Jan

    2016-06-01

    Drug discovery for difficult targets that have large and flat binding sites is often better suited to compounds beyond the "rule of 5" (bRo5). However, such compounds carry higher pharmacokinetic risks, such as low solubility and permeability, and increased efflux and metabolism. Interestingly, recent drug approvals and studies suggest that cell permeable and orally bioavailable drugs can be discovered far into bRo5 space. Tactics such as reduction or shielding of polarity by N-methylation, bulky side chains and intramolecular hydrogen bonds may be used to increase cell permeability in this space, but often results in decreased solubility. Conformationally flexible compounds can, however, combine high permeability and solubility, properties that are keys for cell permeability and intestinal absorption. Recent developments in computational conformational analysis will aid design of such compounds and hence prediction of cell permeability. Transporter mediated efflux occurs for most investigated drugs in bRo5 space, however it is commonly overcome by high local intestinal concentrations on oral administration. In contrast, there is little data to support significant impact of transporter-mediated intestinal absorption in bRo5 space. Current knowledge of compound properties that govern transporter effects of bRo5 drugs is limited and requires further fundamental and comprehensive studies. PMID:27067608

  11. Miner's rule revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, W.; Heuler, P.

    1994-03-01

    In the first sections, the requirements to be met by hypotheses for fatigue life prediction (including those for the crack initiation and crack propagation phases) are discussed in detail. These requirements are shown to be different for 'scientific' and for 'industrial' fatigue life prediction. Aspects with regard to an assessment of fatigue life prediction hypotheses are discussed. The last section presents the results of a large cooperative program between IABG and several automobile manufacturers, in which Miner's Rule in several versions was assessed against spectrum tests with five different actual automobile components: forged steel stub axle; forged steel stub axle, induction hardened; sheet steel welded rear axle (front wheel drive car); cast aluminum wheel; and welded sheet steel wheel. Since up to 80 components each were available, and two different, but typical, automotive stress-time histories were employed, the assessment was very thorough, avoiding many of the drawbacks of previous assessments. It is shown that damage sums to failure were usually far below 1.0; they also depended on the component in question, the aluminum wheel resulting in the lowest damage sums to failure; the damage sums to failure where always lower for a mild spectrum than for a severe one; and the influence of spectrum variation was predicted best - among the hypotheses tested - by use of a recent proposal of Zenner and Liu.

  12. Determination of bromhexine in cough-cold syrups by absorption spectrophotometry and multivariate calibration using partial least-squares and hybrid linear analyses. Application of a novel method of wavelength selection.

    PubMed

    Goicoechea, H C; Olivieri, A C

    1999-07-12

    The mucolitic bromhexine [N-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzyl)-N-methylcyclohexylamine] has been determined in cough suppressant syrups by multivariate spectrophotometric calibration, together with partial least-squares (PLS-1) and hybrid linear analysis (HLA). Notwithstanding the spectral overlapping between bromhexine and syrup excipients, as well as the intrinsic variability of the latter in unknown samples, the recoveries are excellent. A novel method of wavelength selection was also applied, based on the concept of net analyte signal regression, as adapted to the HLA methodology. This method allows one to improve the performance of both PLS-1 and HLA in samples containing nonmodeled interferences. PMID:18967655

  13. Possession, use, and transfer of select agents and toxins--reconstructed replication competent forms of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus containing any portion of the coding regions of all eight gene segments. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-10-20

    We are adding reconstructed replication competent forms of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus containing any portion of the coding regions of all eight gene segments to the list of HHS select agents and toxins. We are taking this action for several reasons. First the pandemic influenza virus of 1918-19 killed up to 50 million people worldwide, including an estimated 675,000 deaths in the United States. Also, the complete coding sequence for the 1918 pandemic influenza A H1N1 virus was recently identified, which will make it possible for those with knowledge of reverse genetics to reconstruct this virus. In addition, the first published study on a reconstructed 1918 pandemic influenza virus demonstrated the high virulence of this virus in cell culture, embryonated eggs, and in mice relative to other human influenza viruses. Therefore, we have determined that the reconstructed replication competent forms of the 1918 pandemic influenza virus containing any portion of the coding regions of all eight gene segments have the potential to pose a severe threat to public health and safety. PMID:16237858

  14. TRICARE; diabetic education. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-08-01

    The Department of Defense is publishing this final rule to clarify TRICARE coverage for diabetic education. This rule introduces new definitions and addresses revisions or omissions in policy or procedure inadvertently missed in previous regulatory changes pertaining to diabetic education. PMID:20695037

  15. Developmental Disabilities Program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-07-27

    This rule implements the Developmental Disabilities Assistance and Bill of Rights Act of 2000. The previous regulations were completed in 1997 before the current law was passed. The rule will align the regulations and current statute and will provide guidance to AIDD grantees. PMID:26214859

  16. Art as a Singular Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avital, Doron

    2007-01-01

    This paper will examine an unresolved tension inherent in the question of art and argue for the idea of a singular rule as a natural resolution. In so doing, the structure of a singular rule will be fully outlined and its paradoxical constitution will be resolved. The tension I mention above unfolds both as a matter of history and as a product of…

  17. Exemplar Similarity and Rule Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Ulrike; Prat-Sala, Merce; Pothos, Emmanuel M.; Brumby, Duncan P.

    2010-01-01

    We report four experiments examining effects of instance similarity on the application of simple explicit rules. We found effects of similarity to illustrative exemplars in error patterns and reaction times. These effects arose even though participants were given perfectly predictive rules, the similarity manipulation depended entirely on…

  18. The Clean Air Mercury Rule

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Rossler

    2005-07-01

    Coming into force on July 15, 2005, the US Clean Air Mercury Rule will use a market-based cap-and-trade approach under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act to reduce mercury emissions from the electric power sector. This article provides a comprehensive summary of the new rule. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Solar-Cell Slide Rule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamakawa, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Slide rule relates efficiency, impurity types, impurity concentrations, and process types. Solar cell slide rule calculations are determination of allowable impurity concentration for nonredistributive process, determination of impurity buildup factor for redistributive process and determination of allowable impurity concentration for redistributive process.

  20. Sensitivity-based adaptive learning rules for binary feedforward neural networks.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shuiming; Zeng, Xiaoqin; Wu, Shengli; Han, Lixin

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a set of adaptive learning rules for binary feedforward neural networks (BFNNs) by means of the sensitivity measure that is established to investigate the effect of a BFNN's weight variation on its output. The rules are based on three basic adaptive learning principles: the benefit principle, the minimal disturbance principle, and the burden-sharing principle. In order to follow the benefit principle and the minimal disturbance principle, a neuron selection rule and a weight adaptation rule are developed. Besides, a learning control rule is developed to follow the burden-sharing principle. The advantage of the rules is that they can effectively guide the BFNN's learning to conduct constructive adaptations and avoid destructive ones. With these rules, a sensitivity-based adaptive learning (SBALR) algorithm for BFNNs is presented. Experimental results on a number of benchmark data demonstrate that the SBALR algorithm has better learning performance than the Madaline rule II and backpropagation algorithms. PMID:24808553

  1. Rule Learning with Probabilistic Smoothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Gianni; Guarascio, Massimo; Manco, Giuseppe; Ortale, Riccardo; Ritacco, Ettore

    A hierarchical classification framework is proposed for discriminating rare classes in imprecise domains, characterized by rarity (of both classes and cases), noise and low class separability. The devised framework couples the rules of a rule-based classifier with as many local probabilistic generative models. These are trained over the coverage of the corresponding rules to better catch those globally rare cases/classes that become less rare in the coverage. Two novel schemes for tightly integrating rule-based and probabilistic classification are introduced, that classify unlabeled cases by considering multiple classifier rules as well as their local probabilistic counterparts. An intensive evaluation shows that the proposed framework is competitive and often superior in accuracy w.r.t. established competitors, while overcoming them in dealing with rare classes.

  2. Examining Tennessee's collateral source rule.

    PubMed

    Regan, Judith; Hadley, Edward; Regan, William M

    2008-11-01

    The common law collateral source rule was established to prevent the defendant from benefiting from their wrongful actions. Despite a trend in the United States to limit the effects of the collateral source rule, the rule remains in force in courts of the State of Tennessee. However, to assist with the malpractice crisis, the legislature prohibited this rule by statute in regards to the Medical Malpractice Act. Although this statutory prohibition of the collateral source rule worked to lessen verdicts in malpractice cases after passage, the availability of consortium damages resulting from Jordan v. Baptist Three Rivers Hospital in 1999 has worked to drive verdicts substantially higher. Regardless the Medical Malpractice Act has been held as constitutional and has been clarified through several recent Tennessee court decisions. PMID:19024250

  3. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  4. Microwave peak absorption frequency of liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangze; Chen, Mingdong

    2008-09-01

    Microwave-assisted extraction is a new effective method which has practical applications in many fields. Microwave heating is one of its physical mechanisms, and it also has the characteristic of selectivity. When the applied microwave frequency equals a certain absorption frequency of the material (or specific component), the material will intensively absorb microwave energy. This is also known as resonant absorption, and the frequency is called the peak absorption frequency which depends on the physical structure of the material. In this work, dynamic hydrogen bond energy was included in molecular activation energy; with the liquid cell model, the expression of interaction energy between dipolar molecules was derived. The rotational relaxation time was gotten from the Eyring viscosity formula. Then based on the relationship between dielectric dissipation coefficient and relaxation time, the expression of microwave peak absorption frequency as a function of the material physical structure, rotational inertia and electrical dipole moment of molecules was established. These theoretical formulas were applied to water and benzene, and the calculated results agree fairly well with the experimental data. This work can not only deepen the study of the interaction between microwave and material, but also provide a possible guide for the experiment of microwave-assisted extraction.

  5. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Whitlow, Eugene P.

    1998-09-22

    A method of inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425.degree. F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25.degree. C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425.degree. F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer.

  6. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  7. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  8. Cloud absorption radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strange, M. G.

    1988-01-01

    The Cloud Absorption Radiometer (CAR) was developed to measure spectrally how light is scattered by clouds and to determine the single scattering albedo, important to meteorology and climate studies, with unprecedented accuracy. This measurement is based on ratios of downwelling to upwelling radiation within clouds, and so is not strongly dependent upon absolute radiometric calibration of the instrument. The CAR has a 5-inch aperture and 1 degree IFOV, and spatially scans in a plane orthogonal to the flight vector from the zenith to nadir at 1.7 revolutions per second. Incoming light is measured in 13 spectral bands, using silicon, germanium, and indium-antimonide detectors. Data from each channel is digitally recorded in flight with 10-bit (0.1 percent) resolution. The instrument incorporates several novel features. These features are briefly detailed.

  9. Absorption Features in Soil Spectra Assessment.

    PubMed

    Vašát, Radim; Kodešová, Radka; Borůvka, Luboš; Jakšík, Ondřej; Klement, Aleš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2015-12-01

    From a wide range of techniques appropriate to relate spectra measurements with soil properties, partial least squares (PLS) regression and support vector machines (SVM) are most commonly used. This is due to their predictive power and the availability of software tools. Both represent exclusively statistically based approaches and, as such, benefit from multiple responses of soil material in the spectrum. However, physical-based approaches that focus only on a single spectral feature, such as simple linear regression using selected continuum-removed spectra values as a predictor variable, often provide accurate estimates. Furthermore, if this approach extends to multiple cases by taking into account three basic absorption feature parameters (area, width, and depth) of all occurring features as predictors and subjecting them to best subset selection, one can achieve even higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression. Here, we attempt to further extend this approach by adding two additional absorption feature parameters (left and right side area), as they can be important diagnostic markers, too. As a result, we achieved higher prediction accuracy compared with PLS regression and SVM for exchangeable soil pH, slightly higher or comparable for dithionite-citrate and ammonium oxalate extractable Fe and Mn forms, but slightly worse for oxidizable carbon content. Therefore, we suggest incorporating the multiple linear regression approach based on absorption feature parameters into existing working practices. PMID:26555184

  10. Superselection rules and quantum protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Kitaev, Alexei; Preskill, John; Mayers, Dominic

    2004-05-01

    We show that superselection rules do not enhance the information-theoretic security of quantum cryptographic protocols. Our analysis employs two quite different methods. The first method uses the concept of a reference system--in a world subject to a superselection rule, unrestricted operations can be simulated by parties who share access to a reference system with suitable properties. By this method, we prove that if an n-party protocol is secure in a world subject to a superselection rule, then the security is maintained even if the superselection rule is relaxed. However, the proof applies only to a limited class of superselection rules, those in which the superselection sectors are labeled by unitary irreducible representations of a compact symmetry group. The second method uses the concept of the format of a message sent between parties--by verifying the format, the recipient of a message can check whether the message could have been sent by a party who performed charge-conserving operations. By this method, we prove that protocols subject to general superselection rules (including those pertaining to non-Abelian anyons in two dimensions) are no more secure than protocols in the unrestricted world. However, the proof applies only to two-party protocols. Our results show in particular that, if no assumptions are made about the computational power of the cheater, then secure quantum bit commitment and strong quantum coin flipping with arbitrarily small bias are impossible in a world subject to superselection rules.

  11. A Response from Golden Rule to "ETS on 'Golden Rule'".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rooney, J. Patrick

    1987-01-01

    This article rebuts comments by G. R. Anrig (1987) on the Settlement Agreement that resolved the racial discrimination suit brought by the Golden Rule Insurance Company against the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the Illinois Department of Insurance. (TJH)

  12. Universal waste rule: Final rule issued. Environmental Guidance Regulatory Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-14

    On February 11, 1993, EPA proposed to streamline the management requirements for certain hazardous wastes that were generated in large quantities by a variety of generators (i.e., residential, small businesses, industries, etc.). EPA`s intention was to facilitate the environmentally sound collection and disposal of these types of wastes. In this proposed rule, EPA termed these types of hazardous wastes ``universal wastes`` and developed a management system which was less stringent than the existing Subtitle C regulations. EPA proposed that the following three types of hazardous wastes be managed as universal wastes: batteries, certain pesticides, and thermostats. Because EPA believed that the authority to propose the promulgation of the universal waste rule was not significantly linked to HSWA provisions, the Agency proposed the promulgation of the universal waste rule under pre-HSWA authority. On May 11, 1995, at FR 25492, EPA promulgated a pre-HSWA rule that streamlined hazardous waste management regulations for universal wastes.

  13. 76 FR 17569 - Amateur Service Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 97 Amateur Service Rules AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This document revises the Amateur Radio Service rules to amend and clarify the rules with respect to amateur stations transmitting spread spectrum emissions. The rule amendments are necessary...

  14. 75 FR 27272 - Amateur Service Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 97 Amateur Service Rules AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: This document proposes to amend the amateur radio service rules to facilitate the use of... the amateur service rules by making them conform with other Commission rules, thereby...

  15. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  16. Percutaneous absorption in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I

    1987-11-01

    The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin absorption in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous absorption at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin absorption in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin absorption, as well as postnatal age and skin absorption. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous absorption in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856

  17. Viscosity mixing rules for binary systems containing one ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Mohammed; Altamash, Tausif; Salavera, Daniel; Coronas, Alberto; Rebelo, Luis P N; Canongia Lopes, Jose N

    2013-06-24

    In this work the applicability of four of the most commonly used viscosity mixing rules to [ionic liquid (IL)+molecular solvent (MS)] systems is assessed. More than one hundred (IL+MS) binary mixtures were selected from the literature to test the viscosity mixing rules proposed by 1) Hind (Hi), 2) Grunberg and Nissan (G-N), 3) Herric (He) and 4) Katti and Chaudhri (K-C). The analyses were performed by estimating the average (absolute or relative) deviations, AADs and ARDs, between the available experimental data and the predicted ideal mixture viscosity values obtained by means of each rule. The interaction terms corresponding to the adjustable parameters inherent to each rule were also calculated and their trends discussed. PMID:23650138

  18. Overview-absorption/Rankine solar cooling program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahlig, M.; Heitz, A.; Boyce, B.

    1980-03-01

    The tasks being performed in the absorption and Rankine program areas run the gamut from basic work on fluids to development of chillers and chiller components, to field and reliability testing of complete cooling systems. In the absorption program, there are six current and five essentially completed projects. In the Rankine program, there are five current projects directly supported by DOE, and three projects funded through and managed by NASA/MSFC (Manned Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama). The basic features of these projects are discussed. The systems under development in five of these current projects were selected for field testing in the SOLERAS program, a joint US-Saudi Arabian enterprise. Some technical highlights of the program are presented.

  19. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  20. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  1. Efficient Sub-Bandgap Light Absorption and Signal Amplification in Silicon Photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Hsin

    This thesis focuses on two areas in silicon photodetectors, the first being enhancing the sub-bandgap light absorption of IR wavelenghts in silicon, and the second being intrinsic signal amplification in silicon photodetectors. Both of these are achieved using heavily doped p-n junction devices which create localized states that relax the k-selection rule of indirect bandgap material. The probability of transitions between impurity band and the conduction/valence band would be much more efficient than the one between band-to-band transition. The waveguide-coupled epitaxial p-n photodetector was demonstrated for 1310 nm wavelength detection. Incorporated with the Franz-Keldysh effect and the quasi-confined epitaxial layer design, an absorption coefficient around 10 cm-1 has been measured and internal quantum efficiency nearly 100% at -2.5V. The absorption coefficient is calculated from the wave function of the electron and hole in p-n diode. The heavily doped impurity wave function can be formulated as a delta function, and the quasi-confined conduction band energy states, and the wave function on each level can be obtained from the Silvaco software. The calculated theoretical absorption coefficient increases with the increasing applied bias and the doping concentration, which matches the experimental results. To solve the issues of large excess noise and high operation bias for avalanche photodiodes based on impact ionization, I presented a detector using the Cycling Excitation Process (CEP) for signal amplification. This can be realized in a heavily doped and highly compensated Si p-n junction, showing ultra high gain about 3000 at very low bias (<4 V), and possessing an intrinsic, phonon-mediated regulation process to keep the device stable without any quenching device required in today's Geiger-mode avalanche detectors. The CEP can be formulated with the rate equations in conduction bands and impurity states. The gain expression, which is a function of the

  2. Discovering fuzzy spatial association rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacar, Esen; Cicekli, Nihan K.

    2002-03-01

    Discovering interesting, implicit knowledge and general relationships in geographic information databases is very important to understand and use these spatial data. One of the methods for discovering this implicit knowledge is mining spatial association rules. A spatial association rule is a rule indicating certain association relationships among a set of spatial and possibly non-spatial predicates. In the mining process, data is organized in a hierarchical manner. However, in real-world applications it may not be possible to construct a crisp structure for this data, instead some fuzzy structures should be used. Fuzziness, i.e. partial belonging of an item to more than one sub-item in the hierarchy, could be applied to the data itself, and also to the hierarchy of spatial relations. This paper shows that, strong association rules can be mined from large spatial databases using fuzzy concept and spatial relation hierarchies.

  3. A Perspective on Solubility Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monroe, Manus; Abrams, Karl

    1984-01-01

    Presents four generalizations about solubilities. These generalizations (rules), are useful in introducing the dynamic topics of solubility and in helping high school and introductory college chemistry students make some order out of the tremendous number of facts available. (JN)

  4. Rule-Based Runtime Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barringer, Howard; Goldberg, Allen; Havelund, Klaus; Sen, Koushik

    2003-01-01

    We present a rule-based framework for defining and implementing finite trace monitoring logics, including future and past time temporal logic, extended regular expressions, real-time logics, interval logics, forms of quantified temporal logics, and so on. Our logic, EAGLE, is implemented as a Java library and involves novel techniques for rule definition, manipulation and execution. Monitoring is done on a state-by-state basis, without storing the execution trace.

  5. Occupied and unoccupied orbitals of C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} probed with C 1s emission and absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, J.A.; Terminello, L.J.; Hudson, E.A.

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the orbital structure of the fullerenes, and to pursue its evolution from a cluster to the infinite solid. For obtaining a complete picture of the electronic structure the authors compare a variety of experimental techniques, i.e. photoemission and core level emission for occupied orbitals and inverse photoemission and core level absorption for unoccupied orbitals. Their experimental results focus on optical probes involving the C 1s core level, i.e. absorption via transitions from the C 1s level into unoccupied {pi}* and {sigma}* orbitals and emission involving transitions from occupied orbitals into a C 1s hole. Due to the simplicity of the C 1s level there exist clear selection rules. For example, only transitions to and from orbitals with p-character are dipole-allowed. These results on the p-projected density of states are compared with inverse photoemission and photoemission results, where the selection rules are less definitive. In addition, a first-principles quasiparticle calculation of the density of states is used to assign the orbital features. The spectra from C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} are still far from their infinite analog, i.e., graphite, which is also measured with the same techniques. In order to determine the effect of electron transfer onto C{sub 60}, as in superconducting alkali fullerides, the authors are studying resonant emission of C{sub 60}. An electron is placed in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) by optical absorption from the C 1s level and the C 1s emission detected in the presence of this spectator electron.

  6. The N-end rule pathway and regulation by proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Varshavsky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The N-end rule relates the regulation of the in vivo half-life of a protein to the identity of its N-terminal residue. Degradation signals (degrons) that are targeted by the N-end rule pathway include a set called N-degrons. The main determinant of an N-degron is a destabilizing N-terminal residue of a protein. In eukaryotes, the N-end rule pathway is a part of the ubiquitin system and consists of two branches, the Ac/N-end rule and the Arg/N-end rule pathways. The Ac/N-end rule pathway targets proteins containing Nα-terminally acetylated (Nt-acetylated) residues. The Arg/N-end rule pathway recognizes unacetylated N-terminal residues and involves N-terminal arginylation. Together, these branches target for degradation a majority of cellular proteins. For example, more than 80% of human proteins are cotranslationally Nt-acetylated. Thus, most proteins harbor a specific degradation signal, termed AcN-degron, from the moment of their birth. Specific N-end rule pathways are also present in prokaryotes and in mitochondria. Enzymes that produce N-degrons include methionine-aminopeptidases, caspases, calpains, Nt-acetylases, Nt-amidases, arginyl-transferases, and leucyl-transferases. Regulated degradation of specific proteins by the N-end rule pathway mediates a legion of physiological functions, including the sensing of heme, oxygen, and nitric oxide; selective elimination of misfolded proteins; the regulation of DNA repair, segregation, and condensation; the signaling by G proteins; the regulation of peptide import, fat metabolism, viral and bacterial infections, apoptosis, meiosis, spermatogenesis, neurogenesis, and cardiovascular development; and the functioning of adult organs, including the pancreas and the brain. Discovered 25 years ago, this pathway continues to be a fount of biological insights. PMID:21633985

  7. Simulation of large-scale rule-based models

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek, William S; Monnie, Michael I; Colvin, Joshua; Faseder, James

    2008-01-01

    Interactions of molecules, such as signaling proteins, with multiple binding sites and/or multiple sites of post-translational covalent modification can be modeled using reaction rules. Rules comprehensively, but implicitly, define the individual chemical species and reactions that molecular interactions can potentially generate. Although rules can be automatically processed to define a biochemical reaction network, the network implied by a set of rules is often too large to generate completely or to simulate using conventional procedures. To address this problem, we present DYNSTOC, a general-purpose tool for simulating rule-based models. DYNSTOC implements a null-event algorithm for simulating chemical reactions in a homogenous reaction compartment. The simulation method does not require that a reaction network be specified explicitly in advance, but rather takes advantage of the availability of the reaction rules in a rule-based specification of a network to determine if a randomly selected set of molecular components participates in a reaction during a time step. DYNSTOC reads reaction rules written in the BioNetGen language which is useful for modeling protein-protein interactions involved in signal transduction. The method of DYNSTOC is closely related to that of STOCHSIM. DYNSTOC differs from STOCHSIM by allowing for model specification in terms of BNGL, which extends the range of protein complexes that can be considered in a model. DYNSTOC enables the simulation of rule-based models that cannot be simulated by conventional methods. We demonstrate the ability of DYNSTOC to simulate models accounting for multisite phosphorylation and multivalent binding processes that are characterized by large numbers of reactions. DYNSTOC is free for non-commercial use. The C source code, supporting documentation and example input files are available at .

  8. Intestinal folate absorption

    PubMed Central

    Strum, Williamson; Nixon, Peter F.; Bertino, Joseph B.; Binder, Henry J.

    1971-01-01

    Intestinal absorption of the monoglutamate form of the principal dietary and circulating folate compound, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-MTHF), was studied in the rat utilizing a synthetic highly purified radiolabeled diastereoisomer. Chromatography confirmed that the compound was not altered after transfer from the mucosa to the serosa. Accumulation against a concentration gradient was not observed in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal segments at 5-MTHF concentration from 0.5 to 500 nmoles/liter. Unidirectional transmural flux determination also did not indicate a significant net flux. Mucosal to serosal transfer of 5-MTHF was similar in all segments of the intestine and increased in a linear fashion with increased initial mucosal concentrations. Further, no alteration in 5-MTHF transfer was found when studied in the presence of metabolic inhibitors or folate compounds. These results indicate that 5-MTHF is not absorbed by the rat small intestine by a carrier-mediated system and suggest that 5-MTHF transfer most likely represents diffusion. Images PMID:5564397

  9. Rules and Self-Rules: Effects of Variation upon Behavioral Sensitivity to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumann, Ana A.; Abreu-Rodrigues, Josele; da Silva Souza, Alessandra

    2009-01-01

    Four experiments compared the effects of self-rules and rules, and varied and specific schedules of reinforcement. Participants were first exposed to either several schedules (varied groups) or to one schedule (specific groups) and either were asked to generate rules (self-rule groups), were provided rules (rule groups), or were not asked nor…

  10. Using the Chain Rule as the Key Link in Deriving the General Rules for Differentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprows, David

    2011-01-01

    The standard approach to the general rules for differentiation is to first derive the power, product, and quotient rules and then derive the chain rule. In this short article we give an approach to these rules which uses the chain rule as the main tool in deriving the power, product, and quotient rules in a manner which is more student-friendly…

  11. Statistical Mechanics of On-line Ensemble Teacher Learning through a Novel Perceptron Learning Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Kazuyuki; Miyoshi, Seiji

    2012-06-01

    In ensemble teacher learning, ensemble teachers have only uncertain information about the true teacher, and this information is given by an ensemble consisting of an infinite number of ensemble teachers whose variety is sufficiently rich. In this learning, a student learns from an ensemble teacher that is iteratively selected randomly from a pool of many ensemble teachers. An interesting point of ensemble teacher learning is the asymptotic behavior of the student to approach the true teacher by learning from ensemble teachers. The student performance is improved by using the Hebbian learning rule in the learning. However, the perceptron learning rule cannot improve the student performance. On the other hand, we proposed a perceptron learning rule with a margin. This learning rule is identical to the perceptron learning rule when the margin is zero and identical to the Hebbian learning rule when the margin is infinity. Thus, this rule connects the perceptron learning rule and the Hebbian learning rule continuously through the size of the margin. Using this rule, we study changes in the learning behavior from the perceptron learning rule to the Hebbian learning rule by considering several margin sizes. From the results, we show that by setting a margin of κ>0, the effect of an ensemble appears and becomes significant when a larger margin κ is used.

  12. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  13. Atlas of Infrared Absorption Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    This atlas of infrared absorption line contains absorption line parameters (line strength vs. wavenumber) from 500 to 7000 cm(exp-1) for 15 gases: H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, SO2, NO, NO2, NH3, HCl, HF, HNO3 and CH3Cl.

  14. Hot tube atomic absorption spectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Woodriff, R; Stone, R W

    1968-07-01

    A small, commercially available atomic absorption instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic absorption analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797

  15. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  16. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  17. Academic Debate Paradigms: An Examination from a Rules Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Kenneth G.

    Debate paradigms, which at one time established standards to help judges evaluate arguments and rules to guide debaters' argument choice and strategy selection, no longer offer consistent guidance for either judges or debaters. An increased emphasis on creativity and flexibility has led to a general unwillingness to use a rigid debate format. The…

  18. 75 FR 7428 - Amendments to Enforceable Consent Agreement Procedural Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... cyclohexane, 59 FR 59660 (November 18, 1994) (FRL- 4909-5)). In other instances, EPA selected the substance or substances based on its own initiative (see, e.g., ECA for 1,2-ethylene dichloride, 68 FR 33125 (June 3, 2003... (58 FR 51735, October 4, 1993), this proposed rule is not a ``significant regulatory action''...

  19. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  20. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  1. Dense bubble traffic in microfluidic loops: Selection rules and clogging.

    PubMed

    Hourtane, Virginie; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2016-03-01

    We study the repartition of monodisperse bubbles at the inlet node of an asymmetric microfluidic loop for low to high bubble densities. In large loops, we evidence a new regime. Contrary to the classical belief, we point out that bubbles are directed not towards the arm having the higher total flow rate but towards the arm with the higher water flow rate at low and moderate relative gas flow rates. At higher rates, they enter the longer arm when they reach close packing in the shorter arm. In small loops, we evidence a clogging regime at high relative gas flow rates. Collisions between bubbles coming from the two arms at the outlet clog the longer arm. We propose a comprehensive analysis allowing us to explain these results. PMID:27078414

  2. Dense bubble traffic in microfluidic loops: Selection rules and clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourtane, Virginie; Bodiguel, Hugues; Colin, Annie

    2016-03-01

    We study the repartition of monodisperse bubbles at the inlet node of an asymmetric microfluidic loop for low to high bubble densities. In large loops, we evidence a new regime. Contrary to the classical belief, we point out that bubbles are directed not towards the arm having the higher total flow rate but towards the arm with the higher water flow rate at low and moderate relative gas flow rates. At higher rates, they enter the longer arm when they reach close packing in the shorter arm. In small loops, we evidence a clogging regime at high relative gas flow rates. Collisions between bubbles coming from the two arms at the outlet clog the longer arm. We propose a comprehensive analysis allowing us to explain these results.

  3. Electronic selection rules controlling dislocation glide in bcc metals.

    PubMed

    Jones, Travis E; Eberhart, Mark E; Clougherty, Dennis P; Woodward, Chris

    2008-08-22

    The validity of the structure-property relationships governing the low-temperature deformation behavior of many bcc metals was brought into question with recent ab initio density functional studies of isolated screw dislocations in Mo and Ta. These relationships were semiclassical in nature, having grown from atomistic investigations of the deformation properties of the group V and VI transition metals. We find that the correct form for these structure-property relationships is fully quantum mechanical, involving the coupling of electronic states with the strain field at the core of long a/<2111> screw dislocations. PMID:18764636

  4. Electronic Selection Rules Controlling Dislocation Glide in bcc Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Travis E.; Eberhart, Mark E.; Clougherty, Dennis P.; Woodward, Chris

    2008-08-01

    The validity of the structure-property relationships governing the low-temperature deformation behavior of many bcc metals was brought into question with recent ab initio density functional studies of isolated screw dislocations in Mo and Ta. These relationships were semiclassical in nature, having grown from atomistic investigations of the deformation properties of the group V and VI transition metals. We find that the correct form for these structure-property relationships is fully quantum mechanical, involving the coupling of electronic states with the strain field at the core of long a/2⟨111⟩ screw dislocations.

  5. Evaluating decision rules for dryland rotation crop selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    No-till dryland cropping systems in the central Great Plains have more water available for crop production than the traditional conventionally tilled winter wheat (Triticum aestium L.)-fallow systems because of greater precipitation storage efficiency. That additional water is used most efficiently ...

  6. 17 CFR 243.100 - General rule regarding selective disclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...(f)(5)), that filed a report on Form 13F (17 CFR 249.325) with the Commission for the most recent... or monitoring a credit rating: (A) Any nationally recognized statistical rating organization, as that...)), pursuant to § 240.17g-5(a)(3) of this chapter; or (B) Any credit rating agency, as that term is defined...

  7. The framework of weighted subset-hood Mamdani fuzzy rule based system rule extraction (MFRBS-WSBA) for forecasting electricity load demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansor, Rosnalini; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Othman, Mahmod

    2016-08-01

    Fuzzy rules are very important elements that should be taken consideration seriously when applying any fuzzy system. This paper proposes the framework of Mamdani Fuzzy Rule-based System with Weighted Subset-hood Based Algorithm (MFRBS-WSBA) in the fuzzy rule extraction for electricity load demand forecasting. The framework consist of six main steps: (1) Data Collection and Selection; (2) Preprocessing Data; (3) Variables Selection; (4) Fuzzy Model; (5) Comparison with Other FIS and (6) Performance Evaluation. The objective of this paper is to show the fourth step in the framework which applied the new electricity load forecasting rule extraction by WSBA method. Electricity load demand in Malaysia data is used as numerical data in this framework. These preliminary results show that the WSBA method can be one of alternative methods to extract fuzzy rules for forecast electricity load demand

  8. Dynamics of temporal learning rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Patrick D.

    2000-09-01

    The changes of synaptic strength are analyzed on two time scales: the fast local field dynamics, and the slow synaptic modification dynamics. The fast dynamics are determined by the synaptic strengths and background noise in the system. The slow dynamics are determined by the functional form of a temporal learning rule. Temporal learning rules are defined to be functions yielding state dependent changes in synaptic strengths depending on the timing of pre- and postsynaptic states in the network. The evolution of local field dynamics that result from various learning rules are analyzed for a stochastic, discrete time neural model with no relative refractory period that receives a series of delayed adaptive inputs. A fixed point is found in the learning dynamics, and conditions for two types of instabilities are analyzed. Four universality classes of dynamics are found that are independent of the details of the temporal learning rules. Examples are given of biological systems in which these temporal learning rules have been identified, and their functional consequences are discussed.

  9. Rule-based simulation models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieten, Joseph L.; Seraphine, Kathleen M.

    1991-01-01

    Procedural modeling systems, rule based modeling systems, and a method for converting a procedural model to a rule based model are described. Simulation models are used to represent real time engineering systems. A real time system can be represented by a set of equations or functions connected so that they perform in the same manner as the actual system. Most modeling system languages are based on FORTRAN or some other procedural language. Therefore, they must be enhanced with a reaction capability. Rule based systems are reactive by definition. Once the engineering system has been decomposed into a set of calculations using only basic algebraic unary operations, a knowledge network of calculations and functions can be constructed. The knowledge network required by a rule based system can be generated by a knowledge acquisition tool or a source level compiler. The compiler would take an existing model source file, a syntax template, and a symbol table and generate the knowledge network. Thus, existing procedural models can be translated and executed by a rule based system. Neural models can be provide the high capacity data manipulation required by the most complex real time models.

  10. Hamilton's rule and the causes of social evolution

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, Andrew F. G.

    2014-01-01

    Hamilton's rule is a central theorem of inclusive fitness (kin selection) theory and predicts that social behaviour evolves under specific combinations of relatedness, benefit and cost. This review provides evidence for Hamilton's rule by presenting novel syntheses of results from two kinds of study in diverse taxa, including cooperatively breeding birds and mammals and eusocial insects. These are, first, studies that empirically parametrize Hamilton's rule in natural populations and, second, comparative phylogenetic analyses of the genetic, life-history and ecological correlates of sociality. Studies parametrizing Hamilton's rule are not rare and demonstrate quantitatively that (i) altruism (net loss of direct fitness) occurs even when sociality is facultative, (ii) in most cases, altruism is under positive selection via indirect fitness benefits that exceed direct fitness costs and (iii) social behaviour commonly generates indirect benefits by enhancing the productivity or survivorship of kin. Comparative phylogenetic analyses show that cooperative breeding and eusociality are promoted by (i) high relatedness and monogamy and, potentially, by (ii) life-history factors facilitating family structure and high benefits of helping and (iii) ecological factors generating low costs of social behaviour. Overall, the focal studies strongly confirm the predictions of Hamilton's rule regarding conditions for social evolution and their causes. PMID:24686934

  11. Learning categories via rules and similarity: comparing adults and children.

    PubMed

    Rabi, Rahel; Miles, Sarah J; Minda, John Paul

    2015-03-01

    Two experiments explored the different strategies used by children and adults when learning new perceptual categories. Participants were asked to learn a set of categories for which both a single-feature rule and overall similarity would allow for perfect performance. Other rules allowed for suboptimal performance. Transfer stimuli (Experiments 1 and 2) and single features (Experiment 2) were presented after training to help determine how the categories were learned. In both experiments, we found that adults made significantly more optimal rule-based responses to the test stimuli than children. Children showed a variety of categorization styles, with a few relying on the optimal rules, many relying on suboptimal single-feature rules, and only a few relying on overall family resemblance. We interpret these results within a multiple systems framework, and we argue that children show the pattern they do because they lack the necessary cognitive resources to fully engage in hypothesis testing, rule selection, and verbally mediated category learning. PMID:25558860

  12. Gloger's rule in plants: The species and ecosystem levels.

    PubMed

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Gloger's rule posits that darker birds are found more often in humid environments than in arid ones, especially in the tropics. Accordingly, desert-inhabiting animals tend to be light-colored. This rule is also true for certain mammalian groups, including humans. Gloger's rule is manifested at 2 levels: (1) at the species level (different populations of the same species have different pigmentation at different latitudes), and (2) at the species assembly level (different taxa at a certain geography have different pigmentation than other taxa found at different habitats or latitudes). Concerning plants, Gloger's rule was first proposed to operate in many plant species growing in sand dunes, sandy shores and in deserts, because of being white, whitish, or silver colored, based on white trichomes, because of sand grains and clay particles glued to sticky glandular trichomes, or because of light-colored waxes. Recently, Gloger's rule was shown to also be true at the intraspecific level in relation to protection of anthers from UV irradiation. While Gloger's rule is true in certain plant taxa and ecologies, there are others where "anti-Gloger" coloration patterns exist. In some of these the selective agents are known and in others they are not. I present both Gloger and "anti-Gloger" cases and argue that this largely neglected aspect of plant biology deserves much more research attention. PMID:26786012

  13. Gloger's rule in plants: The species and ecosystem levels

    PubMed Central

    Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2015-01-01

    Gloger's rule posits that darker birds are found more often in humid environments than in arid ones, especially in the tropics. Accordingly, desert-inhabiting animals tend to be light-colored. This rule is also true for certain mammalian groups, including humans. Gloger's rule is manifested at 2 levels: (1) at the species level (different populations of the same species have different pigmentation at different latitudes), and (2) at the species assembly level (different taxa at a certain geography have different pigmentation than other taxa found at different habitats or latitudes). Concerning plants, Gloger's rule was first proposed to operate in many plant species growing in sand dunes, sandy shores and in deserts, because of being white, whitish, or silver colored, based on white trichomes, because of sand grains and clay particles glued to sticky glandular trichomes, or because of light-colored waxes. Recently, Gloger's rule was shown to also be true at the intraspecific level in relation to protection of anthers from UV irradiation. While Gloger's rule is true in certain plant taxa and ecologies, there are others where “anti-Gloger” coloration patterns exist. In some of these the selective agents are known and in others they are not. I present both Gloger and “anti-Gloger” cases and argue that this largely neglected aspect of plant biology deserves much more research attention. PMID:26786012

  14. The low-ion QSO absorption-line systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzetta, K.M.

    1988-01-01

    Various techniques are used to investigate the class of QSO absorption-line systems that exhibit low-ion absorption lines. Four separate investigations are conducted as follows: Spectroscopy of 32 QSOs at red wavelengths is presented and used to investigate intermediate-redshift MgII absorption. A total of 22 Mg II doublets are detected, from which properties of the Mg II absorbers are derived. Marginal evidence for intrinsic evolution of the number density of the Mg II absorbers with redshift is found. The data are combined with previous observations of C IV and C II seen in the same QSOs at blue wavelengths, and the properties of Mg II- and C IV-selected systems are compared. A sample is constructed of 129 QSOs for which are available published data suitable for detecting absorption-line systems that are optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation. A total of 53 such Lyman-limit systems are found, from which properties of the Lyman-limit systems are derived. It is found that the rate of incidence of the systems does not strongly evolved with redshift. This result is contrasted with the evolution found previously for systems selected on the basis of Mg II absorption. Spectroscopy at red wavelengths of eight QSOs with known damped Ly{alpha} absorption systems is presented. Spectroscopic and spectrophotometric observations aimed at detecting molecular hydrogen and dust in the z = 2.796 damped Ly{alpha} absorber toward Q1337 + 113 are presented.

  15. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  16. Percutaneous absorption of Octopirox.

    PubMed

    Black, J G; Kamat, V B

    1988-01-01

    containing 1% Octopirox is 29,400, so that the possibility of systemic effects due to absorption through the skin is remote. PMID:3345970

  17. Final RQ adjustments rule issued

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, L.L.

    1995-08-01

    On June 12, 1995, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its long awaited final rule adjusting certain reportable quantities (RQs) for hazardous substances under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The rule: revises the table of hazardous substances to add 47 individual Clean Air Act (CAA) hazardous air pollutants (HAPs); adjustments their statutory one-pound RQs; adds five other CAA HAPs that are categories of substances and assigns no RQ to the categories; and adjusts RQs for 11 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed hazardous wastes. EPA made conforming changes to the Clean Water Act table of hazardous substances and the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) table of extremely hazardous substances. The rule became effective July 12, 1995.

  18. Progress toward high-Q perfect absorption: A Fano antilaser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Sunkyu; Piao, Xianji; Hong, Jiho; Park, Namkyoo

    2015-07-01

    Here we propose a route to the high-Q perfect absorption of light by introducing the concept of a Fano antilaser. Based on the drastic spectral variation of the optical phase in a Fano-resonant system, a spectral singularity for scatter-free perfect absorption can be achieved with an order of magnitude smaller material loss. By applying temporal coupled mode theory to a Fano-resonant waveguide platform, we reveal that the required material loss and following absorption Q factor are ultimately determined by the degree of Fano spectral asymmetry. The feasibility of the Fano antilaser is confirmed using a photonic crystal platform, to demonstrate spatiospectrally selective heating. Our results utilizing the phase-dependent control of device bandwidths derive a counterintuitive realization of high-Q perfect conversion of light into internal energy, and thus pave the way for a new regime of absorption-based devices, including switches, sensors, thermal imaging, and optothermal emitters.

  19. Resonant Absorption of Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    1999-11-01

    We report the first observation of enhanced laser-plasma optical absorption in a subcritical density plasma resulting from spatial resonances, here in the laser breakdown of a gas with a Bessel beam. The enhancement in absorption is directly correlated to enhancements both in confinement of laser radiation to the plasma and in its heating. Under certain conditions, azimuthal asymmetry in the laser beam is essential for efficient gas breakdown. Simulations of this absorption consistently explain the experimental observations. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9515509) and the US Department of Energy (DEF G0297 ER 41039).

  20. 7 CFR 29.1119 - Rule 13.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rule 13. 29.1119 Section 29.1119 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1119 Rule 13. Degrees of uniformity shall be expressed in terms of.... (These percentages shall not affect limitations established by other rules.) The minor portion must...

  1. 20 CFR 801.302 - Procedural rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedural rules. 801.302 Section 801.302... Action by the Board § 801.302 Procedural rules. Procedural rules for performance by the Board of its... amendments to the rules as may be necessary from time to time, shall be promulgated by the Deputy...

  2. 7 CFR 29.1119 - Rule 13.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rule 13. 29.1119 Section 29.1119 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1119 Rule 13. Degrees of uniformity shall be expressed in terms of.... (These percentages shall not affect limitations established by other rules.) The minor portion must...

  3. 7 CFR 29.2391 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rules. 29.2391 Section 29.2391 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.2391 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  4. 7 CFR 29.2391 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rules. 29.2391 Section 29.2391 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.2391 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  5. 7 CFR 29.6086 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rules. 29.6086 Section 29.6086 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.6086 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  6. 7 CFR 29.3103 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rules. 29.3103 Section 29.3103 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.3103 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  7. 7 CFR 29.2406 - Rule 15.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rule 15. 29.2406 Section 29.2406 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.2406 Rule 15. Uniformity shall be expressed in percentages. These percentages.... Specified percentages of uniformity shall not affect limitations established by other rules....

  8. 7 CFR 29.1106 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rules. 29.1106 Section 29.1106 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1106 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  9. 7 CFR 29.1109 - Rule 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rule 3. 29.1109 Section 29.1109 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1109 Rule 3. In drawing an official sample from a hogshead or other package... visible to the sampler, except for baled tobacco that is not opened for inspection (see Rule 30)....

  10. 7 CFR 29.1109 - Rule 3.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rule 3. 29.1109 Section 29.1109 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1109 Rule 3. In drawing an official sample from a hogshead or other package... visible to the sampler, except for baled tobacco that is not opened for inspection (see Rule 30)....

  11. 7 CFR 29.6086 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rules. 29.6086 Section 29.6086 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.6086 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  12. 24 CFR 10.4 - Rules docket.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Rules docket. 10.4 Section 10.4... RULEMAKING: POLICY AND PROCEDURES General § 10.4 Rules docket. (a) All documents relating to rulemaking..., final rules and general notices are maintained in the Rules Docket Room (Room 5218), Department...

  13. 7 CFR 29.1106 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rules. 29.1106 Section 29.1106 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.1106 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  14. 7 CFR 29.3103 - Rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rules. 29.3103 Section 29.3103 Agriculture Regulations... INSPECTION Standards Rules § 29.3103 Rules. The application of these official standard grades shall be in accordance with the following rules....

  15. 32 CFR 324.6 - Procedural rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedural rules. 324.6 Section 324.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM... first as a proposed rule to allow for public comment and then as a final rule. Procedural rules will...

  16. 29 CFR 18.802 - Hearsay rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hearsay rule. 18.802 Section 18.802 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Hearsay § 18.802 Hearsay rule. Hearsay is not admissible except...

  17. 32 CFR 324.7 - Exemption rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemption rules. 324.7 Section 324.7 National... rules. Each proposed exemption rule submitted for publication in the Federal Register must contain: The... exempt from any provision of the Privacy Act until the exemption rule has been published in the...

  18. 32 CFR 324.6 - Procedural rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedural rules. 324.6 Section 324.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM... first as a proposed rule to allow for public comment and then as a final rule. Procedural rules will...

  19. 32 CFR 324.6 - Procedural rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedural rules. 324.6 Section 324.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM... first as a proposed rule to allow for public comment and then as a final rule. Procedural rules will...

  20. 29 CFR 18.802 - Hearsay rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearsay rule. 18.802 Section 18.802 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Hearsay § 18.802 Hearsay rule. Hearsay is not admissible except...

  1. 29 CFR 18.802 - Hearsay rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hearsay rule. 18.802 Section 18.802 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Hearsay § 18.802 Hearsay rule. Hearsay is not admissible except...

  2. 32 CFR 324.6 - Procedural rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Procedural rules. 324.6 Section 324.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM... first as a proposed rule to allow for public comment and then as a final rule. Procedural rules will...

  3. 32 CFR 324.7 - Exemption rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemption rules. 324.7 Section 324.7 National... rules. Each proposed exemption rule submitted for publication in the Federal Register must contain: The... exempt from any provision of the Privacy Act until the exemption rule has been published in the...

  4. 32 CFR 324.7 - Exemption rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemption rules. 324.7 Section 324.7 National... rules. Each proposed exemption rule submitted for publication in the Federal Register must contain: The... exempt from any provision of the Privacy Act until the exemption rule has been published in the...

  5. 29 CFR 18.802 - Hearsay rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hearsay rule. 18.802 Section 18.802 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Hearsay § 18.802 Hearsay rule. Hearsay is not admissible except...

  6. 32 CFR 324.7 - Exemption rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemption rules. 324.7 Section 324.7 National... rules. Each proposed exemption rule submitted for publication in the Federal Register must contain: The... exempt from any provision of the Privacy Act until the exemption rule has been published in the...

  7. 32 CFR 324.7 - Exemption rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemption rules. 324.7 Section 324.7 National... rules. Each proposed exemption rule submitted for publication in the Federal Register must contain: The... exempt from any provision of the Privacy Act until the exemption rule has been published in the...

  8. 32 CFR 324.6 - Procedural rules.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedural rules. 324.6 Section 324.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE (CONTINUED) PRIVACY PROGRAM... first as a proposed rule to allow for public comment and then as a final rule. Procedural rules will...

  9. 29 CFR 18.802 - Hearsay rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Hearsay rule. 18.802 Section 18.802 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE THE OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Hearsay § 18.802 Hearsay rule. Hearsay is not admissible except...

  10. 76 FR 76815 - Business Opportunity Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... ``Amended Franchise Rule'' refers to the amended Franchise Rule published at 72 FR 15444 (Mar. 30, 2007) and... Opportunity Ventures: Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, 62 FR 9115 (Feb. 28, 1997). ``Initial Proposed... Rule, 71 FR 9054 (Apr. 12, 2006). ``Interim Business Opportunity Rule'' refers to the...

  11. 75 FR 19544 - Inland Navigation Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ...By this final rule, the Coast Guard is placing the Inland Navigation Rules into the Code of Federal Regulations. This move is in accordance with the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Act of 2004, which repeals the Inland Navigation Rules as of the effective date of these regulations. Future updates of the Inland Navigation Rules will be accomplished through rulemaking rather than......

  12. 75 FR 78169 - Amateur Service Rules

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-15

    ... rules with respect to amateur service vanity call signs. The rules are necessary to amend the amateur... amends the vanity call sign system rules to clarify the date on which the call sign associated with a... the exceptions to the general rule that a call sign is unavailable to the vanity call sign system...

  13. Conformance Testing: Measurement Decision Rules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mimbs, Scott M.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of a Quality Management System (QMS) as specified in ISO 9001 and AS9100 is to provide assurance to the customer that end products meet specifications. Measuring devices, often called measuring and test equipment (MTE), are used to provide the evidence of product conformity to specified requirements. Unfortunately, processes that employ MTE can become a weak link to the overall QMS if proper attention is not given to the measurement process design, capability, and implementation. Documented "decision rules" establish the requirements to ensure measurement processes provide the measurement data that supports the needs of the QMS. Measurement data are used to make the decisions that impact all areas of technology. Whether measurements support research, design, production, or maintenance, ensuring the data supports the decision is crucial. Measurement data quality can be critical to the resulting consequences of measurement-based decisions. Historically, most industries required simplistic, one-size-fits-all decision rules for measurements. One-size-fits-all rules in some cases are not rigorous enough to provide adequate measurement results, while in other cases are overly conservative and too costly to implement. Ideally, decision rules should be rigorous enough to match the criticality of the parameter being measured, while being flexible enough to be cost effective. The goal of a decision rule is to ensure that measurement processes provide data with a sufficient level of quality to support the decisions being made - no more, no less. This paper discusses the basic concepts of providing measurement-based evidence that end products meet specifications. Although relevant to all measurement-based conformance tests, the target audience is the MTE end-user, which is anyone using MTE other than calibration service providers. Topics include measurement fundamentals, the associated decision risks, verifying conformance to specifications, and basic measurement

  14. A Short Note on Rules and Higher Order Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scandura, Joseph M.

    This brief paper argues that structural analysis--an extended form of cognitive task analysis--demonstrates that both domain dependent and domain independent knowledge can be derived from specific content domains. It is noted that the major difference between the two is that lower order rules (specific knowledge) are derived directly from specific…

  15. 48 CFR 6102.201 - Scope of rules [Rule 201].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to statute, 7 U.S.C. 1501 et seq. (the Federal Crop Insurance Act), and regulation, 7 CFR 24.4(b) and... SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CROP INSURANCE CASES 6102.201 Scope of rules . These procedures govern the Board's resolution of disputes between insurance companies and the Department of Agriculture's Risk Management...

  16. 48 CFR 6102.201 - Scope of rules [Rule 201].

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to statute, 7 U.S.C. 1501 et seq. (the Federal Crop Insurance Act), and regulation, 7 CFR 24.4(b) and... SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CROP INSURANCE CASES 6102.201 Scope of rules . These procedures govern the Board's resolution of disputes between insurance companies and the Department of Agriculture's Risk Management...

  17. Properties of multilayer optical systems formed by layers with small absorption in inclined falling of radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karyaev, Konstantin V.; Zhoga, Eugene V.; Putilin, Eduard S.

    2000-10-01

    Multilayer dielectric systems find wide employment in different fields of science and engineering. Dielectric systems, formed by layers with small absorption, attract particular interest. Value of absorption, as a rule, depends on structure of the system (order and optical thickness of layers), angle of incidence and wavelength of radiation. Experiment shows that there are peaks of absorption on certain angles of incidence and wavelength, but behavior of absorption wasn't studied well. Model of a system, formed by isotropic layers settled on semiinfinite substate proved to be a good approximation for many of real optical systems. We studied pecularities in spectral dependencies of reflection, transmission and absorption coefficients in dependance on the angle of incidence and wavelength of falling radiation with flat wave front. Problem was solved on the basis of Maxwell equations and corresponding boundary conditions.

  18. Flight Rules Critical Readiness Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, E.; Knudsen, F.; Rice, S.

    2010-01-01

    The increment 23/24 Critical Readiness Review (CRR) flight rules are presented. The topics include: 1) B13-152 Acoustic Constraints; 2) B13-113 IFM/Corrective Action Prioritization Due to Loss of Exercise Capability; 3) B13-116 Constraints on Treadmill VIS Failure; 4) B13-201 Medical Management of ISS Fire/Smoke Response; 5) ARED and T2 Exercise constraints Flight rules (flight and stage specific); 6) FYI: B14 FR to be updated with requirement to sample crew sleep locations prior to receiving a "recommendation" from SRAG on where to sleep.

  19. Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    This final rule replaces the Statewide and Tribal Automated Child Welfare Information Systems (S/TACWIS) rule with the Comprehensive Child Welfare Information System (CCWIS) rule. The rule also makes conforming amendments in rules in related requirements. This rule will assist title IV-E agencies in developing information management systems that leverage new innovations and technology in order to better serve children and families. More specifically, this final rule supports the use of cost-effective, innovative technologies to automate the collection of high-quality case management data and to promote its analysis, distribution, and use by workers, supervisors, administrators, researchers, and policy makers. PMID:27295732

  20. A mechanism for decision rule discrimination by supplementary eye field neurons.

    PubMed

    Ray, Supriya; Heinen, Stephen J

    2015-02-01

    A decision to select an action from alternatives is often guided by rules that flexibly map sensory inputs to motor outputs when certain conditions are satisfied. However, the neural mechanisms underlying rule-based decision making remain poorly understood. Two complementary types of neurons in the supplementary eye field (SEF) of macaques have been identified that modulate activity differentially to interpret rules in an ocular go-nogo task, which stipulates that the animal either visually pursue a moving object if it intersects a visible zone ('go'), or maintain fixation if it does not ('nogo'). These neurons discriminate between go and nogo rule-states by increasing activity to signal their preferred (agonist) rule-state and decreasing activity to signal their non-preferred (antagonist) rule-state. In the current study, we found that SEF neurons decrease activity in anticipation of the antagonist rule-state, and do so more rapidly when the rule-state is easier to predict. This rapid decrease in activity could underlie a process of elimination in which trajectories that do not invoke the preferred rule-state receive no further computational resources. Furthermore, discrimination between difficult and easy trials in the antagonist rule-state occurs prior to when discrimination within the agonist rule-state occurs. A winner-take-all like model that incorporates a pair of mutually inhibited integrators to accumulate evidence in favor of either the decision to pursue or the decision to continue fixation accounts for the observed neural phenomena. PMID:25370345

  1. Selective monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homem-de-Mello, Luiz S.

    1992-04-01

    While in NASA's earlier space missions such as Voyager the number of sensors was in the hundreds, future platforms such as the Space Station Freedom will have tens of thousands sensors. For these planned missions it will be impossible to use the comprehensive monitoring strategy that was used in the past in which human operators monitored all sensors all the time. A selective monitoring strategy must be substituted for the current comprehensive strategy. This selective monitoring strategy uses computer tools to preprocess the incoming data and direct the operators' attention to the most critical parts of the physical system at any given time. There are several techniques that can be used to preprocess the incoming information. This paper presents an approach to using diagnostic reasoning techniques to preprocess the sensor data and detect which parts of the physical system require more attention because components have failed or are most likely to have failed. Given the sensor readings and a model of the physical system, a number of assertions are generated and expressed as Boolean equations. The resulting system of Boolean equations is solved symbolically. Using a priori probabilities of component failure and Bayes' rule, revised probabilities of failure can be computed. These will indicate what components have failed or are the most likely to have failed. This approach is suitable for systems that are well understood and for which the correctness of the assertions can be guaranteed. Also, the system must be such that assertions can be made from instantaneous measurements. And the system must be such that changes are slow enough to allow the computation.

  2. Parallel machine architecture for production rule systems

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Jr., John D.; Butler, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    A parallel processing system for production rule programs utilizes a host processor for storing production rule right hand sides (RHS) and a plurality of rule processors for storing left hand sides (LHS). The rule processors operate in parallel in the recognize phase of the system recognize -Act Cycle to match their respective LHS's against a stored list of working memory elements (WME) in order to find a self consistent set of WME's. The list of WME is dynamically varied during the Act phase of the system in which the host executes or fires rule RHS's for those rules for which a self-consistent set has been found by the rule processors. The host transmits instructions for creating or deleting working memory elements as dictated by the rule firings until the rule processors are unable to find any further self-consistent working memory element sets at which time the production rule system is halted.

  3. Structural difference rule for amorphous alloy formation by ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, B.-X.; Johnson, W. L.; Nicolet, M.A.; Lau, S. S.

    1983-01-01

    A rule is formulated which establishes a sufficient condition that an amorphous binary alloy will be formed by ion mixing of multilayered samples when the two constituent metals are of different crystalline structure, regardless of their atomic sizes and electronegativities. The rule is supported by the experimental results obtained on six selected binary metal systems, as well as by the previous data reported in the literature. The amorphization mechanism is discussed in terms of the competition between two different structures resulting in frustration of the crystallization process.

  4. The rediscovery of absorption chillers

    SciTech Connect

    Katzel, J.

    1992-04-23

    Absorption chillers are back - and for two very good reasons: they are environmentally sound and, in many cases, economically attractive. One factor fueling this resurgence is the outlook for natural gas, the energy source of most absorption systems. Deregulation has spurred exploration, and forecasts indicate an abundant supply and relatively low prices through 2050. Threats of global warming and depletion of the ozone layer also are forces driving the absorption chiller market. Being a good corporate citizen today means minimizing or eliminating the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the basis of many refrigerants used in mechanical chillers. Even as chemical and chiller manufacturers alike work to develop substitute refrigerants, the perfect alternative has yet to be found. Absorption units are free of these problems, a benefit that appeals to many people.

  5. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  6. 76 FR 4144 - Self-Regulatory Organizations; Notice of Filing and Immediate Effectiveness of Proposed Rule...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... Change by NASDAQ OMX PHLX LLC Relating to Rebates and Fees for Adding and Removing Liquidity in Select... the Select Symbols in Section I of the Exchange's Fee Schedule titled Rebates and Fees for Adding and Removing Liquidity in Select Symbols. The text of the proposed rule change is available on the...

  7. Rule Induction with Extension Matrices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Xindong

    1998-01-01

    Presents a heuristic, attribute-based, noise-tolerant data mining program, HCV (Version 2.0) based on the newly-developed extension matrix approach. Outlines some techniques implemented in the HCV program for noise handling and discretization of continuous domains; an empirical comparison shows that rules generated by HCV are more compact than the…

  8. Seven Rules for Social Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firebaugh, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    "Seven Rules for Social Research" teaches social scientists how to get the most out of their technical skills and tools, providing a resource that fully describes the strategies and concepts no researcher or student of human behavior can do without. Glenn Firebaugh provides indispensable practical guidance for anyone doing research in the social…

  9. Close Call: Breaking the Rules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Leadership, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Contrary to a rule to never teach students to lead climb, an instructor taught several youth to lead climb at a parent's request. These students planned to pursue rock climbing on their own after they left school, and preparing them was deemed a safety precaution. Analysis of this "close call" offers guidelines for introducing students to lead…

  10. AGK Rules in Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Jochen

    2006-06-01

    I summarize the present status of the AGK cutting rules in perturbative QCD. Particular attention is given to the application of the AGK analysis to diffraction and multiple scattering in DIS at HERA and to pp collisions at the LHC. I also discuss the bootstrap conditions which appear in pQCD.

  11. TRICARE reimbursement revisions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-06-27

    This final rule provides several necessary revisions to the regulation in order for TRICARE to be consistent with Medicare. These revisions affect: Hospice periods of care; reimbursement of physician assistants and assistant-at-surgery claims; and diagnosis-related group values, removing references to specific numeric diagnosis-related group values and replacing them with their narrative description. PMID:22737760

  12. TRICARE Young Adult. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-05-29

    This final rule implements Section 702 of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (NDAA for FY11). It establishes the TRICARE Young Adult (TYA) program to provide an extended TRICARE Program coverage opportunity to most unmarried children under the age of 26 of uniformed services sponsors. The TYA program is a premium-based program. PMID:23724426

  13. The Eighteen-Electron Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, P. R.; Parish, R. V.

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the stability of the structures of transition metal complexes (primarily carbonyls and organometallic compounds) having 18 electrons or less in their valence shell. Presents molecular orbital diagrams for various structures involving alpha and pi bonding and describes the conditions under which the 18 electron rule applies. (RR)

  14. Data breaches. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-22

    This document establishes regulations to address data breaches regarding sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The regulations implement certain provisions of Title IX of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006, which require promulgation of these regulations as an interim final rule. PMID:17674483

  15. Rules of Procedure for Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities.

    Among the functions of the Commission on Professional Rights and Responsibilities of the NEA is the investigation of cases of alleged unethical conduct by members of the teaching profession. The rules of procedure for investigations presented in this document are intended to assure all parties in a conflict of their individual rights of procedural…

  16. INFORMATION COLLECTION RULE INFORMATION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Purpose:The Information Collection Rule (ICR) Information System was developed to store and distribute the information collected in the ICR for DBPs and microbiological research. It is a research database. The information system consists of our parts: laboratory...

  17. 77 FR 71714 - Final Rule

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ..., 2005 (70 FR 7414) that amended certain provisions of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, that... that NHTSA published on August 6, 2012 (77 FR 46677). There were no comments in response to the notice.... In the final rule published on February 14, 2005 (70 FR 7414), 49 CFR 567.4(g)(5) was amended...

  18. The applicability of Jeans rule.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chongyi, Gao

    1997-10-01

    Jeans rule has a wide applicability. It is not only applicable for the planets and satellites in the solar system, but also suitable for the asteroids, meteoroids and the unusual outer solar system object 95P/Chiron. Its applicability can be expressed with a nomogram as well as defined by equations or by figures.

  19. Rules for Engaging Challenging People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Nathan L.

    2006-01-01

    Communication is the cornerstone of any successful leadership enterprise, including education leadership. It is counterintuitive to think that an excellent education leader could possess a keen vision and have no ability to communicate that vision to students and staff members. Discovering and implementing the rules of communicating effectively…

  20. All Things Out of Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Nuala

    2015-01-01

    This article brings together and compares my own artistic practice of drawing/painting and the eighteenth-century novel "Tristram Shandy." In both cases, there is a free play of lines, textual or graphic, which sets "all things out of rule". A whole typology of lines is woven throughout Sterne's text and reappears,…